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Biblos May 1, 1968

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 VOL. 4 NO. 7  OF THE UBC LIBRARY STAFF NEWSLETTER
MAY-JUNE 1968
Much as we disapprove of serials proliferation, we must agree that the
Library's new weekly publication:  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
LIBRARY BULLETIN, is a most useful addition to the pieces of paper
1i tter i ng our desks.
Graham Elliston, a compiler and editor of the Bulletin, sees it as a
development of the now defunct BIBLOS feature, Front Office News.
It is much more timely and comprehensive, and is in effect a compilation of the routed memos which we (hopefully) committed to memory
before passing along.  Each Library Staff Member now has a personal
file of memos for future reference.
The Bulletin should be received by every member of Staff, so if you
have not yet received numbers 1-3, ask your Division Head for missing
issues.  The Front Office keeps spare copies.
The information in each issue is official and straight from the mouth
of Administration, via Graham who clarifies and expands the oracular
pronouncements where necessary by conferring directly with the person
responsible.  Further enquiries from readers should be directed to the
original source, not to Graham.
BIBLOS will continue a monthly basis (bi-monthly May-August), bringing you social news, longer articles on Library subjects, and from
time to time, the news behind the news in the Bulletin.  Plus of
course, examples of literary talent from the Staff. PERSONNEL
STAFF CHANGES
We say good-bye to -
Will iam Johnson
Clerk 11
Acqu is i t ions
Joanne Brown
L.A. IV
Law
Barbara Pohlman
Key punch oper.
Systems
Pat Bellesen
L.A. 1
C i rculation .
Rosel ie Acutt
L.A. 1 1 1
--CSTal ogu i ng
Maureen Moore
L.A. 1
Sedgewi ck
Heather El 1 iot
L.A. 1
Sedgewick
Charles Hill
L.A.111
Government Pubs.
Kathy Reyler
Clerk 11
Qjxr ii 1 iTl-rom
Pat Smith
L.A. 1
C i rculat ion
Anne Sturgess
L.A. IV
Woodward
Mary-Lynne Natchel
L.A. 1
L.A. 1 1 1
C i rculat ion
Roselind Sanderson
Catalogui ng
Tom Farnsworth
L.A.111
Sc ience
Sherr i11 Perry
Cataloguing Lib
rar ian
L i nda L i nes
L.A. 1
C i rcu]_a_LLpn
Dorthy Nepaulsingh
L.A.11
Inter-Lib. Loans
Fran Brafman
L.A. 1
Cataloguing
Judy Cardin
L.A. IV
J^jXula-tian
Mar i1yn Dav ies
L.A. 1
Law
Janet Kirby
L.A. 1
Catalogu i ng
Teresa Clark
L.A. 1
Catalogu i ng
A warm welcome to -
Chung Sun Suh
L.A. IV
Catalogu i ng
Brian Varty
Stack Att.
C i rculat i on
Ph i1 ip Hind
Stack Att.
Sedgewick
Mrs. S. Criddle
L.A. 1 1
Sedgewi ck
Judy Rennison
L.A. 1
C i rculat ion
Barbara Hultqu i st
Flex.Oper.
Systems
Glor ia B i ssett
Key Punch Oper.
Systems
Sandra Sawatzky
L.A. 1
Sedgewi ck
Marg Scott
L.A. 1
C i rculat ion
Judy Lee
L.A. 1
Sedgewick
Rhonda Hanson
L.A. 1
C i rculation
Susan Kent
L.A. 1
C i rculat ion
Brian Shore
Clerk 11
Acqu is i t ions
Elizabeth Van Der Velde
L.A. 1
Woodward
Marion Kraus
L.A. 1
Catalogu ing
Barbara Archer
L.A. 1
Catalogu ing
CONT'D on page 4. CANADA COUNCIL
GRANT:
3
You wi11
have <
seen from the
Lib
rary Bl
1letin No. 2
that the Canada Council
has gran
ted us
$64,000 for
the
pure
hase of researc
i col lections, The
or iginal
total
amount requested
by
the Univers i ty
departments last Octo-
ber was
$560,000,  This was
pruned
by
the Deans of
Graduate Studies and
Arts and
BSS to $181,000,
The
amount
f i nally gran
ted was one third of
that.
So now the fun begins; the money is being alloted on a pro-rata basis to
the departments, who must try to achieve their original objectives with
a fraction of the requested grant.  If the original estimate was accurate-
and modest,it will obviously be more difficult.
ANOTHER CANADA COUNCIL GRANT:
Evelyn Roth, Fine Arts Division, has received a grant to enable her to
attend a 3 week Summer Workshop on Intermedia and the Environment offered
by architect Lawrence Helprin (UBC's landscape architect) and his well-
known modern dancer wife, Ann,  This is the second year of the Workshop
which is open to practicing professional architects, senior architecture
and planning students and to dancers.  The aim is to explore a new range
of experience in avant-garde environmental arts and to evaluate the environment through more intuitive modes of perception. Architects find
that a freeing of the body and movements can  lead to heightened spatial
awareness, and dancers become conscious of activities other than their
own taking place in an environment,  All the sciences and arts are involved to intensify environmental awareness,  The Workshop takes place
partly at Sea Ranch on the coast, at Mount Tamalpais among chaparral and
meadows, and in the cities of the Bay area.  One week will be spent with
the Porno Indians in the hills.  Dancers and architects work separately
and together, learning from each other.
Last year's participants were enthusiastic about the experience, according to an article in Progressive Architecture July 1967 p.132-5.  Few
would have changed the set-up, although it was suggested that a second
Workshop should again be an entirely new first time adventure for both
the Halprins and the students.  Evelyn, and the 3 other members of Helen
Goodwin's THEco Dance group who are accompanying her, will have a wealth
of new experiences to share on their return.
And, yes, Ev has some wild new clothes in mind for the trip! 4
STAFF
CHANGES
(Cont
d)
A warm welcome to
Gill Ian
Stoneman
L.A.
1 1
Valer ie
Roddick
L.A.
IV
Heather
Jones
Sec.
1 1
Cataloguing
Sc ience
Woodward
Congratulations to -
Paul Deglau
L.A,
IR to Stack Att, Circulation
Ian Edwards
L.A,
1 to Stack Att. Circulation
Susan Fazekas
L.A.
IK Woodward to L.A, III Gov.Pubs.
Dorthy Sheppard
Sec,
II to L.A, II1 Woodward
Arab Shariffe
L.A,
1 Spec. Coll. to Stack Att, Sedge.
Pat LaVac
L.A.
II! Circ. to L.A. IV Law
Louis Exel
L.A,
1 to L.A, 11 Circulation
Bev Harkus
L.A,
I to L.A. II Woodward
Bruce Stephenson
Cler
k 1 to Clerk II Acquisitions
Lydia Lobach
L.A.
111 Cat. to L.A.IV Woodward
Michael Newman
L.A.
II1 to L.A. IV Cataloguing
Joyce Harries
Sec.
111 to L.A, IV Circulation
Mab Belford
L.A.
I'M to L.A. IV For/Agr.
Debbie Gray
L.A,
1 to L.A, 11 Circulation
Moona Prasad
L.A.
I 1 Serials to L.A, 11I Sedge,
Kathy Becker
L.A,
II Circ. to L.A, Ml information &
Orientation Service (l S- OS)
Derika de Beauchamp-
DennIgan
L,A„ III Inter-Lib.Loan to L.A.IV(l&OS)
We are extremely sorry to say good-bye to two Bibliographers
who shall be leaving us at the end of this month.  One is our
editor and chief HELEN CONSTABLE who is joining the happy millions classified as mothers and housewives. We wish her the
best of luck in this new occupation.
The second is R.J.Lanning (or RJL as most of you know him).
He is retiring, for the second time, to move to glorious
haunts of Vancouver Island, We wish him the best of the weather so that his crops may grow luxuriously. THE FIELD HOUSE REMOVAL:
The view from Cataloguing will never be the same!  Staff on Floor 7
will no longer be able to rest from their labours in dreamy contemplation of the tar-paper shack across the way,  Carol Freeman, our photographer, caught these historic shots of the recent slum clearance	
How to move a building? S'easy; you jack up a section.
tfi-tfr
•:^-v.-
Put wheels under
it	
nmjg
■^f*""" .and   tow   it  away!
..V ^'W
r"<fc
..and then clear up the debris!
?w.i."
t.",
■' "-Ai:
'•"^'iWr^tJ,!
«^*WW»«««'l'aW^''"',~    " '■^■^ftV!V/;:^.'; ALL   IN A  DAY'S WORK:
The Gruffydd quest:  Humanities Division.
This was part of a reply to a letter asking about some Original Documents:  "Moreover, from another source we discovered that assistance
might be given by Prebindery Douglas Lockhart, the rector of Bitterly,
near Ludlow, Salop, who has been there for at least twenty years, the
advowson belonging to the Walcot Trustees."
J.S.
Also Humanities Division: The pigeon problem.
During the past few weeks Humanities Division shared the main concourse
with at least four pigeons and two swallows.  A couple of pigeons took
up permanent roosting privileges for about a week, moving into the
Science Division from time to time for a change of scene.  All birds
have now been "removed"  (sinister implications) by the janitorial staff
who have also repaired the bird-proofing at the windows to prevent further breaking and entering.
Cataloguing Division: An enquiry into charity.
In an 18th century publication listing scholarships available for boys
in Bohemia, the conditions quite frequently include an obligation on the
part of the recipient to utter so many prayers daily for his benefactor's
soul .
Does anybody know how well this form of celestial insurance works?
  .,,. * .,,  J.G.
Search and destroy Division: Did we buy this?
Pheasant, L.
The hairy man's book of first aid by Dr. L. Pheasant.
Longon, Wolfe,  1967
96 p.   ill us.  I8i cm. 5/-
Found in the Main Card Catalogue - a false fingernail!  (Those drawers
were getting kind of tight.) N.G. BCLA CONFERENCE, Victoria. 	
W'-.at nappened at the 57th Annual Conference of the British Columbia
Library Association, held at Victoria's Empress Hotel from May 3~5?
One might attempt to find out by looking in a newspaper,  Let's try
the Victoria Daily Times, May 6.  Yes, there is a story on page 32.
The headline reads "25% of Students on Pot, Says Baird," and this
phenomenon is described for some ten column inches.  Libraries?
Who cares? What about the Vancouver Sun? On page 46, there are
six inches headed with "Half Pupils 'Smoke Pot' in Victoria,"  (We
are told nothing about the smoking habits of entire students.)
Jr-ice dga i n, Baird's address is emphasized to the exclusion of any
mention of books or libraries  Of course, complete blame should
not be placed on the Sun, for it relied on a wire service for its
copy, and produced an example of how a bad story is perpetuated
across the nation, and even around the world, although It is doubtful that this one got much beyond Whonnock,  Librarians must be
accustomed to public indifference by now, which is fair enough.  Why
should that noble creature, the man in the street, be bombarded with
literature and art and music when there Is beer to guzzle and bingo
to play? A little consideration please!
It can be inferred from the foregoing remarks that accounts of the
Conference in the press were somewhat lacking in balance.  Let us
try to correct this situation, and begin by examining Baird and pot.
Alderman Robert Baird of Victoria was the speaker at Saturday's banquet, and his spiel was entitled "Two Sides of the Coin," Mr.Baird
did not have to reach too deeply into his bag of banalities for that
one, since he is an investment dealer in private life.  The Alderman
is a quaint orator whose rhetoric inspires visions of a garden choked
with exotic weeds.  His comments on the hippie problem, which we have
already seen and heard in a hundred other places, are rooted in the
school of hippie criticism which spotlights the parasites and the
hangers-on, the dirty, the irresponsible, the licentious.  He is
oblivious to the explorers and the social entrepreneurs, the freedom
fighters and the intellectuals.  The Alderman wants to understand,
he says.  But he won't.  Baird is a mossback, a fossil, a reactionary who can't see beyond his 27-inch, remote control television set.
His time is past.  His type will go.
The featured speaker in the serious part of the programme was
E.J.Josey, a consultant on the staff of the New York State Library.
Mr.Josey elaborated on the admirable reference and research network
which exists in New York state.  The best point that Mr.Josey made,
implicitly, was that little is possible without financial resources. The Rockefeller administration has poured millions into 1 ibraries,-and this
enlightened support is reflected in the quality of library service at all
levels to be found in his state.  No Canadian librarian can fail to be dismayed at the different state of affairs which generally exists in this
country. While the Rockefellers and Johnsons are building for the future,
our Gothic politicians scamper about smooching the behind of every yokel
wanting a paved cattle track for his herd.
A good part of Sunday afternoon was taken up with a panel discussion on
the future of cataloguing,  Participants were Mc El rod (main entries),
Seno Laskowski of SFU (the new code), June Thomson of UVic (subject headings), Bob MacDonald (book catalogues) and Fred White of the Vancouver
Island Regional Library (book catalogues for regional systems.)  It can
probably be said that, at. the very least, everyone in attendance learned
something that he hadn't known before,
We have already noted the yawning indifference with which libraries are
regarded hereabouts.  One approach to overcoming this indifference is to
encourage a greater participation by the public in library affairs,
Easier said than done, you will suggest. Nevertheless, a very significant development has been taking place within BCLA in the past year, and
that is, the formation and growth of an active, enthusiastic Trustee
Section. This group was well represented in Victoria, and may prove to
be the very link with the citizenry that Is needed to blow librarianship
out of the horse latitudes of public opinion.
There were also talks on microforms and public library displays, as well
as a visit to the premises of master printer Charles Morriss.
The new executive will have three UBC staff members among its number,  ^
Anna Leith is President, Nick Omelusik is Treasurer and Jim Sharpe is
Assistant Treasurer.  It will be the duty of this executive to act upon
the only policy resolution to come out of the Conference, a call for-the
design and implementation of a five-year plan for BCLA. Will this be a
Great Leap Forward?
N.Omelus ik 10
BSS ON MAP DESCRIPTION
Those attending the Bibliographical Society of Canada's Jasper
meeting this month will receive a most attractive "keepsake"
prepared by BSS  to illustrate and supplement his paper on
carto-bibl iographic description of early printed maps.
The green-covered collection of "Maps relating to Alexander
Mackenzie" was originally planned as a brief aid to discussion,
but it has grown to a small book and will probably be published
with the paper, by the Bibliographical Society of Canada.
We hope to have a more complete review in next month's issue
of Biblos, from Maureen Wilson who will attend the Jasper
meeting, and from Frances Woodward in Special Collections
who helped with some of the maps.
OUR COOLEST CUSTOMER:  They start young at UBC these days. OUR NEXT COMPETITION
- will probably be in penmanship!  Start practising now - the following
three paqes may qive you inspiration.
John beddon was a seventeenth-century English cal1 igrapher, born in 16^-4.
Until his death in 1700 he was a master at Sir John Johnson's Free Writing School at Priest's Court, Foster Lane, in London.  This scholastic
activity and the two dates are all we know of his life.
Seddon's fame is founded on his illustrative designs, which he executed
with his hand not resting on the table, but poised in the air above the
paper.  Each design was to appear to have been written in single stroke.
Calligraphy, too, was sometimes executed in this command-of-hand style.
Little gems of artistry such as these were a favourite amusement of many
ca11igraphers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.  Old copybooks are the joy of the typophile and very much sought after.  Like them
all, Seddon's work are extremely rare.
The following page shows another style of handwriting, done by Mr. Anderson, a sign writer of Creston, B.C.  Such "hasty notes" of thanks are
rarities in the Circulation (or any other) Division.
BOOKMARK
Found
In an old book store
A flowery bookmark
Held
In a stiff
Discarded volume.
"With al1 my love,"
It said
In deep-pressed ink.
Handed in
To the old book store
For a trade-in
Or a dime.
B.W. Stephenson,   ril 82, ^"(38.
te,tetese,
vjr?verStL?c)o? £>.C.
\7fiNCou^R Js ^J5.C.
©ear f^s. \?acfieres3e,
Ipapei^ paoes  1 leTt ujit
■"WhPBH . °©^art merit.
r  nelp^riess' is .areat
fiews
in. t
Ybur
appreciated /"
ij^arifc. uou
tbJC
i?t ujitn, uou
Itl
&B3$%
otk 15
THE LIMERICK CONTEST:
We had a very interesting collection of poetry in response to our Contest Call; your Committee had quite a problem selecting the winners and
eventually fell back on that time-honoured method, subjective preference!
First of all though we felt obliged to eliminate all those not in Limerick metre, however entertaining.  And then we felt there should be a separate section for foreign languages.  And one poem related to an article
in last month's BIBLOS, and another was perfect for an article in this
issue.  And THEN, from the remainder, we chose the following four.  The
coveted Prize therefore goes to Claudia Kerr; the runners-up preferred
to remain anonymous unfortunately.
FIRST PRIZE    Our Catalogue Chief as a trial
Parted Author from Subject with style;
Though sad to report,
United we sort,
Alas now divided we file!
SECOND PRIZE   A librarian (known to be pert),
Complained that his eyes always hurt.
They proved that the pain
Could be blamed on the strain
Of checking each new mini-skirt.
THRID PRIZE    A Library without a bell tower
Is like to a plant without flower;
Our "flower" will blossom
With sound that is awesome;
Who says we don't have "flower-power"?
FOURTH PRIZE   There once was a libra-ian named Elrod
Whose division did not look at all mod.
So he painted the pillars
All colours - they're dillers!
Let's hear it for Mc Disney Elrod! 16
FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEMERICKS: Translations supplied on request.
Congratulations to our poets who struggled with a foreign metre!
RIM-ERICK
Hoi volt hoi nem volt egy kondas
Sokszor zavarta egy mondas
A rbvid szoknya a hosszu haj
Szamtalan esetben sok eszre vail
Hisz mutatja mindazt mi pompas.
Anon  (A Hum Div Hum)
Pan i profesor i mill,
Kdyz chcete mTt knihus pTIT -
Tu je treba bacha dat,
Rok,autora, titul znat -
Jen tak mozho ve'du sir it!
Erica Wlachow (Searching)
COMMENT ON THE HISTORY OF GRAHAM X
There was a bibliographer named Graham
Who seemed intent on committing some mayhem.
He sped through a red light,
Told the cops it was oversight,
Then asked the Library to over-repayhem!
Anon and trad. 17
DEAFENED BY DECIBELS
A random on-site survey revealed these sentiments:
"Will look like a muezzin to me." "Acropolis? That heap will be no comparison." "Yeh, Great." "Will eventually rivel that leaning tower."
" v? >v * * -,'«• * * * ". "Most imaginatively conceived concept in Canada."
"The ultimate waste in money,"
U,B,C, again in the vanguard of controversy, has authorized erection of
a soaring Campus Campanile,code-named Bells, Books and Consternation.
A generous personal gift of $15,000 by Dr, Leon Ladner, a former member
of the Board of Governors, (after whom Ladner community is named), makes
possible the concept of a central piazza, focal point for relaxation and
musical lunch-hours.  Of 10 designs originally submitted from a Vancouver
architectural  firm, the chosen plan, by a 29-year old U.B.C. graduate,
incorporates a brick-paved courtyard centered by a 140-foot carillon and
clock tower, landscaped in a grass-banked semi-circular seating terrace.
The external tower face will be constructed of textured crushed marble,
Illuminated from within; and will be equipped with four electric clocks
from Holland, each seven feet in diameter; the clocks may be silenced at
night, to prevent disturbing surrounding residential areas. One hundred
and eighty steps will spiral to three internal levels, sub-observation,
observation and clock levels.  The electro-mechanical carillon, made in
Pennsylvania, is the second largest installed in Canada, after the
671-bell carillon of Expo '67.
Carillons, a French word denoting a series of bells played by mechanism,
were evolved in Belgium and Holland during the 13th and 14-th centuries
to 25 or more notes.  Our carillon will consist of 355 bells, played
automatically by programming with punched nylon rolls, or manually on a
console.  The tones which spectators will hear will be produced by smalT^
bronze bars, made from the same metal as cast bells, the tonal qualities
are equal to cast bells weighing many tons; the bars are struck with metal hammers, the sound amplified a million times and broadcast from 12
speakers on top of the clock tower; recitals can be relayed directly to
radio stations for public broadcasting.  Budding musicians are able to
cut off the sound to the loudspeakers, and listen to themselves through
head phones. 18
Bell-tower history has proved precarious, Giotto died building the
Campanile of Florence, the original Campanile of Venice crashed
and the present one is sinking, the Tower of Pisa leans, Big Ben
was blitzed.  Yet to embellish modern history are the Campus Red
Guard.  So do not ask for whom the bells toll.
Martina C i pol1
LADNER LIMERICK:
There once was a rich man named Laner,
Who wanted to make us all gladdener.
So he dug up a flower
And planted a tower,
Which succeeded in making us maddener.
Graham X THE WHATSISNAME BIOMEDICAL LIBRARY:  problems in taxonomy.
12812-MRJ  (8-RAZDEL)
UNIV. OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
WOODWART LIB
VANCOUVER 8 BC
WOODWAVEL LIBRARY,
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA,
LIBRARY,
VANCOUVER 8, CANADA.
WESTWOOD LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Vancouver 8, BC
WOODBURY LIBRARY
Universoty pf British Columbia
Vancouver 8 B C Canada
Wood Ward Library,
University of British Columbia
Vancouver 8, B.C.
CANADA
Woodland Library,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C., Canada.
WOORWARD LIBRARY
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
CANADA. OFF BASE
Now I've HEARD all this
H3NSENSS about the STUDENT
ss a NiGGifl! About 'em
having no rlf-hts and no
protection and so-called
student-teacher
SEGREGATION and I
Just want to get
a few blasted
things
STRAIGHT!
I mean I
guess I
KNOW my
STUDENTS!
Firstly, let rae say     With their own kind they
some of my BEST friends  seem to ENJOY themselves
3re STUDENTS and BASICALLY. IMMENSELY.. .dancing
you eculdn't WISH to meet
e more POLITE, RESPECTFUL,
HAPPY lot when they know
their place. Why some of
•em ars even quite
ATTRACTIVE...
(chuckle)
Yeah!
(got a lotta rhythm!)..
..wearing gaudy clothes!
Wo TEACHEHS say if you
could toe a STUDENT Just
ONE Saturday night you'd
NEVER want to bo a teacher
AGAIN.' (chuckle)
And they're
VEBY good In
SPORTS!
But GOSH DARN it some
folks talk ebout 'em like
they were US! And FACE it,
what contribution are
they making to the ARTS?
How many DOCTORS, LAWYERS
and BUSINESS LEADERS are
STUDENTS? Biologically
they're Just not
EQUIPPED to handle
FREEDOM and
POWER.
So these OUTSIDERS who try
to STIrt 'EM UP over RIGHTS
and such are Just making
TROUBLE for EVtRYBCDI!
First thivig they'll want
to write on every line
and use staff washroorts
and call us by our FIRST
NAKE3! And brother,
there's NOTHIHG
worse than an
UPPITY
student!
And Just between
us would you
want one to
iwrry your
daughter?
From the Toronto Star 21
PACIFIC NORTHWEST BIBLIOGRAPHIC CENTER
Bill Watson attended the P.N.B.C. executive meeting in April and brings
us a progress report.  interviewing is proceeding for a new executive
director who will be responsible for making a complete report on the
Center.  He will evaluate the objectives of P.N.B.C., decide whether
it should continue as it is, or be modified, or even discontinued, and
report his findings to the directors and to P.N.L.A.  They will decide
on an appropriate course of action and may reappoint the executive director to carry it out.  No announcement has yet been made of the person chosen.
HUMANITIES ON HOLIDAY
Barbara  Walden Is on holiday in the States and sends this postcard to
her co-workers and especially to Jennifer Gallup:
"Greetings, all you hard workers!  Drove yesterday from
Jennifer, Arizona, to Gallup, New Mexico - guess that
rates at least a post card. We are having a great time -
California and the Southwest are lovely, warm and SUNNY!!
See you soon,  Barbara."
Who else on staff has a town named after him or her? BIBLOS would
be very interested to hear from people who have visited their namesakes,
either on this Continent or elsewhere.
WRITERS FOR BIBLOS:
The BIBLOS Committee would be very pleased to hear from any member of
the Library Staff who would like to write for our journal. We need
people who would be prepared to undertake an assignment, or freelancers
who will contribute their own ideas.  If you feel inclined to contribute an article on some subject which relates to the Library or the
University, please do send it in. We won't promise to publish it tnat
month, as space is sometimes a problem, but we shall be delighted to
have it. 22
LIBRARY-DESIGNED CARRELS FOR BROCK
Seating arrangements for the new Brock Hall study area raised
the usual problems of the desirable vs. the financially possible.
The cheapest-solution, long tables, would not provide good working conditions.  The ideal, carrels, would be expensive and inflexible.
BSS1 way out of the dilemma was a cheap, collapsible carre)   to
be constructed by Building S- Grounds.  He called in Julius
Benyovits, Mail Room, to draft out his ideas,  Julius designed
a collapsible but very solid modular carrel which could be built
of plywood with the minimum of cuts per sheet.  Rein Brongers
contributed his engineering experience to  the structure, and
four prototypes are now set up in the Science Division as a
demonstration. They are an eminently practical solution to the
problem.
Julius has given us an excellent demonstration of his talent in
woodworking.  He graduated from Technical College in Gyor, Hungary before going on to Forestry at Sopron,  He came to Vancouver
with the other Sopron students in 1957 and finished his second year
at UBC.  Financial problems interrupted his career in that direction, but he was able to employ- his skill as a craftsman with
Building & Grounds at UBC.  For some time he and BSS collaborated
in building a clavichord, Julius exercising his talent for cabinet-
making and BSS providing the musical content. At that time Julius
lived in BSS1 house on 14th, spending his summers on the tennis
courts (where he is a whiz) and his winters in the basement making beautiful woodwork.  He now lives in the West End (very convenient for tennis) but has had to store his very considerable
collection of tools until he can find a small house with a large
basement where he can set up a workshop again. Anybody know of
a suitable place?
THE IBM OFFICE IN TOKYO is reported to have a sign reading:
MAN  -  Slow, Slovenly, Bri11 iant.
IBM - Fast, Accurate, Stupid.
S R/June 1, 1968 p.7 23
LOCAL GIRL MAKES GOOD:
Woodward Library's dynamic "doctor in residence", Hildegard Spaulding,
received a dozen red long-stemmed roses recently from a professor of
psychiatry at UBC in appreciation of the assistance she gave him for
a guest lecture at Simon Fraser.
This floral tribute came as a delightful surprise, coinciding with her
birthday!  The occasion was further enhanced by Dr. Spaulding's gift to
the medical history collection of an early 19th Century American nursing bottle.  This bottle (see photo») dates from 183^, in Franklin, Mass.,
and was used by the grandfather of a UBC grad. who sold it to Dr.Spaulding
in 1948.
* Not the one the flowers are standing in. CONVOCATION - new style
MINI DRESS OF DAYS GONE BY
"Her dress, a figured material in black and white,
was short, allowing her feet to appear."
Thomas Hardy - A Laodicean.

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