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Biblos Jan 1, 1965

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Array V.l,   No.   4 OF THE  U8BsCa   LIBRARY  STAFF  NEWSLETTER-JANUARY   I965
WHY AUTOMATE?
XXX BVD PDQ.
.40958 7463   RUBL,
RUSH
UBC KUB//LUB VCR
JAN 89/65
2WEAVE SERUYIS VMPLAINT FROMM? AS1L STWRT *TUBBS ZZ
HER HASNOT RECEUVRED THE SEX TUCCB64,*8' SIX, 'SIX
REPEAT SIX RARE GOOKS REQ.YESTERD HANUARY ( 9 473,,:
*?:  BOOKS
.e,BOOKSPLEASE,   PLEASE FEND//
TEND TOH1S 1NNEDIATELY*-„/ UBC LIB VCR OOPS
(REPEAT ALA MEETING W1TOUT THESE DEFERENCES,
ADVISE :LEASE.
Although one might start by applying the punched
computer card system to one library process, such
as book acquisitions or circulation, it is vital to
plan so that the system can be extended to serve
all the library operations (save possibfy reference
work, where mechanization is still impractical, but
may eventually become effective„..)
-Ohio Library Association Bulletin
July 1964 -2-
...643 KJD8 WHI  WHO ARE Y OIU   WHO THE88475S ARE YOU????
I suppose that most people's basic fear of automation
is that it is going to turn them into semi-human or subhuman types, into something close to robots. This is
because they confuse automation with mechanization.
Mechanization has sometimes given millions of people subhuman work to do. Automation does the exact opposite.
The man in charge extends his faculties but remains himself.
- Sir Leon Bagrit, "The age of
automation", The Reith lectures,
1964.
MR S:TYBBS88 56473 MR STYBS 57463 UBC LIB VCR.*.?xx 77
WHO ARE YOU *- SOME NIT?
As for automation's doing away with reference librarians
and printed books—that is not yet on the horizon,
chiefly because reference work is unlike all the other
library processes where you seek one precise result
from an input of simple factors -- as when you want to
know a books price, or who has the book.  Serendipity
still plays a large part in the human being's quest for
knowledge, and if he always knew exactly what he was
looking for, and what its keyword name is, then the
discovery of new knowledge would almost stop.  Scien--
trsts, poets, sociologists and historians just don't
usually approach libraries in the frame of mind to
query a magnetic disk.  But, who knows, they may get
the habit as more and more of man's knowledge gets
thus recorded.
- OLA Bulletin, July 1964
UBC LIB VCR 85747..
xxx BVD PDQ.
JAN   JG/65
MESSAGE RECEUVDD.  RARE HOOKS SEND TO MRS  *TUBBS
FHREE DAY AGO ADDRESSED AS FILLOWS?? %&•?.../'$ HAS:
& 756/UBBS, VAMCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY, VAMCOUVER
WASH.   8574699..   HAVE A MICE TRIP MRS ?UBBS. A NEW METHOD FOR CIRCULATION
Many years ago the circulation of books was kept track of
quite simply. Anyone borrowing a book signed a card
which was in the book, a staff member stamped this card
and the date slip in the book with the due date. These
signed cards were filed by call number and when the book
was returned the cards were replaced in the book.  Over-
dues in this system could be found by examining each card
in the file. This method was very satisfactory as long as
the number of books circulating was very small.
Increases in the number of books circulated led to a
modification of the call system.  Call slips, filled in by
the borrower, together with the same book card were used.
The call slips were filed by due date, the cards by call
number. Overdues were found by matching the call slips
against the outstanding loan files. This modification
worked well until the late 1950's when the number of
books circulated increased enormously, to 160,000 in
1958/5*.
The change to an edge matched card in September 1962 was
necessary to control over 270,000 loans that year, but It
soon became clear that this method would also become
inadequate.  Investigations into the possible use of
automatic charging devices were begun. The device had
to be fast, accurate, flexible and be able to absorb
large increases in circulation.
The investigation led to the selection of an electronic
system which could be connected directly to a computer.
The new method, scheduled for operation in September
1965, is an off-line IBM 1030 data collection system
adapted to circulation requirements.
Initially only the stack collections of the main libr??Y",
College Library and the Woodward Library will be \vr
eluded, and later when tbe^mput units are connected to
a computer, the reserve^collections will be U*efuded„ A
precis describing'the system in detail wilJ^be available
early in March. __,----/ -4-
STUART HEMSLEY
Three Poseidon computers
claim to have a brain superior to those of
Britain's eighty-five admirals taken together
News I tern.
When I was a lad 1 served a term
As a card machine for Mr. Hoilerith's firm.
Sortings galore I could do at a glance
(And so could my sisters and my cousins and my aunts).
Then computer electonics made a bid for me,
And now I am the ruler of the Queen's Navee.
I learned about flip-flop, bits, transistors
(And so did my cousins and my aunts and sisters).
Analogs and digitals of every kind
I simply looked at and then refined.
Never was a calculator quite like me!
And now I am the ruler of the Queen's Navee.
The Navy called, and I had it made
As lieutenant (sub) or (junior grade).
(And had I known just a little bit more
I'd easily have qualified as commodore.)
This service life so suited me
That now I am the ruler of the Queen's Navee.
I was doing all right; but what opened the door
Was-my artful switch into the Memory Core.
There the sort of things I kept in mind
Were admirals' indiscretions of a delicate kind.
And I fed these back so cunningly
That now I am the ruler of the Queen's Navee.
The question arises; the point is moot:
How did I pluck this ripest fruit?
Did matchless competence carry the day?
Did my subtle outputtings pave the way?
The answer to that you will never get from me
Or from any other ruler of the Queen's Navee.
The Atlantic Monthly. (Nov. '64)
Vol. 214, p. 166. FRONT-OFFICE
GLEANINGS
Barbara Edmonds
A MEMORIAL COLLECTION
Audrey Mai in
The staff of the Library of the University of British
Columbia have contributed towards the development of a
collection of early children8s books as a memorial to two
former colleagues - Barbara Edmonds and Audrey Malin,
The beginnings of such a collection have been purchased
from the Free Library of Philadelphia,  This collection
once belonged to the famous American bibliophile Dr. A,S,W,
Rosenbach, who had presented his entire collection to the
Free Library with the understanding that duplicates would
be disposed of, and further additions acquired with the
proceeds^  The collection consists of one hundred and fifty
rare American children's books, printed between 1738 and
!871<  The history of the collection begins in 1835 when
Dr0 Rosenbach's uncle, Moses Polock, then a youth of
eighteen , went to work for the old Quaker publishing
firm of M, Carty and Davis, which specialized in children's
books, Mr7 Polock later became the owner of the firm
In 1900 he turned over to Dr, Rosenbach the collection he
had formed, and Rosenbach continued to add to it, concentrating on the period before 1837-=  Others may wish to
assist in defraying the cost of this memorial collection.
They may do so by sending contributions to Mr, Q,,   Stuart-
Stubbs, University Librarian, made out to the Friends of
U„B„C, Library,  Receipts for tax purposes will be returned to donors. -6-
Competition for Xerox
A Docustat machine has been installed in the Library inside
the Humanities stack entry on level 5.  This is an automatic
coin-operated copy vending machine.  It produces negative
copies, slightly reduced. The charge is 15<£; 25<? is inserted and 10<: in change is returned. This machine is operated
and serviced by and for West Coast Canteens Ltd.  It is not
library property, but is placed here to offer an alternative
to students.  If it is successful more machines will be in-
stalled.
We welcome another literary effort by a staff member and re-
emphasize that contributions in varying shapes and sizes of
verse, prose, doggerel, satire, comic relief, etc. are
gathered by us with most open arms.
Prebindery Mystery        by Roby
Deep down in the basement the Prebindery
Is a walled-in place of mystery.
No stairway leads to this cryptic cell;
No elevator operates well.
All doors are locked; no keys around;
A wonder, some communication is found!
To leave the Department, a dangerous thing:
You might not return through some mishappening...
But if you must leave and you have bad luck,
For instance, the elevator is stuck,
Get back thru the outside, get back thru the stacks,
Get back thru a thousand and one zigzags.
Deep down in the basement the Prebindery
Is a walled-in place of mystery. The Black at the Top of the Stacks
Depending on your station in life (to which it may or may
not have pleased God to call you) the Catalogue Division
is many things, none of them good.
This division is one to bring out the worst in all members
of the library staff. Merely mention the division to a
companion, and he never fails to come forward with a tale
of sins of omission or commission even more horrendous
than the one you were about to air,  Nobody, least of all
cataloguers, can be without prejudice on the subject.
The division itself, however, while reserving the right to
carp and grumble, presents a fairly solid front to its
critics.  It prefers to admit to human, even superhuman,
error on the part of individuals, rather than to acknowledge more than slight inadequacies in itself as a division,
It prefers, of course, that the error be shown to be on
the part of the critic - an outsider by definition.
In any case, the Catalogue Division is "peg in the middle"
in the library game.  It is responsible for the "BACKLOG",
for putting history into fiction, or vice versa (or vice
into verse, or worse) and for confusing all, even cataloguers, who approach the card catalogue.  Sometimes,
however, it is kind, helpful and efficient in spite of
itself.
"Be kind to cataloguers week" commences February 1, 1965. -8-
Festival of the Contemporary Arts  February 1 - 10
The fifth.annual Festival of the Contemporary Arts, which
will include experimental films, jazz and "chance" music,
poetry readings and art exhibits, promises to be as stimulating and controversial as it has been in previous years.
The Fine Arts Gallery, with two exhibitions, will no doubt
be a hotbed of festering emotions.  San Francisco artist,
Bruce Conner (inevitably controversial) will have a one-
man^show, including such works as Rat Back Pack and Spider
Lady Housea  Conner's experimental films are also being
shown in conjunction with the festival.
The second exhibit, entitled The Dark Mirror, is a group
exhibition of recent American Expressionist artists,,  To
quote blurbs, it is "a study in degradation, despair, and
pessimism,<e" "... riddled with fantasy, horror, expostulation, social and political protest,.,,".
If you dare visit the basement, the Gallery times are:
February 2-10 (except Sunday) from 10i30 a«m, - 5-00 pcm,
and February 2 and 9 from 7*00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m..
Beg, borrow or steal a programme of Festival events if you
don't want to miss them.
NEWS FLASH!
CONSTRUCTION MEN TO EXIT U.B.C. LIBRARY!
Bill Bell
can be quoted as saying (happily): "All but a few
insignificant details will be completed by the end of
the month".     - JANUARY! PROJECTS IN PROGRESS
or, So this is what they are doing?
Social Sciences Division
The Committee on African Studies in Canada is conducting
a survey to record and catalogue the holdings of African
government documents in Canadian libraries.  This survey
includes only those countries south of the Sahara.  The
findings of the survey will be published in the spring
edition of the Committee's Bulletin. Marilyn Dutton has
undertaken the work of compiling a list of the relevant
documents held in our library.
Joan O'Rourke recently completed Reference publication
no. 19. - Reference guide to literature on industrial
relations.
Joyce Cummings is working on a revision of Reference
guide to sociological 1iterature (Reference publication
no. 12).
Humanities Division
Maria Horvath is compiling a bibliography of the historical background of the Doukhobors.  She would very
much appreciate help from anyone with information to
offer.
A bibliography of history reference works in U.B.C, has
been undertaken by Sue Hand.  Sue also handles the
French B.I,P. programme in all fields which results
in 50 new French books per month (allowing for fluctuations in the budget during the year).
Hans Burndorfer has charge of a corresponding German
B.I.P. programme. Government Documents
The staff is in the process of re-'boxing and re-labelling
all their documents to facilitate the ordeal of finding
them.  By February they hope to have the documents spread
out into the new wing (well) thus allowing for future expansion.
Map Room
Maureen Wilson and Jean Poy have just finished cataloguing
about 600 maps of the British Commonwealth, mostly African.
Miss Joan O'Rourke, Head of the Social
Science Division, resigns as of April 30,
1965. The "Library is thereby losing one
of its senior staff members, and one of
the country's most able reference
librarians in her field of speciality.
Before taking another position she
wishes to complete her M.A. at this
university".  She wi11 be sincerely
missed.
Vacancies
As of April 1, 1965, there will be an opening for a
Supervisor of Technical Services.
On May 1, I965, a new Head of* Social Sciences Division
wi11 be requi red.
BMB needs a Librarian I as of April 1, I965, -11-
Recent Additions
Miss Susan Dunn joined Cataloguing as a Clerk on January
18, 1965.
BMB has a new Library Assistant as of January 4, 1965
in the person of Miss Mona Richardson.
Michael Anson has joined Circulation Division as a second
Xerox operator thus giving Vera Traff some extra breathing time.
As you have noticed, we have a new washer of coffee cups.
We can now be thankful to Mrs. Hilda Kellington that we
do not have to wash said cups.
Name changes
Marie McLellan of College Library became Mrs. Philip
Morgan shortly before Christmas.
Over at the Law Library, Doreen Dowd married Reginald
Ingram of the English Department on January 14, 1965.
Variorum
Gerry Walker of Cataloguing resigns on January 31, 1965.
J. Kincaid switched her allegiance from the Cataloguing
Department to the Fine Arts Division on January 1, 1965.
Eleanor Hoeg, of College Library, is back at work after
several weeks of illness.
Len Williams is progressing favourably.
Bob Harris, Circulation Div. Librarian, announces that
insufficient interest in the computer programming
course forced its cancellation before birth.
Dorothy Shepard's hoping to be back at her desk very
soon. CKGodi     Xt's    pretty   ©.eainl*
FIRE!
THEFTIV
College Library was treated to more than the
called-for amount of excitement recently,
when a fire was reported in their Women's
washroom,, A stolen purse suffered severely
from an arson attack and the smel1 of
scorched plastic permeated some distance.
This all leads up to another warning re:
many thefts which are affecting both students and staff.

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