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The Making of a Research Library: Sixty Years of Collections Development/Annual Report of the University… 1975

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 THE
NG
of a RESEARCH
LIBRARY
60 years of collections development
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN TO THE SENATE
»>nA
University of British Columbia
1974-75
*A-o.,
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•'-A
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*<-.', THE  MAKING OF A RESEARCH LIBRARY
Sixty Years of Collections Development
Annual Report of the University Librarian
to
the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Sixtieth Year
1974/75
Vancouver, December 1975. TABLE OF CONTENTS
22
I. Collections Over Sixty Years. ...1
II. Growth and Nature of the Collections. ...2
III. Value and Cost of Collections. ...7
IV. Housing the Collections. —14
V. Service and the Collections. —!8
VI. Significance of the Collections.
Appendix A. Size of Collections - Physical Volumes
B. Library Growth, 1915/16 to 1974/75
C. Growth of Collections
D. Library Expenditures
E. Recorded use of Library Resources
F. Reference Statistics
G. Library Organization
H. Library Supported Reading Rooms
I. Senate Library Committee -1-
I.  Collections Over Sixty Years.
If, as it is so often said, the library is the heart of the
university, it is certainly the case that the collection is the heart
of the library.  It is its most valuable asset, measured in any terms,
This report focusses on the collection, and approaches all other
aspects of the library through it, not just because it, like the
university, is marking its sixtieth anniversary, but because while its
significance continues to grow, its future is in several respects in a
state of jeopardy.  And this is a matter which should be of concern far
beyond the gates of the university. -2-
Growth and Nature of the Collections.
To have  arrived,   after sixty years,  at a collection of one and two-thirds
millions of physical volumes,  and more  than two and one-quarter millions of
items  in other formats,  has  required an immense collaborative effort on the
part of faculty members,   librarians,  university administrators,  governments,
foundations  and private donors.     Virtually every item in the  collection
represents  a choice,  a decision made,  an amount provided,  an amount expended.
What is  truly astonishing is  that so much has been accomplished in just the
past decade.
A graphic representation of the growth of the collections   (See Figure  1)
shows  that the Library entered the 1960's with about four hundred and fifty
thousand volumes  on its  shelves, barely enough,  in terms of present standards,
to satisfy the needs of a university of even modest size and ambition.     In
1963 a period of rapid development began,  and by  1966 the Library was  adding
every year as many volumes as  it had been able  to acquire in the  first twenty
years of its existence.     In the  decade that followed,  the Library acquired
one million volumes:  it had taken fifty years  to acquire its  first half
million.     By 1975  the collections,  measured in terms of physical volumes
alone, were  four times  as  large  as  they had been on the threshold of the
1960's,  and in that interval one million four hundred thousand volumes had
been selected,  acquired,   catalogued and made available  for use.
It will also be noted that in recent years  the  rate of growth has
declined.     This  is no reflection of a parallel decline in the availability
of library materials in the marketplace,  nor of their desirability to the
University.     It can be  traced to economic factors,  as will be shown.
What is  the nature of the Library's  collections?    The physical volume,
as  represented by the book or the bound periodical,  is  the  familiar object
that stands  in the minds  of most people  as  symbolic of the Library.     It is
certainly the one most often counted when the importance of a collection is
being assessed.     But,  as Table  1 shows,  it is  joined by the microform,  the
sound recording,  visual materials,  maps  and manuscripts.     The  total number
of these physical items was  recorded as  3,945,897 at the end of March 1975.
To understand the meaning of this,   it must be kept in mind that each physical •3-
1915  20   25   30   35  40   45   50   55   60   65   70   75
$ Hundred
of Thousc
1 Q
s
nds
1
j
J.O
17
i
|
lo
15
1 4
5
1
13
12
5
11
10
3
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9
8
I
7
1
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5
I
4
3
2
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Figure 1: Growth of Collections in Volumes, 1915/16 to 1974/75 Table 1: Growth of Non-Book Collections, 1961/62 to 1974/75.
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
1968/69
1969/70
1970/71
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
Uncatalogued
Documents
197,876
227,595
266,911
307,215
359,764
425,690
483,617
544,470
603,414
669,175
737,202
804,712
350,463
417,070
Films,
Filmstrips
& T.V.-Tapes
-
-
-
-
-
-
24
172
172
569
569
569
2,606
2,703
Slides,
Transparencies
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5,242
8,172
Pictures,
Posters
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
62,812
64,280
Microfilm
3,224
3,650
4,701
5,209
6,907
9,578
11,697
13,734
27,224
30,275
35,344
36,198
38,227
42,687
Microcard
8,413
8,577
8,977
8,990
15,810
27,761
34,669
101,280
107,840
108,320
111,680
111,680
111,680
111,680
Microprint
5,189
54,989
55,654
61,130
236,130
236,130
252,582
527,500
618,500
698,000
732,500
760,500
826,250
858,000
Microfiche
366
692
692
5,891
12,934
16,248
23,264
285,820
337,246
412,018
525,790
584,770
595,641
600,186
Maps
-
-
-
-
40,2P5
51,278
59,944
63,220
70,861
75,203
80,211
86,024
94,443
105,733
Manuscripts
in linear feet
78
107
136
398
410
437
457
562
1,102
1,800
1,900
2,005
3,350
3,550
Recordings
-
-
-
-
8,278
9,782
12,045
14,359
22,260
24,150
25,575
27,364
45,367
58,476
Appendix Y: Size of Collections Physical Volumes. -5-
item, especially in the case of periodicals and microforms, can represent
many discrete bibliographical items.
In an attempt to make information available where it is actually
needed most, the collection has been distributed throughout a system of
branch libraries and reading rooms.  The division of the collections among
these elements is shown in Appendix A.  It will be seen that there are now
five volumes in branch libraries, reading rooms and individual subject
collections within the Main Library, to every four volumes in the stacks of
the Main Library, which before the 1960's were virtually the sole repository
for books.
Figure 2 shows the distribution of major subjects within the collection,
according to the Library of Congress classification.
Figure 2: Contents of Collections, by Library of Congress Classes.
- General
- Philosophy & Religion
)
f
|- History
Social Sciences:
Geography, Anthropology,
Sociology,
Political Science,
Law, Education.
M - Music
N - Art & Architecture
P - Literature
Q - Science
S - Agricultural Science
T - Technology
U - Military Science
V - Naval Science
W - Health Sciences
Z - Bibliography
Z     A
3.43% 4.G7%
C,D,E,F.
15.66* -6-
A study carried out over many years  and completed by the National Library
of Canada during the year made it possible  to compare  the  relative strength
of U.B.C.'s  collection by subject area.     It has  for some  time been the case
that in total U.B.C.'s  collection is  the second largest in Canada.     It is
some  two million seven hundred thousand volumes  smaller than the University
of Toronto's,  very slightly larger than McGill's,  and fifty thousand volumes
larger than the  University of Alberta's.     But it does  contain Canada's
largest collections in the subject areas of:  Canadian history,  German history,
Canadian literature,  and Transportation and Communication.
In the following areas,  it contains  the second largest collections in
Canadai British history,  French history,  Anthropogeography,  Anthropology,
Sociology, English literature,   German literature,  Spanish and Portuguese
languages  and literatures,  Philosophy,  Political science,  and Folklore.
While  these  facts  are  cause  for satisfaction it must be pointed out
that as research libraries  go,  U.B.C.  Library is still only of moderate size.
Its  collection is smaller,   for example,  than those  to be  found at the
universities of Virginia,  Missouri,  Kansas,  Rutgers,  Florida and Maryland.
Out of .eighty-one university members of the Association of Research Libraries,
U.B.C.   Library is  not far from the median,  ranking thirty-seventh.     And
whereas  just four years  ago it ranked eleventh in terms of its  annual growth
rate,  it had dropped to twenty-ninth place by 1973/74.     Accessions have
declined from 162,428 volumes in 1970/71 to 85,086 volumes  last year,  a drop
of forty-eight percent in four years.     This  can be  traced to the  fact that
funds  for the purchase of collections have not kept pace with inflating
prices. ■7-
III.     Value  and Cost of Collections.
Everyone who has purchased a book recently knows  that prices have
increased.     For both periodicals and books  the price  trend has  tilted
sharply upward in the past five years.
The average price of U.S.  periodicals  in the five years  1970  to 1974
more  than doubled,   rising from $8.66 to $17.71   (Bowker /Annual,  1975, p.177).
Hardcover U.S.  books over the same period rose  in price  from $8.77 to $14.09,
an increase of sixty-one percent   (Bowker /Annual,  1975, p.180) .     A British
compilation shows  that adult non-fiction  from the U.K.  increased in price by
a relatively modest twenty-seven percent in the four years ending with 1974
(Library Association Record,  August 1974, p.155).     The same source indicates
that periodical prices  rose during the period by seventy-four percent to an
average of £,19.78   (p.153).
An examination of monthly paid invoices  reveals  that U.B.C.   is now
paying an average of $14.20  for each book.     The average cost of a periodical
subscription now runs  to between  $37  and $38 a year.
The monetary value of the whole collection has  thereby appreciated and
keeps on increasing in value with each passing year.     The  following table
estimates  the worth of the  collection.
Table  2:   U.B.C.   Library Collections Valuation,  April 1975.
Main Library
Branches
Animal Resource Ecology
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Law
MacMillan
Medical Branch
Mathematics
Music
Marjorie Smith
Sedgewick
Woodward
$37,378,244.75
391,461.00
304,384.00
1,356,287.00
2,853,092.75
1,034,435.25
701,340.00
506,880.00
779,032.50
295,566.25
4,345,827.25
8,098,814.00
Reading Rooms
20,667,120.00
2,661,430.00
$60,706,794.75 -8-
This staggering figure of course cannot be regarded as a true  replacement
cost, because  the  great majority of the  items in the collection can not be
replaced.     Included in this estimate are  the labour and material costs of
acquiring,  cataloguing,  and maintaining the bibliographical apparatus which
permits  access  to the  contents of the  collection.     In terras of today's
salaries  and expenses,  that figure is  greater than the actual purchase  cost.
The  actual amount spent on collections purchases  over sixty years has
been $17,915,246   (See Appendix B,   for expenditures).     In addition there
have been gifts  to the collection of unmeasured value.     The total value
today of almost sixty-one million dollars  is  an appreciation of three
hundred thirty-nine percent over purchase price.
In recent years,   the amounts  spent on collections  annually have  risen,
fallen and risen again,  as  can be seen in Figure  3.     The number of volumes
added annually   (presented in Appendix B)   shows  a different pattern.     In the
late sixties,  the numbers of accessions exceeded the capacity of the
Processing Divisions  to deal with them.     Proceeding methodically,  they
gradually eliminated the backlog.     In the past few years  the number of
accessions has  dropped significantly,  while expenditures have  risen slightly.
In 1974/75,  expenditures  on collections   (books,  periodicals  and binding)
were  $1,629,797,   representing 25.8 percent of total  library expenditures,  a
decline over the previous year.     In fact,   the proportion spent on
collections has been diminishing for many years,  as  shown on the chart
presented as  Figure  3.
In the sixties  this was  attributable  to an increase in the numbers of
staff needed to deal with collection processing and to operate  the
developing branch system of libraries over increasingly longer schedules.
However,   few staff members have been added to the establishment in the
past four years:   the  growing proportion of the library budget allocated to
salaries arises out of salary increases,  yet another symptom of the general
problem of inflation. Figure   3:  Expenditures  on Salaries,  Collections,  Other Expenses,   19*5/66  to 1974/75.
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1965/66    1966/67    1967/68    1968/69    1969/70    1970/71     1971/72    1972/73    1973/74     1974/75 -10-
Within the library budget other trends are developing.  To examine them,
the collections budget can be broken down into four main areas of spending:
1. Current and Research.  In this category are the funds for maintaining
periodical subscriptions, for acquiring periodical back files, for
purchasing new books and significant collections of material.
2. Branch Libraries and Subject Collections. Each branch library and
subject collection has a fund for general collection development.
3. Reading Rooms.  Reading rooms receive varying levels of support
for collections.
4. Departments.  Those departments predominantly in the Faculty of Arts,
which have a need for out-of-print materials receive allocations.
Figure 4 shows that more and more dollars are being spent for the first
category.  The reason for this becomes apparent when one looks at the growth
in the cost of the serials component budget, as shown in Figure 5. Whereas
in 1970/71 periodicals and continuations accounted for about forty percent
of all expenditures on library materials, by last year they accounted for
over fifty-five percent, and in the current year it is expected that they
will account for over sixty percent.
As part of a programme to counteract these trends, which see increasing
amounts committed to current publications, a "quid-pro-quo" policy was
established, whereunder no new subscription was entered until a subscription
or subscriptions of equal dollar value and in the same subject field had
been cancelled.  Initially this policy served to weed out some titles of
marginal significance. However, this policy, which it was hoped to suspend
in 1975/76, is now a source of annoyance and concern to faculty members and
librarians alike.  And despite the policy, the annual costs of periodicals
keep mounting.  If these costs can not be paid, ruthless slashing of the
subscription list would be needed to reduce it to its former proportion of
the budget. Figure 4: Collections Budgets, by Expense Category, 1970/71 to 1974/75.
$ loo,oo9-»isrT- ■]-ri^rirj-arrn-*rTT~rrirr:rr-r rTi—r tt~~kt-' ~~rv
i i.
1970/71
1971/72
1973/74
1974/75 -12-
Figure 5: Proportion of Book Budget Spent on Continuations and Periodicals,
1970/71 to 1974/75.
,   llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
-7V72 rninmifniiTiimimmmiu
1.7V73; i if f ii ji f iinniiijii immnnoii
J (40.1%)
1973/74
1974/75
illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllL
HIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1I[|||||||||IHIIIIII[[
(41.8%)
(45.5%)
(48.3%)
(55.4%)
0%
50%
100% -13-
Another dangerous  trend,  again stemming from inflationary pressure,
is  the increasing size of the commitment which is  carried over from one
budget year to the next.     Given the  fact that there is  always a delay
between the ordering of an item,   its receipt and payment for it,  some carryover from year to year is essential.     But costs  for materials have been
growing,  and the value of the  commitment has  swollen from $421,322  in 1969/70
to  $875,920  in the current year.     It is obvious  that this  can not continue,
and that it will be necessary to  further reduce the numbers of orders placed.
As vital to the University as  is  the welfare of the Library's  collection,
it is  unfortunately true  that among budget items  it is  among the most
vulnerable.     That is because  it is easier to hold back increases or to cut
the  collections budget than it is  to reduce or lower the quality of academic
programmes or library services,  either of which would involve diminishing
the numbers of University faculty or staff.     The immediate implications of
inadequate support for library collections  are not so keenly  felt in human
terms.     An event in the past year demonstrated this  clearly enough.     An
increase of  $106,420 had been made to the collections budget,  representing
a 7.7 percent increase over the previous year,  not enough to offset inflation.
In May,  a mandatory increase in student assistant wages  from $2.50  to $4.16
per hour necessitated adjustments  to the Library's budget.     Had these
adjustments not been made,  the Library would have been forced to adopt a
schedule of hours  so reduced that students  could not have completed their
assignments.     A decreased but adequate schedule of hours was maintained,
but one sacrifice that had to be made was  to the collections budget, which
was  reduced by about fifty thousand dollars.     This in turn lowered the
increase over the previous year to 4.1 percent.     Thus the collections budget
becomes  less  and less  able  to deal with rising costs.     The University and
its  Library must confront two alternatives,  neither of them easy in present
circumstances:  either more money  for collections,  or inadequate collections. ■14-
IV.  Housing the Collections.
At the present time, in all libraries, collections occupy one hundred
seventy thousand net square feet, approximately forty-three percent of the
space available for library purposes.  But unlike other occupants of that
space, collections make special demands.
In the first place, their growth is inexorable.  Limitations can be
placed on enrollment, and thus on the potential number of library users.
In the second place, when a user is unable to find a seat, he goes away,
but books are more demanding.  To a certain extent it is harder to ignore
the space needs of collections than it is of library users, no matter how
difficult their situation.
At U.B.C. the story of collections and space has been one of suspense.
One shelving crisis has followed upon another, with solutions being found
only when disaster is at hand or has arrived.  The past decade of rapid
collection growth has coincided with the construction of a series of branch
libraries, in which 637,837 volumes, or forty percent of the collection
of physical volumes, are now housed (See Appendix A).  But there is a limit
to the shelf life of all libraries on campus, and some deadlines are
painfully close.
At the present rate of growth the following collections will have
exceeded the point of full working capacity of existing shelves before the
end of the decade:
In 1975: Animal Resource Ecology Library; Curriculum Laboratory.
In 1976: Special Collections Division.
In 1977: Fine Arts Division; MacMillan Library; Mathematics Library;
Music Library.
In 1978: Asian Studies Library; Crane Library; Main Library Stacks.
In 1979: Biomedical Branch Library (Vancouver General Hospital).
However, there are under way three construction projects which will
ameliorate this situation. -15-
A site for the Processing Building has finally been found west of the
Woodward Library, and construction could begin in the early summer of 1976.
When that building is completed, hopefully in 1977, it will then be necessary
to renovate the seventh level of the Main Library stacks, to receive the
Government Publications Division, now on the sixth level.  Following this,
the sixth level will be renovated and additional shelving installed, to
provide space for about one hundred fifty thousand volumes, enough for
four years of collection growth at present accession rates.  Capital funds
have yet to be allocated to these renovation projects.
The Asian Studies Centre is partially complete, but can not be finished
until additional funds are raised.  The withdrawal of the Asian collection
from the Main Library will free space for another one hundred fifty thousand
volumes, and provide the Asian Studies Library with space for expansion for
a decade.
An educational resources centre, including a library, is provided for
in a new building for the Faculty of Education, to which the Senate Committee
on Academic Building Needs has given first priority.  This building will
probably not be complete until sometime in 1978, at the earliest.  The space
problem of the Curriculum Laboratory will then be solved, and the removal
of the education collection from the Main Library stacks will release space
for twenty-seven thousand five hundred volumes, enough for eight months'
collection growth.
In combination, these projects extend the shelf life of the Main Library
into the early 1980's.  But they do nothing for several of the other branch
libraries listed above.
What is the solution to housing the ever-expanding collection?
Essentially, there are only two alternatives: construct more space, or
diminish the collection.  Both alternatives are being pursued.
In planning the library system, an optimum collection size defining an
upper limit has been posited for all branches.  This limit is not arbitrary,
but takes into consideration the differing requirements of different groups -16-
of users. It is also proposed that as an adjunct to the library system, a
remote storage library be constructed at some future date, to which seldom
used volumes can be retired.
To diminish collections, volumes can either be withdrawn, or their
contents reduced in size.  Again, both approaches are being taken already.
Last year the Sedgewick library withdrew eleven thousand volumes, comprising
works no longer assigned as reading to high enrollment courses, and made
them available at no charge to colleges in British Columbia, where
collections are still in a rudimentary stage of development.  Such
collection weeding is practiced everywhere in the U.B.C. library system.
Wherever it is possible and practical to do so, microform materials
are acquired in preference to physical volumes.  This is increasingly the
case with periodical and newspaper files.  In fact, there are now more
bibliographic items in the microform collection than in the collection of
physical volumes.
The storage repository has already been proposed as the solution to
the problem of dealing with physical volumes when they exceed the capacity
of a given library to contain them.  There are already three small storage
areas within the library system.  One of these, in the Woodward Library,
now holds some fifty thousand volumes withdrawn from the Main and other
libraries.  These volumes were selected for storage on the basis of their
low frequency of use.  Any book which had not been borrowed in five years
was retired.  That only fifty thousand books fell into that category is an
indication that the great majority of the books in the collection are in
active use.  At the present time about two hundred and fifty volumes per
month are retrieved from the Woodward Library storage area in response to
users* requests.
The second storage area is in the basement of the Main Library, and
it contains twenty-five thousand volumes, mostly from the nearby Asian
Studies collection. -17-
The third storage area is in the basement of the new Law Library.  It
had at one time been planned to prepare this space for high-density storage
using compact shelving like that in the Woodward Library and Main Library
storage areas, but budget constraints made this impossible, and conventional
shelving has been substituted.
Altogether, the three book storage areas can hold approximately one
hundred seventy-five thousand volumes, in a total floor space of about five
thousand square feet.
As logical as storage libraries appear to be, and as necessary as they
are in library planning, it should not be assumed that they represent the
most economical approach to dealing with collections and their use.  Cost-
benefit studies have shown the contrary to be the case.  The costs of
changing records, handling books and delays in retrieval offset the savings
in construction costs which inexpensive storage buildings usually provide.
In U.B.C.'s case it is an ironic fact that the type of construction found
in the Main Library stacks, with its low ceilings and narrow aisles is the
type advocated for a storage building.  Rather than reconstructing such space
at a distance from the centre of campus, a better long-range alternative
would be to replace the Main Library building with a new research library,
to seal off the old stacks from public access for storage purposes only,
and to renovate the other spaces in the building for other purposes, such
as offices, seminar rooms and classrooms, all of which are in short supply
at the north end of the campus.
In the future technology may offer new options for the storage and
retrieval of information, involving such things as computer storage of full
texts, and the recording of collections on video tapes or discs.  It is not
possible for the Library itself to develop such technology, but it can and
will adapt and exploit it as soon as it is possible and sensible to do so.
This also presupposes that authors and publishers will be willing to accept
revolutionary approaches to the recording and dissemination of knowledge.
Whatever developments take place, it seems likely that no single medium will
replace the conventional printed newspaper, magazine or book, and that the
reader will continue to be faced, as he is now, with a diversity of media. -18-
V.     Service and the Collections.
Collections,   to be intellectually accessible,  must be catalogued.     To
be physically accessible  they must be given marks of identification and
prepared for use.     The records which provide intellectual access must be
created and maintained on a virtually daily basis.     And skilled reference
assistance must be provided to the users of these  records and the collections.
For over a decade  the  computer has become increasingly responsible  for
the handling of library records, which are distinguished by these
characteristics:  they are massive in size,  require constant revision,  and
must be susceptible of access  in a multitude of ways  and on a random basis.
Theoretically,  as  a successor to the expensive and cumbersome  card catalogue,
an on-line,   real-time computer system would provide  the perfect solution to
dealing with library records.     Realistically,  neither the hardware nor the
software to accomplish this  for all of U.B.C.'s  records  is  available,  nor
could it be afforded if it were.    However,  the Library's  systems  are moving
by degrees  toward this  distant objective.
One sign of this  trend took place during the summer of 1975 when
conventional paper printout was  replaced by computer output microform,  or
COM,   for all machine-maintained library records,  and microfiche readers
appeared where printout consulting tables  formerly had been.     COM is not,
as some believe,  a photograph of paper printout.     It is produced directly
on film from a magnetic  tape  record,  using fibre optics.     The resulting
record is more compact,  more  legible,  and because  it is  so much less
expensive,   contains more information and fewer abbreviations.
Careful consideration is being given to the use of COM as  a substitute
for card catalogues, which are becoming too expensive  to maintain and too
large  to house.     The union catalogue in the Main Library is  now on the
threshold of its effective  limit of growth within the space  available  for it
in the Main Concourse.     Conversion to COM would solve  the growth problem
and provide other benefits.     Among them would be  the availability of a  full
record of the holdings  of all libraries  in the system which could be
economically reproduced and distributed to all  libraries,  reading rooms,
academic departments  and off-campus  locations where desired. -19-
Behind the scenes,  systems which  foreshadow the public catalogue of the
future  are already in operation:   in the Acquisitions  Division orders  are
being entered by means of computer terminals,  themselves prototypes  of the
equipment which library users will one day employ to gain access  to the
total record of the  library's holdings.
It is now generally known that the computer is being used to conduct
searches  of indexes  to large bodies  of literature in medicine and the
sciences,  and depending on the  nature  and level of the  individual question,
to do this more quickly and with better results  than could be achieved through
the use of printed indexes.     Ultimately,  of course,   the usefulness of such
literature searches  rests on access  to the references  they yield,  and thus
on the strength of the  collection.     But the expectations of users sometimes
go farther.     In the experience of librarians,  instant access  to information
about literature  arouses in the user the assumption that the material
itself will be provided on the same instant basis,  and without exertion on
the part of the user.
As  there will never be a time when the Library holds every item of
information,   there will never be a time when every user will receive  total
service:   that is, when every  inquiry will yield not just information about
information,  but the information itself.     To a large extent,  libraries rely
on the abilities of patrons to help themselves,   and as  information,   in the
broadest sense of that term,  becomes more abundant,  complex and varied in
format,   a higher order of skill is needed.
One of the aims of reference service at U.B.C.   Library is  to develop
the user's  skill.     To begin with,  it is committed to a heavy programme of
user guidance and instruction,  involving tours,   lectures and publications.
Special emphasis  is  given to providing orientation to students enrolling at
the university  for the  first time;   for the great majority it is  their first
encounter with a library of significant size.     In the period between
September and April 1975,  one hundred and fifty-five  tours  and two hundred
and twenty-nine instructional sessions were conducted,  involving 7,767
persons.     Programmes which will reach all students  in their first year are
in preparation,  in cooperation with the English Department. -20-
In the course of the year,  Library staff members  answered more  than
three hundred thousand specific questions,  an average of roughly a thousand
per day.     As  can be seen in Appendix F,  almost a quarter of a million of
these questions were of a reference or research variety,  involving trained
staff in assisting patrons  in the use of the collections.
Not all of the Library's patrons are U.B.C.   students or faculty,  as  a
survey conducted on November 3,   1974,  revealed.     Sixteen percent of those
persons  counted in the Main,  Sedgewick and Woodward libraries  during the
survey identified themselves  as not being from U.B.C.     Their reasons  for
being on this  campus were numerous,  but the greatest attraction for most
respondents was  the collection.     The materials  they sought were simply not
to be  found at their home institutions.
Counts were being made  at the same  time in other libraries on the
lower mainland and Vancouver Island,   at Simon Fraser University,  Vancouver
City College,  the B.C.  Institute of Technology,  the Vancouver Public
Library and the University of Victoria.     It was learned that of U.B.C.
students  located in libraries,  ninety-four percent were  at U.B.C,  and
that the total number of U.B.C.   students  in all libraries equalled fourteen
percent of this  university's  total enrollment.     Parenthetically,  November
3rd was  a Sunday,  and the sun was  shining.     On October 23-29,  1975  another
more extensive survey was  carried out.     Preliminary results  confirm the
findings  of the earlier survey,  that sixteen to seventeen percent of U.B.C.
Library's population of users has  no formal connection with the University.
While  reference  activity increased,   for the first time in the Library's
recent history the number of items  loaned decreased overall by one percent
(See Appendix E).     However,   the pattern of increases  and decreases among
branches  and divisions  shows no consistent pattern.     Some decreases  can be
explained readily:   the Woodward Library duplicated many  titles which were
in heavy demand and thereby reduced its  circulation of loans of reserve
materials;  during the period of construction, when the Law Library was
separated from faculty and student quarters,  use declined, but will probably
increase again,  the  new building having been opened in January 1975. -21-
Interlibrary lending,  on the other hand,  continued to increase.     It
should be noted that U.B.C.   Library is now working with the Federated
Information Network,   a project of the Greater Vancouver Library Council,
and this  arrangement,  which involves  the use of a committed telephone line,
a truck delivery and staff paid for by the Council, permits  access  to
U.B.C.'s  collections  for users of all public  libraries  in municipalities
in the  lower mainland.
While the numbers of items  loaned to other libraries  is  a small
proportion of the  total,   the unit costs of these loans  is high because
each request involves  the searching of the catalogue,   frequent bibliographical
verification of incorrect or incomplete  citations,   the retrieval of the
item,  photocopying in about half the cases,   the creation of loan records,
packing and shipping.     In connection with  this,   and with all other extramural services,  as  the Library's budget situation worsens  the question must
be raised:   can the University afford to continue to subsidise  the needs  of
other libraries when it is  increasingly unable  to meet the needs of its
immediate  community of users?    Should it seek additional appropriations  for
extra-mural service of this  and other kinds?    Or should it establish systems
of cost recovery?
As  for the use of the collection generally,  a plateau may have been
reached.     In the  1960's  use turned up sharply:  it doubled between 1964/65
and 1968/69,   and has  doubled again since  then.     If total circulation is
stabilizing at nearly two and a half million items per year,  it may be
because  any individual can only deal with so many pages of print in a
given year.     Whatever the case,  U.B.C.  Library continues  to lead other
major Canadian university libraries  in the volume of its  loans.     In 1973/74,
the University of Toronto Library loaned 1,707,563 items,  McGill University
Library loaned 1,015,737 items,  and the University of Alberta Library loaned
941,278 items,   compared with U.B.C.'s  2,290,173 loans.     Considering that
this  represents  about half the use,   the other half taking place within
libraries being unrecorded,   it can be seen that the  collection,  besides
being large in size  and valuable in monetary terms,  is both useful and
intensively used. -22-
VI.  Significance of the Collections.
As the diamond jubilee of the University and its Library came to a
close, the 3,945,897th item was added to the Library collections.  The
number has no significance, lacking even the symbolic value of the hundred-
thousandth or the millionth.  It merely represents a moment in the continuing
process in which a library matures imperceptibly as a research library rich
in resources.
The centrality of the library in a university is axiomatic.  At every
level of academic work the library is of great consequence, for study, for
teaching, for research.  At the graduate and research levels, the importance
of the collection is vital.  In his Assessment of Quality in Graduate
Education, Cartter says of the library that "no other single nonhuman factor
is as closely related to the quality of graduate education", and observes
that universities strong in all areas of graduate work invariably have
major national research libraries (A.M. Cartter; Washington, D.C., American
Council on Education, 1966; p.114).  In its dependence on the library for
the quality of graduate studies and research U.B.C. is no exception.  The
research collections constitute a vital foundation for work at these levels.
And in the province of British Columbia, where library resources are
meager, the U.B.C. collections constitute the single largest concentration
of library materials in the province.  There are some seven and one-quarter
million volumes in B.C. all told, of which almost one-fourth are at U.B.C.
No other library has as much as one-tenth of the total. Practically, even
inevitably, the U.B.C. Library is seen as, and is relied upon to be, the
back-up collection for the province and beyond.
Every indicator of library activity confirms the fact that the U.B.C.
Library is the chief resource centre for the province. The library use
studies show that, whereas some U.B.C. students may be found in other
libraries when surveys are made, the U.B.C. libraries are visited by some
three times as many off-campus users.  In interlibrary lending, three and
one-half times as many loans and photocopies are made available to other
libraries from U.B.C. as are obtained by U.B.C. from other libraries.
Especially in times of budget constraints, it is presumed at other -23-
institutions that only materials in heavy demand will be bought and that the
U.B.C. collections will assume responsibility for other essential but less
frequently consulted publications.
It seems clear that the time has arrived when U.B.C. can no longer
afford to provide services for off-campus users at no expense to them.  Costs
have increased to such an extent, while financial resources have failed to
keep abreast, that U.B.C. members would have to be penalized in order to
maintain present levels of services to others. This would be patently unfair.
The first responsibility of the Library must be to provide for its immediate
clientele, and only secondarily for others.  This situation is faced to a
greater or lesser extent by all research libraries, and increasingly so in
the seventies. Some have responded by imposing very high use fees on non-
members.  Most have been attempting to find ways to make cost recoveries.
At U.B.C. no solution is immediately at hand, but ways are being explored
to cope with the conflicting pressures.
Strong collections are not the product of an overnight miracle.  They
represent a heavy investment in expertise, time and money.  In its first
sixty years the University of British Columbia has developed a collection
which can be said to rank among the most important resources for research
in Canada and even in North America.  This report concludes with the hope
that in the years ahead, whatever economic vicissitudes the University
encounters, the Library will be enabled to continue to mature and to
maintain and develop the collections for research and study which both the
University and the province need. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
March 31, 1974       Growth       March 31, 1975
39,614 737,380
7,660 61,582
4,802 58,017
2,187 34,914
720 13,352
1,970 42,511
Main Library
General Stacks
697,766
Asian Studies
53,922
Fine Arts
53,215
Humanities  and
Social Sciences
Ref.
32,727
Science  Reference
12,632
Special Collections
40,541
Animal Resource Ecology
12,493
Crane Library
4,964
Curriculum Laboratory
28,531
Law Library
89,296
MacMillan Library
29,423
Biomedical Branch
22,171
Mathematics Library
15,977
Music Library
20,353
Reading Rooms
84,017
Sedgewick Library
131,255
Social Work Library
8,879
Woodward Library
190,578
SUBTOTAL
637,837
SUBTOTAL
1,528,640
Volumes withdrawn
-
Net growth
1,528,640
Storage
59,634
TOTAL
1,588,274
SUBTOTAL 890,803 56,95 3 947,756
Branch Libraries  and Reading Rooms
335
12,828
621
5,585
3,772
32,303
5,315
94,611
2,070
31,493
1,207
23,378
919
16,896
1,951
22,304
4,460
88,477
8,658
139,913
955
9,834
9,042
199,620
39,305
677,142
96,258
1,624,898
14,172
14,172
82,086
1,610,726
-
59,634
82,086
1,670,360
Includes  Reserve Book Collection and some minor Main Library collections. Appendix B
LIBRARY GROWTH, 1915/16 to 1974/75
1
Spent on
Collections
$         1,300
Net Vols.
Added
Total
Holdings
20,000
Circulation
1,300
University
Enrolment
1915/16
-
379
16/17
6,650
3,500
23,500
2,036
369
17/18
6,900
3,800
27,300
2,750
416
18/19
7,750
3,700
31,000
3,639
538
19/20
18,800
2,000
33,000
4,401
890
1920/21
16,000
3,000
36,000
9,657
962
21/22
9,500
6,000
42,000
12,637
1,014
22/23
6,500
3,000
45,000
14,450
1,194
23/24
12,000
4,700
49,700
16,040
1,308
24/25
9,000
3,300
53,000
17,522
1,451
25/26
16,800
3,000
56,000
40,560
1,463
26/27
12,000
5,000
61,000
60,945
1,582
27/28
13,500
4,373
65,373
76,609
1,741
28/29
13,000
4,211
69,584
78,265
1,730
29/30
13,000
7,997
77,581
83,306
1,904
1930/31
12,660
3,612
81,193
93,469
2,044
31/32
4,500
4,823
86,016
68,925
1,989
32/33
2,000
1,701
87,717
80,299
1,739
33/34
7,000
3,602
91,319
96,903
1,606
34/35
7,000
6,074
97,393
96,982
1,752
35/36
11,700
6,622
104,015
102,966
1,883
36/37"
37/38„
I            23,870
7,141
111,156
M101,955
(.121,071
2,049
2,481
38/39
39/40
13,750^
14,300J
10,001
121,157
p.37,496
(125,906
2,476
2,594
1940/41
14,510
5,145
126,302
128,359
2,658
41/42
17,537
5,510
131,812
124,597
2,671
42/43
17,264
5,463
137,275
102,857
2,609
43/44
16,340
5,245
142,520
89,749
2,569
44/45
18,682
5,249
147,769
92,470
3,058
45/46
27,786
9,301
157,070
166,515
6,998
46/47
43,318
11,518
168,588
191,736
9,035
47/48
39,729
11,028
179,616
219,535
9,374
48/49
52,942
9,628
189,244
264,689
8,810
49/50
51,088
12,001
201,245
249,318
7,572
(1950, etc. Continued on next page) Appendix B   (Continued)
1950/51
$
56,658
11,628
228,117
238,884
6,432
51/52
47,929
15,216
243,333
219,262
5,548
52/53
76,425
18,098
261,431
199,241
5,355
53/54
115,128
22,448
283,879
234,096
5,500
54/55
129,665
20,368
304,247
258,501
5,914
55/56
135,099
20,964
325,211
252,239
6,403
56/57
146,051
32,283
357,494
252,907
7,699
57/58
190,497
30,258
387,752
300,256
8,986
58/59
212,254
31,767
419,519
328,890
9,950
59/60
244,084
32,851
452,370
394,080
10,642
1960/61
267,859
37,556
489,926
443,888
11,621
61/62
273,997
35,235
525,161
594,240
12,950
62/63
330,067
35,792
560,953
649,410
13,598
63/64
444,135
52,945
613,878
738,597
14,714
64/65
571,288
61,568
675,446
788,657
15,489
65/66
1
,663,771
65,915
741,361
1
,046,539
16,337
66/67
1
,621,018
103,631
844,992
1
,116,143
17,219
67/68
1
,099,233
98,998
943,990
1
,368,722
18,310
68/69
1
,109,920
119,569
1
,063,559
1
,597,421
20,089
69/70
1
,240,000
129,283
1
,192,842
1
,838,155
20,767
1970/71
1
,341,807
162,428
1
,355,270
2
,017,274
20,936
71/72
1,
,432,902
144,505
1
,499,775
2
,113,326
19,826
72/73
1
,463,130
136,626
1
,502,7463
2
,132,862
19,166
73/74
1
,513,856
85,528
1
,588,274
2
,319,054
20,100
74/75
1
,629,797
85,086
1
,673,360
2
,290,173
22,035
From 1915/16 to 1939/40 the amount shown is  the appropriation  for books,
periodicals  and binding,   including supplementary appropriations  and grants
from outside  the University.     From 1940/41 on the amount shown is  the
actual expenditure on books, periodicals  and binding.
An inventory established the  fact that the Library's  collections were
larger than the  cumulated statistics showed.
Several factors,  chiefly the decision to delete non-book materials  from
the volume count,  occasioned a downward revision of volume holdings.     The
collections were measured and a new statistical base  adopted. Appendix C
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
Volumes - Catalogued
Documents - Uncatalogued
Films, Filmstrips & Video Tapes
Slides & Transparencies
Pictures & Posters
Microfilm (reels)
Microcard (cards)
Microprint (sheets)
Microfiche (cards)
Maps
Manuscripts *
Recordings
March 31/74
Additions
Withdrawals
March 31/75
1,578,661
104,697
12,998
1,670,360
350,463
66,607
—
417,070
i    2,606
97
—
2,703
5,242
2,932
—
8,172
62,812
1,468
—
64,280
38,227
4,460
—
42,687
111,680
—
—
111,680
826,250
31,750
—
858,000
595,641
4,545
—
600,186
94,443
11,290
—
105,733
3,350 ft.
200 ft.
—
3,550 ft.
45,367
13,109
—
58,476
♦Thickness of files. Appendix D
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April-March
Salaries & Wages
Books & Periodicals
Binding
Supplies, Equipment
1972/73
3,178,630
1,308,537
154,593
350,455
1973/74
3,522,626
1,348,775
165,081
373,302
1974/75
4,263,647
1,502,317
127,480
428,391
Estimated
1975/76
5,633,000
1,500,000
160,000
358,000
4,992,215   5,409,784   6,321,835   7,651,000 Appendix E
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
September 1974 - August 1975
GENERAL CIRCULATION
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
% Increase/
Decrease over
1973/74
768,734
Main Library
General Stack Collection 542,687
Reserve Circulation
Extension Library
Asian Studies Division
Fine Arts Division
Government Publications
Map Collections
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Branch Libraries and
Reading Rooms
Animal Resource Ecology
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Medical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
Music Library
Reading Rooms
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Biomedical
SUBTOTAL
Recordings
Wilson Recordings       10„ _lf.
Collection
Music Library _ .„
Record Collection        '
SUBTOTAL 157,671
542,687
498,656
483,699
465,534
- 3.8%
37,148
37,603
35,383
31,656
-10.5%
6,061
5,355
5,317
3,831
-27.9%
9,076
10,704
13,691
18,586
+35.8%
59,160
62,749
74,145
81,097
+ 9.4%
94,083
103,491
130,491
148,960
+14.2%
7,939
8,353
9,320
6,915
-25.8%
12,580
12,681
20,068
19,571
- 2.5%
29,881
739,592
772,114
776,150
27,483
27,606
26,947
173,718    247,146    255,498
34,880
33,906
37,920
+ 0.5%
3,066
4,202
6,598
9,651
+46.3%
25,117
29,361
43,085
48,626
+12.9%
229,448
222,392
239,365
249,054
+ 4.0%
125,493
122,813
135,054
124,169
- 8.1%
29,517
33,304
39,323
41,860
+ 6.5%
16,270
13,807
11,900
12,969
+ 9.0%
20,763
21,965
22,976
18,972
-17.4%
2.4%
20,606
20,679
26,473
27,468
+ 3.8%
72,063
66,700
75,447
75,195
- 0.3%
474,981
446,860
433,681
396,286
- 8.6%
139,716
175,106
204,380
189,408
- 7.3%
1,186,921
1,184,672
1,265,888
1,220,605
- 3.6%
208,598    281,052    293,418
+ 3.4%
+11.8%
+ 4.4% Appendix E (Continued)
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
1971/72
1972/73
1973/74
1974/75
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY
LENDING
From Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
From BCMLS
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY
BORROWING
GRAND TOTAL -
(General Circulation
and Interlibrary Loans)
13,932
21,418
13,330
21,297
12,781
21,579
13,483
25,575
% Increase/
Decrease over
1973/74
General
4,518
5,027
5,582
7,362
+31.9%
To FIN libraries
(9 mos.
.*)  -
-
-
685
-
To BCMLS**
1,321
1,341
1,415
1,997
+41.1%
To SFU***
1,354
1,270
1,396
1,645
+17.8%
To U. Victoria***
241
267
299
314
+ 5.0%
To BCIT***
52
62
106
89
-16.0%
SUBTOTAL
7,486
7,967
8,798
12,092
+37.4%
- Photocopies
General
6,722
6,923
6,991
8,142
+16.5%
To FIN libraries
(9 mos.
.*)  -
-
-
183
-
To SFU***
5,862
5,228
4,227
2,951
-30.2%
To U. Victoria***
1,137
865
1,020
1,492
+46.3%
To BCIT***
211
314
335
269
-19.7%
To Colleges***
-
-
181
416
+130.0%
To Bamfield***
—
—
27
30
+11.1%
+ 5.5%
+18.5%
2,457
4,090
2,613
2,657
+ 1.7%
412
434
473
919
+94.3%
2,901
3,847
3,241
3,801
+17.3%
5,770
8,371
6,327
7,377
+16.6%
2,140,514
2
,162,530
2,346,960
2
,323,125
(-23,835)
Overall % decrease = 1.0%
♦Federated Information Network (Greater Vancouver Public Libraries)
**B.C. Medical Library Service
***Loaned via special Simon Fraser University unit Appendix F
REFERENCE  STATISTICS
September, 1974 - August, 1975
Directional
Reference
Research
Percentage
Questions
Questions
Questions
Total
Increase/Decreas<
Main Library
Asian Studies
1,874
3,560
825
6,259
Fine Arts
6,889
9,779
1,666
18,334
Government Publications
368
29,792
554
30,714
Humanities
2,290
8,700
642
11,632
Information Desk
12,940
61,942
-
74,882
Map Collection
84
3,392
57
3,533
Science
698
6,947
838
8,483
Social Sciences
660
14,058
832
15,550
Special Collections
1,257
5,569
212
7,038
27,060
143,739
5,626
176,425
+ 3.9%
(1973/74)
(25,921)
C137,507)
(6,364)
(169,792)
Branch Libraries
Animal Resource Ecology
1,942
2,378
143
4,463
Crane Library
5,400
3,633
620
9,653
Curriculum Laboratory
3,736
6,797
355
10,888
Law Library
2,689
2,373
1,569
6,631
MacMillan Library
1,689
5,009
341
7,039
Marjorie Smith Library
202
1,641
254
2,097
Mathematics Library
1,129
1,174
73
2,376
Medical Branch Library
(V.G.H.)
2,872
7,692
823
11,387
Music Library
3,395
7,889
968
12,252
Sedgewick Library
8,921
12,171
199
21,291
Woodward Library
7,875
29,763
1,223
38,861
39,850
80,520
6,568
126,938
+13.6%
C1973/74)
(29,467)
(75,812)
(6,472)
(111,751)
GRAND TOTALS
66,910
224,259
12,194
303,363
+ 7.8%
(1973/74)
(55,388)
(213,319)
(12,836)
(281,543) Appendix G
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
ADMINISTRATION
Stuart-Stubbs, Basil
Bell, Inglis F.
Hamilton, Robert M.
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
de Bruijn, Erik
ACQUISITIONS
Harrington, Walter
ASIAN STUDIES
Ng, Tung King
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Elliston, Graham
Jeffreys, Anthony
Johnson, Stephen
Mcintosh, Jack
Mercer, Eleanor
Palsson, Gerald
Shields, Dorothy
BINDERY
Fryer, Percy
CATALOGUE DIVISION
Elrod, J. McRee
Original Cataloguing
Bailey, Freda
Catalogue Preparations
Little, Margaret
Searching/LC Cataloguing
Balshaw, Mavis
University Librarian
Associate Librarian
Assistant Librarian - Collections
Assistant Librarian - Public Services
Coordinator of Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Librarian - Physical Planning
and Development
Administrative Services Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Research Bibliographer
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - European Languages
Foreman
Head Librarian
Head
Head
Head Appendix G (Continued)
-2-
CIRCULATION
Butterfield, Rita
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
FINE ARTS DIVISION
Dwyer, Melva
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY LIBRARY
Nelson, Ann
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
GIFTS & EXCHANGE
Elliston, Graham
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Dodson, Suzanne
HUMANITIES
Forbes, Charles
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION
Sandilands, Joan
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Friesen, Margaret
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Thomas
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
Head Librarian
Head
Head
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian Appendix G (Continued)
-3-
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
de Bruijn, Elsie
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
READING ROOMS
Omelusik, Nicholas
RECORD COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
SERIALS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Carrier, Lois
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Selby, Joan
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY
Freeman, George
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian
Curator, Colbeck Collection
Systems Analyst
Systems & Information Science Librarian
Head Librarian
Head Librarian Appendix H
LIBRARY SUPPORTED READING ROOMS
AS OF AUGUST, 1975,
Academic
Planning
Adult
Education
Agricultural
Economics
Anthropology-
Sociology
Applied
Science
Architecture
Asian Studies
Audiology
Chemical
Engineering
Main Mall North
Administration Bldg.
Room 20,
5760 Toronto Road.
Ponderosa Annex D
Room 105.
Hut M22,
Room 23.
Civil Engineering
Bldg., Room 305.
F. Lasserre Bldg.
Room 9B (Basement)
Buchanan Building
Room 2208.
James Mather Bldg.
Fairview Place.
Chem. Engineering
Bldg., Room 310.
Economics-
History
Buchanan Tower
Room 1097.
Electrical
Engineering
Elect. Engr. Bldg.
Rm.428 (Enter by Rm
English
Buchanan Tower
Room 697.
French
Buchanan Tower
Room 897.
Geography
Geography Building
Room 140.
Geology
Geological Sciences
Building, Room 208.
Geophysics
Geophysics Building
2nd Floor, South.
Hispanic-
Italian
Buchanan Building
Room 2220.
Home
Economics
Home Economics Bldg
Room 112.
Chemistry
Chemistry Bldg.
Room 261.
Institute of  Auditorium Annex 100
Industrial Relations
Classics
Buchanan Bldg.
Room 2218.
Library
School
Library North Wing
8th Floor.
Commerce
Henry Angus Bldg.
Room 307.
Linguistics
Buchanan Building
Room 227.
Comparative
Literature
Buchanan Building
Room 2227.
Mechanical
Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Bldg., Room 200A.
Computing
Centre
Civil Engineering
Bldg., Room 238.
Metallurgy
Metallurgy Building
Room 319.
Creative
Writing
Brock Hall, South
Wing, Room 204.
Microbiology  Wesbrook Building
Room 300. Appendix H (Continued)
Mineral
Engineering
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Philosophy
Physics
Physiology
Political
Science
Psychiatry
Psychology
Mineral Engineering
Building, Room 201.
Medical Sciences Building
Block C, Room 221.
Cunningham Building
Room 160.
Buchanan Building
Room 3270.
Hennings Building
Room 311.
Medical Sciences Building
Block A, Room 201.
Buchanan Building
Room 1220.
Health Sciences Centre
2255 Wesbrook Road.
Henry Angus Building
Room 203.
Rehabilitation
Medicine
Slavonic
Studies
Theatre
Hut B2, Room 26-27.
Buchanan Building
Room 2251.
Frederick Wood Theatre
Room 211. Appendix I
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1974/75
Dr. C.S. Belshaw
Mr. J.C. Bouck
Dr. E.M. Fulton
Dr. M.C.L. Gerry
Dr. R.H. Hill
Dr. R.F. Kelly
Mr. B.A. Krasselt
Dr. P.A. Larkin
Dr. S. Lipson
Dr. M.F. McGregor (Chairman)
Rev. J.P. Martin
Dr. H. Mitchell
Mrs. A. Piternick
Dr. M. Shaw
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor D. Miller
President D. Kenny
Mr. J.E.A. Parnall
Mr. B. Stuart-Stubbs
Terms of Reference:
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i)  formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii)  advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii)  developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv)  keeping himself informed about the library needs of
instructional and research staffs, and keeping the
academic community informed about the library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the
Committee.

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