History of Nursing in Pacific Canada

The Vancouver Medical Association Bulletin: February, 1938 Vancouver Medical Association Feb 28, 1938

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 The BULLETIN
I
OF THE
VANCOUVER MEDIGAf
ASSOCIATION
Vol. XIV
FEBRUARY,  1938
No. 4
In This Issue:
KIPLING AND THE DOCTORS
THE SOURCES AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE OF
THE VITAMINS
NEWS AND NOTES
VANCOUVER MEDICAL ASSOCIATION SUMMER SCHOOL
JUNE 21-24,1938
m BULKETTS
(With Cascara and Bile Salts)
. . FOR . .
Chronic Habitual
Constipation
BULKETTS POSSESS ENORMOUS BULK
PRODUCING PROPERTIES AND BEING
PROCESSED WITH CASCARA AND
BILE SALTS PRODUCE BULK WITH
MOTILITY.|
WE WILL BE PLEASED TO PROVIDE
ORIGINAL CONTAINERS FOR TRIAL
ON REQUEST.
Western Wholesale Drug
(1928) Limited
456 BROADWAY WEST
VANCOUVER   -   BRITISH COLUMBIA
(Or at all Vancouver Drug Co. Stores) THE   VANCOUVER   MEDICAL   ASSOCIATION
BULLETIN
Published Monthly under the Auspices of the Vancouver Medical Association
in the interests of the Medical Profession.
Offices:
203 Medical-Dental Building, Georgia Street, Vancouver, B. C.
Editorial Board:
Dr. J. H. MacDermot
Dr. M. McC. Baird De. D. E. H. Cleveland
All communications to be addressed to the Editor at the above address
Vol. XIV.
FEBRUARY, 1938
No. 5
f  ~ OFFICERS  1937-1938 tlllf
Dr. G. H. Clement Dr. Lavell H. Leeson Db. W. T. Ewing
President Vice-President Past President
Dr. W. T. Lockhart Dr. A. M. Agnew
Hon. Treasurer Hon. Secretary
Additional Members of Executive—Dr. J. R. Neilson, Dr. J. P. Bilodeau.
TRUSTEES:
Dr. F. Brodie Dr. J. A. Gillespie Dr. F. P. Patterson
Historian: Dr. W. D. Keith
Auditors: Messrs. Shaw, Salter & Plommer.
| SECTIONS
Clinical Section
Dr, R. Palmer  Chairman.   Dr. W. W. Simpson Secretary
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Dr. S. G. Elliott Chairman     Dr. W. M. Paton Secretary
Pediatric Section
Dr. G. A. Lamont ...Chairman    Dr. J. R. Davies Secretary
Cancer Section
Dr. B. J. Harrison Chairman    Dr. Roy Huggard Secretary
Library
Dr. A. W. Bagnall
Dr. S. Paulin
Dr. W. F. Emmons
Dr. R. Huggard
Dr. H. A. Rawlings
Dr. R. Palmer
STANDING COMMITTEES
Summer School
Dinner
Dr. G. F. Strong
Dr. R. Huggard
Dr. D. D. Freeze
Dr. J. R. Naden
Dr. A. C. Frost
Dr. A. B. Schinbein
Dr. A.Y. McNadj
Dr. T. H. Lennie
Dr. F. A. Turnbull
Publications
Dr. J. H. MacDermot
Dr. D. E. H. Cleveland
Dr. Murray Baird
Credentials
Dr. A. B. Schinbein
Dr. D. M. Meekison
Dr. F. J. Buller
Metropolitan Health Board
Advisory Committee
Dr. W. T. Ewing
Dr. H. A. Spohn
Dr. F. J. Buller
Representative to B. C. Medical Association—Dr. Neil McDougall.
Sickness and Benevolent Fund—The President?—The Trustees
V. O. N. Advisory Board
Dr. I. Day
Dr. G. A. Lamont
Dr. Keith Burwell Serum Therapy of Pneumonia
In a large proportion, estimated as well over fifty per cent,
of all cases of lobar pneumonia, the causative agent is a
Type I or a Type II pneumococcus. In treatment of pneumonia caused by either of these types of pneumococcus,
favourable results from serum therapy had become, by
1934, so obvious that international units were then
adopted for standardization of Type I and of Type II
anti-pneumococcus sera.
In using anti-pneumococcus serum, its administration
early and in adequate doses is, of course, a factor of fundamental importance, as is the use of serum specific for
the type of the pneumococcus present in the case under
treatment. By the Neufeld method of rapid typing,
determination of type may be made in hospital or other
laboratories, or a determination may be carried out by
the physician with the aid of a microscope.
Information relating to Concentrated Anti-Pneumococcus Sera
and to Pneumococcus Typing-Sera as prepared by the Con-
naught  Laboratories  -will  be  supplied  gladly   upon   request.
CONNAU G H T LABORATO'R IE S
UNIVERSITY   OF   TORONTO
Toronto 5
Canada
Depot for British Columbia
Macdonald's Prescriptions Limited
MEDICAL-DENTAL BUILDING, VANCOUVER, B. C. VANCOUVER   HEALTH   DEPARTMENT
STATISTICS—DECEMBER, 1937
Total population—estimated  253,363
Japanese population—estimated  8,522
Chinese population—estimated  7,765
Hindu population—estimated \ 1  352
Rate per 1,000
Number        Population
Total deaths    248 11.0
Japanese deaths  3 4.1
Chinese deaths  8 12.3
Deaths—Residents only 1  219 10.2
BIRTH REGISTRATIONS—
Male, 174: Female, 157.
I    331
Dec, 1937
INFANTILE MORTALITY—
Deaths under one year of age        7
Death rate—per 1,000 births  21.1
- Stillbirths (not included in above)  11
15.4
Dec., 1936
10
36.2
3
CASES OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES REPORTED IN THE CITY
December 1st
to 15th, 1937
Cases Deaths
Scarlet Fever :	
Diphtheria    0
Chicken Pox  104
Measles   5
SfCarlet Fever 1 %  43
Rubella   5
Mumps   47
Whooping Cough '.. 17
Typhoid Fever .1. 8
TJndulant Fever  0:
Poliomyelitis   „:._: 1.. ,.   0
Tuberculosis    i-i _„—___ 26
Erysipelas    1
October, 1937
Cases   Deaths
43 0
November, 1937
Cases  Deaths
0
VENEREAL DISEASE CASES REPORTED TO PROVINCIAL BOARD
OF HEALTH, DIVISION OF V. D. CONTROL
Vancouver Hospitals and
Clinic    private doctors Totals
Syphilis --        71                   31 108
Gonorrhoea        91                   23 114
HYPERTENSION  BIOGLAN
Has proven the most effective remedy
MADE IN ENGLAND BY
THE BIOGLAN LABORATORIES LTD.
Biological and Research
Ponsbourne Manor, Hertford, England.
1  Rep.: S. N. BAYNE
1432 Medical-Dental Bldg. Phone: Sey. 4239 Vancouver, B. C
References: "Ask the Doctor who is using it."
Page 98 PROLONGED
ACTION
in reducing
BLOOD
PRESSURE
TTYPOTENSYL is preferred to
** nitroglycerin and the nitrites as
a hypotensive agent because of its
more prolonged action. Reductions of
20 to 30 mm. Hg. beginning 12 hours
after a single dose may be augmented
and mantained indefinitely by continued medication.
Lowering of blood pressure is accompanied by striking relief of headache and dizziness in at least 75% of
cases.
Three synergists, each an effective
vasodilator, are combined in Hypotensyl; namely, Viscum album (European mistletoe), hepatic extract
and insulin-free pancreatic extract.
The effect of the synergism is to prolong and intensify the hypotensive action of each of these agents.
In essential hypertension, administration of Hypotensyl in conjunction
with dietary restriction and suitable
rest periods usually suffices to keep
the condition under control. When
hypertension is secondary to nephritis
or other serious causes, Hypotensyl
proves a valuable palliative.
The average dose is 1 to 2 tablets,
three times daily, % hour before
meals. Supplied in bottles of 50 and
500 tablets.
SAMPLES ON REQUEST
H
Photo by Cendreau
HYPOTENSYL
KEEPS BLOOD PRESSURE LOWER
ANGLO-FRENCH DRUG CO., 354 St. Catherine St., E.f
Montreal, Quebec VANCOUVER MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
Founded 1898    ::    Incorporated 1906
GENERAL MEETINGS will be held on the first Tuesday of the month
at 8 p.m.
CLINICAL MEETINGS will be held on the third Tuesday of the month
at 8 p.m.
Place of meeting will appear on Agenda.
General meetings will conform to the following order:
8:00 p.m.—Business as per Agenda.
9:00 p.m.—Papers of the evening.
Programme of the 40 th Annual Session
February 9th—GENERAL MEETING. |
Dr. C. E. Sears, Portland, Ore.: "The Pathogenesis and Treatment
of Vascular Hypertension."
February 15th—CLINICAL MEETING.  |      |
March 1st—OSLER LECTURE—Dr. L. H. Appleby.
March 15 th—CLINICAL MEETING.       S^fc
April 5 th—GENERAL MEETING.
"Symposium on Liver and Gall-Bladder":
Dr. W. Graham: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Surgical Conditions."
Dr. H. H. Pitts: "Physiology and Pathology of Liver and Gall-
Bladder."
April 19th—CLINICAL MEETING.
—■  ■-
BRITISH COLUMBIA MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
|     I        CANCER COMMITTEE
A meeting of the Committee on the Study of Cancer of the British Columbia Medical Association was held on Monday evening, January 17th.
The following members were present: Dr. A. Y. McNair in the Chair;
Doctors H. H. Milburn, M. W. Thomas, C. W. Prowd, K. F. Brandon representing Dr. J. W. Mcintosh, H. H. Pitts, J. W. Thomson, F. R. G. Langston,
Roy Huggard and Ethlyn Trapp.
The question of biopsies was again discussed, and a committee was
appointed to interview Dr. H. E. Young, reminding him of the necessity of
this service.
A progress report was received from the Canadian Society for the Control
of Cancer. Proceedings leading to incorporation are now under way, and a
book on the various aspects of cancer is being prepared for distribution to
members of the profession throughout Canada.
The following resolution was passed for submission to the Board of
Directors of the British Columbia Medical Association:
Resolved : That this committee recommend to the Executive of the
B. C. Medical Association that on any lecture tours that may be undertaken this year a speaker be included who would deal with some problem in cancer and also be prepared to outline the various activities
under way in the matter of cancer control.
It was decided that this Committee meet on the third Monday of each
month, and they again ask for suggestions from doctors throughout the
Province for the mutual benefit of the Committee and themselves in this
phase of medical practice.
Page 99 EDITOR'S PAGE
We take the greatest of pleasure in presenting to our readers, in this
number of the Bulletin, the very delightful paper that Dr. D. E. H. Cleveland
read before the Association at its last meeting, on "Kipling and the Doctors."
It reads, we think, even better than it sounds, which is a very severe test of
a paper, since the critical faculty of the listener is to some extent lulled to
inaction by the personality of the speaker, by the lack of time to dwell on any
part of the paper, and so on. But this is an eminently readable paper, and
we are grateful to its giver. It is one of the rare papers that can be handed
to the printer as it is received, with no editing necessary.
We have been thinking of Dr. Cleveland's remarks to the effect that
Kipling is kinder and perhaps fairer to the doctor than most writers are,
and pondering on the reasons therefor, if haply these may be found. The
doctor, as a class, does not have a "good press." His portrait, as presented by
most of the writers who attempt to delineate it, is not flattering, to put it at
its mildest; it very often makes one wonder if indeed we can be as bad as
all that, and we have a feeling, perhaps a prejudiced one, that we are not
any worse than anyone else. Yet we do suffer quite a bit at the hands of those
who write about us.
Some of the writers are of the "debunking" turn of mind—Bernard Shaw
being perhaps the outstanding example. Sinclair Lewis does it too, but he
does not use the glittering rapier of Shaw—rather the keen dissecting knife,
perhaps better the pruning knife—because he does acknowledge the existence
of some good wood which is worth saving. On the whole, we cannot refute
Lewis' charges half as well as we can those of Shaw, who, we feel, has overplayed his hand, has so exaggerated and distorted the picture that it is no
longer even a good cartoon.
Others put the doctor on a pedestal, which make him look, and feel, rather
ridiculous. It is hard to get down off a pedestal without considerable loss of
dignity—indeed, without a fall—and the higher the pedestal, the greater
the danger of a crash.
Where we must be grateful to Kipling is that he treated us as ordinary
men, doing our work on the whole quite well, and shewing ourselves good
craftsmen. How he loved a good craftsman! One sees it in so many of his
writings. The man who loved good timber, and wrought out of it a bridge
that would outlast many generations of men, or a ship that was staunch and
seaworthy; the artist who was true to his vision, the civil servant that could
be trusted, regardless of any honour or fame to be gained, or any hardship
to be suffered, to "stand by the day's work and await further orders." His
little poem on Martha's sons is one of the gems of his creation, and we feel
that he must have read, again and again, that essay by Ecclesiasticus on
the different types of men; in which he describes, first, and with evident
delight in him, the worker at a craft, who merely does his work well. You
will not, says this great old essayist, find his name in the list of the mighty,
nor will he sit on high in the councils of the people, but "these men maintain
the fabric of the world, and in their handicraft is their prayer."
That would be the best thing anyone could say of the doctor-folk, as
Kipling might have called us: that most of us are good and honest craftsmen,
doing our work without fuss, but as well as we know how. This implies silence
and lack of publicity—and it is perhaps nothing to be ashamed of that as a
class we are not good advertisers, nor do we appear attractive when appearing in public. There is a certain element of drama in our work, but when it
becomes conscious of itself, it tends to become melodrama, and our best
friends are those who do not try to make too much of us.
Page 100 IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTICE!
*
VANCOUVER MEDICAL ASSOCIATION.
REGULAR SCIENTIFIC MEETING POSTPONED!
Owing to the illness of Dr. Charles E. Sears, the guest speaker at the next
monthly meeting of the Association, the meeting usually held on the first
Tuesday in the month has been postponed until WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9th.
The meeting will take the form of a dinner meeting to be held in the
Aztec Room at the Hotel Georgia, commencing at 6:30 p.m. The dinner is
informal, and members are asked to come directly from their offices. Tickets
are $1.00.
Dr. Charles E. Sears, the speaker of the evening, is a specialist in Internal
Medicine and is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Medical School of the
University of Oregon, at Portland, Oregon. The subject of his paper will be
"Pathogenesis and Treatment of Vascular Hypertension."
There will be a short business meeting immediately following the dinner
and the paper will commence not later than 8:30 p.m. Those who are unable
to attend the dinner are cordially invited to come in later.
NEWS AND NOTES
Dr. W. Norman Kemp is leaving Vancouver early in February for Montreal, where he will make his home for the next two years. Dr. Kemp has
accepted the position of Director of Clinical Research at the Ayerst, McKenna
and Harrison Company of Montreal, Pharmaceutical and Biological Chemists. Dr. Kemp will have the privilege of working with Dr. J. B. Collip of
McGill and other prominent research workers, who are associated with
Messrs. Ayerst, McKenna and Harrison in an advisory capacity. We offer our
heartiest congratulations to Dr. Kemp on his appointment and wish him
every success. The results of his work will be watched with interest by his
former associates in Vancouver.
#      *      ♦      ♦
Dr. Grant Lawrence has left for a two months' tour of Southern Mexico.
Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Frost have left for a six weeks' holiday in Southern
California.
$      $      ♦      ♦
We offer congratulations to Dr. and Mrs. Fred Saunders on the birth of
a daughter on December 21st.
* *      #      *
Dr. H. R. Mustard, Dr. Colin Graham, Dr. E. H. Saunders and Dr. F. W.
Brydone-Jack attended the mid-winter Ophthalmological Clinical Course in
Los Angeles in January.
* #      *      *
Drs. D. M. Meekison and J. R. Naden attended the meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons in Los Angeles in January.
sfc H8 ♦ ♦
Dr. G. D. Oliver of Quesnel and Miss Louise Clunness were married on
December 2nd at Williams Lake. Following a motor trip to the Coast they
will return to Quesnel, where Dr. Oliver is associated in practice with Dr.
Gerald Baker. They carry with them the best wishes of the profession.
* *      *      *
Dr. N. E. Morrison of Salmo has been appointed Medical Health Officer
for Salmo and District, and School Health Inspector.
Page 101 Dr. S. L. Williams of Nanaimo and Dr. T. C. Harold of Lady smith are no
longer associated with the Hall-Giovando group of Nanaimo.
*      *      *      *
Dr. S. L. Williams has established himself in practice in Nanaimo in offices
adjoining those of Dr. W. F. Drysdale. Dr. T. C. Harold is remaining in Lady-
smith and will carry on in practice in that city.
Dr. A. L. McQuarrie visited Upper Vancouver Island centres in the
capacity of Provincial Medical Director of the Indian Affairs Branch.
*      *
Dr. V. L. Annett has entered practice in Victoria with offices in the Bank
of Toronto Building.
*      *      *      *
Dr. M. D. McKichan of Sidney called at the office in January.
The doctors in one area in District No. 4 have formed a clinical study club
which includes in its membership Doctors Alan and Stuart Beech and Harry
Baker of Salmon Arm, Reg. Haugen of Enderby, J. A. Shotton of Armstrong,
Osborne Morris, J. E. Harvey, Frank H. Pettman, Hugh Campbell-Brown,
Norman W. Strong, A. O. Rose and H. J. Alexander of Vernon. This interesting group has as its Chairman Dr. Morris, and Secretary Dr. Pettman.
Clinical meetings will be held each month at one of the four centres and
rotation will be determined by available material.
* *      *      *
Dr. W. T. Kergin of Prince Rupert has left on a two months' trip, going
first to Toronto, whence he will drive westward and spend the remainder of
the period motoring in California.
* *      *      *
Dr. A. E. Perry, formerly at Port Simpson, is now on the staff of the
Department of Radiology at the Toronto General Hospital. Dr. C. A. Armstrong is now in the practice at Port Simpson.
* #      $      ♦
Dr. Bliss McQuarry, a graduate in Medicine at the University of Toronto,
was recently married to Dr. L. J. Pugsley of the Fisheries Experimental
Station at Prince Rupert, where they will reside.
* *      *      *
Dr. H. M. Robertson of Victoria has now recovered from a serious major
operation and will spend the next month or so convalescing in Honolulu.
* *      *      *
Dr. and Mrs. Norman C. Cook of Victoria are receiving congratulations
on the birth of a son and heir.
Our congratulations to Dr. and Mrs. C. E. MacRae of Williams Lake on
the birth of a daughter on January 18th.
S}J 5JS 3JC ^C
Dr. John A. Stewart of Victoria is attending the winter school in Eye,
Ear, Nose and Throat held in Los Angeles, and will be away about two weeks.
Dr. J. Stewart Henderson of Kelowna travelled to Vancouver to attend
the meeting on January 19th of the Board of Directors of the British Columbia Medical Association. Dr. Henderson is President of No. 4 District Medical
Association.
Page 102 Dr. K. C. Wray-Johnston has returned from Great Britain and is again in
the service of the Columbia Coast Mission, with headquarters at Pender
Harbour.
# #      #      #
Dr. J. S. Cull, who, since relinquishing his post as Director of the Health
Unit in the Peace River Block one year ago, has been an officer with the
Metropolitan Health Board in Vancouver, will now succeed Dr. G. F. Amyot
in the office of Assistant Provincial Health Officer and Advisor on Hospitals.
# #      ♦      #
Dr. R. B. Brummitt of Smithers has been in Vancouver and is now, we are
pleased to report, sufficiently recovered from an operation to return to his
practice. During his enforced stay in Vancouver, Dr. Brummitt's practice has
been carried on by Dr. J. C. Poole of Fraser Lake. Mrs. Poole, known professionally as Dr. Lois F. Stephens, is conducting the practice single-handed at
Fraser Lake during Dr. Poole's absence.
* *      *      *
Dr. A. O. Rose of Vernon called at the office before leaving Vancouver, he
having convalesced rapidly from a successful operation in January.
* *      *      *
Dr. C. H. Ployart of Lillooet visited Vancouver in January.
Dr. J. G. Robertson has returned to his practice at Tofino.
Dr. George F. Young has returned to Vancouver from Tofino, where he
did locum tenens during Dr. Robertson's absence.
n* •%• •!• *P
Doctors J. Bain Thorn and M. R. Basted of Trail were in Vancouver
January 19th and 20th. Dr. Thorn attended the meeting of the Council of the
College and Dr. Basted attended the meeting of the Board of Directors of
the Association. Dr. Basted is President of the West Kootenay Medical
Association.
*      *      *      *
Doctors Frank P. McNamee and Stewart A. Wallace were down from
Kamloops on January 19th. The former was here for the meeting of the
Council of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and the latter attended
the meeting of the Board of Directors of the British Columbia Medical Association.
afc afe $ sje
Dr. C. T. Hilton of Port Alberni, representing the Upper Vancouver Island
Medical Association, attended the meeting of the Board of Directors of the
Provincial Association in Vancouver, January 19th.
Doctors Thomas McPherson, Gordon C. Kenning, W. Allan Fraser and
P. A. Clyde Cousland of Victoria were in Vancouver January 19th attending
meetings. Doctors McPherson and Kenning were over for the meeting of the
Council of the College, and Doctor Kenning, as President of the British
Columbia Medical Association, presided at the meeting of the Board of
Directors, which was attended by Doctors Cousland and Fraser.
Dr. S. Cameron MacEwen, President of the Council of the College, and
Doctors George T. Wilson and F. R. G. Langston, all of New Westminster,
attended meetings in Vancouver on January 19th. Dr. MacEwen presided at
the meeting of the Council and Doctors Wilson and Langston were over for
the meeting of the Board of Directors of the British Columbia Medical Association.
Page 108 POST GRADUATE COURSE  IN
OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTO-LARYNGOLOGY
The Editoe,
Vancouveb Medical Association Bulletin :
We would like to call your attention to the Third Annual Post Graduate
Course in Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology which will be held in Portland, Oregon, April 3rd to 9th, 1938. This course is sponsored jointly by the
Oregon Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology and the University
of Oregon Medical School. We would appreciate all the publicity you care to
give the course in order that interested men not reached by our mailed
announcement may get in communication with us.
The course is primarily intended for those in special practice. However,
in the two previous years that the course has been given, a number of men
whose general practice in certain districts necessitates care of eye, ear, nose
and throat conditions have taken the course and pronounced it of definite
value to them in their work. The program committee wishes it announced
that subjects of practical interest to men in active practice will be given the
first consideration.
Our guest teachers this year, Dr. A. C. Furstenberg and Dr. Sanford Gif-
ford, certainly need no introduction. In addition to their fame as research
students they are both gifted speakers and teachers. They will be with us all
week. The mornings will be dedicated to programmed papers by our guests.
There will be a round-table luncheon each noon hour with question box. The
afternoon sessions will be held at the out-patient clinic of the Medical School,
and in the evenings Dr. Olof Larsell, Professor of Anatomy at the school,
will demonstrate the surgical anatomy of the head and neck. There are several other features in the formative stage which will be announced later in
the preliminary program. Copies of this program may be secured by writing
Dr. Paul Bailey, 929 Medical-Dental Building, Portland, Oregon.
Sincerely yours,
Paul Bailey, Secretary.
RADIOLOGICAL MEETING
On February 4th and 5th the Radiologists of Alberta and British Columbia will gather in Victoria for a session on scientific and other matters which
concern Radiology. This meeting is in accordance with the policy of the
newly-organized Canadian Association of Radiologists and is the first of what
is expected to be an annual event held alternately in British Columbia and
Alberta.
Dr. C. W. Prowd, counsellor for B. C, will occupy the chair. Local arrangements in Victoria are in the hands of Dr. Wm. H. Carr. Dr. H. H. Cheney, in
association with Dr. W. H. McGuffin, counsellor for Alberta, is organizing
the scientific programme.
Approximately a dozen Radiologists from B. C. are expected to attend,
and a good representation of Alberta members is assured.
Included among the papers to be presented are the following: "The Canadian Association of Radiologists": Dr. C. W. Prowd; "Some Ideas About the
Nature of Cancer": Dr. B. J. Harrison; "Skeletal Metastases in Mammary
Carcinoma": Dr. W. H. McGuffin (Calgary) ; Subject to be announced: Dr. A.
D. Irvine (Edmonton) ; "Trends of Radiation Therapy in Europe": Dr.
Ethlyn Trapp; "The Development of Institutional Radiology": Dr. H. H.
Cheney; "Contact Radiation Therapy, Chaoul Technique" : Dr. F. H. Bonnell.
In addition to the presentation of papers, considerable time will be devoted
to inspection and discussion of interesting films collected by those in attendance.
Feed H. Bonnell, M.D., Secretary for Meeting.
Page 104 COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
[This should be kept for reference. The membership of other local medical
societies will be published as opportunity allows.—Ed.]
THE FRASER VALLEY DISTRICT
FRASER VALL!
Peesident : Dr.
Secretary : Dr. L. R.
ABBOTSFORD:
Dr. J. M. McDiarmid
Dr. R. J. MacDonald
AGASSIZ:
Dr. P. S. McCaffrey
CHILLIWACK:
- Dr. H. W. Epp (Sardis)
Dr. W. E. Henderson
Dr. R. McCaffrey
Dr. J. D. Moore
Dr. L. Patten
Dr. G. A. C. Roberts
Dr. A. R. Wilson
CLOVERDALE:
Dr. F. D. Sinclair
Dr. L. C. Steindel
COQUITLAM :
Dr. L. S. Chipperfield
IOCO:
Dr. A. N. Beattie
EDMONDS :
Dr. Roderick A. McLeod
ESSONDALE:
Dr. A. L. Crease
Dr. E. J. Ryan
Dr. J. P. Byrne
Dr. Ernest A. Campbell
Dr. L. G. C. d'Easum
Dr. G. R. F. Elliott
Dr. A. M. Gee
Dr. B. Harry
Dr. J. M. Jackson
Dr. L. E. Sauriol
Dr. S. S. Murray
Dr. T. G. B. Caunt
Dr. G. Kirkpatrick
Dr. J. W. Vosburgh
HAMMOND:
Dr. Lawrence Broe
HANEY:
Dr. D. G. Morse
Dr. J. F. Sparling
Dr. A. M. Stewart
LADNER:
Dr. J. C. Grimson
Dr. A. A. King
SY MEDICAL SOCIETY
C. R. Learn, Sapperton.
Williams, New Westminster.
LANGLEY PRAIRIE:
Dr. Donald Beach
Dr. A. McBurney
Dr. B. B. Marr
MISSION:
Dr. E. J. Eacrett
Dr. E. H. Phickson
Dr. W. H. Mclntyre
WHITE ROCK:
(Dr. G. W. Ross now in Wells,
B.C. Area now covered by Drs.
Sinclair and Steindel of Clover-
dale. )
PORT MOODY:
Dr. C. R. Symmes
STEVESTON:
Dr. C. A. Greaves
NEW WESTMINSTER:
Dr. Charles E. Benwell
Dr. B. W. Cannon
Dr. D. A. Clark
Dr. W. A. Clarke
Dr. A. E. Davidson
Dr. Alexander King
Dr. C. R. Learn (Sapperton)
Dr. F. R. G. Langston
Mrs. Langston (Dr. Mary Kathleen Woods)
Dr. E. H. MacEwen
Dr. R. S. Manson
Dr. J. Margulius
Dr. George S. Purvis
Dr. W. A. Robertson
Dr. O. Van Etter
Dr. L. R. Williams
Dr. George T. Wilson
Dr. E. W. Wylde
Dr. A. W. Bowles  (Specialist, E.,
E., N. &T.)
Dr. B. H. Cragg (Specialist, E., E.,
N. &T.)
Dr. G. H. Manchester (Psychiatrist)
Dr. R. E. Mitchell (Radiologist,
Royal Columbian)
Dr. W. Sager. M.O.H. (Burnaby)
Page 105 LIBRARY NOTES
ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY
-Collapse Therapy of Pulmonary Tuberculosis
1931
193
3D.
Alexander, John-
Bluemel, C. S.—Stammering and Allied Disorders.
Bute, L. A.—Practical Proctology. 1937.
Gabetel, W. B.—Rectal Surgery. 1937.
Joslin, E. P.—Diabetic Manual. 1937.
Merritt, H. H., and Fremont-Smith, F.—Cerebro-spinal Fluid. 1937
Purves-Stewart, Sir James—Diagnosis of Nervous Diseases. 1937.
Osgood, E. E.—Atlas of Hematology. 1937.
Steel, Matthew—Biological and Clinical Chemistry. 1937.
THE DAVID DONALD LABORATORY
QUEEN ALEXANDRIA SOLARIUM, VANCOUVER ISLAND
The David Donald Laboratory at the Queen Alexandra Solarium was
formally opened by His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor.
This important adjunct was presented by the family and friends of the
late Doctor David Donald as a memorial to his interest and work, in his lifetime, for children and their welfare.
Dr. Richard Felton, Medical Health Officer of Victoria, recounted the
events which led up to the need and development of this department. He
told of the work of Dr. Cyril Wace, the first superintendent, and spoke appreciatively of this valued contribution by Mrs. Donald, her daughter and friends
who were present.
Dr. Glen Simpson, the Medical Superintendent, presented a microscope
and other apparatus. The Laboratory will allow of blood and skin tests,
sputum and other examinations, being done readily and conveniently. His
Honour referred to the kindly and humanitarian spirit of the late Doctor
Donald and added that no more suitable tribute to his memory could have
been chosen.
BRITISH COLUMBIA MEDICAL ASSOCIATION
The Board of Directors of the British Columbia Medical Association held
its regular meeting on January 19th in Vancouver.
The President, Dr. Gordon C. Kenning, was in the chair. Twenty-one
members were present: Doctors G. C. Kenning, W .E. Ainley, L. H. Appleby,
M. R. Basted of Trail, E. Murray Blair, D. E. H. Cleveland, P. A. Slyde
Cousland and W. Allan Fraser of Victoria, J. Stanley Henderson of Kelowna,
C. T. Hilton of Port Alberni, F. R. G. Langston of New Westminster, A. Y.
McNair, H. H. Milburn, A. Howard Spohn, G. F. Strong, W. S. Turnbull,
C. H. Vrooman, Stewart A. Wallace of Kamloops, George T. Wilson of New
Westminster, Wallace Wilson and M. W. Thomas (Executive Secretary).
Notes were in hand regretting inability to attend from Doctors F. M.
Auld of Nelson, W. J. Knox of Kelowna, D. Murray Meekison, J. R. Naden,
Colin W. Graham, H. Carson Graham of North Vancouver and N. E. Mac-
Dougall, who Were unavoidably absent.
Highlights of the business before the meeting arose out of the reports of
the chairmen of standing committees. Dr. H. H. Milburn, Chairman of the
Committee on Constitution and By-Laws, in his report stressed the subject
of Federation as the matter most pressing upon the attention of his committee
for study and action at this time. A large committee, the personnel representative of all districts, has been organized, and a letter written to each
member outlining the various points which must be considered by the committee had evoked replies which were encouraging and showed a willingness
and desire on the part of all to support any action leading to Federation.
Page 106 Amendments to the Constitution of the Canadian Medical Association were
now under consideration which would pave the way for the provinces to
more easily become an integral part of the national organization. In this
way, securing a sufficient quota of membership in the Canadian Medical
Association from this Province would permit our organization to function
as part of Federation. Considerable discussion followed and the sense of the
meeting supported the Committee on Constitution and By-Laws in an effort
to secure a larger membership in British Columbia in the Canadian Medical
Association. In that the membership from this Province in the Canadian
Medical Association was 370 in 1937, it was felt that an effort should be made
to enrol between 100 and 200 new members within the next two or three
months. Dr. Milburn accepted the assignment of this work on behalf of the
committee of which he is Chairman.
Dr. Wallace Wilson, Chairman of the Committee on the Study of Economics, reported on the preparation and submission of the brief of the
Canadian Medical Association to the Rowell Royal Commission. This document, he considered, covered the question fully from the standpoint of representation made from this Province. Much of the matter supmitted from the
profession in British Columbia had been written in verbatim. Dr. Wilson
reported that the submission had been made in January and suggested that
it was probable that an opportunity would present itself for amplification
before the Commission at a later date.
Dr. Walter S. Turnbull, Chairman of the Committee on Maternal Welfare,
presented an interim report telling of a erview of the maternity situation in
this Province and a report being prepared for the central committee of the
Canadian Medical Association. The Committee, which includes Doctors A.
C. Frost, A. M. Agnew and A. E. Trites, is considering a proposal for an educational programme which will be submitted to the Provincial Association.
Dr. E. Murray Blair, Chairman of the Committee on Pharmacy, reported
that his Committee had co-operated with the British Columbia Pharmaceutical Association in the effort to control the sale of the preparations of
sulphanilamide. This action by the Committee on Pharmacy was approved
by the Board of Directors.
Dr. A. Howard Spohn, Chairman of the Committee on Public Health,
reported that a committee has been appointed, and told of the study of the
various provincial and municipal health problems.
Dr. A. Y. McNair, Chairman of the Committee on the Study of Cancer,
described the set-up of the National Society for the Control of Cancer and
the efforts of his Committee to have the representatives, lay and medical,
appointed as members of the Board of Governors of this national body.
Members representing all areas of the Province comprise his committee, and
the projection of a Province-wide programme is being studied. A letter from
the Committee was read to the Board of Directors. This presented a resolution, which was approved by the Board, recommending that one speaker on
any proposed lecture tour throughout this Province should deal with the
cancer problem and be prepared to give information on the proposed programme. The question of approach in the problem of control of cancer was
discussed by Doctors H. H. Milburn, W. Allan Fraser, Stewart A. Wallace,
G. F. Strong and C. T. Hilton. Dr. McNair will present a proposed plan to
cover this whole subject at the next meeting of the Board of Directors.
Under new business many matters were introduced for discussion and
were referred to the various committees for study and report. Thus ended a
very enthusiastic and largely attended meeting of the Board of Directors of
the Provincial Association. .
Dr. H. H. Milburn, as Chairman of the Committee on Constitution and
By-Laws of the British Columbia Medical Association, is accepting leadership
in British Columbia in an effort to make federation of Canadian Medicine an
Page 101 ' 1
accomplished fact, and seeks the support of every member of the British
Columbia Medical Association in the forthcoming effort to increase very con-
ciderably the membership in this Province in the Canadian Medical Association. With the strong endorsation by the Board of Directors of the Provincial Association to such a move, he now appeals to the profession for a
generous response from the members in all districts and thus place this Province in a strong place in nationally organized Medicine.
THE SOURCES AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE
t |       OF THE VITAMINS   §
(Continued from last issue)
VITAMIN G (B2)
The eight years 1919-1927 gradually brought full conviction that at least
two substances, the antineuritic vitamin B and some other more heat stable
vitamin, were involved in the functions which had been attributed to vitamin
B. This other more heat stable vitamin is probably made up of several components. It has been called the vitamin B "complex." It is now known to contain a flavin (the "flavin factor") which is called vitamin G in America and
B2 in Great Britain. In addition there is at least one other nutritionally
essential substance which has been variously designated as vitamin H, vitamin B6, and which may be the same as the growth essential called "factor Y."
The term vitamin G or B2 may now be considered as standing for the
flavin factor. It has been concentrated from milk and shown to be a water-
soluble crystallizable greenish-yellow substance belonging to the flavin group
of organic compounds and is known chemically as lacto-flavin.
Deficiency of vitamin G in the dietary of experimental animals has the
following effects:
(a) The growth is checked.
(b) The general health is impaired.
(c) Digestive disturbances are induced.
(d) General weakness and loss of muscular tone is induced.
(e) An unhealthy condition of the skin develops.
(f) The incidence of infectious disease is increased.
(g) The span of life is definitely shortened.
Pellagra, often considered as due to deficiency of vitamin G, is probably
due to a deficiency of two or more vitamins and possibly a protein as well.
Certainly pellagra is not a straight vitamin G deficiency as beriberi is a
vitamin B deficiency.
Vitamin G is formed in the growth of green succulent plants. It is very
probable that the amount of G present in such plants decreases as the plants
dry and wither. The developing seed accumulates a fair amount of G but
cereals contain less G than B. As in the case of the latter, much the greater
part of G is rejected in the milling of grain. Animals derive their vitamin G
from plants, possibly also from the flora of the intestinal tract. Liver shows
a greater concentration of G than other tissues. Milk is the most important
dietetic source of this vitamin.
VITAMIN H (B6)
An important part of the "B-complex," vitamin H or B6 is distributed
similarly to G. Milk, liver and eggs are good sources of both G and A.
A good general rule concerning the intake of vitamin B and the "B-complex" is that given by the great American authority, Dr. H. C. Sherman: "If
half of the needed food calories are taken as fruits, vegetables, milk and
eggs,, and if half of whatever breadstuff s and cereals are used are taken in
Page 108 the whole-grain or 'dark' forms, there will most certainly be provided an
ample supply of vitamin B and of many other important nutritional factors
as well."
VITAMIN C
Scurvy, now known to be due to a dietary deficiency of vitamin C, is as
old as civilization and has been responsible for the death of thousands.
The earliest recorded successful treatment of scurvy occurred in Canada
in 1535 when Jacques Cartier, on the advice of a friendly Indian, gave his
scurvy-prostrated men a decoction of young green succulent "shoots" from
the spruce trees with successful results. These happy effects apparently were
not appreciated in Europe, for scurvy continued to be endemic. In 1734
Bachstrom ascribed specific anti-scorbutic virtues to fresh vegetables. Twenty
years later James Lind, a naval surgeon, conducted his celebrated clinical
experiments whereby he, for the first time, established the efficacy of oranges
and lemons in the treatment and prevention of this scourge.
The modern study of vitamin C commenced in 1907 with the demonstration
of experimental scurvy in the guinea pig by Hoist and Frolich of Christiania.
Their work in this respect is comparable to the pioneer experiments of
Eijkman in avian beriberi.
In 1932 Waugh and King precipitated from lemon juice an actively antiscorbutic substance in crystalline form which they demonstrated to be identical with the "hexuronic acid" which Szent-Gyorgi had isolated from the
adrenal cortex, from oranges and from cabbage as early as 1928. This substance is Vitamin C and has been named cevitamic acid or ascorbic acid.
Its structure was established in 1933 by Ha worth and associates and the same
year Reichstein and Oppenhauer synthesized it.
In the body vitamin C plays a very essential role. It is necessary in the
oxidation-reduction processes of biological chemistry and so-called tissue respiration. Wolbach and Howe state "scurvy is a condition characterized by the
inability of the supporting tissues to produce and maintaih intercellular substances." This function is deficient in scurvy as shown by the study of the
teeth in regard to dentin, by the study of repair of soft tissues and in the
study of growth and repair of bone in regard to bone matrix. The failure of
capillary structure can be explained reasonably in the light of knowledge of
other intercellular substances as due to failure of the endothelial cells to
form cement substance, an inference arrived at by Aschoff and Koch.
The clinical signs and symptoms of acute deprivation of vitamin C, or
scurvy, are well known. In the words of Dr. Ling of H.M.S. Salisbury (1747),
"They all in general had putrid gums, the spots, and lassitude, with weakness
of their knees." In adults, swollen and bleeding gums (gingivitis), weakness
and pain in the lower extremities and subcutaneous haemorrhages are the
features. The skin is usually pallid and shows petechiae. Gingivitis is followed by loosening of the teeth due to resorption of the alveolar bones and
infection. Fever is present and some complicating infection is common. In
mild cases of scurvy the only signs may be swollen gums, rheumatic pains
and varying expressions of the hemorrhagic diathesis.
Infantile scurvy is the commonest form. Here tenderness and swelling of
the thighs and a disinclination to move are common signs. Irritability and
fretfulness are commonly present. Joint pains are frequent signs. Indeed, the
latter make a diagnosis of rheumatic fever or osteomyelitis seem probable
in some casts.
Latent scurvy or the sub-clinical forms of vitamin C deficiency are to
physicians important and interesting phases of avitaminosis C. This condition is probably fairly common as indicated by recent studies. Methods of
diagnosis consist of chemical studies of intake, excretion and blood concen-
Page 109 tration, or, more commonly used, of methods designed to estimate the presence of the hemorrhagic diathesis such as the capillary resistance test.
This test, as modified by Gothlin, consists in marking a circle of 6 cm.
diameter on the patient's forearm just below the antecubital fossa and then
inflating the cuff of the sphygmomanometer above the elbow to 50 mm. Hg.
maintained for fifteen minutes. Then the number of petechiae within the
circle are counted. More than eight indicates a lowered capillary resistance,
the normal being about five. If the condition improves with vitamin C therapy
one is safe in assuming that the lowered capillary resistance indicated the
presence of latent scurvy. Using this method, twenty to twenty-five per cent
of the poorer children tested in Sweden and New York were found to have
sub-clinical scurvy, and to respond to increased vitamin C intake. Here it is
relevant to recall the experimental work of Rinehart in the production of
rheumatic fever," mentioned earlier in the paper, under conditions of
avitaminosis C.
The supposition that sub-clinical scurvy may be responsible for many
cases of soggy, bleeding gums, seems to be supported by the experience of a
number of physicians. Nordenmark found that two-thirds of his cases of
gingivitis in children were associated with abnormally low capillary resistances. In eight out of nine cases, vitamin C improved the gingivitis and raised
the capillary resistance.
The demonstrated relationship between vitamin C and the so-called
hemorrhagic diathesis opens up other fields of clinical investigation. Two
of these, hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and abnormal uterine hemorrhage, are being examined with promising results.
The skeletal lesions of chronic scurvy and osteogenesis imperfecta are
histologically remarkably alike. The use of a high vitamin C diet in the latter
condition offers an interesting possibility for therapeutic experiment.
There is a considerable amount of evidence to show that vitamin C is an
important factor involved in individual resistance to toxins and infections.
King and Menten*have shown experimentally that normal guinea pigs are
twice as resistant to diphtheria toxin as those with latent scurvy. Here we
note a similarity of action to cortin, the hormone of the adrenal cortex. It is
possible that vitamin C may have a notable rdle to play in the future study
of the least understood aspects of resistance to infection.
According to Hess' dictum, 2.5 mgm. of cevitamic acid per day will protect an infant from scurvy, while an adult needs 7.5 mgm. The latter amount
is found in 15 cc. of lemon or orange juice. It is very probable that an optimal
adult requirement for robust health is higher than this. Many suggest from
20 to 30 mgm. daily.
Most fruits contain some vitamin C. Since it is oxidation rather than heat
that is the destructive agent in respect to the preservation of this vitamin,
commercial canning processes of fruits and vegetables delivers them with a
high C content. Also foods preserved by quick-freezing processes have little
loss of C. The citrus fruits, oranges, lemons and grapefruit, constitute the
richest sources of vitamin C.
The International Unit of vitamin C is 0.05 mgm. of cevitamic acid. This
is one-tenth the quantity required to prevent scurvy in a guinea pig on a
scorbutic diet. This is equivalent to the cevitamic acid content of O.l cc. of
fresh lemon juice. In other words, 2 cc. of orange or lemon juice is the equivalent of 1 mgm. of cevitamic acid.
If 30 mgm. be considered the optimum daily vitamin C intake, this quantity can be obtained in:
60 cc. (2 oz.) of orange, lemon or grapefruit juice;
4/14 oz. of tomato juice.
Page 110  O
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Pa^e ii^ KIPLING AND  THE  DOCTORS
D. E. H. Cleveland, M.D.
(Read before the Vancouver Medical Association, January 4th, 1938)
If you go to our medical library and take down from the shelves a book
entitled "The Story of a Surgeon," by Sir John Bland-Sutton, you will see
as a frontispiece a photograph of the author. In the motor-brougham beside
him, gazing at you directly but benignly from beneath his beetling brows,
sits Rudyard Kipling; he of the jutting jaws and "gig-lamps." The time was
October 1st, 1908; the occasion Kipling's arrival at Middlesex Hospital
Medical School to present prizes.
In the preface which follows, the surgeon-author relates how on many
occasions Kipling had prompted him to write in a personal form the Story
of the Hospital. Kipling took the trouble to inscribe with his own hand on
the flap of a portfolio, in quaint English, instructions for such a book. With
his permission Bland-Sutton used this as a preamble for his book. I will not
detract from your pleasure to be derived from reading it by quoting from
it here.
Kipling, we may believe, was bound by ties of warm friendship to many
medical men. Among them Bland-Sutton was one with whom he was for
long on terms of intimacy. The great master of the short story shows his
comprehension of our craft, and his appreciation of those who serve it, all
through his writings, prose and verse. He never portrayed an ignoble member of our profession, yet never descended to mawkish adulation.
Something of the awe and mystery which once clung about the medicineman as viewed by his fellow-mortals has colored the writings of most authors.
Yet superstitious reverence never hindered a Chaucer or a Shakespeare from
taking a shrewd dig at erudite medical pomposity, while their honest tributes
to doctors we may remember as well. Later dramatists, and eighteenth century novelists, sometimes selected a doctor for their low comic relief. With
the Victorian novelists the doctor fared indifferently. He was a boor and a
rowdy, or an arrogant ignoramus, as Scott, Dickens or Thackeray sometimes
portrayed him; a moral weakling or a prig, as we may find him in stories of
George Eliot and Trollope. Today's novelists assume an attitude of free and
easy familiarity in the fields of medicine and surgery and with those who
practise therein, and apply liberally the methods of what in their own jargon
has been called the "debunking" school. Doubtless each of these writers had
met with prototypes of such characters in their personal lives.
Rudyard Kipling stands alone among writers of whom we have knowledge, whose active writing life belongs to the Victorian, the Edwardian and
Georgian periods, as an author who knew and portrayed doctors at their
work, without distortion. His insight into the problems of medicine, his
appreciation of the philosophy of medicine, his understanding of the doctors'
way of looking at the world, and the principles upon which they act, is
unparalleled among authors. Let us consider how this may be accounted for.
In his own words on several occasions he seems to have given us a large
part of the answer. He told the students to whom he presented prizes at
Middlesex Hospital that there were "only two classes of mankind in the
world—doctors and patients." Speaking as one of the latter class, he says
it is "your business to make the best terms you can with Death on our behalf.
... It follows, therefore, that you . . . must be amongst the most important
people in the world." The world "has long ago decided that you have no
working hours that anybody is bound to respect. . . . Have you heard of any
legislation to limit your output? Have you heard of any bill for an eight-hour
day for doctors?" (It is apparent that his prophetic vision had not considered
State Medicine or Health Insurance.)
Page 115 To Kipling the doctor was, like the Soudanese gentleman to whom he
addressed a poem, "a first-class fighting man." His job is to fight the battle
of Men against Death. Not alone by strategy in the field of preventive medicine, but with the tactics and weapons of therapeutic medicine. If Kipling's
interest lingers more frequently on the latter phase, it is not merely because
of its higher dramatic value, but because he knows that Death always wins
the last hand. As Shakespeare makes Cymbeline say,
By medicine life may be prolonged, yet death
Will seize the doctor too.
But he knew, as none know better than those who have witnessed the
sweep of epidemic disease in Oriental countries or in the field of war, what
preventive medicine can and must do. Who of us that remember the South
African war does not recall the terrible slaughter of typhoid and think of
Bloemfontein ? Writing of this many years later, Kipling said, "Our own utter
carelessness, officialdom and ignorance were responsible for much of that
death-rate . . . the organising and siting of latrines seemed to be considered
'nigger-work.' The most important medical office in any Battalion ought to
be Provost-Marshal of Latrines." His unsparing and accurately-aimed denunciation of the sanitary situation there, and its results, could hardly have been
bettered by a modern public health officer, and we would like to feel that
some of the credit for the reform in this respect which we saw in a later
war is his.
His remarks on venereal disease also indicate his modern view. "I came
to realize," he says in speaking of his early years in India, "the bare horrors
of the private's life, and the unnecessary torments he endured on account
of the Christian doctrine which lays down that 'the wages of sin is death.'
It was counted impious that bazaar prostitutes should be inspected; or that
the men should be taught elementary precautions in their dealings with
them. This official virtue cost our Army in India nine thousand expensive
white men a year always laid up from venereal disease."
Once he wrote a fanciful story in prophetic vein, when thirty years ago
he gave us a description of a night-flight from London to Quebec by dirigible
at the end of the twentieth century. It is full of vivid photographic detail
just as it might have been described by a bright young journalist, full of
crackling phraseology. Nearing the Labrador coast early in the summer morning, they pass above another dirigible with cots and nurses in white uniforms
on her decks. The officer on the control platform refers to the other ship as
a "lunger." He explains, "Savages used to haul their sick and wounded up
to the tops of hills because microbes were fewer there. We hoist them into
sterilized air for a while."
There was an old astrologer-herbalist, Nicholas Culpeper. (You will find
his book in our library, too.) He was a pet of Kipling's, and he became the
hero of a story, "A Doctor of Medicine." Culpeper's argument, which commenced from an astrological false premise and led to a true conclusion by
which he cleared plague from his village by exterminating the rats, is too
lengthy and involved to repeat here. Let me recommend it for your great
entertainment and edification. Thus did Kipling record triumphs of preventive medicine in olden times. Incidentally, you will also find in this story
the directions for the Culpeper Cocktail, which you may wish to try when
you are feeling low: "Waters, which I do not say cure the plague, but are
excellent against heaviness of the spirits . . . white brandy rectified, camphor, cardamoms, ginger, two sorts of pepper, and aniseed." It is understood
that the correct proportions of each are to be expressed by the abbreviation
"q. s."
A copy of his book, "Rewards and Fairies," in which this story was
included, was sent by Kipling to his friend Sir William Osier. In the same
book was another story about a pioneer in clinical research and preventive
medicine—Laennec. The story, "Marklake Witches,    tells how the young
Pane 116 Laennec, himself a victim of pulmonary disease, lived as a French prisoner-
of-war in an English household. He collaborates with an unorthodox healer
in the village in treating the phthisical daughter of his host. She is tricked
into breathing draughts of fresh air when they order her to prop her window
open with a charmed stick of maple sixteen inches long, one inch for each
year of her age. She must stand in front of this window five times daily,
fasting, repeat the names of the Twelve Apostles, drawing her breath in
through her nose before each name, and letting it out slowly through her
pretty little mouth after the name. At the same time Laennec and his colleague are experimenting with little wooden trumpets. They place their bells
against each other's chest, listen at the other end, and compare notes. They
manage to bribe a few villagers to let them listen to their chests. Superstition
soon runs riot; one man is dying from stitches in his side where the trumpet
was placed; it is said that "it left round witch-marks on people's skins, dried
up their lights, and made 'em spit blood, and threw 'em into sweats." The
outraged village doctor who had lost cases to the unholy pair said they had
"been impudently prying into God's secrets by means of some papistical
contrivance." Thus did Kipling dramatize the origin of the stethoscope.
The Culpeper story was followed in the book by a set of verses, from
which we quote some lines that show again how it was the humanity and
bravery in the fight waged by the medicine-man that appealed especially
to Kipling:
Wonderful little, when all is said,
Wonderful little our fathers knew,
Half of their remedies cured you dead—
Most of their teaching was quite untrue—
Yet when the sickness was sore in the land,
And neither planet nor herb assuaged,
They took their lives in their lancet-hand
And oh, what a wonderful war they waged.
Excellent courage our fathers bore—
Excellent heart had our fathers of old.
None too learned, but nobly bold
Into the fight went our fathers of old.
But natural results follow natural causes, and Kipling has amused us
in his verses entitled "Natural Theology" by showing how primitive, pagan
and mediaeval man sought supernatural causes for ordinary phenomena,
while modern scientific investigation has placed our remedies in our own
hands.
PRIMITIVE
I ate my fill of a whale that died
And stranded after a month at sea . .
There is a pain in my inside.
Why have the Gods afflicted me ?
Ow! I am purged till I am a wraith!
Wow! I am sick till I cannot see !
What is the sense of religion and faith?
Look how the Gods have afflicted me!
Page 111 PAGAN
How can the skin of a rat or mouse hold
Anything more than a harmless flea ? . . .
The burning plague has taken my household.
Why have the Gods afflicted me?
All my kith and kin are deceased,
Though they were as good as good can be.
I will out and batter the family priest,
Because my Gods have afflicted me!
MEDIAEVAL
My privy and well drain into each other
After the custom of Christendie. . . .
Fever and fluxes are wasting my mother.
Why has the Lord afflicted me ?
The Saints are helpless for all I offer—
So are the clergy I used to fee.
Henceforward I keep my cash in my coffer,
Because the Lord has afflicted me.
CONCLUSION
This was none of the good Lord's pleasure,
For the spirit He breathed in Man is free;
But what comes after is measure for measure,
And not a God that afflicteth thee.
As was the sowing so the reaping
Is now and evermore shall be.
Thou art delivered to thine own keeping.
Only Thyself hath afflicted thee.
Of Kipling's personal friendship with doctors something has been said.
One of his earliest medical friends must have been Dr. James Conland of
Brattleboro, Vermont. After some financial reverses Kipling and his newly-
married wife had gone to live in a cottage on the estate of her grandfather
on the outskirts of Brattleboro. She was attended here in her first confinement, December, 1892, by Dr. Conland. In his posthumously-published autobiography Kipling speaks of him as "the best friend I made in New England."
He was probably ten years or more older than Kipling, having graduated
from the University of Vermont in 1878. Kipling says that Conland had
served in the cod-fleet when he was young, and through his influence the
writing of "Captains Courageous" was begun. Their adventures about Boston
harbour picking up necessary local colour is described, and the author says:
"My part was the writing; his the details. . . . Conland took large cod and
the appropriate knives with which they are prepared for the hold, and demonstrated anatomically and surgically so that I could make no mistake about
treating them in print." Conland also played him a trick to extend his
familiarity with fishing, by sending him "out on a pollock-fisher, which is
ten times fouler than any cod-schooner, and I was immortally sick, even
though they tried to revive me with a fragment of unfresh pollock."
Many years later, when what he calls a "Super-film Magnate" was negotiating with him for the film rights of this book, Kipling innocently asked if
it was planned to introduce much sex-appeal into the great work. On being
told "Why, certainly," he went on to explain that a happily married lady
cod-fish lays about three million eggs at one confinement. Sex-appeal on such
a super-colossal scale rather floored the magnate, and Kipling prayed that
wherever Conland, long since dead, might be, he may have heard.
Page 118 Kipling, it may be observed here, retained something of late Victorian
reticence upon some subjects. As he says in his poem of 1894, extolling the
old "Three-Decker" novels, whose passing he seemed to mourn, with never
a suspicion of the multi-decked Noah's Arks and their strange and varied
cargoes yet to come:
"We asked no social questions—we pumped no hidden shame;
We never talked obstetrics when the Little Stranger came."
Dr. Conland, Mrs. Kipling's accoucheur, Kipling's beloved friend and
boon companion in sailors' eating houses on the Boston waterfront, veteran
of the Banks fleet, was a man of many parts and wide interests. He was a
member of the Vermont State Tuberculosis Commission, and served two
terms as a member of the State Legislature. He died in 1903.
Of Bland-Sutton mention has already been made. He evidently became
Kipling's personal medical attendant, for he mentions in connection with his
being created LL.D. of St. Andrews in 1923, in the same year in which Kipling
became rector of this university, that Kipling had been seriously ill that year
and he had operated upon him.
Of the familiar footing on which they were with each other a comical
story related by Kipling gives evidence. On one Boxing Day Bland-Sutton
came down to visit him at his home in Sussex, "very full of a lecture he was
about to deliver on 'gizzards'." He mentioned that a certain authority had
said that if you hold a hen to your ear, you can hear the click in its gizzard
of the little pebbles that help its digestion. Most of us would be content to
nod acquiescently and say, "So-and-so's authority, no doubt that's true."
This is just what Kipling did, although it was his usual habit to verify his
own references. But Bland-Sutton, after an uneasy silence, asked him if he
had any hens about. Remorselessly, then, he worried Kipling into taking him
down to the henhouse, catching an outraged pullet, soothing her while he
took her pulse. (Can't you see the picture!—the most celebrated author of
his time and the president of the Royal College of Surgeons standing out in
the wintry day solemnly taking the pulse of a pullet!) The pulse-rate was
duly recorded as one hundred and twenty-six. Then—"She clicks alright,"
said the surgeon. He made the author listen, too, who opined there was enough
click for a lecture. But—"Wait a bit," called the surgeon, "let's catch that
cock. He'll click better." They caught him after a loud and long chase, and
he clicked like a solitaire-board. Full of indignation, and with ears full of
parasites, Kipling stalked off to the house, and the fun escaped him until later.
It is easy to understand how Sir William Osier and Kipling could appreciate each other. Osier, with his love of whimsy, his highly developed imaginative faculty, his warm humanity, his entry into the hearts and minds of
children, could not but recognize a kindred spirit in Rudyard Kipling.
It is possible that their friendship commenced from the time that Kipling
was Osier's guest in his home at Oxford for the great gathering there in
June, 1907, when Kipling and Mark Twain were among those who received
degrees. Possibly Osier's old friend, Janeway of New York, who had attended
Kipling in a serious illness some eight years before, had made them acquainted
before this. There are many references to show what an admirer of Kipling's
stories Osier had been, and at Oxford he speaks of him as "such a jolly
fellow, so full of fun and with an extraordinary interest in everything."
Three years later, in 1910, Osier received a copy of "Rewards and Fairies,"
inscribed to him with the quotation: "Excellent herbs had our fathers of old,"
and with it a note:
"Herewith my book of Tales. I wouldn't bother you with it except for
Xick Culpeper and Laennec, for whom I feel you are in a way responsible."
How quickly it was assayed and its gold put into circulation by Osier is
apparent from the fact that a few months later, in an address which he gave
Page 119 at Reading when unveiling memorials to the first and last abbots of Reading,
he quoted a stanza from what he styled Kipling's "splendid poem, 'Our
Fathers of Old'." Again, when he delivered the presidential address to the
Bibliographical Society in January, 1914, he quoted another stanza from
this poem.
In June, 1914, there was a Roger Bacon celebration at Oxford. Osier
asked Kipling to come and stay with him and to recite something of his own
composition appropriate to the occasion at a lunch at Merton College. Kipling
was unable to accept, but some lines from his reply are amusing and
characteristic:
"I can't tell you how shocked I am to find the practice of medicine at
Oxford (Roger's own university) so grossly behind the age. It was Galen
who laid down that 'anger at meat' (by which he meant all mental emotion
save of the mildest) is the mother of evil; and here are you—Regius Professor—counselling me to recite my own verses 'at'—not before or after, but
at—a bountiful meal. . . . Nicholas, who could write even if he couldn't
cure for nuts—says at the beginning of his Herbal, 'I knew well enough the
whole world and everything in it was formed of a composition of contrary
elements, and in such harmony as must needs show the wisdom and power
of a great God.' That seems to me to cover Roger Bacon's outlook and I
present it to you for a quotation."
Finally, when death seized the great doctor too, it was a story from the
Second Jungle Book, "The King's Ankus," which Archie Malloch read to him
on one of his last nights alive, as he lay in his darkened room thinking of
his lost son.
It has been noted by his critics and reviewers that Kipling was a man of
enormous versatility. "He proved . . . that he could enter into the minds of
sailors and schoolboys and animals, besides giving something very like consciousness to machines, with as much facility as he could enter into the minds
of soldiers, Hindoos and the members of Anglo-Indian society." It is no
wonder, then, tha t the minds of doctors were laid open to him; the only
wonder is that this fact has not been more widely commented upon. It seems
to us one of his most notable characteristics, yet examination of a fairly
recent bibliography fails to show that it has been noticed. His "love of the
masculine life ... is the underlying and impelling influence. . . . He took
things as he found them, the men who worked at manly crafts like soldiering
and sailoring and engine-driving." Had the reviewer's knowledge and interests
been as wide as those of his subject, he would have added "and doctors."
Kipling thought of the doctor as a man, as a fighter and a humanitarian, often
armed with inadequate weapons, but brave and many times displaying an
innate wisdom of which he himself hardly was aware. Often a lone fighter,
whose prayer Kipling formulated in the lines:
"Help me to need no aid from men
That I may help such men as need /"
Another critic says of him, "He has what cannot be acquired by any trick
on earth—the grip on human life." He was "that man who looked at life with
a huge and perilous curiosity."
These being the marks of the man, and his intimate acquaintance what it
was, it is far from surprising that the behaviour of sick people and the
phenomena of disease should be matters for his keenest observation and his
most vivid graphic portrayal. His virility and sense of humour always saved
him from what we call the morbid, in his writings. If the statement of an
English literary critic, published shortly after his death, "He sees the savage
in man and that it is not far below the surface, and he is disposed to question
the benefits of civilization," were true, it would dispose of our claims for
Page 120 Kipling. But he was no cynic; that species of schoolboy green-sickness had
left no trace upon him. He never questioned the benefits of civilization, at
least in respect to the advance of medical knowledge.
Kipling could see even what most lay writers miss, and—alas for our profession—many of us may lose: how medical men follow their light with the
keen joy and pride of craftsmanship. He knew the Love of the Game, whether
in Art or Science. Look again at such stories as "The Tender Achilles," and
"Unprofessional." His lines on the Artist's Heaven we may take for ourselves, for what physician or surgeon worthy of his calling is not an artist?
"And only the Master shall praise us, and only the Master shall blame,
And no one shall work for money, and no one shall work for fame,
But each for the joy of the working, and each in his separate star,
Shall draw the Thing as he sees It, for the God of Things as They Are."
We are not unaccustomed to medical themes and pictures in the works of
modern writers. Some are so replete with their anatomico-physiologico-
psychopathological learning, so glibly accurate with their technical terms,
that our recreative reading is spoiled by pathology dragged upon the stage
in and out of season. Some of this writing is propaganda, some iconoclastic
and some specimens which, curiously enough, have suffered more at the
hands of lay than of medical reviewers, come under the description of washing dirty linen in public.
While Kipling's medical interest was in doctors rather than in patients,
he had a genius for familiarizing himself with fields of intense activity. A
sick man was to him a scene of warfare, a stronghold besieged or a hard-
fought battlefield. Like his friends the Nilghai and Torpenhow in "The Light
That Failed," he was drawn towards the arena with notebook and sketch-
block.
He gave us some wonderful pictures. Many of them were drawn from his
life with soldiers in peace and at war. Sometimes it is only a random snapshot. What had he in mind, for instance, when he described a Boer farmer's
idiot son?—"His head was hairless, no larger than an orange, and the pits of
his nostrils eaten away by a disease. He laughed and he slavered . . ."
He described cholera in an Indian troop-train on a siding until you smell
it, and see, in Mulvaney's words, "The men . . . goin' roun' an' about like
dumb sheep, waitin' for the nex' man to fall over," wholly without technical
language.
The long monologue of the half-caste opium smoker in the story, "The
Gate of the Hundred Sorrows," is a tonal masterpiece. The key is one
throughout, fraught with drowsiness and apathy; the colour a flat gray
through which/Chinese reds and yellows show dully, and you are looking at
the world through the eyes of one saturated with the poppy.
As a comic relief we cannot refrain from calling attention to one of Kipling's funniest stories, in which he describes—nay, invents—a dermatologic
syndrome. It gives him an opportunity to dig our sobersides in the ribs with
an impudent and friendly-humorous elbow, when he portrays the puzzlement of the doctors—including the dermatologists—in the face of a bizarre
skin eruption with no suggestions or clues. An experimenter with chemical
fertilizers is careless in his disposition of residues, and produces an eruption,
quite unwittingly, among the neighbouring rural population of a pruritic,
non-contagious character, appearing as orange and coppery-green blotches
which seriously embarrassed the panel-doctors. Even white pigs were
affected. The doctors "asked where they had been and what they had eaten.
They had, it seemed, been in ever so many places, and by the way had eaten
everything in Leviticus and out of it." (Which shows how much may be
learned from asking for history in such general terms.) The tendency, in
brand-new diseases, to treat them empirically with the latest specific discovered for some other disease Kipling was acquainted with, and he made the
B.M.A. recommend the exhibition of chaulmoogra oil. The source of the
Page 121 trouble is discovered by the inventor's scientist-son and his doctor-friend,
and, after taking necessary steps to end the epidemic, they are enabled to
utilize it hilariously to settle scores with a local snob and leader of opinion.
As a tragic recountal of the history and course of a disease, Kipling's chef
d'oeuvre is found in "Love-o'-Women." Larry Tighe, gentleman-ranker of the
Black Tyrone, "cud put the comether on any woman that trod the green earth
av God." Mulvaney, one of the Soldiers Three, who tells the story, was transferred from this regiment, and some years later, after a battle, meets Tighe
again. He is now known by his nickname. Mulvaney notices first that "whin
he got up off the ground he shtaggered a little, an' laned over all twisted."
In subsequent patrol-work, and when the camp in the Khyber Pass is being
sniped by Pathans, Mulvaney soon learns that for some reason "Love-o'-
Women" is deliberately courting death. He saves his life more than once and
is cursed for his pains. Mulvaney again observes, "He set off from the halt
wid a shunt as tho' he was bein' kicked from behind . . . wint back to his
tint wid that quare lurchin' send-off that I cud niver understand." The man
was being plagued by remorse: there had been a woman, one out of the
scores to whom he had given no second thought; but there was something
more. "Iv'ry time he got up afther he had been settin' down or wint on from
the halt, he'd start wid that kick and traverse . . . his legs sprawlin' all
ways to wanst. . . . Wan day ... he stopped an' struck ground wid his
right fut three or four times doubtful. ... 'Is that ground ?' said he ... up
comes the docthor. . . . Love-o'-Women starts to go on quick, an' lands me
a kick on the knee while his legs was gettin' into marchin' order. . . . ' 'Ten-
tion,' says the docthor; and Love-o'-Women stud so. 'Now shut your eyes,'
sez the docthor.'No, ye must not hould on by your comrade.' ' 'T is all up,' sez
Love-o'-Women, thryin' to smile, 'I'd fall, docthor, an' you know ut.' We wint
back together, an' I was dumb-struck. Love-o'-Women was cripplin' an'
crumblin' at ivry step. He walked wid a hand on my shoulder all slued sideways, an' his right leg swingin' like a lame camel. ... In hospital but two
days later ... I shuk hands wid him, an' his grip was fair strong, but his
hands wint all ways to wanst, an' he cud not button his tunic. . . . 'But
fwhat ails him, docthor?' I sez. 'They calls it Locomotus attacks us,' he sez,
'bekaze,' sez he, 'ut attacks us like a locomotive, if ye know fwhat that
manes. An' ut comes,' sez he, lookin' at me, 'ut comes from bein' called Love-
o'-Women.'
" 'You're jokin', docthor,' I sez.
" 'Jokin'!' sez he. 'If ever you feel that you've got a felt sole in your boot
instid av a Government bull's-wool, come to me,' he sez, 'an' I'll show you
whether 't is a joke.'
"You would not believe us, sorr, but that, an' seein' Love-o'-Women over-
tuk widout warnin', put the cowld fear av Attacks us on me so strong that
for a week an' more I was kickin' my toes against stones an' stumps for the
pleasure av feelin' the hurt.
"An Love-o'-Women lay in the cot . . . and he shrivelled like beef-rations
in a hot sun, an' his eyes was like owls' eyes, an' his hands was mut'nous."
Of how his end came we are not concerned here, but the story, medical interest apart, is worth many readings. It was written, we should remember,
over thirty years ago when Schaudinn's discovery was very recent news in
medical circles, and the spirochaete was not yet fully established in the minds
of all as the cause of tabes. Kipling's story could not have been written at
that time had he not been made acquainted by authority with the fact that
locomotor ataxia is syphilis of the spinal cord.
There are many other things in Kipling's short stories, his verse, and even
in his few novels, of special interest to the medical reader. You will be repaid
in more ways than one by watching for them as you read. You may possibly,
if you are crank enough, read into them something that the author had not
thought of.
Pane 122 For instance: There are two women who are major characters in the
novel, "The Light That Failed." Dick Heldar, the hero, is in love with one
of them, Maisie, whom he has known as a child. She shares a flat with the
other, whom we know only as "the red-haired girl." Maisie lets Dick take
her to dinner and on day-excursions to the sea-side, but holds herself aloof
from his warmer advances. He must not interfere with her desired career
in the studio. The "red-haired girl" says little to Dick, and he is unaware
of her. She releases her emotions inspired by him in bitter castigation of
Maisie for her feline acceptance of Dick's bounty. Maisie goes away, and
Dick goes blind. Sun-glare in the desert and a sword-blow on the head in a
Soudanese melee years past have combined to produce optic atrophy. He
manages to get back to the Soudan, where the Mad Mullah has risen again,
and meets a carefully-planned death by an enemy bullet between his sightless eyes. Not much of a story, perhaps, but Kipling was not made famous
by his novels. An endocrinologist might lead us on an interesting speculation
over how the course of events turned upon sex-hormones, and how a judicious
exhibition of certain ductless-gland extracts might have made Kipling say,
as he was used to, "But that is another story."
Now some of you who were at McGill in 1913 may remember how in those
dark pre-endocrine days Sir Arbuthnot Lane once lectured before the two
senior years on the redundant colon and "Lane's kink." His description of
the unfortunate young female thus afflicted was most affecting and picturesque. A sallow skin, a pimply chin, flat breasts, partial amenorrhcea,
chronic dyspepsia and colonic stasis were not all of her troubles. Her disposition was frigid. The opposite picture of the young lady who had either
been short-circuited, or who had never stood in need of such ministrations,
was easily imagined. She had all, and was all that her sister was deficient in.
Then he turned to "The Light That Failed" for a classical illustration in the
persons of Maisie and the "red-haired girl." The latter had been blessed with
a short taut transverse colon, and hence no inhibitions. Poor Maisie, on the
other hand, according to the eminent surgeon, had a colon that festooned
and draped itself all over her cold little insides, hence her and Dick's tragedy.
But would it not have been sad had Sir Arbuthnot met her before Rudyard
Kipling heard of her, and short-circuited her?
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Well-lighted corner suite, suitable for Physician, consisting of waiting-
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Bank of Toronto' Building, 3702 Tenth Ave. W.  Phone: Bay. 3301
A PRESCRIPTION SERVICE ...
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Page 123 7 vi«5KSSSaS»!BffiKS$»$!&«^r?>r
real one • ° _ventative  oi
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Carnation Company, Ltd., Toronto,
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Irradiated Carnation Milk is fortified with
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IHRADI^ED'
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^^^►^   A CANADIAN PRODUCT — "from contented cows
CARNATION COMPANY LIMITED, 134 Abbott Street, Vancouver. NOW CHECK
gastric hyperacidity
without The use of
%M ALKALIES   1
AMPHOJEL
Wyeth's Alumina Gel
A palatable and inexpensive antacid—not alkaline, yet it neutralizes twelve volumes of gastric
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A.mphojel cannot produce second-
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Literature upon request.
JOHN WYETH
& BROTHER, Inc.
WALKERVILLE, ONTARIO
PREVENTION
Detecting foot weaknesses and defects in youths will check defects
unrecognized by parents before they
become serious. Direction as to the
shape and fit of a shoe counts while
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Your Patients Fitted with
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Subject to Your Prescription
and Recommendation
51 W. HASTINGS STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The Purified
ACTIVE PRINCIPLE
OF
SANDALWOOD OIL
4, a ^ECONOMICAL
Dosage Form
Doctor, why use ordinary sandalwood
oil when you can just as easily administer the active principle of the oil
with the irritating and therapeutically
inert matter removed—and at a cost
to your patients of only a very few
pennies more?
You can do this by prescribing the
new, economical 50-centigram capsules of
ARHEOL
(ASTIER)
now obtainable in bottles of 12, 24 and
100 capsules at $1.00, $1.75 and $6.00
a bottle respectively.
ARHEOL is the purified active principle of sandalwood oil. It is a uniform, standardized product with which
prompt and dependable results may
be expected. Undesirable sequelae
often associated with sandalwood therapy are either absent or reduced to a
negligible degree.
A3-BVMA
Dr. P. Astier Laboratories
36-48 Caledonia Rd., Toronto.
Please send me a sample of
ARHEOL (Astier) in the new
economical dosage form.
.M.D.
Street.
City  Prov....
Dr. P. ASTIER LABORATORIES
36-48 Caledonia Road, Toronto THE MARGARET Convalescent and Nursing Home
KSS&XJS
|p^;,toim.-.
IB
(^WrtMMiiiftMOOo;
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Mill
m
m
mm
SsSs'
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PRE OR POST-SURGICAL AND MEDICAL CASES
MARGARET A. McLENNAN, R.N. M. J. SHENFIELD, R.N.
1185 Harwood St., Vancouver, B. C. Seymour 2885
And now . . .
prescribe for yourself:
m\
\m
,_j -s
*2&4t
R.
J. f.
"A short rest and
Spa treatments
MEMBERS of the medical profession (busiest of all men at this season) recognize,
of course, the advisability of taking a short vacation every winter. . . . And it
is the wise ones who are actually putting their conviction into practice. . . .
The "Spa of Canada" offers you a happy combination of all the. comforts and services
of a modern hotel, plus complete facilities for Spa treatments.
And, of course, we are pleased to extend to members of the
medical profession our special rates. For all information,
phone Trinity 2201 (our Vancouver office) or write:
Harrison
HARRISON HOT SPRINGS, B. C
ft*6
O*
CA
jtfAP^ To a necessity has come
C04i4/e4ue4ice> and ec&n&ttuf
Vitamins A and D have long been a recog- D as halibut liver oil with viosterol yet
nized necessity in the diets of pregnant it costs 40 per cent less. Ten drops or one
women,   nursing   mothers   and   growing capsule  provide   9400   units   of  natural
children.   Vitamin  A  aids  in  preserving Vitamin  A  and   1700   units  of  natural
the function of epithelial tissue through- Vitamin D (International Units),
out the body, and, with other vitamins, List Price
in normal growth and development. Vita- 5 cc. hot. of ail (with, dropper) $ .40
min  D plays an important part in the 50 cc. hot. of oil (with dropper)  2.25
assimilation  of  calcium  and  phosphorus Box of   25 gfelatin capsules 75
and in the prophylaxis and treatment of Box of 10O gfelatin capsules  2.25
rickets. Box of 250 grelatin capsules  5.00
Navitol, a blend of specially selected, re- \ 1
fined fish liver oils, provides a convenient
and economical method of administering For literature address Professional Service
Vitamins A and D. This natural Vitamin Dept., 36 Caledonia Rd., Toronto, Ont.
A and D preparation is so rich in these
factors  that  ten  drops  or one  3-minim E. R. SQUIBB & SONS
capsule    constitute    the   average    daily OF  CANADA,   LIMITED
prophylactic dose for the average infant Manufacturing Chemists to the Medical
or child. It is as rich in Vitamins A and Profession since 1858.
naV't<*
.    ^AVITO*'    •
HfL  looms   ^ \
''^ffixvZSgr*
mm
NAVIT0L
SQUIBB NATURAL
VITAMIN   OIL The New Synthetic Antispasmodic
Trasentin "Ciba"
(Diphenylacetyldiethylaminoethanolester-hydrochloride)
SUPPRESSES SPASMS OF THE GASTRO-INTESTINAL
TRACT, GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM AND
OTHER SMOOTH MUSCLE ORGANS
Tablets—bottles of 20 and 100. Ampoules—boxes of 5 and 20.
1 tablet or 1 ampoule contains 0.075 grm.
of the active substance.
CIBA COMPANY LIMITED
MONTREAL
13 th Ave. and Heather St.
Exclusive  Ambulance  Service
FAIRMONT 80
PRIVATE AMBULANCES AND INVALID COACHES
WE SPECIALIZE IN AMBULANCE SERVICE ONLY
J. H. CRELLIN
W. L. BBRTRAND
X . ant la
Hum Ail
r BOUT THIS |l
1 DIAGNOSTIC
k-RAY UNIT m
F you have put off buying diagnostic
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o pay, you will get what you'd really like
p have—then it's time to size up the Gr-E
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You want high quality, of course—reliable equipment to produce results that
kill reflect credit to your professional
Service. The R-36, designed for a much
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bfflce x-ray unit, equips you ideally for
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|)f the chest at six feet.
Self-contained and extremely compact,
the R-36 is readily accommodated in a
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moisture-proof—free from the effects of
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and gives you accurate and refined control of the x-ray energy, are reasons why
you can rely on the R-36 for a uniformly
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You'll have an entirely new conception
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ELECTRIC
ORATION
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Jt
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2012 JACKSON  BLVD. STEVENS' SAFETY PACKAGE
STERILE GAUZE
is a handy, convenient, clean commodity for the bag or the office. Supplied
in one yard, five yards and twenty-five yard packages.
ESTABLISHED  NEARLY A
""   .CENTURY*
B. C. STEVENS CO.
Phone Seymour 698
73 0 Richards St., Vancouver, B. C.
S. BOWELL & SON
DISTINCTIVE FUNERAL
SERVICE f  ■
Phone 993
66 SIXTH STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
Breaks the vinous circle of perverted
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menorrhea. Affords refljiarkable symptomatic
relief by simulating the innervatiorj|p|the
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1|normal menstrual cycle.   :"$|||^§HS
• MARTIN H. SMITH COMPANY
fe. ISO LATAYITTf STMIT, NEW YORK, N. Y.
^^11
ft
p**^
Full formula and descriptive
literature on request
Dosage:   l to 2 capsules
3 or 4 times daily.   Supplied
in packages of 20.
Ethical protective mark MHS
embossed on inside of each
capsule, visible only when capsule  is  cut  in  half  at  seam.
I
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11
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HI
1
1
1
1
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i iSiS&ra *    %  i
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Vancouver/ B. C.
Colonic
Irrigation
Institute
Superintendent:
E. M. LEONARD, R..N.
Post Graduate Mayo Bros.
Up-to-date treatment rooms;
scientific care for cases such as
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Individual Treatment $ 2.50
Entire Course $10.00
Medication (if necessary)
$1 to $3 Extra
631  BIRKS BUILDING,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone: Sey.2443
506-7 CAMPBELL BUILDING
VICTORIA, B.C.
Phone: Empire 2721
For
Arthritis
and Chronic
Rheumatism
Prescribe
Lyxanthine
Astier
• Its formula — iodo-
propanol-sodium sul-
phonate, lysidin bitar-
trate, cilciutn gluconate,
sodium bicarb, tartaric
and citric acids—supplies calcium, iodine and
sulphur, with a powerful   uric   acid   solvent.
LYXANTHINE
ASTIER
GRANULAR
EFFERVESCENT
Clinically effects rapid
disappearance of tissue
infiltration, relieves
pain, promotes protein-
waste elimination, exerts
cholagogue action.
DOSAGE, 1 teaspoonful well
dissolved in a glass of water
every morning, on an empty
stomach, for 20 days. Rest 10
days.  Repeat if necessary.
Please send Sample and
Literature of Lyxanthine Astier
Dr	
Address....
City	
province..
L1BVMA
Dr. P. ASTIER LABORATORIES
36-48 Caledonia Road, Toronto RADIOSTOLEUM
(Standardised Vitamins A and D)
The ill-effects which arise from the all-prevailing
shortage in the normal dietary of Vitamins A
and D are counteracted by the administration of
Radiostoleum, a highly active preparation which
contains   these   two   vitamins   in   accurately-
standardised and properly-balanced proportions.
The daily ingestion of two or three capsules of
Radiostoleum, or their equivalent in the form of
Radiostoleum   liquid,   aids   in   the
preservation of epithelial integrity,
thus preventing the inroads of infective organisms, particularly through
the nasal cavities, the throat and
respiratory tract.
Stocks of Radiostoleum are held by leading druggists throughout
the Dominion and full particulars are obtainable from:—
The BRITISH DRUG HOUSES (Canada) LTD.
Terminal Warehouse
Toronto, 2, Ont,
Rstm/Can/3 82
flfoount flMeasant TUnoertafcino Co. %tb.
KINGSWAY at 11th AVE. Telephone Fairmont 58 VANCOUVER, B. C.
R. P. HARRISON W. R. REYNOLDS In Tonsillitis
the lymphatic system of the
entire throat is involved, as
the tonsils themselves are an
important  unit  of  this  system.
m
jtos^
lis
HE stimulation of this capillary
net-work with generous applications of
Antiphlogistine
over the entire neck, is frequently all the local
treatment that is required to remove the toxic
products and thus relieve the discomfort and
reduce the inflammation almost immediately.
Generous clinical supply and descriptive
literature on request from:
The Denver Chemical Manufacturing Co.
153 LAGAUCHETIERE ST. W. MONTREAL
Made in Canada STRAPPED FDR RICKETS
The swaddled infant pictured at
right is one of the famous works
in terra cotta exquisitely modeled
by the fifteenth century Italian
sculptor, Andrea della Robbia.
In that day infants were bandaged from birth to preserve the
symmetry of their bodies, but
still the gibbous spine and distorted limbs of severe rickets
often  made  their appearance.
Qwaddling was practised down
S| through the centuries, from Biblical times to Glisson's day, in the
vain hope that it would prevent the
deformities of rickets. Even in sunny
Italy swaddling was a prevailing custom, recommended by that early pediatrician, Soranus of Ephesus, who
discoursed on "Why the Majority
of Roman Children are Distorted."
"This is observed to happen more
in the neighborhood of Rome than in other places," he wrote. "If no one oversees the
infant's movements, his limbs do in the generality of cases become twisted. ... Hence,
when he first begins to sit he must be propped by swathings of bandages...." Hundreds
of years later swaddling was still prevalent in Italy, as attested by the sculptures of the della
Robbias and their contemporaries. For infants who were strong Glisson suggested placing
*'Leaden Shooes" on their feet and suspending them with swaddling bands in mid-air.
How amazed the ancients would have been to know that bones can be helped to grow
straight simply by internal administration of a few drops of Oleum Percomorphum. What
to them would have been a miracle has become a commonplace of science. Because it can
^_    be administered in drop dosage, Oleum Percomor-
A bambino from the Foundling Hospital, Florence, Italy,—A. della Robbia
Oleum Percomorphum offers
not less than 60,000 U.S.P. vitamin A units and 8,500 U.S.P.
vitamin D units per gram* Sup'
plied in 10 and 50 cc* bottles,
also in boxes of 25 and 100 ten-
drop soluble gelatin capsules
containing not less than 13,300
vitamin A units and 1,850 vitamin D units (equal to more than
5 teaspoonfuls of cod liver oil*).
*U.S.P. Minimum Standard
phum is especially suitable for young and premature
infants, who are most susceptible to rickets. Its vitamins A and D derived from natural sources, this
product has 100 times the potency of cod liver oil. *
Important also to your patients, Oleum Percomorphum is an economical antiricketic.
MEAD JOHNSON & CO. OF CANADA, LTD.
BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO
Please enclose professional card when requesting samples of Mead Johnson products to cooperate in preventing their reaching unauthorized persons. ■■
M:
Seymour
2263
Matter $c Sfatttta lOtfc
Established 1893
VANCOUVER, B. C.
North Vancouver, B. C.   Powell River, B. C.
published Monthly at Vancouver, b. c. by ROY wrigley ltd., soo wmt Pender street
H 11I
.^f<>g$SasS3%S^^
1
Hollywood Sanitarium
Limited
For the treatment of
Alcoholic, Nervous and Psychopathic Cases
Exclusively
Reference—B. G. Medical Association
For information apply to
Medical Superintendent, New Westminster, B. C.
or 515 Birks Building, Vancouver
Seymour 4183
Westminster 288
NIOJl
*»■■ w^r%/\tr**mm"*
lA^£i^wt<l
Z1*4X.

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