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The Report of the University Librarian to the Senate of the University of British Columbia Mar 31, 1986

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 eport of the university librarian
to the senate
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA LIBRARY
1984-85 The Report
of the University Librarian
to the Senate
of the
University of British Columbia
Seventieth Year
1984/85
Vancouver
March 1986 DEVELOPMENT OF THE LIBRARY 1925 - 1985
As this report marks the sixtieth anniversary of the move from Fairview to
campus and the present Main Library building, it seems appropriate to recall some
of the major events in the development of the Library system over the past sixty
years as background to a report on 1984/85. When faced with seemingly
intractable problems, as we are now, it is easy to forget how many difficulties have
been overcome in the past and how much real progress has been made in the
Library's relatively brief history.
Collections:
In 1925 the University Library collections numbered 55,000 volumes, and it
was estimated that a similar library could not be bought for $200,000. Enrolment
at the University was 1,463. During the first year on the Point Grey campus, the
circulation of books more than doubled, from 17,522 to 40,560 - an early sign of
what was to come.
Sixty years later, the collection had grown to include a total of 2,465,584
catalogued volumes and 4,580,000 additional items of microform and non-print
materials. Although a "similar library" could no longer be bought, the collections
were estimated in 1985 to be worth well over $260,000,000. Daytime enrolment
had grown to a relatively stable 25,483 students, and the circulation of materials
had levelled off at 2,321,208 loans.
Like the University itself, the Library did not grow at an even, measured
pace from year to year. Periods of relative stability were interrupted by dramatic
growth and change as external events and expansion of the University's programs
and enrolments had their effect.   The cumulative growth of collections and the increase in circulation transactions can be seen in the following table, which shows,
at ten-year intervals, the number of catalogued volumes in the collections, the
total anhual circulation, and the University's full-time enrolment:
Catalogued
Volumes
Circulation
Enrolment
1924/25
53,000
17,522
1,451
1934/35
97,393
96,982
1,752
1944/45
147,769
92,470
3,058
1954/55
304,247
258,501
5,914
1964/65
675,446
788,657
15,489
1974/75
1,673,360
2,290,173
22,124
1984/85
2,465,584
2,321,208
25,483
The fact that the Library has added more volumes (358,121) in the last five
years than it did during its first thirty years at Point Grey provides a dramatic
comment on the scope of today's research library. The growth of the collection
between 1965 and 1975 was even more remarkable. During that ten-year period
the collection, already substantial, grew by almost 150%. In common with
advanced educational institutions throughout the western world, the University and
the Library underwent a period of unprecedented growth in the 1960s: new
academic programs came into being and the campus expanded greatly. The
development of a strong research collection was given a special impetus in 1965,
through a gift of $3 million from Dr. H.R. MacMillan, to be spent in three years on
library materials. That gift allowed the Library to compensate, in some measure,
for its late beginnings and led to the development of areas of significant strength,
for example, in Asian studies, medicine, musicology, Pacific Northwest and
Canadian history.
Of course, the rate at which collections have grown is also a function of the
growth in the volume of published information. In 1925, for example, 8,193 books
were published in the United States. In 1983, there were 53,380. Growth in the
number of periodicals published is not well documented. The current edition of
Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory lists some 69,000 periodicals that are
issued on a regular basis. As noted in previous annual reports, the Library's holdings of periodicals
constitute an area of special strength. In November, 1925, the subscription list
"represented an annual cost of $1,768 which [seemed] disproportionate to the total
Book & Magazine Fund of $4,000" (Library Committee Minutes, Nov. 2, 1925). By
1926, the Library subscribed to 386 periodicals at a cost of $2,331.65, which
worked out to an average of $6.04 per title. By contrast, the Library's
expenditures for serials in 1984/85 came to more than two million dollars and, with
almost 35,000 subscriptions, the Library ranked 21st in that respect among the 117
libraries belonging to the Association of Research Libraries.
Still more rapid growth has occurred in the Library's "other" collections, that
is, all of the materials that are by convention excluded from a count of catalogued
volumes. As of March 31, 1985 this important part of the collection included
1,911,944 microfiche, 82,315 reels of microfilm, 1.2 million items of other
microformats, 164,600 maps, 152,540 sound recordings, and small but growing
collections of films and videotapes.
Library facilities and services:
The original library building, which still exists as the core of the Main
Library, was able to contain the Library through the years of slow, gradual growth
in the 1930s and early 1940s. By the late 1940s, however, swelling student numbers
arid a collection approaching the 200,000 volume mark made it necessary to add
new space. In 1948 a north wing was added to the building. The years that
followed saw further additions to the Main Library and the creation of an extensive
system of s;pecialized reference divisions and branch libraries:
1950 Opening of Bio-Medical Reading Room.
1952 Bio-Medical Branch Library established at the Vancouver
General Hospital.
1960 Addition of the Walter C. Koerner South Wing, permitting
the establishment of specialized reference divisions for
Humanities, Science, and Social Sciences and separate
divisions for Special Collections and Asian Studies.
Undergraduate Library opened. 1963 Curriculum Laboratory moved from the Main Library to the
Scarfe building and expanded to provide additional services.
1964 Woodward Library opened to accommodate biomedical
collections and services previously housed in the Main
Library.
1965 Completion of a stack addition, bringing the Main Library to
its anticipated capacity and permitting the creation of
separate divisions for Government Publications and
Microforms and for Maps. The Wilson Recordings Collection
was established.
Marjorie Smith Library established for Social Work.
1967 Opening of the MacMillan Library (Forestry and
Agriculture), the Mathematics Library> and the Music
Library.
1968 Addition of the Crane Library to provide library service to
visually impaired students.
1970 Expansion of the Woodward Library.
1973 Opening of the new Sedgewick Library under the Main Mall.
1975 Move of the Law Library into its present quarters.
Creation of non-public collections storage area in space
previously occupied by the Museum of Anthropology in the
Main Library.
1979 Relocation   of   the   Processing  Divisions   from   the   Main
Library to the Library Processing Centre.
1981 Move of the Asian Studies Library from the Main building to
quarters in the new Asian Centre.
1982 St. Paul's Hospital Library becomes part of the Library
system and the Hamber Library is opened, serving
Children's, Grace, and Shaughnessy Hospitals.
1984 Creation of additional non-public storage for collections on
the 7th floor of the Main Library in space previously
occupied by the Processing Divisions. The overall size and capacity of the Main Library building was determined in
early 1960s, with the addition of the South wing and stack well. Its internal
organization was essentially established by 1965, when completion of the stack well
allowed the present configuration of specialized service units to be set up. The
movement of various collections to external branch libraries and the creation of
non-public storage for substantial numbers of older, less frequently used materials
have combined to extend its working capacity to the present time and, we hope, for
a few more years.
Of course, the development of an extensive system of branch libraries did
much more than relieve space problems in the Main Library. The branch system
reflected the physical growth and decentralization of the University campus and
brought collections and more specialized services into closer proximity to those
who would use them most. The creation of new branch library facilities was
usually followed by very significant increases in the use of collections and services.
While the development of branch libraries was partly responsible for the
tremendous increases in library use that occurred between 1960 and 1975 it was not
the only factor. Enrolment grew from 12,000 to almost 23,000 during the same
period. Through the introduction, in 1965, of an automated circulation system,
borrowing books became much easier than it had been previously, when borrowers
were obliged to fill out a call slip for each item manually. A variety of factors
contributed to the growth in the use of library collections, but the development of
a system which brought major collections closer to their primary users while
fostering the growth of specialized services provided a strong impetus for
increased use.
Recorded external circulation is only a partial measure of use, since it
ignores the very substantial use of collections that occurs inside the library. The
opening of the new Sedgewick Library, for example, resulted in a decrease in
recorded circulation for that branch, while there is strong reason to believe that
the amount of use actually increased. Prior to the move, seating in the Sedgewick
Library was very limited and borrowing was high.  In the new building, the provision of adequate study seating for almost 1,500 library users allowed materials to be
used on site in comfortable surroundings. While the number of loans from
Sedgewick dropped sharply, the heavy use that the facility received was apparent
in the amount of material that was reshelved and in the dramatic increase in
reference statistics.
The lesson that may be conveyed by the changing pattern of library use is
that enrolment, academic programs, and teaching methods create the potential for
intensive use of library resources. The provision of appropriate facilities and
services makes it possible for that potential to be realized.
During its brief history, the UBC Library has participated in a virtual
revolution in the provision of reference services in research libraries. Prior to
1950, reference services were provided by a single general department situated in
the Ridington Room. Though special reading rooms had been established in the
building for fine arts and rare books, the beginnings of more specialized service
were not seen until 1950, with the establishment of a Bio-Medical Reading Room to
support the new Medical Faculty. In the years that followed, reference service was
further developed in such areas as fine arts, maps, and rare books, and with the
addition of the south wing in 1960, the general reference service was divided into
subject divisions for science, humanities and social sciences. That realignment of
reference service permitted reference librarians to work within a more restricted
field and to develop a closer knowledge of their materials and the needs of their
clientele.
Subsequent growth of the present branch library system offered further
opportunities to ensure that specialized reference service could be provided to
meet the developing needs of the University and to assist library users in coping
with the complexities of a large collection and a much larger universe of
potentially available publications.
Since the early 1970's, the computer has played an increasingly important role in this task at UBC. For the first two years, computer-based information
service was limited to the provision to a small number of library users of monthly
lists of citations to current scientific literature, obtained by running interest
profiles against bibliographic tapes held at the National Science Library. By 1972,
a terminal had been installed in the Woodward Library to allow searching of the
U.S. National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE system. Computer-assisted
bibliographic searching is now acknowledged to be an important aspect of
reference service in most disciplines, with several hundred specialized data bases
available for online access. Indeed, the Library is now being asked with increasing
frequency to assist groups and individuals in learning how to make direct use of
online bibliographic services designed and marketed for the end-user.
Technical Processing and Systems:
The UBC Library and the Library of Congress classification system came into
existence at about the same time. In fact, as the first large shipment of books was
being unpacked and catalogued in 1915, the Library of Congress classification
scheme was only partially completed. The decision to use that scheme for
classifying UBC's new library was one of the far-sighted decisions for which the
Library must always be grateful to John Ridington, the first University Librarian.
It is difficult for those of us who work in the Library today to visualize the
difficulty of acquiring and organizing a university library collection without the
assistance of the modern tools on which we have come to depend. The task
involved every staff member - Mr. Ridington himself spent long hours in the early
days affixing labels to the spines of books.
Nevertheless, by 1925/26 the number of orders placed annually by the Library
had risen to 2,420, which translated into the addition of about 3,000 volumes to the
collection. It may be of interest that the greatest number of volumes added to the
collection in a single year was in 1970/71, when 162,428 were processed. This, of
course,  reflected   the impact  of  the  MacMillan gift, as  backlogs  of  materials 8
acquired were finally catalogued. In the year of this report, a net total of 121,212
volumes were added. That figure includes 19,538 items listed in the Library's DRS
system, a relatively informal online catalogue of pamphlets and other materials for
which official cataloguing cannot be justified. It is not planned that those items
will ever receive full cataloguing.
It is now twenty-one years since the Library introduced an automated system
for lending books, its first venture into the use of the computer to deal more
effectively with increasing volumes of work. By 1967, a system had been devised
to permit the listing of books prior to cataloguing and work was well advanced on a
new acquisitions and accounting system. Among the most important of many local
computer-based developments was a system for serials management, which had its
beginnings in the late 1960s with the creation of a printed list of serial holdings for
the UBC Library. The serials system has more recently become an extremely
effective and sophisticated tool through which complex records for many thousands
of serial publications are maintained. Online access now permits information about
the receipt of serials to be available throughout the Library system as soon as
individual issues are checked in.
Most record management systems relating to processing had been automated
to some extent by 1978, when the Library's central record, the card catalogue, was
finally closed and continued through the regular publication of a microcatalogue.
During the several years that followed, the Library participated with other B.C.
university, college and institute libraries in the development of the B.C. Union
Catalogue. With special funding from the Ministry of Education, substantial
progress was made in converting existing records to machine-readable form, and a
union catalogue was issued which, though incomplete, was extremely useful in
widening access to library resources. Unfortunately, work on the B.C. Union
Catalogue was discontinued in 1983 when funding was no longer available.
An attempt by the university and some college libraries to develop a shared
local cataloguing network continued into 1984 but was finally dropped because of the lack of funding. Since then, post-secondary libraries in B.C. have been obliged
to pursue individual approaches to the automation of their catalogues, to the
detriment of future opportunities for cooperation. For the university libraries, and
particularly for UBC, the demise of the B.C. Union Catalogue left substantially
incomplete the task of converting existing catalogue records to machine-readable
form. We must find ways of resuming this formidable undertaking at UBC if the
records for our extensive monographic collections are ever to be made more widely
accessible.
At UBC, the development of a local cataloguing system was made possible
through the purchase of a main-frame computer in 1985. The improved computing
facilities have allowed more efficient operation of all of the Library's recordkeeping systems and have resulted in improved access to information about the
collections. Ultimately, the quality of library service depends on the extent to
which our collections have been successfully organized and indexed, and on the
ease with which library patrons can use our records to find what they require.
While much remains to be done, the UBC Library has been fortunate in having
innovative and expert systems and processing staff who have worked hard to create
better and more efficient ways of utilizing the Library's resources. THE PAST YEAR:  1984/85
Collections:
Due to reductions in university funding the Library's collections budget
increased by only five percent (in 1984/85) over the four fiscal years from 1982/83
to 1985/86. We must express appreciation for the broad support which protected
the collections budget from the actual dollar cuts which have afflicted most other
areas of the University. At the same time, it must be pointed out that inflation
continues to be higher for library materials than might be expected. Our serial
subscriptions cost about 10% more in 1984/85 than in the previous year; book
prices were up 4 - 5% on average. Since serial subscriptions take up more than half
of our budget, the continuing high rate of inflation for this material must be a
matter of concern when little additional money can be provided.
Despite the difficult times, we have, for the most part, been able to continue
to improve some aspects of the research collection. External sources of funding
have helped to develop the collection in a number of areas, and some of the sources
are acknowledged below. The most significant impact of static funding levels is
that we are not able to keep up with the many new journals and monographic series
which are being produced in almost overwhelming numbers. At present we budget
$10,000 per year for new subscriptions, about half of the amount that should
reasonably be available for this purpose. In the absence of significant budget
increases, however, we can ill afford to add further to the annual rate of increase
in our costs. In order to subscribe to a broader range of new serials, we may be
obliged to cancel a body of existing subscriptions every two or three years.
The retrenchment in staffing levels which has affected all areas of the
Library in recent years has led to a significant reduction in the time spent on book
selection. There are four librarians in the Collections Division who formerly spent
their whole time selecting materials for the Main Library collection; three of
them now spend one-quarter to one-half their time on reference duties replacing
librarians who retired or resigned, with the result that one FTE of librarian time
has been lost out of four. For similar reasons the librarians in branch libraries find
it difficult to spend as much time on book selection as they would like. 11
Donations and other external financial support:
External support for the Library is most gratifying in times of restraint, and
it is a pleasure to acknowledge contributions from individuals and agencies outside
the University.
The Japan Foundation has been a generous supporter of our Asian Studies
collection over the years. As the interest in Asian affairs has spread across the
campus, so too has the distribution of Asian material spread to other campus
libraries. The most recent gift of the Japan Foundation was to the Law Library,
which received the backfile of an important Japanese law serial.
Also in the Asian area, a 1985 grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council (SSHRC) was to purchase a reprint collection of Chinese
gazetteers. These are local histories which are a fundamental resource for the
study of Chinese history; with the addition of the material to be purchased our
collection should be the best in Canada. Grants made under the SSHRC program
for support of library research collections continue to be a regular and important
source of external funding.
The Library is indebted to a variety of local foundations, societies and trusts
which have provided support for the purchase of materials in a number of areas.
The Vancouver Foundation was associated with three of these donations. Acting on
behalf of the donors, the Foundation conveyed gifts from the Ernest Theodore
Rogers Fund (for cartographic materials and Canadiana) and the Mark and Phae
Collins Fund (for undergraduate books). Some of the Foundation's gift to the
Faculty of Arts was also used to buy library materials, primarily newspaper
backfiles (complementing the newspaper files purchased with a SSHRC grant two
years ago).
The Crane Library for visually impaired students has benefited from the
support of the Kiwanis Club and was also the recipient of a substantial donation
from the 1985 UBC graduating class. This support from within and without the
University is particularly appreciated. 12
Through the good offices of St. Paul's Hospital, the UBC branch health sciences
library at the hospital has received valuable support from the Sutherland
Foundation for the Rodger Stanton Fund.
The continued support of the Law Foundation (Law Library serials), the Boag
Foundation (history and development of socialism) and the Mount Pleasant Legion
(geriatrics) is gratefully acknowledged.
The Special Collections Division has received support from two agencies to
organize and provide access to some of its valuable materials. The Graduating
Classes of 1921 and 1922 continue to give generous financial support for work with
the UBC photographic archives. The Division also received a grant from SSHRC to
prepare a computer-produced guide to the UBC archives and manuscript
collections.
It is a pleasure to pay tribute to personal donors who take an interest in some
part of the library collection. Among our regular donors every year are Dr. Kaye
Lamb and Mr. Samuel Lipson (Canadiana in Special Collections), Dr. Blythe Eagles
(the MacMillan collection), and Mr. Derek Lukin Johnson (the humanities and social
sciences collection). The Crane Library has received generous donations this year
from Mrs. Helen Humphrey, Mr. John MacDonald and Mr. W.R. Read (who was also
able to secure a matching corporate donation from his employer in the U.S.). We
would also like to acknowledge a number of personal donors to the Alumni
Association who regularly designate their contributions to be for the Library.
Lastly, it is appropriate to record the continuing support for library purposes
which is derived from the income from endowment funds which were set up in
earlier years. The Library has endowments of varying amounts which pay tribute
to the memories of the following individuals -
Dr. Keith Burwell (anthropology, sociology, psychology, and medicine)
Mr. Harry Daggett (philately)
Dr. William Gough (medical library)
Mr. Otto Koerner (music, fine arts, theatre)
Dr. Iser Steiman (medical history)
Dr. Honor Kidd Timbers (history of medicine <5c science)
Dr. Cooley Verner (cartography) 13
In addition to the financial donations recorded above, the Library also
receives numerous gifts-in-kind. The donors of individual books and small amounts
of material are too many to be listed in this brief report, and it is only possible to
thank them collectively. A few representative names would include Mr. A. Petzold
and Mr. Y.C Pan, who donated materials to the Asian Library; Dr. H.F. Angus
and Dr. I. Avakumovic, who donated materials for the Main Library general
collection; Dr. R.A. 3obe, who donated children's books to the Curriculum
Laboratory; and Dr. J.E. Nafe, who donated to the Arkley children's collection in
Special Collections. Mr. M. Bullock, Mr. H. Logan and the Thompson Berwick Pratt
Co. donated papers to the UBC Archives. Ms. A. Alvey, Mr. J. Stanton and Mr. H.
Thayer donated materials to the manuscript collections in Special Collections.
Public Services:
Use of the Library's public services by its clientele continued at a very high
level in 1984/85. The two chief and traditional measures of public service activity
- the recorded use of library materials, and the count of questions answered at
reference and information points - show that services from the Library remain in
heavy demand.
The circulation of library materials to borrowers for use outside the premises
fluctuates somewhat from year to year, but UBC continues to be near the top of
the list of North American university research libraries in this respect. It might be
assumed that a high rate of renewals has swelled the circulation totals, but in fact
the University provides an extended loan period which leads to fewer renewals. It
appears that UBC Library users, for undetermined reasons, simply borrow a great
many books.
During the report year 799,432 items were loaned from the Main Library, as
compared with 793,535 in the previous year. The branches loaned 1,153,790 items,
compared to 1,148,739. Use of recordings held by the Wilson Recordings Collection
dropped considerably, by 13.3 percent, from 296,885 in 1983/84 to 257,317 last
year, perhaps because of an increase in the cost of a borrower's card and perhaps
partly because of a slight reduction in hours of opening.   The transfer of materials 14
among the members of the Health Sciences Network went up substantially again
this year to 33,558 transactions, as compared to 29,036 in 1983/84 and 24,052 in
1982/83.
In loans between UBC on the one hand and libraries elsewhere on the other,
once again the numbers of items borrowed from UBC declined while our borrowing
from elsewhere increased. A few years ago there were three items loaned to other
libraries for every one borrowed from them. The balance has gradually shifted
year by year so that in 1984/85 the ratio was 1.63 loaned for every one borrowed.
The change can be attributed to the action taken by UBC in 1976 to charge a
handling fee for interlibrary loans, while undertaking at the same time to pay fees
for items borrowed from other libraries. The policy became necessary since this
University could not continue to absorb the costs of handling the growing numbers
of loans requested by other libraries. While UBC was not the first Canadian
university to charge for interlibrary loans, the decision was widely criticized on
both economic and philosophic grounds, particularly by institutions that had been
used to relying heavily on UBC for loans. That it resulted in a major shift in the
balance of loans indicates its effectiveness.
In recent years lending patterns have also been affected as more and more
information about collections has become available through conversion of
catalogues to machine readable form. The number of potential sources for loans
has thus been increased, and the practice of sending requests to the largest
libraries as the most probable owners of needed materials has become less
prevalent. As for our borrowing from other libraries, UBC researchers are
increasingly finding that they need access to materials not available in our own
collections. This trend may result in part from an increased awareness, through
computer-assisted searching, of a wider range of publications; it may also reflect
the fact that the Library can no longer afford to purchase as much of the output of
the world's presses as it did a few years ago. In 1984/85 the total of loans from
UBC to other libraries was 15,730, which compares to 17,172 in 1983/84 and 18,600
in 1982/83. Borrowing from other libraries last year came to 9,676, as compared to
8,789 in 1983/84 and 7,855 in 1982/83. 15
The provision of information is the other major service responsibility of the
North American university library. In the UBC Library there are twenty-one
service points set up to answer questions asked by students, faculty and the general
public. Some of them serve that function alone, while the rest are both reference
and circulation points. In addition, there are several locations intended primarily
to provide other services, but which are incidentally called upon to answer
questions. All reference stations deal with questions put to them both in person
and over the telephone. Counting all formal reference stations, but excluding
casual queries at other locations, the Library gave answers to 370,367 questions in
1984/85, up by 7.2 percent over the previous year's total of 345,625 questions.
An important part of the work of the reference librarian is showing people
how to use the library and how to do research on their own. The librarian is
concerned not only to provide an answer to a question, but also wherever possible
to show the user how to use library resources more effectively. This teaching
activity sometimes takes place in a formal environment set up for the purpose, as
for instance when the librarian addresses a class. The Term Paper Clinic, at which
advice is offered on how to research the individual student's topic, and how to
construct a paper setting it forth, is another example of practical teaching. Most
instruction by librarians, though, takes place informally in the course of assisting
users to get hold of the information or the material they want. The process is
routine, continuous, and immeasurable.
At reference and information desks distinctions are made in the terminology
applied to different sorts of questions. At the most basic level are directional
questions, making up about one quarter of the total. Most numerous are the
reference questions proper, which account for about two thirds of the total. This
category includes all sorts of questions, excepting the directional ones, providing
that the assistance required takes no more than about fifteen minutes to provide.
They range from assistance in interpretation of the public catalogue, through
advice on likely locations of materials or data sought, to guidance on how to
proceed with a topic. The remaining category, research questions, covers those
which call for more than fifteen minutes of the librarian's time. 16
In 1984/85, as compared with 1983/84, the number of directional questions
answered increased by 10.7 percent to 98,376; reference questions answered
increased by 5.8 percent to 252,153; and research questions answered by 8.2
percent to 19,838. During the most intense parts of the winter session, there were
more than 10,000 questions answered in a week.
A part of reference activity that has grown steadily during the past decade
has to do with the extraction of information wanted by clients from machine-
readable data bases. Figures for some recent years show the extent of the growth
in demand: 1978/79-1,653; 1980/81-3,398; 1982/83-6,633; 1984/85-8,183.
In fact, the demand is greater than the figures suggest, since many people who ask
for computer searches find that their needs can be satisfied more readily and
without payment of a fee through a conventional "manual" reference search.
The reference librarian must be able to distinguish between an information
need that can be well served by a computer search and one better handled by the
traditional approach. If a machine search is indicated, the librarian has to know
which utility and which data base are likely to be most productive, how the data
base is structured, and how to search it efficiently. For most reference librarians
computer-assisted searching is a technique that has to be acquired and mastered in
addition to their other work. The opportunity is rare to be a full-time specialist in
machine searching.
Library staff have been building and using computer-supported information
and record-keeping systems for a number of years. In the spring of 1985 computer
terminals were installed at all of the public service desks in the library system.
Local files listing books on order and in process, serials holdings including recent
receipts, and quantities of uncatalogued material can now be consulted on-line.
This is an important first step in the long-term goal of replacing the microfiche
records with online access.
In 1985 the fifteenth anniversary of the formal establishment of the
University Archives occurred. The Archives, which operate as a part of the Special
Collections Division, have  responsibility to select, describe, preserve and make 17
available those records which have enduring value for the University for
administrative, legal, fiscal and historical purposes. In 1984, with the help of
funding received from the Public Archives of Canada, the Archives completed the
first phase of a survey of all University offices to determine the type, location,
quantity and condition of existing records. The survey resulted in the transfer of
much material to the Archives. The next step involves work on an automated
repository guide to the University's archives and manuscripts collections, which
will make their contents easier to manage and to access.
Technical Services & Systems:
The story of the technical services and systems divisions in 1984/85 was
largely one of the continuing development and implementation of automated
systems. All of the changes were aimed at more efficient operations in order to
achieve better results from fewer staff hours.
There were two major and related developments during the year, both of
them proceeding out of a comprehensive review of alternatives for automated
systems which had been completed the previous year. The review had determined
that the best prospect for the Library would be to discontinue reliance on the
UTLAS catalogue support system in favor of placing all automated systems on a
Library computer. This would call for development of a local catalogue support
system.
The University accepted the proposal to obtain a mainframe for library
operations, and the computer, an IBM 4381, was installed in December 1984. The
existing Library applications were shifted to the new facility virtually overnight.
The transition was quick and smooth and accompanied by very few problems. The
result was an immediate improvement in online response time, providing a marked
benefit to all technical service divisions except Catalogue Records.
Having obtained the necessary computing capacity, the next requirement was
to design, develop and implement a catalogue support system to take the place of
UTLAS.    The process took a month longer than had been estimated and the new 18
system started up in June 1985. It included an authority control feature by which
the consistency of names, series and subjects in the database could be maintained.
This gave promise that the reliability of the catalogue for both users and staff
would, in time, be considerably enhanced.
When the catalogue system had been mounted on the new computer, joining
those other functions transferred to it previously, the technical services divisions
held a Library Processing Centre open house in late June. Members of the Library
staff and interested observers from elsewhere viewed demonstrations of the
systems and sub-systems at work.
Important factors in the success of the switch to the new computing facility
and the development of the local catalogue support system were the excellent
assistance provided by the Computing Centre, the very hard work of the Library
systems and cataloguing staff over a sustained period, and the sound foundations
already established in the development of applications over the past five years. I
wish to acknowledge with gratitude the cooperation of the Centre and the efforts
of the staff.
In this year the Library made a substantial leap forward in the application of
computer technology by going online with most applications and obtaining systems
and facilities to permit the planning and development for an eventual online public-
access catalogue. There remains much work to be done before such a sophisticated
public facility is available for use.
To illustrate the benefits to be realized from better systems, the
redevelopment of prebindery routines meant that one staff position could be
released. Similarly, the new invoice processing system made it possible for all
accounting activities to be handled within the responsible unit and without staff
assistance from outside. In Serials, the availability of computer indexes together
with a low rate of staff turnover made for an up-to-date check-in situation. All
check-in processing was done online and in one to three days of receipt of the
material. 19
Towards the end of the report year (i.e. in August 1985) contract
arrangements between the University and the consulting firm of Ritchie &
Associates were signed for a detailed study of the Library technical services
staffing levels. The process had started earlier in the summer with a "preliminary
analysis" study by the R <5c A staff. Work was scheduled to begin in September and
to be completed by mid-winter.
Because of the heavy commitment of time by librarians and supervisory staff
that would go into supporting the work of the consultants, it was clear that most
plans to determine revised procedures made possible by the new catalogue system
would have to be postponed. Also to be deferred were several major clean-up and
corrective projects for the catalogue data base, although some of this work would
be given priority to continue as and when possible.
Staff:
Two conditions characterized the staff situation during the year under
review, both having to do with retrenchment. One was that the freeze on hiring
continued, so that a staff vacancy was refilled only when it was demonstrable that
the position was necessary to maintain library services. The other was that the
Library lost positions as staff reached retirement age, took early retirement, or
made use of the provisions for voluntary termination.
Melva Dwyer, the long-time Head of the Fine Arts Division, retired at the
end of 1984. The position was eliminated, and her duties were temporarily assumed
by Hans Burnsdorfer, who also continued as Head of the Music Library.
Dorothy Shields, the Bibliographer responsible for selecting Canadian and
west European materials, took early retirement at the end of 1984. Her position
was eliminated, and her work taken on by Leszek Karpinski, who was reassigned on
a two-thirds time basis from the Humanities & Social Sciences Division.
Rita Butterfield, Head of Circulation, chose to take early retirement at the
end of March 1985. The complement of librarians in the division was reduced from
two to one and one half and Mary Banham was promoted into the Head's position. 20
Mary Macaree, Head of the MacMillan Library, Margaret Pahr, Catalogue
Librarian, and Marilyn Dutton, Commerce Reference Librarian, all took early
retirement at the end of June 1985. Lore Brongers, the half-time Reference
Librarian in MacMillan, replaced Mary Macaree as Head, while the positions of
Margaret Pahr and Marilyn Dutton were eliminated as part of retrenchment.
Ture Erickson, Head of the Sedgewick Library for many years, decided to
return to full-time reference work, and transferred to the Humanities and Social
Sciences Division. Joan Sandilands, Head of the Information and Orientation
Division, took over as Head of Sedgewick, and her former position was taken by
Juliette Stevens. As part of this series of changes, the complement of Sedgewick
librarians was reduced by one position.
Retirements of those who served the Library for many years were not limited
to librarians. Sheila Neville, who had supervised the Reserve Book Collection for
many years, retired in January 1985. Sam Tao, who worked in the Library's Mail
Room, retired at the end of June, and Cecilia Lee, from the Catalogue Products
Division, retired at the end of July. Among the resignations of long-term
employees was that of Nancy Smith, Technician in the Crane Library, who left at
the end of March.
There were also several librarians who elected during the year to take
reduced appointments of four-fifths' time. The hours reduced were lost to the
Library through retrenchment.
Spaces and Facilities:
The point of full working capacity of the Library draws ever nearer. Until a
resolution of the space problem is attained, it will remain one of our chief
concerns. As of this presentation to Senate only two branches have more than five
years' space for collections growth. The rest of the system has already reached
capacity or will have reached it within the next few years. 21
During the summer and autumn of 1984, as a temporary alleviation of the
space situation, more than 60,000 volumes from the Main stacks were relegated to
a newly-created storage area on stack level 7. At the same time the stacks were
thoroughly cleaned and the collections readjusted to provide some room for growth
throughout the classification. A stack and collections measurement made during
the Christmas and New Year's break indicated that there would be room for normal
growth until 1990/91, but subsequent observations suggest that the predictions
were over-optimistic and that full working capacity may be reached before that
time.
A second concern about Library facilities is that, aside from some of the
newer branches, they are in poor physical condition, none moreso than the Main
Library. That building, treasured by many as the focal point of the campus, is
deficient under the building code, expensive to operate, difficult to explain to
users, and impossible to improve by alteration. Even minor changes are costly, and
sometimes, for reasons of building code interpretations, not permitted.
The Library urgently needs a new central building that will provide space for
some functions and will at the same time free space in the Main Library for
reconstruction. Steps towards the new building were taken in April, 1985 when
Senate acknowledged the urgent need for new library space and recommended that
it be given a very high priority in the University's plans for capital fund raising. It
was also suggested that every effort be made to invoke government co-operation
and participation along with private sources. On the basis of the recommendation
from Senate, the Board of Governors set aside the former Bookstore site for that
purpose and resolved that the project be designated a high priority for fund raising.
Friends of the Library are awaiting next steps with very keen interest. MAJOR CONCERNS
At the end of the year under review, the Library faced three problems that
have confronted it on and off over the years, more or less routinely. They were
and are all rooted in funding insufficient to needs, and they could all be resolved if
enough money were available. They are the familiar themes of declining
purchasing power for collections; insufficient staff and other resources for major
projects, especially those projects that would enable us to move ahead rapidly in
exploiting current technology; and rapidly dwindling space, particularly for normal
collections growth. Although services to users continue to function relatively well,
they are directly affected by weaknesses in collections development, insufficient
time for projects and other staff functions, and lack of space.
At the risk of these remarks losing their force through too frequent
reiteration, I must stress to Senate that the problems are genuine, persistent and
severe. As of this writing (in early 1986) library staff are spending a great deal of
time in selecting periodical titles for possible cancellation. The staff are also
looking forward with apprehension to the need to curtail purchases of books and
materials in other formats. It is distressing to contemplate the effect of continued
reductions in purchasing for the collections. Not only will gaps be created which
can never be filled, but the quality of the University's research collections - a most
important Provincial resource - is being seriously eroded.
In the press to maintain more routine activities under difficult
circumstances, very little has been said about the major projects which a library
like UBCs should be undertaking. In this we are falling behind other academic
research libraries, particularly those in the United States. Two related major
projects from among those needing attention are the completion of conversion of
the card catalogue to machine-readable form, and development of the online
public-access catalogue. One-third of the Library's holdings are represented in the
computer data base, partly entered there since 1978 as part of the process of
adding materials to the collections, partly entered under a grant-funded project
which concluded three years ago. To complete the remaining two-thirds of the
records for UBC's library holdings is a massive undertaking on which, in present
circumstances, staff are able to make only very limited progress. 23
Access to holdings information in machine-readable form for the entire
collection is clearly desirable as the basis for a second major project: the
replacement of the microcatalogue with an online public-access catalogue. To
some extent, the online catalogue will proceed out of work already done on the
local catalogue-support system, but it will require much more developmental work
and an expansion of existing computing resources. Again, we can make only
limited progress toward this goal with present resources.
Other areas which call for staff time and, in some cases, capital funding are
active participation with other major libraries in the conservation of collections,
the preparation of local plans for protecting the collections against disaster, the
implementation of a fully online circulation system, the application of bar-coding
for circulation and inventory control, the acquisition of a computer system for
handling materials in Asian alphabets, and a microfilming project for archival
materials. Many of these important tasks will have to be left until additional
resources are available. In other areas, we will have to proceed as best we can
with existing resources, since our participation cannot easily be deferred. For
example, we cannot afford to defer participation in the National Collections
Inventory Project (NCIP), through which a detailed picture of the research
strengths and weaknesses of Canadian libraries will be obtained. Inclusion of
information about UBC's collection is essential to the Canadian data base for this
international project, and the work must be carried out over the next two years.
And, as pointed out above, the need for space to house our collections must
be addressed as soon as possible. Most branches of the Library system are already
at or near full working capacity. When the shelves are as full as is practical, if
there is no better solution, lesser-used library material must be consigned to
storage. But there are already a quarter-million volumes in storage, and
designated storage locations will not hold many more volumes. The point of full
working capacity is expected to be reached in the Main Library within the next five
years. The process of fund-raising, planning and construction is lengthy. There is
no time to be spared.
Despite these serious concerns, the Library continued in 1984/85 to offer a 24
good level of service to an expanding community of users. Staff members have
sought and found creative ways of reducing costs, and of maintaining services with
reduced resources. I trust that the Library will continue to merit the appreciation
and good will of the University's students and members of faculty as well as of the
thousands of other who make use of our facilities.
In submitting this report to Senate, I would like to express my appreciation to
members of the Senate Library Committee for their advice and assistance during
the past year. In particular I would like to thank the chairman of the Committee,
Dr. Jonathan L. Wisenthal, for his leadership, advice and willing participation in
the discussion of library issues. Appendix A
SIZE OF COLLECTIONS - PHYSICAL VOLUMES
Asian Studies Library
Biomedical Branch Library (VGH)
Catalogue Records Division
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Data Library
Fine Arts Division
Government Publications Division
Hamber Library (CGSH)
Humanities <Jc Social Science Reference
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Main Stacks
Map Library
Marjorie Smith Library
Mathematics Library
Music Library
St. Paul's Library (SPH)
Science Reference
Sedgewick Library
Special Collections Division
Woodward Library
TOTAL
Storage Collections
TOTAL
Less internal transfers
GRAND TOTAL
March 31/84
Additions
Deletions
March 31/85
173,370
8,667
1
182,036
27,563
1,340
242*
11
29,134
5,326
64
3
5,387
7,720
129
96
7,753
80,359
6,531
5,117*
984
91,023
335
81
416
99,733
5,555
138
105,150
2,627
289
8
2,908
7,960
695
146*
39
8,762
53,544
2,823
354*
284
56,437
128,988
3,678
17
132,649
44,515
2,689
4,483*
9471
50,740
928,662
40,795
60,6822
908,775
7,704
271
2
7,973
16,603
1,121
326
17,398
25,744
1,149
27
26,866
41,262
3,906
45
45,123
5,439
852
1
6,290
17,121
571
2807*
113
20,386
181,890
6,829
888*
1,451
188,156
58,556
1,898
485*
1
60,938
281,640
11,201
5,016*
226
65,402
297,631
2,196,661
101,134
19,538*
2,251,931
153,440
60.7533
5403
213,653
2,350,101
181,425^
65,942
2,465,584
60,213
60,213
2,350,101
121,212^
5,729
2,465,584 Notes: l.Of  the  deletions  from   the MacMillan Library, 890  volumes  were
relegated to storage and 57 volumes were withdrawn.
2. Of the deletions from the Main Stacks 59,863 volumes were relegated
to storage and 819 were withdrawn.
3. Storage collections were increased by 60,753 volumes from
MacMillan Library and the Main Stacks, reduced by 540 that had
previously been consigned to storage from the MacMillan Library.
4. Includes 19,538 items processed through the Library's DRS system, a
COM fiche listing of pamphlets, directories, school textbooks,
newsletters and miscellaneous material.
* Items processed through the DRS system.  See note 4 above. Appendix B
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
March 31, 1984
Net Growth
March 31, 1985
Volumes - Catalogued
2,350,101
115,483
2,465,584
Documents - Uncatalogued
654,288
9,127
663,415
Microfilm (reels)
78,512
3,803
82,315
Microcards (cards)
111,680
111,680
Microprint (sheets)
1,106,500
-18,830
1,087,670
Microfiche (sheets)
1,643,179
268,765
1,911,944
Aperture Cards
2,589
2,589
Films
1,516
81
1,597
Filmloops
8
8
Film strips
2,203
237
2,440
Slides
16,285
1,107
17,392
Slide/Tape Shows
2
12
14
Transparencies
1,250
31
1,281
Video Tapes
900
273
1,173
Photographs
25,264
200
25,464
Pictures
72,613
2,054
74,667
Maps
159,542
5,058
164,600
Manuscripts*
1,761m
152m
1,913m
Sound Recordings
143,246
9,294
152,540
Computer Tapes
467
38
505
Air Photos
72
72
*   Thickness of files in meters. Appendix C
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
Fiscal Years, April/March
Salaries &
Wages
Collections
Binding
Other
1982/83
1983/84
1984/85
9,794,212  (64.23)     3,971,674   (26.05)
10,140,508  (65.76)     3,839,763   (24.90)
9,825,272  (66.17)     3,649,325   (24.58)
171,609 (1.13)
193,605 (1.26)
178,021  (1.20)
1,310,877 (8.60)
1,246,746 (8.08)
1,195,044      (8.05)
15,248,372
15,420,622
14,847,662
Notes: (1)      There was a change in practice regarding collections expenditures because of which figures for 1984/85 are not
comparable with those of previous years. Funds for orders which have been placed, but not yet received, can now be
carried forward to the following fiscal year.  The introduction of this practice will result in lower expenditures in
1984/85 and higher expenditures in 1985/86.
(2)      Expenditures from grant and trust funds are not included;   in 1984/85 they amounted to $122,427 for collections and
binding. Appendix D
RECORDED USE OF LIBRARY RESOURCES
Years ending 2
lune 30
% Increase
Decrease vs
GENERAL CIRCULATION
1982/83
1983/84
1984/85
1983/84
Main Library
General Stacks
457,543
489,525
500,628
2.3
Reserves
29,777
35,346
30,680
-13.2
Extension
7,560
6,720
7,153
6.4
Fine Arts
108,701
112,856
104,668
-7.3
Government Publications
109,806
115,096
122,631
6.5
Maps
9,209
9,980
10,919
9.4
Special Collections
22,118
24,012
22,753
-5.2
SUBTOTAL
744,714
793,535
799,432
0.7
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
22,670
20,133
21,320
5.9
Crane*
45,052
32,394
29,093
-10.2
Curriculum Laboratory
170,112
160,111
149,496
-6.6
Film Library
1,370
1,441
2,034
41.1
Hamber
13,863
21,988
27,979
27.2
Law
119,684
113,777
120,624
6.0
MacMillan
58,418
65,114
60,833
-6.6
Marjorie Smith
20,510
23,604
26,082
10.5
Mathematics
20,001
23,035
28,630
24.3
Medical Branch
31,928
31,929
33,387
4.6
Music
51,470
52,681
54,164
2.8
St. Paul's
11,752
15,664
17,929
14.5
Sedgewick
318,762
345,230
333,855
-3.3
Woodward
210,243
241,638
248,364
2.8
SUBTOTAL
1,095,835
1,148,739
1,153,790
0.4
Use of Recordings
Wilson
311,618
296,885
257,317
-13.3
Music
52,958
53,210
53,516
0.6
SUBTOTAL
364,576
350,095
310,833
-11.2
Document Delivery
Health Sciences Network
INTERLIBRARY LOANS (excluding Films)
To Other Libraries
From Other Libraries
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LOANS
24,052
18,600
7,855
26,455
GRAND TOTAL (General Circulation
& Interlibrary Loans) 2,255,632
29,036
16,097
8,010
24,107
2,345,512
33,558
14,736
8,859
23,595
2,321,208
15.6
-8.5
10.6
-2.1
■1.0 Crane Library circulation statistics are reported here by the individual cassette,
plus a few circulations of print materials. Counting cassettes by the portfolio,
this year's circulation comes to 5,143, transactions. Appendix E
INTERLIBRARY LOANS
Years ending June 30
To Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
Federated Information Network'-
BC Medical Library Service
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL
-    Films
1982/83
■  *    .         ■ ■ *
1983/84
1984/85
% Increase/
Decrease vs
1983/84
1,722
1,739
1,465
1,222
1,003
974
3,465
3,690
3,797
2,303
2,286
2,120
27
16
40
8,739
1,343
8,734
1,075
8,396
994
-3.9
-7.5
-    Photocopies
General
Federated Information Network
BC Medical Library Service
BC Post-Secondary Library Network
Bamfield Marine Station
SUBTOTAL "
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY LENDING
1,975
1,878
1,617
1,040
660
472
92
29
17
5,344
4,722
4,140
67
74
94
8,518
7,363
6,340
-13.9
18,600
17,172
15,730
-8.4
From Other Libraries
- Original Materials
General
BC Medical Library Service
SUBTOTAL
- Films
- Photocopies
TOTAL INTERLIBRARY BORROWING
2,273
2,457
2,853
553
383
353
2,826
2,840
3,206
+12.9
762
779
817
+4.9
4.267
5,170
5,653
+9.3
7.S55
8,789
9,676
+10.1 Appendix F
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK
July 1984 -June 1985
Interbranch Loans
To Other Branches
Woodward
Medical Branch
Hamber
St. Paul's
Other U.B.C. Libraries
SUBTOTAL
(1983/84)
Original
Material
Photocopies
Total
5,615
22,149
27,764
810
2,078
2,888
228
350
578
220
152
372
1,050
907
1,957
7,923
25,636
33,559
(6,324)
(22,712)
(29,036)
From Other Branches
Woodward
Medical Branch
Hamber
St. Paul's
Other U.B.C. Libraries
SUBTOTAL
512
1,227
2,768
6,368
2,489
8,087
1,563
8,534
591
1,420
7,923
25,636
1,739
9,136
10,576
10,097
2,011
33,559
(1983/84)
(6,324) (22,712)
(29,036) Appendix G
REFERENCE & INFORMATION QUESTIONS ANSWERED
July 1984-June 1985
Main Library
Fine Arts
Government Publications
Humanities & Social Sciences
Information Desk
Map Collection
Science Division
Special Collections
SUBTOTAL
Directional
Questions
16,672
...... 1>449
1,737
11,261
438
497
3.932
35,986
Reference
Questions
14,538
26,480
28,135
46,766
4,145
7,586
5.051
132,701
Research
Questions
1,802
1,062
1,353
61
678
1,782
TOTAL
33,012
28,991
31,225
58,027
4,644
8,761
10.765
% Increase/
Decrease vs
1983/84
6,738        175,425
(1983/84)
(36,915)        (130,912)        (7,434)    (174,261)
0.1
Branch Libraries
Asian Studies
Crane
Curriculum Laboratory
Film Library
Hamber Library
Health Sciences Network
Law Library
MacMillan Library
Marjorie Smith
Mathematics Library
Medical Branch (V.G.H.)
Music Library
St. Paul's
Sedgewick Library
Woodward Library
SUBTOTAL
(1983/84)
GRAND TOTAL
(1983/84)
1,935
5,120
405
7,460
1,440
1,580
640
3,660
13,598
16,960
347
30,905
4,959
3,094
225
8,278
7,306
8,684
1,556
17,546
—
2,655
137
2,792
3,400
5,306
2,265
10,971
869
7,611
418
8,898
1,418
1,877
108
3,403
1,550
1,247
421
3,218
1,904
7,157
680
9,741
2,657
10,094
62
12,813
2,799
8,674
987
12,460
10,269
14,056
131
24,456
8.286
25,337
4,718
38,341
62,390
119,452
13,100
194,942
(51,985)
(107,476)
(10,903)
(170,364)
98,376
252,153
19,838
370,367
(88,900)
(238,388)
(18,337)
(345,625)
14,4
7.2 Appendix H
COMPUTER-ASSISTED BIBLIOGRAPHIC SEARCHES
July 1984 -June 1985
1
No. of
Division Searches
Biomedical
Branch 537
Hamber 929
Humanities St.
Social Sciences 420
Law 111
MacMillan 185
St. Paul's 597
Science 2732
Woodward 2672
Total 8183
1983/84 (7476)
2
Student
Searches
97
24
25
69
96
311
(262)
3
UBC
Searches
364
425
146
9
16
362
123
838
4 5
Non-UBC
Searches Reference
171
504
2283
(1824)
9
6
2
27
35
81
(98)
168
72
142
235
567
1044
2903
I.L.L.
1946*
659**
2605
Data Bases
Searched
1150
1891
539
1330
272
1390
2866
5498
5508
(5292)
14,936
(12,196)
8
SDI
Reports
163
584
128
1010
1885
(1603)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Number of searches:  a total of the figures in columns 2 to 6.
Student specials:  limited searches provided to UBC students at a flat fee.
UBC searches:  for UBC members, excluding student specials.
Non-UBC searches:  full costs, including staff time, are charged for searches on behalf of persons
not associated with the University.  These searches tend to be complex and often involve the use of
several data files.
Reference searches are usually brief inquiries for information not readily accessible in print.
ILL verification is a search for the purpose of determining the existence and location of documents
and ordering them on-line as interlibrary loans.
*The total for science includes all ILL verification for the Library system except Woodward and
the hospital libraries.
**The Woodward total includes ILL verification for Woodward Library and the 3 hospital libraries.
A single reference search may involve the use of more than one data base.  Staff time for a
reference search may vary depending on the number and combination of data bases used.
SDI reports:   the number of monthly updates distributed to clients. Current awareness (SDI)
profiles are included in columns 1 to 5 only when they are initially established or subsequently
revised. Appendix I
LIBRARY ORGANIZATION
1984/85
ADMINISTRATION
Mclnnes, Douglas N.
de Bruijn, Erik
Jeffreys, Anthony
Keate, Heather
MacDonald, Robin
Watson, William J.
University Librarian
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Administrative
Services
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Collections
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Branch Libraries
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Technical Processes
and Systems
Assistant Univ. Librarian for Public Services
- Central Libraries
ACQUISITIONS DIVISION
Davidson, Joyce
Head
ASIAN STUDIES LIBRARY
Ng, Tung King
Head
BIOMEDICAL BRANCH LIBRARY (V.G.H.)
Freeman, George
Head
CATALOGUE RECORDS DIVISION
Turner, Ann
Bailey, Freda
Head
Deputy Head & Bibliographic Control Librarian
CATALOGUE PRODUCTS DIVISION
Omelusik, Nick
Head
CIRCULATION DIVISION
Butterfield, Rita
Banham, Mary
Head (to March 31, 1985)
Acting Head (from April 1, 1985 to June 30, 1985)
Head (from July 1, 1985) Appendix I
(continued)
COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Forbes, Jennifer
Hallonquist, P. Lynne
Kreider, Janice
Mcintosh, Jack
Shields, Dorothy
Karpinski, Leszek
Bibliographer - Serials
Bibliographer - English Language
Bibliographer - Life Sciences
Bibliographer - Science
Bibliographer - Slavonic Studies
Bibliographer - European Languages (to December
31,1984)
Bibliographer - European Languages (from January
1, 1985)
CRANE LIBRARY
Thiele, Paul
Head
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
Hurt, Howard
Head
DATA LIBRARY
Ruus, Laine
Head
FINE ARTS DIVISION
Dwyer, Melva
Burndorf er, Hans
GIFTS & EXCHANGE DIVISION
Elliston, Graham
Head (to December 31, 1984)
Acting Head (from January 1, 1985)
Head
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS & MICROFORMS DIVISION
Dodson, Suzanne
Head
HAMBER LIBRARY (Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals)
Nelson, Ann Head Appendix I
(continued)
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK SERVICES
Price, Jane
Co-ordinator
HUMANITIES <5c SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
Forbes, Charles
Head
INFORMATION & ORIENTATION DIVISION
Sandilands, Joan
Stevens, Julie
Head (to June 30, 1985)
Head (from August 1, 1985)
INTERLIBRARY LOAN DIVISION
Friesen, Margaret
Head
LAW LIBRARY
Shorthouse, Tom
Head
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
Macaree, Mary
Brongers, Lore
Head (to June 30, 1985)
Head (from July 1, 1985)
MAP DIVISION
Wilson, Maureen
Head
MARJORIE SMITH LIBRARY
Frye, Judith
Head
MUSIC LIBRARY
Burndorfer, Hans
Head
ST. PAUL'S HOSPITAL LIBRARY
Saint, Barbara
Head Appendix I
(continued)
SCIENCE DIVISION & MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
Brongers, Rein
Head
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
Erickson, Ture
Sandilands, Joan
SERIALS DIVISION
Baldwin, Nadine
Head (to June 30, 1985)
Head (from July 1, 1985)
Head
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
Yandle, Anne
Daniells, Laurenda
Selby, Joan
Head
University Archivist
Curator, Colbeck Collection
SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
Dennis, Donald
Dobbin, Geraldine
Systems Analyst and Head
Systems <Sc Information Science Librarian
WILSON RECORDINGS COLLECTION
Kaye, Douglas
Head
WOODWARD LIBRARY
Leith, Anna
de Bruijn, Elsie
Head
Associate Head Appendix J
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
1984/85
Mrs. H.M. Belkin
Mr. B.E. Bengston
Dean P.T. Burns
Ms. E.T. Busza
Ms. D. Chow
Dr. J.A.S. Evans
Mr. K.D. Hancock
Dr. P.A. Larkin
Dr. B.C. McBride
Mr. M. McMillan
Mr. B. Mah
Dr. A.G. Mitchell
Prof. A.B. Piternick
Dean B.E. Riedel
Dr. R.D. Russell
Dr. J.R. Stein
Dr. L.S. Weiler
Dr. J.L. Wisenthal (Chairman)
EX-OFFICIO
Chancellor W.R. Wyman
President K.G. Pedersen
President pro tern R.H.T. Smith
Mr. K.G. Young
Mr. D.N. Mclnnes
Terms of Reference
(a) To advise and assist the Librarian in:
(i) formulating a policy for the development of resources for
instruction and research;
(ii) advising on the allocation of book funds to the fields of
instruction and research;
(iii) developing a general program of library service for all the
interests of the University; and
(iv) keeping himself informed about the library needs of instructional
and research staffs, and keeping the academic community informed
about the Library.
(b) To report to Senate on matters of policy under discussion by the Committee.

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