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  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
UPCOM
MS
ENT
Jun 7/8
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Jun 30
OPERATORS
KRANIUM
REVEREND HORTON HEAT
TOGETHER PANGEA
VUNDABAR
BLUE OCTOBER
THE MESSTHETICS
MEMBERS OF FUGAZI
GRANVILLE ST. FLEA
BOB LOG III
CUCO
(ALL AGES)
COMETHAZINE
THE MARIAS
BBOYS
BODGEA AND DUMB
MIYA FOLIK
PIXX
ALISON SUDOL
THE DRUMS
EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE!
FORTUNE
VENUE
VENUE
FOX CABARET
FOX CABARET
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IMPERIAL
FOX CABARET
NCE TICKETS AND MUCH MORE
 TABLE Of COnTETlTS
JUNE 2019     ^^^^^^^^^^^m
COVER: PHOTO OF RYLEY DESJARLAIS BY R.   HESTER.
JFeature*
04  - DIVORCER
The Sweet Sound of a Debt Free Fantasy
06   -  WHESS HARMAN
Decolonizing Punk
08  -  C.R.U.W.
Youth Leaders in Land Based Healing Practices
10  -  MIND MIRROR
A Stop Motion Odyssey
GD&ttor*'* iptote
Thank you to everyone for the warm welcome to this position. My journey as a
Freddie Mercury impersonator is never ending but now I have a new journey:
Anna Wintour of east van. Abuse of power comes as no surprise? Pray for
my soul. And if you have no idea who I am that's great, you give me the blank slate I
desperately crave. It's been both a privilege and a struggle to begin this position just
as the flames of modern society give rise to new tragedies, poignant revelations and
the sharing of quotes with strangers at the bus stop in a TED talk cadence (just me?).
To give credit where it's due, the content in this issue was arranged by my predecessor
Mallory Amirault, all of which I'm beyond pleased to share because I hold everyone
being featured in high regard.
For those grieving the recent great loss of Aileen Bryant in the community; I'm
feeling it too and my heart is with you. She was a visionary musician and performer.
There's so much more but it's difficult to encapsulate at this time.
With love,
Chandra
tfje Hegula r*+ otfjer tfrnts*
11  - Art Project
By Meredith Hama-Brown
14  -  June  2019  Calendar
16  - Under Review
Music  + a little  extra
18 - Real Live Action
Just music this
time around
20 - Filmstripped
Illusions of Control
21 - CiTR Program Schedule
22 -  CiTR Program Guide
23 - April  2019  Charts
ADVERTISE: Ad space for
upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca
Rates available upon request.
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email advertising@citr.ca.
We are always looking for
new friends.
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happening, please email
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Editor-in-Chief at
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You may also direct
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and corrections via email.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // Station Manager: Ana Rose Carrico // Advertising
Coordinator: Alex Henderson // Discorder Student Executive: Fatemeh Ghayedi // Outgoing Editor-
in-Chief: Mallory Amirault Incoming Editor-in-Chief: Chandra Melting Tallow // Under Review Editor:
Cae Rosch // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Web Editor: Zoe Power //Art Director:
Ricky Castanedo Laredo // Social Media Coordinators: Alex De Boer, Dora Dubber // Administration
Coordinator: Halla Bertrand//Charts: Jasper Yip// Production Assistants: Savilla Fu, James Spetifore,
Christina Damson Song // Writers: Sarah Amormino, Katherine Gear Chambers, Zainab Fatima, Hana
Golightly, Tasha Hefford, Almas Khan, Silvana Martinez, Aaron Schmidtke, Frances Shroff, Angela
Villavicencio, Tom Whalen, Jasper Wrinch, Tatiana Yakovleva// Photographers & Illustrators: Evan
Brien, Fiona Dunnett, Corayma Gaytan, Alistair Henning, R.Hester, Kalena Mackiewicz, Sunny Nestler,
Seoyeon Park, Hayley Schmidt Proofreaders: Ana Rose Carrico, Ricky Castanedo Laredo, Katherine
Gear Chambers, Em Ludington, Chandra Melting Tallow
©Discorder 2019 - 2020 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, located on the lower level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the hehqemiriem speaking Musgueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9
FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at
(604) 822 1242, email CiTR at stationmanager©citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada
bea role model
friend advocate
burger expert
mentor
Our volunteer
mentors help
youth recognize
their many
strengths and
work towards
their goals.
To learn how you can become a mentor, visit:
unya.bc.ca/mentorship
HAW       Urban Native Youth
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | JUNE 2015
words by Tom UJhalen // illustrations by fiona Ounnett // photo by Corayma G
know Divorcer well; I played at their first show: May
26,2017 at the Alf Haus. That evening felt like a fresh
beginning for us all; I was starting to feel more grateful
for what was to come in local music.
4
I V   ith members hailing from stunning past projects
I I   such as Genderdog and Lunchlady, plus fantastic
^F^r    current projects like Tough Customer, Underpass,
Luvgoon and Fake Fruit; they comprise a promising
supergroup. A band with viola, guitar, synthesiser, drums and
bass was there to rock me, and I had never been so ready.
Marita, Divorcer's drummer recalls: "The takeaway from
that show is that I brought the Alf Haus a pack of toilet
paper and they were like 'That's the most thoughtful thing
anyone's ever done, you're a genius.'" Hannah, Divorcer's
guitar/viola player recalls,"I remember feeling 'This is the
first time that Vancouver people are gonna see me playing
music, I gotta bring it.' But it went so well!"
Divorcer originally began as a two-piece, with Katie on
bass and Beth playing synthesizer, They were later joined
by close friend and longtime collaborator Marita on drums.
Hannah, who alternates between viola and guitar, had moved
to town from New York in February 2017, and found herself
at Red Gate one evening for a show. "I felt like I was already
having a hard time making friends." she reminisces. Luckily
Hannah ended up meeting Katie that night.
Katie remembers: "At some point I was like, 'Wouldn't
it be cool if we had a violin?' [Hannah and I] had been
talking about jamming separately." On a whim, Katie asked
Hannah if she played violin and to her surprise, Hannah
revealed that she played viola in school. With the addition
of viola, the group finally felt like the songs had everything
they needed. "It was so good. We were just like, the songs
feel finished now. They feel right," Katie recollects.
Prior to leaving for their first tour in August 2017,
Divorcer produced an album of thirteen tracks
entitled Debt Jubilee at a spacious lodge that Beth's
parents happen to be caretakers for. Beth recalls: "We got
'Diuorcer'
to use the lodge to record over two days. We went so fast...I
swear we wrote twelve songs in three weeks. Every jam we
had, new songs would happen."" Katie also was surprised
at how quickly the group coalesced "I look back at it now
and I'm like, we did so much in three months."
Their songwriting process was highly collaborative as
Hannah explained "We would all bring stuff to the table
separately and then we would tie the loose ends together."
Marita continued "Some songs are three different people's
stories wrapped up in one and then others are a full idea."
Divorcer takes the title of their debut album from
the concept of a debt jubilee; a mass cancellation
of debt. Throughout the songs featured on Debt
Jubilee, a strong anti-capitalist and even anti-materialist
message is championed. While listening, I found there is
something about the phrases and lyrics which Divorcer uses
that feels like a cartoon mallet hitting a giant nail labeled
"THE POINT".
"Where do you buy that power? 11 can make myself
nothing I Must be nice to have the energy I No more snakes
at the punk rock show I Cause they're all on the internet
jacking each other off"
While the addition of viola rounded out the group's
sound, it came at a price. Hannah rented a viola on Beth's
account at Long & McQuade but the payments proved
difficult to make. Hannah recalls: "I remember feeling like
Long & McQuade was a wolf on our back." They even
showed up Beth's house one night. "You can't rent unless
you're Canadian," Katie remarked, "and Marita and I
have too much debt from Long & McQuade so Beth had
to do it." Beth remembers "He was putting threats in the
mailbox, it was crazy."
 gXOS  3HUt! 9nisD9DffI i9bioD2iQ
HUTAH
Divorcer succinctly achieves one of my favorite ideas
within music; that any concept of "punk" can be applied
regardless of genre. Their tireless work ethic and desire to
maintain their own identity is strong. Though the realm of
music journalism may falter with unfitting categories like
"post punk" or "angular rock", the group moves into more
spacious territory that leaves you hoping for more after the
album is over. Debt Jubilee lends itself to multiple listens in
order to appreciate their distinct approach to music. Instead
of a straightforward debut album, the group opts for a
dynamic display of their styles, jumping seamlessly between
off-kilter pop songs and heavy sleeper-hits.
Even though the group has been on a hiatus which
lasted from the end of their tour in August 2017 to
recently, the members of the group; two currently
residing in America and two in Vancouver, have kept the
band alive through steady communication and endless song
ideas. When it comes to songwriting, the group has always
made use of voice memos to share snippets of melodies or
lyrics.  "When we talk about songs, there's stuff we send
back and forth, but it's the same way when we're together
too, even in WhatsApp, if someone types something,
Hannah will be like 'That should be a song.' I was having
a really bad day and I'd typed "Life is a hellhole trap" and
Hannah was like 'Well, this is a song now.'" Beth described.
Katie continues "I came up with a bassline and a little vocal
melody, I sent it and instantly all three were sending back
the same melody but adding something to it."
"It's like my whole life, [is] just loose ends," comments
Marita. "Digital files strewn through five different chat
threads. So when it comes down to it there's so much
material. Pasting it all together again is a fun process, but
also kind of daunting." Those aforementioned loose ends
may promise more material from the group; Divorcer
recently reconvened to record, and play a show in Oakland
this spring. "We have something like ten songs that are
ready to go, so it's exciting to all get together and start
working," Katie says.
As we wait on more music from a group that has shown
much promise, I reflect upon Debt Jubilee with a sense
of anticipation and optimism. Perhaps this is the turning
point where rock and roll music goes to die, and perhaps
that is a good thing. Perhaps we shall ride again into the
sunset, newly divorced. Perhaps we shall divorce ourselves
from our expectations of punk, and embrace the new
sound of tomorrow.
The North American release of Debt Jubilee will
be available via No Sun Recordings in early July.
To pre-order, visit:
https://nosunrecordings.bandcamp.com/
-4*3b.
"Diuorcer'
A
 FEATURE
Discorder magazine | JUNE 201'
II
think a lot of people look at punk as this very
specific visual aesthetic," says mixed-race,
queer, trans/non-binary, multi-disciplinary
artist Whess Harman, "but I think it's more a
sentiment of commitment to resistance and that a sentiment like
that can come up in many different forms."
words
b y
jasper d.
wrinch
// illus
trations
by sunny
n es 11 e r
/       /
photos
b.    y
a Iista i r
henning
a
Harman, from the Carrier Wit'at Nation, and currently
living and working in Coast Salish territories in Vancouver,
effortlessly weaves punk aesthetics and ethos into their
experiences of Indigeneity and self-identity through their work. "The
bridge, in this case feels really natural to me," they say, "like, to me,
Buffy Sainte-Marie is the most punk ever. She's The Grandest Auntie."
One of their more recent works, Potlatch Punk — shown as part
of aceartinc's exhibition "Oneself, and one another" in Treaty 1,
Winnipeg last summer — showcases this juxtaposition explicitly.
Harman's piece consists of thrifted leather jackets carefully altered
through embroidery and beading — coyote teeth, horsehair and
beads, along with texts like "OUR BLOOD RUNS THE REDDER"
and "TELL ME ABOUT FIRST CONTACT" adorn the garments —
imbuing the very fabric of a typically punk signifier while subverting
colonial erasure. "Right now, being able to show who you are as an
Indigenous person and rolling up in your best beads, ready to say
'No' to an injustice is so powerful because it shows how much you
love your identity and your people."
The jackets, displayed hanging in the centre of a white-
walled exhibition space, aren't necessarily reserved for that
gallery format — "I definitely wear them sometimes!" says
Harman — but you won't see them being sold off any time soon. "I
really hate this sentiment that once people see that you can make
something, it's immediately assumed that you'd be chill with selling
it. I don't mind sharing the jackets by showing them, and I do collect
exhibition fees for doing so, but right now they need to live with
one another and I don't foresee that changing any time soon," says
Harman. But the question of ownership over the jackets extends to
the wearer as well — and Harman is careful with who they allow
to don them. "It matters a lot who wears them; I wouldn't feel
comfortable letting someone I didn't have a good relationship with
wear them, or someone who isn't Indigenous," says Harman. "It'd
kill me to think of them in some private collection, probably owned
by someone who isn't Indigenous and would never understand
the parts of myself and my family that I put into that work... The
dream is to one day have the people I think of most often when
I'm working on them dance [the jackets] into a space as a way of
honouring the things they represent to me and to give respect to
them as well."
While Harman's Indigeneity is integral to their artistic practice,
not all of their work is intended for Indigenous eyes. Harman's text
work, part of their grad project at Emily Carr University of Art +
Design, is usually for non-Indigenous folks, "but I think Indigenous
folks usually get a kick out of it," explains Harman. "The first
iteration of that text work came entirely out of pettiness," Harman
UUhess Harman'
admits. Visually dense and cumbersome to read, the short poem-like
texts take express effort to decipher, "and then the 'punchline' in
figuring out what it says isn't always cute."
Initially created during the events of Truth and Reconcilliation
Commission, "I was so fed up with explaining myself and being
held for all Indigenous politics, and being expected to spill everything out on command," says Harman. "While I was hearing the
full details of residential schooling for the first time from people
back home who made the trips down to Vancouver to tell it, I was
already expected to be an expert on it instead of expected to give
myself time to process those things and [how] knowing those things
affected how I understand the hardships in my community."
Coming from the Carrier Wit'at Nation located in Northern BC,
Harman expresses their gratitude in being able to live, work and
form community within unceded Coast Salish territories. "I'm an
uninvited guest on these territories, but at the same time, the people
I've met here have been so welcoming and empathetic," explains
Harman. "A lot of my work is shaped by that relationship of really
feeling invested in and cared for by the people and this land, but
also about missing my own home."
Part of that sense of belonging in Coast Salish territories is the
artist residency program at Skwachays Lodge, an Indigenous art
gallery and hotel, where Harman currently lives. "It's amazing
to have affordable housing in this city, not having to spend more
than half of your monthly income on rent," they say. "It gives you
time to work towards building up bodies of work or applying for
different opportunities and building better relationships in your
community, just because you're more available as a person." Even
with the benefits of the Skwachays Lodge, Harman has mixed
feelings towards it.
In addition to the neighbourhood in which it resides, on the
border between Chinatown and the DTES — " [It's] a hard place to
be in, especially if you carry your own trauma. I don't always feel
tough enough to be in it," — the many and sometimes conflicting
layers of authority at the Lodge can encumber the ability of the
artists within to work freely. "It takes a lot of negotiation to be
comfortable in the building," explains Harman. "You're dealing
with the Vancouver Native Housing Society, the hotel management
... building management, whose focus is split between us and the
subsidized housing across from us with way more residents, and the
gallery management; there's a lot of bureaucracy and meritocracy."
The idea of punk, for Harman, extends beyond aesthetics,
permeating throughout their practice in a multitude of ways,
not just within the cultural mashup of Potlatch Punk, or
their subversive textual response to the expectation of educating
 gXOS  3HUt! 9nisD9DffI i9bioD2iQ
HUTAH
non-Indigenous people. "Punk is also, to me, about sharing;
your time, your resources and your empathy and commitment to
resolving conflicts through moral reason and kindness," explains
Harman. "And those are types of governance and self-discipline that
potlatches also teach."
In April, Harman co-curated Together Apart, a three-day
symposium for 2QS/Indigiqueer folks put on by the grunt
gallery, where Harman currently works. "I'd been curating last
season's round of Spark Talks [grunt's monthly artist talk series] and
the basic intention of moving towards Together Apart," explains
Harman, "was to extend the same sentiments I had with the
Spark Talks: to make space for 2QS/Indigiqueer folk and to leave
a touchstone behind for whatever Indigiqueerdos end up at grunt
down the line." Made up of readings, roundtables, nature walks,
musical performances and artist talks — some open to the public
and some for 2QS/Indigiqueer participants only — among other
things, the symposium was a way for Harman to share their time,
resources and empathy with their community, to make space for
and give voice to the queer Indigenous population. "Together Apart
went really well in many aspects," they say. "I think, or I hope at
least, that the participants felt like things were going smoothly and
that they were able to share their work comfortably. Working as
an artist, I definitely know what it's like to feel as though you're
somehow in the way or just how awkward it feels when you're not
totally sure what's going on or if a space is ready for you."
In addition to co-curator Kali Spitzer, Harman had some help
and guidance in pulling the symposium together. "I looked a lot at a
previous event that happened in the early '90s called The Two-Spirit
Cabaret," says Harman. "Looking at that archive felt so validating
and real because I could see people like me awkwardly doing what
I'm also trying to do, and it felt like important evidence of care."
Care is essential in Harman's artistic practice. Not only in the
care and intention that goes into creating their own work, but in
the mutual care of those who surround Harman's life and work.
"Making good work is important, but having good relations with
the people who are interested in what you do is just as important
and will guide you to making better work. I think the clearest way
of figuring that out for me is if I make time for someone and they
reciprocate and appreciate that effort, I know I'm going to feel good
about the work we do together."
"UJhess Harman'
A
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | JUNE 201'
words by Katherine Gear Chambers
illustrations by Hayley Schmidt
photo by R. Hester
Culturally
Relevant
Urban
Wellness
LOCATED ON THE TRADITIONAL
AND UNCEDED TERRITORY OF THE
COAST SALISH PEOPLES, including the
territories of the xwmsGkwsysm (Musqueam),
Skwxwu7mesh (Squamish), Sto:l5 and Salilw3ta?/Selilwitulfi
(Tsleil- Waututh) Nation, Culturally Relevant Urban Wellness
(CRUW) addresses the experience of being an Indigenous
youth in an urban environment. Ryley, one of the program's
first participants and now the Assistant to the Program
Coordinator, explains that "in the city, it's really hard to
find a dedicated space to feel connected with your culture."
The city "doesn't feel culturally inviting. It doesn't feel
representative of myself." CRUW provides "that missed out
opportunity of culture." Two years into her role as youth
worker, Toucanni reflects, "the program allows me to be
connected to Indigenous culture in a way that I have never
been able to, even if I am a visitor to this land and to the
traditions that are being taught to me."
With a vision of using land-based Indigenous healing
practices to create an intentional and inviting space for
vulnerable youth, particularly those in foster care, CRUW
came to life in 2011 as a program led by the Vancouver
Aboriginal Child and Family Services Society (VACFSS). In
partnership with UBC Farms and the Pacific Community
Resources Society, CRUW combines the teachings of elders
with the tactile experience of developing a relationship with
a natural environment.
V
outh are the grounding core that draws the
community at CRUW together, providing the energy
of purpose. A place of learning and of sharing
knowledge, CRUW is not only based on youth
formation, but is shaped around the
importance of youth as leaders. "For
the people at CRUW to be inclusive
with how the program is run, that's
very powerful." Ryley highlights
the importance of creating a space
that "breaks down the stigma of
being a youth." CRUW is instead
a place that commits to uplifting
the voice of youth, "holding them
with respect and seeing them with
respect." Toucanni foresees that,
as CRUW continues, it will "give
youth a voice and a place to feel a sense of
belonging in a way that they haven't been
able to experience before."
Both Ryley and Toucanni's involvement
with CRUW has been shaped by the
transformative experience of being and
becoming a leader. The anxiety that
they each experienced when entering the
program has grown into the strength of
experienced youth mentors. Toucanni was
a participant for two years before going
through the Life Skills and Leadership
program that allowed her to become a
youth mentor, and then a youth worker.
Ryley has similarly transitioned from
participant to leader, and a role as Market
Coordinator has ushered him into the
new position of Assistant to the Program
Coordinator that he has now held for three months.
Leading, even mentoring, other youth allows Toucanni
and Ryley to both witness and contribute to the growth
of participants. "I love my youth so much," Ryley laughs,
"They're just so brilliant and to watch them grow over the
past couple of years into wonderful people, it makes me
feel so great to be a part of that." Ryley explains that "the
program is there to cultivate our growing as people, as
much as it is for the medicines and the plants growing."
The elders in the program are an integral part of
that growth. Reflecting on what working across
generations in CRUW has taught her, Toucanni notes
that the connection between youth and elders is grounded in
patience and in making room: "I learn that things need time
and space to grow and that they need encouragement and
nourishment. I learn that it is important to give myself time
to feel my emotions."
The elders are a source of wisdom and knowledge that
is both life-giving and life-changing. Ryley shares that in
the foster care system, "you feel like you're stripped of
your culture and everything that makes you an Indigenous
person." Ryley emphasizes the damage committed by
the misrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in media:
"Growing up as a youth in care, I never wanted to be
Indigenous. I never felt like that was who I was and who I
wanted to be seen as [...] I didn't feel like that represented
k
X.R.U.U).'
 eiOS  3HUt! 9nisD9DffI i9bioD2iQ
SflUTAH
me. But being on the farm, and being surrounded by
culturally relevant guiders, really showed me what it's like
to be a strong Indigenous person." Being with the elders -
being taught by them, shaped by them, and guided by them
- has given Ryley the opportunity to "have that knowledge
of what it means to be Indigenous and to hold that wisdom
for myself." "I learn that having a connection to culture
means many different things," Toucanni reflects, "and can
be shown in many different ways."
Through sharing their knowledge of the land, the elders
in CRUW allow participants to maintain a connection to
the land and to their culture that may not be possible in an
urban environment. Toucanni explains that her involvement
in the program helps her "to maintain a relationship with
the land by giving [her] a chance to take a break from
the city." "I notice the difference in the air and how I feel
when I am on the land at the farm. The program gives me
a chance to put my hands in the dirt and be a part of how
plants are growing." For Toucanni, participating in
CRUW has developed the meaning of being with the
land: "[it] has made me
more curious in learning
about the different plants
and animals that come
from the land and what
they do. It has made
me more environmentally conscious in my
day-to-day life. I am more
aware of what I do and
what my friends do when
we're in the city and how
that affects everything."
Toucanni highlights how
CRUW's work in fostering connection to the
land changes its participants' relationship to it:
"This program has made me appreciate what
this land is and its importance."
Reflecting on the future of CRUW and its
role in the community, Toucanni notes,
"I think it is important to know that
CRUW is definitely a place that can give youth a
chance to grow and to learn in such a supportive
environment. The program is an escape from
the busy city life. I have personally met so many
people at the program that have become such important
people in my life. I'm not sure what I would be doing or
who I would be without CRUW."
"Moving forward," Ryley concludes, "I know where to
go. When I'm feeling disconnected, I know where I can feel
connected again. And it's not the physical garden itself,
but the people surrounding us. Who I'm able to
go and be with."
CRUW's involvement in the community
will be increasing over the summer. "I'm
excited because the ball is rolling now"
Ryley enthuses. On June 21st, CRUW
will be present at Trout Lake for National
Aboriginal Day, where people will have the
opportunity to learn more about the program.
"One thing that I'd say to people is don't be
afraid to show up," Ryley offers, "Don't be afraid
to take that leap. It's changed my life."
'C.R.U.U).'
A
 FEATURE  .
Discorder magazine | JUNE 201^
words by Zainab Fatima
illustrations by Kalena Mackiewicz
PRIOR TO WATCHING MIND
MIRROR, I HAD SEEN VERY FEW
STOP-MOTION FILMS, such as Coraline
and Corpse Bride, and the experience was very
different than what I imagined, not only because the film is
made entirely of paper, but because it has themes that were
really thought provoking for me, especially as I emerge
into adulthood.
Mind Mirror is a three minute animated film that
follows a man as he navigates a world that controls him,
perfectly capturing the anxiety of time passing and ensuing
helplessness. A stop-motion masterpiece that was created
over a span of three years, and comprised of more than
2000 hand cut images, Mind Mirror is a music video for
thrash metal band Phoenix Thunderbird for their song
Mirrored Mind.
Along with the artwork that was done for it, the
movie was also shot entirely on Super 8mm film.
Director Meredith Hama-Brown explained, "As I began
brainstorming for the film, the main storyline that I
envisioned was of a person navigating a threatening world.
Thematically, for me, this world represented humans'
relationship with time and mortality. Because of these
creative directions, Norm Li, esc (my cinematographer) and
I decided that we would love the film to have a raw and
textured look."
The aesthetic of the film itself makes it fascinating.
All of the images were made of paper, and for
Hama-Brown, not only was paper a part of her
vision for Mind Mirror, it also allowed the objects to stand
out from the background (colour against black and white)
to make a unified film.
The inspirations for the movie were drawn from several
different sources. Psychedelic images from the internet
provided initial ideas, and artists who use paper in their
films, "Sean Pecknold right from the beginning and later on
I came across Winston Hacking's incredible work." Hama
Brown added, "I was especially inspired by numerous paper
based artists such as Noriko Ambe, Andrea Russo and Yuko
Nishimura. We also spent a lot of time looking at design
books (a favourite was "Principals of Three-Dimensional
Design" by Wucius Wong)."
The use of paper accentuates the raw look of the
film that not only allows Mind Mirror to stand out
from other stop-motion films, but gives it a very
dream-like quality. In the best possible way, it's reminiscent
of nightmares, as I found myself visualizing some of
humans' worst fears. The film conveys the overwhelming
feeling we experience when we feel we don't have control
over anything. This made it very easy to connect with this
film on a personal level, since I could apply that feeling to
anything: from academics to illness to natural disasters.
The flowers and celestial bodies in the film stand out
because they're a predominantly red and yellow palette while
the rest of the movie is very cool toned. In the film we see
planets rearranging, flowers dying, and time passing us by.
Another theme that stood out to me in Mind Mirror
was identity. In the movie, I never directly looked at the
main character's face, but instead witnessed how he sees
himself when he looks in the mirror. Instead of a face, I saw
things like hands and lips, creating grotesque imagery. This
was one of my favourite parts in the film because it shows
us how we see ourselves, simultaneously portraying our
struggles with self worth and identity.
Overall, Mind Mirror is a film that accurately represents
the obstacles we face on a daily basis, not only things that
are minor, but also grand issues that we have little to no
control over. A thought provoking and inspiring film, Mind
Mirror manages to impeccably portray complex emotions.
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MUSIC
1
JESSE LEBOURDAIS
^M                           JESSE LEBOURDAIS
^H                       SEE YOU IN THE STORM
See You In The Storm
(£elf-release&)
May   7,   2019
This May, Jesse LeBourdais welcomed us into spring with
the upbeat folk punk EP See You In The Storm. Its three
songs are captivating ballads on the frictions of life, touching
on everything from mental health to hatred.
Raised in the small town of Horsefly, British Columbia,
LeBourdais has defined the limitations of rural life. He began
producing music in 2000 and his expertise is evident. The
second song, "See You In The Storm," is a culmination
of LeBourdais' practice, transporting the listener to the
passionate pop punk era of the late '90s.
Jesse's vocals draw on influences of Brandon Flowers
from The Killers and Green Day's Billie Joe Armstrong. His
beautifully rough voice is accompanied by a solid drum beat
and chilling bass. The captivating beats complement the
rigid mood of the lyrics perfectly. However, "Three Shots"
deviates from the rest of the EP and takes on a depressing
yet comfortable acoustic tone. Jesse's ability to perform
such different tones is astonishing.
The lyrics on See You In The Storm create a mesmerizing
contrast with its musical composition. In the seemingly
cheery song "When You Fail," Jesse laments "So I take
that pain and I close my eyes and I bury it deep inside /
Not knowing where the words were going take me or which
melody was going to break me." The pure grunge and angst
cannot be simply explained—they can just be heard.
See You In The Storm provides a gloomy and passionate
lens for everyday frustrations. The combination of the
melody, vocals, and lyrics create a symphonic experience.
Jesse's self-expression is breathtaking, and this EP is an
intense emotional ride. — Tatiana Yakovleva
L0 SIENTO
■  % <p 1
Brujas
(5elf-release&)
March   14,   2019
It is easy to imagine Lo Siento's second album Brujas as
a dream project that turned out exactly right — just how
the band thought it should be when they began. The pastel
cover art, designed by lead singer and songwriter Pepa
Chan, works in tandem with the synth-peppered upbeat
tracks, contributing to an overall feeling of entering a cartoon
dreamworld.
Hailing from St. John's, Newfoundland, Lo Siento is a
Spanish language punk band made up of Pepa Chan (vocals/
guitar), Allison Graves (drums), and Andrea McGuire (bass/
backing vocals), joined by Jake Nicoll on keys and synths
for their sophomore album. Brujas is a self-released follow
up to 2017's Bingo Bango, and generally stays true to its
predecessor's sound and upbeat pace, the sugary melodies
getting even sweeter with the addition of Nicoll's synths.
Brujas makes you feel like you want to run around the city
and set something on fire - and for non-Spanish-speakers,
this perception even arises from atmosphere alone.
Upon a deeper dive into the lyrics, Chan's high-pitched
saccharine vocals belie their complexity, tackling subjects
like loss, insomnia, and not giving a shit about other people's
opinions. The songs get grittier as the album progresses,
each track hurtling toward its conclusion with relentless
energy. "Otro Planeta" stands out for its wistful undertones,
as Chan sings about an imagined escape to another planet,
ending with the repeated refrain "mi cuerpo se debilita" -
"my body weakens."
The album is just as easily imagined in front of a crowd
of confused yet curious 5 year olds as it is in a mosh pit of
sweaty adults. It's the kind of music you can dance to with
any sort of abandon - joyous or otherwise. A bandcamp
comment on Lo Siento's first album Bingo Bango puts it
simply: "Obnoxious yet lovable, like a toddler or a small dog.'
This comment makes sense in the kindest possible way, a
nod to the enthusiasm and frenetic energy of a band simply
making music that makes them happy. — Hana Golightly
m
:
16
Pure Noise Records is home to many well known
pop-punk bands, like The Story So Far and State
Champs. Youth Fountain signed to the label last year and,
with this great debut album, the Vancouver duo has begun
to make its mark. Letters to Our Former Selves combines an
energetic sound with honest and melancholic lyrics to result
in a well-crafted album full of emotion.
"Helpless" opens the album with a delicate guitar riff
and a short verse, creating a majestic sound before going
into the title track, "Letters to Our Former Selves." Its loud
guitars, fast-paced drums and shouting vocals set the tone
other Loose, a two sided single from Vancouver gals
Primp, is the latest in an evolutionary process that has
taken the band from lo-fi through power pop to garage rock.
Cheekily scrawled in the liner notes on Primp's Bandcamp
page,  "This is the last of allie's breakup tracks (for now...)
so enjoy i guess" puts an emotional lynchpin in Mother
Loose's otherwise fun, hooky melodies.
On one hand, it's a perfectly breezy listen, with credit to
Aly Laube's sunny power-pop vocals and a heavy serving of
guitar and bass — central traits in Primp's earlier release,
Half-bloom. Mother Loose however delivers the guitar-
bass-drums template to tougher grooves and articulates
a sincerity essential to this style of rock. Veering towards
bolder gestures, Mother Loose unveils two tracks that are
sharper, richer and distantly sadder — "Don't Wanna" has
a strutting rhythm/bass forward sound that inlays call and
response countermelodies over climbing power chords.
Instead of the fuzzy soft peaks Half-Bloom offered, Primp
has taken steps towards a harder sound and an antic energy
due in part to the "breakup album" onus.
Mother Loose has the thematic underpinning of
adolescent figures and spins it through the emancipated,
confident but ultimately sharp lens of adult womanhood.
Tracks like "No Fun" relish in this kiddie-like candor but
ultimately maintain their edge in lyric and tone: "Are you
restless? / I don't blame you / It'll be alright" expresses the
toxic stillness of intimacy, all the while letting loose a little
chaos. In a similar vein, "Don't Wanna" has a childlike tone
and is paired with an extra raucous funk sound — totally
unencumbered and doing just what it seems Primp will be
pulling for the full release of Mother Loose: bracing gooey
emotions with an effortless full-torque thrust of fuck it.
— Tasha Hefford
for the rest of the album. This can become repetitive at
times, but the duo includes them in the right places to show
angst and frustration in tracks like "Worried," where the
first verse starts slowly and explodes into an aggressive
pre-chorus and chorus.
"Rose Coloured Glass" stands out for its classic pop
punk guitar riff that intertwines with the bass perfectly and
the depressing lyrics that contrast with an upbeat melody.
The vocal interplay between Tyler Zanon (guitar/vocals) and
Cody Muraro (vocals) is especially good here. They take
turns singing the lines and it feels natural instead of being
a distraction. They also nail the backing vocals by using
different voices. A similar technique is present in the other
tracks as well, and Youth Fountain's sound definitely benefits
from it.
The album explores loneliness, self-doubt, and
resentment in the most honest way possible. "Worried"
shows self-doubt with lyrics like, "It's useless to ask what
this life is all for / If we found out the answers, we'd still
want more," making you experience all the emotions of the
situation yourself. Similarly, "Complacent" hides nothing
about the pain and bitterness one could feel about a
relationship that fell apart. The album closes with a high
level of energy on the tracks "Grinding Teeth" and "Blooms"
in a smart mix of sadness and pessimism.
Letters to Our Former Selves touches on personal issues
with an energetic sound that helps to convey emotions. It is
a good start for Youth Fountain and it will be interesting to
see them continue to develop their sound.
— Angela Villavicencio
BOOKS
November 28, 2018
Awasis and the World Famous Bannock, a recently
released children's book with words by Dallas Hunt and
illustrations by Amanda Strong, is a delightful story about
a young Cree girl, the titular Awasis, who seeks help from
animal friends in the forest when she loses her kokum's
{grandmother's) "world-famous" bannock recipe.
The book uses a multifaceted approach in engaging
its young readers. Each page features a mix of Cree and
English words that will spark curiosity in non-Cree-speaking
readers and draw Cree-speakers in. But the central focus
of the book's plot is not on the interaction between the two
languages, but on the complex connection between nature
and family and how it can provide a view into Cree culture
accessible to both Cree and English speakers. According to
Hunt, Cree children and speakers should "feel comfortable
with this book and their language" and "havjej fun with Cree
language revitalization" throughout.
Additionally, the universal message of the importance of
working together and sharing, represented through each
animal's contribution to the bannock, is presented in a subtle
and fun way without feeling heavy handed. Readers absorb
a bannock recipe through the narrative, but they can also
find it written out along with a glossary of the Cree words
used in the book on the final pages, which are great starting
points for further discussion and engagement. The narrative
is beautifully complemented by Amanda Strong's warm,
earth toned, yet whimsical illustrations, which will be sure to
delight any reader who opens this book.  — Almas Khan
III
To submit music, podcasts, books or films for review consideration, please email
Cae Rosch at ur.discorder@citr.ca.
To media that applies, please send a physical copy to Discorder Under Review at
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 MAY 2019
JANE'S WALKS VANCOUVER
MAY 8 / VARIOUS LOCATIONS
from Mount Pleasant to the West End, Vancouverites of
different ages and backgrounds went out for a walk — a
Jane's Walk.
The Jane's Walk initiative is rooted around the ideas of
late urban theorist, journalist and activist, Jane Jacobs. An
advocate for human relations and community building within
the city, she encouraged many across cities and disciplines
to stand in favour of a people-friendly city and against
invasive projects that jeopardize human interactions. Each
Jane's Walk, occurring in urban areas all over the world,
encourages citizen engagement and a community-based
approach to understanding the city.
From the iconic Granville Bridge to the city's vibrant
neighbourhoods, the Vancouver walks are arranged
around a specific topic, like community building, heritage
preservation, renovation and development, or even public
art. The tours "make space for every person to observe,
reflect, share, question and collectively reimagine the
places in which they live, work and play," as the Jane's Walk
Community Organization mission states.
On a Friday morning, two members of the City of
Vancouver's Granville Bridge Project invited walkers to
reflect on Granville Bridge and imagine what its future
would and should be. We learned its great width comes
from previously thwarted highway plans across Vancouver.
The bridge stands as an emblem for citizen engagement
in the planning process, which aims to prioritize safety and
accessibility without compromising transport effectiveness,
following Jacobs' belief that cities are for people.
A walk on Sunday centered around Mount Pleasant's
Heritage Heart and the diversity of public art found from
Downtown to Chinatown. We were enlightened to histories
and legacies of events left or torn down through the art and
buildings in the area. We took away concepts like intangible
heritage and human-scale buildings, which refer to those
structures amiable to humans instead of tall and imposing
ones that, in words of the first walk's leader Christine
Hagemoen, "make you feel part of the machine."
A symbolic reading of the cityscape accompanied both
walks. With this special attention drawn to the environment
around us, we saw the heart-shaped stained-glass at
8th Ave and Main St, as well as the bell that celebrates
Vancouver's sister cities in China. John Steil, co-author
of book Public Art in Vancouver, and leader of the walk,
encouraged us to keep our eyes and mind open to the
various pieces embedded in the cityscape, including some
quote-engraved tiles near the Public Library, along with
murals, mosaics and war memorials.
All walk leaders were knowledgeable of both their topic
and city area, giving a well-informed and deeply anecdotal
account of Vancouver spaces — both their historical and
current use, as well as their symbolic meaning and value.
Most importantly, they all highlighted the intention to spark
a genuine interest for the city one cruises through everyday
— whether it be by engaging in city planning, recognizing
the heritage value of our neighbourhoods, or by encouraging
our artistic curiosity and attentiveness to detail. By walking,
Jane Jacobs' legacy of creating a more human city lives on
in Vancouver. —Silvana Martinez
SUGAR CANDY MOUNTAIN / FLAURAL /
CANDACE
MAY 14/STATIC JUPITER
ak
alking through the front doors of the Static Jupiter —
which do not give the impression of a venue — I was
guided through a dull, white hallway that felt like it led to a
doctor's office. I made my way through the few spectators
scrambling outside for a last bit of fresh air before the show
began, and received the venue's emblem stamped on the
inside of my wrist.
Entering the serene venue — which mirrors what a living
room might have looked like in the '70s, complete with a
lounging area decorated to the nines — the first opening act
to take the stage was the trio, Candace. I wasn't too familiar
with their music but I was pleasantly surprised by their sound
and overall stage presence. I would describe their set as a
dreamier take on a style similar to that of The Cranberries.
Candace was followed by the Denver band, Flaural,
who were finished just about as soon as they started. For
their sake, I hope the sound mixing wasn't up to their usual
standards because their noise caused most of the audience
to shuffle outside to wait out the set.
By the time both openers had finished their sets, it was
already past eleven, and given the very reasonable ticket
price, the audience had every excuse to call the night early
but they stayed.
What appeared to be the waistline of a pair of denim
jeans projected onto the red velvet curtains served as the
background, fitting perfectly into the vintage aesthetic that
Sugar Candy Mountain brought to the stage. The jam packed
crowd gave them a warm welcome.
I couldn't think of a better name than Sugar Candy
Mountain for the sound they generated. And as for playing
at a venue called Static Jupiter, their sound was something
psychedelic pop, the dreariness of the set was verging on
forgettable except when the teeth-clenching feedback from
the microphone grew intolerable — but that's hard to pin on
the artist. —Aaron Schmidtke
WEYES BLOOD /JACKIE COHEN
MAY 17 /ST. JAMES HALL
The St. James Hall — a small, spiritual community
centre and non-profit organization based in the heart
of Kitsilano — was filled with the scent of frankincense and
myrrh when Weyes Blood emerged to the former church's
altar. Weyes Blood was preceded by the wispy Jackie
Cohen, an up-and-coming musician, whose twangy opening
performance suited the century year-old beams of wood
detailed with cobwebs and dust. To close her set, Cohen
announced her new album, Zagg, thanked the audience
and exited the building out of the back door and onto the
street, where she stood alongside the cigarette smokers and
fashionably late attendees.
In front of a velvet canopy, the all-ages congregation
stood in awe of Weyes Blood as the band emerged with
a bow. Natalie Mering — undeniably cool in an all-white
pantsuit — took center stage. Born in Santa Monica,
California, Mering created the moniker Wise Blood at a
young age, eventually changing the spelling from Weyes
Bluhd to the current, Weyes Blood. Titanic Rising, her
fourth studio album last month, is a masterpiece that
otherworldly to say the least. Led by vocalist and guitarist,
Ash Reiter, Sugar Candy Mountain was formed with
fellow members Will Halsey and Jeff Moller. Their live
performance, however, was as a four-piece and given that
Halsey is credited with drums, keys, guitar, & bass on their
Bandcamp page, they undoubtedly needed a helping hand
to perform to their best ability live. With their droning guitar
riffs, bubblegum keys and vocally driven sound, Sugar
Candy Mountain could easily be compared to Jefferson
Airplane or Melody's Echo Chamber, given their '60s
counterculture vibe.
Reiter, and the rest of the band, weren't all that outgoing
on stage, and the crowd matched the mundane tone.
Swaying their shoulders side-to-side, the audience inched
further and further away from the rowdiness I have come to
expect from a fair share of smaller shows. The one exception
was when Sugar Candy Mountain performed one of their
most popular tracks, "Windows," from their 2016 album 666.
When they began the familiar slow paced drum rhythm and
tickling of guitar chords, the crowd exploded with cheers.
While the band came through with their brand of
REAL   LIVE  ACTION
is both complex and tranquil — a showcase in evoking
musical nostalgia. Weyes Blood performed this richly
textured and introspective album, layered with compelling
and ethereal expressions, to an audience that grooved
along hypnotically, as if transcending to another dimension.
Mering's voice soared; her poetic and poignant lyrics
seduced and mesmerized.
Halfway through the set, Mering paused and said, "I
almost didn't make it to Canada today. I forgot my passport
in Los Angeles. Thankfully, I found someone to fly to Seattle
and deliver it to me." She chuckled, "I promise, I'm never
going to fail Canada again. But now, back to the stuff that I
haven't forgotten about." She resurrected the songs "Used
to Be", "Do You Need My Love", and "Seven Words" from
her 2016 album, Front Row Seat to Earth. The energy
vibed between the five-member Weyes Blood as little kids
in tie-dye and polka-dot dresses hopped around the venue,
older folks sat in the choir and intently listened while sipping
water out of blue Dixie cups, and solo millennials stood
before the spotlight stage with canvas bags slung over
their shoulders, not afraid to brush up against the arm of
Discorder magazine | JUNE  201'
 ~
a stranger in close proximity despite the beads of sweat
accumulating from the warm room.
The flickering candles on stage glowed brighter as the
night went on. After "Mirror Forever" from Titanic Rising,
Weyes Blood jumped into a melodic cover of "God Only
Knows" by The Beach Boys — a moment that had the entire
crowd singing along. For the encore, Mering graced the
audience with "Bad Magic", a somber and stunningly tragic
song off of her 2014 album, The Innocents, because, as she
said, "I love a deep cut."—Sarah Amormino
ORVILLE PECK /THANKS JEM 8 JANE
SMOKER/IAN BADGER
MAY 19/WISE HALL
Ps the room resounded with the chatter of the
ever-growing crowd — who were clad in more cowboy
hats, fringed suede jackets, and large belt buckles than one
usually encounters in Vancouver — Ian Badger stepped
onstage. He tentatively finger-picked his guitar, as if the soft
sound could capture the attention of the room. A few eyes
slowly turned his way, but the conversations continued. It
was only until Badger started singing that the crowd really
took note. For his first two songs, Badger's guitar and
twangy voice were alone, only just cutting through the noisy
hall. Then things kicked off, as Badger invited out his band,
a guitarist, bassist and drummer. With the energy of three
others behind him, Badger's songs turned from emotive
ballads to foot-stomping country tunes, verging on rockabilly
at times.
While the second act was drastically different than the
first, the energy in the WISE Hall somehow managed to
continue its upward trajectory. Drag artist Thanks Jem,
co-host of Brat Pack Thursdays at the Junction Pub,
stepped on stage in a cowboy hat, boots and a sheer,
fringed top and dived into a Shania Twain lip sync that
enraptured the crowd. "How many of you have been to a
drag show before?" she asked the audience. With a half
hearted cheer from the countrified crowd, Thanks Jem
responded, "Well you have now!," before introducing fellow
Brat Pack co-host, Jane Smoker.
With an impassioned and energetic performance of
Lady Gaga's "You and I," complete with an unplugged
microphone, Jame Smoker kept the energy high and the
crowd excited. After thanking the crowd and Orville Peck
for inviting them to perform, as well as an acknowledgment
of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh nations,
on whose land the venue sits, the two drag queens joined
forces for a final duet.
If the first two acts of the night seemed out of place on
the bill, the headliner brought the entire night together,
bridging the thematic and stylistic divide that had been
established. With the audience absolutely buzzing, Orville
Peck stepped on stage. The rising-country star, complete
with a black and silver Nudie suit and his signature fringed
leather mask, was joined by his four bandmates. Opening
with the smoldering and dramatic "Dead of Night," the
first track on Peck's debut record Pony, Peck's voice
immediately took centre stage. With incredible control and
power, Peck's voice dipped down to the very bottom of his
register, filling the room. While his band were stellar, over
the course of the night, Peck's voice stole the show, the
perfect hybrid of Chris Isaak and Roy Orbison.
A few songs into the set, Peck paused between songs
to thank the opening acts and reveal his admiration and
respect for drag artists — "Drag is the last subversive art
form" — before inviting Thanks Jem and Jane Smoker to join
his onstage for the next song "Queen of the Rodeo," which
was written for Thanks Jem. Channeling the extravagance
and performativity of the queens beside him, Peck left it all
onstage, putting down his guitar, tossing his jacket aside,
and giving himself fully to the show.
While the sound of Peck's music isn't far off from
the traditional outlaw country sound, save for a few
psychedelic flairs, the spirit of subversion that imbued
Peck's performance was a truly refreshing experience.
Though country music has a long but somewhat forgotten
history of challenging social norms, its conservatism, both
musically and thematically, have come to define the genre
in recent years. But as artists and audiences who don't or
can't identify with that brand of country yearn for different
narratives and voices within the genre, it's artists like Orville
Peck that prove country music is for anyone and everyone.
—Frances Shroff
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder Magazine and
online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in advance to
Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
RLA also includes comedy and theatre, among other live experiences. Feel free
to submit those event details to the e-mail above.
THEATRE
1660 EAST BROADWAY
JUNE
JUNE
T
Double Bill!
Jackie Chan
POLICE STORY 1 & 2
JUNE
~6
Paul Anthony's
TALENT TIME
Psychedelic Summer Trip!
JUNE
7
Dario Argento's
DEEP RED
Friday Late Night Movie
JUNE
8"
The Geekenders Present
DISNEY BIG BAND
BURLESQUE
JUNE
9
Free Screening!!!
THE WIZARD OF OZ |
JUNE
10
An Evening With
STORMY DANIELS
JUNE
il
Federico Fellini's
LA STRADA    |
JUNE
12
STORY STORY LIE
Championships!
The Gentlemen Hecklers Present 1
STARSHIP TROOPERS |
JUNE
13
Double Bill!
SUSPIRIA
Dario Argento's (1977)
Luca Guadagnino's (2019)
JUNE
14
GAME OF THRONES: LIVE
Fire and Ice, Ice, Baby!
"Also June 15
Nicolas Cage
MANDY
Friday Late Night Movie
JUNE
16
L'INFERNO (1911)
With Live Store Performed By
MAURIZI0 GUARINI (ofGoblin) 1
MAY
18
The Fictional: Comedy Co. Presents 1
IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY 1
Maple Magic
JUNE
20
25th Anniversary Screening
REALITY BITES
JUNE
22
GREASE
Sing-a-long!
JUNE
25
35th Anniversary Screening
PURPLE RAIN
JUNE
26
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOwl
A #DNDLive Improv Comedy Adventure 1
*www.riofheatre.ca for additional times
COMPLETE LISTINGS AT WWW.RI0THEATRE.CA
?xos autre ! 9rti5DpDfn i9bioojia
REAL   LIVE   ACTION
n
 PILTTISTRIPPED
ILLUSIONS OF CONTROL
words by Zainab Fatima //   illustration by Seoyeon Park
Discorder magazine | JUNE 201^
Strikingly beautiful, simultaneously
heartbreaking.
Illusions of Control is a
documentary directed and written by
Shannon Walsh, that follows women from
many different parts of the world - such as
China, Canada, Japan and Mexico - Who
work to overcome the challenges that
confront them.
The audience is introduced to five
women: Silvia has begun a search for
her missing daughter in Mexico, Kaori is
organizing women in her community to
keep record of the radiation in Japan, Yang
works in an expanding Chinese desert,
Lauren faces a disease that will change her
life forever, and Stacey explains the arsenic
crisis in Yellowknife. As I followed these
women throughout the film, I came to
understand their point of view and see what
their lives are like.
The film expands the viewer's
awareness to the struggles people
face in other parts of the world.
I personally learned about a lot about
issues I was completely oblivious to, as the
film expanded my understanding of and
connection with humanity. The film delivers
a vital message about human nature: that
we have the ability to persist no matter the
situation, The film delivers a vital message
about human nature: that we have the
ability to persist no matter the situation,
even if the obstacles are beyond our control.
Illness, climate change and corruption,
are amongst the obstacles faced by some
women in Illusions of Control. Due to the
heavy subject matter, the score, alongside
a
some of the sights we view, the film has a
similar air to that of a horror movie. Wide
and long shots of barren landscapes, signs
displaying the word "danger", paired with
the subdued soundtrack, left me with a
chilling sensation.
At the same time, there were moments
that were very aesthetically pleasing, shots
framed with intentional symmetry, where
everything is still except the clouds. As
I was distracted by the beauty of these
visuals, the film would then introduce a
new person, facing a new challenge. The
disasters we see in this film are not easily
forgotten. Thought provoking, eye opening
and heartbreaking, it makes me feel
grateful for things I take for granted, such
as clean water.
The most memorable thing in this
film was the love the parents had
for their children. It stuck with me
because I have always wanted kids, but
knowing that you can't always protect your
loved ones is a terrifying reality. In Illusions
of Control we meet a few people who are
trying to find or protect their children in the
face of crisis: kidnappings, arsenic in the air
and water, and pollution.
Trying to shelter one another from
external factors that are bigger than us is
extremely difficult. All we can do is try our
best to provide for our loved ones, and love
them unconditionally.
The film reminded me a lot of the novel
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro, in
which the protagonist is part of a world that
doesn't give her the freedom to live. There's
a moment in the book where two main
characters are talking, and one of them says
that he feels as if he is standing in the middle
of a river, trying to hold onto his friend.
However, the river's current is too strong to
keep them together, and they are seperated.
This heart-wrenching metaphor can
describe how issues going on in the "big
world" disrupt our "small worlds",
meaning that the lives of many, are at the
mercy of external factors that are beyond
their control.
Climate change is one of those "big
world" problems that affect us. Animals are
caught in the middle of it, where their
habitats are destroyed, and there are
people whose homes are surrounded by
toxic water and air. Issues as daunting as
climate change cannot be overcome by one
individual single handedly. Yet there are so
many individuals that are directly affected
by it every single day. Even then, the
women we are introduced to in Illusions
of Control continue to strive forward, in
efforts to improve the lives of their families.
'Yhit^s Iv>e Seen
6-10 pra
Thursday June 201'1
an art show by
frn^ce AspmaW
)(
*'« OF I**
1636 Venables st.
FILMSTRIPPED I Illusion Of   Control
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'DISCORDER MAGAZINE RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERY DAY!
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6AM
TRANCENDANCE
CiTR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
6AM
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GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICON"
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OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CANADALAND
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CONVICTIONS &
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SEEKING OFFICE:
AT LARGE
PACIFIC PICKIN"
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BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
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MIXTAPES WITH
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COMEDY ZEITGEIST
10 AM
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DREW
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SUMMER GHOST MIX
U DO U RADIO
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11AM
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SYNCHRONICITY
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DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
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12 PM
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SUMMER GHOST MIX
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TOO DREAMY
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1PM
2 PM
120BPM HOSTED BY
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SUMMER GHOST MIX
ASTROTALK
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2 PM
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SUMMER GHOST MIX
DIALECTIC
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120BPM
3 PM
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SHOES ON A WIRE
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
4 PM
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DELIBERATE NOISE
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8 PM
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9 PM
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THE JAZZ SHOW
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10 PM
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DO YOU WANT TO PITCH YOUR OWN SHOW TO CiTR?
EMAIL THE PROGRAMMING MANAGER AT PROGRAMMING@CiTR.CA TO LEARN HOW
D
pc-hey, this kind of cell means this show is hosted by students
They are also highlighted in the spot colour on the guide,
you can't miss it.
 ■ monti/iy
TRANCENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM,  ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
3AM-11AM,  ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters:
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththebrowns
@h otmail.com
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B in spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOES ON AWIRE
4PM-5PM, rock/pop/indie
Music + Stories, by and
for Women + Queers.
Insta: @shoesonawirepod
Tweeter: @Shoesonawire
• DELIBERATE NOISE
2PM-3PM, ROCK / POP / INDIE
Love rocking out to live music,
but don't feel like paying
cover? Tune in for the latest
and greatest punk, garage
rock, local, and underground
music, with plenty of new
releases and upcoming
show recommendations.
Let's get sweaty.
contact: programming@citr.ca
• RECORDS MANAGEMENT
10AM-11AM, ROCK/ROOTS/FOLK
A show for Canadian Rock,
Indie, Folk, Country, and other
Canadiana! Curated for you by
your hosts, Nathalie and Adrian.
contact: programming@citr.ca
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies:
tunes from television, alone
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks:
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TltEStiay
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6am-8am, roots/folk/blues
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
3AM-10AM, TALK/POLITICS
Dedicated to the LGBTQ +
communities of Vancouver
Queer FM features music:
current events, human interest
stories and interviews.
Contact:
queerfmvancouver@gmaii.com
Twitter | @recordsmgmtyvr
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
11PM-1PM,  ROCK / POP/ INDIE
Oswaldo Perez Cabrera plays
your favourite eclectic mix of
Ska, reggae, shoegaze, indie
pop, noise, with live music:
local talent and music you
won't hear anywhere else.
The morning after what?
Whatever you did last night.
Twitter | @sonicvortex
• 120BPM HOSTED BY
AARON SCHMIDKE
2PM-3PM, MUSIC
120 BPM hosted weekly
by Aaron Schmidke!
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming @citr. ca
• DIALECTIC
3PM-4PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Defined as "The way in which
two different forces or factors
work together", Dialectic brings
the distinct music tastes of
hosts Chase and Dan together.
Each episode showcases
a variety of indie rock and
beyond, bound together by
the week's unique theme.
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming @citr. ca
• TEACHABLE MOMENTS
TUES 4PM-5PM, TALK/POP
a show with music
about being uncool
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• INTOTHEWOODS
TUES 5PM-6PM, ROCK/POP/INDIE
Lace up your hiking boots and
get ready to join Mel Woods as
she explores music by female
and LGBTQ+ artists. Is that a
bear behind that tree? Nope,
just another great track you
won't hear anywhere else. We
provide the music mix, but
don't forget your own trail mix!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6pm-8pm, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES &TREASONS
3PM-10PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles:
Homeboy Jules, Fielly Rels:
Malik, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
3AM-10AM,  ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room.
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes:
information and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackveivet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM,  ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM,  ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
. C-POP CONNECTION
C-POP Connection brings you
some of the most popular songs
in the Chinese music industry!
The show also talks about
Chinese culture to connect you
to the Chinese society. Tune in
every Wednesday from 3-4 PM
with your host DJ Sab to get
updated on the hottest singles,
album, and news in C-POP!
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
4I30-5PM, TALK/SPORTS
CiTR Sports treat you to
interviews with UBC's top
athletes and Olympians,
off-field stories of the
accomplished sportspeople.
T-Bird Eye is your weekly
roundup of UBC Thunderbirds
sports action with hosts Eric
Thompson, Jake McGrail,
Liz Wang, and Jacob Aere.
Contact: Twitter | @CiTRSports
• ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The Arts Report on CiTR brings
you the latest and upcoming
in local arts in Vancouver
from a volunteer run team
that likes to get weird! Based
primarily in Vancouver, BC,
your show hosts (Ashley and
Jake) are on the airwaves.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
alternating wed 6:30pm-8pm:
rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia:
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins:
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE MEDICINE SHOW
ALTERNATING WED 6:30PM-8PM:
eclectic/live INTERVIEWS
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact:
vanco uvermedicinesho w@gmaii. com
MIX CASSETTE
3pm-9pm, hip hop/indie/soul
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too) and relished in the merging
of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NINTH WAVE
9PM-10PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Between the Salish sea and the
snow capped rocky mountains:
A-Ro The Naut explores the
relationships of classic and
contemporary stylings through
jazz, funk and hip hop lenses.
Contact: Facebook | NinthWaveRadio
ANDYLAND RADIO WITH
ANDREW WILLIS
10PM-11PM, TALK
Listen to your favorite
episodes of Andyland Radio
with Andrew Willis. Our
borders are always open.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK / SPORTS
The Thunderbird Locker
Room gives you a backroom
perspective on varsity athletes:
coaches and staff here at UBC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSSay
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• CONVICTIONS* CONTRADICTIONS
THURS, 8AM-9AM, TALK/COMEDY/
SOCIAL OBESERVATIONS
Convictions and Contradictions
is about our own convictions
and contradictions about
society, shown through social
observational comedy. To boot,
a comedy of human psychology
and instrumental music.
Contact: programmingcitr.ca
• COMEDY ZEITGEIST
g:30AM-i0PM, talk
Each week, Doug Vandelay
interviews a current comedian
about their comedic
influences, their careers and
whatever else comes up
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
10AM-11AM,  PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new:
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com,
rocketfromrussiacitr(3>gmaii. com,
<3>tima_tzar,
facebook. com/Roc ke t From Russia
U DO U RADIO
11AM-12PM,  ELECTRONIC
A delicious spread of
electronic vibes from across
the decades. Acid, Afro-beat
Lo-Fi, Ambient and plenty of
classic house. Let Galen do
his thing so u can do urs.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.wordpress.com
ASTROTALK
2PM-3PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ 120BPM
3PM-5PM, MUSIC	
120 minutes of Beginners
Playing Music! This drive time
block is for BRAND NEW
programmers who want to find
their feet, practice their chops,
and rep CiTR's playlist. Get
at us if you want this airtime
Contact: @CiTRRadio
programming@citr. ca
• DEMOCRACY WATCH
5PM-6PM, TALK / NEWS / CURRENT
AFFAIRS	
For fans of News 101, this is
CiTR's new Current Affairs
show! Tune in weekly for
commentary, interviews
and headlines from around
the Lower Mainland.
Contact: news101@citr.ca
• THE SPENCER LATU SHOW
6pm-7:30PM, talk/ political
commentary
The Spencer Latu Show is a
progressive politics show that
speaks truth to power. We
provide much needed coverage,
and media criticism of stories
at the municipal, provincial,
national and international
level from the perspective of
two progressive working class
students; Spencer Latu and
Ajeetpal Gill. We are based
out of UBC in Vancouver BC.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
C1 RADIO
thurs 7:30pm-9pm, hip hop/r&b/
RAP
Best of new and local hip hop
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM,  ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), ifll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with whaf s heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ TRUiay
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance:
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact:
auraitentacies@hotmaii. com
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
37AM-8AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news:
politics and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse(S>canada!andshow. com
• SEEKING OFFICE: AT LARGE
8AM-9AM, TALK/NEWS/POLITICS
Seeking Office is innovative
storytelling and municipal news
coverage from Vancouver and
the Lower Mainland. Join us for
Season 2, At Large.
Subscribe to Seeking Office on
iTunes, Stitcher or Google Play.
Contact: @CiTRNews
MIXTAPES WITH DREW
9AM-11AM,  ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows what
musical curiosities you will
hear from Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
• THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/FILM  	
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery and a 'IN dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
whaf s happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact:
daveradiopodcast@g maii.com
TOO DREAMY
1PM-2PM, BEDROOM POP / DREAM
POP/SHOEGAZE
Let's totally crush on each other
and leave mix tapes and love
letters in each other's lockers xo
Contact:
Facebook | @TooDreamyRadio
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
2PM-3:30PM, experimental/
DIFFICULT MUSIC
CiTR's 24 HOURS OF
RADIO ART in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word:
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPANA© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter | @bepicrespan
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact:
h ttp://nardwuar. com/rad/con tact/
• WORD ON THE STREET
5PM-6PM, ROCK/INDIE/POP
Hosted by the Music Affairs
Collective, every episode is
packed with up-to-date content
from the Lower Mainland music
communities including news,
new music releases, event
reviews and upcoming events,
interviews with local musicians
and industry professionals and
discussions over relevant topics.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ RADIO PIZZA PARTY
6PM - 7:30PM, TALK/COMEDY
Every week Jack, Tristan and
a special guest randomly
select a conversation topic
for the entire show; ranging
from God to unfortunate
roommates. Woven throughout
the conversation is a cacophony
of segments and games for
your listening pleasure. Also
there is no pizza. Sorry.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
imational
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present, and future.
This includes jazz, soul:
hip-hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
There are also interviews
with local and international
artists. Truly, a radio show
with international flavour.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skald's Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings:
poetry recitals, drama scenes:
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skaids_Haii
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock
drone, ambient, experimental
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
C1 RADIO
FRI  11PM-12:30AM, HIP HOP/R&B/RAP
Repeat of Thursday's show -
Best of new and local hip hop
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ saTURSay
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass
scene, Industrial, Noise:
Alternative No Beat takes
you into the early morning.
Contact: citriatenightshow@gmaii.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
3AM-12PM,  ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31 st year on CiTR, The
Saturday Edge is my personal
guide to world & roots music:
with African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, Blues, Songwriters:
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM,  PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact:
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into
music that's on the heavier/
darker side of the spectrum:
then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Coleman, Serena:
Chris, Bridget and Andy!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks:
blues and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
Contact: codebiue@pauinorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5pm-6pm, electronic/mantra/
IMU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats:
music, chants and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact:
mantraradioshow@gmaii. com
NASHAVOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavoina@shaw.ca
SOCASTORM
3PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
Papayo!!#SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
3bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM,  EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79. We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ sunti/iy
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
3AM-10AM,  ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
A repeat of Tuesday morning's
favourite Bluegrass Show -
Bluegrass, old-time music and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM,  INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM,  REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
3PM-5PM,COUNTRY
Real cowsh it-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
5PM-6PM, international/latin
AMERICAN
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue:
Latin House and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM,  INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM,  ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds:
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
3PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans:
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmaii.com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
3PM-9PM, electronic/ deep house
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance:
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem.
especially if it's remixed.
Contact:
djsmiieymike@trancendance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
This weekly soccer discussion
show is centered around
Vancouver Whitecaps, MLS
and the world of football. Est.
in 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points:
interviews with the headline
makers, a humorous take on
the latest happenings and even
some soccer-related music.
If you're a fan of the beautiful
game, this is a must-listen.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ isvam>°f
VOSTTOgS
• STUDENT PROGRAMMING
ECLECTIC
Marks any show that is
produced primarily by students.
YOUR NEW SHOW
ECLECTIC
Do you want to pitch a show
to CiTR? We are actively
looking for new programs.
Email programming@citr.ca
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
 CiTR 101.9 FM MAY CHARTS
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UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
June  7 June  7
GREAT GOOD FINE OK I ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVER
Fox Cabaeret Rickshaw Theatre
June 8 & 9
NICK MURPHY FKA CHET FAKER
Commodore Ballroom
June 12
CONNAN MOCKASIN
Rickshaw Theatre
June 9
MATTIEL WITH MOONWALKS
Wise Hall
June 12
L7 SCATTER THE RATS TOUR
Commodore Ballroom
June 15
COSMO'S MIDNIGHT
Fox Cabaret
Saturday June 15 & Sunday June 16
A$AP ROCKY, RAE SREMMURD, LIL BABY, GUNNA
Breakout Festival 2019 @ PNE Amphitheatre
June 23
ALEJANDRO ESC0VED0
Wise Hall
June 21
OKKERVIL RIVER
Wise Hall
June 25
GRAPET00TH
Fox Cabaret
June  25
YEASAYER
iRickshaw Theatre!
July  15
DEERHUNTER
Commodore Ballroom
July 20
WAAX
Fox Cabaret
August 12
THE NUDE PARTY
Fox Cabaret
August  18
TUXEDO
Fortune
July  27
A.A. BONDY
Fox Cabaret
July  31
MDOU MOCTAR
Fox Cabaret
August  17
KING GIZZARD & THE LIZARD WIZARD
Harbour Convention Centre
August 18
G0LDR00M HIGH SEAS BOAT TOUR 2019
Aboard The Abitibi Boat
August 24
GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR
Commodore Ballroom
August 27
GENERATIONALS
Fox Cabaret
August 28
THE NATIONAL
Deer Lake
Tickets  & more  shows
timbreconcerts.com

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