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UBC Publications

UBC Library News Jun 30, 1971

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 ni.B.C. LIBRARY NEWS
Volume IV, No. 5
May — June, 1971
Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter is published as an information service for UBC faculty, students and other readers outside the Library. It
contains feature articles and news about developments in the library system which we feel will be of interest or concern to the
larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms and suggestions for future articles.
SUMMER SESSION LIBRARY HOURS
During the Summer Session (July 5 - August 20) the Main Library and most of the larger branches will be open for service at
least four nights a week. Service hours for all campus libraries are listed below.
MAIN AND SEDGEWICK LIBRARIES
Monday — Thursday
8 a.m. —
9 p.m.
Friday
8 a.m. —
5 p.m.
Saturday
9 a.m. —
5 p.m.
Sunday
Closed
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Monday — Thursday
8 a.m. -
9 p.m.
Friday - Saturday
8 a.m. -
5 p.m.
Sunday
Closed
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Monday — Friday
8 a.m. -
10 p.m.
Saturday
9 a.m. -
5 p.m.
Sunday
Closed
MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Monday — Friday
8 a.m. —
9 p.m.
Saturday
10 a.m. -
5 p.m.
Sunday
Closed
MUSIC LIBRARY
Monday — Thursday
8 a.m. —
10 p.m
Friday
9 a.m. —
5 p.m
Saturday
12 noon -
- 6 p.m.
Sunday
Closed
ALL OTHER LIBRARIES
Monday — Friday
9 a.m. -
5 p.m
Saturday - Sunday
Closed
BROCK HALL STUDY AREAS
Monday - Saturday 8 a.m. - midnight
Sunday Closed
HOURS FOR MAIN LIBRARY DIVISIONS -
ASIAN STUDIES
Monday — Friday
Saturday — Sunday
FINE ARTS
Monday — Thursday
Friday
Saturday
■ Sunday
8:30 a.m.
Closed
5 p.m.
8 a.m. — 9 p.m.
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday    Sunday Closed
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND MAP DIVISION
Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Sunday Closed
LIBRARY ORIENTATION
Summer Session students and faculty, especially those who have not used the Library recently, are invited to one of the
half-hour orientation programs offered during the Irst two weeks of Summer Session. First, a 14-minute colour slide show will
explain the basics of library use at UBC. This will e followed by a short tour covering the most important public service and
reference divisions in the Main Library.
The audio-visual presentation will be given in the Mildred Brock Room of Brock Hall, behind the Main Library. Signs posted
at the entrances show how to get to this room. Library toui. wi 1 begin after each show, and those interested should meet at the
Information Desk near the Main Library's card catalogue. SCHEDULE OF ORIENTATION PROGRAMS
Audio-Visual Show
Tours
Wed., July 7
10:30a.m.
11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m
Thurs., July 8
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m
Fri., July 9
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m
Mon., July 12
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m
Tues., July 13
10:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m
Wed., July 14
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m
Thurs., July 15
10:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m
Fri., July 16
10:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m
Mon., July 19
10:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m
Tues., July 20
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m
Wed., July 21
10:30 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m
Faculty members may wish to book special tours for their classes, showing how to find library materials in a particular
subject area. To make arrangements for these tours, please see the Information Desk staff or call them at locals 2076 or 2077.
The Information Desk is also the place to come for library guides and handouts. Besides the basic handbook, Know Your
Library, students and faculty members can pick up a map giving the locations and holdings of all campus libraries; bookmarks
listing their Summer Session hours; and a sheet entitled "PROBLEMS?" which answers thirty of the most-asked questions about
the Main Library and its use.
The Library is most anxious to do all it can to help students and faculty make the best use of its resources. Faculty members
can do their part by making sure their students know about these orientation aids.
UBC LIBRARY REFERENCE PUBUCATIONS:
HOW AND WHERE TO FIND THEM
Don't wait till the end of Summer Session to find out about the Library's reference guides. These bibliographies list materials
held at UBC which will be useful to students in particular subject areas. The entries usually give call numbers and locations, and
many include descriptive notes as well.
Just before the start of Summer Session, two Main Library reference divisions issued new bibliographies. Theses on B.C.
history and related subjects is available from the Special Collections Division, and Periodicals in Asian studies in the UBC Library
is being given out by Asian Studies.
Other guides which are currently in print and available are listed below. For copies, please see the Main Library division
mentioned after each title.
TITLE
■
1) Reference Guide to Educational Literature (1967)
2) Guide to Reference Materials in Anthropology (1968)
3) Guide to Reference Materials in French Language and Literature (1968)
4) Applied Economics (1969)
5) Library Guide for Commerce Students (1969)
6) Guide to Reference Materials in Geography (1969)
7) Guide to Reference Materials in German Language and Literature (1969)
8) Brief Guide to Reference Materials in Chemical Engineering (1969)
9) Reference Guide to Reviews: A Checklist of Sources in the Humanities,
Social Sciences and Fine Arts (1970)
10) Guide to Reference Materials in Economics (1970)
11) A Doukhobor Bibliography. Supplement to Part I (1970)
12) A Doukhobor Bibliography. Part II (1970)
13) Brief Guide to Reference Materials in Electrical Engineering (1970)
14) Classical Studies - An Undergraduate's Guide (1970)
15) Brief Guide to Reference Materials on Transportation (1971)
Sample copies of most of these reference guides are now on display near the Main Card Catalogue.
■
WHERE   TO   GET   COPIES
Social Sciences
Social Sciences
Humanities
Social Sciences
Social Sciences
Social Sciences
Humanities
Science
Humanities
Social Sciences
Humanities
Humanities
Science
Humanities
Social Sciences .  -     :
MUSIC AT NOON
July 12. BACH AND?
Bach - Schoenberg
Bach — Foss
Bach - Mozart
Bach — Webern
Bach
July 19. LATE ROMAN!
.
Faure
Scriabin
.
Alkan
Busoni
A series of recorded concerts will be given on Mondays during Summer Session. They will be held in the SUB Art Gallery, and
will run from 12:30 to 1:30. All music featured comes from the Recordings Collection.
The tentative programme is given below.
UJD?
St. Anne Prelude and Fugue
Phareon (Mvt. 3, Baroque Variations)
Well Tempered Clavier Fugues (String Quartets)
Ricercare, from the Musical Offering
Organ Toccata in F Major
S
Theme and Variations for Piano
Prometheus
Piano Etudes
Piano Concerto (Mvt. 1)
July 26. NORTH AMERICAN MUSIC
Somers Phantasia
Copland Music for Our Town
Pentland Viola Duo
Ives Symphony No. 2 (Mvt. 4)
August 2. OLD OLD MUSIC AND NEW OLD MUSIC
Poulenc Suite Franchise
Machaut Mass (Kyrie, Gloria and Angus Dei)
Farnaby Loath to Depart
Warlock Capriol Suite
Gabrielli Canzonas
August 9. STRING QUARTETS
Bartok String Quartet No. 6
Boccherini String Quartet (No. ?)
Coulthard String Quartet No. 2
August 16. SPECTACULARS
Lully Court Music for Louis XIV
Britten Procession, from the Burning Fiery Furnace
Beethoven Wellington's Victory
Mahler Symphony No. 8 (Mvt. 1)
THIS MONTH'S DISPLAYS
BOOKS PRINTED IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
As part of its series of Centennial displays, the Library is featuring some of the outstanding books designed and printed in
B.C. The colourful exhibit in the Main Library's entrance hall is in two parts. A display case on the left-hand wall features books
from some of B.C.'s many private presses. On the other side of the hall are the classics: Haig-Brown's The Living Land (the first
book to be printed on paper made in B.C.); fine local reprints of historical works; and some of the best books of George Clutesi,
Robert Reid and the late George Kuthan. If the names aren't familiar, they deserve to be. See this exhibit and find out why!
THE CONTEMPLATIVE MAN'S RECREATION
' A display of angling books belonging to the Special Collections Division has been set up in the case outside the Ridington
Room. Visitors will notice a striking set of photographs showing members of the Harry Hawthorne Foundation. This
Foundation was set up "for the inculcation and propagation of the principles and ethics of fly-fishing" by a light-hearted group
of fishermen in 1953. The Library's extensive collection on angling has been built up through gifts of the Foundation and other
generous donors.
The focal point of the display is a handsome two-volume edition of Charles Phah's Atlantic Salmon Fishing which the Library
recently acquired from Roderick Haig-Brown. Only 40 copies of this work were ever printed. The colourful salmon flies included
in the display came from volume 2.
These are several other books which deserve mention, including five of the many editions of Walton's Compleat Angler owned
by the Library. Haig-Brown's The Western Angler is now a collector's item, one which immediately attracted wide attention
both in British Columbia and abroad. 77ie Secrets of Angling is an important work in English literature; the Library's edition is a
rare privately printed one sent by the University of Western Ontario as a gift to the angling collection.
The Library's own book, The Contemplative Man's Recreation, is also on display. Compiled by Susan Starkman and Stanley
E. Read, this is a bibliography of books on angling and game fish in the UBC Library. Copies are available throughout the
Library for anyone who is interested in reading more about the angling collection. MORE LIBRARY PUBLICATIONS
Within the past month UBC librarians have published two works that should be of interest to campus readers. The first is a
case study describing the Library's use of computers to identify books in heavy demand. (An outline of this unique project
appeared in the October, 1970 Library News.) The study, Collection Development and the Computer, was written by Mr. Peter
Simmons of the School of Librarianship.
Two other librarians, Inglish F. Bell and Jennifer Gallup, have brought out a comprehensive Reference Guide to English,
American and Canadian Literature. The 140-page book is available in either hard-cover or paperback.
Both of these publications may be ordered from the University of British Columbia Press.
LOCATING AND BORROWING STORAGE BOOKS 1
Last winter a lack of shelf space forced the Main Library to withdraw about 37,000 little-used books from the open stacks.
None of them had been borrowed for at least five years, so it was felt that few readers would be inconvenienced if these books
were put into storage elsewhere on campus. Until now, borrowers have had to check with the Circulation Division to find out
which titles were in storage. By the time this newsletter comes out, however, the Main Library's Location File will list all of
these books.
Requests for storage items are still handled by the Circulation Division's Main Loan Desk. A call card is filled out for each
item, and every Tuesday and Friday the books ordered will be brought back from the storage area. They are signed out for the
normal loan period, and may be renewed in the same way as regular stack books.
MUSEUM TO MOVE OUT
Thanks to a generous grant from the federal government, the Main Library will be losing a long-time tenant and gaining some
badly-needed floor space. The Museum of Anthropology has been awarded $2,500,000 for a new Museum of Man, to be built on
the UBC campus. The grant is part of a $10,000,000 fund which Ottawa established to mark the 100th anniversary of B.C.'s
entry into Confederation. Planning for the new building will begin immediately.
SECURITY SYSTEM INSTALLED
Readers using the Fine Arts Library will notice that something new has been added this summer. The "something" is
Checkpoint, an electronic system which we hope will improve service by reducing book losses. Unlike the automatic monitoring
systems used in some other libraries, Checkpoint does not use magnets or radio transmitters. Instead the book paper is specially
treated so that volumes cannot be taken through the sensitive Checkpoint zone without setting off a muted buzzer and locking
the turnstile.
Borrowers leaving the Fine Arts Library will now be asked to hand their books to the desk attendant before passing the
Checkpoint station. The items will be charged out and then returned on the other side. The procedure differs very little from the
one that was followed before the system was installed.
Libraries already using this system include the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Yale Medical Library and the University of
Pennsylvania's Fine Arts Library. Book losses in these places have dropped by as much as 93%. The Fine Arts Library, which has
suffered high losses in the past, hopes that the Checkpoint system will give readers better access to the books they need.
Checkpoint will also be installed in the Woodward Library, and possibly in the new Sedgewick Undergraduate Library.
■   ■ i
BUND USERS BENEFIT FROM NEW CRANE - L.C. TIE
All too often library services for blind and sight-restricted people have been unorganized and inefficient. In the United States
this picture has been changing over the years, largely through the efforts of the Library of Congress's Division for the Blind and
Physically Handicapped. It has built up the world's largest collection of books in braille and on phonotape, and has established a
complex array of professional services to readers.   ■
After UBC's Crane Library for the Blind opened, attempts were made to establish an active relationship with L.C. - D.B.P.H.
But the Library of Congress could only extend its services to U.S. citizens, and efforts to secure borrowing privileges for blind
Canadians were not at first successful.
This summer it is a different story. Paul Thiele, the head of the Crane Library, returned from the Library of Congress to
report that its attitude had changed and that the ru'-s applying to this particular group of Canadian borrowers would be relaxed.
A joint agreement has been reached which will be c great benefit to visually handicapped college and university students across
the country. The Crane Library now has:
- complete and unrestricted use of the L.C. braille and tape collection
- the privilege of copying any phonotapes borrowed fr-m T .C. and distributing them to other university libraries in Canada
- the option of receiving on a deposit basis braille and phonotape books which cannot be produced in Canada
. - 17 music textbooks, comprising 65 reels of tape, as a gift from L.C.
- complete supplies of up-to-date information material, including catalogues, reference circulars and union catalogue cards
- a communications link with various L.C. departments via Telex, TWX and air mail
In return, Crane has given the Library of Congress full borrowing and copying privileges, and has agreed to supply some tapes
of Canadian, French and German literature. L.C. will also make use of the rapid book transcribing service made possible by
Crane's system of volunteer readers. At present about 40 people help to record books for the library, and Crane could use many
more. If you would like to volunteer one hour a week, please call the library at 228-2373.
HOW TO KEEP UP WITH THE CURRENT SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL LITERATURE:
CAN/SDI
CAN/the National Science Library help you through/SDI?
What is CAN/SDI?
CAN/SDI, Selective Dissemination of Information, is an information retrieval system operated by the National Science
Library in Ottawa for Canadian scientists and engineers. The system selects current references from journals, reports, books,
patents, and conferences. This is accomplished by a fully computerized process matching an individual's "interest profile"
against a number of data bases covering most major sciences. The system was operational in April 1969, and is currently
producing over 1,100 personalized bibliographies for people working in universities, industry and government.
How can CAN/SDI assist you in your research and development work?
1.*     It reduces time spent in locating and scanning the current literature.
2. It expands coverage to peripheral publications and materials not locally available.
3. It produces highly personalized bibliographies geared to the needs of the individual researcher.
4. It is backed up by the literature resources of the National Science Library and a nation-wide Interlibrary Loan network.
5. It permits you at any time to narrow or expand your literature requirements.
6. It helps you to build a personalized file of references for present and future use and may be utilized at the same time as
input to your own internal information systems.
7. It offers you a wide range of data access points such as significant keywords, authors, title words, organizations, and
author supplied citations.
8. It continuously attempts to monitor performance of your profile via the SDI feedback system.
How do you make use of the system?
Basically you communicate your requirements through an interest profile. Several approaches are possible, and the most
important ones are listed below. A Profile Design Manual will give you further instructions. A librarian in the Science Division of
the Main Library, or in the Woodward Library, will assist you in preparing your profile. In addition it will be reviewed by an SDI
expert at the National Science Library.
1. Source Author Question
State the names and initials of key scientists doing research in your field of interest. If these names are encountered by the
system while searching the data base, you will be informed of these papers in your bibliography.
2. Organization Question
If you are interested in what the staff of a particular organization or division of an organization are publishing, you take
this approach.
3. Source Journal Question
This type of question will alert you to all items published in a particular journal.
4. Word Question
A word question asks the system to find current articles that include words, phrases or words with certain stems that you
have supplied and which are relevant to your field of interest. Since the high frequency of many words would produce
excessive output, you may combine several of them in a search expression to increase the relevance of your bibliography.
5. Cited Reference, Book, Author or Journal Question
This type of question is based on the assumption that a paper citing a number of references must be related in content to
the cited articles. Since you are aware of these earlier words you can now include them in your profile, and you will be
, alerted to all current papers citing a reference supplied in your profile.
Most of the time, it is advantageous to combine several of the above techniques in your profile and search expressions.
Output mailed to you will show exactly what caused a reference to be retrieved for you.
What literature does CAN/SDI cover?
1.      Chemical Titles
Publisher: American Abstracts Service,
American Chemical Society,
Columbus, Ohio 43210.
CT is a bi-weekly tape service covering approximately 700 journals in chemistry and chemical engineering. Titles are edited
for unique spelling. A reference consists of title, authors and source. 2. CA Condensates
Publisher: (Same as above)
Condensates tapes weekly. Coverage is equivalent to the entire content of Chemical Abstracts. The printed abstract is not
available on magnetic tape. A reference consists of authors, title, source, abstract number corresponding to the printed
issues of Chemical Abstracts and Keyword Index Entries.
3. ISI Citation Tape (ASCAIV Automatic Subject Citation Alert)
Publisher: Institute for Scientific Information (ISI),
325 Chestnut Street,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106.
This tape service is weekly and combines reference, organization and citation file. Approximately 2,700 journals in science
and technology were covered in 1970. A reference consists of authors, organization, title, source, number of cited
references and the actual cited reference. A cited reference contains first author, source, volume, issue, year and starting
page.
4. INSPEC
Publisher: Institute of Electrical Engineers,
Savoy Place,
London WC 2, England.
INSPEC tapes are bi-weekly. Coverage is equivalent to the printed issues of the three sections of Science Abstracts. They
are: 1. Physics. 2. Electrical and Electronics. 3. Computers and Control. A reference consists of authors, title, source,,
subject number, and if available abstract.
5. MEDLARS
Publisher: U.S. National Library of Medicine,
8600 Rockville Pike,
Bethesda, Maryland 20014.
MEDLARS tapes are monthly covering 2,300 journals in the biomedical field. Vocabularly is controlled. Index terms are
assigned to each reference. Retrospective and current awareness services are available.
6. BA Previews
Publisher: Biosciences Information Service of
Biological Abstracts,
2100 Arch Street,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103.
BA Previews tapes offer - approximately five weeks ahead of the printed versions - the references published
semi-monthly in Biological Abstracts and monthly in BioResearch Index - total 18,000 per month. Over 7,500 serials in
the life sciences and published in more than 90 countries are covered. The printed abstract is not available on magnetic
tape. A reference consists of authors, title, source, Biosystematic and cross codes, and abstract number corresponding to
the printed issues.
7. GEO. REF
Publisher: American Geological Institute,
2201 M Street, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20037.
This tape service will be available in 1972.
■
How can you join the CAN/SDI system?
To subscribe to the system, the National Science Library requires that you sign an application form agreeing to pay the base
fee of $40.00. You are then assigned a profile number and sent a subscriber's kit, containing a Profile Design Manual, coding
forms and return labels. You formulate your profile according to the rules outlined in the Manual, then return it to the NSL
where it is checked and entered into the system. You will then receive at regular intervals a personalized bibliography of
references retrieved by the computer for your interest profile. Your subscription year starts when your profile is first matched
against the current tape of your choice.
What will it cost you?
Scale of charges:
1. Basic initiation fee: $40.00.
This will be credited to the subscriber's account.
2. Charges are based on use — number of terms searched against tapes.
Basic profile: 60 profile terms
Overterms: $0.02 term per tape searched. The following table is based on a profile consisting of 60 terms.
Cost/Tape
Tape Service
Frequency/Year
Searched
Cost/Year
ISI Source
52
$ 2.25
$117.00
CA Condensates
Even
26
2.25
58.50
Odd
26
2.25
58.50
Both
52
2.25
117.00
Chemical Titles
26
1.75
45.00
INSPEC
26
3.00
78.00
BA Previews
36
2.25
81.00
MEDLARS
12
5.00
60.00
3.      Cited question
$0.06 per questior
i per tape searched. Since ISI is a weekly tape a cited question would cost (0.06 x 52)
$3.12 per year.
4.      MEDLARS retrospective:
1966 —
1968   $30.00
1969-
date    $30.00
What help is available from the UBC Library?
The Library offers assistance in the preparation of "interest profiles," and will help you in making changes and revisions as
they become necessary.
To encourage users to experiment with the system the Library also offers to pay the $40.00 base fee for new subscribers who
are UBC faculty members or graduate students. They will have to pay the balance of their account at the end of their
subscription year. This $40.00 subsidy will, however, be limited to twenty subscribers on a first-come first-served basis.
For further information please call R.J. Brongers (Science Division) at local 3826.
AT LAST!
The Library has just installed vending machines for coffee, soup, hot chocolate, candy and cold drinks. These machines are in
the basement immediately below the main entrance hall. Use the outside door under the main stairs, or take one of the stairways
down from the inside hall.
Editor: Mrs. J.E. de Bruijn Information & Orientation Division ■
.   .I-),.
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