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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate Apr 30, 1999

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 XI
82ND &  83RD
YEARS
REPORT  OF
THE  UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIAN
TO  THE  SENATE
1996-98 CONTENTS
Message from the University Librarian 1
People 2-6
[.earning and Research 7-16
Community and Internationalization 17
Future Directions 18
Appendices 1 9-3 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
MESSAGE FROM
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
The University has begun a planning process to
change its direction and emphasis and to respond to
the changes taking place in society. Its goal, stated in
TREK 2000, is to be the best university in Canada
and one of the finest public universities in the world
Specifically, it aims to provide UBC students with an
outstanding and distinctive education, and to conduct
leading research that will serve the people of British
Columbia, Canada and the world. To accomplish
these objectives, the University is determined to
provide its students, faculty, and staff with the best
possible resources and conditions for learning and
research. These include the Library's information
resources, instructional services, and physical facilities,
which play a key role in ensuring the successful
accomplishment of the University's objectives.
The five major areas which form the focus of
TREK 2000 — People, Learning Research,
Community, and Internationalization are represented
in and supported by the Library's operations and
activities. While the Library's accomplishments touch
on each of them, this report focuses primarily on the
first three — People, Learning and Research —
which are core to doe Library's mission of providing
outstanding access to the universe of recorded
knowledge and information fir UBC students,
faculty, and staff. Throughout the report, however,
there is ample evidence of the Library's interactive
relationship with its community, whether at the local,
regional, national or international level
As an example of that relationship, I would like
to highlight the most visible achievement which
occurred during the reporting period and which
directly supports those engaged in learning and
research — the completion of the new Walter C.
Koerner Library. Named in honor of UBC's longtime friend and benefactor, it was funded by some
6,400gifts donated by individual and corporate
supporters of the Library from around the world
during UBC's World of Opportunity Campaign
(1989-1993), with matchingfunds from the Government of British Columbia and the President's Fund
With the opening of this attractive new building
which received the 1997 British Columbia Library
Association Merit Award fir Buildings for its
"achievement in functionality and design, "access to
materials and resources available to students, faculty,
and the community was substantially improved The
Koerner Library provides hundreds of wired and
networked individual study spaces and a number of
well-equipped computer training rooms. It also
provides improved environmental conditions for a
large part of the Library s humanities and social
sciences collections. However, it did not add to the net
space available to the Library.
The $24 million structure was designed as the
first phase of a new 'central' library building. The
architects 'plans call for at least two expansions which
would provide additional space —for up-to-date
study facilities, for the still growing print collection,
for workstations needed to access the electronic
collection, and for the gathering and social space that
was formerly available in the Sedgewick
Undergraduate Library. As well, the additions would
permit the reintegration in a building that meets
current preservation and environmental standards of
much of the collection that has had to be left in the
Main Library.
Continuing and ongoing support from the
Library's community of users and friends combined
with commitment from the University and
government are needed to ensure the realization of the
architects'vision. It is critical to the success of the goals
outlined in TREK 2000, that the UBC Library has
the resources and facilities to meet the information,
research and learning needs of UBC faculty, students
and staff in the 21st century, and to serve as a resource
to the wider community.
Catherine Quinlan
University Librarian THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
PEOPLE
The UBC Library recognizes
that its staff— librarians,
management & professional staff,
support staff, and student staff—
are its most important resource in
supporting the research and
learning needs of the UBC
community. The Library is
committed to attracting and
retaining excellent staff at all levels,
and to providing them with the
training and development they need
to fulfil their responsibilities. It is
also committed to providing for its
users the physical facilities
conducive to an effective learning
and study environment and to
maintaining and upgrading these.
Through a series of faculty and
departmental advisory committees,
through periodic surveys, and
through an online feedback system,
the Library listens and responds to
the concerns of its users — the
students, faculty, and staff of UBC.
Library Staff
The Library's achievements are a result
of the knowledge, skills, and service ethic of
its staff. An active training and development
program continues to support staff members
as they manage and use new information
technologies, accommodate changing work
responsibilities, deal with financial restraint,
cope with the need to reorganize and
develop new services and teach information
technologies to students, faculty and staff.
Although the Library's staff complement
shrank by 4.99% during the reporting
period, when positions were refilled the
Library endeavored to search out the best
applicant for each vacancy within the
constraints of its ability to pay and the
requirements imposed by collective
agreements.
During the reporting period, the
Library received a new University Librarian.
At the end of May 1996, University
Librarian Ruth Patrick informed Library
staff that she had decided not to seek
another term, but had agreed to continue as
University Librarian until June 30, 1997. A
Search Committee, chaired by Vice-
President Maria Klawe and consisting of
University administrators, faculty, students,
and Library staff members (Joyce Friesen,
Dan Heino, Jocelyn Godolphin, Peggy Ng,
Jane Shinn, Bonnie Stableford) was struck
to identify a potential successor. The
Committee's recommendation to appoint
Catherine Quinlan, Director of Libraries at
the University of Western Ontario, as
University Librarian was approved by the
President and the Board, and Catherine
joined the Library in October 1997.
Suzanne Dodson, Facilities and
Preservation Manager, was honored as a
1997 winner of the President's Service
Award for Excellence. The award fittingly
recognizes Suzanne's 34 years of
contributions to the Library, the University,
and the library profession. Margaret
Friesen, Staff Training and Development
Coordinator/Collections Reorganization
Coordinator, was the 1997 winner of the
Gordon New Memorial Prize, awarded by
the School of Library, Archival and
Information Studies. Laura Brechin, LA5,
Order Division, Nancy Forhan, LA4,
Catalogue Division, Avron Hoffman, LA4,
Catalogue Division, and Linda Wensveen,
LA4, Koerner Library, were inducted as new THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
members of UBC's 25 Year Club, which
honors staff members who have completed
25 years of service. Further details about
staff changes and activities are listed in
Appendix A Library Staff.
Training and Development for Staff
In its fifth year of programming, the
Library's Staff Training and Development
program supported 248 sessions or courses
for 1,339 participants. These training
activities were expanded in the program's
sixth year, when a record-breaking 454
sessions for 3,201 participants were
supported.
In the past two years, the program
focussed especially on preparing staff for
major changes in two areas — the move of
Humanities/Social Sciences, some
Circulation and Processing staff from the
Main Library and Library Processing Centre
to the new Koerner Library, and the
implementation of the new automated
library system, DRA (Data Research
Associates). The systematic training
program on the four DRA applications
consisted of 209 formal sessions (18
modules) presented by over sixty librarians
and library assistants and attended by 2,649
participants, an average of 12 modules per
staff member.
Three staff training and development
initiatives were undertaken specifically to
help staff deal with change and transition.
Senior managers attended a two-day
Association of Research Libraries (ARL)
seminar on site on Facilitating Change. Staff
members attended two practical sessions on
Managing Personal Change and Transition
and Conflict Resolution. Three computer
skills courses were customized for staff and
brought in-house through contracts with
Continuing Studies. In the following year,
two programs were brought in-house,
tailored to the Library's environment:
Employee Relations for library managers, and
Customer Services for public service staff.
Implementation of DRA was the
catalyst for bringing the ARL Training Skills
Institute (TSI) to campus to develop the       i
training and presentation skills of a group of
fifty trainers. In addition, this latter
program achieved a number of related
benefits: it crossed boundaries of levels of
staff and functions in the Library, it
developed a sense of community among the
trainers and it identified a pool of talent for
programming and presentation of training
events for the future. The time, effort and
funds devoted to equipping the DRA
trainers with new teaching techniques and
skills in the previous year paid off. Skills
learned in the TSI were applied to the
design of other in-house programs such as
customer services and ergonomics, as well as
in the planning for the revised library
instruction programs for students, faculty
and staff.
Individualized training was provided to
several hundred participants in each year in
a variety of subjects, as diverse as the
Library's specialists themselves, such as
information technology, media literacy,
advanced cataloguing, marketing, research
tools, management/leadership/supervisory
skills, specialized information databases,
data libraries, electronic texts and teaching
tools, ergonomics, medical librarianship,
business information sources, performance
measures, government information files,
interlibrary loan, presentation skills, archives
and records management, publishing. The
full range of computer skills courses offered
by Continuing Studies Computer Skills
program and the communications and
organizational skills offered by the Human
Resources MOST (Management and Other
Skills Training) program were supported. THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
In addition to the DRA training
sessions, in-house trainers presented over
one hundred seminars over two years in
such diverse subjects as Internet access, goal
setting, performance reviews, the collective
agreement, peer training, cataloguing,
budget preparation and monitoring, new
microforms technology, disability
awareness, emergency preparedness and
designing Web pages.
Non-routine training methods included
a distance education tutorial conducted by
electronic mail, an audioconference piped
into the Biomedical Communications
Centre, learning from vendor
demonstrations offered at the Z39.50
conference and at DRA training sessions
and an open-house "show-and-teU" format
to demonstrate new microforms/digital
scanning technology. A Web page for staff
was designed to highlight the Library's Staff
Training and Development program and
link it to MOST and Continuing Studies
course information.
Facilities and Space
The Master Space Plan for the Library
was completed in October 1996 and
presented to the President's Property and
Planning Advisory Committee. The report
emphasizes the fact that despite the
construction of the Walter C. Koerner
Library, "there continues to be shortfall of
space and resources that is rapidly
approaching a crisis situation." (The
University of British Columbia Library
Master Space Plan: Summary Document.
Vancouver: Process Four Design, 1996, p. 5)
In particular, the shortage of collections
space is critical, as is the condition of the
Main Library, which the report describes as
"inadequate and dysfunctional." The
Library fills an increasing role as a gateway
to electronic resources and must provide
assistance and instruction in the use of these
resources, as well as additional infrastructure
for users. These needs complement, rather
than replace, traditional library uses, and
exacerbate current space shortfalls. The
President's Property and Planning Advisory
Committee has endorsed the need for high
density storage space for the Library, and
this was put forward as a Minor Capital
Budget recommendation by Campus
Planning and Development a year ago. To
date nothing has happened.
Nevertheless, the opening of the Walter
C. Koerner Library marked a large step
forward for the UBC Library. After five
years of intense planning, construction and
moving, the new Library emerged bringing
collections and services together for
undergraduates, graduates and researchers;
integrating all types of library materials
(digital, microforms, journals, books) and
expanding instruction programs for library
users. The goal was to create a central
humanities and social sciences library that
meets the needs of the 21st century library user.
Linking the former Sedgewick
Undergraduate Library's underground space
to a new five storey tower, Koerner Library
brings together all active serials and post-
1978 materials in its subject range plus the
UBC Library's complete collection in
heavily used fields such as English language
and literature, Canadiana, classical studies,
archaeology and anthropology. The Koerner
Library now provides information and
reference assistance for the humanities/social
sciences, government publications,
microforms, and data files, in addition to
borrower services such as Library cards,
interlibrary loans and fines payment. The
integration of related reference collections
has made library research less complex for
patrons. A single Information Desk in the
Koerner foyer and a central reference area
on the floor below now handle questions
that formerly went to one set of staff in THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Sedgewick and four separate service
divisions in the Main Library.
Approximately 600 study spaces provide
potential 'docking ports' for users to plug in
their laptop computers, the student
computer lab provides 21 networked
workstations and there are more than 250
workstations throughout the building. The
Information Skills Lab provides 35
workstations in a fully wired classroom.
Numeric data services, an electronic text
and multi-media centre, and the film, video
and preview room complete the range of
available facilities.
The move of part of the Main Library
collection and staff to the Koerner Library
facilitated renovations within the Main
Library building. The project to restrict
access to the building to a single entrance
was completed in February 1998. The
single entrance means that once users enter
the Main Library, they are free to use its
collections and facilities without
encountering further barriers or control
points. The work done by the University's
Plant Operations includes new front doors
and a handsome circulation desk, built to
match the original style of the 1925
building, in the front hall. The lobby has
been transformed into a very welcoming
space, and the original stained glass skylight
is once again a focal point.
The Circulation Division also received
welcome renovations to the office space and
a reserve book facility was built to serve
science and fine arts programs. The Fine
Arts Library was able to reopen its main
doors (closed until the single entrance
project was completed) and its very
attractive reference area is now readily
visible from the corridor outside.
The single entrance project also
included an improved security system. All
outside doors, and doors into stairwells that
lead to the outside, are locked and alarmed,
with the exception of the front door and the
south-west doors leading to the Map
Library. An annunciator panel at the
circulation desk provides information about
the state of the doors fitted with electronic
alarms. Security in the Main Library
continues to be a major concern, however,
as the move of staff to the Koerner Library
has left behind areas that no longer have any
staff supervision.
Room 502, one of the original study
wings opening off the Main Concourse, was
cleared of temporary office walls and floor-
mounted electrical outlets and is now used
as a meeting room and for special events. It
is a beautiful room, with a high, timbered
ceiling and specially designed hanging
lamps, which can be seen to advantage now
that the room has been opened up. A party
to celebrate the 90th birthday of one of
Canada's most distinguished composers and
musicians, Jean Coulthard, was held in this
room in February 1998.
After another summer of excessive heat
in the Special Collections and University
Archives Division's vault in 1996, funding
from the University and the Library and a
generous donation from Earl D. and
Suzanne Cates Dodson finally made it
possible to install a new HVAC system for
the vault and manuscript room. The
collections are now assured of proper storage
conditions.
Thanks to the efficiency of Plant
Operations' painting crew the Main Library
was the recipient of a major facelift. The
result was freshly painted interiors for the
Circulation Division, the Fine Arts Library,
the Science and Engineering Library, the
two wings leading off the Main Concourse,
and various stairwells and corridors, creating
an improved working and study
environment. ^L-^u
THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
A $100,000 equipment donation from
Hewlett-Packard provided the stimulus to
upgrade the electrical and communications
infrastructure in the Ridington Room in
Main Library and re-open it as a general
purpose student workstation lab in late Fall
1997 with 30 Web and about 50 Netinfo
workstations. The remaining space in the
Ridington Room has been furnished with
study tables and chairs. Another teaching
lab, equipped with 12 Library-provided
workstations, was set up adjacent to the
administrative offices on the third floor.
extremely useful for predicting traffic and
activities in both Main and Koerner after
the move of 40% of the Humanities and
Social Sciences collection into the new
building. The survey showed that 97% of
the 1,465 users were UBC faculty, students
or staff and that 54% of them used the
Humanities, Social Sciences and
Government Publications collections and
services. Most of the latter group can be
expected to use the Koerner Library where
these collections and services are now
located.
In the Woodward Library, a 21
workstation teaching lab was opened in Fall
1997 to support the growing number of
library instructional programs for the Life
Sciences. In less than two years, the Library
has installed over 200 additional
workstations exclusively in teaching and
general purpose labs or for student access to
Netinfo.
Responding to Users
The Library actively seeks advice and
assistance from its University users through
a number of standing committees. These
include 14 Faculty Library Advisory
Committees representing all faculties, the
Senate Library Committee, and the
University Archives & Records
Management Advisory Committee.
Undergraduate and graduate student
representatives were added to each of the
Advisory Committees. At a meeting of
Library Advisory Committee Chairs held in
December 1996, recommendations to
support additional space for the Library and
to increase the collections indexing formula
were endorsed.
Library planning continues to reflect
user activities, concerns and advice. A one-
day survey of all Main Library users was
A survey on extended hours delivered a
clear message—the majority of users wanted
better Library access in the late evening
Monday through Thursday. Friday to
Sunday hours were definitely a second
choice. Survey respondents generally agreed
that large libraries in both the arts and
sciences need to open beyond 10:00 p.m. on
weeknights. In addition, there was a call for
the University to provide more non-library
study space after hours as part of its basic
service to students.
In response to student concerns and
based on data from a student survey, the
Library extended the winter session closing
time from 10:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. on
weekdays in the Main, Fine Arts, Koerner,
David Lam, Education, MacMillan and
Woodward libraries. Use of these libraries
during the extended hours will be
monitored during the ensuing year. THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
LEARNING AND RESEARCH
B C     L I B R A R
The UBC Library is committed to
supporting the learning needs of
undergraduate students and the research
needs of graduate students and faculty.
It does so through the acquisition,
provision, and preservation of
information resources locally, both in
print and electronic form, and through
access to information resources beyond
the campus. It provides individual,
group, and Web-based instruction and
training to enable its users to make the
best possible use of the universe of
information that is available. In
addition, the Library provides the
infrastructure and technology to support
and deliver information resources, it
provides bibliographic access to and
information about them through its
online catalogue and other indexes, and
it manages the physical flow of resources
to and from Library users, whether on
campus or at a distance.
Information Resources and Collections
The major new growth in the Library in
the past two years took place in the area of
electronic resources. Several new databases
were loaded onto the Library's SilverNet
platform, and EMBASEwzs loaded onto the
OVID platform. The Library is now
networking Chemical Abstracts, and has
online versions of Russian Academy of
Sciences Bibliography, History of Science and
Technology, Bibliography of the History of Art,
and Dissertation Abstracts. Web access to
two new full-text databases was added,
Canadian Periodical Index and JSTOR,
which has back runs of major academic
journals in a growing number of subject
fields. There is now online access to
Webster's Third New International
Dictionary and the King James Bible. Three
new full-text resources are now available on
CD-ROM: Art Theorists of the Italian
Renaissance, Early English Prose Fiction, and
English Verse Drama. Science Citation Index
is new on CD-ROM.
Access to electronic journals grew with
the acquisition of Project Muse (e-journals
from Johns Hopkins Press) as well as
numerous e-journals from several scientific
professional societies, some free with the
print subscription, others at an extra fee for
online access. A number of these initiatives
were undertaken in co-operation with other
libraries: Dissertation Abstracts and Project
Muse (Council of Prairie and Pacific
University Libraries), EMBASE (University
of Alberta), Russian Academy of Sciences
Bibliography (Pacific Coast Slavic and East
European Consortium). Such co-operation
has enhanced the growth of the electronic
collection and has helped to reduce costs.
Additional co-operation involved
membership in the Scholarly Publishing and
Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)
sponsored by the Association of Research
Libraries. The immediate focus of SPARC is
that of establishing partnerships with
publishers—society, university, and
commercial—who are developing
economical alternatives to existing high-
priced journals in the sciences.
The growth in the acquisition of various
types of electronic resources, as well as the
migrations they typically undergo, required
the Library to modify its infrastructure and
call on a wide range of expertise to handle
the evaluation, selection, ordering, licensing,
cataloguing, implementation, funding, and
advertising of these electronic resources.
Reference assistance and instruction for THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
students has been substantially affected. To
provide some coordination, a specific
librarian has been assigned as the contact
librarian for each electronic resource. As
well, in early 1998 the University Librarian
established the Electronic Resources
Implementation Committee (ERIC), which
coordinates the selection of resources and
advises on procedures. A major
responsibility for ERIC during 1998 was
planning for the migration of locally-loaded
databases from the UBCLIB platform to
other platforms.
Microfilms continue to be a rich
resource for research. The Fine Arts Library
acquired the Art of India, a set of 71 color
microfiches from the Victoria and Albert
Museum and Italien-Index:
Bilddokumentation zur Kunst in Italien, a set
of 620 microfiches of captioned photos
from Bildarchiv Foto Marburg. The Asian
Library acquired 128 reels of microfilm of
rare classical Hindu, Buddhist and Jain texts
in Sanskrit, Prakrit and Pali. The Law
Library acquired a microfiche Native
American Collection. Microfilm for 39 years
of the Montreal Gazette was purchased for
the Koerner Library.
Negotiations had been going on for
many years to acquire a collection of books,
journals, exhibition catalogues, and albums
on the arts, history, culture, literature,
politics and philosophies of China, Japan,
and Korea, owned Dr. Peter Swann. This
collection was assembled by Dr. Swann over
a fifty year period as Keeper of the
Department of Eastern Art in the
Ashmolean Museum, Oxford University, as
Director of the Royal Ontario Museum,
and as Professor and Director, East-Asian
Studies, University of Waterloo. In 1997,
the Library purchased 1,000 items which
were not already held in its own collection,
using funds donated some years ago by
Walter C. Koerner. These materials will be
housed in the Fine Arts Library and in the
Asian Library. The Collection Endowment
Fund made possible the purchase of 70
volumes, manuscripts, letters and notes of
the famous 19th century Irish author,
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu (1814-1873) for
Special Collections. This collection was
assembled by the late Professor Roy Stokes,
a former director of UBC's School of
Library, Archival and Information Studies.
The Asian Library purchased the 102-
volume set of Yoktae Han guk munpop
taegye, an important collection of Korean
grammar books throughout the ages. Special
Collections obtained one of Lucie Lambert's
limited editions of Air, a 1909 limited
edition of Arthur Rackham's Grimm's Fairy
Tales, and A Map of the United States of
North America Drawn from a number of
Critical Researches by Aaron Arrowsmith,
Hydrographer to H.R.H. The Prince of
Wales, 1796. Donations of additional books
and manuscripts (see Appendix F Donor and
Gift Recognition) also helped to enrich the
Library's collection.
Systems migration within the Library
during the reporting period led to serious
disruptions in ordering, reducing the
number of monographs which were ordered
and received during the 1997/98 fiscal year.
The increase in serials costs was modest
during both years of the reporting period,
due to the relative strength of the Canadian
dollar against the US dollar in both the fall
of 1996 and in 1997, and the decreased
strength of EU currencies during the fall of
1997. Thanks to this, the Library did not
need to implement major cancellations in its
periodical collection, a vital resource for so
many areas of research on campus.
Archival Resources
During the reporting period, the
University Archives focused on enhancing
access to information about archival THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
material through the use of information
technology. This included initiatives to
expand the number of digitized images on
the UBC Historical Photograph Database
and to develop and enhance the Archives'
Web presence. In addition to information
about archival holdings, the Archives' Web
page now includes a reference section on
general University history as well as a
'virtual' display section and information
pertaining to records management services.
The Archives secured external funding
from the Canadian Council of Archives
(CCA) and from Young Canada Works in
Heritage Institutions (administered through
the CCA) to add approximately 10,000
descriptive records and scanned images to its
existing Historical Photograph Database.
This important resource allows users to
access digitized copies of the Archives'
extensive photograph collection via the
Web. The database currently provides access
to approximately 17,500 online images.
Funding from Young Canada Works in
Heritage Institutions (administered through
the Canadian Library Association) and from
the Alumni Association enabled the
Archives to develop a database for indexing
the UBC Alumni Chronicle (1985-1995).
Future plans include the expansion of this
valuable index to cover the other key
University publications — The Ubyssey and
UBC Reports.
Archives staff continued to work with
the University Records Disposition
Committee and senior University officials to
obtain formal approval for the draft records
retention schedules. In addition, the
Archives offered records management
services to campus units on a fee-for-service
contract basis. Since 1995, six such
contracts have been completed, including
two during the reporting year. It is expected
that demand for this service will increase in
1998 when University Records Schedules
are distributed to faculties and departments.
Preservation
During the reporting period, the
Preservation Microfilming Special Projects
Program continued its program of
preserving fragile and rare materials onto
high-quality microfilm, meeting the high
costs of such filming through subscription
sales of copies of the Library's films to
libraries throughout the province and
around the world, and through partnership
arrangements with other institutions. One
of the key projects — and in some respects
the most ambitious undertaking to date —
was the filming of the Japanese-Canadian
Research Collection and two other archives
of Japanese materials held in the Special
Collections and University Archives
Division. This project, undertaken in
partnership with the National Diet Library
of Japan, has given the Library's Japanese-
Canadian collections considerable publicity.
In completing this project, staff thoroughly
revised and updated the archival inventories
for each collection, and Mr. Gonnami of
the Asian Library, in addition to providing
invaluable technical assistance throughout
the project, wrote a new and comprehensive
introduction to the Japanese-Canadian
Research Collection. An abridged version of
this document, giving an overview of the
Library's resources in Japanese-Canadian
studies, and detailing technical aspects of
the filming project, has been published in
Microform & Imaging Review 26, n. 1
(Winter 1997): 22-33.
The Program also filmed more sets of
B.C. Directories covering the periods 1920-
1929 and 1860-1900. This project was a
milestone for the Library, for it completes
the filming of all the city and regional
directories of the province from 1860
through 1948. These valuable and fragile
volumes are much sought after in public
and academic libraries. The UBC Library is
grateful to libraries which have supported
this project through subscriptions, and to THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
those which lent materials for filming,
especially the Provincial Archives, which
provided many of the volumes for 1860-1900.
A large set of statistical and historical
documents relating to the history of
education in B.C. has been filmed for the
Education Library. These fragile and often
elusive reports have been gathered into
groups and their contents preserved against
loss or damage. The microfilm is now
available for sale to other libraries and
institutions. A new project was begun to
film major M. Ed. papers on an annual
basis. Another new project was the filming
of a portion of the Malcolm Lowry
Collection. This archive, along with related
collections, is one of the most heavily-used
in the Library's collections, and having its
contents and their sequence protected by
having a backup on microfilm is a necessary
precaution. This project was supported by
financial assistance from the federal
government through the National Archives
of Canada and the Canadian Council of
Archives in its Cost-Shared Cooperative
Assistance Program.
In the MacMillan Library, organization
and filming began of a variety of statistical
reports. For the first time, the province's
figures on forest inventory (from 1910
through 1973) and statistics on the forest
industry (from 1912 through 1976) are now
available in organized collections. As well,
the Department of Agriculture's heavily
used Agricultural Statistics series, 1911-1973
were filmed.
One of the most satisfying projects of
the reporting period has been the filming of
B.C. Department of Mines publications, a
set of three projects that have been in
planning stages for several years. Like other
projects, these involve completing the
Library's holdings of fragile historical
materials, as well as creating a permanent
record more durable than the paper
originals, and in an uninterrupted sequence.
Institutions which have lent materials for
these projects were the Ministry of Energy,
Mines and Petroleum Resources Library and
the B.C. Legislative Library.
Ongoing projects continue to be an
important facet of the program, as regular
additions to some of the Library's projects
are filmed in order to maintain their
currency and improve their usefulness. For
example, during 1996/97 another year of
the set of B.C. Provincial Examinations was
filmed, bringing coverage up to 1995, as
well as ten more reels in the set of UBC
Theses on British Columbia History and
Related Subjects, bringing coverage up to
1941. Normally at the end of 1997/98,
filming of another portion of the latter
collection would have taken place. Instead,
the Library took advantage of the generosity
of the B.C. Legislative Library in lending
copies for filming of the B.C. Department of
Agriculture Bulletins, B.C. Forest Service
Bulletins and B. C. Forest Service Technical
Publications. The Library hopes to recover
some of its costs by marketing these films in
the next year.
Future plans include another project of
B. C. Directories, further Special Collections
projects — notably the Alice Ravenhill
Papers and another segment of the large
Malcolm Lowry Collection, an exciting
microfiche project for MacMillan Library
involving vertical files and pamphlet
collections, UBC graduating papers and
historical theses, and additional projects for
high-profile B.C. government publications.
As funding permits, the Program will
undertake additional projects for other
archival, historical and reference resources
threatened by brittle paper and heavy use.
The diversity and quality of the
Library's preservation microfilming projects
remain a source of pride: within the
constraints of cost-recovery, it has been
10 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
possible to create and maintain a presence
for UBC Library in the international
microfilming community. The Library's
publications are listed in KG. Saur's Guide
to Microforms in Print, placing the UBC
Library among only a few academic
institutions in Canada with an active
program and listings in this essential
international reference source. Over the
years the Library has enjoyed the
cooperation of a dozen institutions which
have loaned materials for filming, and films
have been sold across Canada, and in
Europe, Japan and the United States.
The Library's Mendery continues to
give archival-level treatment to damaged
papers and bindings from a wide range of
Library collections. The most remarkable
project of recent years has been the full
restoration of a fine copy of Pierre Le
Muet's Maniere de Bien Bastirpour Toutes
Sortes de Personnes (1647) for the Fine Arts
Library. This page-by-page restoration
involves cleaning, extensive repairs, resewing
and rebinding. Much work was also done
on valuable volumes from the Law Library.
As its prime focus, however, the Mendery
specializes in repairs to high-demand
volumes, maps and printed sheets from
reference sections of all branches of the
Library. The Mendery Assistant offers
training to staff across the Library system in
basic mending procedures.
Preservation staff continue to focus on
three key issues: following the development
of digitization technology and its
applications, monitoring the Library's
acetate microfilm collections for signs of
chemical instability, and working toward
creating and maintaining acceptable storage
conditions for all the Library's collections.
Teaching and Training for Users
Information technology can bring a
wealth of resources to students and
researchers, but only if they know what
exists and how to retrieve it. Finding
information is becoming more complex, as
the Library adds new databases and services,
each with unique characteristics. Whether
the end result is an electronic text, a
traditional book, or a journal article, finding
it usually involves a computer search. While
the World Wide Web has provided students
with new resources, it also poses new
challenges. Applications for digitizing and
managing information for electronic
communication have become almost
ubiquitous, yet many students are
unfamiliar with them.
The Library's teaching programs are
designed to help students cope with the
challenge of effectively using electronic
information. The programs range from basic
through advanced levels and include
instruction on the use of specific subject
databases/services. The research skills and
information technology program funded
through the Teaching and Learning
Enhancement Fund (TLEF) in 1996/97 and
1997/98 enabled the Library to present
tutorials, classes and individual instruction
sessions designed to build basic information
research skills. In addition to the basic
introductory programs, subject specific
programs were introduced by each of the
Library's reference services. Examples of
these programs, also funded by TLEF,
include electronic text networking and
analysis for the humanities, chemical
information training and literacy and online
access to Canadian Social Science data
through the Web. Other advanced
instruction programs were integrated into
individual courses. Librarians work closely
with departments and faculties to monitor
students' information needs and to
determine how best to meet them. In 1996/ THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
I C     LIBRARY
97 more than 17,000 students, faculty and
staff participated in these instruction
programs and in 1997/98 that number grew
to 20,000 participants in 2,000 sessions.
The introduction of problem-based
learning in the Faculties of Medicine and
Dentistry involved Life Sciences librarians
in curriculum planning, library resource
management to support the programs, and
intensive teaching to ensure that students
could find the information they required. In
addition, 1,600 students enrolled in Biology
120 completed literature-based assignments
during two weeks in January. Teaching was
done in classes of 200 students and
supported by a Web site created for the
assignment. The Web site had more that
40,000 hits during the two-week period of
the assignment.
The Library's teaching labs, located in
the Koerner, Main, and Woodward
libraries, are used to capacity. Students
receive tutorial assistance and support in the
Woodward and Ridington labs during
winter session. This assistance was funded
through the AMS Innovation Fund and the
AMS Tutorial Program.
Web-based Learning and Access
In April 1996, the main purpose of the
UBC Library Web site was still to provide
information about Library services and
resources, and it wasn't prominent on
Library computers. In May 1997, a
redesigned site was introduced, and it
became the Library's main public access
system, providing not only information
about services and resources but also online
access to many of them. All online article
indexes and databases, no matter which
platform they resided on, were integrated
into this Web system. A Web catalogue of
Library holdings was introduced, providing
a new option for those users preferring a
graphic interface over text-only. In addition,
users gained access to the resources of the
entire World Wide Web at hundreds of
computers in the Library, a huge improvement
over the single Web-accessible computer
available in most branches in 1996.
During 1996/97, the Library Web site
migrated from a server in University
Computing Services to a new server in the
Library, as more divisions and branches
began creating and maintaining sections of
the Web site. By 1998, reference librarians
throughout the Library had created many
pages, some of them world-renowned, to
assist users with research in a variety of
subject areas.
In 1996/97 and 1997/98, Library staff
developed an online tutorial on how to
search the catalogue of Library holdings and
article indexes, with support from the
Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund.
This tutorial is available on the UBC
Library Web and is as easy to use from a
remote site as within the Library. It is useful
for teaching some basic library skills to a
large undergraduate population on campus,
and those students at a distance. In 1997/98,
the Library embarked on a pilot project to
put course materials on the Web. Study
guides, course notes and other noncopyrighted materials could be accessed
from any location at any time. The pilot
project was considered very successful by
both staff and users.
By March 1998, the UBC Library Web
had become one of the Library's primary
means of communicating with users. All
publications about services and resources are
available online, and new information is
communicated quickly. Users are able to
contact the Library through a feedback link
on the Web site.
12 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Netinfo
Access to Materials at Other Libraries
Netinfo, the campus online service
offering students free access to e-mail,
newsgroups, Web and related Internet
resources, introduced FTP, Telnet and
optional SLIP/PPP support. The Library, in
cooperation with the AMS Tutorial service,
provided assistance to students using
Netinfo. The number of registered users
now exceeds 25,000.
Use of UBC Library Materials
Borrowing of Library materials
continued at more than four million
transactions per year in spite of service
disruptions associated with construction and
renovations related to the Koerner Library.
Self-service check out, introduced on a pilot
basis late in 1995/96, was expanded from
one to four units, with two more units
installed in the Main Library upon
completion of the single entrance project.
The loan period of journals moved to the
Koerner Library was reduced from one week
to one day in January 1997. As of
September 1997, journals in Koerner
Library, like those in most of the Library
system, no longer circulate.
A review of circulation policies resulted
in the extension of loan periods from two
weeks to four weeks for graduate students
while retaining existing policies for
undergraduate students and faculty. Library
card categories for non-UBC users were
reviewed and adjusted to ensure that fees
and services provided are appropriate.
Collections were shifted and shelf read to
ensure users could find materials. Other
circulation services, such as copy services
and storage retrieval processes, will be
reviewed in the Coming year.
Access to materials needed to support
learning and research but not held on site
continued to be provided through Resource
Sharing Services. UBC Library acquired
approximately 24,000 books and journal
articles from other libraries for this purpose.
10,000 of the items were obtained by end
user initiated requests for materials held at
the Canadian Institute for Scientific and
Technical Information and were delivered
within 3 working days of the initial request.
The cost of this service is significantly lower
than if the requests had been filled by the
traditional mediated interlibrary loan
service.
Off-campus Hospital Libraries
The UBC Library supports teaching
and research programs in medicine, nursing,
dentistry and other health sciences on
campus and at three teaching hospital sites.
There has been significant growth in off-
campus research programs in the hospitals,
while Centres of Excellence and the
Medicine 2000 Institutes are being located
in the hospitals. Recent mergers and
restructuring at the UBC teaching hospital
sites have increased the community of
library users at Vancouver Hospital,
Children's and Women's Hospital and St.
Paul's Hospital. A Committee appointed by
the Vice President Student and Academic
Affairs and chaired by John Gilbert worked
to develop recommendations for a policy
framework to address funding for UBC
Library services to the health services
community. The Committee developed
recommendations and submitted a report to
the VPSAS in April 1998. THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Technology Infrastructure Changes
The implementation of the DRA
system and preparation for the opening of
Koerner Library were two major projects
that, in addition to all of the other systems-
related activities also underway, made the
first year of the reporting period an
extremely busy one for the Library's Systems
Division.
As soon as the contract for hardware
and software was signed with Data Research
Associates (DRA) in early July 1996, the
Library embarked on the most active and
intensive phase of implementing the new
system. Task groups for all major
application areas were established and work
commenced on data conversion, reviewing
and planning new work flows and
procedures, and preparing and
implementing a training plan for all staff
and users. As part of the DRA
implementation it was also decided that the
UBC Library would develop a Web-based
interface to all of its major online systems
(DRA, OVID, Silverplatter, UBCLIB) and
services.
This was probably one of the largest
and most difficult projects ever undertaken
by the Library. The replacement of so many
major systems modules at the same time,
combined with the introduction of a
completely revamped public interface, had a
major impact on all Library operations and
services. A large number of staff members
were extensively involved in data
conversion, implementation and training
activities. All staff members were required to
learn new online procedures and deal with
changed work flows. It is a credit to
everyone who worked on this project that
the new system was up and running before
the end of May 1997 — on schedule and
within budget.
Teaching and Learning grant projects,
the acquisition of more electronic resources
both standalone and networked, numerous
branch and division projects, and the
ongoing requirement to replace aging
equipment were also addressed during the
reporting period. One systems project of
particular significance was the
implementation of a docking port facility in
the David Lam Library. Users are able to
plug in their laptops, and, if authenticated
by the system, are then connected directly
to the campus network. This was a campus
"first."
The updating and expansion of the
Library's technology infrastructure
continued. With the opening of the Koerner
Library, the total number of Library LANs
increased to 32. The DRA system added a
DEC Alpha server running VMS to the
existing multiple-system environment that
already included about ten Unix servers and
an IBM mainframe-based system. Over 360
new workstations were purchased in order
to replace most of the Library's older
terminals and workstations and to equip the
Koerner Library. This has now increased the
total number of workstations throughout
the Library to more than 800.
Systems migration and information
technology infrastructure expansion were
two major themes during 1997/98. The
Library's already extensive array of
computer systems and equipment required
considerable attention in the replacement of
various legacy systems or upgrading to more
current software while simultaneously
growing in new areas. Once again limited
financial and staff resources were
successfully mobilized to meet these
challenges.
The retirement of several local legacy
systems coupled with significant post-
conversion activity on the DRA system
occupied considerable time. Both versions
of the local library systems developed and
14 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
T
maintained over the past twenty-five years
by UBC Library staff were largely retired
from active duty. LDMS, the oldest,
mainframe based version, was
decommissioned in the Spring 1998, just
ahead of the campus-wide initiative to shut
down the local MVS and MTS operating
systems. Although the major library
processing systems such as cataloguing and
circulation were migrated to DRA in 1997
there were still a significant number of
databases and other services residing on
UBCLIB, the Unix-based version of the
local library system. Work commenced in
Fall 1997 to find suitable homes for these
remaining applications and is expected to be
completed in 1998. The first year on the
new DRA system placed a heavy demand on
many staff. Data clean-up, system tuning,
and workflow and procedural changes while
attempting to maintain regular processing
operations was very taxing.
Another significant migration project
that commenced during the past year was
the shift of the Library's workstation
environment from Windows 3.1 to
Windows NT, an increasingly popular
operating system for large, networked
operations. With over 800 workstations in
use throughout the Library and various
major "flavors" — public (guest and UBC
user), lab, staff, reference, circulation and so
on — this is a major undertaking. Existing
workstation software must be upgraded,
workstations and servers must be upgraded
and reconfigured to take advantage of NT
features, and staff and users must be
familiarized with generally subtle, but
nonetheless significant, changes in the way
these workstations operate. It is important
to note that the Library's migration to
Windows 3.1 from a largely DOS-based
environment was completed only during the
previous year and already it was time to
make the next major operating system
transition.
Migration activity also generated some
local systems development. Systems, in
conjunction with Collections Accounting
and Budget staff, undertook the
redevelopment of the Library's invoice
processing system. CABI (Collections
Accounting and Budget Interface), as the
new system was christened, was the
Library's first foray into using Oracle, a
popular relational database management
package, combined with a Web-user
interface for accessing and maintaining data.
The CABI system also functions as an
interface between the Library's DRA-related
activities and the University's Financial
Management Information System (FMIS).
Work also commenced on an Interlibrary
Loan and Document Delivery (ILL/DD)
system to replace existing facilities on
UBCLIB and is expected to be completed in
1999.
The Library was able to purchase
sufficient new computer equipment to
support all of the systems migration projects
and other changes. Over 280 new
workstations were acquired throughout the
year that, in addition to supporting new
facilities such as labs, allowed the retirement
of older, less powerful workstations. New
central servers for both the OVID and
Silverplatter systems were also obtained.
This was required by the continued growth
in the number of databases being loaded on
both systems and the increase in the
numbers of users accessing these services.
The Law Library is fortunate to be
located in one of the first campus buildings
to have major network upgrading occur
under the auspices of the Campus
Connectivity Project (CCP). This work is
almost completed and will result in a vastly
improved network infrastructure at this
location. During 1997, the network
communications links to the three hospital
branches were upgraded to higher-speed
TI-based services.
15 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
LIBRARY
Bibliographic Control, Cataloguing, and
Ordering
Preparation for and implementation of
the conversion to the new DRA automated
system were the major activities in the
Library's Technical Services for the
reporting period. It began to affect
processing as early as February 1997. The
shared file structure characteristic of DRA
and other Integrated Library Systems (ILS)
vendors meant dramatic changes to the
relationship between Cataloguing, other
processing units, and public service units.
The major processing files, including the
catalogue, retrospective conversion
(RECON), order, serial, and vendor files,
were converted and merged into a single
bibliographic file.
Actual file conversion began prior to the
end of the 1996/97 fiscal year, requiring the
shut-down of certain processing activities.
Start-up on DRA was not easy, and the
process of data conversion and integration
into a single file had mixed results, requiring
further clean-up of records. Although the
DRA system lacks some of the functions of
the old system, staff are gradually learning
the capabilities the new system has that the
old one lacked. Meanwhile, processing
backlogs developed during the training and
implementation phases, and these now have
to be dealt with.
The Library now has a single
bibliographic file or database, to which
order, receiving, circulation, holdings, and
other data are linked. Any work involving
these activities requires a basic
understanding of this file structure.
Ensuring the quality of this central
bibliographic database is a major concern, as
not only Technical Services staff but staff in
public service units need to add or modify
records.
Partly in relation to this issue, the
Library also implemented a new cataloguing
policy. This was outlined in the Levels of
Cataloguing Report, issued in September
1996. The Library, following the lead of the
National Library of Canada and the Library
of Congress, established guidelines that
ensure that bibliographic records added to
its central bibliographic database are at one
of three levels. Briefly, level one records
contain the normal full cataloguing data,
level two records restrict the number of
subject headings and added entries to one
each, and level three records lack subject
headings and added entries. Some of the
reasons for implementing this policy were
to:
♦ reduce and/or eliminate cataloguing
backlogs as much as possible,
♦ apply classification numbers to material
for which shared catalogue copy is not
available so that the material is shelved
in its proper classification with related
materials rather than in accession
number order in separate uncatalogued
books areas,
♦ establish consistent standards for the
input of bibliographic records into the
single bibliographic database for both
catalogued and uncatalogued material.
The Library hopes to use the services of
library utilities such as OCLC or RLIN to
globally enhance or upgrade brief records at
some point, as well as to apply authority
control to the name, and possibly subject,
headings in its database. While such use of
library utilities would facilitate the
upgrading of bibliographic records, the
process would also require a significant
amount of Library staff time for editing
records. THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
COMMUNITY AND
INTERNATIONALIZATION
The UBC Library is firmly
committed to cooperating with other
academic libraries and institutions,
government agencies, and industries in
order to support learning and research
and to further the transfer and
preservation of knowledge. As a
community resource, it plays a key role
in the intellectual, social, cultural, and
economic growth of the Vancouver
region and the province of British
Columbia. It is now part of a network
of information resources that extends
around the world, and which
strengthens British Columbia's and
Canada's links to the international
community.
No one library can hope to house all the
information resources its users may need.
For that reason, the Library participates in a
number of regional, national, and
international programs and consortia to
provide access to important research
materials for UBC students and faculty.
Through these agreements, as well as
through initiatives such as the Preservation
Microfilming Special Projects Program, the
Library in turn makes its own rich resources
known and available to scholars around the
world.
The Library also serves the community
as well as UBC users. As other institutions
and agencies reduce their library
acquisitions and cancel journal
subscriptions, more and more community
users turn to the UBC Library for their
information needs. Although not funded for
such a role, the UBC Library now functions
as the de facto provincial resource library for
British Columbia. At times, community use
of the Library's resources and staff is
substantial, and must be balanced with the
Library's primary role — to support the
information needs of UBC students, faculty,
and staff.
In return, the Library enjoys
considerable support from the community,
which has resulted in new buildings, new
facilities to enhance learning, and the
acquisition of rare and notable research
materials. The generosity of the Library's
many friends and donors and the support
received from granting agencies and
government are gratefully acknowledged in
Appendix F Donor and Gift Recognition.
Without such continuing generosity and
support, the UBC Library would be a much
poorer resource for its community of users.
17 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
FUTURE DIRECTIONS
The University has embarked on the
course of becoming the best university in
Canada and one of the world's finest
public universities. As the 'heart' of the
University, the Library is central to the
implementation of the University's
vision for the new millennium.
The Library is well positioned to build
on its existing strengths, growing and
changing with the University as the latter
establishes a pre-eminent role for itself in
the global academic community. Yet such
growth and change will not happen
automatically. To support the innovative
learning-centered academic programs and
outstanding research envisioned in TREK
2000, the Library must have the resources to
maintain and develop the print, microform,
and electronic collections which form the
basis of its information services. An
outstanding library collection, which
includes seamless access to electronic
resources world-wide, is also essential in
recruiting first-class students, faculty, and
researchers.
The continuing exponential growth in
electronic information resources, and the
University's strategy to expand the use of
information technology in teaching and
learning make it vital for the Library to
increase its training, instructional, and other
user services. It must be able to attract and
retain skilled and competent librarians and
staff to develop and provide such services.
As well, the Library must keep pace with a
rapidly developing and increasingly
sophisticated technology in which the life
span of hardware and software becomes
shorter and shorter. Infrastructure
development and support are critical to the
Library's success.
No less important is the provision of
quality space to hold the Library's vast and
still-growing print collection. Largely
irreplaceable, and valued in the hundreds of
millions of dollars, it deserves housing in
environmental conditions that will ensure
its preservation for future generations of
scholars. At the same time, such facilities
must allow use of the collection, incorporate
the infrastructure and connectivity for
work-stations and other equipment that
support access to electronic information,
provide individual and group study space,
and provide the social or gathering space
that supports and encourages learning.
Collections, staff, technology, space —
all of these are essential requirements for a
world-class academic research library. A
strong and vibrant UBC Library is integral
to the University's success in achieving its
mission of providing its students, faculty,
and staff with the best possible resources
and conditions for learning and research.
Continuing support from the University
and the community, as well as the efforts of
its own staff, will ensure that the Library is
equipped and prepared to meet the
challenges of the 21st century.
18 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
APPENDICES CONTENTS
A Library Staff 21-23
B Library Statistical Summary 24
C Growth of Collections 1996/97 25
D Growth of Collections 1997/98 26
E Library Expenditures 27
F Donor and Gift Recognition 28-30
G Grant Funding 31
u
UBC     LIBRARY
19 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
20 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix A
LIBRARY STAFF
The Library's staff complement (including
GPOF and non-GPOF budget positions) now
totals 312.11 full-time equivalent (FTE) positions,
including 82.35 librarians, 12.17 management &
professional (M&P) staff, and 217.59 support
staff. This compares to a total of 328.51 FTE
positions in 1996, and represenrs a net decrease of
4.99%. The effect on GPOF budget positions was
slightly less, as these decreased from 306.63 FTE
to 291.86 FTE, a reduction of 4.82%. Non-GPOF
budget positions (cost-recovery or grant-funded)
decreased from 21.88 FTE to 20.25 FTE, a
reduction of 7.45%. Such positions now represent
6.48% of the Library's staff complement. In
addition, the Library's student assistant and
temporary hourly staff complement totalled 59.89
FTE positions in 1996/97 and 56.46 FTE in
1997/98. Of these, 2.76 FTE were funded by cost-
recoveries or from grants in 1996/97 and 1.69 in
1997/98.
Long-service sraff members who retired or took
early retirement during the reporting period
included Lore Brongers, Head, MacMillan Library;
Diana Kent, Reference Librarian, Woodward
Library; Indy Bhugra, Indie Languages/Law
Cataloguer; Nancy Forbes, Reference Librarian,
Biomedical Branch; Joze Lazar, LA4, Catalogue
Division; Tongsook Chang, LA3, Catalogue
Division; Rose Saligumba, LA3, Catalogue
Division; Toshie Aoki, LA2, Catalogue Division;
Winnie Chan, LA2, Order Division; Lily
Crawford, LA2, Mathematics Library; Joanna
Nagel, LAI, Education Library; Gwen Gregor,
LA4, Education Library; Sui Cheong Siu, LA4,
Mathematics Library; Edmund Kam, LA4,
Catalogue Division; Catherine Haley, LA3,
Koerner Library; Eleanor Maze, LA3, Catalogue
Division; Sylvia Ng, LA4, Catalogue Division.
Howard Hurt, Head, Education Library, took
early retirement at the end of 1997. Howard came
to UBC in 1968 as the first Head of the then
Curriculum Laboratory. Don Dennis, Head of
Systems, and John Campbell, Senior Programmer/
Analyst both took early rerirement in 1997. Don's
tenure stretched back to 1966 when the Library
took its first steps to develop and implement
automated library systems. John had worked for
the Library since the early 1970's and was the chief
systems developer for the LDMS and UBCLIB
systems.
The following librarians were on study leave:
Janice Kreider, Coordinator of Collections and
Science Bibliographer (July 1996 to June 1997);
Tim Ross, Map Librarian (September 1996 to
August 1997); Jo-Anne Naslund, Reference
Librarian, Education Library (September 1996 to
August 1997); Jocelyn Godolphin, Head,
Humanities & Social Sciences Division (September
1997 to August 1998); and Tomoko Goto,
Catalogue Librarian, Catalogue Division
(September 1997 to August 1998). Tom
Shorthouse was appointed as Acting Coordinaror
of Collections in addition to his appointment as
Head, Law Library. Jack Mcintosh, Science
Reference Librarian and Slavic Bibliographer, acted
as Science Bibliographer. Frances Woodward,
Reference Librarian, Special Collections and
University Archives assumed responsibility for the
Map Library, with reference assistance from Peggy
McBride, Reference Librarian, Fine Arts Library;
Marcel Fortin, Reference Librarian, Humanities/
Social Sciences Division; and Pauline Willems,
LA4, Public Services. Helene Redding was
appointed as Acting Head, Humanities & Social
Sciences Division.
The following librarians were granted
confirmed appointments: Christina Sylka,
Reference Librarian, David Lam Library; David
Winter, Circulation Librarian, Circulation
Division; and Catherine Quinlan, University
Librarian.
Brenda Peterson, Information Services
Librarian, Sedgewick Library, was appointed Head,
Special Collections & University Archives
Division/Fine Arts Library/Map Library, for a five-
year term; Kirsten Walsh, Music Reference
Librarian, was appointed Head, Music Library, for
a three-year term; and Lee Ann Bryant, Reference
Librarian, Education Library, was appointed as
Head, MacMillan Library, for a two-year term.
Hilde Colenbrander was appointed half-time
Distance Education Librarian for a two-year term,
and will continue as well as half-time Data Services
Librarian. Suzanne Dodson's appointment as
Facilities and Preservarion Manager, Margaret
Friesen's appointment as Staff Training and
Development Coordinator/Collections Reorganization Coordinator, and Pat Dunn's
appointment as Acting Head, Resource Sharing
Services, were extended until the end of June
1998. Ann Doyle, Librarian/Analyst, Systems
Division, was appointed Acting Head, Xwi7xwa
Library, during Gene Joseph's leave of absence
without pay. Chris Hives, University Archivist,
21 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix A
LIBRARY STAFF
was temporarily seconded to the office of the Vice-
President, Student and Academic Services, as
Assistant Executive Coordinator. Tom Nicol,
Programmer/Analyst D, was seconded to the
Library from Computing and Communications for
one year, and subsequently was formally
transferred to the Systems Division. David Winter
was appointed Acting Undergraduate Services
Coordinator during the absence of Julie Stevens.
Jo-Anne Naslund was appointed Acting Head,
Education Library while a search for a permanent
Head took place. Janice Kreider's appointment as
half-time Coordinator of Collections was increased
to full-time. Isabel Pitfield was appointed as
Coordinator of the grant-funded Vancouver
Bibliography Project in Special Collections and
University Archives.
Several librarians assumed new responsibilities
on a continuing basis. Margaret Price, Reference
Librarian, Woodward Biomedical Library, was
appointed Head, Life Sciences Libraries; Martha
Whitehead, Librarian/Analyst, Systems Division,
was appointed Head of the Library's new
Information Services Division. The appointment
of Theresa Iverson, Reference Librarian,
Government Publications Division was changed to
Reference Librarian, Special Collections and
University Archives (50%) and Fine Arts Library
(50%). Terry Horner's appointment as Catalogue
Librarian, Catalogue Division, was changed to
Reference Librarian, Music Library, although he
will continue to spend 15% of his time as
Coordinator of Cataloguing in Publication. Nick
Omelusik stepped down as Head, Catalogue
Division to take on cataloguing responsibilities in
the Law Library and administrative ones in the
Systems Division. Bonnie Stableford, Head,
Science and Engineering Library, assumed
responsibility for the Map Library, previously part
of Special Collections and University Archives, as a
result of organizational restructuring.
New appointments included Kathy Hornby,
Reference Librarian, Woodward Biomedical
Library; Donna Curtis, Life Sciences Resource
Sharing & Processing Librarian, Woodward
Library; Julie Clarke, Human Resources Assistant,
Library Administration; and Felix Cheung, User
Services Consultant, Systems Division. Librarians
appointed on a temporary basis or whose
temporary appointments were extended included
Alex Haig, Woodward Biomedical Library; Doug
Brigham, Facilities and Preservation, and
subsequently in the Systems Division; Sara Sleigh,
Circulation; Carol Shepstone, Humanities and
Social Sciences Division; Mamie Burnham, Special
Collections and University Archives; Don Taylor,
Science and Engineering Division; Linda Dunbar,
Education Library; Debra Gilman, Woodward
Library; and Margaret Fukuyama, Catalogue
Division. Larry Campbell was appointed initially
to a one-year term position in the Sedgewick/
Koerner Library, and subsequently to a continuing
position as Information Librarian in Information
Services. Norman Amor was appointed for a two-
year term position as CIP/Preservation Microforms
Librarian. Dana McFarland was appointed for a
two-year term position as a Reference Librarian in
the Education Library. Sally Taylor was appointed
for a one-year term position as a half-time
Reference Librarian in the Woodward Library.
David Reimer, Catalogue Librarian, Catalogue
Division, resigned to take another position in
Winnipeg. Julie Stevens, Undergraduate Services
Coordinator, resigned her position at the end of
December 1996 after more than 25 years of
service. Dana McFarland, Reference Librarian,
Education Library, resigned to become Librarian of
Royal Roads University.
Polly Diether, LA3, Special Collections and
University Archives Division, returned to the
Library from full-time Union leave, having served
as President of CUPE 2950 for three and one-half
years. Pauline Willems, LA4, Information Services,
a long-time Library staff member, resigned to take
a position with Green College. Peggy Ng, Human
Resources Assistant, Library Administration, left to
take a more senior administrative position in the
Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration. Jean Philippe Wilmshurst,
Executive Secretary to the University Librarian,
resigned to travel in Asia.
There were also two major staff relocations
which affected Technical Services staff. Ten staff
members from the Order Division moved from the
Library Processing Centre to the Koerner Library
to join the Humanities/Social Sciences-
Government Publications-Periodicals processing
staff during December 1996 and January 1997.
The following functions are now coordinated by
the Koerner Library Processing unit: periodical
receiving and claiming, serial binding, monograph
binding, and management of the Library's binding
contract. Three music cataloguing specialists THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
Appendix A
LIBRARY STAFF
moved from the Catalogue Division in the Library
Processing Centre to the Music Library in order to
make better use of music specialists and to provide
back-up for Music Library reference service. A
move of Technical Services staff with Asian
language skills to the Asian Library is planned for
similar reasons. Continuing staff reductions and an
increased demand for services make it vital to make
the most effective use of language and subject
specialists.
In Memoriam
Judy Atkinson, Reference Librarian, Sedgewick
Library, passed away on September 23,1996 after
a long and valiant struggle with cancer. Judy's
career in the UBC Library spanned nearly 30
years, and she will be greatly missed by her
colleagues and friends both within the Library
and elsewhere on campus.
The Library was also saddened to hear that
Fanny Woodsworth passed away on July 25,
1997. Prior to her retirement, Fanny worked for
many years as a Library Assistant 4 and later as a
Catalogue Librarian in the Catalogue Division,
specializing in children's literature.
Helen Goetz, the Library's Book Mender from
1965 until her retirement in 1983, passed away
on June 22, 1997.
UBC's first Law Librarian, Diana Priestly,
passed away on March 27,1997. Her ten years at
UBC from 1953 to 1963 marked the beginning
of a distinguished career. Following appointments
at the University of Toronto, Osgoode Hall, and
the University of Western Ontario, she returned
to British Columbia to create the University of
Victoria's new law library, which is now named
after her.
Leslie Ashford, formerly the Library's
Development Officer, passed away on January
18, 1998.
23 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix B
LIBRARY STATISTICAL SUMMARY
COLLECTIONS
Total Volumes'
Volumes Added, Net
Total Titles Catalogued
Current Subscriptions
Number of monographs purchased
1 Includes net volumes added
2 Excludes Law and Life Sciences Libraries
SERVICES
Total Recorded Use of Library Resources
Internal Document Delivery - Copies3
Internal Document Delivery - Books3
Interlibrary Loan - Loaned/Copied3
Interlibrary Loan - Borrowed/Copied3
Instruction Classes/Orienrations
Number of Participants
Total Questions Answered
Research Questions
Reference Questions
Directional Questions
3 Included in Total Recorded Use of Library Resources
STAFF (FTE)
Librarians
Professional (M&P)
Support Staff
Subtotal4
Students5
1996/97
3,667,542
73,720
46,685
24,557
51,159
1996/97
4,160,646
41,859
2,668
46,711
20,314
1,698
17,774
411,605
35,204
231,454
144,947
1996/97
84.25
12.17
221.33
317.75
59.89
1997/98
3,744,372
76,830
54,247
24,7482
49,6852
1997/98
3,349,659
44,221
1,756
45,134
23,929
1,987
19,644
411,714
33,501
225,723
152,490
1997/98
82.35
12.17
217.59
312.11
56.46
Total FTE all staff
383.15
368.57
Includes 20.25 cost-recovery or grant funded positions in both years.
Includes 2.76 cost-recovery or grant funded positions in 1996/97 and 1.69 in 1997/98.
EXPENDITURES
Collections
Salaries & Wages
Binding
Other Operating Expenditures
Total Gross Expenditures
Cost Recoveries
Total Net Expenditures
1996/97
1997/98
$9,159,355
33.78%
$9,769,644
36.77%
$13,878,493
51.56%
$13,999,426
52.68%
$196,649
0.73%
$162,650
0.61%
$3,891,052
14.34%
$2,641,540
9.94%
$27,125,549
$26,573,260
($1,968,994)
($1,637,931)
$25,156,555
$24,935,329
24 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix C
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS 1996/97
UBC     LIBRARY
Air Photos
Aperture Cards
Archives (metres)
CD-ROM Databases
CD-ROM Discs
Databases Online
Electronic Journals (Internet)1
Films
Filmstrips
Flash Cards
Government Publications (unbound)
Interactive Computer Files
Magnetic Tapes
Maps
Microcomputer Discs
Microfiche (sheets)2
Microfilms (reels)
Microprint/Microcards
Motion Pictures
Photographs
Pictures
Realia
Slides (sets)
Slide/Tape Shows
Sound Recordings-Cassettes
Sound Recordings-CD's
Sound Recordings-LP's
Subscriptions3
Transparencies (sets)
Videodiscs
Videotapes
Volumes-Catalogued
1 Figure included in Databases Online.
2 Base figure for one branch recalculated.
3 Includes periodical subscriptions, standing orders, and monographic series.
The March 31, 1996 figure listed in the previous report has been revised.
MARCH 31, 1996
NET GROWTH
MARCH 31, 1997
1,045
0
1,045
2,589
0
2,589
3,055
55
3,110
316
57
373
1,621
517
2,138
162
66
228
33
-33
0
921
0
921
2,854
0
2,854
908
0
908
808,415
-3,003
805,412
1
0
1
900
0
900
198,281
915
199,196
1,222
43
1,265
3,248,429
80,970
3,329,399
109,678
1,672
111,350
1,199,350
0
1,199,350
1
0
1
326,293
4,705
330,998
66,968
250
67,218
0
2
2
32,114
38
32,152
112
0
112
5,459
371
5,830
13,499
1,586
15,085
52,204
100
52,304
24,801
-244
24,557
1,498
96
1,594
12
0
12
6,510
340
6,850
3,593,822
73,720
3,667,542
25 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
Appendix D
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS 1997/98
Air Photos
Aperture Cards
Archives (metres)
CD-ROM Databases1
CD-ROM Discs'
Databases Online1
Electronic Databases
Films
Filmstrips
Flash Cards
Government Publications (unbound)
Interactive Computer Files
Magnetic Tapes2
Maps
Microcomputer Discs
Microfiche (sheets)
Microfilms (reels)3
Microprint/Microcards
Motion Pictures
Photographs
Pictures
Realia
Slides
Slide/Tape Shows
Sound Recordings-Cassettes
Sound Recordings-CD's
Sound Recordings-LP's
Subscriptions4
Transparencies (sets)
Videodiscs
Videotapes
Volumes-Catalogued
MARCH 31,1997
NET GROWTH
MARCH 31, 1998
1,045
0
1,045
2,589
0
2,589
3,110
59
3,169
373
-
-
2,138
-
-
228
-
-
-
-
1,320
921
6
927
2,854
0
2,854
908
0
908
805,412
14,475
819,887
1
0
1
900
-900
0
199,196
1,844
201,040
1,265
93
1,358
3,329,399
63,972
3,393,371
111,342
2,329
113,671
1,199,350
0
1,199,350
1
0
1
330,998
1,050
332,048
67,218
80
67,298
2
0
2
32,152
-169
31,983
112
0
112
5,830
594
6,424
15,085
663
15,748
52,304
15
52,319
24,557
191
24,748
1,594
0
1,594
12
0
12
6,850
568
7,418
3,667,542
76,830
3,744,372
1 Electronic resources counting and categories were revised in 1997/98. All are now included in Electronic Databases.
2 Magnetic Tapes have been converted to online format.
3 Base figure for one branch recalculated.
4 Includes periodical subscriptions, standing orders, and monographic series.
26 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC     LIBRARY
Appendix E
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
SALARIES
GROSS
YEAR
& WAGES
%
COLLECTIONS
%
BINDING
%
OTHER
%
EXPENDITURE
1992/93
13,502,655
58.45%
6,735,336
29.16%
258,481
1.12%
2,604,148
11.27%
23,100,620
1993/94
13,726,868
57.80%
7,541,116
31.76%
235,432
0.99%
2,244,024
9.45%
23,747,440
1994/95
13,663,492
55.89%
8,389,284
34.32%
210,068
0.86%
2,183,458
8.93%
24,446,302
1995/96
13,758,042
53.33%
8,978,367
34.80%
194,749
0.75%
2,866,274
11.11%
25,797,432
1996/97
13,878,493
51.16%
9,159,355
33.77%
196,649
0.73%
3,891,052
14.34%
27,125,549
1997/98
13,999,426
52.68%
9,769,644
36.77%
162,650
0.61%
2,641,540
9.94%
26,573,260
♦ As in previous years, only expenditures from the Library's own GPOF budget are included in the above. Excluded are:
Faculty of Commerce expenditures in support of the David Lam Library.
Expenditures for library materials by other campus units, for example for departmental reading rooms.
Expenditures from library grant and trust funds.
Collections expenditures from library grant and trust funds amounted to $178,360 in 1996/97 and $259,165 in 1997/98.
♦ "Other" expenditures include non-recurring equipment acquisitions which vary considerably from year to year.
♦ The Library's GPOF expenditures for 1996/97 were 7.85% of the University GPOF expenditures.
♦ The Library's GPOF expenditures for 1997/98 were 7.73% of the University GPOF expenditures.
SOURCES OF LIBRARY OPERATING FUNDS
YEAR
AMOUNT
1992/93
21,783,348
94.38%
1993/94
22,371,900
94.09%
1994/95
23,286,079
93.15%
1995/96
24,610,477
92.66%
1996/97
26,072,323
92.98%
1997/98
24,825,940
93.81%
FEES FOR SERVICE
FEES FOR SERVICE
LIBRARY FINES
TOTAL
INTERNAL
%
EXTERNAL
%
AMOUNT
%
FUNDING
114,405
0.50%
1,048,499
4.54%
133,213
0.58%
23,079,465
167,929
0.71%
1,043,032
4.39%
193,747
0.81%
23,776,608
130,992
0.52%
1,202,963
4.81%
377,781
1.51%
24,997,815
195,157
0.73%
1,289,958
4.86%
465,660
1.75%
26,561,252
155,138
0.55%
1,405,976
5.01%
407,880
1.46%
28,041,317
83,138
0.32%
1,304,806
4.93%
249,987
0.94%
26,463,871
27 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
UBC      LIBRARY
Appendix F
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
THE WALTER C. KOERNER LIBRARY
The University of British Columbia gratefully recognizes the following key donors who generously contributed to the Walter C. Koerner
Library through the World of Opportunity Campaign (1989-1993), as well as the Government of British Columbia, which matched all
donations. It also thanks all other contributors to the Koerner Library.
MAJOR PATRON
$2,000,000 AND ABOVE
Walrer C. Koerner
PATRONS
$1,000,000 TO
$1,999,999
BC Hydro
Imperial Oil Charitable
Foundation
Placer Dome Canada
DISTINGUISHED
BENEFACTORS
$500,000 TO $999,999
The Bank of Nova
Scotia
Canada Trust
Canadian Imperial
Bank of Commerce
RBC Dominion
Securities Inc.
Shell Canada Limited
Toronto Dominion
Bank
MAJOR BENEFACTORS
$250,000 TO $499,999
BCGas
Sultan and Sultana
Vicwood Kee Ting
Chong
Estate of Elizabeth
Wilson Grant
MacMillan Bloedel
Limited
The Sun Life
Companies
BENEFACTORS
$100,000 TO $249,999
Anonymous
BC Sugar
Earl D. & Suzanne
Cates Dodson
Pratt & Whitney
Canada Inc.
DISTINGUISHED
CONTRIBUTORS
$50,000 TO $99,999
The Canada Life
Assurance Company
Confederation Life
Insurance Company
MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS
$20,000 TO $49,999
Brascan Limited
The Mutual Group
Royal LePage Limited
DISTINGUISHED
SUPPORTER
$5,000 TO $9,999
Anonymous
Charles J.S.& A.
Emelyn Farrand
Letitia A. Hay
In Memory of Joey
McLeod
Abdul M. Mousa
Robert S. Rothwell
MAJOR SUPPORTER
$2,500 TO $4,999
Boiler Inspection &
Insurance Co. of
Canada
Irene M. Bourassa
Joanne V. Brown
W. Thomas Brown
In Memory of Margaret
Anna Campbell
Charles & Dora Davis
Dragon Seed
Connection
David J. Elkins &
Nicole Parton Elkins
D. Ross & Linda
Fitzpatrick
Janis Hamilton
Penelope Ann Koch
In Memory of Edward
Clarence Redmond
Donald Rogers
John E.R. Stainer
NOTABLE SUPPORTER
$1,000 TO $2,499
Anonymous
Elsa Alsgard
Ian E. & Janet A.
Ashdown
Gwendolyn J. Bailey
C. Jane Banfield
John & Cheryl Banfield
Walter M. & L.M.
Barss
William H. Barton
Birgit Freybe Bateman
Pat Blunden
Dr & Mrs David
Brabyn
Vivienne Brosnan
Albert A. & Nancy
Brosseuk
Arnold W. By
Jean A. K. Campbell
Chung Cheung
Professor & Mrs D.P.
Chong
David Chi Wai Chung
Nigel H. & Elizabeth
G. Clark
Stanley Coren
E. M. Derworiz
Talosa Dix
Charles B. Dunham
Mary C. Dvorak
Gene W. Faryna
Dean & Gayle Feltham
Douglas G. Finlayson
Mr & Mrs Sherold
Fishman & family
Stephen Fong
Richard D. French
Paul Friesen
Audrey & Bruce
Gellatly
David & Karalee Greer
Ronald Hagler
H. Meng Heah
Dan R. Heino
Peter S. Higashi
Donna Hinds
Sana L. M. Hodgins
Donald & Isabelle F.
Irvine
Mona Iwabu
Karen A. James
Herbert William Kee
BeeGall (B.G.) Lam
Ernest F. & Lynn
Ledgerwood
Daniel S.Y. Lee
Lanson & Donna-Jean
Lee
Vanessa Tung Li
Mary A. Luebbe
Judge Duncan K.
McAdam
John H. & Netilia
McArthur
Elsie M. MacCaig
Elmer Lyle Menzie
Robert & Patricia
Miller
Paul R. Moritz
D. Marie North
John E. O'Donnell
Ian T. Okabe
Mark T. Olsen
James M. Orr
Noel A. S. Owens
Ruth Patrick & John
Aubry
John & Joan Pavelich
Marion L. Pearson
Leslie R. Peterson, QC,
OBC
James W. Pilton
Man-Chiu Poon
Christopher A. Read
James G. Reddon
Donald Rogers
Sheila & Robert Ross, QC
D. E. Ryder
In Memory of
Sigtryggur & R6sa
Tom & Anne
Shorthouse
M. Colleen L. Sim
Penelope C. Simons
Lynn & Florence Sully
In Memory of
Jagannath Sundararajan
Delfa Syeklocha
Trident Enrichment
Society
Geraldine M. Ty
George & Olga Volkoff
Edmund T. Wong
28 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix F
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
OTHER DONATIONS
The Library continues to be the recipient of many donations
from alumni, friends, parents, faculty and staff. Total donations to
the UBC Library in 1996/97 were $928,342, which includes
$242,593 in gifts-in-kind. This was an 80% increase over the
previous year in which $514,000 was donated to the UBC Library.
During 1997/98 donations increased by 36% to a total of
$1,269,000, including $941,000 in gifts-in-kind.
Highlights include achieving the $1-million goal for the Library
Collections Enrichment Fund, which included $500,000 in
matching funds from the UBC President's Fund. Income from the
Collections endowment is used to benefit more than 40,000
students annually, as well as countless community users, through
acquisition of new electronic resources and databases, scholarly
journals, and books covering the range of academic disciplines.
A total of $275,000 was raised in 1996/97 for the $1.5 million
UBC Library Technology Endowment Fund. Mr George and Mrs
Rae Poole generously donated $250,000 towards the endowment
and MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates Inc. pledged $25,000.
The President's Fund has committed $500,000 in matching funds
to this endowment. Fund-raising continued during 1997/98. The
fund will support enhanced technology and services for users, to
create a "library without walls." To date, endowment income has
been used to purchase a copy of Livelink Search/Spider from Open
Text and full-text software for Web-based systems which will be
used in a number of innovative applications to make the Library's
collections more accessible to students, faculty and staff.
Earl D. and Suzanne Cates Dodson, long-time benefactors to
the UBC Library, donated over $163,000 in 1996/97 to a variety of
projects. They provided funds for the second elevator in the Walter
C. Koerner Library, for lights for the atrium on Level 7 in the
Koerner Library, for completion of the deck outside the staff
lounge, and for the new air conditioning system for the Special
Collections vault.
As well, the Library received funding both years from the
following University departments for specific resources: $6,000 for
education journals from the Faculty of Education; $3,000 which
was half the cost of the ICPSR membership from the Department
of Political Science; $2,000 to assist in the cost of Metadex from the
Department of Metals and Materials; $5,000 from the Electrical
Engineering Department and $2,500 from the Faculty of Applied
Science for the IEL, and payment of the SIAM membership of
$4,000 from the Department of Mathematics.
More than 1,000 individuals and organizations donated $50 or more to the UBC Library and are eligible to become members of the UBC
Friends of the Library. The following are donors who contributed $1,000 or more to the UBC Library. In addition, the Library is grateful to
its many anonymous donors whose names do not appear here ar their requesr.
PRESIDENTS CIRCLE
MEMBERS WHO DONATED
TO THE UBC LIBRARY IN
1996/97
(Cumulative donation
of$250,000ormore)
Alcan Aluminum
Limited*
Bank of Montreal*
BC TEL*
Hongkong Bank of
Canada*
IBM Canada Limited*
The Koerner
Foundation
MacMillan Bloedel
Limited
Northern Telecom
Limited*
Mr George and Mrs
Rae Poole
Vancouver Foundation
PRESIDENTS CIRCLE
MEMBERS WHO DONATED
TO THE UBC LIBRARY IN
1997/98
Alcan Aluminium
Limited
BCTEL
Hewlett Packard
(Canada) Limited
IBM Canada Limited
Koerner Foundation
Dr Gerald W. & Mrs E.
Audrey Korn
MacMillan Bloedel
Limited
Noranda Foundation
Northern Telecom
Limited
Vancouver Foundation
Weldwood of Canada
Limited
Mr & Mrs P.A.
Woodward's
Foundation
CHANCELLOR'S CIRCLE
MEMBERS WHO DONATED
TO THE UBC LIBRARY IN
1996/97
(Cumulative donation
of $25,000 to
$249,999)
Dr Ivan Avakumovic
Mr & Mrs A. V.
Backman
Mr W. Thomas Brown
Dr Max & Mrs Moira
Cynader
Dr George F. Curtis,
QC, OBC
Mr J. Erik de Bruijn
Dr L. Stanley Deane
Earl D. and Suzanne
Cates Dodson
Mr Haig & Mrs Mary
E. deB Farris
Miss Letitia A. Hay
Hydrecs Trust Fund
Mr J. Norman Hyland
ICI Canada Inc.*
Inco Limited*
Dr Ronald A. Jobe
Mrs Margaret H. Knox
MacDonald Dettwiler
& Associates Limited
Mr David & Mrs Mary
Macaree
MetLife*
Mr Chester F. Millar
Mr Guy Mills
Mobil Resources*
Dr V. J. Modi
Mr Eric P. Nicol
Mr Hannibal S. Noce
Dr Robert S. Rothwell
Soka Gakkai
International
Mr Philip & Mrs Hilda
Thomas
Vancouver Historical
Society
Warner-Lambert
Canada Inc.*
' These corporations have matched employees' donations to the UBC Library.
CHANCELLOR'S CIRCLE
MEMBERS WHO DONATED
TO THE UBC LIBRARY IN
1997/98
Dr Ivan Avakumovic
Mr W. Thomas Brown
Dr Jean Coulthard
Adams, OBC, OC
Dr George F. Curtis,
QC, OBC
Dr Max & Mrs Moira
Cynader
Mr J. Erik de Bruijn
Earl D. & Suzanne
Cates Dodson
Dr William C. Gibson
Miss Letitia A. Hay
Mr J. Norman Hyland
ICI Canada Inc.
Dr Ronald A. Jobe
Dr David & Mrs
Mary Macaree
Dr John H. & Mrs
Netilia McArthur
Mrs Donovan F. Miller
Dr V. J. Modi
Mr N. Anthony Onley
29 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix F
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
Dr Robert S. Rothwell
Dr Miguel P. & Mrs
Julia G. Tecson
Mr Philip & Mrs
Hilda Thomas
Dr David Watmough
LIBRARIAN'S CIRCLE AND
WESBROOK SOCIETY
MEMBERS 1996/97
($1,000 - $24,999)
Mr Philip Chen
Dr David Chi Wai
Chung
Ms Elsie C. de Bruijn
Dr Edward M.
Derworiz
Ms Mary C. Dvorak
Elsevier Science Inc
Mrs Chen L. Eng
Dr & Mrs Sherold
Fishman
Mr Timothy Foote
Dr Joseph & Mrs Joyce
Gardner
Ms Janis Hamilton
Ms Sandra L. M.
Hodgins
Inwest Investments Ltd
Dr Robert W. Kennedy
Miss Gertrude A.
Langridge
Mr James M.
Maclntyre, QC
Mrs Doris Elsie Magee
Mrs Sarah J. McAlpine
Dr Ian T. Okabe
Ms Mildred Olson
Mr Noel A. S. Owens
Dr Ruth Patrick and
Mr John Aubry
Mrs Vera Pech
Mr James W. Pilton
Dr Man-Chiu Poon
Dr Gerald N. Sandy
Mr Amil Shah
Dr J. Harry G. Smith
Dr John E. R. Stainer
Mrs Elfriede
Sundararajan
Vancouver Aboriginal
Friendship Centre
Mr Bryce Waters
LIBRARIAN'S CIRCLE AND
WESBROOK SOCIETY
MEMBERS 1997/98
Mr Joseph Blackman
Miss Jean A. K.
Campbell
Ms Diana Cooper
Dr Edward M.
Derworiz
Ms Mary C. Dvorak
Dr Joseph & Mrs Joyce
Gardner
Dr Leonidas E. Hill
Ms Sandra L.M.
Hodgins
Estate of Margaret
Elizabeth Leighton
Andrew Mahon
Foundation
Mrs Leota J.
McCullagh
Mr & Mrs George
McWhirter
Mrs Margaret T.C.
Morgan
Mr John A. Munro
Mrs Mary Norris
Mr Jerry Olynyk
Mr Noel A.S. Owens
Mrs Vera Pech
Mrs Elaine R. Polglase
Medicine 1976
Reunion
Dr Clayton L.N.
Robinson
Dr David Schindler
Dr John E.R Stainer
Mrs Mary L. Taylor
Mr Leon Tuey
Mr David
W.H.Tupper, QC
Mr Bryce Waters
Dr June M. Whaun
Dr Shirley M. Wong
These corporations have matched employees' donations to the UBC Library.
GIFTS-IN-KIND
The Library's collections were enriched by numerous gifts-in-
kind during the two years. Notable gifts to Special Collections
included the following: music manuscripts of Jean Coulthard; a
collection of 19th Century works by major English novelists donated
by Herbert Rosengarten, a collection which compliments the
Division's Colbeck Collection; the David Watmough papers; antique
maps and prints of the Philippines donated by Dr. Miguel P. Tecson
and Mrs. Julia G. Tecson; manuscripts and paintings by Ann Blades;
three major historic atlases donated by Dr. Stanley Deane; the 9
volume Boydell edition (1802) of Shakespeare's works, donated by
Timothy Foote; a collection of 18th century women's literature from
Dr. William Messenger; four volumes of original collaborative
artistic works by Toni Onley and Claude Peloquin; additions by Phil
Thomas to a collection of folk songs he donated earlier to Special
Collections; a donation by Mrs. Doris McGee of 500 volumes of
British Columbiana; from Hannibal Noce a collection of 150
volumes of Italian late-Renaissance works; from David Tupper a
collection of Canadiana, which formed part of the library of his
great-grandfather, Sir Charles Tupper, a former Prime Minister of
Canada; a donation by Charles Latimer of a variety of first editions
of literary works published in England from the 1950s forward,
many of which are signed by their authors. Dr. Gerald and Mr.
Audrey Korn donated a large and very significant collection of rare
medical texts dating back to the 16th century. The collection is a
valuable resource for researchers, medical students and professionals,
and others interested in the history of medicine.
The Asian Library received a gift from Dr. Tsang Kay Cheung of
Hong Kong of 123 volumes of "Treasury of Chinese Classics", a
selection of 1,000 of the most important Chinese classics from
ancient time to the 19th Century. Other gifts included the following:
a wide variety of materials (books, microfilm, videotapes), worth
$62,000, on Japanese life and culture donated by the Soka Gakkai
International Association; 50 volumes covering Thai culture from
The Royal Thai Consulate General, in celebration of Canada's Year
of Asia-Pacific; and a collection of nearly 150 current books in
computer science in memory of Jimmy Ning.
30 THE UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
Appendix G
GRANT FUNDING
With increasing costs in all budgetary sectors, grants are playing an
increasingly important role in funding services and projects that
would otherwise be beyond the Library's means. They have been
particularly helpful in meeting the tremendous demand for library
instruction in the new technology, which involves both staff
resources and equipment to access the new media. Benefits from
successful applications during 1996/97 and 1997/98 include:
BC MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT AND INVESTMENT
$105,900 each year for continued support of the PATSCAN service.
BC MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT AND INVESTMENT. NETWORKS OF
CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE, INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE
$25,000 in 1996/97 and $16,000 in 1997/98 ro support reference
assistance in the life sciences.
CANADIAN COUNCIL OF ARCHIVES
$3,695 for processing the Joy Kogawa fonds (96/97).
$7,525 for Phase 2 of the UBC Historical Photograph Imaging
Project (96/97).
$3,150 for the Lowry Collection Microfilming Project (97/98).
DEFT OF CANADIAN HERITAGE. YOUNG CANADA WORKS IN HERITAGE
INSTITUTIONS
$19,072 for 5 projects in 1996/97.
$30,749 for 4 projects in 1997/98.
HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CANADA. SUMMER CAREER
PLACEMENTS
$2,083 in 1996/97 and $3,124 in 1997/98 for srudent employment
on Library projects.
NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF CANADA
$6,426 for the UBC Audio Tape Description Project (97/98).
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF CANADA
$58,000 each year in continued support for the Cataloguing-in-
Publication program.
VANCOUVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY
$30,500 to update the Vancouver Centennial Bibliography.
WOODWARD FOUNDATION
$25,000 toward provision of a computer lab in the Woodward
Library.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C. ACADEMIC EQUIPMENT FUND
$100,000 each year for acquisition of the DRA system.
UNIVERSITY OF BC ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Two AMS Innovation Fund grants totalling $21,600 in 1996/97.
Three AMS Innovation Fund grants totalling $34,700 in 1997/98.
UNIVERSITY OF BC GRADUATING CLASS COUNCIL 96/97
$3,000 for a CD-ROM workstation in the Woodward Library.
UNIVERSITY OF B.C. GRADUATING CLASS IN AGRICULTURE 96/97
$3,330 for a computer workstation in the Macmillan Library.
UNIVERSITY OF BC INNOVATION FUND '96
$71,250 for workstations in the Sedgewick Teaching & Learning
Centre in the new Koerner Library.
UNIVERSITY OF BC MINOR CAPITAL FUND
$80,000 in 1997/98 for renovations to improve security in the Main
Library by creating a single entry/exit point.
UNIVERSITY OF BC TEACHING AND LEARNING ENHANCEMENT FUND
$291,340 for 18 projects in 1996/97.
$163,726 for 9 projects in 1997/98.
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of this listing of donations, gifts, and grants received between April 1, 1996 - March 31, 1998.
Questions or inquiries should be directed to Ron Burke, Library Development Officer, at 822-8926.
31 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT
32 Edited by
Erik de Bruijn
Design & Production by
UBC Library Graphics
Published by
The University of British Columbia Library
1956 Main Mall
Vancouver. BC  V6T l/.l
Internet home pagc:hrrp//:www.library.ubc.ca/
April 1999 

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