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Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Mar 31, 1987

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Array i
Tueport of the university librarian
to the senate
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
1985-86 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Seventy-first Year
1985/86
Vancouver
March 1987 ANNUAL REPORT. 1985/86
The publication this year of the President's Report on the Library has focused
attention on some of the broad issues facing the UBC Library. The present report
will deal more specifically with developments of the past year, 1985/86.
The year was characterized by a very high level of activity and by a growing
concern about the soaring costs of maintaining strong collections. Noteworthy developments were:
- the introduction of a new computer system for the catalogue
- further efforts directed towards achieving a resolution of the space problem, especially to deal with collections growth
- additional economies of staffing
- obtaining grant funding for establishing a patent search service,
PATSCAN
- participation in the North American Collections Inventory Project, NCIP
- renovation of the entrance area of the Sedgewick Library.
The gathering of information for the President's Report on the Library led to extensive, useful discussion of library costs, plans, and issues, and as the year drew
to a close preparations were made to reestablish an active Friends of the Library
organization.
Perhaps 1985/86 will be best remembered as the year in which the centrality of the
Library   system   to   the   University's   programmes   was   carefully   examined   and confirmed. The support of President Strangway and members of the Senate
Library Committee in helping to focus attention, both within the Library and outside it, on the major issues we face is gratefully acknowledged.
Library Collections
The Collections budget:
Inflation and a rapid devaluation of the Canadian dollar against European currencies resulted in a substantial loss in purchasing power for the Library's collections
budget in 1985/86. The cost of maintaining the Library's periodical subscriptions
and standing orders was about 15% higher than in 1984/85; book prices also continued to rise, especially for British and other European materials. In order to
meet our obligations during 1985/86, it was necessary to supplement the continuing
collections budget by using $300,000 held in reserve to deal with sudden increases
in collections costs, and it became obvious that some drastic steps would be necessary in 1986/87 to correct the imbalance in collections funding, especially since a
further substantial increase in prices (particularly for serials) was expected as a
result of continuing devaluation and inflation.
In consultation with the President's office and the Senate Library Committee, it
was agreed that three parallel remedies for the collections budget problem would
be pursued:
a) to try to reduce the serials subscription lists;
b) to look for cost savings in other areas, primarily staffing, which could be transferred to the collections budget; and
c) to make a strong case for additional funding.
Through a consultation process which is described below about 900 serial titles were identified which could be cancelled for a saving of $163,000. By the elimination of library staff positions which had come vacant during the year, an additional $223,000 was released for transfer to the collections budget. Finally the situation was much improved by the announcement in August 1986 that an additional
$339,000 (8%) in new funding was to be added to the collections budget.
It was decided to set aside for new serial subscriptions $50,000 of the $163,000
saved by serial cancellations, leaving a net saving of $113,000 in serial costs. The
combination of the transfer from salaries and new funding yielded a total of
$562,000 (14%). Since expenditures for collections exceeded the operating budget
by $300,000 in 1985/86, the first $300,000 of the new funding was required to
cover that cost increase on a continuing basis. (No additional funds had been provided in 1985/86 to cover the costs of inflation and devaluation.) The net increase
in funds available for 1986/87 was therefore $375,000, much of which had to be
allocated for expected serial cost increases, though some improvement to the book
funds was also possible. Funds for the purchase of current books in areas which
had been hard-hit by devaluation were given priority for increases.
Serial cancellations:
The Senate Library Committee met several times early in 1986 to determine how to
identify the journal titles that might be cancelled. Each branch and division of
the Library reviewed its journal subscriptions and produced two lists of titles. The
first included those which, by virtue of infrequent use or duplication, could most
easily be cancelled. The second list cut more deeply into the collection, proposing
titles that could be used as substitutes for any that proved impossible to cancel
from the first list, as well as indicating the kind of material that would be lost if
a second round of cancellations were required in 1987.
The lists were made available for public review and comment in branches and divisions of the Library, and lists specific to departmental interests were sent to academic departments for review. That process resulted in the identification of approximately 1,000 journal titles for possible cancellation. By July 1986, with the
budget for collections still uncertain, the Library was obliged to proceed with the
cancellation of about 900 titles from the first list.   With few exceptions, these   had been accepted by academic departments as the titles that could be most easily
dropped. At least 40% of the titles cancelled were duplicate subscriptions for
which one copy would remain available somewhere in the Library system. Savings
anticipated from the cancellations would total $163,000 in 1986/87. The Senate
Library Committee recommended that, if it should become possible, some of the
funds released through cancellations should be made available for new subscriptions in 1986/87.
North American Collections Inventory Project:
In September 1985 several librarians from UBC attended a workshop for training
in procedures used in the North American Collections Inventory Project (NCIP).
The following spring UBC participated, along with most other Canadian academic
research libraries, in a pilot project to determine staff time required to use the
NCIP methodology as a means of recording in a central data base information
about our collections and our present collecting levels. The pilot project was coordinated through the National Library of Canada and the Canadian Association of
Research Libraries (CARL).
NCIP was developed as a tool for collection assessment in very large research libraries in the United States. It was subsequently adopted by the Association of
Research Libraries (ARL) and by CARL, both organizations to which the UBC
Library belongs. Very briefly, the objective of collections inventories is to describe the collections of research libraries in all subjects by using standard numerical ratings which would provide information on collection strengths. This information could be used for the purposes of resource sharing, cooperative collections
development and shared programs, assistance to researchers in locating materials,
assistance to granting councils in assessing applications for funds to develop and
strengthen collections, and cooperative conservation/preservation activities and
plans. For Canada, the National Library has developed an online database through
which NCIP data will be available.
While the process of assessing the collection is extremely time-consuming, it offers
substantial benefits to the local institution.   Staff members are obliged to assess as objectively as possible the strength of the existing collection and the level of current collecting in all areas of the Library of Congress classification. Where possible, external measures are used as checks to make the results as consistent as possible among the participating libraries. Both library staff and faculty members
should gain a better understanding of existing collection strengths and current
levels of collecting from the NCIP process.
During the pilot project the UBC Library completed one portion of the LC classification: TN, or mining engineering. This required 70 hours of staff time. Clearly,
the application of NCIP to the entire collection will be an enormous task, requiring
two or three years to complete. It is important, however, to have UBC's collections
represented in the Canadian NCIP database; our holdings make up a significant
part of Canada's "national collection". Furthermore, future development of our
collections through federal grants may depend on collection strengths reported in
the NCIP database.
Grants, donations and gifts-in-kind:
In August 1986, the Library was awarded a grant of $50,000 from the Social
Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for the purchase of microform sets of unpublished music manuscripts drawn from the most important
English music archives. More about this important acquisition will be found below
in the section of the report on the Music Library.
On the occasion of his visit to Expo '86 the Honourable Ryutaro Hashimoto,
Minister of Transport in Japan, donated one million yen (almost $8,700) for the
acquisition of materials by the Asian Library.
Two substantial memorial donations were received during the year; friends and
relatives of the late Professor Stanley Pech have donated over $3,000 for the purchase of materials in Central and Eastern European history; in another similar gesture friends of the late Mr. Masao Shimizu donated $3,310 for the purchase of current Japanese books in the fields of Fine Arts, History and Literature.
I would particularly like to acknowledge the continued support of such donors as - 6 -
Mr. Samuel Lipson, Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering, Dr. Kaye Lamb, former University Librarian, Mr. Derek Lukin Johnston and Mr. John Stainer. The
Library is the grateful beneficiary of their continued interest and timely support.
Similarly, the continued interest and support of the Japan Foundation and the Law
Foundation of B.C. should be gratefully acknowledged.
Other donors during 1985/86 included First City Financial Corporation Ltd.,
Mr. William Read and Mr. Sholto Hebenton, as well as numerous benefactors who
contribute either through the annual Alumni appeal or individually to one of the
library units.
Important gifts-in-kind for the library collections included the following:
- Manuscripts and letters relating to Malcolm Lowry, from Mrs. Margerie Lowry.
Literary manuscripts and letters from Intermedia Press, Mr. Hubert Evans,
Mrs. Nan Cheney and Mr. Raymond Hull.
Business records from the Seabord Lumber Sales/Seabord Shipping Co. and from
the Fisheries Association of B.C.
Records of the Solidarity Coalition, 1983-85.
- An addition to the Gary Lauk papers.
A first edition of Lowry's Under the Volcano, from Mr. Harvey Burt.
- Books and journals for the Curriculum Laboratory from Dr. R.F. Gray, Dr. W.A,
Gray, Dr. R.A. Jobe and Mr. C. Pennock.
Children's books for the Special Collections Division from Mrs. Helen Jones and
Mrs. Dorothy Mackay.
- Reports for the Law Library from the firm of Russell and Dumoulin. - Antiquarian books from Mr. D.C.G. Mackay, Mrs. Lillian Timberlake and
Mrs.  Frederika Ward.
- Books on the Philippines from Dr. Edgar Wickberg.
Significant donations to the University Archives included the following:
- Bequest of papers and paintings from Mrs. Renee Chipman-Haweis.
Papers of Dr. G. Philip V. Akrigg.
- Papers of Mr. Henry Howard.
Additional papers of Mrs. Jean Coulthard Adams.
- Papers of Mr. Lloyd Detwiller.
Grants and donations for purposes other than collection development are referred
to in the sections on Library Services and on Divisions and Branches.
Library Services
Use of collections:
Library collections continued to be heavily used in 1985/86. While total circulation for the Library system dropped 1.6% to 2,283,121, most of that reduction is
explained by a change in the method of counting the loan of sound cassettes from
the Crane Library; Crane's statistics are now more consistent with those from the
rest of the Library system. Significant increases were recorded in the teaching
hospital libraries, where loans totalled 90,295, up by 14.1% over loans during
1984/85. Continued growth also occurred in the delivery of books and photocopies
within the Health Sciences Library Network, which includes the Woodward Library
and the three teaching hospital libraries: St. Paul's, Hamber, and the Biomedical
Branch at Vancouver General.
The exchange of materials with libraries outside the UBC system represents an - 8 -
important aspect of our Library's service to its own users as well as a means of
making UBC's library resources available beyond the campus. Most interlibrary
loans are now handled through a variety of networks, with improved efficiency
and some recovery of staff and other costs. Electronic mail has become the
standard means of requesting material on interlibrary loan. Delivery of the
document itself still depends largely on mail service, though locally, and where
special arrangements are feasible, truck delivery and courier are both used. The
amount of material borrowed by UBC from other libraries increased in 1985/86 for
the fourth year in a row, this time by 2%. Lending from UBC's collections
increased by 12%, the first increase recorded in several years.
Though not revealed in the statistical tables, the increased borrowing of compact
discs from the Wilson Recordings Collection is of special interest. While holdings
of compact discs make up less than 5% of the recordings collections, they now represent more than 25% of the items out on loan at a given time. As funds permit,
additional copies of compact discs will be acquired for the collection.
In 1985/86 the Library registered 1,652 extramural borrowers, who accounted for
approximately 50,000 loans during the year.
Reference services:
The use of the Library's reference services has increased for the fourth consecutive
year. In 1985/86 reference assistance was provided in response to 374,139
reference questions. At peak periods the Library has little capacity to respond to
additional requests for reference assistance. We are experiencing continued growth
in the number of visitors who need reference assistance: students from other post-
secondary institutions and from high schools in Greater Vancouver, business and
professional people, government employees, private researchers, as well as members
of the general public. While the Library welcomes extensive use of its unique resources, many visitors require special assistance and tend to use the Library most
frequently in the evening and on weekends, when staffing levels are minimal. As
a result, reference staff in many of UBC's libraries are finding it increasingly difficult to  provide a  level of  service  that fully  meets  the  needs  of users  from - 9
off-campus. Yet to supplement weekend and evening reference staffing at the
expense of peak weekday periods of student and faculty use would be a disservice
to the Library's primary community. In considering any reallocation of limited
staff resources to meet new and growing demands from the external community,
both the needs of the University and the Library's role as a provincial resource
must be considered.
The case for supplementary funding to assist the UBC Library in carrying out its
special responsibilities to the province received strong support from the community
last spring when documentation was gathered to accompany a request for
"Excellence" funding. With remarkably little prompting from the Library, more
than 260 community users wrote letters attesting the value of the Library's collections and services and urging the provision of improved funding. Most of the letters came from business firms, cultural organizations, educational institutions, government departments, and hospitals. About 50 were from individuals engaged in
private research. Apart from the practical value of such evidence of heavy use of
the Library as a provincial resource, the letters provided additional assurance to
Library staff members that their efforts were appreciated.
Technology continues to have a growing impact on the way in which the Library
provides its services. Reference has already been made to the increasing use of
compact discs in the Wilson Recordings Collection. With declining purchasing
power, it is difficult to provide adequately for new and sometimes more expensive
technological developments like the compact disc for sound recordings. As a result,
our response to the availability of materials in new formats is often slower and
less full than our users would like. In most circumstances thus far, provision of
information in a different format, such as through an external online data base,
has not made it possible to drop the equivalent conventional printed version. The
cost of using an external data base would have to be subsidized in order to permit
the same level of access now provided by its printed equivalent. Special
consideration will have to be given to this question, particularly as some indexing
and abstracting services become available for local use through the potentially revolutionary medium of the CD-ROM laser disc. 10
Online searching of external bibliographic data bases is becoming increasingly
attractive to library users. While the initial impact of online searching was
experienced most substantially in the sciences and health sciences, the number of
data bases available in the humanities and social sciences has increased sharply. In
the first six months of 1986, the two principal data base vendors used by the
Library added 27 new data bases in the humanities and social sciences. Seventeen
of these were in the business and commerce area.
A new online service was introduced in the fall of 1986. The Library obtained a
grant through the Canada-British Columbia Subsidiary Agreement on Science and
Technology Development to develop and operate a patent search service. Through
the new service (PATSCAN), we are promoting the use of the patent literature as a
source of information and developing easier and more effective access to Canadian
patent literature. PATSCAN provides subsidized search service to faculty and students at B.C. universities.   It is located in the Science Division of the Main Library.
The British Columbia Library Association received a grant from the Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council of Canada to continue its work on a union catalogue of B.C. newspapers. The project is housed in the UBC Library and the data
base is being created at the University. The union catalogue, intended to be
definitive, is expected to become an invaluable aid to research on provincial and
local history.
The use of the latest technology requires the expenditure of funds for new equipment and for the replacement of existing equipment as it wears out or becomes
obsolete. During the year, it became evident that much of the Library's existing
equipment for photocopying and the use of microforms needs to be replaced. In
1986/87 steps must be taken to replace worn-out and obsolete equipment and to add
features for greater user convenience, such as equipping copying machines to
accept debit cards for payment.
Divisions and Branches
Almost all public service branches and divisions reported improvements in work
procedures  and  services  to  users  as  a  result  of increased  online  access  to  the - 1
Library's automated systems. Prior to the purchase of additional computing capacity for Library operations in 1985, response time was too slow to permit wide
direct access to our automated systems. While capacity is still too limited to support direct use by library patrons, it has been possible to extend online access to
divisions and branches for a number of routine operations. Online use of such
files as the in-process list (a record of items on order or received for the collection
but not yet catalogued), the DRS system (an informal online "catalogue" of documents that will not receive formal cataloguing treatment), the record of books in
storage, and the rapidly developing data base of catalogued records has been of
considerable assistance to staff working in public service divisions. Such access is
also of critical importance as a means of reorganizing work flows in future to
eliminate redundant manual records required previously in branches and divisions.
The following brief notes highlight some of the other comments made in divisional
reports for 1985/86:
Circulation Division:
For the first time in many years, all books and shelves in the main stacks were
thoroughly vacuumed in the summer of 1985. Portions of the collections will be
done each year as part of an ongoing maintenance programme. Circulation staff
also "shelf-read" the entire stack collection to ensure that it was in good order for
the beginning of the Winter Session.
- The Extension Library, which is administered through the Circulation Division, is
now in its third year of expanded operation, providing reference assistance as
well as loans to students enrolled in off-campus credit courses. Requests for assistance increased to more than 9,000 in 1985/86, and loans numbered 9,168, as
compared to 7,153 in 1984/85, an increase of 28.2%.
Fine Arts Library:
- The Library's DRS system, a file that can be consulted online at any Library
terminal or by using a microfiche listing, is now used to record holdings of exhibition catalogues. Until about a year ago exhibition catalogues, which comprise
an important part of the collection, were first fully catalogued and then given 12
supplementary indexing in the Fine Arts Library. The process was expensive and
much too slow. Now records for the catalogues are created directly at the
terminal by staff in the Fine Arts Library. The same procedure is being used for
part of the collection on planning. In fact, throughout the Library, the DRS file
has been used where appropriate as an alternative to much more expensive full
cataloguing.
Government Publications and Microforms Division:
- The multitude of documents received in this division are now processed through
the Library's automated systems, with the result that holdings records, previously
available only in Government Publications, can now be consulted through terminals in other divisions and branches. The Division also maintains the Library's
microform collection - one of the strongest in North America. It may be of interest that the collection contains 3,290,766 "pieces" of microform (microfilm, microfiche, microprint), and that 70-75% of these are governmental in origin.
Humanities and Social Sciences Division:
Humanities and Social Sciences experienced a further increase (3.2%) in the number of reference questions answered by its staff. Research questions, which are
particularly time-consuming, increased by 11.4%. As noted earlier, more online
bibliographic databases were available in the humanities and social sciences in
1985/86 and 26% more computer-assisted searches were carried out in the Division last year.
Information and Orientation Division:
The number of publications prepared to help patrons use the Library system more
effectively increased by 51% in 1985/86. Thanks again to the computer, the process of keeping Library printed information guides and brochures up-to-date has
been greatly simplified.
- The number of participants in voluntary library tours arranged by the Division
increased   13.5%   to   1,100,  in   1985/86.     For   the  Library  system  as  a   whole,
Appendix J shows that almost 12,000 individual library users were provided with - 13 -
instruction in the use of library resources, either through tours or through formal
classroom instruction.
An analysis of enquiries received by telephone and in person at the central information desk provided another indication of the extent to which the UBC
Library is used by the community at large. A one-day survey showed that 62% of
the telephone enquiries received at the desk were from users not affiliated with
UBC. Thirty percent of those asking in person for assistance were from outside
the University; in the evening, that percentage increased to 45%.
Interlibrary Loan Division:
Eighty-six percent of all documents requested through interlibrary loan at UBC
are now ordered through electronic communication with such cryptically named
services as ENVOY, ONTYME, TEXTRAN, CANDOC, DIALOG, BRS, UTLAS,
and OCLC. Access to OCLC (the Online Computer Library Center) began in June
1986 and promises to enhance our potential for locating items needed by UBC researchers. OCLC maintains the largest bibliographic data base in the world, including records from more than 6,000 member libraries.
Map Division:
Maps of the Pacific Rim countries have become a significant focus. During
1985/86, special efforts were made to purchase maps of China, mostly in English
but occasionally in Chinese as well.
Science Division:
- The Science Division remains a focal point for training in the use of online systems. Though online bibliographic searching has been with us for some time, new
systems and changes to existing systems require regular training seminars for librarians and others who wish to maintain their searching skills. Attendance at
the seminars has grown steadily, with many more participants from business and
industry. The seminars, normally provided by representatives of major online
services such as DIALOG, CAN/OLE and INFOGLOBE, are organized and
sponsored by the Science Division. 14
Special Collections Division:
- Last year was noteworthy for Special Collections. UBC's outstanding Beans collection of Japanese maps of the Tokugawa period was one focus of attention.
During the summer, a grant from the Japan Foundation enabled Professor
Kazutaka Unno, an authority on Japanese cartography, to review our Japanese
map collection with a view to producing a revised catalogue. The revision is now
ready to be edited. Professor Unno's work confirmed earlier estimates of the
quality of UBC's Japanese map collection. In addition, a committee chaired by
Professor John Howes undertook the tasks of promoting awareness of this valuable resource and considering the steps needed to ensure its proper maintenance
and preservation. One early outcome was the creation of full-scale photographic
reproductions of two of the maps for exhibition in the Japanese pavilion at Expo.
A project housed in the Special Collections Division and funded by the Social
Sciences and Humanities Research Council led to the publication in November
1985 of A Guide to Labour Records and Resources in British Columbia.
In April 1986, through a grant to the Vancouver Historical Society, the
Vancouver Centennial Bibliography was published. The data base for this major
publication is being maintained online at UBC. The Special Collections Division
has continued its success in obtaining grants for the organization of manuscripts
and archives. Most recently, Laurenda Daniells, the University Archivist, obtained a grant from SSHRC to produce a guide to the UBC Archives and, eventually, to the Manuscripts Collection.
- A grant of $12,000 from the Canadian Council of Archives supported a project to
sort, select, appraise, arrange and describe five major manuscript and records
groups.
- Donations were received from Violet Eagles, Roland Lanning and Anne Smith for
the Classes of '21 and '22 Photographic Archives Fund to support work on UBC
photographs. - 15 -
Asian Studies Library:
- In 1985/86 grants and donations for Asian Studies collections totalled more than
$72,000, the largest amount received to date in a single year.
- In addition to approximately 2,000 Japanese government serials, the Asian
Library subscribes to more than 800 journal titles. In response to growing interest
and academic programmes, a special effort is being made to increase the number
of current serials acquired.
A committee composed primarily of faculty users of the Asian Studies Library
was invited early in 1986 to review priorities for future collections and services
and to advise the Librarian on the qualities that would be most important in
seeking a new Head for the Asian Studies Library following Miss Ng's retirement
in December. In its review the committee considered the effect of increased general interest in Pacific Rim studies on existing collections priorities. A key recommendation was for the development of an outline of purchasing priorities for
each country and subject area. Offering a range of other recommendations on
collections, staffing, and services, the report will be extremely useful in setting
the most appropriate course for the Asian Studies Library in the future.
Crane Library:
- Nine of the students using Crane Library resources graduated from UBC and one
from Regent College in 1986.
- Thanks to generous outside support, a number of improvements were made to the
facilities available in Crane. The Variety Club of British Columbia provided
$35,000 to equip two additional professional recording studios. With assistance
from the B.C. Ministry of Labour Apprenticeship and Training Programme, the
Vancouver Foundation, and the UBC Student Counselling Office, a computer
technology work station was developed for student use. It includes a
microcomputer, large screen colour monitor, printer, voice-synthesizing equipment, and an image-enlarging package. As funds are available, equipment for the
display and printing of information in Braille and for translating print to Braille
will be added. 16 -
Curriculum Laboratory:
- In response to greater emphasis on the teaching of children's literature and the
spectacular growth of French immersion programmes in the schools, the Curriculum Laboratory has taken steps to develop excellent collections for the teaching
of children's literature in both French and English. Significant donations of materials to support this effort have come from the federal and provincial governments as well as from individuals.
- In a separate project Curriculum Laboratory staff have created records on the
Library's DRS system for a large collection of school textbooks and curriculum
guides dating from 1900 to 1950. As time permits, this special historical file will
be expanded to include other materials, such as the extensive collection of early
textbooks held in the Special Collections Division.
- In 1983 the Library assumed responsibility for the Film Library, located in the
Library Processing Centre where it operates under the general direction of the
Curriculum Laboratory. A trend towards the use of videotapes, considerably less
expensive than films, has allowed more materials to be stocked, and since joining
the Library system the Film Library's collection has increased by almost 50%.
The collection is being recatalogued using the Library's DRS systems, a project
that is expected to be completed in 1987. This will permit the Film Library's catalogue to be consulted online.
Law Library:
Following an agreement between UBC and IBM Canada to establish a Cooperative
Project in Law and Computers, a computer room was set up on the bottom floor
of the Law Library. Student access to the 21 microcomputers located there is
administered by the Law Library according to policies established by the Faculty
of Law.
- Staff in the Law Library made good use in 1985/86 of the service potential offered by the Library's online systems. Online access to information about books
awaiting cataloguing, for example, has permitted the Law Library to offer up-to-
date lists of books on topics of interest to faculty members. - 17 -
MacMillan Library:
The MacMillan Library began on a trial basis to circulate from its reserve collection computer software owned by the faculties of Forestry and Agricultural
Sciences.
- During the summer, a further 1,419 volumes were removed from the collection to
storage space in the Library Processing Centre, restoring sufficient space for two
years' growth in MacMillan.
Marjorie Smith Library:
The Marjorie Smith (Social Work) Library was also obliged to seek additional
shelf space - 821 volumes, duplicates of titles held in Marjorie Smith or elsewhere
on campus, were withdrawn.
Two major projects were initiated in 1985/86. The first saw staff in the branch
begin the process of converting catalogue records for the collection to machine-
readable form. While the Library's ability to do retrospective conversion
(RECON) of the catalogue has been very limited since 1983, when grant funds for
this purpose were exhausted, there is strong interest throughout the Library system in getting more of our records into the automated data base. A second project started in 1985/86 will see the organization of a collection of documents relating to the history of social work and social welfare in B.C.
Music Library:
- A comparison of current statistics for the Music Library with those for ten years
earlier shows increases of 60% in circulation of print materials, 38% in the use of
recordings, and over 20% in the number of reference questions answered. During
the same period, the collection has doubled in size, and staff time available has
decreased by 12.5%. 18
- Some of the remarkable growth in collections can be attributed to success in obtaining outside grant funds. Last year, the Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council grant referred to above made it possible to further expand the
collection of early music manuscripts, some of which are held on microfilm.
Additions to the collection will include 18 microfilm sets of the series
Unpublished Music Manuscripts from the Great English Collections, which
contain English and continental music from the 16th to the 20th century held in
libraries such as the Bodleian, the British Library, and the Royal College of
Music.  Musicologists, theorists, and performers will benefit from this acquisition.
Sedgewick Library:
- With special funding from the University, steps were taken to overcome longstanding noise problems in the Sedgewick Library. Renovations to the entrance
area helped to make a clear distinction between the foyer/lounge area and the library proper. In addition, plans for September called for an extensive publicity
campaign to discourage eating, drinking and socializing in Sedgewick and for the
hiring of monitors to help control behaviour.
- To conserve space and to keep the Sedgewick collection relevant to undergraduate
needs, a major project to "weed" the collection was begun in May, 1986, and will
continue on a year-round basis.
- The Sedgewick Library Skills Lab received a Merit Award from the British
Columbia Library Association in 1986. The programme is an effective method of
teaching basic library procedures to beginning students, allowing them to work at
their own pace but providing for one-to-one instruction where needed.
Woodward Library:
- UBC's largest branch, the Woodward Library has been commended by visiting
accreditation bodies for the level of service it provides. Annual statistics of medical school libraries in the U.S. and Canada consistently rank the Woodward
Library's facilities and services at or near the top in almost every respect except 19 -
for hours of operation. The latter reflect a conscious decision in the face of reduced staffing at UBC to maintain strong services during periods of peak use,
rather than extend hours of operation to cover periods when library use would be
slight. In the light of that compromise, it is reassuring to see the Woodward
Library's very high standing in terms of numbers of current serials, volumes
added annually, reference transactions and total collections use.
Health Sciences Network Service:
Located in the Woodward Library, the Network Service makes it possible for the
four health science libraries associated with UBC to share their resources effectively. In 1985/86, in response to requests from individuals at the four locations,
it delivered 9,243 books and 27,289 photocopies, an increase of almost 9% over the
volume handled in 1984/85. Since the service was introduced in 1982/83, the volume of completed transactions has grown by 52%.
Improvements in procedures for handling requests have allowed the small staff of
the Network Service to maintain good turnaround time for requests in spite of
the growth in demand. Last year, a grant from the Woodward Foundation provided five telefacsimile transceivers for the Network. These are used primarily
to transmit copies of handwritten requests, eliminating the time-consuming task
of keying requests into the electronic messaging system. The telefax machines
have also proved to be very useful for transmission of reference questions and
responses.
Last year a new venture was initiated through the cooperation of the Network
Service and librarians from Woodward and the teaching hospital libraries. An instructional package and manual for "end-user" Medline searching was developed.
Patrons of the Hamber Library were invited to participate in a two-session workshop designed to help those who wished to learn to do their own online bibliographic searches. Response was good, and we hope that some of the growing
pressure on professional staff time in the health science libraries will be reduced
as more library users become proficient enough to do at least the less complex
searches on their own. With further refinements the programme will be offered
again. - 20 -
Teaching Hospital Libraries: Biomedical Branch, Hamber, and St. Paul's:
The identification of periodical titles for cancellation in 1987 proved difficult
for the teaching hospital libraries. Their relatively small and carefully selected
collections receive intensive on-site use. A reduction in the number of titles held
locally will result in even greater demands on the Network Service for the delivery of journal articles.
The Biomedical Branch Library at the Vancouver General Hospital experienced a
42% increase in 1985/86 in the number of computer-assisted bibliographic
searches completed for its patrons. In order to compensate for the increased use
of relatively untrained student assistants on weekend and evening shifts, the
Branch increased its efforts to provide orientation for new and inexperienced library users: twice as many sessions were arranged, with a 50% increase in the
numbers of participants.
- The Hamber Library, which serves faculty, students, and staff at Shaughnessy,
Grace, and Children's hospitals, continued to experience increases in the order of
25% annually in the use of its circulation and reference services.
- Rapid growth in use has also occurred at the St. Paul's Library. Last year, increases of 17% and 31% were recorded in circulation and reference questions respectively. While the St. Paul's collection is smaller than at other locations in the
health sciences system, it has received special support through annual grants from
the Rodger Stanton Memorial Fund. In 1985/86, the Fund provided $6,750 for
the purchase of books in obstetrics, gynaecology, and general surgery.
The degree to which improved library service at Hamber and in the other
teaching hospitals has been welcomed and appreciated by users has been very
encouraging. With a very small number of staff at each location, it will be
difficult to keep up if the demand for service continues to grow.
Technical Processing and Systems
For the Library's processing divisions 1985/86 was in many respects a difficult
and unusual year. - 21
■ A great deal of effort was invested in the redevelopment of the acquisitions system, a project which is now nearing completion and which will see the one remaining "batch processing" system converted to online. The new acquisitions system will permit reference divisions and branches to perform some work directly
online, reducing the number of redundant records and in some cases avoiding the
manual preparation of order forms for new materials.
• The Serials Division has been successfully using an online system for recording
the receipt and disposition of periodical issues for five years. Further development of the system will see the introduction of barcodes to obtain the ability to
control the circulation of unbound issues on the automated circulation system and
to improve present methods of updating the status of serial holdings in the pre-
binding and binding process.
Cataloguing output of 50,321 new titles was the lowest since 1968/69, down 23%
from 1984/85. Several factors contributed to the drop in production. Training
for and implementation of the new local catalogue system affected cataloguing
operations for a period of five months. From September 1985 to January 1986 response time problems and system downtime severely disrupted both cataloguing
and pre-order searching activities. A great deal of supervisory time was also
spent working with the University's consultants, Ritchie & Associates. The introduction of the new catalogue system provided the means to re-establish authority
control on the catalogue data base. This meant, however, that an intensive effort
was required to clean up the file, eliminating serious discrepancies that developed
in catalogue entries and subject headings during the past eight years. Less effort
will be required in future as the quality of the data base gradually improves.
Several developments are underway to recover lost cataloguing time. Improvements in productivity began to appear in August 1986 and, unless the level of acquisitions changes substantially, the number of backlog items awaiting cataloguing should be restored to a more acceptable level in the coming year.
The processing divisions have been most profoundly affected by continued efforts to reduce costs through the application of technological change.   During the 22
past eight years, the number of staff in processing has been reduced more than
17%. The staff reductions represent an annual cost in 1986 dollars of approximately $650,000. Most of the reductions have been made possible by the shift towards online computing. In some cases, online processing has permitted several
separate operations to be integrated and completed as one process. In other cases
an automatic process has been introduced to replace routine staff work. A
striking example of the latter is the automatic search for catalogue data using
standard numbers and author/title data contained in order records. Previously,
this was done by a staff member keying the search data at a terminal and
waiting for the computer to respond with some result, often a message that no
records were found.
Although automation priorities have been determined largely by the potential
staff savings that might be obtained, the enhancement of automated systems and
the provision of online access have provided significant benefits for service to
users as well. Some of these are obvious: thanks to the automated circulation system, it is much easier to borrow materials, and information about library holdings
is available throughout the Library system. Less evident, perhaps, are such improvements as the DRS system, which makes it possible to provide access to thousands of previously uncatalogued materials held in a variety of locations in the
Library. It is noteworthy that many improvements have been obtained during a
period of severe restraint.
Staff
The total number of Library staff continued to decline in 1985/86. All vacancies
were carefully scrutinized as they occurred and only those determined to be
essential for the operation of the Library were approved for refilling. Duties as
well as classification levels and job descriptions were examined in detail to ensure
that the positions were filled at an appropriate and economical level.
Eleven positions were eliminated from the processing divisions in April 1986,
yielding funds for transfer to the collections budget. Ability to accommodate the
reduction was made possible by improved methods and by better computer response
time as a consequence of the installation of the Library's mainframe computer. 23 -
Hans Burndorfer, Head of the Music Library and, since January 1985, Acting Head
of the Fine Arts Library, was appointed Head of the Fine Arts Library in April
1986 in addition to his Music Library responsibilities.
Librarians who left the Library during 1985/86 included Freda Bailey of the Catalogue Records Division, who took early retirement in December 1985; Tania Gorn
of Interlibrary Loans, who left in October 1985; and Penny Haggarty of Catalogue
Records, who resigned in July 1986.
Senior support staff members who left during the year were Janet Yuan, Catalogue
Records, August 1986; Jerry Anderson, Government Publications and Microforms,
March 1986; and Regina Tsanas, Law Library, July 1986. The Library was
saddened by the death in November 1985 of Flovin Tang, Catalogue Records.
Five support staff members left the Library to embark on professional careers by
enrolling as students in the UBC School of Library, Archival and Information
Studies. They were Leonora Crema, Circulation Division; Philip Hall, Map Division; Jan Johnson, Collections Division; Alice McNair and Rita Penco, both of the
Interlibrary Loans Division.
The Senate Library Committee
In submitting this report, I would like to express my appreciation to the Senate
Library Committee for its advice and generous support. The Committee met
formally on five occasions during the year, addressing such issues as the need for
library space, the role of a Library "Friends" organization, the increasing cost of
collections, and the procedures for identifying serial publications for possible
cancellation.
Particular thanks are due to the Committee's Chairman, Professor Jonathan L.
Wisenthal, whose keen interest in the Library and unstinting support of efforts to
maintain and improve the quality of its collections and services have been
invaluable. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
March 31/85
Additions
Deletions
March 31/86
Asian Studies Library
182,036
8,646
1
190,681
Biomedical Branch Library (VGH)
29,134
1,671
459
30,346
Catalogue Records Division
5,387
98
4
5,481
Crane Library
7,753
130
1,160
6,723
Curriculum Laboratory
91,023
6,939
1,334
96,628
Data Library
416
52
3
465
Fine Arts Library
105,150
4,567
88
109,629
Government Publications Division
2,908
444
18
3,334
Hamber Library (CGSH)
8,762
761
7
9,516
Humanities <5c Social Science Reference
56,437
2,622
97
58,962
Law Library
132,649
6,289
141
138,797
MacMillan Library
50,740
4,575
48
55,267
Main Stacks
908,775
32,168
926
940,017
Map Library
7,973
353
2
8,324
Marjorie Smith Library
17,398
1,024
821
17,601
Mathematics Library
26,866
971
10
27,827
Music Library
45,123
2,794
23
47,894
St. Paul's Library (SPH)
6,290
1,371
723
6,938
Science Reference
20,386
1,316
60
21,642
Sedgewick Library
188,156
6,547
1,760
192,943
Special Collections Division
60,938
2,938
16
63,860
Woodward Library
297,631
11,561
53
309,139
SUBTOTAL
2,251,931
97,837
7,754
2,342,014
Storage Collections
213,653
2,465,584
213,653
TOTAL
97,837
7,754
2,555,667 Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31, 1985
Net Growth
March 31, 1986
Volumes - Catalogued
2,465,584
90,083
2,555,667
Documents - Uncatalogued
663,415
7,305
670,720
Microfilm (reels)
82,315
3,494
85,809
Microcards(cards)
111,680
111,680
Microprint (sheets)
1,087,670
1,087,670
Microfiche (sheets)
1,911,944
93,663
2,005,607
Aperture Cards
2,589
—
2,589
Films
1,597
(2)
1,595
Filmloops
8
8
Filmstrips
2,440
56
2,496
Slides
17,392
96
17,488
Slide/Tape Shows
14
78
92
Transparencies
1,281
1,281
Video Tapes
1,173
331
1,504
Videodiscs
	
1
1
Photographs
25,464
650
26,114
Pictures
74,667
188
74,855
Maps
164,600
3,831
168,431
Manuscripts*
1,913m
152m
2,065m
Sound Recordings
152,540
4,951
157,491
Computer Tapes
505
29
534
Microcomputer Discs
80
80
Air Photos
72
72
*  Thickness of files in meters. Appendix C
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April/March
Year
Salaries <5c
Wages
Collections
Binding
Other
Totals
1983/84
1984/85
1985/86
10,140,508 (65.76) 3,839,763 (24.90)
9,825,272 (66.17) 3,649,325 (24.58)
9,589,910  (63.85)     4,266,642   (28.41)
193,605 (1.26)
178,021 (1.20)
202,553  (1.35)
1,246,746  (8.08)
1,195,044  (8.05)
959,160  (6.39)
15,420,622
14,847,662
15,018,265
Notes: (1)     There was a change in practice regarding collections expenditures because of which figures for 1984/85 are not
comparable with those of other years.  Funds for orders which have been placed, but not yet received, can now be carried
forward to the following fiscal year.  The introduction of this practice resulted in lower expenditures in 1984/85 and
higher expenditures in 1985/86.
(2)     Expenditures from grant and trust funds are not included;  in 1985/86 they amounted to $113,675 for collections.
(3)      Cost recoveries of $240,046 are not reflected in Appendix C. Appendix D
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
Years ending
June 30
% Increase
Decrease vs.
GENERAL CIRCULATION
1983/84
1984/85
1985/86
1984/85
Main Library
General Stacks
489,525
500,628
514,315
Reserves
35,346
30,680
25,716
Extension
6,720
7,153
9,168
Fine Arts
112,856
104,668
95,481
Government Publications
115,096
122,631
120,768
Maps
9,980
10,919
11,132
Special Collections
24,012
22,753
21,143
SUBTOTAL
793,535
799,432
797,723
-0.2
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
20,133
21,320
19,667
Crane
32,394
29,093
1,958
Curriculum Laboratory
160,111
149,496
162,012
Film Library
1,441
2,034
2,032
Hamber
21,988
27,979
34,659
Law
113,777
120,624
117,198
MacMillan
65,114
60,833
62,584
Marjorie Smith
23,604
26,082
27,081
Mathematics
23,035
28,630
22,637
Medical Branch
31,929
33,387
34,784
Music
52,681
54,164
53,424
St. Paul's
15,664
17,929
20,852
Sedgewick
345,230
333,855
304,699
Woodward
241,638
248,364
248,721
SUBTOTAL
1,148,739
1,153,790
1,112,308
-3.6*
Use of Recordings
Wilson
296,885
257,317
257,240
Music
53,210
53,516
53,610
SUBTOTAL
350,095
310,833
310,850
0.0
Document Delivery
Health Sciences Network 29,036
INTERLIBRARY LOANS (excluding Films)
To Other Libraries
From Other Libraries
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LOANS
GRAND TOTAL (General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans)
16,097
8,010
24,107
2,345,512
33,558
14,736
8,859
23,595
2,321,208
36,532
2,283,121
+8.9
16,694
+ 13.3
9,014
+ 1.8
25,708
+9.0
■1.6
* The Crane Library circulation transaction unit has been changed from a piece to a package of one or
more parts equipped with a single circulation card. There is no satisfactory way of comparing the
1985/86 figure to those of previous years. Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
Years ending June 30
1983/84
1984/85
1985/86
% Increase/
Decrease vs
1984/85
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
1,739
1,465
1,486
Federated Information Network
1,003
974
969
BC Medical Library Service
3,690
3,797
3,662
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
2,286
2,120
2,504
Bamfield Marine Station
16
40
25
SUBTOTAL
8,734
8,396
8,646
+3.0
Films
1,075
994
895
-10.0
-    Photocopies
General
Federated Information Network
BC Medical Library Service
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
1,878
1,617
2,312
660
472
592
29
17
713
4,722
4,140
4,329
74
94
102
7,363
6,340
8,048
17,172
15,730
17,589
+26.9
+ 11.8
From Other Libraries
-    Original Materials
General
2,457
2,853
2,496
BC Medical Library Service
383
353
394
SUBTOTAL
2,840
3,206
2,890
-9.9
-    Films
779
817
828
+ 1.3
-    Photocopies
5,170
5,653
6,124
+8.3
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
8,789
9,676
9,842
+ 1.7 Appendix F
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK
July 1985 -June 1986
Interbranch Loans
To Other Branches
Woodward
Biomedical Branch
Hamber
St. Paul's
Other U.B.C Libraries
SUBTOTAL
(1984/85)
Original
Material
Photocopies
Total
6,421
23,351
29,772
774
2,246
3,020
294
430
724
320
146
466
1,434
1,116
2,550
9,243
27,289
36,532
(7,923)
(25,636)
(33,559)
From Other Branches
Woodward
Biomedical Branch
Hamber
St. Paul's
Other U.B.C Libraries
SUBTOTAL
(1984/85)
594
3,273
3,138
1,606
632
9,243
(7,923)
1,258
1,852
7,105
10,378
9,887
13,025
7,579
9,185
1,460
2,092
27,289
36,532
(25,636)
(33,559) Appendix G
REFERENCE & INFORMATION QUESTIONS ANSWERED
July 1985 - June 1986
Main Library
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Humanities & Social Sciences
Information Desk
Map Library
Science Division
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
(1984/85)
Directional
Questions
12,952
505
1,571
11,762
491
428
4,711
32,420
(35,986)
Reference      Research
Questions      Questions      TOTAL
9,827
27,058
29,677
45,079
4,042
7,091
5,943
128,717
(132,701)
1,383 24,162
1,098 28,661
1,507 32,755
56,841
67 4,600
594 8,113
2,055 12,709
6,704 167,841
(6,738) (175,425)
% Increase/
Decrease vs
1984/85
-4.3
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Film Library
Hamber Library
Health Sciences Network
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics Library
Medical Branch (V.G.H.)
Music Library
St. Paul's
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
(1984/85)
GRAND TOTAL
(1984/85)
1,707
5,079
720
7,506
1,276
1,639
548
3,463
10,300
15,802
642
26,744
1,984
7,088
504
9,576
7,571
10,755
3,340
21,666
-
2,728
102
2,830
4,028
5,491
2,982
12,501
1,687
7,759
560
10,006
1,661
1,908
110
3,679
1,491
1,225
432
3,148
2,087
8,730
914
11,731
2,925
10,011
60
12,996
4,398
11,169
764
16,331
8,427
17,313
173
25,913
7,525
26,607
4,076
38,208
57,067
133,304
15,927
206,298
(62,390)
(119,452)
(13,100)
(194,942)
89,487
262,021
22,631
374,139
(98,376)
(252,153)
(19,838)
(370,367)
+5.8
+1.0 Appendix H
COMPUTER-ASSISTED BIBLIOGRAPHIC SEARCHES
July 1985
- June 1986
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
No. of
Student
UBC
Non-UBC
Data Bases
SDI
Division
Searches
Searches
Searches
Searches Reference
I.L.L.
Searched
Reports
Biomedical
Branch
707
-
503
2
202
-
2,601
171
Hamber
928
-
469
-
459
.
2,158
586
Humanities &
Social Sciences
530
110
135
19
266
-
570
1
Law
205
52
37
10
106
_
2,397
_
MacMillan
242
59
36
6
141
_
296
2
St. Paul's
291
-
355
2
134
_
1,389
176
Science
2,920
67
118
15
594
2,126
2,995
3
Woodward
2,268
86
821
27
822
512
5,322
1,103
Total
8,291
374
2,474
81
2,724
2,638
17,728
2,042
1984/85
(8,183)
(311)
(2,283)
(81)
(2,903)
(2,605)
(14,936)
(1,885)
1.       Number of searches;
a total of the figures in columns 2 to 6.
2.      Student spe
jcials: Urn
ited search*
js provided
to UBC sti
idents at a i
:lat fee.
3.
5.
6.
7.
8.
UBC searches: for UBC members, excluding student specials.
Non-UBC searches: full costs, including staff time, are charged for searches on behalf of persons
not associated with the University. These searches tend to be complex and often involve the use of
several data files.
Reference searches are usually brief inquiries for information not readily accessible in print.
ILL verification is a search for the purpose of determining the existence and location of documents
and ordering them on-line as interlibrary Joans.
*The total for science includes all ILL verification for the Library system except Woodward and
the hospital libraries.
**The Woodward total includes ILL verification for Woodward Library and the 3 hospital libraries.
A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base. Staff time for a
reference search may vary depending on the number and combination of data bases used.
Selective Dissemination of Information reports: the number of monthly updates distributed to
clients.  Current awareness (SDI) profiles are included in columns 1 to 5 only when they are
initially established or subsequently revised. Appendix I
ORIENTATION TOURS & INSTRUCTIONAL SESSIONS
July 1985 - June 1986
Main Library
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Humanities <5t Social Sciences
Information 6c Orientation
Map Collection
Science
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Community groups
UDV.    31
uvn
;nto,     j,o,v.u»,
/
/
1^
V
.0/
■Or
j>
1<*
1
12
3
82
1
10
	
—
5
42
3
49
--
—
49
972
—
—
48
1.
,100
—
--
15
263
—
—
18
236
1
23
3
15
4
81
--
--
15
66
27
271
30
246
67
1
,193
106
1
,684
50
591
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Hamber
Law
MacMillan
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics
Medical Branch (V.G.H.)
Music
St. Paul's
Sedgewick
Woodward
SUBTOTAL
3
49
II
10
15
7
1
34
22
37
189
10
806
69
180
114
108
2
85
79
60
1,513
3
45
I
8
74
1,637
22
1,355
4
38
15
119
31
269
128
2,270
374
5,855
145
390
6
76
2
45
4
16
7
138
1
2
1
3
4
170
28
698
GRAND TOTAL
1
Estimated number of participants
Primarily English labs
256
2,706
375
7,539
220
1,289 Appendix J
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1985/86
ADMINISTRATION
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
Keate, Heather
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
University Librarian
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Administrative
Services
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Collections
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Branch Libraries
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Central Libraries
ACQUISITIONS DIVISION
Davidson, Joyce
Head
ASIAN STUDIES LIBRARY
Ng, Tung King
Head
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George Head
CATALOGUE RECORDS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
Bailey, Freda
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS DIVISION
Omeiusik, Nick
Head
Deputy Head 6c Bibliographic Control Librarian
(to December 31, 1985)
Head
CIRCULATION DIVISION
Banham, Mary
Head Appendix J
(continued)
COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Kreider, Janice
Mcintosh, Jack
Karpinski, Leszek
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
Head
FINE ARTS LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
GIFTS & EXCHANGE DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Acting Head (from January 1, 1985 to March 31,
1986)
Head (from April 1, 1986)
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS & MICROFORMS DIVISION
Dodson, Suzanne
Head
HAMBER LIBRARY (Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals)
Nelson, Ann Head Appendix J
(continued)
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK SERVICES
Price, Jane
Co-ordinator
HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Forbes, Charles Head
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION DIVISION
Stevens, Julie
Head
INTERLIBRARY LOAN DIVISION
Friesen, Margaret
Head
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Brongers, Lore
Head
MAP LIBRARY
Wilson, Maureen
Head
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
Frye, Judith
Head
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
ST. PAUL'S HOSPITAL LIBRARY
Saint, Barbara
Head Appendix J
(continued)
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
Head
*'
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Sandilands, Joan
SERIALS DIVISION
Baldwin, Nadine
Head
Head
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Daniells, Laurenda
Selby, Joan
Head
University Archivist
Curator, Colbeck Collection
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst and Head
Systems 6c Information Science Librarian
WILSON RECORDINGS COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head
Associate Head Appendix K
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1985/86
Mrs. H.M. Belkin
Dean P.T. Burns
Ms. H.E. Cowan
Ms. C. Davidson
Dr. J.A.S. Evans
Dr. CV. Finnegan
Mr. K.D. Hancock
Dr. P.A. Larkin
Dr. B.C. McBride
Mr. M. McMillan
Dean R.C Miller
Dr. A.G. Mitchell
Miss D.J. Moore
Prof. A.B. Piternick
Dr. R.D. Russell
Dr. L.S. Weiler
Dr. J.L. Wisenthal (Chairman)
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor W.R. Wyman
President D.W. Strangway
President pro tern R.H.T. Smith
Mr. K.G. Young
Mr. D.N. Mclnnes
Terms of Reference
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i) formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii) advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii) developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv) keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the Library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee.

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