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UBC Publications

Report of the University Librarian to the Senate Jan 31, 2002

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Array REPORT OF
THE UNIVERSITY
LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
2000/2001
86TH YEAR CON!
munityand Internationalization
jre Directio
Append-. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
MESSAGE FROM THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
The University is committed to the discovery, expression, preservation, and
dissemination of knowledge and the enhancement of understanding. The Library is an active
and integral partner with students, faculty, and staff in these endeavours. Its staff develops,
organizes, and manages the infrastructure, services, and access to knowledge, ideas, and
information that are critical in a University dedicated to distinctive learning, outstanding
teaching, and leading-edge research. The Library serves and collaborates with a large and
diverse community: first, the students, faculty and staff of UBC, and, as resources permit,
individuals and institutions throughout British Columbia, Canada, and the rest of the world.
Mission Statement, furthering Learning and Research, p. 7
Looking back over the past year, it is encouraging to see how much has been
accomplished to support this mission statement, and how many people have been
involved. Library staff provided excellent support for ongoing services and
resources, while at the same time beginning numerous projects arising from the
objectives oi Furthering Learning and Research, the UBC Library's strategic plan.
Collaborations with UBC students, faculty and staff have been essential to
numerous initiatives. The interest and support of our surrounding community,
Friends and donors have never been higher. Underlying all of this, the University
Administration continues its commitment to ensuring that UBC has the calibre of
library required for a leading research university.
One of the Library's greatest strengths continues to be its collection. This year
we were fortunate in being able to expand our online collection and also increase
spending on monographs and other research materials. Still, researchers continue to
request materials not held at UBC and, with new and expanding research
programs, we expect even heavier demands on our collection in the coming years.
As well as looking to other institutions for resource sharing and document delivery
opportunities, building a stronger collection at UBC continues to be a high priority
and a funding challenge. Though the University has been extremely successful in
obtaining new funding for research programs, there have been few funding
increases for the indirect costs of research, such as library collections and services.
During the past year there has been a growing awareness of this issue, and we hope
to see the Library and other research infrastructure included in future research
funding allocations.
The expanded role that UBC Library could play provincially and nationally has
also been an area of study during this past year. It is generally acknowledged that
UBC Library's collection is the largest and most diverse in the province, yet how
this resource can be leveraged to benefit not just UBC but other post-secondary
communities in BC and Canada has never been fully explored. I am sure that this
issue will continue to be a topic of lively discussion. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
This is an interesting time, as the Library embraces the electronic exchange of
information but continues to be a physical place — an accessible, welcoming place
for learning and research. This combination will soon be embodied in a new facility
in Main Library, thanks to the very generous donation this year of UBC alumna
Mrs. Katherine Scott Chapman and her husband Dr. Lloyd Chapman. Their gift
enabled the renovation of the concourse of the Main Library and its development
as a learning commons, a facility that will combine leading-edge technology with
support for a wide range of innovative learning opportunities. The Chapman
Learning Commons will open in 2001/02 and provide a learning support space for
members of all our user communities. Initiatives such as this and the financial
support of the University for the growth of the Library's collections and services
are heartening indications that, indeed, the Library continues to be the symbolic
heart of the University.
Catherine Quinlan
University Librarian REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
PEOPLE
The UBC Library recognizes that its staff- librarians, management & professional
staff, support staff and student staff- are its most important resource in supporting the
research and learning needs of the UBC community. The Library is committed to
attracting and retaining excellent staff at all levels, and to providing them with the
training and development they need to fulfil their responsibilities. It is also committed to
providing for its users the physical facilities conducive to an effective learning and study
environment and to maintaining and upgrading these. Through a series of faculty and
departmental advisory committees, through periodic surveys, and through an online
feedback system, the Library listens and responds to the concerns of its users.
Furthering Learning and Research, p. 12
Library Staff
As the Library began implementation of its 2000-2003 strategic plan Furthering
Learning and Research, Library staff were involved in both the daily support of
research and learning and the analysis of future directions. Each Library branch and
division completed its first Unit Plan, and all staff were invited to provide input to
the development and implementation of the Library's three-year strategic plan.
In the midst of this very active period, the Library undertook several initiatives
directly aimed at improving support for staff. In November 2000, the first Employee
Opinion Survey was conducted, and the return rate of 79 per cent exceeded all
expectations. The survey addressed a wide range of issues for individual units and
the Library as a whole; recommendations are being addressed by the Employee
Opinion Survey Task Group and the Administrative Group, the Library's senior
management team. Also during this year, many staff and division heads were
involved in the CUPE pay equity and classification discussions arising from the
University-wide job evaluation process. The Library worked closely with UBC's
Human Resources department to establish processes to resolve these issues and
work toward an equitable and affordable classification system. Lasdy, a staffing plan
for Human Resources support in the Library was developed in 2000/01 and will be
implemented next year.
Two staff members were inducted as new members of UBC's 25 Year Club:
Leeta Sokalski and Regina Tsanas. Staff members who retired or took early
retirement during the reporting period were honoured at biannual Library
retirement parties: Florence Doidge, Woodward Library; Stephanie Dykstra,
Woodward Library; Mary Fankhauser, Education Library; Joyce Friesen,
Collections Accounting and Budget; Pamela Niblock, Woodward Library;
William Parker, Woodward Library; Ruth Patrick, Education Library; Allen
Soroka, Law Library; Frances Wong, Law Library. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Further details about staff changes and activities are listed in Appendix A:
Library Staff.
Training and Development for Staff
The Library provides year-round staff training and development programs to
enable its staff to support the research and learning needs of the UBC community.
In its ninth year of programming, the Library's staff training and development
program supported 2,261 participants in 394 sessions.
More than 40 trainers presented 88 per cent of the formal training in-house in
267 sessions. These sessions focused on topics directly related to the Library's
mission and values: customer service, information resources and services, teaching
and instruction, preservation of the collection, employee relations, orientation to
the Library, health and safety. The staff orientation program was expanded this year
to include a guided tour of the virtual library, a meeting with the University
Librarian and Library-wide open houses.
Collaborations with other campus departments are integral to the Library's
staff training and development program. Student trainers from the Disability
Resource Centre presented two sessions in the Library on disability awareness to 40
participants. Twenty-one UBC librarians took advantage of the instructional skills
workshops offered by the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth. The
Continuing Studies computer skills programs attracted 40 participants to 18
sessions, primarily in spreadsheet applications, word processing and Internet
publishing. The MOST program attracted 127 participants to 49 different topics
including communication and interpersonal and management/supervisory skills
development. Human Resources advisors and the CUPE 2950 president held
sessions with Library supervisors and staff to review the changes in the contract and
to brief them on pay equity developments.
In addition to in-house and on-campus activities, Library staff are encouraged
to participate in training and development opportunities off-campus. This year 68
participants attended 50 different sessions, including provincial, national and
international events.
Communications and Advisory Committees
A review of the Library's communication methods this year resulted in several
recommendations for improving communication with students, faculty, staff and
community users. Work began on establishing a consistent visual identity program,
with input from a variety of users and Library staff. The position of
Communications Coordinator was established, and is expected to be filled early in REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
the coming year. This increased focus on communications reflects the Library's
desire to ensure that its key audiences are aware of the wealth of resources and
services available to them, and that users are able to communicate their needs in a
timely and effective manner.
The Library continued its formal review of the user survey conducted in the
previous year, in order to track progress and analyze gaps in particular service areas.
The User Survey Task Group will report out in 2001/02 and provide recommendations that will help determine the scope and timing of the next user survey.
Faculty Library Advisory Committees continued to ensure an ongoing
exchange of ideas between the Library and faculty and students in each discipline.
Members of several such advisory committees assisted the Library in planning
eLibrary@ubc2: Research and Learning Through Technology, a symposium held
November 2,2000. It attracted over 100 people from the campus community and
featured local experts as well as keynote speakers Michael J. Rosenzweig, publisher
and editor-in-chief of Evolutionary Ecology Research, and Donald Gutstein, author
of E. con: How the Internet Undermines Democracy. The event concluded with a
session sponsored by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies (PWIAS),
where John Willinsky, PWIAS Distinguished UBC Scholar in Residence, invited
participants to discuss the theme Knowledge Futures: Alternative Models for
Scholarly Publishing.
Other events of the past year included the annual UBC Authors' Reception
(now in its 11th year) co-hosted with the President's Office, workshops and displays
for Alumni Day in October and Research Awareness Week in March, and the
third season of the School of Music Students' Recital Series in the Dodson
Room, Main Library.
Health, Safety and Security
Health and safety training sessions continue to be mandatory for all staff and
include information about health and safety policies and procedures, disaster and
emergency preparedness, fire safety, personal security and ergonomics. Sessions
were offered each quarter as new staff members were hired. In addition, supervisors
and safety committee members were encouraged to attend training sessions offered
by the University Health, Safety and Environment program.
A priority this year for the Library's health and safety program was to
undertake a series of ergonomic risk assessments for staff workstations. To date,
11 units involving 31 staff members' workstations have been assessed and
recommendations have been made for improving the conditions where these were
found to be less than satisfactory for the individual employee. In keeping with this
theme, a staff colloquium was held in April 2000, featuring guest speakers on
repetitive stress injury risk reduction and other ergonomic issues. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Library Facilities and Space
During this year significant steps were taken toward renovating and expanding
one of the University's first permanent buildings, the Main Library. In the fall of
2000, UBC alumna Mrs. Katherine Scott Chapman and her husband Dr. Lloyd
Chapman made possible the creation of a learning commons in Main Library's
concourse, through a very generous gift of $1 million. Program planning and a
complete renovation of the space have begun, and the Chapman Learning
Commons is expected to open in 2001/02. The project is a collaborative effort of
many facets of the University, reflecting the common goal of creating an open,
welcoming space that offers a variety of services and innovative technology to
support learning for a wide variety of users. At the same time, planning continued
for the University Learning Centre (ULC), with the 1925 core of Main Library at
its centre. In May 2001, the Board of Governors granted Board One approval for
the ULC - a facility that will provide learning space and facilities, ensure good
environmental conditions for collections of rare materials, and facilitate the
installation and use of new technology and services.
Existing facilities in Main Library underwent tremendous improvement as well
this year. In collaboration with UBC Food Services, Pages coffee bar was opened in
the Ridington Room, greatly enhancing this area as social and group study space.
The room's 80 computers and 130 study spaces were fully utilized throughout
winter session, and the Alma Mater Society's peer tutoring service had great success
in this location. Improvements to the wiring and telecommunications network in
the South wing of Main Library were also completed this year.
Other improvements to Library facilities included numerous small projects, but
two were particularly significant. The Library was pleased to become home to the
new Statistics Canada BC Inter-University Research Data Centre, a project
supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the British Columbia
Knowledge Development Fund. Construction for this new facility in Koerner
Library began this year, and it is expected to open in the fall of 2001. Secondly,
approval was received for the installation of compact storage in Woodward Library.
In spite of this addition, the need for improved and expanded space for collection
growth continues to be a major concern. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
LEARNING AND RESEARCH
The UBC Library is committed to supporting the learning and research needs of
undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty and staff. It does so through the
acquisition, provision, and preservation of information resources locally, in print,
electronic, and other formats, and through access to information resources beyond the
campus. It provides instruction and training (e.g. individual, group, Web-based) to help
students develop the information-seeking and critical thinking skills required to succeed
in their studies and as members of a knowledge-intensive society. It works with faculty,
students, and staff to find, develop, and effectively use the information resources they
require for the creation and transmission of knowledge. In addition, the Library
provides the infrastructure and technology to support and deliver information
resources, it provides bibliographic access to and information about them through its
online catalogue and other indexes, and it manages the physical flow of resources to
and from Library users, whether on campus or at a distance.
Furthering Learning and Research, p. 14
Reference and Teaching
A major focus of the Library's public service activities is providing help and
instruction to students, faculty, staff and other researchers. Often this occurs one-
on-one in the Library, but as the Library's online collection continues to grow,
more help and instruction have been provided through the Web and in classroom
settings.
During the past year, a total of 1,587 Library instruction sessions reached 21,411
participants. This included the drop-in workshops listed in the Library's Information
Connections program and classes within regular courses in each faculty. Subject
librarians throughout the Library continued to work closely with faculty to develop
classes and assignments specific to students' research needs. For example,
information literacy skills instruction was built into the new Arts Foundations
program, and a new online assignment module was developed for Chemistry 120,
adding to the Library's groyning list of tutorials on WebCT. Librarians also
collaborated with the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth in offering faculty
professional development workshops related to information resources and services,
and with AMS Orientations to offer Library orientation sessions for new students.
The total number of questions asked at reference and information desks and via
email was 372,270. Although there is still significant activity at desks within the
Library, there are increasing demands for electronic reference service, given the
growing emphasis on electronic collections. Questions received via the Library's
central email contact service increased by 18 per cent this year.
The Library recognized the need to examine electronic reference service
options and included this as an area for investigation in its strategic plan. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Web-based Learning and Access
The Library saw dramatic increases this year in usage of the resources and
services on its Web site. For online indexes and electronic journals alone, the total
number of accesses per month almost doubled from 263,150 in January 2000 to
512,581 in January 2001.
A new version of the Library's Web site was released in September 2000, giving
greater prominence to electronic journals and other high-demand electronic
resources and services, and a more consistent look and feel across the site. Shortly
after, a significant new resource was added: Nursing and Allied Health Resources:
The Peggy Sutherland Site. This site aims to support students, researchers and
practitioners in nursing and allied health professions, principally in BC, but will also
be useful for anyone considering a career in these fields or simply pursuing a
personal interest. Users can learn how to get started with their research, access rich
databases of information, and link to continuing education opportunities,
professional associations and much more. In early 2001 another special site was
added: The Harry Hawthorn Foundation for the Inculcation and Propagation of the
Principles and Ethics of Fly-Fishing. This site provides access to the Library's
excellent collection of books on angling and fly-fishing, which includes many rare
and valuable items. Both the Sutherland site and the Hawthorn site are available under
Showcase Sites on the Library's home page (www.library.ubc.ca/showcase).
The Library was one of the partners involved in the development of UBC's first
student portal, myUBC, released in September 2000. Working with ITServices,
Student Services and the Faculty of Applied Science, the Library developed portal
channels to alert students to new library resources and to library materials about to
become overdue. The latter was developed in response to student feedback indicating
this would be a highly desirable improvement to borrower services. Related to the
portal, the second stage of the electronic course reserve project was implemented
on the Library's Web site. Through a single access point, students can find online
readings, catalogue records for readings in the print collection, guides to
information resources relevant to their course research and other useful links.
Access to the Library's catalogue was improved in the fall of 2000, with in-
house development and implementation of a new Web interface. The new system
provides a faster and more functional interface to the Library's holdings. Planning
also began for the replacement of the Library's overburdened Web server with a
newer and faster computer.
Information Resources and Collections
This was a good year for collections growth. The Library continued to place a
heavy emphasis on expanding its collection of electronic resources, particularly in
the disciplines where they are in high demand. At the same time, print collections
were given high priority in some areas, and there were increases in spending on REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
monographs and other research materials. This growth was possible because of
improved license agreements, better management of serial subscriptions, and
favourable exchange rates at the time of payments.
The Canadian National Site Licensing Project (CNSLP) came to fruition this
year, with three-year licenses for electronic resources centrally negotiated for 64
Canadian university libraries, including UBC. Funding for the project came from
the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), provincial governments and
contributions from each university. UBC gained several hundred electronic journals
as well as savings on existing subscriptions.
The increase in journal costs was much lower than expected this year, due to
several factors. In early 2000, the Library placed more subscriptions with a single
vendor, resulting in lower service charges. There were significant discounts on print
subscriptions, due to CNSLP and other consortia. The timing of payments to
vendors and the exchange rates at those times provided considerable savings. The
number of subscriptions remained stable, with only a few being cancelled and a
small number of new ones being ordered. Despite this good news, however, users
continue to ask for additional journals, and improving and expanding the Library's
research collections remains a high priority.
With the savings resulting from CNSLP and lower increases in journal costs,
the Library was able to purchase a number of new electronic resources in various
fields. These included the JSTOR-General Science Collection, JSTOR-Ecology and
Botany Collection, Library and Information Science Abstracts, ATLAS Religion
Database, Statistical Universe, Hein-On-Line, International Index to Music Periodicals
Full Text, eHRAF Collection of Ethnography, E* Subscribe (online access to ERIC
documents), TableBase, Business & Industry, Victorian Database Online, BIOSIS
Previews, Alternative Press Index, Grove Dictionary of Art, Grove Dictionary of Music,
JUSTIS CELEX, International Treaties, and ExecuComp.
Spending on monographs and research materials was higher than the previous
year, thanks in part to the availability of year-end money from savings on journal
subscriptions. Some unique items were added to Special Collections, including
another instalment of Jane Rule's papers, Tom Wayman's literary papers, additions
to the Herbert J. Rosengarten Collection of Victorian Literature, the 30-year
archive of Arsenal Pulp Press, several Doukhobor items, and the complete backfile
of Adbusters. Significant historical and literary research materials were acquired on
microfilm. These included backfiles of Variety, Toronto Star, and Seattle Times as
well as more of The 18th Century, more oi Goldsmiths' Kress, the Oscar Wilde
Collection, and Russian Archives: Cold War and Central Committee. New print sets
included American Journalism: 1690-1940, British Documents on Foreign Affairs, and
Thesaurus Proverbiorum Medii Aevi. In addition, the Library gratefully accepted
many gifts-in-kind, as indicated in Appendix E: Donor and Gift Recognition.
A project to weed duplicate items from both storage and open shelves began in
November 2000. Years ago, the Library acquired multiple subscriptions to selected
journals and reference books in order to support users at many branches. More REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
10 TO THE SENATE
recent budgets have not permitted this practice to continue. These older duplicate
volumes are now little used, and many electronic journals, such as those in JSTOR,
alleviate the need to retain duplicate copies. A weeding policy is being written to
strike a balance between the need to free up expensive shelf space and the need to
retain materials for future scholars.
As the Library's online collection expanded over the past several years, it
became clear that the distributed administrative structure for collections
management was increasingly inadequate. During the past year, the reorganization
of the collections management structure continued. Two librarian positions were
created, one charged with coordination in the sciences and one in the social sciences
and humanities. Changes were also made to the handling of license negotiations, with
the Head of the Law Library taking on the coordination of this complex process.
This restructuring of collections administration will continue in conjunction with
the Library's strategic plan implementation task groups, several of which will be
considering how electronic resources are changing the Library's environment.
University Archives and Records Management Services
During the past year the University Archives' staff continued developing Web-
based resources to enhance access to unique archival material and promote a better
understanding of the history of the University.
As part of an ongoing initiative to provide users with comprehensive
information about the Archives' holdings, detailed inventories or finding aids
continued to be published on the Web. To date, access has been provided to
inventories for 302 of 316 separate collections or 'fonds'. Each of these collections
can extend from a few centimetres to a few hundred metres. The Archives also
added approximately 3,500 digitized images to its increasingly popular historical
photographs database. This brings the total number of scanned University Archives
images available through the Internet to approximately 25,000. In addition, the
University History section of the Archives' Web page has expanded with the
addition of two new virtual exhibits, Campus Sculptures and Campus Plans. The first
provides information on sculptures and other works of art currendy and formerly
on campus, and the second chronicles the historical evolution of the UBC campus.
To assist in some of these projects, the Archives has made use of work study
students, as well as professional experience and practicum students from UBC's
Master of Archival Studies program.
In 2000/01, the University Archives added approximately 36 metres of new
material to its holdings. In addition to a variety of institutional records, the
Archives acquired and processed the private papers of William New, Jean
Coulthard, Pat Carney and Michael Smith.
Also during this year, members of the Archives' staff participated in various
facets of the new Canadian Archival Information Network, which is currendy REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
developing under the direction of the Canadian Council of Archives.
In addition to ongoing activities in the next fiscal year, the Archives plans to
undertake several special projects including: microfilming approximately 7,200 pages
of UBC Board of Governors minutes (1964-1973); a major photographic scanning
project; and standardizing name subject headings for the Archives' online
databases. In addition, the Archives will investigate the possibility of providing
online access to digitized copies of audio and video tapes. Archives' staff also hope
to devote more time to institutional records management issues and, in particular,
the challenges presented by electronic records at UBC.
Preservation
The Library continued with its small but significant preservation microfilming
program. Highlights this year were the completion of the filming of the Malcolm
Lowry Collection and the first phase of filming the Bachelor of Science in Forestry
undergraduate theses. More UBC theses on BC history and related subjects were
also filmed. Although no British Columbia Directories were filmed this year, funds
from sales of the microfilmed Directories from previous years were higher than
expected and provided a fiscal basis for the year's projects.
The Mendery provided training for the many library assistants who handle
book repairs in their branches, kept up with book repairs, and restored several 19th
century books. Suzanne Dodson, retired Facilities and Preservation Manager,
returned to the Library to give two staff development sessions on preservation and
mending in November, assisted by the Mendery Assistant.
Collection Use and Access to Materials at Other Libraries
Circulation activity of materials held at UBC Library increased by 17 per cent
this year. An improved Web interface for renewals may be one reason for this
increase. To ensure print collections are available and in good order on the shelves,
the Library devoted extra attention to its shelving and shelf reading programs this
past year. Campus document delivery, including the three hospital sites, continued
to be used heavily, with more than 43,614 items delivered.
Nearly 45,000 items were delivered from UBC to libraries across Canada and
around the world. The Library conducted an in-depth study to ensure that its
fees for interlibrary lending continue to recover the costs of providing this
service. A new fee schedule was developed, including a preferred rate for Ariel
delivery reflecting the efficiencies and lower costs of document transmission over
the Internet. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
For interlibrary borrowing, development of the RSS/Epixtech system made
online ordering easier and allowed users of the system to track the status of their
requests online. The Library has also begun to link its ordering systems to those
supplied by vendors in bibliographic databases, so that the ordering process
becomes more seamless. In the Life Sciences, redevelopment of the QuickDoc
system enabled more efficient tracking and distribution of requests.
Interlibrary borrowing increased by 10 per cent in 2000/01, demonstrating that
in most subject areas access to remote collections continues to be important. The
Pegasus service for obtaining documents from the Canada Institute for Scientific
and Technical Information (CISTI) also showed strong use, levelling from the past
year but still delivering approximately 19,000 documents to users on campus and at
the hospital sites.
Technology Infrastructure
Several improvements to the Library's public computers were carried out this
year. Almost 80 older workstations capable of supporting only text-based email
were upgraded to fully functional public workstations capable of accessing all of the
Library's online resources. Workstations in Koerner Library's computer teaching
lab were upgraded to support both public and staff software. This allowed them to
be used for a much wider range of instructional activities and also be made available
as public workstations when the teaching lab is not in use for other activities. The
Library's standalone CD-ROM workstations were also reviewed and upgraded
where necessary. At the same time, additional CD-ROM titles were made available
via the Library's networked CD-ROM facility.
The Library's central computing support facility has grown to include over 30
servers supporting a variety of local systems and operating environments. The
Library purchased a computer server for the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and
provides for its ongoing facilities management and operational support. The PKP,
founded by John Willinsky, Professor in the Department of Language and Literacy
Education, explores alternative knowledge economies for research libraries and
universities to better serve faculty and the public. The Data Services server was
upgraded to a newer machine and relocated to one of the Library's main computer
rooms. Additional security systems and improved air conditioning were provided
for the main computer rooms.
The Library's communications network achieved a significant milestone with
the upgrading of all three off-campus connections for the hospital branch libraries
to 10MBPS links. This provided them with the same bandwidth as campus branches
and reduced many of the response time and other problems that had plagued these
locations. Planning also began for general network upgrades at several campus Library
locations as part of the University Network Project (UNP). The UNP will provide
faster connectivity and additional network drops for these locations. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Bibliographic Control, Cataloguing and Ordering
The Technical Services units made progress on a number of projects this year,
while maintaining pace with the processing of current material for the Library's
collection. Clean-up of serial holdings record displays continued to be a priority for
periodicals and binding staff throughout the Library. Holdings records for
currently received subscriptions have been the main focus of attention for the last
few years, and these have been cleaned up to the point that more attention can now
be given to the work needed on non-current holdings. Acquisitions staff began to
use the automated system to claim orders. Cataloguing production typically
averaged approximately 5,000 tides per month.
The cataloguing backlog situation is the best it has been in recent memory
thanks to a number of events that started in 1997: implemention of the current
automated system which gives quicker and greater access to catalogue copy;
workflow innovations; a change in cataloguing policy; and the dedicated efforts of
the Technical Services staff, in particular those of the 'fast cataloguing' team. The
remaining cataloguing backlogs, excluding those in the Asian Library, are in the
process of being centralized in the Library Processing Centre into a single
workflow. This year the backlog was reduced by 14,644 volumes, and at the end of
the year totalled approximately 38,000 titles.
Work continued on the first phase of retrospective conversion (recon) of the
card catalogue. As of March 2001, there were 1,308 drawers done (81 per cent), 57
drawers in process (4 per cent), and 242 drawers not done (15 per cent). 'First
phase' means that at least a basic bibliographic record and all Library holdings are
recorded in the online catalogue. Currendy, funding for this work is from
reallocation within the Library's budget. See the Recon Progress Report on the Web
at www.library.ubc.ca/home/sl-summ.html.
Another major project affecting catalogue records was the conversion from the
Wade-Giles form of Chinese romanization to the Pinyin form, beginning in
October 2000. This follows changes made at the Library of Congress and other
sources of bibliographic records. Along with Chinese bibliographic records, Wade-
Giles forms in non-Chinese records and non-standard Chinese romanization in
name authority files were also affected.
The second phase of the branch binding backlog clearance project was
concluded, thanks to another one-time $20,000 reallocation from within the
Library's budget. Binding backlogs were also addressed in Koerner, Law,
MacMillan, Music and the Life Sciences Libraries. In total, the binding backlog was
reduced by 3,336 volumes. A third phase is planned for the coming fiscal year. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
14 TO THE SENATE
COMMUNITY AND INTERNATIONALIZATION
The UBC Library is firmly committed to cooperating with other academic libraries
and institutions, government, and industry in order to support learning and research
and to further the transfer and preservation of knowledge. As a community resource, it
plays a key role in the intellectual, social, cultural, and economic growth of the
Vancouver region and British Columbia. It is now part of a network of information
resources that extends around the world, and which strengthens British Columbia's and
Canada's links to the international community.
Furthering Learning and Research, p. 16
Cooperation with Other Libraries
The Library continues to collaborate with other academic institutions to share
the cost of access to electronic resources and the development of print collections
and other programs. The list of consortia involving UBC expanded this year, as the
Canadian National Site Licensing Project (CNSLP) came to fruition. In this
initiative, three-year licenses for electronic resources were centrally negotiated for
64 Canadian university libraries. Also in the electronic environment, the Library
participated in the development of electronic resources for the Pacific Rim Digital
Library Alliance (PRDLA). In the realm of print collections, the Library was a
partner in a new reciprocal borrowing program with the Ontario Council of
University Libraries (OCUL), and participated in expanded reciprocal borrower
programs with the Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL).
In the coming year, the Library will undertake a review of consortial arrangements,
recognizing the role UBC has played and the benefits to both UBC and other
members of the consortia.
The Library often participates in the development of information resources
useful to communities beyond UBC. This year technical support was provided for
the Vancouver Bibliography Project, and a union catalogue, Periodicals in Canadian
Law Libraries, was produced for the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL).
Community Access
In addition to serving the University community, the Library serves many users
beyond UBC. This year, there was a 60 per cent increase in the number of UBC
alumni who registered for a Library card, which they received free with the
purchase of the Alumni Association's A-card. In the community very close to UBC,
Library privileges were extended for residents of Hampton Place and Acadia Park.
Farther afield, students in Humanities 101 and Science 101, predominantly residents
of the downtown eastside of Vancouver, were provided with Library cards and
orientation sessions. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE 15
Two exciting new ventures are expanding the Library into the downtown core.
The Learning Exchange opened in the downtown eastside in the fall of 2000, and
the Library was pleased to be able to provide access to online resources at this
location, as well as delivery of Library materials from the campus. At Robson Square,
construction began on UBC's downtown campus due to open in the fall of 2001. A
combined Library/Bookstore facility will be an integral part of this new initiative.
Friends, Donors and Alumni
The Library enjoys very positive relationships with many alumni and other
members of the community, and over the years has received tremendous support
from the Friends of the Library and other donors. In an effort to ensure that these
groups are well served by the Library, a second Library Development Officer was
added to the Library's staff.
It was thanks to donors that the Library's Web site expanded this year to
include Showcase Sites, featuring two new resources of particular interest to the
community (www.library.ubc.ca/showcase). Nursing and Allied Health Resources:
The Peggy Sutherland Site was launched in the fall, providing access to a wide range
of materials useful to students, researchers and practitioners in nursing and allied
health professions, principally in BC, but also useful for anyone considering a career
in these fields or simply pursuing a personal interest. The site was made possible by
the Peggy Sutherland Memorial Library Endowment, a generous gift from the
Sutherland Foundation. Mrs. Sutherland, who passed away in 1999, was a graduate
of the School of Nursing at St. Paul's Hospital, and her generous spirit is
represented in the opportunities this site provides for nursing students, health care
professionals and members of the community. In early 2001 another special site was
added, tided The Harry Hawthorn Foundation for the Inculcation and Propagation of
the Principles and Ethics of Fly-Fishing. The site provides records for the Library's
excellent collection of books on angling and fly-fishing, which includes many rare
and valuable items. Background information on the collection, and the Foundation
that made it possible, are also included on the site. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
16 TO THE SENATE
FUTURE DIRECTIONS
The UBC Library will be a provincial, national and international leader in the
development, provision and delivery of outstanding information resources and
services that are essential to learning, research and the creation of knowledge at
UBC and beyond.
Vision Statement, Furthering Learning and Research, p. 5
This vision reflects the Library's position in an institution that aspires to be
Canada's best university. It is by working closely with University colleagues and
others outside the institution that the Library will be able to attain this vision. The
directions and actions we plan to take are laid out in Furthering Learning and
Research: Implementing the UBC Library's Strategic Plan 2000-2003, which is closely
linked to the Trek 2000 pillars of People, Learning, Research, Community and
Internationalization. The Library's goals and objectives are too numerous to list
here, but some themes deserve particular attention.
UBC is benefiting enormously from newly established federal research funding
programs such as the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Canada Research
Chairs. There is a growing recognition that research infrastructure, including
library collections and services, must be factored into this funding. The same is true
for infrastructure support for new or expanded programs, such as the expansion of
UBC's medical program (Northern Medical Program/Island Medical Program).
Such programs result in increased demands on the Library for information
resources and staff assistance and have a corresponding impact on Library funding
requirements. During the coming year, the Library will continue to work closely
with University colleagues and funding agencies to ensure that these needs are
understood and met.
Another high priority is improved space for collections and services. Next year
will see the opening of the Chapman Learning Commons in Main Library. As well,
planning will continue for the renovation and expansion of the Main Library as the
University Learning Centre (ULC), the main focus of which is a greater integration
between the Library's collection and services and those who use them on campus,
in the Lower Mainland and throughout BC.
Across the Library, we are dealing with rapid changes in the delivery and
format of information, an emphasis on inquiry-based learning, increased research
activity and increased community interest in our resources. In order to address
users' needs as efficiently and effectively as possible, we must take a close, critical
look at our services and the organizational structure in place to support them. In
the coming years, we will continue to change and adapt to ensure we have the
strength and agility to be the library we envision. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE 17
APPENDICES
CONTENTS
A  Library Staff 18
B   Library Statistical Summary 19
C   Growth of Collections 20
D Library Expenditures 21
E   Donor and Gift Recognition 22-23
F   Grant Funding 24 18
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Appendix A
LIBRARY STAFF
The Library's staff complement (including GPOF and non-
GPOF budget positions) now totals 297.49 full-time
equivalent (FTE) positions, including 73.70 librarians,
16.58 management and professional staff and 207.21
support staff. This compares to a total of 302.37 FTE
positions in 2000, and represents a net decrease of 1.6 per
cent. Non-GPOF budget positions (cost recovery or grant-
funded), 14.35 FTE, represent 4.8 per cent of the Library's
staff complement. In addition, the Library's student
assistant and temporary hourly staff complement totalled
49.23 FTE positions. Of these, 6.04 FTE were funded by
cost recoveries or from grants.
Long-service staff members who retired or took early
retirement during the reporting period: Florence Doidge,
Woodward Library; Stephanie Dykstra, Woodward Library;
Mary Fankhauser, Education Library; Joyce Friesen,
Collections Accounting and Budget; Pamela Niblock,
Woodward Library; William Parker, Woodward Library;
Ruth Patrick, Education Library; Allen Soroka, Law
Library; Frances Wong, Law Library.
New appointments, extensions of appointments, or changes
in appointment: Sheryl Adam, appointed as Acting Head,
Education Library; Norman Amor, extended as
Preservation Microfilming and CIP Cataloguing Librarian,
partially from funding provided by the National Library of
Canada; Lee Ann Bryant, term extended as Head of
MacMillan Library; Rajwant Chilana, appointed as Indie
Librarian (.5 FTE), Asian Library; Heman Choi, appointed
as Systems and Network Analyst; Winnie Chu, appointed as
Social Science Researcher, Patscan; Hilde Colenbrander,
appointed as Reference Librarian, Humanities and Social
Sciences; Donna Curtis, appointed as term Technical
Services Librarian; Erik Dierks, appointed as Senior Library
Development Officer; Patrick Dunn, extended as Acting
Head, Resource Sharing Services, then appointed as
Interlibrary Loan Librarian, Borrower Services; Hillary
Gosselin, appointed as Library Development Officer;
Aleteia Greenwood, appointed as hourly Reference
Librarian, Science and Engineering; Tracy Havlin,
appointed as term Reference Librarian, Woodward Library;
Alan Ho, appointed as Programmer/Analyst, Humanities
and Social Sciences; Susie Jones, appointed as hourly
Reference Librarian, Science and Engineering; Heather
Keate, Assistant University Librarian for Public Services,
granted study leave for one year; Joe Jones, Humanities and
Social Sciences, granted study leave for one year; Joy
Kirchner, appointed as Reference and STM Serials
Coordination Librarian; CF. Lee, appointed as Consultant,
Cataloguer of the P'u Pan Collection; Mei Li, appointed as
Chinese Language Librarian, Asian Library; Jing Liu,
appointed as Chinese Language Librarian, Asian Library;
Richard Moore, appointed as Facilities, Security and Health
and Safety Administrator; Simon Neame, appointed as term
Librarian, Information Services; Lucia Park, appointed as
Korean Language and Reference Librarian, Asian Library
and Science and Engineering; Isabel Pitfield, extended as
part-time Coordinator, Vancouver Bibliography Project in
Special Collections and University Archives; Gina
Prokopchuk, appointed as hourly Reference Librarian,
Education Library; Les Rans, appointed as User Services
Advisor, Systems; Trish Rosseel, appointed as Information
Literacy Librarian, Humanities and Social Sciences; Ron
Simmer, Patscan, granted study leave for one year; Sally
Taylor, appointed as Reference Librarian, Woodward
Library; Alfred Tse, appointed as Circulation Supervisor,
Woodward Library; Jane Wells, appointed as term
Reference Librarian (.5 FTE), Law Library.
Heads of branches and divisions: Sheryl Adam - Education
(acting term); Lee Ann Bryant - MacMillan (term);
Elizabeth Caskey - David Lam; Leonora Crema - Borrower
Services; Patrick Dunn - Resource Sharing Services (acting
term); Jocelyn Godolphin - Humanities and Social
Sciences; Brenda Peterson - Fine Arts, Special Collections
and University Archives (term); Margaret Price - Life
Sciences Libraries; Bonita Stableford - Main Circulation
(term), Science and Engineering, Maps, Mathematics;
Kirsten Walsh - Music; Martha Whitehead - Information
Services; Sandra Wilkins - Law; Eleanor Yuen - Asian.
Library Administrative Group: University Librarian -
Catherine Quinlan (chair); Assistant University Librarian
for Collections - Janice Kreider; Assistant University
Librarian for Public Services - Heather Keate (study
leave); Assistant University Librarian for Technical
Services - Nadine Baldwin; Facilities Manager - Darrell
Bailie; Financial and Budget Manager - Ann Turner;
Human Resources and Planning Consultant - Dwight
Tanner; Systems Manager - Brian Owen; Public Services
Representatives - Jocelyn Godolphin, Margaret Price,
Martha Whitehead, Sandra Wilkins. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
19
Appendix B
LIBRARY STATISTICAL SUMMARY 2000/01
COLLECTIONS
Total Volumes1
Volumes Added, Net
Total Tides Catalogued
Current Subscriptions
Number of Monographs Purchased
1    Includes net volumes added.
4,039,028
97,595
62,835
26,016
52,622
Number of Sessions
Number of Participants
SERVICES
Total Recorded Use of Library Resources
Document Delivery (Internal)2
Interlibrary Loan - Lending2
Interlibrary Loan - Borrowing2
Instruction Classes/Orientation
Instruction Classes/Orientation
Total Questions Answered
Research Questions
Reference Questions
Directional Questions
2    Included in Total Recorded Use of Library Resources.
STAFF (FTE)
Librarians
Professional (M&P)
Support Staff
Subtotal3
Student4
Total FTE All Staff
Includes 14.35 cost-recovery or grant-funded positions.
Includes 6.04 cost-recovery or grant-funded positions.
EXPENDITURES
Collections
Salaries & Wages
Binding
Other Operating Expenditures
Total Gross Expenditures
Cost Recoveries
Total Net Expenditures
4,296,257
43,614
44,557
35,766
1,587
21,411
372,270
24,423
176,564
171,283
73.70
16.58
207.21
297.49
49.23
346.72
11,973,519
40.95
14,127,769
48.31
205,260
0.70
2,934,980
10.04
29,241,528
1,979,492
27,262,036 20
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Appendix C
GROWTH OF COLLECTIONS
Volumes - Catalogued
Serial Subscriptions1
Other Formats:
Archives (meters)
Audio (Cassettes, CDs, LPs)
Cartographic
Electronic Resources:
Bibliographic and Full Text Databases
CD ROM2
Diskettes
E-journals
Numeric Databases
Film and Video
Government Publications (Unbound)3
Graphic (Photographs, Pictures, etc.)
Microfiche
Microfilm
Microforms - other (mcard, mprint)4
1 Includes print and electronic periodical subscriptions, standing orders and monographic series.
2 New base count in 2000.
3 Major weeding project in 00/01.
4 Includes aperture cards.
MARCH 31,2000
NET GROWTH
MARCH 31,2001
3,941,433
97,595
4,039,028
25,966
50
26,016
3,300
130
3,430
76,781
1,098
77,879
203,394
1,046
204,440
316
21
337
4,460
272
4,732
1,742
1
1,743
4,700
763
5,463
833
180
1,013
9,727
335
10,062
814,307
-6,117
808,190
451,113
2,827
453,940
3,527,942
51,746
3,579,688
116,956
1,581
118,537
1,201,939
0
1,201,939 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
21
Appendix D
LIBRARY EXPENDITURES
LIBRARY OPERATING EXPENDITURES
FISCAL YEARS    APRIL-MARCH
SALARIES
GROSS
& WAGES
%
COLLECTIONS
%
BINDING
%
OTHER
%
EXPENDITURES
1995/96
13,758,042
53.33%
8,978,367
34.80%
194,749
0.75%
2,866,274
11.11%
25,797,432
1996/97
13,878,493
51.16%
9,159,355
33.77%
196,649
0.73%
3,891,052
14.34%
27,125,549
1997/98
13,999,426
52.68%
9,769,644
36.77%
162,650
0.61%
2,641,540
9.94%
26,573,260
1998/99
13,945,766
50.71%
10,569,120
38.43%
203,093
0.74%
2,782,233
10.12%
27,500,212
1999/00
13,870,137
49.61%
11,666,649
41.73%
164,438
0.59%
2,259,511
8.08%
27,960,735
2000/01
14,127,769
48.31%
11,973,519
40.95%
205,260
0.70%
2,934,980
10.04%
29,241,528
As in previous years, only expenditures from the Library's own GPOF budget are included in the above. Excluded are:
Faculty of Commerce expenditures in support of the David Lam Library.
Expenditures for library materials by other campus units, for example for departmental reading rooms.
Expenditures from library grant and trust funds.
Collections expenditures from library grant and trust funds amounted to $223,120 in 2000/01.
"Other" expenditures include non-recurring equipment acquisitions which vary considerably from year to year.
SOURCES OF LIBRARY OPERATING FUNDS
FISCAL YEARS   APRIL-MARCH
GPOF BUDGET
FEES FOR SERVICE
FEES FOR SERVICE
LIBRARY FINES
TOTAL
AMOUNT
%
INTERNAL
%
EXTERNAL
%
AMOUNT
%
FUNDING
1995/96
24,610,477
92.66%
195,157
0.73%
1,289,958
4.86%
465,660
1.75%
26,561,252
1996/97
26,072,323
92.98%
155,138
0.55%
1,405,976
5.01%
407,880
1.46%
28,041,317
1997/98
24,825,940
93.81%
83,138
0.32%
1,304,806
4.93%
249,987
0.94%
26,463,871
1998/99
25,526,451
92.91%
138,007
0.50%
1,398,876
5.09%
413,005
1.50%
27,476,339
1999/00
26,123,163
92.82%
159,317
0.57%
1,431,005
5.08%
431,060
1.53%
28,144,545
2000/01
26,557,509
93.06%
116,776
0.41%
1,388,721
4.87%
473,995
1.66%
28,537,001 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Appendix E
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
DONATIONS
Alumni, friends, parents, faculty, staff, foundations,
corporations and organizations continued the tradition of
supporting the Library in 2000/01. Gifts varied from those
focusing on specific interests of donors, to unrestricted gifts
benefiting all users of the Library. In 2000/01, the Library
received more than 2,000 donations, with a combined value
of $2,918,614. Donations came in forms of cash, gifts-in-
kinds, and pledged support, which may be received over a
period of years. All gifts shared and conveyed the
philanthropic spirit of donors wishing to support students,
scholars and community users of the Library.
There were two $1 million donations in 2000/01. A
$1 million donation from alumna Mrs. Katherine Scott
Chapman and her husband Dr. Lloyd Chapman provided
funding to renovate the concourse in Main Library into the
Chapman Learning Commons. The Chapman Learning
Commons will be a welcoming learning space with
comfortable individual and group study areas, support
services, and technology to support the research and
learning activities of campus and community members.
A $1 million donation from the Sutherland Foundation
established The Peggy Sutherland Memorial Library
Endowment. The endowment and the important Library
resources it funds are a tribute to Mrs. Peggy Sutherland,
who passed away in 1999. The endowment allowed the
Library to build Nursing and Allied Health Resources: The
Peggy Sutherland Site, which provides online support to
students, researchers and practitioners in the nursing and
allied health professions. Anyone considering a nursing or
allied health career or researching health topics will find
extensive information there.
GIFTS-IN-KIND
Gifts-in-kind play an important role in enhancing the
Library by increasing the depth and breadth of research
collections and contributing to its uniqueness as an
institution. Significant gifts-in-kind received in 2000/01
include:
♦ The Dr. H. Colin Slim Stravinsky Collection, named
for its donor, includes more than 120 items
documenting the life and work of Igor Stravinsky. As
one of the world's most diverse Stravinsky
collections, it includes a signed edition of the ballet
Petrushka, an inscribed copy oi Poetics of Music, and
numerous autographed items such as signed sketches
of piano works Divertimento and Les Noces.
♦ Jane Adams, daughter of Canadian composer Jean
Coulthard, donated original musical recordings and
manuscripts of her late mother.
The Library is grateful to all of the generous individuals and
organizations who contributed financial support and gifts-
in-kind during 2000/01. These Friends of the Library
significantly enrich the information resources, learning
resources, and experiences of UBC students, faculty, staff
and community users.
The Library Collections Enrichment Endowment and the
Library Technology Endowment continued to grow
towards their $2 million goals respectively. The
Endowments generate annual income to support ongoing
acquisition and technological needs. The Collections
Enrichment Endowment funds the acquisition of electronic
resources and databases, scholarly journals, and books
covering the range of academic disciplines. The Technology
Endowment funds technology and services to enhance the
Library's capacity as a 'library without walls,' through
delivery of resources and services online to students, faculty,
staff and community users wherever they are located. REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
23
Appendix E
DONOR AND GIFT RECOGNITION
FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY 2000/01
The following donors generously contributed gifts
between April 1, 2000 and March 31, 2001.
PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE
($250,000 and above)
Dr. Lloyd Chapman and
Mrs. Katherine Scott Chapman
Dr. H. Colin Slim
The Sutherland Foundation
CHANCELLOR'S CIRCLE
($25,000 to $249,999)
Ms. Jane C. Adams
Ms. Valerie Haig-Brown
Mrs. Elizabeth Hawkins
Ms. Heather Spears
Wu hive made every
effort to ensure the
accuracy of the list of
donations received
between Apri 11,2(KK)
and March 31, 2001.
Please direct any
i inquires to the Ij brary
Development Officer
at 604 822-6553:
WESBROOK SOCIETY
($1,000 to $24,999)
Dr. David Friend Aberle
Mr. Gordon Adaskin 1
Mr. Frank A. Anfield
Dr. Ivan Avakumovic
Dr. C. Jane Banfield
Mr. Harcourt Robin Brammall
Mr. W. Thomas Brown, MBE
Dr. Michael H. Bullock
Canadian Bridge Federation
Dr. James O. Caswell
Commonwealth Holding Co. Ltd.
Mrs. B. Lynn Craigie
Dr. Max Cynader
Mr. S. H. Dean
Mrs. Suzanne Cates Dodson
Ms. Mary C. Dvorak
Ms. Betty A. Fredeman
Dr. Joseph Arthur F. Gardner, CM
Dr. Leonidas E. Hill
Dr. Ronald A. Jobe
Ms. Deborah Mary Kerr
Mr. Arthur A. Kube
Mr. John Lee
M Ways Productions Corp.
Mrs. Lorna J. Maclnnes
Dr. Richard V. Mattessich
Mr. Richard Irwin Nelson
Dr. William Herbert New
Mr. Noel A. S. Owens
Mrs. Vera Pech
Mrs. Marion L. Petiey
Mrs. R. Elaine Polglase
Roland Whittaker Charitable Trust
Dr. Jan Vance Rule, OBC
Estate of John Keith Russell
Mr. John R. Singleton, QC
Dr. John E. R Stainer
Ms. Hilary M. Stewart
Mr. Philip J. Thomas
Mr. Alan Robert Twigg
Vancouver Foundation
Vancouver Historical Society
Mr. Bryce Waters
Mr. Edward David H. Wilkinson, QC
Ms. M. Wilson
Ms. Ingeborg Woodcock 24
REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
TO THE SENATE
Appendix F
GRANT FUNDING
With increasing costs in all budgetary sectors, grants play an increasingly important role in funding services and projects that
would otherwise be beyond the Library's means. Benefits from successful applications during 2000/01 include:
B.C. MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT AND INVESTMENT.
$105,900 for continued support of the PATSCAN service.
B.C. MINISTRY OF EMPLOYMENT AND INVESTMENT.
NETWORKS OF CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE, INFORMATION
INFRASTRUCTURE.
$10,000 to support reference assistance in the life sciences.
CANADIAN COUNCIL OF ARCHIVES.
$3,000 for the Lowry Collection microfilming project,
phase 4.
DEPT. OF HERITAGE.
YOUNG CANADA WORKS IN HERITAGE INSTITUTIONS.
$8,454 for the Chung inventory project.
$2,984 for WebCT project.
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF CANADA.
$118,000 in continued support for the Cataloguing-in-
Publication program.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ACADEMIC EQUIPMENT FUND.
$125,000 for replacement equipment and furniture.
$30,000 for the Chung Collection project.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY. INNOVATIVE PROJECTS FUND.
$15,000 for the Woodward Library laptop port project.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TEACHING AND LEARNING ENHANCEMENT FUND.
$50,000 for the Information Connections program.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
TREASURY (INSURANCE).
$4,642 for upgraded security system in Main Library.
$998 for upgraded security system in Asian Library.
$2,500 for upgrade security system in Main Library.
VANCOUVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY.
$6,500 for the Vancouver Bibliography project.  

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