Hawthorn Fly Fishing & Angling Collection

Fishing in Canada Canadian National Railways 1923

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 FI/HING
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1923  Fishing in
Canada
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"Praise God, be quiet,
and goe a-fyshynge."
Izaak Walt
ISSUED BY
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
PRINTED  IN CANADA 1
'T^HIS publication is intended to cata-
**■ logue,   accurately   and  concisely,
attractions   along   the   line   of   the
Canadian National Railways for the
followers of the piscatorial  art.    As
every   fisherman   knows,   strictly   ac
curate    information    is    difficult    to
obtain, but we have endeavoured to
set forth in the following pages, in
formation that we believe to be entirely
dependable.     Brevity,   it   should   be
remembered, has been the watchword
in   putting   the   facts   together,   but
additional details will be gladly sup
plied upon application to
C.   K.   HOWARD
General Tourist Agent
Canadian National Railways
Montreal, Que.
INDEX
ALBERTA 69
BRITISH COLUMBIA           ...    71
1
\             MANITOBA, SASKATCHEWAN AND
ALBERTA 68
NEW BRUNSWICK                ...    18
NOVA SCOTIA 8
ONTARIO: 38
Algonquin Park      ...           .40
!
Rideau Lakes          ...          .42
Kawartha Lakes and Trent
Waterway       ...          .44
Hastings County                                .47
Lake Nipissing, Pickerel River,                          \
Georgian Bay and Highlands                         j
1
of Ontario                                             50
Sudbury and West to Port Arthur    55
Lake of the Woods                                 58
1
Timagami                        ...     61
The New North              ...     62
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND                 .    17
QUEBEC: 24              j
•
St. Lawrence River and Lower                         j
St. Lawrence Basin                          25             \
Lake St. John and tributaries           28             j
The Transcontinental                               31
The Laurentian Mountain Region        34
The Gaspe Peninsula                     .   .        37
j
Vancouver Island           ....         78 A Few Suggestions
In writing us or making reservations with
outfitters and guides, a general statement
as to your knowledge of the woods would be
helpful, particularly when desiring to go into
out-of-the-way places.
Do not wait until you are in the hunting
grounds before trying out a new rifle. Target
practice in the woods frightens game and
lessens your chances for a shot.
We recommend that outfitters or guides be
not asked to accept personal cheques—a
better plan is to carry Money Orders or
Travellers' Cheques.
Follow the recommendations of your outfitter
or guide as to where you should fish or hunt.
He knows the country and your chances for a
pleasant and profitable trip will be better if
you do as he suggests.
Do not fraternize too freely with your guide
or keep him up all night to amuse you. He is
there for a purpose—to see that you have a
clean and comfortable camp, to give you
service and to render the protection that his
knowledge of the bush affords. Do not give
him intoxicating liquor—it has ruined many a
hunting and fishing trip and may, in a pinch,
endanger your life.
The Canadian National Railways are not responsible for the actions, conduct or charges made by
the various outfitters or guides mentioned in this
publication, nor do they guarantee the success
of any hunting or fishing trip. mmmmmMmwjmmj^mmmwMmmM^mMmmMmM
The Angler in Canada
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o
rNE of the most interesting human developments in America
of recent years is the drift to outdoor life. The pace of business
demands it. The' 'nose to the grindstone" idea must be balanced
periodically by the tramp of feet on a bush trail or the pull of
biceps on a dripping paddle. Therein lies the high efficiency of
thousands of business captains. But it is sometimes forgotten
that if a deliberate and "organized" search for health were all
that lay behind the present popularity of outdoor recreation, it
would soon sink to the staleness of a gymnasium course in mid-
July. This whole continent has assumed the mood that Nature
was not made for picture postcards, that the woods and streams
are beneficent servants of mankind and that fishing and kindred
sports are the right and privilege of the millions rather than the
special enterprise of the expert bait caster or the "been there"
veteran. The incredible growth and influence of such bodies
as the Izaak Walton League and the American Game Protective
Association are ready evidence of the taking over of outdoor
sport by the masses of our people. The onward swing of conservation measures is just one convincing sign that the woods
and streams and wild life must be regarded as great social
necessities, to be turned to maximum use in the present day and
left unspoiled and unimpaired for future generations.
While active measures to restock streams and lakes and
bring back the "old fishing days" are likely to restore large
areas of the United States to something like their virgin munificence, Canada has thrown open her whole vast domain to
every seeker after healthy sport, with a full assurance that the
richest of fishing resources are in existence today with no
plaintive regrets for the "good old times." In providing this
brief introduction to the fisherman's Canada—with information
carefully revised and cautiously employed—the Canadian
National Railways seeks to invite men and women only to areas
actually tested by season after season of fishing experience.
Every body of water is not a fisherman's "paradise," but every
section noted is at least a first rate sporting chance. There are
waters in Canada substantially fished out—not a few streams
and lakes in which fishing has never been worth while, but the
Canadian National Railways is as eager to warn away from
barren territory as to set forth the facts concerning really
worth-while fishing grounds. Canada possesses thousands of
miles of actually tested waters in which an abundance of Fishing in  Canada
natural food, and a total lack of stream pollution in any form,
breed more game fish in a year than are taken by all the sportsmen visiting Canada in a quarter century or more. It is sometimes forgotten by those unacquainted with the natural features
of the Dominion that the great bulk of the population of nine
millions is spread chiefly across the more southerly areas and
that the great hinterland of millions of square miles represents
an unexplored, immeasurable domain of deep woodlands,
circling rivers and myriad lakes where the chance of exhaustion
of'fish life is too remote for present worry. Five hundred million acres of forest does not seem to suggest overcrowding or
an immediate danger to the spawning waters and food supply
of multiple varieties of fish. It is probably no exaggeration to
suggest that there are ten thousand good-sized lakes and rivers
within the zone of habitable Canada where not more than two
or three fishing parties appear in a twelvemonth. Any experienced engineer or prospector or fire ranger can give account of
dozens of waterways, well stocked with fish, in which he and a
few of his fellows are the sole intruders during a long summer.
All the active fishing sportsmen of the United States could
spent a comfortable summer in the single province of Quebec
and seldom run foul of one another's camps.
It is, of course, no news to any fisherman that what is
everybody's fishing is nobody's fishing. No lake or trout
stream can bear the inroads of motor car battalions. It stands
to reason that the keenest of anglers always strike a few miles
"deeper in." During the past few years the discovery has been
made by many thousands of sportsmen that the pioneer location
of the Canadian National Railways' newer lines through the
hardly broken "wilderness" of woods and waters, opens up
fishing country in all the abundance and richness which some
thought had passed out with the times of covered wagons.
The Canadian National Lines are the great "forest railroads,"
sweeping through the virgin north of New Brunswick, Ontario,
Quebec and British Columbia. Forcing their way, as developers
of the natural resources to the heart of the pine and spruce
reserves and the great belts of mineral wealth, it has become
inevitable that they also should bring within reach of humanity
the choicest recesses of game and fish. Such is the fact to which
increasing numbers of outdoors men bear willing testimony.
It may be your fancy to take bass with fly or bug, or to live the
ecstacy of a leaping "lunge" on an Ontario lake or play for a
creel of trout in Northern Quebec or New Brunswick, or dare
the adventures of tuna fishing off a Nova Scotia headland.
Whatever the purpose,   the  Canadian  National  highway  is Fishing  in  Canada
blazed for an unforgettable experience. It is a fact of great
significance to the visiting sportsman that the rising volume of
Canadian National sportsman traffic is largely created by word-
of-mouth evidence of men—yes, and women too, nowadays—
who having shared of one angling experience under Canadian
National auspices, call upon the railway a second, third and
fourth time to "please tell me how I can duplicate the good time
I had last year." Any artist can put fish in a painted stream.
But sporting realities are all that count when wading boots are
on. The roll-call of any twenty men entering a Canadian
National fishing area usually began with two men who brought
back four, who in turn told their story to a dozen friends and so
the circle of angling partnership kept on spreading.
The Canadian Governments, working to a common purpose
with the railways, have taken elaborate constructive steps to
guard against the depletion of fish in those waters where easy
travel has naturally brought the greatest number of anglers.
Ontario and Quebec control their own fisheries and administer
extensive fish culture services, involving numerous hatcheries
and scientific distribution and care. The Dominion Government looks after the fisheries of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island and the tidal and coastal fisheries of New Brunswick, the inland water of the latter province being taken care
of by the local government. Millions of fry of Atlantic salmon,
speckled trout and experimental plants of rainbow and brown
trouts have been made each year. In the "prairie provinces"
of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Dominion authorities distribute mainly commercial species, but have also
distributed pickerel in Manitoba and Saskatchewan and trout
of various kinds in Alberta. British Columbia enjoys a large
fish cultural service under Dominion direction, including the
planting of rainbow, cutthroat, steelhead, Kamloops, speckled
trout and Atlantic salmon.
Finally, the easiness of entry to Canada, the lack of bothersome red tape at the border, is more than matched by the
smoothness of Canadian National travel arrangements. Rapid
and highly disciplined service, the most modern sleeping and
dining car facilities, prompt departure and prompt arrival, and
a standard of personal courtesy not surpassed anywhere on this
continent, take away the last trace of hardship and bring you
and yours to the edge of a fishing kingdom where royal rewards
are ready to your summons. Fishing in   Canada
In Prince Edward Island   Salmon   (fly   fishing);   Trout   (fly
fishing);     Sea    trout;    Deep     sea
fishing —Tuna; Swordfish, etc.
In Nova Scotia Salmon (fly fishing); Trout  (fly fishing); Sea
bass; Sea trout; Deep sea fishing.
In New Brunswick Salmon (fly fishing); Trout (fly fishing);
Pickerel; Pike; Deep sea fishing.
In Quebec Ouananiche; Speckled trout  (fly fishing); Maski-
nonge; Bass (fly fishing) (large and small mouth);
Pike; Pickerel; Lake trout.
In Ontario  Speckled trout  (fly fishing);  Lake trout; Maski-
nonge; Bass (fly fishing) (large and small mouth);
Pike; Pickerel.
In Manitoba   Pike; Pickerel; Goldeye.
In Saskatchewan Speckled trout (fly fishing); Pike; Pickerel;
Goldeye.
In Alberta   Speckled,    Rainbow,    Dolly Varden    trout    (fly
fishing); Pike, Pickerel.
In British Columbia Salmon; Rainbow trout; Cutthroat trout;
Salmon trout; Brook trout; Dolly Varden
trout; Grayling, Black sea bass, etc. (fly fishing).
No license fee is charged for fishing in Dominion National
Parks (this does not affect charges for licence fees in Provincial Parks). Nova Scotia
Nc
ilOVA Scotia holds out the double attraction of deep sea
fishing and unfailing sport of inland lakes and rivers. From the
great island of Cape Breton in the East to Yarmouth at the
Western tip, monotony of scene and diversion is nullified by the
lovely undulation of the country, the succession of farm and
orchard and deep woods, and water courses fringed by overhanging trees. There are no broad rivers like the St. Maurice
or the Saguenay of Quebec, but almost countless streams where
trout find ideal breeding grounds. Then, too, the Bras D'Or
Lakes which break across the centre of Cape Breton and Lake
Rossignol, both of those among the most fascinating bodies of
water to be found anywhere. Two thousand square miles of
adventuring and no out posted lands or preserved rivers to
complicate the angler's programme. Modest governmental
regulations ask no more than any sportsman is willing to
concede. Brook trout are the great standby of angling in both
Eastern and Western Nova Scotia. They are not as a rule
record breakers in size, but full of a peculiar deviltry which surpasses any consideration of bulk. Sea trout, fished at the head
of tide water, run heavier, and the rarest of sport can be relied
on when salmon are properly gone after in such waters as
Grand Lake and Beaver Bank Lake in Halifax County.
The visitor will find uncommonly easy facilities for travel
in the interior of Nova Scotia, for settlement roads and bush
roads will always open the way to the edge of good fishing
territory. Farm supplies are seldom far away, and guides of
the most dependable quality—fine companions and wise in
woodcraft—are available for modest remuneration. Nova
Scotia guides, like their brethren of New Brunswick, are high-
grade cooks and can work up a monarch's dish from bacon and
eggs, or pancake flour.
Off the coast, in recent years, tuna fishing—yes, and that
spine tester, sword-fishing—have grown in popularity and many
of the famous fishermen of America have staged stirring battles
with such species in Nova Scotia waters. Cod and pollock are
taken in some places with a fly.
The majority of fishing expeditions, however, are attracted
by the inland waters, or by the salmon chances in the pools
where the rivers empty. From a seat in a canoe, the interior f—
m:i
Prince Edward Island:    Cliff Hotel, Stanhope, fishing
waters; beach at Stanhope A
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Nova Scotia:    Deep sea fishing; one of the Wobamkek
Camps,  Port Mouton,  N.S. Nova Scotia:     Birchdale  Camps,   Yarmouth;  inland
fishing waters; fishing out of Lunenburg Nova Scotia:   Bras d'Or Lake, deep sea fishing Fishing in  Canada—Nova Scotia
spaces of Nova Scotia are unforgettably appealing, for the
streams are as fresh and apparently as undisturbed as in the
times of the pioneer.
Easy access is gained by the Canadian National lines to
Truro and thence eastward which brings one to Cape Breton
and the Bras D'Or Lakes, or by continuing through to Halifax
and branching westerly along the south shore coast line.
NOVA SCOTIA FISHING REGULATIONS
ANGLING
Salmon   Open season 1st March to August 15th, both days
inclusive.   Not more than 30 salmon can be taken
in one week by an angler.
Trout   Open season 1st April to September 30th, both days
inclusive. Limit 30 in one day and not more than 10 lbs.
ANGLERS' PERMITS
Non-resident angling permit—$5.00.
Albany   124 mis. northeast   of  Halifax, via Bridge water in
Annapolis county.  Excellent trout fishing in the headwaters and tributary streams of the Nictaux and Medway
Rivers.
Outfitter:    F. N. Merry, Albany Cross, N.H., has well equipped
camps in the section supplying guides, canoes, camp
equipment, etc.
Albany Cross is located seven miles by road from Albany
Station.
Antigonish    84 mis. east of Truro.
Trout fishing in Lochaber Lake, fifteen miles from
station; also South, West and Right Rivers, one-quarter to
fifteen miles from station. Also sea bass in Antigonish Harbour
and George Bay.
Guides:   May be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels:   Merrimac, Royal George. 10 Fishing in  Canada—Nova Scotia
Baddeck   12 mis. by steamer from Iona; latter 168 mis. east
of Truro.
Salmon pools of Northeast Margaree reached from Bad-
deck by motor,—a drive of about twenty-eight miles. Trout
fishing in Baddeck and Middle Rivers, two to ten miles from
Baddeck.
Guides:   May be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels: Bras D'Or, Telegraph.
Barrington    53 mis. east of Yarmouth.
Salmon and trout in Barrington and Clyde Rivers,
one-half to five miles; trout in Oak Park and Sabinim Lakes,
three to seven miles from station.
Outfitter:    Fred Hogg has a number of camps located in this
territory   and  will  supply   guides,   canoes,   camp
equipment, etc., for extended fishing trips.
Hotels:   Barrington House.
Caledonia   121 mis. west of Halifax, or 39 mis. from Bridge-
water, by rail; also reached by motor from Bridge-
water, thirty-five miles; or, from Liverpool about thirty miles.
Caledonia is the gateway to seven hundred and fifty square
miles of sporting territory. Over one hundred and thirty
lakes, rivers and brooks, including Lake Rossignol, Kejimi-
kujik Lake and River, Medway River and Mersey River.
Kejimikujik Lake was a former hunting resort of the Micmac
Indians. It is broken by many bays and headlands and presents wonderful opportunities for trout fishing. The Medway
and Mersey are splendid salmon rivers. Ideal canoe trips may
be arranged through the Great Lake section.
Outfitters:   Phil H. Moore, proprietor of Moore's Camps, Lake
Rossignol, P.O. Address Caledonia, N.S.
C. W. Mills, P.O. address, Kedgemakooge, N.S.   Proprietor
of Rod and Gun Club.
Charles Minard, P.O. address, New Grafton, N.S.   Proprietor
"Minard's Camps."
J. G. Shirreff, P.O. address, Caledonia, N.S.   Proprietor   of
"Shirreff's Camps."
R. S. Baxter, P.O. address, Caledonia, N.S.   Proprietor Baxter's Camps.
The above outfitters have excellent accommodation in
lodges and camps supplying guides, canoes, camp equipment,
etc.
Hotels:   Alton, Parker, Freeman. Fishing in  Canada—Nova Scotia 11
Chester   52 mis. west of Halifax in Lunenburg County, on the
shores of Mahone Bay.   Salmon and trout in East,
Gold, Middle Rivers and tributary waters.
Guides:   Arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels:  Hackmatack, Pinehurst, Lovett, Cole.
Chezzetcook 30 mis. east of Halifax. Salmon and trout in
Chezzetcook River and Lake, Petpeswick Lake,
Conrod Lake and tributary waters. Deep sea fishing in
' Chezzetcook Inlet. This section is a network of lakes,
rivers and streams, the finest of fishing to be had throughout.
Outfitter:   George Colford has well equipped camps, supplying
guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Hotel:   Belleclaire.
Dartmouth   Reached by ferry across the harbor from Halifax
in Halifax County.
Salmon and trout in Salmon River, Lakes Echo, Major,
East, Charles, Morris, William and tributary waters.
Outfitter: Geo. Chapman, Proprietor "Moosehorn Lodge" at
Guysboro Road. Guysboro Road is reached by motor
drive some sixteen miles from Dartmouth. Mr, Chapman
will supply guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: Dartmouth.
Guysboro Reached from Monastery, which is 106 mis. east
of Truro. Guysboro is eighteen miles from Monastery by motor, and is also reached by steamer from Mulgrave,
which point is one hundred and twenty-two miles east of Truro,
by rail.
Salmon fishing in St. Mary's River and excellent trout in
Loon, Trout, Desbarres, Five Mile and Lawlor's Lakes, from
nine to twelve miles from station. There are excellent opportunities for deep sea fishing.
Outfitter:   A. H.   Desbarres has camps on Desbarres Lake; he
also operates an outfitting store where you can make
arrangements for guides,  canoes,  camp equipment,  etc.
Guide:   L. Grerrior, Lundy, P.O.
Hotels:   Grant's, McDonald, O'Connor.
Harbour   37 mis. east of Halifax.
Salmon, sea trout and deep sea fishing in the Mus-
quodoboit River and Harbor; also trout throughout network
of lakes, rivers and streams within radius of fifteen miles.
Guides:   Hotel proprietors will arrange for guides.
Hotels:   Claremont, Gardner's, Stoddard's. Fishing in  Canada — Nova Scotia
Hubbard's   36 mis. west of Halifax, on the south shore.
Trout in Upper and Lower Mill Lakes, Lakes
Tip, Little Tip, Caribou Mountain, Skinner and Collen's.
Nearest fishing water about two and one-half miles from station—up to five miles.
Excellent opportunities for Tuna fishing in St. Margaret's
Bay, on which Hubbard's .is situated. Motor boats, with all
equipment, may be obtained in the town for persons wishing
to take in this sport.
Outfitters:   Ray  Dorey,  Hugh  Dorey  supply  guides,  boats,
camp equipment, etc.
Guides:   The proprietor of the Gainsborough Hotel will make
arrangements for guides. •
Hotels:   Gainsborough, McLean House.
Kejimikujik Lake Reached by motor from Caledonia, which
or Fairy Lake is 121 miles west and north of Halifax, or
thirty-nine miles from Bridge water.
Trout fishing waters about nine miles from Caledonia,
reached by motor. Good accommodation at Rod and Gun
Club and at Minard's Camps. Arrangements for guides and
equipment may be made with Mr. A. W. Mills of Rod and
Gun Club., Kedgemakooge, P.O., Chas. Minard, New Grafton
P.O., or Mr. Phil H. Moore, Caledonia, P.O., proprietor of
Moore's Camps, J. G. Shirreff, R. S. Baxter, who operates a
number of camps on Lake Rossignol.
Hotels:   Alton, Parker, Freeman, at Caledonia.
Liverpool   113 mis. west of Halifax; 127 mis. east of Yarmouth,
at the mouth of the Mersey River.
Salmon in the Mersey River, between Liverpool and Milton,
a distance of about two or three miles; trout in Broad River, a
few miles west of Liverpool.
The famous "Indian Gardens," on Lake Rossignol can
be reached by automobile, twenty-one miles from this point.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels:  Maple Leaf, Mersey, Elmwood, Riverside. Fishing in  Canada — Nova Scotia 13
Lockeport   148 mis. west of Halifax; 102 mis. east of Yarmouth.
Deep sea fishing in Green Harbor, excellent trout
fishing in the numerous lakes and streams tributary to the
Sable and Jordan Rivers.
Outfitter: A. V. Allen, Allendale, N.S. (four miles from Lock-
port) has complete equipment including camps located in
the upper section of Shelburne; he will also arrange to supply
guides.
Hotels:  Beachmount, Hillcrest.
Medway    104 mis. west of Halifax; 145 mis. east of Yarmouth.
Salmon in the Medway River and deep sea fishing
(swordfish and tuna), in Medway Harbor.
Guides:   Roy Croft, Osborn Croft.
Hotel:  Clattenburg's.
Port Clyde    189 mis. west  of   Halifax; 61   mis. east  of Yarmouth.
Salmon in Clyde River,  trout in Clyde River,  Bloody
Creek, Hamilton Branch River, Morris Lake,  Dirty Creek
Lake, Harper Lake and tributary waters.
Outfitter: Jas. E. Dexter has a number of well equipped camps,
supplying guides, canoes, etc.
Hotels: Maple Lodge.
Port Mouton 125 mis. west of Halifax; 119 mis. east of Yarmouth.
Splendid trout fishing in lakes and streams in this territory,
deep sea fishing (tuna and sea trout) out of Mouton Harbor.
Outfitter: J. W. Willis, proprietor of Wobamkek Camps, will
supply guides, canoes, motorboats, camp equipment, etc.,
and everything necessary for deep sea or inland fishing.
Hotel: Scotia House, Wobamkek.
Pubnico   221 mis. west of Halifax; 28 mis. east of Yarmouth.
Trout in Pubnico,  Sabinim and Oak Park Lakes,
two five miles from station; deep sea fishing, for tuna and
swordfish, in Pubnico Harbor.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietor.
Hotel: Goodwin's.
Quinon    Five mis. from Belleville station  by  motor, which
point is 236 mis. west   of   Halifax; 14 mis. east of
Yarmouth.
Trout in Argyle, Durkess and Miapough Lakes, one to five
miles from station.
Guides: Fred Gould, Quinon, N.S.; Wm. Pictou, Quinon, N.S.;
Wm. Muise, Quinon, N.S.; Gus Vacoon, East Quinon, N.S.
Hotel: Belleville, at Belleville. 14 Fishing in  Canada—Nova Scotia
Shelburne 164 mis. west of Halifax;,86 mis. east of Yarmouth,
on the south shore.
Salmon and trout in the Rose way and Shelburne Rivers,
about three miles from station. Excellent opportunities
afforded for deep sea fishing in Shelburne Harbor. Some few
miles inland, and easily reached by motor car from Shelburne,
are Horseshoe Lake, Green Harbor Lakes, Clyde River and
tributaries afford the finest of fishing for salmon, speckled and
lake trout.
Guides: Manus Bower, Middle Shelburne, N.S.; Jas. M. Bower,
Middle Shelburne, N.S.; Austin Jones, Shelburne, N.S.;
Jeffrey McKay, Shelburne, N.S.
Hotels: Atlantic, Central, Bower.
Sheet Harbor  Reached via Stewart station, 82 mis. east of
Halifax, thence 25 mis. south by motor to Sheet
Harbor.    Parties may motor direct from Halifax,  distance
about seventy miles.
Salmon and sea trout in Salmon, East and West Rivers,
trout in the tributary waters.
Guides: J. A. Malay, C. C. Richards.
Hotels: Conrad's, Fahil, McPhee House.
South Brookfield    118 mis. west of Halifax, via Bridge water.
Salmon   in  Medway  River   and   trout   in
Ponhook and Malago Lakes.
Outfitter:  J. B. McLeod, who is an outfitter in connection with
Echo Lodge resort, located on Ponhook Lake.
Hotel: Echo Lodge.
Springfield    108  mis.   west  of .Halifax,   via  Bridge water, in
Great Lakes territory.
Trout in Pleasant and Big Lahave Lakes and Ohio River.
Guides:   Irving Mason, Emery Darling, James Conrad, George
Wilson.
Hotel: Lakeside.
Stewart   82 mis. east of Halifax.
Trout fishing in the Upper Musquodoboit River and
in surrounding network of lakes and streams.
Guides: P. Farnell, Frank Paul.
Hotels:  Stewart, Hutchinson. Fishing in  Canada—Nova Scotia 15
Sunny Brae    49 mis. east of Truro, via Ferrona Jet.
Trout  in  East   River,   Pictou   and  McLennon
Brooks, and in numerous small lakes about five miles south
of town.
Guides: Dougald A. Cameron, J. W. McDonald, W. J. Hattie,
John McLean.
Hotels: Caledonia, Sherbrooke.
Sydney 224 mis. east of Truro.
Salmon fishing on the Margaree River and branches,
reached by motor about eighty miles from Sydney. Trout and
sea trout in Mira Lake, Mira and Salmon Rivers, about 12 miles
by motor from Sydney. Trout fishing at St. Ann and Ingonish,
reached by steamer from Sydney or North Sydney, distance
about forty miles, and also reached by motor about seventy-
five miles. Good tuna fishing also to be had at Mira Bay and
St. Ann Bay.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels:    Grand,   Minto,   Norfolk,   Paul's, Randolph   House,
Victoria, Vidal.
Thorburn—See Sunny Brae.
Tusket—See Yarmouth.
West Newdy Quoddy    located  on  the   south  shore  east  of
Halifax in Halifax Country, reached by
steamer or motor from Halifax via Port Dufferin, also by motor
from Stewart Station.
Salmon in Salmon and Quoddy Rivers, trout in Lakes
Eagle, Nowlin, Spar, Salmon River and tributary waters of
the salmon and Quoddy Rivers, sea trout in harbor waters.
Outfitter:    Henry   O'Leary, proprietor   of   O'Leary's Camps,
will  make   all  arrangements  for  guides,   canoes,   camp
equipment, etc.
Hotel:   O'Leary's Camp.
Yarmouth   249 mis. west of Halifax, also reached by steamer
from Boston.
Salmon and trout in Tusket River and tributaries; also
trout in Wilson, Parr, Pearl and Crawley Lakes.
Guides: Judson Grey, Kemptville, N.S.; Ellison Grey, Kempt-
ville, N.S.; Forman Gavel, Tusket, N.S. Fishing in  Canada — Nova Scotia
Outfitters: G. Allen Patterson is prepared to make all arrangements for fishing in the above territory, supplying guides,
canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Lloyd E. Ring, North Kemptville, N.S., Manager of Birchdale
Camps, will make all arrangements for guides, canoes,
camp equipment, etc.
Birchdale Camps are reached by motor from Yarmouth. The
proprietor of the above camps is G. H. Allen, Yarmouth.
Stephen Glode, J. A. Taylor, Joe Charles, Hectanooga, N.S.,
supply guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc., for extended
fishing trips in this territory.
Hectanooga is reached by motor from Yarmouth, twenty miles.
Hotels: Grand, Commercial, Hawthorne.
a^^5 Prince Edward Island
1 RINCE Edward Island, the "Garden of the Gulf," is a
pastoral province, a most popular summering place, to which
thousands of recreation seekers come year after year. It is not
usually regarded as having any extensive salmon fly fishing,
but in sea trout and brook trout, its claims are genuinely based.
From May 24th until the middle of August, the tidal rivers of
the island furnished splendid sport in sea trout, and interior
streams and small lakes are so well stocked with smaller trout
that the luck of the angler continues unabated from season to
season. Prince Edward Island is quickly and pleasantly reached
via Sackville, New Brunswick, from which trains run to Cape
Tormentine connecting with the palatial car ferry "Prince
Edward Island," giving a beautiful run through gulf waters to
Borden. The Canadian National Railways links up nearly
every town and village throughout the Island province.
The most noted of the trout streams are the Morell,
Dunk, Pierre Jacques, Miminagash, Kildare, Tignish, Percival,
Enmore, Hunter, Fortune and East Rivers.
The tidal rivers of the Island abound in sea trout and this
fishing is good from May 24th until the middle of August.
Trout of large size are taken in these rivers.
Charlottetown Charlottetown being a central point for Island
travel, it is easy to reach many of these streams
by motor or by rail. Near by is the East River, renowned for its
trout. Information concerning these waters is furnished by the
proprietors of hotels and by the officers of the Prince Edward
Island Tourist Association (Secretary, W. R. Tinney, Charlottetown); the visitor will have no difficulty in obtaining
excellent sport.
Hotels:   Victoria, Queen, Revere, Davies, Russ, Lennox, Beach
Grove Inn, Strathcona.
Summerside   Summerside is also a central point from which
to   motor   to   many   of   these   fishing rivers.
There is good fishing in the Windsor River, five miles, and in
tKe Dunk River, eight miles.   Good roads lead from Summer-
side to all parts of the Island and there are no long distances to
any given point.   The Tourist Association officers will give
visitors every assistance in arranging for fishing trips.
Hotels: Mawley, Clifton, Queen, McKenzie, McNutts.
Souris   There is a good road from Souris to the Morell River,
although the nearest railway station is St. Peters.
The Morell is famous for trout.   There is fine fishing for sea
trout at Rollo Bay and in Fortune Bay and River; good fishing
also in East and North Lakes.  Every assistance will be given
visitors by the proprietors of hotels.
Hotels: Cox, Oakley. I
New Brunswick
1 HE fame of the leased salmon pools of New Brunswiek
where, on the Restigouche alone, $100,000 are spent annually
by the Riparian Association for upkeep of salmon privileges,
has in some quarters obscured the wide range of free and open
fishing which any visitor may fully enjoy. The fish resources
of the province of New Brunswick are not by any means restricted to the salmon pools of the well-to-do clubs. Trout of
large average size and fighting quality are abundantly present
in most of the rivers and lakes and arrangements may be made
at scores of stopping places along the Canadian National
whereby guides and canoes will assure vigorous sport. Salmon
fishing is also provided for the non club member, on the Nepis-
guit, the Tobique and various tributaries of the Miramichi
during the spring run of salmon.
The efficiency of guides and the quality of service rendered
to fishermen and hunters in New Brunswick is equalled in few
other sections of the Dominion and surpassed nowhere. Long
practice with increasing numbers of experienced anglers has
brought about a standard of camps, outfitters and guides which
greatly contributes to the enjoyment of a fortnight's adventure.
A glance at the map of New Brunswick quickly explains
why outdoorsmen as a matter of course utilize the Canadian
National Railways. The Northern and Eastern sections of the
province are newest to settlement and industry and represent
the heavily-wooded areas from which the streams run south
and east to the Atlantic. This great verdant empire of wild life
is identified with the Canadian National lines. Access by
modern fast trains, equipped according to the most luxurious
standards, is to be had daily from Montreal by two famous all
steel trains. From Quebec City, a service runs via the Transcontinental and Valley Divisions to Edmunston, Fredericton
and Saint John, following the beautiful St. John River for much
of the way. The Boston traveller steps aboard at his home
city and is not disturbed until he reaches his. destination at
the Saint John, New Brunswick, station. Convenient daily
trains run from Saint John to most parts of the province.
From Campbellton, by taking the branch line to St.
Leonard and stopping at Kedgewick, Christopher Brook and
Jar dine Rock, really good trout are found and some salmon
fishing also is within reach. Fishing in Canada—New Brunswick 19
The Miramichi, and especially its tributaries, furnishes
some of the best trout angling in the province. Access is simply
arranged from Fredericton, Plaster Rock, Newcastle or
Moncton.
CANOE TRIPS—SUGGESTIONS
Proceed to Lake Stream Crossing, follow down stream for
twenty miles, then entering the Salmon River, paddle to Chip-
man.    This will take a week or ten days but is richly worth it.
The St. John River, one of the most beautiful in America,
is particularly inviting. Parties may proceed by train from
Fredericton with canoes and outfits to Grand Falls. The run
down river to Fredericton, 125 miles, can be made in three to
six days, with ideal camping spots en route.
A more exciting route, with wild game frequently within
view and fine trout fishing always at hand, is to paddle up the
Tobique and go down the Nepisiguit to Bathurst. A good
starting point is Plaster Rock.
NEW BRUNSWICK  FISHING REGULATIONS
ANGLING
Salmon    Open  season,   Restigouche   River   and  tributaries,
1st April to August 15th, both days inclusive.
Open season for remainder of Province, 24th May to
September 30th, both days inclusive.
Landlocked Salmon   Open season 1st April to September 30th,
both days inclusive.
Trout   Open season 1st April to September 30th, both days
inclusive.
Bass (striped) no closed season for angling.
ANGLING PERMITS
For non-residents (Salmon) $25.00
For non-residents   (trout and landlocked salmon or any
other species of fish)  10.00
A special license costing$5.00for three days fishing for nonresidents, which applies principally to the unleased waters on
the St. John, Upsalquitch and Nepisiguit Rivers. 20 Fishing in  Canada—New  Brunswick
Albert    58 mis. from Moncton; 44 mis. from Salisbury by
rail, also reached by automobile from Moncton, about
thirty-five miles.
Trout fishing in Crooked Creek, Lakes McFadden, German-
town, Bennett, West River and Trenton Pond.
Guides: M. D. Fullerton, H. D. Cleveland.
Outfitter:   Elliott & McKinley will supply guides, boats, camp
equipment, etc.
Hotels: Jones, Waverley.
Bathurst   530 mis. from Montreal.
Salmon and trout in Tetagouche,  Nepisiguit and
Pokemouche Rivers and tributary waters.
Guides: Henry Vieno, Thos. Vieno, Wm. Vieno, Jas. Grey,
Frank Chamberlain, Isaac Roy, Samuel Gammon, Sam
Chamberlain, Peter Roy, Wm. Grey, Jr., Peter J. Boucher,
Peter E. Boucher, Sylvan Boucher, Robert McEwen, Alex.
Prisk, Jas. Black, Jos. Grey, Frank Blanchard, Burnsville
P.O.
Outfitters: R. S. Branch has leased area on Nepisiguit River
with comfortable camps.
J. B. Hachey, Imhoff Bros., Wm. Gray, Sr., & Sons will
supply guides, boats, camp equipment, etc., for salmon
and trout fishing.
Geo. Gilbert, Agent for the Nepisiguit Angling Ass'n,
will arrange for guides, equipment, etc., and place a certain
number of fishermen on the Nepisiguit River. Arrangements for all equipment for deep sea fishing, including
motor boat and crews, may be made by wire or letter
through E. J. White, Secretary, Northern New Brunswick
Fishing and Hunting Association, Bathurst, N.B.
Hotels:   Gloucester, Chateau Evangeline, Brunswick, Queens.
Blackville   26 mis. from Newcastle.
Salmon, trout and sea trout in Miramichi, Cains
and Renous Rivers.   Quarryville, nine miles from Blackville,
excellent salmon fishing in tidal waters.
Outfitters: Pat Whalen, Renous, P.O., Herman H. Campbell,
Upper Blackville, P.O., Thos. E. Colford, Howard, N.B.,
John Hare, Curventon, P.O., have comfortable camps
situated on excellent fishing waters and will make all
arrangements for guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: Blackville. 1
Fishing in  Canada—New  Brunswick
Blissfield    45 mis. southwest of Newcastle.
Salmon and trout in Southwest Miramichi,  Bartholomew Rivers and tributary waters.
Outfitter:     E. D. Weaver, Proprietor of S'Bartholomew River
Camps," supplies guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
This is an excellent point to outfit for canoe trips.
Hotel:   E. D. Weaver has camp accommodation.
Campbellton  467 mis. from Montreal.
Salmon and trout in Kedgewick River, Resti-
gouche and Guanametz Lakes.
Guides: Rod. Thomas, Upsalquitch; Dan. McAllister, Jacquet
River, who also has for rental fishing area on the Jacquet
River; proprietors of hotels will also arrange for guides.
Hotels:  Chateau Restigouche, Brunswick, Florence, St. Louis.
Charlo   18 mis. from Campbellton.
Salmon and trout in Charlo  and Benjamin Rivers,
Lakes Bastion, Murray, Longnew and tributary waters.
Outfitter: Geo. Oaks has a number of camps, and will supply
guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Guides: A. Savage, J. H. Levesque.
Hotel: Bay Shore House.
Edmundston    243 mis. from Quebec City; 230 mis. from Moncton.
Salmon and trout in Upper St. John River, Madawaska
River and Temiscouata Lake.
Guides:   Jack Beaulieu,   Paul  Therrien,   Frank Vallancourt,
Arthur Ouellette.
Hotels:   Madawaska Inn, Royal, Windsor.
Fredericton    Salmon and trout in Miramichi, Cains, St. John,
and   Nashwaak   Rivers;   trout   in   Donaldson's
Lake.
Outfitters:    The following outfitters have their own camps,
supplying  guides,   canoes,   camp equipment,   etc.:  Chas.
Cremin,   Fredericton,   N.B.,   W.   Harry  Allen,   Penniac,
N.B.,   William  T.   Griffin,   Cross   Creek,   N.B.,   Arthur
Pringle, Stanley, N.B., George F. Moore, Penniac, N.B.
Descriptive pamphlets are issued by these outfitters, who
will forward copies to those interested.
Guides:     Alfred    Nicholls,     Wm.    Craig,      Robert    Craig,
J.  G.  Sommerville, all of Taymouth, N.B.   Jas. B. Kelly,
Biggar Ridge,   N.B.,  Murdock McKenzie,  Juniper, N.B.,
Wm. Statten, Fores ton, N.B.
Hotels: Barker House, City, Grand, Lome, Waverley, Windsor,
York. Fishing in  Canada—New  Brunswick
Jacquet River 28 mis. east of Bathurst.
Salmon and trout in Jacquet River, about one
mile from station; deep sea fishing in the Baie de Chaleur.
D. McAllister has a fishing lease on the Jacquet River, where
a limited number of sportsmen can be taken care of at a
time. Applications should be addressed to D. McAllister,
Jacquet River, N.B.
Hotel: Bay View.
Loggieville   17 mis. from Newcastle.
Salmon and trout in Miramichi River and tributaries.
Guides: Wm. Wishart, Wishart's Point, Tabusintac P.O., John
Wishart, Tabusintac P.O.
Moncton   653 mis. from Montreal; 89 mis. from St. John.
Trout fishing in nearby rivers and lakes—convenient
centre for salmon waters of the Miramichi River.
Outfitter: Thos. McEachern, Chipman, N.B., operates camps,
supplies guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Guides: Glover Lernon, Chipman, N.B.; Parley Wry, Harcourt,
N.B.; Neil & John McLeod, Harcourt, N.B.; Michael
Connors, Harcourt, N.B.; M. D. Fullerton, Albert, N.B.
Hotels: American, New Brunswick.
Newcastle 574 mis. from Montreal; 168 mis. from St. John.
Salmon and trout in Miramichi River and  south
branch of Nepisiguit River; deep sea fishing in Miramichi Bay.
Guides: Ed. Way & Sons, Edward Menzies, David Mutch,
R. H. Armstrong, Jas. McNeil, Wayerton, N.B.; Russell &
Asa Ward, Millerton, N.B.; PatWhalen, Renous, N.B.;
John Hare, Curventon, N.B.; Walter Freeze, Doaktown,
N.B.; Wm. Murray, Doaktown, N.B.; Geo. H. Hinton,
Doaktown, N.B.; Thos. E. Colford, Blackville. N.B.;
Grant Forsyth, Whitney, N.B.
Hotels: Miramichi, Royal, Union, Waverley.
New Mills   491  mis.  from  Montreal;  25 mis.  from  Campbellton.
Salmon and trout in Jacquet and Charlo Rivers; deep sea
fishing in the Baie de Chaleur.
Outfitter: Chas. R. Taylor operates "Shore Acres" Hotel;
will arrange for guides, canoes and necessary equipment for
fishing parties. While Mr. Taylor does not hold lease on
any salmon waters, he can arrange through the owners
of such waters for the privilege of placing a few fishermen
on Club, or privately owned holdings.
Hotel: Shore Acres. Fishing in  Canada—New  Brunswick
23
Plaster Rock   307 mis. from Quebec City; 165 mis. from Moncton.
Salmon and trout in Tobique, Nepisiguit and Miramichi
Rivers, and tributary waters.
Guides: Ray Barker; Asa Martin, Sission Ridge, P.O.
Outfitters: Chas. Wright, Three Brooks P.O. Operates permanent camps throughout this section, which are fully
equipped.
Chas. Cremin, Fredericton, N.B., has a number of camps
located on the headwaters of the Tobique, Nepisiguit and
Upsal quitch rivers.
Percy B. Falding, Perth, N.B., operates permanent fishing
camps on Serpentine Lake and also conducts fishing parties
on Tobique and Nepisiguit Rivers.
Gough & Linton, North View, N.B., have permanent
camps located on the Serpentine, Nepisiguit and Miramichi Rivers.
Ogilvy Bros., Oxbow, N.B., have an excellent system of
camps located on the Upper Tobique section, they supply
competent guides, together with complete equipment for
extended fishing trips.
Outfitters: Wright, Cremin, Falding, Gough & Linton and
Ogilvy Bros, issue small descriptive publications, copies of
which will be supplied upon request.
Hotels:  Turner House, Queen's Hotel.
Saint John    Trout  in  Loch   Lomond,   Ben  Lomond,  Upper
Loch Lomond, Victoria, East Long, Rocky, Otter
Lakes and Bonny River.
Guides: Mr. G. Sinibaldi is operating a number of up-to-date
fishing camps at Loch Lomond, St. John P.O.
Charles Raynes, Harold Chadwick will provide accommodation for fishing parties at Fairville, Fairville, P.O.
George McCafferty, Upper Loch Lomond, Upper Loch
Lomond P.O. Prop, of Ben Lomond House, Ben Lomond
P.O., Henry Matheson, Bonny River P.O., Leonard
McAleer, John McAleer, Charles Easton, Wirral P.O., will
arrange for guides, etc.
Hotels:    Admiral   Beatty,
Dunlop, New Dufferin.
Royal,   Park,   Clifton,   Victoria, Quebec
v^UEBEC Province may seem almost too bewildering in
its opportunities for outdoor recreation to permit of certain
judgment on one "best" locality. It is a fact of experience
that scores of well-known international hunters and anglers
have been coming to Quebec annually for a very long time,
changing their districts for variation of scenery or species
of game and fish but always recording the same good averages of
sporting luck. It is mostly a matter of time available, or the
depth of purse, whether you select the nearer districts of the
Laurentian Mountains or the more distant excitements of a
ouananiche catch in a tributary of Lake St. John or salmon
angling in the rivers of Gaspe. Happy times are waiting in any
case, whether a few hours run from Montreal or a full day's
travel from Quebec City. The reader knows his own case and
will make his decision accordingly.
One of the strongest magnets to all who love and profit
by outdoor recreation is the Laurentides National Park to the
northeast of Quebec and embracing 3700 square miles. It was
established, and is maintained, by the Quebec Government to
provide a playground for all, and to aid in perpetuating the
finest of hunting and trout fishing. The forest growth of course
is not exploited commercially and lakes and rivers are free
from any sign of industrial intrusion. Virgin conditions have
been maintained and the unfailing good fortune of the sportsman
visitor fully assured. Excellent camps have been built by the
Government of the Province, the finest of all being Camp
Perrault on Lake St. Ann, a noted fishing water, reached from
Murray Bay. Those desiring information on hunting or fishing
or leasing of camp privileges in the Park should write to the
Superintendent of Fish and Game, Parliament Buildings,
Quebec.
East of Laurentides National Park, on the tributary
streams on both sides of the St. Lawrence will be found excellent trout fishing, particularly speckled but with red trout also.
Gaspe Peninsula, a land of vast extent, washed by the waters
of the St. Lawrence River and Gulf, has won fame by its marvellous salmon streams and hardly less by its resources in
trout. Gaspe is always sure fire in angling. Its rivers are long
and tortuous and of enthralling scenic beauty. Deep sea fishing has lately sprung into deserved prominence because of the QBHHHHHHMHI
Prince Edward Island:    Trout fishing New Brunswick:    Nepisiguit River; salmon fishing along
the Miramichi; some of Falding's Camps,
Perth, N.B. New Brunswick:   Salmon, Restigouche River;    Togue,
Serpentine Lake;   lower—Ogilvy's Camps, at Oxbow,
on  the  Tobique  River i ^ ^^Ja^j^S^v
New Brunswick:    Salmon fishing on the Tobique and
Nepisiguit Rivers Fishing in  Canada—Quebec 25
record catches of tuna. Perhaps the best known sportsmen's
headquarters is at the village of Gaspe. On the Gaspe coasts,
boats, equipment and guides are especially to be recommended.
These essentials of the angler's success are looked after with
praiseworthy thoroughness.
OPEN SEASONS FOR FISHING
Salmon—May 1st to August 15th.
Ouananiche—Dec. 1st to Sept. 30th.
Speckled Trout—May 1st to Sept. 30th. (Min. 6 in.)
Lake or Grey Trout—Dec. 2nd to Oct. 14th.
Pickerel—May 16th to April 14th. (Min. 15 in.)
Maskinonge—June 16th to April 14th. (Min. 24 in.)
Bass—June 16th to March 31st. (Min. 9 in.)
ANGLING PERMITS
Residents of Quebec Province—No permit required.
Non-residents of Quebec Province—All fishing (except
Salmon) $10.00
Non-residents of Quebec Province—Salmon fishing  25.00
Except Bona-fide active members of Fishing Clubs duly
incorporated in the Quebec Province     5.00
(Guests or honorary members of such clubs must pay full
fee.)
ALONG ST. LAWRENCE RIVER AND LOWER
ST. LAWRENCE BASIN
Bic   333 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout in Rida Bic River.   One  to four miles
from station.
Guides: Chas. Ouellette, Johnny Anse, E. Beaupre.
Hotels: Canada, Laval.
Bras d'Apic    102 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled  trout  in  River  Noir,   10  miles  from
station.
Guide:   Mr. D. Mercier, proprietor of hotel, will arrange for
guides.
Hotel: Mercier. 26 Fishing in  Canada—-Quebec
Coaticook    123 mis. from Montreal.
Lake trout, pike and bass in Lake Lester, Massa-
wepie, ten to fifteen miles from station.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels:  Coaticook, Thorndyke.
Coteau Jet.   38 mis. from Montreal.
Pike, lunge, bass and pickerel in Lake St. Francis,
2 miles from station.
Guides:  Norbert Deguarde, Adelard Royal.
Hotels:  American, St. Lawrence, Windsor.
Drummondville  65 mis. from Montreal.
Pike, lunge, bass and pickerel in St. Francis
River, one-half mile from station.
Guides: Maj7 be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels:  American, Grand Central, Manoir Drummond.
Lacolle 44 mis. from Montreal.
Lake trout, bass and pickerel in Richelieu River and
Lake Champlain, right at station.
Guide:   Proprietor of hotel will arrange for guide.
Hotel:  Windsor.
Matapedia    454 mis. from Montreal.
Salmon and speckled trout in Restigouche. Matapedia, Little Rivers and tributaries.
Mr. J. A. Dube, Proprietor of the Restigouche Hotel, has
salmon fishing leases on both the Restigouche and
Matapedia Rivers; he has also a speckled trout fishing area
under lease eighteen miles north of Matapedia on the
Little River. Mr. Dube will arrange for guides, boats,
camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: Restigouche.
Mont Joli    362 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel in Mushquash
River and River Metis, one-quarter to four miles from station.
Guides: Ernest Dechene, Chas. Levesque, L. Lavoie, A. Lavoie.
Hotels: Canada, Commercial, Mont Joli, Victoria.
Nicolet    97 mis. from Montreal.
Pike, lunge, bass and pickerel in Nicolet River and
Lake St. Peter, one to three miles from station.
Guides: Gideon Blanchet, Donat Bellerose.
Hotels: Nicolet and Victoria. 1
Fishing in  Canada—Quebec
Point an Pic    255 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel in Grande Lac,
Petit Lac, Lac Long, about ten miles from station.
Guides:  Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels? Chateau Murray, Warren.
Riviere da Loup   278 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout,  pike  and pickerel  in  Lac
Grande Foche, 5 mis. from station.
Guide: Paul Plourde, Notre Dame du Lac.
Hotels:   Bellevue,  Chateau Grandeville,  Ophir,  Riviere  du
Loup, Victoria.
St. Anne de Bellevue  20 mis. from Montreal.
Pike,   lunge, bass and pickerel in Lake
St. Louis, Lake of Two Mountains, River St. Lawrence, one-
half to three miles from station.
Guides: Arranged for through Emile Pilon.
Hotels: Bellevue, Canada, Clarendon, Raymond, St. Anne.
St. Pascal  253 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout, in Lakes Trout, Moose and Beaver,
twelve to eighteen miles from station.
Guides:   Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels: Victoria, Commercial.
St. Raymond  34 mis. from Quebec City.
Speckled trout in River St. Anne and Bad River,
one to twenty-five miles from station.
Guides:   Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels: Plamondon, St. Raymond, Pore's, Beaupres.
St. Simon   314 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout in St. Mathieu Lake, Lac St. Simon
and Port a Pic River, four to twelve miles from station.
Guides:  Philias Goudreau, Felix Vallancourt, Antoine Vallan-
court, J. E. Ouellette.
Hotels: Levesque, Caron.
Stottsville  40 mis. from Montreal.
Pike, bass and pickerel in the Richelieu River,
about two and one-half miles from station.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels: Bouillon, Gosselin. 28 Fishing in  Canada—Quebec
Vaudreuil   25 mis. from Montreal.
Pike, lunge and pickerel in Ottawa River, about
one-half mile from station.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels: Canada, Central, Vaudreuil, Grand Union.
LAKE ST. JOHN AND TRIBUTARIES
Ti
HERE are types of fishermen who "specialize" in bass,
or trout or lunge. Each has his own way of putting the case,
but in any versatile gathering of anglers, the man who knows
ouananiche fishing "as is" on Lake St. John, or its six mightiest
tributaries, either enjoys his triumph in dumb silence or demands
the floor for the main speech. Lake St. John has a shore line of
one hundred miles and is the famous home of the ouananiche or
landlocked salmon, truly one of the most sporting fishes to
be found anywhere in the world. The best of the fun comes in
June and July, as concerns Lake St. John itself. The three big
rivers flowing in from the north, the Ashuapmuchuan, the
Mistassini and Peribonka also run heavily with ouananiche,
and pike of peculiarly great size, and all the trout that the most
ardent sportsmen could wish to take. Of the scores of wilder
and more thrilling trips by canoe, the one to Lake Tschotagama
may be especially singled out. It will take three days up and
two down by way of the Peribonka River and a minimum
requirement is two guides and a canoe to each traveller, but
the time and trouble will be returned many times over in
experiences that memory will always treasure. The impetuous
descent of Peribonka's waters beggars description, and it is
emphatically reserved for stout hearts and willing hands.
It is a safe rule that ouananiche are to be taken by trolling
rather than the fly. Canoes and boats stand off shore a few
hundred feet.  Pickerel and giant pike also diversify the catch.
Lake St. John empties southward into the Saguenay
through a stupendous chasm of the Laurentian mountains
known as the Grand Discharge. All the way down the Saguenay
the tributary rivers are noted for salmon and trout. The
Canadian National is the only railroad serving the Lake St.
John country. A rapid run is made from Quebec or Montreal
and no traveller need anticipate the slightest trouble as regards
reliable guides and equipment. Fishing in Canada—Quebec 29
Chicoutimi   307 mis. from Montreal; 227 mis. from Quebec
City.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike, pickerel and ouananiche in
Lake St. John and tributaries.
Guides: Arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels: Chicoutimi, Bellevue.
Hebertville  279 mis. from Montreal; 198 mis. from Quebec.
Brook and lake trout, ouananiche, pike and pickerel, in Lake St. John and tributary waters.
Guides:   Jos. Hudon, Simon Purlleo, Jos. Allard, L. Hudon.
Hotel: Commercial.
Grand Mere  94 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike and pickerel in
Lake des Piles, Lakes Berube and Francois, St. Maurice River,
one mile upwards from station.
Guides: Chas. Reed; Albert Hatt.
Hotels: Grand Central, Laurentide Inn, St. Maurice, Windsor.
Jonquiere   290 mis. from Montreal; 217 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled  trout,  pike  and pickerel  in Kenogami
Lake, 15 miles from station.
Outfitter: Harry O'Brien, secretary of the Plessis Fish &
Game Club, Which club has under lease from the Quebec
Government, about forty-two square miles adjoining Lake
Kenogami, in which are included approximately fifty lakes
and ponds. A number of permanent camps are maintained
throughout this area, home camp being right on Lake
Kenogami. Mr. O'Brien will meet parties at Jonquiere and
drive them to the village of St. Cyriac, thence by motor
boat to camps.
Hotels: Jonquiere, Royal.
Lac aux Sables   121 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout and pickerel in Lac aux Sables,
Lakes George, Peron, Francis, one-half mile to four miles from
station.
Outfitter: Mr. J. O. Nault has hunting cabins located throughout this section, he will supply guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Guides: Chas. Tremblay, Art. Genest, F. Rivard.
Hotels: Jacobs, Bergeron, Deveault. 30 Fishing  in  Canada—Quebec
Lac Bouchette   240 mis. from Montreal; 160 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled and lake trout in Lac Bouchette and
Lac Commissionaires, close by.
Guides:   Guides for the above area can be arranged through
G. K. and Robert Rowley, Lake Edward P.O. (See Lac
Edouard).
Lac Edouard 193 mis. from Montreal; 112 mis. from Quebec.
(Lake Edward) City.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel in the Lake
Edward territory, also ouananiche fishing in Lake St. John
and tributary waters.
Outfitters: G. K. and Robert Rowley, owners and operators of the "Laurentide House" and Camps at Lake
Edward. Lake Edward is the largest body of water
between Quebec City and Lake St. John, and possesses
great attractions for the angler. Messrs. Rowley hold
approximately one thousand square miles under lease from
the Government, throughout which are maintained permanent camps, fully equipped, some of which are on the
shores of Lake Edward, others upon islands in the lake,
and still others, miles back in from the rail on the finest
of fishing waters, with every opportunity for big game
photography. Canoe trips may be arranged, guides and
all necessaries supplied for short or extended canoe trips.
On the tributaries of Lake St. John—Ashuapmuchuan,
Mistassini, Peribonka and Saguenay Rivers.
Messrs. Rowley issue a small and very attractive pamphlet, a copy of which will be supplied upon request.
Hotel: Laurentide House.
Metabetchouan   267 mis. from Montreal; 186 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled and lake trout, pike, pickerel and
ouananiche in Lake St. John,  on which Metabetchouan is
situated, and tributary waters.
Guides: Arranged through hotel proprietor.
Hotel: St. Jerome.
Riviere a Pierre   138 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout,  pike  and pickerel  in Lac
Donald, Lac Canard and Riviere a Pierre, three miles and
upwards from station.
Outfitters:   Gauvin  &  Prouix have  camps,   and  will  supply
guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Hotels: Bergeron, Voyer. Fishing in  Canada—Quebec 31
Roberval   269 mis. from Montreal; 188 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled trout, pike, pickerel and ouananiche in
Lake St. John and tributary waters, one to twenty-five miles
from station.
Outfitter:    J. Leonce Hamel, Manager Chateau Roberval.
Club Panache is the name of a large leased area of
excellent trout fishing waters located some 25 miles west
of Roberval. In connection with this club, there are a number
of camps located on the various lakes throughout this section.
Mr. Hamel, proprietor of the Club, will supply guides, canoes,
camp equipment, etc., for extended fishing trips. He also
outfits parties for ouananiche fishing in Lake St. John and
tributaries. Mr. Hamel issues a descriptive booklet which will
be supplied upon request.
Hotel:  Chateau Roberval.
St. Felicien    286 mis. from Montreal; 205 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled trout, ouananiche, pike and pickerel in
Ashuapmuchuan River and Lake St. John.
Outfitter: C. W. Bates, owner and operator of the "Lake
Clair Fishing Club," having under lease from the Government about 100 square miles of territory, interesting canoe
trips may be arranged up Rivers Mistassini, Peribonka
and Ashuapmuchuan. Mr. Bates issues an attractive
pamphlet describing his territory and will supply a copy
upon request.
Hotel: Chateau St. Felicien.
THE TRANSCONTINENTAL
A new field of practically untouched country has been
opened up by the Canadian National along what was formerly
known as the Transcontinental line running from Quebec City
to Winnipeg. The portion to which attention is now drawn lies
between Quebec and Parent, and especially the more recently
opened areas on both sides of the track from La Tuque to Parent.
Here one may come with thorough dependence upon the natural
stock of trout, pike and pickerel. Such rivers as the Vermilion and the Lievre have been fished relatively little and are
ideally navigable and ruggedly beautiful. Many new camps
with reliable outfitters and guides have made successful records
in these areas and the annual trek of anglers grows steadily in
volume. Fishing in  Canada—Quebec
The St. Maurice River While known to fame as one of the
great "industrial" rivers of Quebec
it is sometimes overlooked that the upper waters of the
St. Maurice strike into the most abundant trout territory of
central Quebec. More and more sportsmen are finding that
few regions surpass it for speckled fighters or for pike and
pickerel. The tributary streams are splendidly stocked and
provide not only the best of canoeing but dependable guides
and many good camps.
Amos   490 mis. from Montreal; 433 mis. from Quebec.
Pike and pickerel in Harricanaw River and tributaries,
one quarter mile from station.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Outfitters:  Sigouin Bros., A. T. H. Taylor Co., A. Drouin.
Hotels: Transcontinental, Central, Amos.
Bourmont   374 miles northwest of Montreal, 317 miles northwest of Quebec.
Speckled and lake trout, pickerel and pike in Kapitachuan
Lake and tributary waters.
Outfitters: Sigouin Bros., P.O. address, Amos, Que., proprietors of "Kapitachuan Club" and Camps, supply guides,
canoes, camp equipment for extended fishing trips throughout this section. This is an excellent starting point for
canoe trips.
Creek des Prairies    208 mis. from Montreal,  151 mis. from
Quebec.
Speckled and lake trout, pickerel and pike.
Outfitter:   Armand Tremblay, P.O. LaTuque, Que., has an area
of 120 square miles under lease from the Quebec Government.   This area is drained by the Vermillion River and in
the tributary lakes and streams there is excellent speckled
trout fishing, while in the main streams and larger lakes
there is a wealth of lake trout and great northern pike.
Mr.  Tremblay has his main clubhouse located on the
Vermilion River at Creek des Prairies Station.   From here
sportsmen proceed up the river to the different camps.  There
is an excellent starting point for those desiring a two to three
weeks canoe trip through virgin territory.
Mr. Tremblay has a complete outfit of guides, canoes, camp
equipment, etc. HHHNHHWHHHH
■MM
Quebec:    Salmon fishing, Gaspe A
1W
Quebec:    Trout  fishing   along   the   Transcontinental
Division Quebec:    Trout   fishing,   Lake   Edward   District:    lower
two—one of Sigouin's Camps and Kapitachuan
Falls,   Bourmont ^nm
wBSM
Quebec:   Fishing at Tremblay's Camps, La Tuque Doucet    411 mis. from Montreal; 354 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel in Atik River,
three-quarters of a mile from station, and in Canyon Creek,
Bernier Lake and Misgiskan River, three to twelve miles from
station.
Outfitter:   J. A. Savard, prop, of Savard's Hotel will arrange
guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Fitzpatrick   189 mis. from Montreal; 132 mis. from Quebec.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel in Trout Lake
and Lac LaCroche, about fifteen miles from station.
Guide: W. Boudreau, "LaCroche, P.O.
Hotels: See La Tuque.
LaSarre  544 mis. from Montreal; 487 mis. from Quebec.
Pike and pickerel in LaSarre River, one-quarter mile
from station, and in Lakes Mance, Abitibi and Duparaquet,
two to eighteen miles from station.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels: Paquette, Bedard.
LaTuque   186 mis.  from Montreal;   129 mis.  from  Quebec.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike and pickerel in the
numerous lakes and streams throughout this section.   This
is one of the finest speckled trout areas in Northern Quebec.
Outfitter: Alphide Tremblay, proprietor of Lac des Isles
Camp, has a large area of hunting and fishing territory
under lease from the Quebec Government situated north of
La Tuque, reached by a seven mile motor drive. His
main camp is situated on Lac-a-Ligne with a number of
well equipped camps located throughout his territory.
Mr. Tremblay supplies guides, canoes, camp equipment,
in fact, everything necessary for extended fishing trips; he also
outfits parties desiring canoe trips throughout this territory.
Hotel:  Royal.
Parent   309 mis. from Montreal; 252 mis. from Quebec City.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel in the headwaters and tributaries of the Lievre and Gatineau Rivers.
Outfitters:    Ogilvy & Campbell, Parent, Que., proprietors of
the Lievre River Hunting and Fishing Preserve, have 300
square miles under lease from the Quebec Government.
This area has just recently been opened up and offers some
of the finest speckled trout fishing in Northern Quebec. 34 Fishing  in  Canada—Quebec
This territory offers splendid opportunities for canoe trips.
Their  headquarters'   camp  is  reached  by  water  route
through Simard Club, a flag stop, seven miles east  of
Parent Station.
Ogilvy & Campbell have an up-to-date system of camps,
guides, camp equipment, etc.
Parent is an excellent starting point for canoe trips throughout practically virgin territory.
Hotel: National.
Vilmontel   482 mis. from Montreal, 128 mis. east of Cochrane.
Speckled  and  lake  trout,   pickerel  and  pike  in
Kenojevis River, Kenogami Lake and tributary waters.
Outfitter: C. S. Richmond, Vilmontel, Que. (winter address
O'Brien, Quebec), has his camps located on the Kenojevis
River, reached by motor boat from Vilmontel Station; he
has complete equipment of motor boats, canoes, camp
equipment, etc., supplying complete guides.
THE LAURENTIAN MOUNTAIN REGION
This is one of the best known recreational areas in Canada,
and is a favorite resort of all who combine the pleasures of canoe
trips with an angling programme. Lake and speckled trout,
pike and bass are available almost in every lake, or stream
of the Laurentian range and the fisherman will by no means
overlook the unusual ease of travel, the nearness to Montreal
and the American border, the quality of guides and the natural
loveliness of this mountain playground. Hotel accommodation
is abundant and good, and rapid train service offers at convenient hours via the Tunnel Station of the Canadian National
at Montreal.
Westward from the Laurentians to the Ottawa River
which is the boundary line with Ontario, some good fishing
may be had, if spots are more carefully chosen. There are
muskie and bass northwesterly towards Ottawa and by taking
a few days off at Lachute, excellent lake trout fishing can be
quickly and conveniently developed.
The Canadian National Railways Tourist Department at
Montreal will be pleased to suggest a number of easy and at the
same time adventurous canoe trips and will provide accurate
maps, such as will give the visitor an insight into Quebec's
resources of water and woods. Fishing in Canada—Quebec 36
Arundel  76 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and bass in Bevans
Lake and Rouge River, one mile from station, and Bark Lake,
four miles from station, Otter Lake, three miles from station,
speckled trout in tributary waters.
Guides:   Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Outfitters:" C. J. Staniforth will outfit fishing parties.
• G. E. Wheeler, proprietor of "Gray Rocks Inn," post
office address St. Jovite, Que., has a number of well equipped
camps located on excellent fishing waters in territory lying
north of this point. Some very fine canoe trips can be made
throughout this section. Mr. Wheeler supplies guides, motor
boats, canoes, camp equipment, etc., for extended fishing or
canoe trips.
Hotels:   Arundel, Temperance, Bark Lake House,  four miles
from station.
"Gray Rocks Inn" is reached by motor car twelve miles from
Arundel Station.
Huberdeau  77 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel in
Lakes Laurin, Polo, Les Lacs, Lac La Loutre, Shingle, Henry, Upper Wolf, Quebec, one to six miles from station. Les
Lacs, beautifully situated in the Rockway Valley, six miles
from Huberdeau Station, is an ideal location for the angler.
The waters of the lake are clear and cold and offer the finest
of fishing. Mr. O. Coursolle, Les Lacs P.O., operates a camp
at this point, having accommodation for about 25 persons.
Guides:- Adelard  Charbonneau, O.   Courcelle   (of   Les   Lacs
P.O.), G. Cupal.
Hotel:  C.N.R. Hotel.
Laurel   64 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled   and   lake   trout   in   Lake   Killarney   and
tributary waters.
Guides:  Mr. John Shannon will arrange for guides, boats, etc.
Hotel: Killarney Lake House.
Monfort   60 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled and lake trout in Lakes St. Francois Xavier,
Victor, Indian, Cooks and Belanger, one-quarter to four miles
from station.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels: Montfort, Somme Villa, Laurentide Inn. 36 Fishing in Canada—Quebec
Morin Heights  55 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled and lake trout, bass and pickerel in
Lakes St. Mary, St. Joseph and Ann, five to seven miles from
station.
Guides:   The proprietors of hotels will  arrange for guides,
boats, camp equipment, etc.
Hotels:   Rockcliff, Maple Villa, Strathcona, Bellevue, Aipino
(6 miles by motor).
Newaygo   61 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled and lake trout in Lakes St. Francois
Xavier, Indian, Belanger and Victor, one-quarter to three miles
from station.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietor.
Hotels: Thurston Park Cottages.  Address Manager, Thurston
Park Cottages, P.O. Box 293, Montreal, Que.; after May
24th, Newaygo, Que., Canada.
St. Jerome   38 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike and bass in Lakes
Lachigan and Marias, ten to twelve miles from station.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels: Bellevue, Mountview, Victoria.
St. Sauveur 51 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout in Lakes Rochon, Millette. Morin,
Long, Boucane, one to three miles from station.
Guide: J. B. Cyr.
Hotel: Beaulieu.
Shawbridge   47 miles from Montreal.
Speckled and lake trout, bass in Lakes Marois,
Echo, and numerous smaller lakes and streams.
Guides: Arranged through hotel proprietors.
Hotels:   Bellevue, Herron's, Lac Marois, Laurentian Lodge,
Glenbower House, Walker's Inn, Riverside House.
Weir  74 mis. from Montreal.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike and bass in Lakes Bevans,
Round, Rock, McDonald's, Green, McCulloch, McCrea, Long,
Fraser, Gate, Marshall, and Bark, one-half to nine miles from
station.
Guides: The proprietor of resorts will arrange for guides,
boats, camp equipment, etc.
Hotels: Round Lake House, Morgan House, both at Weir
Station. McDonald Lake House, Hillcrest, Lake View
Lake View Cottage, at McDonald Lake, five to nine miles
from Weir. Bates House at Batesville, one mile from Weir. Fishing  in  Canada—Quebec 37
THE GA$PE PENINSULA
Bonaventure  89 mis. from Matapedia.
Speckled trout and salmon in Lake Duval, Bonaventure and Hall Rivers, Cullen Brook and tributary waters,
one to eighteen miles.
Guides:     Mr. Alex. Bernard, prop, of Chateau Blanc, upon
application, will arrange for guides, boats, equipment, etc.
Hotel:  Chateau Blanc.
Carlton    44 mis. from Matapedia.
Speckled trout in Nouvelle River.
Guides:  Hotel proprietors, upon application, will make arrangements to supply guides, boats, equipment, etc.
Hotels:  St. Wilfrid, St. Louis.
Chandler   142 mis. from Matapedia.
Speckled trout and salmon in Grand Pabos, Little
Pabos and tributaries. Salmon in tidal waters.
Guides:  Proprietor of Langlois Hotel will arrange upon application to supply guides, boats, equipment, etc.
Hotels: Langlois Hotel.
Gaspe    202 mis. from Matapedia.
Speckled trout and salmon in York, St. John, Dartmouth Rivers and tributaries.
Outfitters: Mr. John Baker, proprietor of Baker's Hotel, has
fishing areas leased on the York and Dartmouth.
Mr. Baker will arrange for guides, boats, equipment, etc.,
upon application.
Hotels:  Baker's HoteL Morin Hotel.
New Carlisle   98 mis. from Matapedia.
Speckled trout in Nouvelle, Halls Rivers and
tributaries.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange, upon application, to
supply boats, guides, equipment, etc.
Hotels: Caldwells, White House. Ontario
Ti
HE Province of Ontario contains 407,000 square miles, of
which more than 260,000 square miles are heavily wooded, and
41,000 miles of fresh water. Except for the peculiar attractions
of tidewater fishing and the innovations of mountain climbing,
Ontario possesses in remarkable degree the varied beauty of
natural scenery and the unexhausted resources of wild life
characteristic of the other provinces. To those readers of this
publication whose residence is in the more crowded areas,
it is given as a significant fact that Ontario's mammoth area
is inhabited by just three million people, mostly concentrated
in the southern agricultural and urban districts. It is an
obvious deduction, therefore, that this vast expanse of woods
and water, measuring together more than 300,000 square miles,
have retained in the fullness- of Nature's bounty, the original
stock of game fishes and astounding numbers and variety of
wild game. Although government and private agencies have
been at work for a century mapping and listing the lakes and
rivers, the map maker has yet only partially covered his ground
and fresh explorations are in order for many years to come.
At the same time, it is of even more interest to the visitor
to Ontario's great stretches of wilderness to know that the
assets of thrilling sport have been made accessible. An overnight journey on a solid steel Pullman train, or a few hours
from Toronto to Montreal or Sarnia, brings the traveller quickly
and inexpensively to the edge of his "sphere of action." He will
encounter not the primitive hardships that the name "wilderness" may connote, but modern provision of camp and hotel,
outfitters and guides that eliminate most of the worry and
conserve the best of the fun. It is worth saying also to the newcomer to Canada that he will meet with no experience at the
border to ruffle his good nature. Customs regulations are made
simple and easy and the law of the Canadian border officers
is the law of courtesy. Nor need anyone entertain doubts as to
Canada's climate. The most bracing and healthful summer
climate in the world is that of Canada—lovely clear days, the
inimitable scent of pine and balsam, pleasantly cool nights
and in most regions immunity from that distressing ailment,
hay fever. Thousands have found happy relief from the burdensome heat characteristic of the middle • States in July and
August, for while the weather is uniformly warm during Ontario's
midsummer days, it is not subject to violent changes and is
never enervating in effect. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 39
ONTARIO FISHING REGULATIONS
ANGLING
Speckled and Brown trout   May   1st   to   September   14th.
Limit—not more than ten pounds
per day, but in no case more than twenty fish.    No fish to be
taken under seven inches in length.
Salmon trout   No closed season for angling.   Limit—five in
one day.
Rainbow trout   June 2nd to September  14th.    Limit—six in
one day.
Maskinonge   June  16th to November 30th.    Limit—four in
one day.
Large and Small-mouthed Bass   In  the  waters  west   of   the
boundary line between the
Districts of Algoma and Thunder Bay, July 1st to November
30th. In the Waters of Lake Erie west of a line drawn south
from Point Pelee to the International Boundary, July 16th
to May 23rd next following. All other waters, June 16th to
November 30th. Limit—five in one day, no fish to be less
than ten inches in length.
Pickerel In the waters of the Great Lakes, Georgian Bay,
North Channel and connecting waters, no closed
season. In other waters, south of the French and Mattawa
Rivers and Lake Nipissing, May 1st to March 31st, next following. North and west of, and including the French and Mattawa
Rivers and Lake Nipissing, May 16th to April 14th next following.  Limit—Twelve in one day.
ANGLING PERMITS
For Provincial Waters, with the exception of Nipigon River,
Nipigon Lake and other waters in the Nipigon Forest Reserve,
Algonquin Park, Quetico Park, Indian Reserves and other
waters legally prohibited:— 40 Fishing in Canada—Ontario
Residents of Ontario No permit required
Non-residents of Ontario $ 5.50
For Nipigon River, Lake Nipigon and other waters in the
Nipigon Forest Reserve:
Residents of Ontario (two weeks)     5.50
Non-residents of Ontario (per week, or fraction thereof) 10.50
For Algonquin Park, and Quetico Park:
Residents of Canada     3.50
Non-Residents of Canada     5.50
Ai
ALGONQUIN PARK
LLGONQUIN PARK is the great public reserve of wild life
and natural scenery, perpetually protected by the provincial
government. It lies 200 miles north of Toronto and measures
55 miles from north to south and 71 miles from east to west.
Twelve hundred lakes, chained together by rippling streams,
break the pattern of its dense forests and make certain that the
quest of speckled and lake trout, pike, lunge, bass and pickerel
shall never go unrewarded. Shooting in the park is prohibited
by law, but fishing may proceed unhampered. The richly
bordered lakes, where white and red pine, spruce and hemlock,
maple and birch mount backward to the hills in every shade of
green, are replenished in their game fish supply by abundant
sources of shelter and food, and by a total absence of stream
pollution. While the Ontario Government maintains large and
successful fish hatcheries at seven points, delivering constantly to public waters millions of black bass, speckled trout,
salmon trout, pickerel, rainbow trout and steelhead salmon,
the secret of successful days for anglers in Ontario is the retention of virgin conditions for fish propagation, the purity of the
waters and the wide margin of safety between supply and
depletion.
Algonquin Park  205 mis. north-east of Toronto, via Scotia Jet.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike, lunge, bass
and pickerel throughout the hundreds of lakes and streams in
Algonquin Park.
Guides:   Through   the   Manager   of   the   "Highland   Inn,"
Algonquin Park Station, or J. S. Fraser, Mowat P.O.
Hotels: "Highland Inn" (open June 15th to Sept. 1st),
"Nominigan Camp " (open July 1st to August 31st),
"Camp Minnesing," operated by the Canadian National
Railways Hotel Department, Mr. N. T. Clarke, Mgr.
Mowat Lodge, J. S. Fraser, Prop., Mowat P.O.
Hotel Algonquin, G. W. Colson, Prop., Mowat P.O. Fishing  in  Canada—Ontario 41
The Canadian National Railways serve the south and north
borders of the Park.
Adjacent to the railway line which runs through the
northern part of the Park (which is naturally more virgin
territory, in fact it is just recently fishermen have been going
into this section) there are hundreds of lakes and streams
practically unfished, which contain a wealth of speckled and
lake trout, lunge, bass and pickerel. Parties desiring to go
into this territory should get in touch with Mr. Geo. Wade,
outfitter, P.O. address 124 Dixon Street, Pembroke, Ont.,
who is in a position to make all arrangements for guides, canoes,
camp equipment, etc.
The Canadian National Railways issue a folder "Algonquin Park," a copy of which contains an excellent map showing
the numerous waters, trails, portages, camps, etc.,andmay be
obtained upon application to any passenger representative.
Barry's Bay   265 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Speckled and lake trout and bass in Carson and
Long Lakes, reached two to eight miles from station.
Guides:    Martin   Daly,   Jas.   Sullivan,   John   Whalen, Allan
Exmanskie, Charles Murray, A. Barber.
Hotels:   Balmoral, Windsor.
Brent   288 mis. north of Toronto, via North Bay.
Speckled and lake trout in Cedar, Catfish and Gilmour
Lakes and Petawawa River, reached one-half mile and upwards,
from station.
Guides:    Arrangements  for   guides   may   be   made   through
E. L. Banner, North Bay, Ont.
Canoe Lake    198 mis. north-east of Toronto via Scotia Jet.
Speckled and lake trout and bass in Canoe, Tea
and Joe Lakes, reached one mile and up from station.
Guide:   May be arranged through hotel proprietor.
Hotel: Mowat Lodge.
Golden Lake   85 mis. west of Ottawa;   289 mis. north-east
of Toronto.
Lake  trout,  pike,  bass   and  pickerel  in   Golden  Lake,
Bonnechere  River, and Dore Lake, one-half to six miles from
station.
Outfitter:   Matt Bernard has a complete outfit of motorboats,
canoes, camp equipment, and will arrange for guides.
Hotel: Sunstrum. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Madawaska   244 mis. north-east of Toronto; 130 mis. west of
Ottawa.
Speckled and lake trout and bass in Madawaska River,
Moore's and Opeongo Lakes, one-quarter mile upwards from
station.
Outfitter:   C. L. Blatherwick will arrange for guides, canoes,
camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: Madawaska.
Pembroke  89 mis.   west of Ottawa; 137 mis.   east  of  North
Bay.   Pembroke is the eastern gateway into the
northern section of Algonquin Park.
Speckled and lake trout, lunge, bass and pickerel in lakes,
Lea, Manitou, Kioshkoqui, Mink, Cauchon, Cedar, Trout,
Lavielle, Travers, Grand, Rivers Nipissing, Little Madawaska,
Lavielle Creek, White Partridge Creek, Carcajur Creek and
numerous other tributary lakes and streams of the Petawawa
River.
Outfitter:    Mr.  Geo. Wade,  P.O.  address 124 Dixon Street,
Pembroke, Ont., will make all arrangements for guides,
canoes, camp equipment, etc., for extended fishing trips.
Hotels:    Copeland,   Pembroke,   Leland,   McKay,   Windsor,
Pontiac.
o>
RIDEAU LAKES
"NE of the most accessible fishing grounds in all Canada to
reach, and one most certain to give fine rewards, is known as
the Rideau Lakes. These lie in beautifully undulating country
along the Canadian National's trunk line from Toronto to
Ottawa. The railway runs through lightly wooded and, at
places, decidedly rugged terrain in the open vistas of which
glistening water is always peeping. There is enticing beauty
of distant island and dark silent coves, the resistless dwelling
place of bass and pickerel. Opinicon Lake, one of the best known
of the long chain, is noted for its large mouth bass catches, but
its repute is rivalled by Indian, Benson, Clear, Charleston,
Beverley and many other connected lakes, each capable of
repaying the angler for the short and pleasant journeys by canoe
or over land.
Athens   200 mis. east of Toronto in the Rideau Lakes.
Lake trout, pike, bass and pickerel in Charleston
Lake, Upper and Lower Beverly Lakes, reached one to five
miles from station.
Guides:   Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels: Cedar Park Inn, Armstrong. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 43
Chaffer's Locks    176 mis. east of Toronto.
Pike, bass and pickerel in Rideau, Opinicon,
Benson and Rock Lakes, together with sixteen smaller lakes,
reached, without a portage,  one-quarter mile and up from
station.
Guides: J. Murphy, J. Simmons, E. Fleming, John Flemming,
Jas. Davidson, P. J. Hughson.
Hotel: Opinicon.   The proprietor of this hotel will arrange for
guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Gananoque   159 mis. east Toronto.
Lunge, bass, lake trout and pickerel in St. Lawrence River, Gananoque and Rideau Lakes, one to ten miles.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides, boats, etc.
Hotels: Gananoque Inn, Provincial, International, Hay Island
Echo Lodge.
Lancaster   54 mis. west of Montreal.
Pike, lunge, bass   and pickerel, in St. Lawrence
River and Lake St. Frances, about one mile from station.
Guides:  B. Laframbois, A. Bertrand, J. Senecal, F. McLeod.
Hotels: Commercial, South Lancaster.
Newboro   188 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, bass and pickerel, in Newboro,
Loon, Devil, Clear, Indian and Wolf Lakes, one-half mile and
upwards from station.
Guides:   Chas. McCaskell, Fred Landon, Dick Taylor, Fred
Graham, Harry Bishop.
Hotels: Rideau, Ontario.
Ottawa    The Capital of Canada and one of the principal gateways into the  Rideau Lakes  and Ottawa Valley
districts.
Speckled and lake   trout, lunge, bass, pickerel and pike
in the Rideau Lakes, Ottawa and Gatineau Rivers and the
numerous tributary lakes and streams.
Outfitter:   Mr. A. B. West, proprietor of Grand Lake  Camps,
will make all arrangements for parties desiring fishing in
this section.  Grand Lake Camps are situated thirty miles
northeast of Ottawa and reached by good motor road.
There is excellent black bass fishing in these waters.
Hotels: "Chateau Laurier,"operated by the Canadian National
Railways, Albion, Alexandra, Grand Central, King Edward,
Osgoode Hall, Windsor. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Portland   187 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Lake trout,  pike,  bass  and pickerel,   in  Big and
Little Rideau Lakes,  Otter,   Bass,   Otty,  Round,
Long and Adam Lakes.
Guides:  Ernest Hanna, Stanley Hanna, Geo. Foster, H. Howe.
Hotels: Commercial, Garrett's Rest.
Westport   192 mis. east of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, bass, pickerel, in Lakes Sand, Wolf,
Clear, Spectacle, Devil, Upper Rideau, Bobs, Canoe, all within
radius of seven miles.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides, boats, etc.
Hotels:  American House, Alhambra.
KAWARTHA LAKES AND THE TRENT WATERWAY
m
HE Kawartha Lakes have won their renown amongst
anglers of the continent on two counts: Bass, maskinonge and
salmon trout in the larger lakes, and speckled trout in the smaller
ones. The name "Kawartha" means "feright Waters and
Happy Lands" and the angler well knows that environment
means nearly as much as the harvest of pole and line. Travelling
through Kawartha Lakes his attention is unwearied by a succession of wooded shores, broken here and there by farm
clearings and the indentations of river mouths. Some of the
best known of the Kawartha group, as regards proven fishing,
are Katchewanooka, Clear, Buckhorn, Pigeon, Sturgeon,
Cameron, Balsam and Stoney. Sturgeon Lake is worth a
special note for its lunge fishing which thrives on account of the
great areas of wild rice and other vegetation, notably at the
mouth of the Scugog River. Under this natural cover the largest
of the lunge wait for their prey.
THE TRENT WATERWAY
What applies to Kawartha Lakes is equally applicable to
the greater part of the area included under the general appellation of the "Trent Watershed," now formed into a connected
route, two hundred and fifty miles long, leading from Georgian
Bay via the Severn River, Lakes Couchiching, Simcoe and the
Kawartha chain out into Lake Ontario at the town of Trenton.
This is the historic route by which Champlain and his Indian
allies made their descent upon the Iroquois of New York
State. The scenery is delightfully varied and lovely and
pleasant hotels and camping places, with "civilization" always
in convenient reach, bid the traveller extend his stay and test
the secret of nearby trout streams. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 4&
A comparatively new fishing area, although fished successfully for many years, is to be found in the Haliburton Highlands, reached by a branch of the Canadian National running
up from Lindsay to Haliburton. The tourist who visits the
latter village will find himself at the gateway of a truly
unspoiled region, with good facilities for travel and highly
attractive country to move about in.
Atherley Jet.    88 mis. north of Toronto.
Lake trout, lunge, bass and pickerel in Lakes
Simcoe and Couchiching, reached one-half to three miles from
station.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels:   Orchard Point Inn, Fern Cottage, Lakeview House,
Simcoe Lodge.
Burnt River   92 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Lunge   and bass in Four-Mile Lake and Burnt
River.
Guides:  Geo. Wright, Alex. Wood, Rodney Wright.
Hotels: See Fenelon Falls.
Coboconk    86 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, bass and pickerel in Lakes Balsam and Kawartha and Kawartha River, one to seven miles
from station.
Guides: Alex. Drake, Geo. Burridge.
Hotels: Pattie House, Elm Braes.
Cobourg    78 mis. east of Toronto.
Pike, lunge, bass and pickerel in Lake Ontario,
on which Cobourg is situated, and in Rice Lake about twelve
miles north of Cobourg, reached by motor-bus.
Guides:   Madden Howard,  Alderville,   Ont.;  D.  McAllister,
Gore's Landing, Ont.; Thos. Wallace, Gore's Landing, Ont.
Geo. Hogg, Harwood, Ont.
Hotels:    Albion,   Balmoral,   Baltimore,   British,   Cedarmere,
King   Edward,   Lakehurst,   Lakeview,   Arlington,   New
Durham.
(At Rice Lake): Rice Lake House, Gore's Landing, Ont.;
White  House,   Gore's  Landing,   Ont.;  Lakeview  Hotel,
Harwood, Ont. 46 Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Fenelon Falls    82 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Bass,  pickerel  and   lunge in Cameron,   Sturgeon and Balsam Lakes, Burnt and Gull Rivers, one-quarter
of a mile up, from station.
Guides: D. E. Merriam, J. Calder, G. Beteau.
Hotels: Kawartha, Mansion, Brooks.
Haliburton   124 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Speckled trout, lake trout, bass and pickerel in
Redstone, Haliburton, Eagle and Buck Lakes, one to two miles
from station.
Outfitter:   F. P. Austin has a number of well equipped camps,
and    will    arrange    to    supply    guides,   boats,    camp
equipment, etc.
Guides: W. B. Austin, T. K. Roberts, J. Boivin.
Hotels:   Royal Kooshog, Nagamog Inn, Northern Eagle Inn,
Archer's.
Keene    102 mis. north-east of Toronto, via Peterboro.
Pike,  lunge,   bass  and pickerel,  in Rice  Lake  and
Otonabee River, three to five miles from station.
Guides: Geo. Paudash, M. Howard, A. Crowe.
Hotel:  Victoria.
Lindsay   69 mis. east of Toronto,
Lunge   and bass in Lakes Sturgeon and Scugog and
Scugog River, one to eight miles from station.
Guides: J. O'Brien, Dave Hudson.
Hotels: Benson, Butler, Elsmure, Royal.
Longford   94 mis. north of Toronto.
Pike,   lunge, bass and pickerel in Lakes Couchich-
ing and Simcoe, about one half mile from station.
Guides: At    Rama   Road P.O.:—Alex.  Douglas,  Jas.   York,
Thos. Williams, Wm. Strelling.
Hotels:  White House Inn, Thompson House.
Peterboro   92 mis. east of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, lunge, bass and pickerel in the
Kawartha Lakes region, for which Peterboro is central point.
The following excellent fishing resorts are reached through this
gateway: Lakefield Hotel, Lakefield P.O.; Park Hotel, Jacobs
Hotel, Burleigh Falls P.O.; Glenwood, Juniper Island P.O.;
Victoria, Hall's Glen P.O.; Belvedere, Clarina P.O.; Lakeview,
Young's Point P.O.; Maple Leaf, Kawartha Park, Kawartha Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Park P.O.; South Beach, South Beach P.O.; Buckhorn, Windsor,
Hall's   Bridge   P.O.;   Oak  Orchard   Lodge,   Peterboro   P.O.
The proprietors of the above resorts will upon application
arrange for guides, equipment, bait, boats, etc.
Guides:   D.  Drain,  Clarina,  Ont.; T.  Drain,  Clarina,  Ont.;
J. Thompson, Mount Julian, Ont.; W. Nicholls, Buckhorn,
Ont.
Hotels: Empress, White House, Grand, King George.
Port Perry   48 mis. east of Toronto.
Lunge and bass in Lake Scugog, on which Port
Perry is situated.
Guides: C. Bowerman, M. L. Crandall, W. Rolph, S. Wakeford.
Hotel:  Sebert House.
Rice Lake  See Cobourg, Hastings and Keene.
Washago   89 mis. north of Toronto.
Bass and lunge in Severn River, three miles from
station.
Guides:   J.   A.   Le   Quyer,   proprietor  Riverdale   Hall,   will
arrange for guides, boats, etc.
Hotel:  Riverdale Hall.
HASTINGS COUNTY
Grey trout and bass have unfailingly supported the reputation of Hastings County as an angling region. Close to Gilmour
Station, on the Canadian National, is Salmon Lake, five miles
long, to which there are many tributary streams all leading to
smaller and equally beautiful bodies of water. Deep water
trout are here in great abundance and give an umnatchable
thrill. Small mouthed bass have been fished most successfully
season after season by practised anglers who find the sport
justifies journeys of many hundreds of miles. The streams are
prolific in speckled trout and the sportsman will at times marvel
that he can enjoy such a high average of luck and at the same
time never be out of reach of telegraph, telephone and daily
mail and train service.
Bancroft    187 mis. north-east of Toronto via Trenton.
Speckled trout, lake trout and bass in L'Amable,
Weslemkoon, and Clear Lakes, and tributary waters reached
one to seventeen miles from station.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides. 48 Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Campbellford   145 mis. east Toronto via Belleville.
Lunge, bass and pickerel in Trent River.
Guides:   Mr. F. S. Keller,   proprietor   of   Rest-A-While, will
arrange for guides, boats, etc.
Hotels: St. Lawrence, Windsor.
Coe Hill    175 mis. north-east Toronto, via Trenton.
Speckled and lake trout, bass in Egan Creek, Lakes
Loon, Eagle, Clear and Lavalle, one and half to ten miles
from station.
Outfitter:    Ed.  McCaskie,  proprietor of  Lake   View   House,
Glen Alda P.O., six miles from Coe Hill.
Hotels:   Sexsmith House, Royal Hotel, Graham House, Lake
View House, Glen Alda, P!Q.
Consecon  122 mis. east of Toronto.
Pike, bass and pickerel, in Consecon Lake and
Wellers Bay, close by.
Guides: W. H. Booth, J. A. Clark, W. Mattis.
Hotel:  Hillcrest.
Gilmour    161 mis. north-east of Toronto, via Trenton.
Lake trout and bass in Beaver Creek, Gull, Salmon, Weslemkoon and Devil Lakes, one-half to five miles from
station.
Guide: Joe Baker.
Hotels: At Coe Hill (14 miles from Gilmour), Royal, Sexsmith,
Graham.
Hastings   114 mis. east of Toronto.
Pike,  lunge and bass in Trent River and Rice Lake,
about one-half mile from station.
Guides: Arranged through Mr. R. Black,  proprietor of Trent
Valley Lodge, Mrs. B. Lukes, R.R.  No. 4 or proprietors
of hotels.
Hotels: Clarendon, Royal.
Marmora  131 mis. east of Toronto.
Lake trout, lunge and bass in Lakes Belmont,
Crowe and Deer, Crowe and Deer Rivers, two to five miles
from station.
Guides: Walter Rivoy, S. Lawrence.
Hotels:  Royal Hotel, St. James Hotel, Marble Cliff Inn, Tip-
perary House, the latter two located on Crow Lake reached
by motor some three miles from Marmora. m
I^^T^
ifcw
I
La&e  Edward section,   in  Northern   Quebec,   showing
one of Rowley Bros.' Camps Ontario: Opinicon Lake;   Muskie and bass, Wahnapitae
Lodge,    Pickerel   River;      Tomahawk   Lodge    and
Camps,  North Bay Ontario:    Cottages  at   Turkey   Point,   Port  Rowan;
bass   fishing,    Charley's   Locks;   lake   trout,
Loon Lake,   Coe Hill 4tW
Ontario:    Fishing the upper part of Algonquin Park Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 49
Maynooth    202 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel, in
Lakes St. Peter, Mink, Bark and Papineau and Papineau Creek,
one to eight miles from station.
Guides: Wm. Stringer, Robert Ramsay, Fred Saunders.
Hotels: Arlington, Queen's, Temperance.
Picton    132 mis. east of Toronto.
Bass, lunge,  pickerel and pike in Bay of Quinte, West
Lake and Lake on the Mountain.
Outfitter:   R. A. Williams, P.O. address Glen Island, Ont., is
manager of "Glen Island Resort," and will supply  guides,
boats, etc.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels: Bayside Park, Castle Villeneuve, Globe, Royal.
Tweed   183 mis. north-east of Toronto.
Pike, lunge, bass and pickerel in Stoco Lake, Moira
River, Moira Lake, one-quarter to four miles from station.
Guides:   Ed. Cronkwright, W. Greer, Robert Reid, the latter
two at Red Bay P.O.
Hotel:    Huyck.
ST. LAWRENCE RIVER
Cornwall   67 mis. west Montreal, 267 mis. east Toronto.
Lunge, bass and pickerel in St. Lawrence River and
Lake St. Francis.
Guides: Mr. J. R. Duquette, proprietor of the King George
Hotel, Cornwall, also Algonquin Hotel, Stanley Island
(eight miles from Cornwall) will arrange for guides,
boats,   camp equipment, etc.
Hotels: Carleton, King George, Maple Leaf, Windsor.
LAKE ERIE
Port Rowan    131 mis.  southeast of Toronto,  on Lake Erie.
Excellent black bass fishing in Long Point Bay.
Guides:  The proprietor of "The Bayside" and "Turkey Point
Inn" resorts will arrange for guides, boats, etc.
Hotels: St. Charles, the Bayside. Fishing in  Canada — Ontario
LAKE NIPISSING, PICKEREL RIVER,  GEORGIAN BAY
AND HIGHLANDS OF ONTARIO
A great many successful fishing expeditions take their
start at North Bay which lies 227 miles due north of Toronto
and on the edge of choice and uncrowded sporting territory
on Lake Nipissing, Trout Lake and Pickerel River. Speckled
and lake trout, pike, lunge, bass and pickerel are caught aplenty.
The guide service is first rate and outfitting establishments
leave no want unfilled. Lake Nipissing, which is 50 miles long
and 20 wide, draws enthusiasts from many distant parts of the
continent to spend their vacations on its shady shores. Its
tributary rivers are famous for the small mouthed black bass
fished in the rapid waters. Pickerel that tip the scale at fifteen
pounds are caught, as well as maskinonge from fifteen to thirty.
Nipissing also offers unexcelled lunge fishing along the reed
beds off Sandy and Burnt Islands.
The waters of the Pickerel River are reached conveniently
from the Canadian National bridge which spans it —another
much favored fishing water, opening up as large a sporting
territory as is included in the whole Muskoka playground, we
come upon exciting ventures with bass, yellow pickerel or dore,
with plenty of good lunge and pike as well.
Georgian Bay with more than 40,000 islands, probably
holds the record for all-round good bass fishing. Thousands of
anglers return annually to its waters and as yet no lessening of
the supply seems evident. Canoeing in the Georgian Bay is an
experience by itself. The adventurer may change location
every night for months and fail to explore more than a corner
of this great inland ocean. Islands that jut from the water like
bits of barren masonry are hemmed about by scores of green
oases, where the music of whispering birches and pines has
seldom been broken by human call.
Ardbeg 172 mis. north of Toronto.
Speckled trout,  lake trout, pike,  bass and pickerel
in Trout, Deer and Gooseneck Lakes, reached from one-half
mile to five miles from station.
Hotels: Royal Wah Wash Kesh and Cottages,  operated by
E. C. Bennett; Linger Long Lodge, operated by Foster
and McRae.
Messrs. Bennett and Foster & McRae will also arrange to
supply guides, canoes, camp equipment, provisions, etc., for
extended fishing or canoe trips; they will gladly furnish full
information regarding their territory. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 51
Bayswater  222 mis. north of Toronto.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike, lunge, bass and
pickerel in French River and Wahnapitae River,  one to two
miles from station.
Guides: J. N. Cook has camp accommodation for fifteen people,
canoes,   etc.,   and  can  furnish  equipment  for  extended
fishing trips.
Burks Falls   170 mis. north of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, bass, pickerel in Doe Bay and
Lake, Pickerel Lake, Lake of Many Islands, Horn Lake, Ahmic
Lake and Maganatawan waterway.
Burks Falls is the rail gateway into the Maganatawan
section. Listed below is a number of excellent fishing
resorts reached by steamboat through this point: Lake of
Many Islands Hotel and Camps, Lakeview Resort, Island View
Lodge, Klondike, Cedar Croft Resort, Cedar Croft P.O.,
Bay view Hotel, Katrine P.O., Rockwyn Resort, Rockwyn
P.O.
Guides: The proprietors of the above resorts will upon application arrange for guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Hotels:   Central, Lake of Many   Islands, Lakeview,   Island
View, Klondike, Cedar Croft, Bayview, Rockwyn.
Callander   219 mis. north of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, bass and pickerel in Lake Nipissing
and French River.   Fishing waters reached one-quarter mile,
and upward, from station.
Outfitter: J. A. Lecklitner, proprietor of Waltonian Inn and
Cottages. This resort is located at Johnson's Point on the
south shore of Lake Nipissing, transportation by launch
from Callander. Mr. Lecklitner will make all arrangements
for guides, boats, etc.
Guides: Chester Neil, C. Kervin, Thos. Kervin, J. Alkins, Tom
Alkins, W. Jervis.
Hotel: Pacific.
Depot Harbor  152 mis.  north   of   Toronto,  reached by bus
from Parry Sound.
Lake trout, pike,   bass and pickerel in Georgian Bay on
which Depot Harbor is situated.
Guides: Richard Black, Parry Sound, Ont.; Stephen Partridge,
Parry Sound, Ont.
Hotel:  Island. Fishing  in  Canada—Ontario
Dorset   150 mis. north of Toronto to Huntsville, thence by
boat to head of navigation on the Lake of Bays.
Lake trout and bass in Lake of Bays, on which Dorset is
located, speckled and lake trout in Hollow Lake, reached by
stage four miles from Dorset.
Guides: Guides arranged through proprietors and resorts.
Hotels: Bunny Lodge, Ganosego, Garryowen, The Maples, The
Narrows.
Emsdale     163 mis. north of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, bass and pickerel in Sand and Doe
Lakes and Maganatawan River, two miles, and upward, from
station.
Guides:   Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides, boats,
etc.
Hotels: Sand Lake, Northcote.
French River See information regarding Pickerel River.
Huntsville    150 mis.   north  of Toronto; the gateway to the
Lake of Bays section.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike, bass and pickerel, in Lakes
Clear, Loon, Lake of Bays, Sand, Rebecca, Hollow, Trimber,
Fletcher and numerous other smaller lakes and    tributary
waters, two to fifteen miles from Huntsville.
Guides: The proprietors of hotels and resorts will make the
necessary arrangements for guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Hotels: Deerhurst, Dominion, Fairyport Inn, Fairy Villa,
Grandview Inn, Haverland, Kent, Limberlost Lodge,
Riverside, The Hollinshead, Vernon House, Wayagamack.
Lake Nipissing See North Bay, Powassan and Callander.
Loring   Reached via Trout Creek.    Trout Creek is 199 miles
north of Toronto, thence 25 miles by road to Loring.
Bass, pickerel and pike in Lakes Wauguimakog, Hungry,
Clear and tributary waters of the Upper Pickerel River.
Outfitter:    E. H. Kelcey, proprietor of lodge and camps, will
arrange for guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Maganatawan River   See  South Maganatawan,    Burks  Falls,
Sundridge, Emsdale and Ardbeg. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 53
Midland    191 mis. North Toronto.
Lake   trout,   bass,   lunge,  pickerel,   and   pike   in
Georgian Bay.
Guides: The proprietors of the above resorts, upon application,
will arrange for guides, boats, equipment, etc.
Hotels: Minnicoganashene, Royal, Delawana, The Lighthouse.
North Bay  227 mis. north of Toronto.
Speckled and lake trout,  pike,   lunge,   bass  and
pickerel in Lake Nipissing, French River and Trout Lake.
Outfitters and Guides: E. L. Hughes (P.O. address, Trout Mills),
owner of "Camp Champlain," on Trout Lake, reached by
automobile, about seven miles from North Bay, will supply
guides, canoes, and all required equipment for fishing
parties. E. L. Banner, North Bay, will arrange to outfit
parties for fishing trips in Lake Nipissing and French River
sections, supplying guides, provisions, etc.
"Lucky" Cameron (P.O. address, Rutter, Ont.) will accommodate sportsmen at his splendidly equipped camp
"Samoset," located on the north-west arm of Lake Nipissing. Motor boats are operated by Kervin Brothers of
Callander (8 miles south of North Bay) to this camp.
Messrs. Hughes and Cameron have issued very attractive
pamphlets descriptive of their respective localities and will
gladly mail copies to those interested.
Tomahawk Lodge and Camps located on a ninety acre
island in the French River section,  operated by Mr. J. A.
Sheedy, North Bay.
Splendid steamer service is maintained between North
Bay, Lake Nipissing and French River points by the steamer
"Northern Belle," of the North Bay and French River Navigation Co.   Effective July 1st, this steamer will operate from
North Bay to French River and Chaudiere Falls,  leaving
North Bay 9 a.m. Mondays, Thursdays and Sundays, returning
6.30 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays.
Hotels:  Pacific, Queen's, Cecil, Mackey, King George.
Parry Sound    149 mis. north of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, bass, pickerel and lunge, in
Georgian Bay, Mill Lake and Moon River, one to five miles
from station.
Guides:    Proprietors of hotels  and resorts will  arrange for
guides.
Hotels:     Belvidere, Kipling, Mansion, Victoria.
"Georgian Bay" folder, issued by the Can. Nat. Rys.,
gives some very interesting information regarding the Georgian
Bay section. /^
54 Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Penetang   102 mis. north of Toronto.
Lake   trout,   pike,   lunge,   bass   and   pickerel    in
Georgian Bay.
Guides:   Pete Landrigan, Adam Michaud, Wm. Allen, F. Du-
some.
Hotel:   Canada.
Pickerel River 215 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Bass,   lunge,   pickerel   and  pike,   in   French,
Pickerel, Bad and Wahnapitae Rivers and Wahnapitae and
Ox Lakes.
Outfitters: In addition to operating fishing lodges, as below, the
proprietors are prepared to furnish, for those wishing to
make camping or canoe trips, guides, canoes, tents and
other necessary camping outfit:—
"Pickerel  River  Lodge,"   F.   C.  Johnston,   prop.,   P.O.
address, Key Jet.
"Wahnapitae Lodge,"  and Camps,  Nelson W.  Barrett,
proprietor, P.O. address, Key Jet.   (Prior to June  21st,
communications should be addressed to Mr.  Barrett at
953 Ellicott Square, Buffalo, N.Y.)
"French River Lodge," C. W. West & Sons, proprietors,
P.O. address, Key Jet.
Messrs. Barrett and Johnston issue small booklets and will
gladly mail copies to those interested.
Bass Lake Camps, Mr. H. Fenton, proprietor, P.O. address
up to July 1st, Wanikewin, Ont., after July 1st., Key Jet.,
Ont.
Powassan   207 mis. north of Toronto.
Pike,  lunge,    bass and pickerel, in South River,
Ruth and McQuaby Lakes, South Bay and Lake Nipissing, one
to ten miles from station.
Outfitter:      Robert   Byers,   P.O.   address,    Powassan,    Ont.,
proprietor, Sunset Cove Camps, located on Lake Nipissing,
will supply guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Guides: D. Gallagher, Powassan; J. H. Quigley, Nipissing, Ont.;
John Floyd, Nipissing, Ont.; Chester Knapp, Nipissing,
Ont.
Hotels:   New Windsor, Temperance House.
South Maganatawan  183 mis. north of Toronto.
Black bass, pickerel and pike in south
branch of the Maganatawan River, on which station is situated;
and in Harris Lake, about seven miles from station.
Guides: May be arranged through hotel proprietor.
Hotels: Weemac Inn, McArthur Bros., proprietors. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
South River   188 mis. north of Toronto.
Speckled trout,  lake trout, pike and pickerel,
in Eagle and Braie Lakes, and South River, one to six miles
from station.
Outfitter: Mr. Horton Merrick, P.O. address South River,
R.R. No. 1, proprietor Sunny Bay Camp located on Eagle
Lake, will arrange for guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Guides: E. Malloy, S. R. Mitchell, Thos. Wattie, Wm. Campbell.
Hotel: New Queens.
Sundridge  182 mis. north of Toronto.
Speckled trout, pike, bass and pickerel, in Bernard,
Eagle, Flemming, Clear, Craig Lakes and Maganatawan River,
one-half to ten miles from station.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides.
Hotels: Bernard, Duncan Inn.
Trout Mills   7 mis. from North Bay by motor.
Speckled and salmon trout,  lunge,   bass,   pike
and pickerel in Trout Lake and tributary waters.
Outfitter: E. L. Hughes, owner of Camp Champlain and camps
will supply guides, boats, camp equipment, etc., for extended fishing or canoe trips.
Hotel: Camp Champlain.
Washagama   282 mis. north Toronto, via North Bay.
Speckled and lake trout,  bass,  lunge, pickerel
and pike, in Lakes Washagama, Muskanonge, Donald, Green,
Kokogaming, Corafel and tributary waters.
Outfitter:  C. G. Shoop.
Hotel:  Shoop's Hunting and Fishing Lodge.
SUDBURY AND WEST TO PORT ARTHUR
INCLUDING PART OF NIPIGON FOREST RESERVE
Bowlands Bay   286 mis. north-west of Toronto, via Capreol.
(Skead P.O.)    Speckled trout, lake trout, bass, pike and pickerel, in Wahnapitae Lake and tributaries, and Massey Bay.
Outfitter: Alphonse Rioux, P.O. Skead, Ont., owner of Lakeland
Lodge and Camps. A very reliable outfitter, having motor
boats, row boats, canoes; will supply guides, equipment,
provisions, etc., for extended fishing or canoe trips throughout this section.
Hotels:  Lakeland Lodge and Camps. 56 Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Dorion   823 mis. north-west of Toronto; 52 mis. east of Port
Arthur.
Lake trout, pike and pickerel in Coldwater Creek and Lake
Superior, about one-half mile from station.
Guides: J. Jackson, S. Nut tie.
Hotels: See Port Arthur.
Elsas   459 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled trout, pike, bass and pickerel in Trout River
and Kapuskasing Lake, one-quarter mile from station.
Guides: Jack Wright, Joe Duchene, R. S. Hall.
Hotels: Elsas, Bedard.
Foleyet 424 mis. northwest of Toronto.
Speckled and lake trout, pickerel and pike in Ivanhoe
Lake and River, Moose Lake and River and tributary waters.
Outfitter: F. M. Linekan, P.O. address Box 108, Foleyet, Ont.,
has a number of camps located throughout this section, and
will arrange for guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Hotels: Central, Foleyet.
Hornepayne    572 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled  trout,   pike   and  pickerel  in  Shekak
or  Morrison   and  Nagagami  Rivers,  Nagagami Lake,   and
tributary waters,  one to twelve miles from station.
Outfitter:    The  Cockburn Mercantile  Limited,  reliable  outfitters.  Mr. Cockburn supplies guides, canoes, camp equipment,  etc.,  for extended fishing trips  throughout  this
section.
Hotel: Crawley & McCracken.
Jellico   723 mis. north-west of Toronto; 148 mis. east of Port
Arthur.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel in Beatty and
Partridge Lakes and Sturgeon River, three miles from station.
Guides: J. McKenzie, J. Hill.
Hotel: Crawley & McCracken.
Longlac   673 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled trout in Kenogamisis River,   lake  trout,
pike  and pickerel  in  Longlac  and  Kenogamisis  Lake,   and
Pagwachuan River.
Outfitters: F. E. Mathe; Hudsons Bay Co.
There is no hotel in town,  but boarding house accommodation may be secured. Ontario:    Bowlands Bay and Lakeland Lodge;
Wahnapitae   Lake Ontario:    Upper—Friday's Camp; Ka-Kena Camp
scenes,   Timagami Ontario: Shoop's Lodge and fishing parties, Washagama w&f
Ontario:     Upper two—trout fishing north of Nakina;
lower two—fishing the northern part of Algonquin Park 1
Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 57
Morrison River   560 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled trout, pickerel and pike in Rivers
Shekak, Nagagami and tributary waters.
Outfitters: Grant Howe, P.O., Hornepayne, Ont., E. K. Haynes,
proprietor of Shekak Lake Camp, P.O., address Hornepayne, Ont., supply guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Nipigon River and Lake See Orient Bay Station.
Oba    534 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel in Oba River, Watt
Lake, Kabinakagami Lake and River, Cameron Lake, one to
fifteen miles from station.
Outfitter:    C. E. Wilson  will  supply  guides,  canoes and all
necessaries incidental to fishing trips.
Guides: Jim Essery, Forest Brown, T. H. Crawford.
Orient Bay   764 mis. north-west of Toronto; 106 mis. east of
Port Arthur.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel, in Orient Bay,
Nipigon River and Lake, all within easy access of station.
Outfitters: Wm. McKirdy & Sons, reliable outfitters, have
been operating in this section for some years, and will supply
guides, canoes and all equipment for parties desiring to
fish the Nipigon River.
Hotel: "Nipigon Lodge," owned and operated by the Canadian National Railways, open from June 15th to September
15th. Mr. Neil McDougall, Sportsmen's Representative
of the Canadian National Railways, is in attendance at the
Lodge during the period which it is open, and will make
arrangements for outfitting, and will also suggest and
arrange for canoe trips.
Shekak River  See Hornepayne, Morrison River.
Sudbury   267 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled trout, pike, bass and pickerel in Wahnapitae
Lake and River, and the many lakes and rivers on the western
edge of the Timagami Forest Reserve.
Outfitters:  Sudbury Boat & Canoe Co., Fowler Hardware Co.;
Cochrane Hardware Co.; A. Rioux, Massey Bay, Ont.
Hotels:   Nickel  Range,   Balmoral,  King Edward,  American,
Queens. 58 Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
LAKE OF THE WOODS
RAINY RIVER AND SHEBANDOWAN LAKE DISTRICTS
Nature has endowed Canada with a lordly domain, but
nowhere does it call human-kind to its courts more insistently
than in the Lake of the Woods country. Here, close to the
border of Minnesota and conveniently short for any traveller
in Canada is a varied abundance of forest and waterway, where
one may fish and hunt, paddle ar loiter, to his heart's abiding
content. It is one of the most wonderful of muskie countries,
and hundreds of naturally well stocked streams and small
lakes have hardly been fished as yet for bass and lake trout.
The Government of Ontario years ago set aside Quetico Park
as a permanent reserve of three thousand square miles. It
lies at about the centre of the Rainy River District and is best
reached from Kawene Station on the Canadian National
Railways. The whole area has 3,960 square miles of water
surface, and drains over 26,000 square miles of well forested
country. Rainy Lake and Lake of the Woods, joined together
by the lovely Rainy River, are the main bodies of water, but
in any direction, a few miles through the bush roads or trails
are multitudes of other lakes, some of them scarcely more than
sampled by occasional angling parties and nearly all have
plentiful fishing.
Atikokan   143 mis. west of Port Arthur; 272 mis. from Duluth.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike and pickerel in Atikokan River, Steep Rock Lake and Clearwater Lake, reached
two miles from station.
Outfitters:  Watson & Lloyd, Fort Frances, Ont.
Guides: Thos. L. Rawn, A. Smith.
Hotel:   Pioneer.
Barwick    257 mis. west of Port Arthur, 200 mis. north-west of
Duluth.
Lunge,   lake trout, pickerel and pike in lakes Off, Clearwater, Burnt, Rainy River and tributary waters.
Outfitter:    Geo. W. Hughes has camp  accommodation and will
make all arrangements for guides,  canoes,  camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: Roseberry.
Devlin   242 mis. west of Port Arthur; 195 mis. from Duluth.
Lake trout, pike and pickerel,  in North-west Bay,
ten miles from station.
Guides: Wm. Smith, Angus McLennan.
Outfitters: Watson & Lloyd, Fort Frances, Ont.
Hotel:   Ontario. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 59
Flanders   164 mis. west of Port Arthur; 250 mis. from Duluth,
Lake trout, pike and pickerel in Pine, Joe and Quetico
Lakes, two miles, and upward, from station.
Outfitters: Mr. R. S. Campbell has a complete outfit of cabins,
boats, camp equipment, etc., and competent guides are
supplied. Broeffle Bros., proprietors of Calm Lake Ranch,
have their headquarters on Calm Lake, which is
reached by road four miles north of Flanders Station.
They specialize in fishing and canoe trips throughout the'
Quetico Park and Rainy Lake section, making all arrangements for guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Hotel:   Calm Lake Ranch.
Fort Frances    230 mis. west of Port Arthur; 183 mis. from
Duluth.
Lunge,    bass,  lake trout,  pike and pickerel,  in Rainy,
Footprint, Clearwater and Trout Lakes; reached two miles,
and upward, from station.
Outfitters: Watson & Lloyd will arrange for guides, canoes?
camp equipment and necessary provisions for parties
making extended fishing or canoeing trips throughout the
Rainy River and Quetico Park Districts.
Hotels: Fort Frances, Monarch, Emperor, Palace, Prince
Albert.
Kashabowie   80 mis.  west  of  Port   Arthur; 333 mis.    from
Duluth.
Lake trout, pike and pickerel in Trout, Greenwater and
Kashabowie Lakes, one to four miles from station.
Guides: Write A. Mollinshead.
Kawene 120 mis. west of Port Arthur; 293 mis. from Duluth.
Lake trout, bass, pike and pickerel in Eva, Crystal and
Mink Lakes, one and one-half to five miles from station.
Guide: Roy Jones, P.O. address Kawene, Ont. (winter address
1225 Foster Avenue, Chicago, 111).
Outfitter: John Manning (winter address, Port Arthur), proprietor of "Inn Seclusion," will make all arrangements
for guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc. "Inn Seclusion"
is located on Eva Lake, and is reached two miles by
road from Kawene Station. 60 Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Mine Centre  189 mis.  west of Port Arthur; 224 mis.  from
Duluth.
Lake trout, pike and pickerel, in Bad Vermillion, Shoal,
Wild Potato and Little Turtle Lakes and Little Turtle River,
one to fifteen miles from station.
Guides: Jas. Fair, A. Johnston, K. Carlson, L. Hamel.
Outfitters:  Watson & Lloyd, Fort Frances, Ont.
Hotel:   Vermilion.
Port Arthur   870 mis. north-west of Toronto; 413 mis. from
Duluth.
Principal outfitting centre for all points east, north and
west ot Port Arthur; Lake of the Woods, Rainy River, etc.
Outfitters: Marks, Clavet, Dobie Co., Ltd. supply camp equipment, provisions, etc.; information given in regard to the
various guides and camps.
Hotels: "Prince Arthur," operated by the Canadian National
Railways. Mariaggi, Canadian Northern, Cumberland,
New Ontario, Vendome, Western.
Quetico 105 mis. west of Port Arthur, 308 mis. from Duluth.
Lunge,  bass,  lake trout, pickerel and pike in the
numerous   lakes   and  streams  throughout  the  northeastern
section of Quetico Provincial Park.
Outfitter: Mr. F. E. Lawrence, proprietor of Camp Quetico,
P.O., address Huronian, Ont., will arrange for guides,
canoes, camp equipment, everything necessary for extended fishing trips throughout this section. Camp Quetico
is located on Windigo Lake a short distance from Quetico
Station.
Rainy River   278 mis.  west of  Port Arthur;  237 mis.  from
Duluth.
Lake trout, pike,   lunge, bass and pickerel, in Lake of the
Woods territory.
Outfitters: E. D. Calvert, Rainy River; Green Brothers,
Morson P.O. Kendall Hanson, Rainy River, proprietor
of Brooks Lake Camp, reliable outfitters, has log cabins,
launches, boats, canoes and all camp equipment, and
will supply guides and arrange to take care of parties
for fishing or canoe trips in the Rainy River Country.
Guides:  C. Bowman, M. Neilson, G. St. John, G. Schram, all
'   of Stratton, Ont.
Hotels: Canadian Northern, Northern.
L Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 61
Shabaqua    52 mis. west of Port Arthur; 361 mis. from Duluth.
Lake trout, pike and pickerel, in Mattawin River,
Shebandowan River and Lake, one to six miles from station.
Guides: Bill Hunter, J. Stark, Sam Young.
TIMAGAMI
Four million acres, bearing the name "Timagami," have
been set apart by the Government of Ontario as a recreational
resort for all time and for all people. A glorious wilderness
massed about a lake of virgin beauty. One hundred miles from
north to south and ninety miles from east to west, this splendid
provincial park is a silver patchwork of clear water and dense
pine woods. Lake Timagami itself is bewitching in its beauty
and although the lake's width is never more than two miles,
it will take 3,000 miles of paddling to circumnavigate the indented shores. As a fishing region, Timagami is not surpassed
on the American continent. Few areas have attained such
sensational speckled trout fishing as between North Bay and
Timagami. The small mouthed hass is well distributed everywhere, averaging from ten to twenty inches in length and scale
from two to four pounds. The Great Lake trout, commonly
caught at fifteen pounds and often as high as thirty, is also
abundant. A welcome feature of the Timagami Lake district
is the high class provision for camps and guides. The full range
of accommodation, from hotel luxury at the village of Timagami
to a modest canvas shelter in .a pine grove on Bear Island, is
open to choice.
Timagami   300 mis. north of Toronto in the Timagami Forest
Reserve, an area of 5,900 square miles.
Speckled trout, lake trout, bass, pike and pickerel throughout the hundreds of lakes and streams in the Timagami Reserve.
Camps and fishing lodges, where guides, canoes, and other
equipment may be obtained are:—
Ronnoco Hotel owned by Timagami Fur Co., Timagami, Ont.
Camp Acouchiching owned by Timagami Fur Co., Timagami,
Ont.
Keewadyn Camps owned by Hon. A. S. Cregg Clark, Washington, Conn.   (Summer Address), Timagami, Ont.
Camp Wabi-Kon owned by Miss L. A. Orr (before June 8th),
250 Wright Ave., Toronto; (after June 8th), Timagami P.O.
Camp Eucaroma owned by Robert D. Morgan, 529 Guardian
Bldg.,  Cleveland,  Ohio;  (Summer Address),  Timagami,
Ont. 62 Fishing  in  Canada—Ontario
Friday's Resort owned by W. Friday, Timagami, Ont.
Menewassa owned by W. H. Guppy, Timagami, Ont.
The Hudson's Bay Co., Bear Island, Timagami P.O., will
also arrange for guides, supply outfits, canoes, etc., for those
wishing to make independent fishing or canoeing trips throughout the Timagami region.
Ka-Kena Camps located on Garden Island, owned by Mr. H.
Smith, Bear Island, P.O.
Timagami General Store, Mr. H. T. Lloyd, Timagami, P.O.,
proprietor.
Each of the above named camps issue descriptive booklets
or pamphlets on their respective places, copies of which will be
gladly supplied upon request.
THE  NEW NORTH
COCHRANE AND WEST
As one travels northward, the appearance of the country
changes. The rolling pastoral land of Southern Ontario gives
place to the great mineralized and forested zone and then with
the last traces of the white pine tree we enter the great sweep
of the Claybelt" where the topography is often as level as the
western prairie and the black spruce in dense masses dominates.
This "New North" lies along the Canadian National Railways
between the Abitibi River and the Manitoba boundary. Between Cochrane and Mattice, to the west, six starting points
on six waterways, all running north to Moose Factory on James
Bay, are open to choice. In every case experienced guides and
the best of local equipment should be engaged for the journey
is not only long, but too exciting for the newcomer to attempt
by himself. It is a great country for pike and pickerel of unusual
size.  Sturgeon are caught in the Mattagami.
Westward from Mattice is Hearst, where good guides may
be had and splendid pike and pickerel fishing enjoyed. The
Nagogami River is well known for its speckled trout, as is the
SavofT section further west. Trout abound in all the scores of
streams flowing northward and run two to three pounds on an
average with special catches of five and six pounds frequently
recorded. The Kenogami River, in this respect, merits special
mention.
Nakina is the point of entry to the Drowning River and a
day's canoe trip will deliver rewards in two and three pound
trout.   The Twin Lakes, with sixteen miles of lovely water, Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 63
broken with wooded islands, give great fishing for pike and
pickerel and trout. The station of Cavel also opens the way to
many trout waters. By choosing the right season—usually
July, August and early September—fishing in the Kowkash
River and Johnson and Trout Creeks is well worth while.
Flowing into Lake Nipigon, ten miles to the south, is the
Ombabika River, which crosses the railway at the station of
the same name, leads to numerous lakes with virgin stocks of
pike and pickerel and speckled trout. This provides a canoe
trip full of happy surprises and under right weather conditions
no one could ask better angling.
Lake Nipigon, one of the best known bodies of water in
Canada, and a great rendezvous for sportsmen, is the outlet
of a score of rivers and streams flowing in from the north and
it is in such waters that the best of the fishing for speckled trout
can be had. Pike and pickerel are found in most of the waters,
and lake or grey trout are abundant in other lakes quite easily
reached.
Sioux Lookout leads to a network of lakes and rivers in
which the sportsman may take his choice of pike, pickerel,
trout and, in some sections, maskinonge. The latter appear
to be the only fish in the Vermilion Lakes, the record to date
being one of 55 pounds.
At Minaki, long a favorite resort, and provided with
excellent accommodation, an hour's paddle will bring the
tourist to excellent grey or lake trout fishing or to maskinonge
grounds where forty pounders have frequently been taken.
COCHRANE TO MANITOBA BOUNDARY
INCLUDING   MATTAGAMI   AND   ALBANY  RIVER   BASINS,
NORTHERN SECTION OF NIPIGON FOREST RESERVE,
NORTHERN SECTION LAKE OF THE WOODS
Allan water   336 mis. east of Winnipeg; 870 mis. north-west of
Toronto.
Lake trout, pike and pickerel in Barrington, Kawaweo-
gama, and Flint Lakes and Flint River, and Seseganaga Lake,
reached one to six miles from station.
Outfitters:   O. J. Gastmier, Ed. Troke, of Allanwater and F. V-
Williams, Ogaki, via Allenwater P.O.
Hotels: The above outfitters have camp accommodation. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Armstrong    392 mis. east of Winnipeg; 814 mis. north-west of
Toronto.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike and pickerel in the hundreds
of clear water lakes in this vicinity, reached one-half mile and
up from the station.
Outfitters:  W. S. Bruce, F. V. Williams.
W. S. Bruce operates a permanent camp on the shores of
Mud River, near Willet, 23 miles east of Armstrong, and also
on the Whitesands River, about twelve miles east of Armstrong. Has motor boats, canoes, and all camp equipment and
will arrange for extended fishing trips north or south of the
railway line.
F. V. Williams operates a permanent camp on the shores of
Onamakawah Lake, reached from Ogaki station, 29 miles west
of Armstrong. The only place in the vicinity that offers accommodation for ladies. Extended fishing and canoe trips may be
arranged through Mr. Williams.
Cochrane  482 mis. north of Toronto.
This is the principal outfitting centre for points east,
west and north of Cochrane.
Outfitters:   Regal Store; Geo. Taylor Hardware Co.; Hewson
and Gauthier.
Hotels: King George, Stevens, Queens.
Collins  370 mis.  east of Winnipeg; 836 mis.  north-west  of
Toronto.
Lake   trout,   pike,   pickerel  in  Trout,   Gnome,   Tamarac,
Smoothrock and Caribou Lakes, all within eight mile radius of
station.
Guide:   O. J. Gastmier.
Hotel:   O. J. Gastmier has camp accommodation.
Hearst   611 mis. north-west of Toronto, via Cochrane.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel, in Nagogami,
Savoff, White and Skunk Rivers, Leonard and Wolverine Lakes,
three to thirty-five miles from station.
Guides: Wm. Johnston, Savoff, Hearst P.O.; Jas. Robb, Kabina,
Hearst P.O.; Sam McCann, Nagogami, Hearst P.O.
Hotels: Windsor, Waverly. m
Ontario:    Muskie and lake trout;    Kenneally's Lodge,
Sioux    Lookout;     lower—Jackpine   Lodge,    Ogaki I
Ontario:     Green Bros.' Camps; Muskie and bass fishing
at Calvert's and Green Bros.'  Camps, Rainy River Fishing in Canada—Ontario 65
Kowkash  726 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel in Kowkash River,
Johnston and Trout Creeks, close to station and the following
lakes within radius of twenty-five miles:—O'Sullivan,Eske-
genaga, Kawashkagama and Fleming Lakes.
Guides: R. L. Vanderbeck, Nakina, Ont., operates permanent camps throughout this section, will supply canoes,
tents, equipment, provisions, for extended fishing or canoeing trips throughout the maze of waterways north and south
of the line.
Hotels: R. L. Vanderbeck has camp accommodation.
Malachi  99 mis. east of Winnipeg; 1107 mis. north-west of
Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, lunge,   bass and pickerel in Malachi,
Otter, Pelican, Simpson, and White Lakes, one to fifteen miles
from station.
Outfitters:   J. B. Simpson; H. Hoist of Minaki, Ont.
Hotels: See Minaki.
Mattice   592 mis. north-west of Toronto, via Cochrane.
Pike and pickerel in Missinaibi River, at station.
Guides: R. L.Vanderbeck, Nakina P.O.; Hudson's Bay Co.
Hotel: See Hearst, Ont.
This is the starting point, via Missinaibi River, to Moose
Factory on James Bay. R. L.Vanderbeck or Hudson's Bay Co.
will supply guides, canoes, equipment, etc., necessary for such
a trip.
Mcintosh    168 mis. east of Winnipeg; 1036 mis.   northest  of
Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, lunge and pickerel, in Canyon Lake and
River, Forest and Edward Lakes, about one mile from station.
Outfitters:   Swain & Waddell operate a trading post at this
point and are prepared to take care of sportsmen visiting
this section, supplying guides, canoes and equipment.
Hotels:  See Minaki.
Minaki 114 mis. east of Winnipeg; 1901 mis. north-west of
Toronto.
Lake   trout, pike, pickerel, lunge and bass in Lakes Gun,
Pistol, Sand and Winnipeg River, and throughout the many
lakes and rivers comprising the "Lake of the Woods," in which
Minaki is situated.
Outfitter:  L. Hoist,
Hotels:   "Minaki   Inn" (open June 27th to Sept. 1st), owned
and operated by the Canadian National Railways,  Hoist
Point Inn. 66 Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Nakina 702 mis. north-west of Toronto.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel, in Twin
Lakes,   Drowning,   Wababimiga,   Devilfish,   Kenogami    and
Kenogamisis Rivers, one to twenty miles from station.
Outfitter: R. L. Vanderbeck, Nakina, Ont., a reliable outfitter,
operates in excellent speckled trout territory; his main
camp is located just west of Nakina, with outlying camps
on waterways north of this point. Mr. Vanderbeck supplies
guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc., for extended trips
throughout this section.
"Caribou Lodge," operated by Wilson & Hughes, P.O. address
Nakina, Ont. l'Caribou Lodge" is located close to Jobrin
Station, 27 miles east of Nakina, in numerous lakes and
streams throughout this section, there is excellent speckled and lake trout, pickerel and pike fishing. Wilson &
Hughes operate a number of camps supplying guides,
motor boats, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
John Sadlo, Bawk, Ont., P.O. address Nakina, Ont.,
operates a camp in what is known as the Devilfish Lake
section—the waters of which offer good speckled trout
fishing. Mr. Sadlo supplies guides, canoes, camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: Nakina.
Ogaki  363 mis.   east  of  Winnipeg;  843  mis.  north-west  of
Toronto.
Lake trout, pickerel and pike in Onamakawash, Trout,
Cache, Black Bear and Gnome Lakes, one to five miles from
station.
Outfitter: F. V. Williams, Armstrong P.O., operates "Jackpine
Lodge," on the shores of Onamakawash Lake, a short distance from Ogaki Station. Will accommodate fishing
parties at his own lodge, or make arrangements for guides,
canoes, etc., for extended canoe and fishing trips.
Ombabika  447 mis. east of Winnipeg; 759 mis. north-west of
Toronto.
Speckled trout, lake trout, pike, lunge and pickerel, in
Ombabika River, Pidgeon, Cross, Summit, Upper and Lower
Meta and Marshall Lakes, one to twenty miles from station.
Outfitter: Wm. McKirdy & Sons, P.O. address Nipigon, Ont.
(after June 1st, Tashota, Ont.), reliable outfitters, operate
an outfitting store at this point, supplying guides, canoes,
camp equipment, etc., for extended fishing or canoe trips.
Ombabika is the starting point for the Hudson's Bay Co.'s
canoe route to Fort Hope on the Albany River.
Herman Sells, P.O. Tashota, operates an outfitting post
at this point.
I Fishing in  Canada—Ontario 67
Pagwa   690 mis. north-west of Toronto, via Cochrane.
Pike and pickerel, in Pagwachuan River.
Outfitters: R. Gauthier, Hudsons Bay Co., Revillon Freres.
Canoe trips may be made from Pagwa Station to Fort Albany on James Bay, without a portage, via the Pagwachuan, Kenogami and Albany Rivers, this being one of the
regularly travelled routes of the Hudson's Bay Co.
Quibell   177 mis. east of Winnipeg; 1028 mis. northwest of
Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, lunge and pickerel, in Lakes Blue, Indian, Boulder, Twilight, Mystery, Evening, Cliff and Clay, one
to ten miles from station.
Outfitters: Richardson & Downes, proprietors of Mystery Lake
Hunting and Fishing Lodge; Swain & Waddell, Mcintosh,^
Ont.
Savoflf 674 mis. north-west of Toronto, via Cochrane.
Speckled trout, pike and pickerel in Savoff River, at
station, and in Flint, Dog, Bad, White and Skunk Rivers, one
to twenty miles from station.
Guides: Wm. Johnston, Pagwa River P.O., takes care of
parties at his camps, and will arrange for fishing trips
throughout this section.
Sioux Lookout  253 mis. east of Winnipeg; 954 mis. north-west
of Toronto.
Lake trout, pike, lunge and pickerel in Pelican, Abram,
Little and Big Vermilion and Minnitaki Lakes, one-quarter to
ten miles from station.
Outfitter: J. D. Kenneally, proprietor of "Kenneally Lodge"
and Camps, will supply guides, motor boats, canoes, camp
equipment, etc. This is one of the finest muskie and lake
trout sections in northwestern Ontario. Mr. Kenneally
also outfits parties for extended canoe trips throughout
this section.
Hudson's Bay Co. operate a general store at this point.
Hotels: Lakeview, Y.M.C.A., Moberley. Fishing in  Canada—Ontario
Smith  276 mis.   east  of  Winnipeg;  930  mis.  north-west  of
Toronto.
Lake trout, pike and pickerel in Dog Lake and River,
Stranger, Stanzhikimi, Francis and Long Lal^es, within radius
of ten miles.
Outfitters: Wm. H. Dodds & Sons will supply guides, canoes,
and all necessary equipment for fishing or canoe trips.
Have home camp one-quarter mile from Smith Station
with accommodation for twelve people, and six outside
camps on the waterways back in from the line.
Hotels: Accommodation at Dodd's Camps.
Willet 451 mis.  east  of Winnipeg;  791 miles north-west of
Toronto.
Speckled and lake trout, pike and pickerel, in Pikicigushi
or Mud River, Lake Nipigon, White Sands River and Kenna
Creek, within radius of twelve miles.
Outfitter:   W. S. Bruce, Armstrong P.O., reliable  outfitter,
operates camps on Mud and White Sands Rivers.   Will ,
supply guides, canoes and all necessary equipment.
Hotel: W. S. Bruce has camp accommodation.
MANITOBA, SASKATCHEWAN AND ALBERTA
These are the so-called "prairie" provinces, a description
which is apt to obscure the fact that more than half their area
is rolling and wooded country. Manitoba, for example, is more
than two-thirds tree covered, while a third or more of Saskatchewan and Alberta carry a fairly heavy tree growth. What is
missed on the open plains, in the way of fishing and hunting, is
more than made up by the provision of the northern sections or,
in the case of Alberta, the western and northern areas which
blend picturesquely into the Rocky Mountains. Manitoba and
Saskatchewan are well provided with pike, pickerel and goldeye
in scores of lakes and rivers. North of Prince Albert in Saskatchewan is plenty of good lake trout fishing and a commencement has been made in stocking with bass. This applies as
well to the waters north of Edmonton. Alberta offers first
rate sport in the mountain section as regards mountain trout,
also Dolly Varden, cutthroat, and rainbow. FISHING REGULATIONS
Open Season   North Saskatchewan,   Red Deer  Rivers  and
tributaries—May 1st to August 31st.
North between the International boundary and Bow River
and tributaries June 15th to October 15th.
Athabasca,   McLeod,   Pembina   Rivers   and   tributaries—
June 1st to October 31st.
Non-resident angling license $5.00
Brazeau 270 mis. south-west of Edmonton.
Rainbow and bull trout in Pinto Lake, Blackstone and
Big Horn Rivers, one to fifty miles from station.
Outfitters: Watson & Ennis, Bighorn Trading Co., Geo.H.Kidd,
proprietor, will arrange for guides and equipment.
There are no hotels in town but fair boarding house accommodation may be obtained.
Cold Lake reached by motor some eighty miles from St. Paul
Station, St. Paul is 127 miles northeast of Edmonton
by railway. Cold Lake is noted for its lake trout fishing.
Guides: L. F. Shaw, H. Nieuhouse.
Hotel: Felix Auto Camp.
Colinton 86 mis. north of Edmonton.
Trout, pike and pickerel, in Muskeg River, Pine
River, Baptiste Lake and Island Lake, one to twelve miles from
station.
Outfitter:  A. Galbreath, camps, guides, etc.
Hotels: Grand Union Hotel at Athabasca, eight miles north of
Colinton.
Edson    128 mis. west of Edmonton.
Rainbow, Dolly Varden and Grayling trout in Edson
River, Trout Creek, McLeod River, Muskey River, Obed and
Bear Lakes and Moose Creek,  Sundance Creek,  Embarres
Creek, one to thirty miles from station.
Outfitter: Donald Phillips, Jasper, Alta., has camp accommodation at Obed Lake; he will make arrangements for
guides, boats, etc.
Guides: F. M. Sawyer, B. Cooper, A. S. Maxwell, Donald
McDonald, W. R. Hare.
Hotel: Edson. 70 Fishing  in  Canada—Alberta
Entrance   194 mis. west of Edmonton.
Rainbow and Dolly Varden, in Athabasca and McLeod Rivers, Prairie Creek, Fish Creek and Lake, six to fifty
miles from station.
Outfitters:   Thos. Monaghan, S. H. Clark, I. J. Wilson supply
guides, pack and saddle horses, camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: There is one small hotel in town.
Jasper   239 mis. west of Edmonton, in Jasper National Park.
Dolly Varden and mountain trout in Pyramid and
Jacques Lakes and Buffalo Prairie Creek, four to thirty miles
from station.
Outfitters:  Major Fred Brewster, Donald Phillips (See Edson),
Otto Brothers, Jack Brewster,  Harris & Mellor,  Alex.
Wylie, Bert Wilkins.
The above outfitters will arrange to supply guides and
equipment for fishing trips throughout Jasper National Park,
the largest national park in America, consisting of 4,400 square
miles.
Hotel: Jasper Park Lodge, operated by the Canadian National
Railways (open May 15th to Sept. 30th).
(See "Jasper Park Lodge" booklet issued by Canadian
National Railways).
Lovett 195 mis. south-west of Edmonton.
Rainbow, Dolly Varden and mountain trout in Pembina,
Cardinal, Brazeau Rivers and tributary waters.
Outfitter:   Mr. E. Lund will make all arrangements for guides,
pack and saddle horses, camp equipment, etc.
Hotel: Mr. Lund has camp accommodation.
Mountain Park   210 mis. west of Edmonton.
Rainbow and bull trout in Brazeau, and Mary
Gregg Lakes, Brazeau River and MacKenzie Creek, five to
twenty miles from station.
Outfitters:   H. M. Mustard & Sons, H. King.
The above outfitters will arrange for guides, equipment
and all other necessaries for extended fishing trips in this
locality.
Hotel: Cheviot. British Columbia
OO magnanimous has Nature been in her endowment of
British Columbia, so bold in her designing of cliff and canyon,
so rich in adornment, that it follows quite logically that the
living endowment of stream and field should be without parallel
in the Dominion of Canada. No better index to the resources
of fish and game need be given than the commercial fact that
forty million salmon bred in British Columbia waters are taken
annually for food purposes. Rich in rivers—the Columbia, Fraser, Thompson, Kootenay, Skeena—all known to fame, British
Columbia takes equal pride in her great fresh water lakes, as the
Stuart Babine, Quesnel, Francois, and Lakelse, and possesses a
coast line of over 7,000 miles. It is in very fact a province fresh
from the hand of Nature, quite untamed and untameable, ready
to share all its sources of happiness with the true outdoorsman.
While fishing off the coast has attained great fame and is
incomparable in excitement and in sporting rewards, too much
attention cannot be given to the trout fishing on the upper
tributaries of the Fraser and Thompson and in the lovely lakes
and bubbling streams that abound in the Columbia watershed.
Identification of Pacific Coast trout often puzzles even the most
expert angler, although their game qualities are never open to
question. The steel-head trout of the Province is close to the
European salmon in habit, form and color, but it is a mistake
to class it as a Pacific salmon. They run from four to twenty
pounds in weight. Two species of the charr that give vivacious
sport and the very choicest of food are the Dolly Varden or
bull trout, found abundantly in most streams and lakes on the
mainland, also in tidewater, and ranging in weight up to thirty
pounds, the bigger fellows falling to the spoon and defying the
fly.
As to times and conditions of fishing, the smaller coast
rivers and streams give the best sport during a few weeks of
the spring and again in the fall after the first heavy rains, but
the expert angler need not at any time in between lack for a
goodly creel. As to the interior lakes and rivers^ it is well to
gauge your season by the spring and early summer freshets.
Just before or just after high water is considered the best
season. During the period of high water, however, as soon as.
warm weather brings out the flies in early spring, is the cue for
fly fishing in the larger lakes. 72 Fishing in  Canada—British  Columbia
Visitors may possibly associate the idea of inaccessibility
with a province of such vast extent and limited interior development. Actual experience, however, furnishes a welcome surprise. Along the coast line and up the streams, good Indian
guides, with canoes, are always available, while in the interior
of Vancouver Island and on the lakes and rivers of the mainland,
no trouble will be encountered in obtaining boats on most of the
worth while waters. Fine hotel accommodation is never far
removed, and the art of the outfitter has been practised sufficiently long as to cover every tourist necessity.
One of the most romantically beautiful districts in the
Province to which thousands of men and women have been taken
in recent years on the famous "Triangle Tour" is the great
playground of Jasper Park. There is little fishing immediately
about Jasper Park Lodge, the woodland hostelry of the Canadian National Railways, but westward north of Vanderhoof,
on the Canadian National, Douglas Lodge and camps on
Stewart Lake have given access to 200 miles of waterways,
which have already spread their fishing repute to many parts of
the continent.
Salmon fishing, as a sporting proposition, needs no adver-^
tisement. Trolling with rod and spoon in the salt water reaches
from Victoria to the northern end of Vancouver Island, scores
of anglers, sometimes in groups representing famous fishing
clubs of half a dozen countries, have little trouble in obtaining
specimens of thirty, forty and even sixty pounds weight. The
neighborhood of Victoria, or Vancouver, Cowichan Bay or the
mouth of Campbell River, being so readily accessible, are dotted
with salmon anglers almost any day between July and November, and at some of the estuaries, fishing proceeds unabated
practically the whole year round. On the Mainland, Harrison
Lake, easily reached from Vancouver, is a favorite ground for
salmon fishing with the fly during the month of October.
FISHING REGULATIONS
Closed Season No one shall fish for, catch or kill trout of
any kind, including steelhead and char of two
pounds in weight undressed, or under, from the 15th of November in each year to the 25th of March following, both days
inclusive, except in the waters east of the 120th meridian, where
no one shall fish for, catch or kill trout of any kind from the
15th of November in each year to the 30th of April following, \f
UJt
Alberta: Edmonton and west  to   Jasper;   lower-
Paul Lake, near Kamloops, B.C. British  Columbia: Stuart Lake;    Douglas Lodge and
Camps, Vanderhoof ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M
British Columbia:    Fishing at Gray and Adler's Camps,
Vinsulla;    A. Bryan Williams, of Vancouver, with
catch of salmon Forest
Fire
Patrol
>:f
m
&Sifc
M
Forest Ranger's Lookout
Losses from forest fires are enormous. Directly or
indirectly, everyone bears part of this loss, and
should therefore not only be careful with fire himself, but make others so. See that your camp
fire is DEAD OUT. Be careful where you throw
your cigar and cigarette stubs for they are one of
the forests' worst enemies. Fishing in Canada—British Columbia 73
both days inclusive, provided that these closed seasons shall
not apply to Seton and Anderson Lakes, and waters tributary
thereto, nor to Dolly Varden trout or steelhead caught in the
tidal waters by rod and line, or in Okanagan, Kamloops, Shus-
wap, Arrow and Kootenay Lakes, or in streams tributary
thereto, nor to landlocked salmon weighing five pounds undressed or over, provided that in the non-tidal waters of Vancouver Island no one shall fish for, catch or kill steelhead from
the 20th of March to the 30th of November in each year, both
days inclusive.
Size Limit   No trout of any kind, under eight inches in length
shall be taken from waters of British Columbia,
and if taken shall be immediately returned, alive and uninjured.
Limit of Catch No one shall take in one day, by angling,
more than twenty-five cut-throat, rainbow,
Dolly Varden trout, salmon trout, or of the different species
named than will in the aggregate amount to more than twenty-
five fish.
License Fee   Non-resident license fee $10.00
Ashcroft   327 mis. west of Jasper, Alberta.
Rainbow, Dolly Varden, mountain trout and salmon
in Lakes Isaac, Indianpoint, Bowron, Spectacle, Sandy, Long,
Caribou, Quesnel, Horsefly, and the numerous tributary waters
of the Fraser and Thompson Rivers.
Outfitters: E. S. Knight, Limited, are in a position to
supply everything required by the fisherman. Parties are
met on arrival at Ashcroft and local accommodation arranged for, if necessary. Knights operate Cariboo Lodge on
Quesnel Lake, reached by motor car from Ashcroft, via the
old Cariboo Road, built in the early '60s to serve the Gold
Rush to Northern British Columbia. Here are an adequate
supply of boats, some with outboard motors, canoes, pack
and saddle horses. Fishing trips may be arranged to nearby lakes and streams returning to the lodge nightly.
F. L. Peters, Interior Transportation Co., Ashcroft
Board of Trade, will gladly furnish information on this
section.
Thompson Bros., Barkerville, B.C., operate camps
throughout this section supplying guides, boats, pack and
saddle horses, camp equipment, etc. Barkerville is reached
by motor via Quesnel Station. Fishing in  Canada—British  Columbia
Trail's End Lodge and Camps, A. H. Gaugh, Manager, P.O.
address, Likely, B.C., main camp situated on Quesnel Lake
with outlying camps on good fishing waters—they supply
guides, motor boats, camp equipment, etc. Likely is
reached by motor from Ashcroft Station.
Malcolm F. Duff, P.O. address Williams Lake, B.C.,
proprietor of lodge and camps on Horse Fly Lake. This is
excellent fishing territory. Mr. Duff supplies guides, boats
and everything necessary for an extended fishing trip.
This point is reached by motor from Ashcroft via Williams
Lake.
Bay Ranch Lodge, T. O. Hooker, Manager, P.O.  address
Horse Fly, Caribou, B.C., located at the mouth of Horse
Fly River, reached by motor from Ashcroft, via Williams
Lake.
Hotels: Central, Ashcroft, Caribou.
Burns Lake   202 mis. west of Jasper, Alta., on northern line.
Mountain and rainbow trout in Teschinkut and
Francois Lakes and tributary waters.
Hotels: Omineca, Lakeview.
Clearwater   201 mis. west of Jasper on Southern line.
Dolly Varden and mountain trout in Clearwater
and Blue  Lakes,  Upper  Clearwater River  and
Bridge Creek.
Guides: Tom Sundt, George Glover, Raft River P.O.
Hotel: The above guides have camp accommodation.
Endako   367 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Mountain and rainbow trout in Fraser and Francois
Lakes and Stellaco River, one to five miles from station.
Guides:   J. Bellack, A. G. Arman.   The proprietors of hotels
will arrange for guides, boats, camp equipment, etc.
Hotels: Endako, Kenwood Resort, Glen Annan.
Hazelton   542 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Rainbow and Dolly Varden trout and  salmon   in
Sealy, Silver Standard, Robinson and Lost Dutchman   Lakes
and Skeena, Kispiox, and Bulkley Rivers, one to ten miles from
station.
Outfitters: Geo. M. Beirnes" is fully equipped to handle parties
going into this section, supplying all necessaries. Will also
arrange for excellent canoe trips into the country north,
of the line, supplying competent guides.
Guide': Albert Mercier, New Hazelton.
Hotels: Omineca, Northern. Fishing in Canada—British Columbia 75
Hope    444 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Steelhead, mountain, Dolly Varden and Rainbow
trout in Coquilla Lake and River, Silver Lake and Creek, one-
half to two miles from station.
Outfitters: F. Bears, W. Bears, reliable outfitters, will supply
guides, canoes and all necessaries for extended fishing
trips. Arrangements for guides, outfits, etc., may also be
made through the Board of Trade.
Hotels:   Commercial, Northern.
Hutton   193 mis. from Jasper, Alta.
Rainbow and Dolly Varden trout in Aleza and Tone qua
Lakes and Tone qua Creek.
Guides:  O. Hansen, Aleza Lake, B.C.; W. Sykes; Penny, B.C.
Outfits and equipment, if desired, may be secured through
the Northern Hardware Co.
Very interesting canoe trip of one month or six weeks can^
be taken, Hutton to Griscombe, via Fraser River, Parsnip,
Willow, Pack, Bear, Findlay and Nation Rivers to Peace River,
thence to Peace River Landing and rail to Edmonton.
Hotels:  See Prince George.
Kamloops   275 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Rainbow, Steelhead and Dolly Varden trout in
Lakes Paul, Panatan, Knouff and Fish, ten to thirty-five miles
from station.
Outfitters: J. Arthur Scott, proprietor of "Echo Lodge," on
Paul Lake, Mr. Botta, Panatan Lake, and Mr. Phillips,
Knouff Lake will arrange to supply guides, canoes and all
other necessary equipment for fishing trips throughout
this vicinity.
Hotels: Leland, Dominion, Grand Pacific.
McBride   106 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Mountain and Dolly Varden trout in Beaver and
Shuswap Rivers, six to twenty miles from station.
Outfitters:  Goodell & Sons, Otto Johnson, Jack Renshaw.
The above outfitters can supply pack horses, canoes, tents
and all other outfit necessary.
Hotel:  Fraser. 76 Fishing in Canada—British Columbia
Prince George   252 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Dolly Varden, Mountain and Steelhead trout
in Lakes Six Mile, West, Bednesti and Summit, and Crooked
River, fifteen to forty miles from station.
Outfitters: Cowart & Woolsey will supply guides and all
equipment. Further details obtainable from Board of
Trade.
Guide: J. McGaghran.
Hotels: Prince George, Royal, Connaught.*
Prince Rupert 719 mis. west of Jasper, Alta., on the Pacific
Coast.
Rainbow, Cut-throat, Dolly Varden trout, Spring salmon,
Cohoes and Steelheads, in Johnston Lake, Khatida Lake, Wark
Channel and Muddy Creek, forty to sixty miles from Prince
Rupert. Excellent deep sea fishing for black and red cod, spring
salmon and sea bass in Prince Rupert Harbour.
Outfitters: A. Swanson, A. Gammon, Capt. R. L. Newcombe.
The above reliable outfitters will supply motor boats,
guides, camp equipment and provisions for persons desiring to
make fishing trips to points along the coast, north and south of
Prince Rupert. Arrangements may also be made through these
outfitters, or the Board of Trade, for trips to the inland fishing
waters.
Hotels: Prince Rupert, Central.
Smithers  492 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Mountain and Dolly Varden trout and salmon, in
Lakes Wilson, Barrel, McDonald, Dennis and Loon and Bulkley
and Copper Rivers, one to seven miles from station.
Guide: Ben Nelson.
Hotels: Bulkley, Smithers.
Terrace   626 mis. west of Jasper and 95 mis. east of Prince
Rupert on the northern line.
Rainbow, Dolly  Varden,   lake and   Mountain  trout   in
Skeena River, Lakelse and Kalum Lakes and tributary waters.
Guides: Proprietors of hotels will arrange for guides, boats,
camp equipment, etc.
Hotels: Terrace, Tourist, Coffs Hotel, the last named situated
on Kalum Lake. Fishing in  Canada—British  Columbia 77
Usk   612 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Mountain and Dolly Varden trout and salmon, in Skeena
River and Gold Creek, one to four miles from station.
Outfitter: Jas. Wells will arrange to supply guides, and all
necessary equipment for fishing parties.
Guides: J. P. McDonnell, Jas. Gall, R. Lowrie.
Hotels:  Durham, Shackelton.
Vancouver Central outfitting point for coastal and interior
localities   for   Mountain,   Cut-throat,  Steelhead,
Dolly Varden, Cohoes, Spring salmon and Sea trout.
Outfitters: Any of the following will make arrangements to
supply guides, camp equipment, motor boats, if necessary:
British  Columbia  Big  Game  Club,   C.  M.  Houghton,
Sec.-Treas., Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C.
A. Bryan Williams, 1170 Georgia St., Vancouver, B.C.
A. H. Peppar, 2204 Cornwall St., Vancouver, B.C.
F. Mansell, 437 5th St. E., North Vancouver, B.C.
British Columbia Coast Cruising, 1011 Metropolitan Bldg.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Hotels: Hotel Vancouver, Grosvenor, Abbotsford, Alcazar,
Austin, Canada, Angelus, Europe and numerous other
smaller hotels.
Vanderhoof 322 mis. west of Jasper, Alta.
Rainbow, Mountain, and Dolly Varden trout in
Lakes Stuart, Pinchi, Babine, Tezzeron, Whitefish, Tarnzell,
Trembleur, Rivers Tachi, Kuzkwa and Tributary waters.
Stuart Lake is reached forty miles from Vanderhoof, by auto.
Outfitters: Douglas Lodge and Camps have established
a number of permanent camps on the shores of Stuart
Lake. Will arrange to meet parties at Vanderhoof and
drive them into the Lake; will supply guides, canoes, camp
equipment, saddle and pack horses, tents, etc., for parties
desiring to make extended fishing or canoeing trips into
this territory.
Douglas Lodge—Address Hotel Grosvenor, Vancouver,
B.C., up to May 15th, from May 15th to October 30th,
Douglas Lodge, Stuart Lake, Vanderhoof, B.C.
Hotels: Douglas Lodge, Nechako. 78 Fishing in  Canada—British  Columbia
Vinsulla    268 mis. west of Jasper on southern line.
Dolly Varden and Mountain trout in Bonaparte,
Bare, Eating Lakes and the numerous tributary waters.
Outfitters: Gray & Adler, P.O. address Vinsulla, B.C., have
their main camp located at 22 Mile House, three miles from
Vinsulla Station. They supply guides, boats, camp equipment, pack and saddle horses. This is a splendid territory
for trail trips.
Hotels:  Gray & Adler Camps.
VANCOUVER ISLAND
Trout Practically speaking, all the streams and lakes of Vancouver Island contain trout of some kind or other,
chiefly rainbow, or cut-throat. Large fish are caught in the
lakes by trolling, but there is no trout water in British Columbia
where the fish will not take a fly. Larger fish are caught on the
fly as a general rule in the streams than in the lakes. In the heat
of midsummer, when the rivers are low, and fly-fishing is hardly
practicable, except in the early morning and late evening, excellent sport is given by sea-trout in the estuaries. These sea-
run fish average heavy, two-pounders being common, three-
pounders by no means rare, and four and even six-pounders
occasionally caught. As a general rule, they take a fly well
even in the salt water.
Salmon Of the several varieties of Pacific salmon there are
two with which the sportsman is principally concerned—the cohoes and the "Spring" salmon. Of these, the
"Spring" salmon are the finest table fish and attain the greater
weight, although average weight depends a good deal on
locality, as is the case in other salmon countries. The "Spring"
salmon is known by several aliases, notably, kind, tyee and
Chinook. The best known and handiest reached places on
Vancouver Island, for the biggest tyee salmon, are Campbell
River and Comox on the east coast, and Alberni and Nootka
Sound on the west coast. Spring salmon are caught in these
waters practically all the year round.
There is a run of cohoes in May and June, but these early
fish, although very game, are not of great size. The big run of
cohoes does not arrive, as a rule, until the latter part of September, and the sport they give is superior for their size to that
yielded by the springs, as they play more on the surface. The
fall cohoe is about nine pounds in weight, on the average. Fishing in  Canada—British Columbia 79
That British Columbia salmon will not take a fly is a fallacy
which was long since disproved. Both spring salmon and
cohoes are caught every season by anglers who know how and
where to use a salmon fly, and give splendid sport in suitable
waters.
The expert with a spinning bait will be able, to kill many
large fish in the rivers.
Most of the fishing for salmon here is in the form of trolling
in the sea with a spoon, by which means the veriest tyro is able
to kill many fine salmon.
Steelheads Steelheads are properly classed as trout, although
the open season for steelhead-fishing, in non-tidal
waters, is exactly the reverse of that for other species of trout,
the steelhead running from the sea in the winter months.
Open season, November to March.
They attain to a large weight, and give very fine sport on a
good-sized salmon fly, expertly fished.
Steelheads have been compared, for sport-giving qualities,
to the Scottish salmon—no small compliment.
Bass Freshwater black bass are not native to Vancouver
Island, but have been introduced, with success, into
several lakes. Handy to Victoria are Langford Lake and
Florence Lake, both of which have yielded excellent black bass
fishing in recent years.
Dolly Varden Scientifically speaking, the Dolly Varden is not a
true trout, but is typically a charr (as is the
Eastern brook trout) in structure and habits. They are a very
handsome fish, attain a large weight, and give very fine sport
on spinning tackle or a salmon fly, being found chiefly at the
outlets of the large inland lakes.
The following lakes, rivers, streams and tidal waters are,
perhaps, among the best on Vancouver Island and also in the
whole province of British Columbia. They are all easily
accessible by rail, good motor roads or stage from Victoria, and
Victoria is reached within two or three hours from any of the
following mainland ports, Anacortes, Bellingham, Port Angeles,
Seattle, Vancouver. Large commodious steamers and automobile ferries ply from these ports to Victoria, so that fishermen can come across to Victoria, Vancouver Island, with or
without their cars, with no trouble and at a minimum expense. 80 Fishing in  Canada—British  Columbia
For Salmon Trolling:—Oak Bay (Victoria), near Discovery
Island and up to south-east end of James Island.
Saanich Inlet (Brentwood to Deep Bay), Cowichan Bay, Sooke
Harbour, Cowichan Lake, Gulf Islands, Qualicum Beach,
Comox, Campbell River, Alberni Canal.
For Trout Cowichan River, Cowichan Lake and tributary
streams, Shawinigan Lake, Koksilah River, Che-
mainus River, Englishman River, Cameron Lake, Sproat Lake,
Great Central Lake and tributary rivers, Ash River, Stamp
River, Somass River, Courtenay River, Oyster River, Campbell River, Campbell Lake.
For Steelheads and Sea-trout     Cowichan River, Nanaimo River,   Chemainus   River,   Sooke
River.
For Bass Langford Lake.
CALENDAR
For Fishing on Vancouver Island
Jan. For the Fisherman: Grilse, in salt water, with a good
chance for a Spring Salmon. Steelhead in non-tidal
waters.
Feb.     Grilse, Spring Salmon and Steelheads.
Mar. Grilse and Spring Salmon, Trout, Steelheads. Trout
fishing opens and Steelhead-fishing closes March 26th.
April    Trout, Grilse, Spring Salmon.
May     Trout, Grilse, small run of Cohoe Salmon.
June Trout, Black Bass, Grilse, Cohoe Salmon (best month
for Sea Trout).
July     Trout, Black Bass.
Aug.    Trout, Spring Salmon, Black Bass.
Sept.    Trout, Spring,Salmon, Cohoe Salmon, Black Bass.
Oct.     Trout, Spring Salmon, Cohoe Salmon,
Nov. Trout until Nov. 15th, Cohoes. November 15th, Trout-
fishing closes and Steelhead-fishing opens, Nov. 15th.
Note.—Grilse are young Salmon, usually running from 2 to 5
lbs. in weight.
Non-resident fishing license fee $5.00
Good from March 25th to November 15th Fishing in Canada—British Columbia 81
Daily License $1.00
Licenses issued by Provincial Police, Court House, Victoria, B.C.
The Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau at Victoria will
gladly advise sportsmen as to the best localities for fishing.
The Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau at Victoria,
has available, at all times, reliable information in regard to the
waters which are offering the best of fishing during the various
periods of the season, and will gladly make recommendations
to sportsmen as to the locality they should visit, and with whom
arrangements should be made.
Hotels: There are numerous hotels in Victoria, the principal
ones being:—Empress, St. James, Strathcona, Westholme,
Balmoral, Brunswick, Dominion, Fairfield, James Bay.
CANADIAN GOVERNMENT CUSTOMS
REGULATIONS
The articles which may be brought into Canada (in addition to wearing apparel), on which no duty is levied as tourists,
outfits, comprise guns, fishing rods, canoes, tents, camp equipment, cooking utensils, musical instruments, kodaks, etc.
A deposit of duty on the appraised value of the articles
imported must be made with the nearest Collector on arrival
in Canada, which deposit will be returned in full, provided the
articles are exported from Canada within six months.
The United States Government regulations provide for
an import duty of one cent a pound on game fish from Canada. CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
PUBLICATIONS
Copies of the following publications may be obtained from Agents of the
Canadian National Railways:—
Algonquin Park, Ontario
Bigwin Inn, Lake of Bays,
Highlands of Ontario
Camp Craft & Woodlore
Canada—Atlantic to Pacific
Canada—Pacific to Atlantic
Continental Limited
Fishing in Canada
Hunting in Canada
Hotels 8s Boarding Houses,
Camps and Golf Clubs
Hotels of Distinction
International Limited
International Route—Eastward
to the Sea
Jasper Park Lodge, Canadian
Rockies
Kawartha Lakes
Lake of Bays, Highlands of
Ontario
Lakes of Northern Minnesota
6b Quetico Park
Minaki Inn, Winnipeg River
Mount Robson
Muskoka Lakes
Niagara, St. Catharines & Toronto
New Brunswick
Nipigon Lodge
Nova Scotia
Ontario Resorts
Pacific to Atlantic, through the Canadian Rockies, Jasper National Park
Prairie Province Summer Resorts
Prince Edward Island
Quebec Resorts
Romance of the Rockies
Seashore Holidays—Maine Coast Resorts
To the Pacific Coast, through the
Canadian Rockies-Jasper National
Park
Triangle Tour Map
Tourist Map of Canada
What to do at Jasper RADIO
T*
HE CANADIAN NATIONAL
RAILWAYS have established and maintain in operation a complete Radio system
which is one of the factors in the service
offered to the travelling public. The Radio
Department operates a chain of nine broadcasting stations stretching from Moncton, in
the east, to Calgary, in the west, and from
these stations broadcasts news bulletins,
market reports, educational addresses and
concert programmes.
ALL of the Company's trains on the transcontinental route are equipped with radio
receiving sets in charge of competent operators, so that passengers are kept informed
of important events and have the opportunity
of enjoying a great variety of entertainment.
The hotels operated by the Company have
radio receiving sets so as to obtain for guests
the greatest possible range of the programmes
broadcast daily from numerous stations in the
United States and Canada.
The Canadian National Railways were the
first transportation company in the world to
establish radio as a definite part of the
system.
TO THE PUBLIC
Officers and Employees of these Railways aim to serve you efficiently.
If you will kindly transmit to any of
our Officers as listed on next page, your
comment or suggestion upon any feature
you feel may be improved, you will
greatly help us  to attain our object. CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
OFFICERS   OF  THE  TRAFFIC   DEPARTMENT
J. E. Dalrymple, Vice-President, Montreal, Que.
G. T. Bell, Executive Assistant to Vice-President, Montreal, Que.
H. H. Melanson General Passenger Traffic Manager, Montreal, Que.
C. w. Johnston Passenger Traffic Manager, Montreal, Que.
R. Creel man Passenger Traffic Manager, Winnipeg, Man.
A. T. Weldon Traffic Manager, Moncton, N.B.
C. K. Howard General Tourist Agent, Montreal, Que.
H. C. Martin General Freight Traffic Manager, Montreal, Que.
Frank J. Watson Freight Traffic Manager, Montreal, Que.
R. L. Burnap Freight Traffic Manager, Chicago, 231., U.S.
W. G. Manders Freight Traffic Manager, Winnipeg, Man.
L. MacDonald Asst. Freight Traffic Manager, Toronto, Ont.
N. W. Hawkes New England Traffic Manager, Boston, Mass., U.S.
D. O. Wood Traffic Manager, Foreign Freight Dept., Montreal, Que.
H. C. Bourlier. ..
E. C. Elliott	
F. W. Robertson.
A. B. Chown	
Osborno Scott. ..
G. A. McNicholl.
.. General Passenger Agent, Toronto, Ont.
.. General Passenger Agent, Montreal, Que.
.. General Passenger Agent, Moncton, N.B.
. .General Passenger Agent, Chicago, 111., U.S.
.. General Passenger Agent, Winnipeg, Man.
. .General Passenger Agent, Vancouver, B.C.
PASSENGER  AGENCIES
Boston, Mass W.J. Gilxerson, 201 Province Building, 333 Washingt(
Belleville, Ont H. C. Thompson, 243 Front St.
Brantford, Ont J. T. O'NBAIL, 153 Colborne St.
Brockville, Ont. 10 Courthouse Ave.
Buffalo, N.Y H. M. Morgan, 11 South Division Street.
Calgary. Alta J. H. Norton, 218 Eighth Avenue West.
Charlottetown, P.E.I. P. W. Clarkin, C.N.Rys. Station.
Chicago, Ml C. G. Orttenbtjrger, 108 West Adams Street.
Cincinnati, Ohio       .. W. K. Evans, 406 Traction Bids.. 432 Walnut St.
Cleveland, Ohio       .. .H. G. Pextlaxd, Union Trust Bldg., 925 Euclid Ave.
Detroit, Mich J. H. Burgis, 1259 Griswold Street.
Duluth, Minn C. A. Skog, 430 West Superior Street.
Edmonton, Alta J. S. Peck, Cor. Jasper and 100th Street.
Grand Rapids, Mich. .C. A. Justin, 151 Ottawa Avenue.
Guelph, Ont G. E. Walker, 11 and 13 Wyndham Street.
Halifax, N.S J. J. Leydon, 107 Hollis Street.
Hamilton, Ont Jas. Anderson, 7 James Street North.
Kansas City, Mo L.E.Ayek,334-335 Railway Exchange Bldg.,706 Grand
Kingston, Ont J. P. Hanley, Cor. Johnston and Ontario Streets.
London, Ont R. E. Ruse, 406 Richmond St., cor. Dundas Street.
Los Angeles, Cal H. R. Bullen, 503 South Spring Street.
Minneapolis, Minn G. A. North, 518 Second Avenue South.
Montreal, Que M. O. Dafoe, 230 St. James Street.
New York, N.Y. C. E. Jennet, 1270 Broadway, Cor. 33rd Street.
North Bay, Ont C. W. Murphy, 81 Main Street.
Ottawa, Ont P. M. Buttlek. Cor. Sparks and Metcalfe Streets.
Peterboro, Ont J. B. Doran, 324 George Street.
Philadelphia, Pa G. L. BRYSON.Franklin Trust Bldg.,1500-1506 Chestnu
Pittsburgh, Pa W. J. BURR, 505 Park Building, 355 Fifth Ave.
Portland, Me G. A. Harrison, G. T. Railway Station.
Portland, Ore A. B. Holtorp, 122 Third St., Cor. Washington St.
Prince Rupert, B.C—R. F. McNaughton, 528 Third Avenue.
Quebec. Que S. J. NESTOR, 10 St. Anne St., cor. Dufort Street.
Regina, Sask S. M. Grebne, 1874 Scarth Street.
San Francisco, Cal W. F. Barrt, 689 Market Street.
Saskatoon, Sask A. F. Lenox, 103 Second Avenue South.
Seattle, Wash. J. F. McGuihe, 902 Second Avenue.
Sherbrooke, Que A. M. Stevens, 23 Wellington St. North.
St. Catharines, Ont.. .C. J. Harris, 106 St. Paul Street.
St. John, N.B L. C. Lynds, 49 King Street.
St. John's, Nfid R. H. Webster, Board of Trade Bldg., 155 Water St.
St. Louis, Mo W. H. Burke, 305 Merchants Laclede Bldg., 408 Oih
St. Paul, Minn A. H. Davis, 328 Jackson Street.
Sudbury, Ont A. G. Bell 26 Elm Street.
Toronto, Ont W. Grundy, Northwest Cor. King and Yonge Sts.
Vancouver, B.C W. G. Connolly, 527 Granville Street.
Victoria, B.C C. F. Kahle, 911 Government Street.
Windsor, Ont B. A. ROSE, 24 Sandwich St. East.
Winnipeg, Man T. E. P. Pringle, Cor. Main St. and Portage Avenue
Woodstock, Ont N. A. B. Smith, 502 Dundas Street. CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
OFFICERS OF THE TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
EUROPE
Wm. Phillips, European Manager.
P. A. Clews, European Traffic Manager,
17-19 Cockspur St., London, S.W.I, Eng.
Antwerp, Belgium Wm.  Taylor,  Special Agent,  c/o  Agence Maritime
DeKeyser, Thornton, S.A., 2 Quai Ortelius.
Belfast, Ireland J. W. Rigby, Passenger Agent, 74 High St.
Stephens & Walkington, Freight Agents, 8 Victoria
Street.
Cardiff, Wales F. J. Arrowsmith, District Traffic Agent, 82 Queen St.
Genoa, Italy E. G. Laing, Special Agent, Piazza Nunziata, 39.
Glasgow, Scotland J. M. Walker, District Traffic Agent, 75 Union St.
Hamburg, Germany Adolf Blum & Popper, 17 Monckebergstrasse.
Havre, France Hernu Peron & Co., 53 Quai George V.
Liverpool, Eng H. V. Caldwell, District Passenger Agent, 19 James St.
E. L. Roper, District Freight Agent, 19 James Street.
London, S.W.I, Eng F. A. Young, General Passenger Agent.
17-19 Cockspur St. G. E. Cowie, General Freight Agent, United Kingdom
Traffic.
J. P. McClelland, District Passenger Agent.
London, E.C., Eng J. Deed, City Agent, 44 Leadenhall St.
Manchester, Eng R. J. McEwen, District Traffic Agent,40 Brazennose St.
Newcastle-on-Tyne, Eng. ..Messrs. H. Burt & Co., Passenger Agents, 7 Royal
Arcade, Pilgrim Street.
Paris, France Canadian National Railways (France) No. 1 Rue Scribe
Hernu Peron & Co. (Freight Dept.), 95Rue des Marais.
Hernu Peron & Co. (Passenger Dept.), 61 Boulevard
Haussmann.
Southampton, Eng F. E. Birch, District Traffic Agent, 134 High St.
AUSTRALASIA
Geo. E. Bunting, General Traffic Agent,
309 George Street, Sydney, Australia.
Auckland, New Zealand. ..F. G. Wood, Agent, 5 & 6 Ferry Bldg.
Brisbane, Australia C. Hopkins, 318 Elizabeth St.
Christchurch, N.Z..
Melbourne, Australia. .
Sydney, Australia	
Wellington, N.Z	
.H. L. Penny, 103 Hereford St.
.A. J. Simpson, 60 Market St.
.G.  F.  Johnston,  General  Agent,  Passenger  Dept.,
309 George St.
.T. R. Boyes, Dominion Farmers' Institute.
ASIA
A. Brostedt, General Traffic Agent,
Asiatic Bldg., Queen's Road Central, Hong Kong, China.
Hong Kong, China G.   M.   Hensworth,   Traffic   Agent,   Asiatic   Bldg.,
Queen's Road Central.
Shanghai, China D. E. Ross, Traffic Agent, 10 and 11 Glen Line Bldg.
CANADIAN NATIONAL HOTELS
HOTELS OF DISTINCTION
The Chateau Laurier Ottawa, Ont.
The Fort Garry. Winnipeg, Man.
The Macdonald Edmonton, Alta.
are open all the year, and are operated on the European plan.
The Prince Arthur Port Arthur, Ont.
The Prince Edward Brandon, Man.
are also open all the year and, together with the tourist hotels which are open during
the summer season, are operated on the American plan.
Highland Inn Algonquin Park, Ont.
Nominigan Camp Algonquin Park, Ont.
Camp Minnesing Algonquin Park, Ont.
Minaki Inn Minaki, Ont.
Nipigon Lodge Orient Bay, Ont.
Grand Beach Hotel Grand Beach, Man.
Jasper  Park  Lodge Jasper,  Alta. CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
EXPRESS DEPARTMENT
Forwarders  of Merchandise,  Money  and  Valuables to all parts of the World.
Waggon   Collection   and   Delivery   Service   at
Principal Points.
Money   Orders,   Travellers'   Cheques,   Foreign
Cheques,    and    Foreign    Postal    Remittances
issued, payable everywhere.
Money Transferred  by  Telegraph  and  Cable.
Permit us to serve you.
GENERAL OFFICES,          W. C. MUIR,
Montreal, Que.                           General Manager.
CANADIAN NATIONAL TELEGRAPHS
WITH ITS DIRECT
EXCLUSIVE CONNECTIONS
Comprises   the   largest   Telegraph   and   Cable
System in the World
REACHING
75,000 POINTS IN
CANADA,   UNITED   STATES   AND
MEXICO
Every CANADIAN NATIONAL Sleeping and
Parlor Car is a TELEGRAPH OFFICE.   Just
hand your message to the porter and it will be
despatched   from   the   next   station   en   route.
W. G. BARBER, Gen. Manager,   -   Toronto, Ont.
CANADA WELCOMES TOURISTS
PASSPORTS NOT  REQUIRED 1
MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM '.-■ • -■£«
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