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\ DiSfcORDER
A Guide tO CITR fm 102 cable 100 AUGUST 1985 • VOL. 3 NO. 7
In This Issue
Mutabaruka
Jill Rennie and Bruce Turpin talk
to dub poetry's Medicine Man
Spot the Difference
Kawika talks to L.A.'s eclectic Tupelo Chain Sex
In Every Issue
Airhead
Musings from the mail bag
Behind the Dial
Inside the mysterious cargo cult of CITR
Program Guide
How to listen to the radio—in three easy lessons
Vinyl Verdict
Big Black Things with little holes in them
Singles
Into the world of the 7"
Roving Ear
Bev Demchuck gets a tan in the Bahamas
Tupelo Chain Sex
Cover: Jim Main
Editor
Chris Dafoe
Contributors
Bev Demchuck, Steve Edge, Steve Robertson
Mark Mushet, Rob Simms, Jason Grant
Jill Rennie, Bruce Turpin,
David Firman Mike Dennis
Photos
Jim Main, Jill Rennie, Bruce Turpin
Cartoons
R. Fi I brant, Susan Catherine,
Chris Pearson
Production Manager
Patrick Carroll
Design
Harry Hertscheg
Layout
Patrick Carroll, Chris Dafoe,
Jim Main, Randy Iwata
Program Guide
Jan is MacKenzie
Typesetting
Dena Corby
Advertising and Circulation
Harry Hertscheg 228-3017
DISCORDER, c/o CITR Radio, 6138 SUB Blvd.,
'  Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
DISCORDER, a guide to CITR, is published monthly by the
Student Radio Society of UBC. CITR fm 101.9 cable 100.1
broadcasts a 49-watt signal in stereo throughout Vancouver
from Gage Towers on the UBC campus. CITR is also available
via cable in Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver,
Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody,
Maple Ridge and Mission. DISCORDER circulates 12,000 free
copies. To advertise in DISCORDER or to have copies dropped
off call 228-3017. Yearly subscriptions available in Canada,
$9.00, outside Canada, $12.00. Send cheque or money order
payable to DISCORDER. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons and graphics are welcome but they can be
returned only if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped
envelope. DISCORDER does not assume responsibility for unsolicited material. DISCORDER and CITR offices are located
in Room 233 of the UBC Student Union Building. For CITR
Mobile Sound bookings and general inquiries call 228-3017.
The Music Request line is 228 CITR. A bad haircut can wipe
the smile off anybody's
face. DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
August 1985
Snips and Snails and
Puppy Dog Tails...
Dear Airhead:
You are correct to demand substantiated facts concerning allegations of sexism at CITR and DISCORDER.
So here you are:
Example One
Cover of June, 1985 DISCORDER
The photograph is a typical
"tacky Sixties" picture used often
by CITR and DISCORDER. Although DISCORDER uses other
styles of photographs every issue,
the pictures of women in them
usually project a female stereotype
which belittles women in a way that
is rarely used to portray men.
Example Two
Page 2, June DISCORDER
This month's issue was asserrv
bled by fourteen men and FOUR
women. No articles were written by
women. In fact, women did the shit
work of layout and typesetting.
Example Three
Page 6, June DISCORDER
CITR obviously needs no
women for its High Power. Every
band in your fund-raiser was a
men's band. The "leggy Prince
Georgettes" do NOT count. You
seem to be interested only in the
latest from men's bands, and as far
as you are concerned, the "dykes
and bitches" can go home if they
feel out of place.
Example Four
Page 12, June DISCORDER
Skinny Puppy is yet another
sadomasochist synthesizer band,
and the slavish attention CITR
gives to this bunch of boys is pathetic. This is cock rock for the trendy set—the joy of torture, mutilation and ultraviolence (and suffering) all at 120 beats per minute on
12-inch single or cassette.
Example Five
rh6a&
ssssss^vspwy^sssssssssg
Page 14, June DISCORDER (Program Guide)
I'm not even going to mention
the fact that there are virtually no
women as disc jockeys or announcers. My point here is that most of
the shows on CITR orient themselves to men and men's bands.
DJs seem to worry about women
in a token sense.
Example Six
Page 17, June DISCORDER
As usual, no women's bands
were reviewed. Most of the records
reviewed were thankfully of the
alternative vein.
Example Seven
Charts, June DISCORDER
Spot the women's bands. Let us
know when you have some.
I'm not suggesting that CITR indulge in tokenism or hypersensitivity on this issue. I overplayed the
Au Pairs and Ann Clark and Joan
Armatrading on my show but that
was only once a week that they
ever got played.
I simply want to aid the previous
and potential efforts by women and
men in pointing out that you are
consistently ignoring women's
music and consequently ignoring
women.
I urge all readers of DISCORDER and all listeners of CITR to
continue the debate and I also urge
members of CITR to consider the
evidence and act in a responsive
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T2A5
manner to your supporters and
your critics.
Sincerely
F. Ian Weniger
former DJ at CITR
CFUO (in Ottawa)
Your conception of what constitutes "fact" is a strange, one, Ian.
All I see here is hyperbole, innuendo, and generalization. Let's examine the examples one by one.
1. Sexist? You be the judge.
2. DISCORDER has not, as yet, installed a chromosome tester in our
offices. Decisions on content in
DISCORDER are not, and will not,
be made on the basis of sex. In
short, we welcome and encourage
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contributions from anyone who is
willing to make the effort to write,
and write well, regardless of sex.
3. What is a men's band or a
women's band? Seven of the
groups that performed included
women, but I suppose in your view
they don't count either.
You're on your own as regards to
the reference to "dykes and bitches" because I haven't got a clue
what you're talking about.
4. One article hardly qualifies as
slavish attention. If you don't like
Skinny Puppy, do what I do—ignore
them. It's very easy.
5. Good thing you didn't mention
the fact that there are virtually no
women announcers at CITR because you would be wrong if you
did. If you'd bother to check your
"facts" you'd have discovered that
there are many female programmers at CITR, not just in music but
in news, sports and public affairs
programming as well.
6. I suppose the women in Working Week and Go Four 3 don't count
either.
7. Female musicians are represented on the charts, if only you'd
check them out. What's a women's
band?
Re: Example Two
I'm afraid I don't appreciate having my work called "shit." As a
typesetter, a woman (not that being
a woman has anything to do with
it) and as a person I am enjoying
what I do for DISCORDER. Any
typesetter, male or female, is more
than welcome to contribute.
Dena Corby
Typesetter
Sugar and Spice,
and Everything Nice
Mr. Michael Shea
Music Director
Dear Mr. Shea,
I am writing to express my disappointment with the interview you
gave on PROPAGANDA, July 6th.
Mike Johal was questioning you
about your decision, as CITR's
music director, to move from a playlist format to some other less structured one.
You said at one point that the
playlist had been made up from
listeners' responses and requests,
announcer preferences, and your
own subjective judgement. You
allowed that your position gives you
the power to exercise personal discretion over music choice. You
added with a chuckle that sometimes you just decide that you really didn't like such-and-such a record and that it shouldn't be on the
list. It began to sound like "every
Saturday night Mike and the boys
get together to spin a few discs and
have a few beers..."
You never made clear precisely
what standards or mechanisms of
selection would replace the play- D SCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
list. While it may be pleasant and
satisfying for the announcers to
have more "fluid" and "open" programming, a non-philosophy
regarding CITR's musical style and
format will ultimately be damaging
to the station's reputation in a highly competitive market. Your job, Mr.
Shea, is to develop, and articulate,
a style of music programming that
enhances the progressive and alternative philosophy CITR espou-
ces. Either you don't have a coherent philosophy, or you were unable
to articulate it.
Finally, your comments on
women's music provoked my indignation. You had stated earlier that
you, as Music Director, buy and
promote new music, and particularly new music by local artists,
even at the expense of listener
satisfaction. You stated, at least
twice, that if you programmed
music entirely by listener response,
you'd be playing old Iggy Pop, U2,
Cramps, etcetera, ad nauseam.
You claimed to recognize the
power that the position of Music
Director gives you, and you claimed to use that power to combat the
inequities of mainstream FM music
programming. Imagine my surprise, then, when you immediately
labelled Mike Johal's suggestion
about the active promotion of
women's music as "contrived." It
seems that your affirmative action
policy toward homegrown music
stops short of artists without
penises.
You'd be hard pressed to find
music more progressive and alternative than the music of the
women's movement, and of lesbian
and women's culture! Your assertion that what CITR plays is a reflection of what is actually available
in the marketplace is rubbish.
You admitted that your choice of
music—I assume in terms of dollars spent—reflects your personal
bias. That bias has no place in the
music programming of an ambitious radio station. You are no longer
a little boy spinning your favorite
discs for four hours a day.
I suggest the following action:
1) Set aside a percentage of
record purchasing funds for music
by women.
2) Appoint a women's music
advisor/purchaser from CITR's
membership.
3) Approach individual women,
and women's groups, for lists of
artist and labels.
4) Contact distributors and independent record labels and ask
them specifically for women's
music and material.
5) Set up a music show which
highlights women's music. The
show might even include some
progressive songs by men (there
are some)!
Sincerely
Anila Srivastava
Michael Shea replies:
While I appreciate your interest in
the musical programming of CITR,
I would like to clarify some points
I feel have been misrepresented in
your letter.
First, regarding the role of my
bias in the purchase of new records
and the compilation of the playlist;
my personal taste is an element, but
by no means an omnipotent one. As
music director, I must remain aware
of the tastes and perspectives of
both announcers and listeners. In
the end, however, I have to rely on
my own judgement.
Second, the CITR philosophy (or
lack of it) is not dictated by a committee; it exists as the sum of the
contributions of the individuals who
choose to involve themselves as listeners, announcers, or musicians,
in the station. As music director, I
try to reflect this diversity by programming a variety of music.
In regards to your comment regarding local music: we do not promote music at the expense of listener satisfaction. I was referring to
the less-than-pristine audio quality
of some of the demo tapes we
receive, which might not be to the
taste of some of our audiophile
listeners. Recording technique is,
however, merely a part of packaging, and we hope to put the emphasis more on content.
Finally, in dealing with the issue
of women's music you seem to
indicate that treating "women's
music" as a separate entity would
do it justice. I disagree. If you are
going to change the world, you are
going to have to join it first.
Women's music is part of a whole
(as is men's, gay's, black's, etc.) and
once separated from that whole it
ceases to act as a dynamic force
in changing the composition. More
women making more music, not
quotas, is the solution to any shortage of music by women on CITR.
Proletariat Strife?
Dear Airhead,
Amongst all that funky advertising there must be some room for
a bit of somewhat primitive political
poetry.
Back in Victoria,
in the land of a right-wing warrior,
there's talk of a new reality
—regardless of the casualties
sacrificed like so much lamb,
by the governing rich who
don't give a damn
about you and me and
the quality of life
or of the true reality
of proletariat strife
and I'd give up my
next U.I. cheque
to see bourgious Bennet
strung up by the neck!
No name given
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August 1985
Folk from the Edge
Folk music!?! not that crap
that ageing hippies listen to while
guzzling real "organic" beer, with
their fingers in their ears so they
can't hear the music. Not on CITR,
surely?
Oh yes, I'm a
Folk Music wit
last year or so; si
started   pi a;
music   rW^N	
Lobos, REM, Jason & the Scorchers, etc.) and at the same time,
British bands such as The Pogues,
The Men They Couldn't Hang and
Boothill Foot-Tappers have begun
a movement sometimes referred to
as Rogue Folk. ThfeSe bands project the appearance of punks, and
play traditional music, updated,
and often disrespectfully so, to
shake up the complacency of both
the Top 40 and established folk
scenes.
Since June 1st, I have been
presenting a show from 10:30 a.m.
to 12 noon on Saturday mornings,
and have tried to blend the new
rogue stuff with elements of traditional folk music from around the
world. Featured artists have included The Pogues, a North London-
based Irish band; Spirit of the
West, a local band who play to en
thusiastic audiences in clubs such
as The Railway Club and The
Savoy, on Saltspring Island and
Folk Festivals in Courtenay and
Seattle (but alas, not at Vancouver's own folk festival. A glaring
omission if ever there was one);
Richard & Linda Thompson, established Brit folk-rockers, once mar-
pursuing solo careers
jdrjrably^and Billy Bragg, who
fmec&rilliantly at the Town
tly.
Mixed in with these people have
been well-known Canadian singer
(and sadly lamented, too) Stan
Rogers; Irish/Scottish bands such
as The Boys of the Lough, Stockton's Wing, the Tannahill Weavers,
The JSD Band, The Chieftains;
English folk stalwarts Fairport
Convention; American bands like
Touchstone and Los Lobos, as well
as South American music from
Peru and Bolivia.
The new season of the Folk
Show will begin on August 10th. If
you have any requests and/or
comments about the show either,
phone them in on Saturday, or better still, drop me a line and I'll see
what I can do...
Comments/requests should be
addressed to: Steve Edge, c/o The
Folk Show, CITR, 6138 SUB Blvd.,
U.B.C, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5.
The new CITR T-shirt is a bold new fashion statement, heralding
a new style and sensibility that is shaking the fashion world in New
York, Paris and Rome even as you read this.
Which is, of course, a load of bollocks.
However, we think it's a pretty nifty T-shirt. And we think you'd
probably look pretty good wearing one.
So glad you agree.
"So," you ask, reaching for your wallet, "where do I get one?"
Well, right now you can pick them up at CITR (room 233, Student
Union Building, UBC) or at Zulu Records, The Savoy or the Railway
Club. Soon we hope they'll be everywhere.
Buy one tomorrow, okay?
Photo Jim Main
Shindig—The Record is now available at all of the finest vinyl emporiums. Featuring Red Herring, Rhythm Mission, My Three Sons, Nerve
Tubes, Death Sentence and NG3, the record was recorded live at the
Savoy by the Commercial Electronics Mobile Studio. Great live sound,
six great bands, all brought to you by CITR. We don't know how you
could possibly pass it up.
Photo Dave Jacklin
Spinlist
FOR SIX YEARS NOW, THE
Legendary CITR Playlist has been
an invaluable consumers' guide to
he wide world of the Other Music.
But all good things must pass and
in their place hopefully come better things... and better things in
bigger sizes, too! The new CITR
Spin List is your guide to which
current releases are receiving airplay on FM 102. Over 100 new
demos, 7" and 12" singles, EPs
and LPs are included on the weekly Spin List, now available at Zulu,
Odyssey, and Revolutions record
stores. Each month, the Spin List
is sent to 150 record companies
and radio stations in Canada, the
United States and Europe, too.
If you want to hear the Spin List,
tune in to CITR's new releases program NEOFILE, hosted by Michael
Shea and heard every Saturday
noon to 4.
High Power Update
The plot has thickened in
CITR's pursuit of an increase in
power. We have learned that the
CRTC has received another application for the frequency from an as
yet unidentified group or station.
While this does complicate matters, we are confident that, with
your support, we can prevail in our
attempt to improve the reception
and availability of CITR.
This additional application does,
however, make it more important
than ever that you demonstrate to
the CRTC your support for alternative radio in Vancouver. So it's time
to hunker down to that typewriter,
put a point on the pencil, or jump
start the word processor: the deadline for letters and petitions in support of CITR's bid for High Power
is August 23rd. After that date, your
best intentions will fall on deaf ears.
So put the procrastination to an
end: WRITE TODAY.
All letters should be directed to:
THE   SECRETARY   GENERAL,
CRTC, and should make reference
to the application of THE RADIO
SOCIETY OF UBC and the application number—#851106500.
Please send your letter to:
CITR RADIO
6138 SUB BLVD., UBC
VANCOUVER, B.C. V6T 2A5
Shindig Returns
NO SOONER DOES SHINDIG—
The Record hit the stores than it's
time to start all over again. Shindig will once again showcase local
talent every Monday night at the
Savoy, with prizes of recording time
and equipment awaiting the lucky
winners of the finals in December.
If you are in a band, or know
someone who might be interested DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
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Membership Application
Welcome, Friends, to Reverend Larry's House
of Radio Miracles. I'm asking you to be audially
healed! I'm begging you to take that first step
towards musical salvation.
Put your hands on your radio and feel the power
of alternative non-commercial broadcasting. Feel
it surge into your ears, swelling your cranial
cavities, popping those palpitating pleasure pots
known as your eardrums! Yea, Friend, you have
been SAVED from the horrors of mainstream radio!
Now, to help continue this fine work at Reverend
Larry's House of Radio Miracles, I ask you to send
us a contribution. We need to build our strength,
to increase our friendship circle. Just fill out this
form and send it to me, care of CITR. Send $20.00
if vou are a UBC student, and $25.00 if you are
not. And help us save others from the degradation of dog food radio...
Thank you, Friend.
NAME:
AGE:
ADDRESS:
POSTAL CODE:
PHONE:	
ARE YOU A UBC STUDENT? Y N
UBC STUDENT NO. 	
INTERESTED IN PROGRAMMING? DISCORDER      A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
Mutabaruka
MEDICINE
MAN
"Our prime minister is Mr. Ronald
Reagan. We're living an American
dream. Especially in Jamaica and
the Caribbean..."
"When you hear da voice, it bounce back
and you do something about it. . ."
utabaruka
wrote the
poem
'Outcry" back in the '60s. 15 years later
that poem is the title track of his very popular
second LP, and his call for social justice is still
relevant. In the years between, Mutabaruka has
published books and released records with the
intent of raising the consciousness of people
above the level of political, economic, and
spiritual oppression.
His published works include, Outcry (1973), Sun and
Moon (1976), written with Sister Faybiene Miranda,
and The First Poems (1981). His work can also be
found in Itations of Jamaica and I Rastafari (1982).
In addition to the Outcry LP Mutabaruka can be
found on 1983's Check It and two earlier 12" singles,
one recorded with Sister Breeze. He has also produced and arranged the Word Soun' 'ave Power LP, a
collection of heavy dub poetry.
Bruce Turpin and Jill Rennie spoke to Mutabaruka after
his show July 18th at the Commodore.
DISCORDER: One of the first poems in your show was "Any Means
Necessary." That's pretty straight forward, but now in South Africa
there are blacks killing blacks. Do you see that any means necessary
may have some problems?
MUTABARUKA: No. Ya see, you ave black people dat support
apartheid, you have black multi-national corporations. It's not the
colour you're fighting against but the principality, the power behind
the apartheid regime, and the black people find themselves caught
supporting apartheid. Any means necessary ave to get dem out.
D: You also recited "Sister's Poem" and seem to be a man who
cares about the oppression of woman that's inflicted by man. Do you
see a change happening for woman?
M: Male Chauvinists! Right now dere is a struggle dat we're fightin
and we can't leave woman out of it. Woman ave ta be in it. No
sense fight witout woman becaw da woman is da backbone of da
cont. ► DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
August 1985
X St-
-3288
Let»*l GospEi
from p. 9
family, woman is like da eart' and you have to take care of da eart'.
D: What would you like to say to a Vancouver audience?
M: Well I won't say nuttin about music becaw I don't have any
music, I a poet. What I would say is dat people in Vancouver must
realize dat what is taking place in South Africa today have a direct
relationship with dere economic struggle in Canada. Now, it no use
a man say dat he is in Vancouver and what is in South Africa is too
far to ave a relationship. Everyting 'as a relationship. Canada,
France, Germany, America, England and now Japan is da main
supporters of apartheid. Now if people in Vancouver don't stand
agains' the system that recognize apartheid as a legal system, dey
demselves will always be in an economic struggle. All of these
multi-national organizations are feeding off da backs of 24 million
black people in South Africa. They support the companies by investments and by digging up the soil in Africa and building up their
mineral resources. They build up their atomic bombs, nuclear
weapons wit all their uraniums. Mose of the coal that feed Englan is
comin from South Africa. Coca Cola, Hertz Rent-A-Car, Rothman
cigarrette, a lot of dem support this wicked regime. So I'm sayin to
the people of Vancouver that it is time that people stop and think.
After so much years this wicked regime known as apartheid still exist and what are we doing about it? What are we trying to do about
it? Becaw if we continue to make it exist, mankind is in a shabby
condition in dis age of modern technology. We ave da power to stop
it. Seen we talk abou' democracy. When I was at school dey tell me
dat democracy mean for da people by da people. Now I say which
people?
D: You're talking about school. You have two children, are they in
school?
M: No, they are wit me.
D: Do you teach them at home?
M: No, we send dem to ordinary school. Can do no better. Dem not
ordinary chilren. We ave a certain philosophy and a certain
guideline unlike our parents before us. So even though they go to
dese schools it is good to know everyting. The only way to know DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
evil is to know it. Dere is no such ting as knowin good witout evil.
To know good you ave to know evil and to know evil you ave to
know evil. You have to read everyting and look at everyting and differentiate it in your consciousness. What is right from what is
wrong. Dat mean maybe you see me reading a Playboy magazine,
or da Bible for dat matter, you see you read everyting becaw dats
the only way you're going to differentiate. You know, experience
teaches wisdom, though I wouldn't jump in a fire an let it burn me.
D: Where are you living in Jamaica?
M: I live in Montego Bay. Not really Montego Bay. I live outside, way
up in some bush.
D: / saw the film Land of Look Behind a while ago.
M: Ya dat's my house, up in banana and pineapple country.
D: Have you lived there long?
M: No, eight years. I used to live in Kingston, in the city. I a true city man. I move to the country becaw I couldn't take the city
anymore.
D: A lot of people in Jamaica move from the country to the. city.
M: A lot of people move from the country to Kingston, and a lot of
people move from Kingston to New York. Dey try to go where da
grass is always greener, but sometime da grass dry up.
D: What about the future of Jamaica? It's a young country in the
sense of it's independence, but it doesn't look like the United States
will give it much change to grow up.
M: Our prime minister is Mr. Ronald Reagan yunno. Dere's no
doubt about dat. We're living an American dream. Especially in
Jamaica and the Caribbean. Mos of da countries turning to
capitalism. The IMF is gripping da t'ird world country, especially da
Caribbean, and Jamaica is one of dose key countries and dey have
"People work. Not democracy.
Democracy is ideology, just like
religion, just like communism, just
like teocracy, just like anarchism."
to control Jamaica and da Caribbean, Mr. Reagan and Mr. Seaga.
D: When Reagan was first voted in to office he said that Jamaica
would be used a a model country to prove that democracy could
work in the Caribbean.
M: Democracy never work.
D: What works then?
M: People. People work. Not democracy. Democracy is ideology,
just like religion, must like communism, jus like teocracy, jus like
anarchism. Dose tings are jus words to divert people dem minds
and attention from da reality of life. When people wan food and
clothes and shelter, dey don know nuttin about da philosophy of,
Marxism or Lenninism. Dey don know nuttin about what Sigmund
Freud said or what Mr. Reagan want to believe him said. Dey wan
to know how dem goin ta get food. Food don ave no politics. We're
not talking about political power, we're talkin about people power.
Like we're not talkin bout religion, we're talking bout consciousness.
Consciousness don ave no religion. Da people dem feel dey don
ave no politics, so dem don join nuttin.
D: As of no religion, you are Rasta.
M: Yamon, Rasta is not a religion, it's a way of life. A way of life for
a lot of people in Jamaica. We don ave no preacher, an we don ave
no building, no synagogue and no temple. We jus live it. You take
dis tape to do FBI or da CIA or someting?
D: No, we don't go near them.
M: Dat's a joke, don take it too seriously. I am not the person that
dey project me to be. Understan' dat. People look at me an
see...(frowns and looks terribly serious) I'm not that horror-god,
racist that people turn out!
D: If you could change the world what would you do?
M: If I could change the world. My what a serious question! If I
could change the world I would make everybody reverse. Dat means
I would make ya start at a old age and come up a baby instead of
coming up from a baby to old age. (Much laughter.) So when you
get young agin you go back in da womb and you become a sperm
again. Instead of starting from a sperm and get old, I would make
ya start old and become a sperm. That is if I could change da
world. Everyting mus change, it cyaan remain da same. <<*d&
DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
August 1985
IT'S ALL VERY DIFFICULT TO DESCRIBE.
There I was at one of Vancouver's hippest
nightspots on a warm July evening. There
weren't more than a couple of hundred
others there. Perhaps the rest of Vancouver's
supposedly aware alternative music crowd were
hungover from the Sea Festival, or mellowed into
inactivity by the folk festival. Or maybe it was the
relative anonymity of that evening's headliner that
kept people away.
Whatever the reason, many local music lovers
just plain blew it. That night the Luv-A-Fair was
the site of a truly multi-cultural experience and
musical education. And all provided by just one
band going by the rather unlikely name of Tupelo
Chain Sex.
There were probably as many feelings of apprehension as there were expectations as Tupelo
took the stage. On overweight, overaged hippy
clutched a tiny saxophone. A rainbow-haired
youngster plugged in his guitar. An older black
guy clutched the weirdest looking violin this side
of Laurie Anderson.
The band opened with a rather melodic number, based on some simple mid-Eastern melody.
They then bashed through a perfectly executed
time change into a hard-edged sound before
switching smoothly back into the melody. By the
time it was over a collective grin had invaded the
dance floor while surrounding tables were empty
and the bar quiet.
The audience was thus well primed when lead
singer Limey Dave joined the proceedings sporting a scintillating mohawk. Absurdity was replaced, at least for the most part, by organized chaos.
The band continued to flash through a broad
musical spectrum, sometimes playing many
styles simultaneously. Dave crooned, spat and
screamed heavily satiric lyrics. The next couple
of hours were to pass all too quickly.
Though new to most of us that live outside
California, Tupelo Chain Sex has been a hot item
in L.A. for about three years. They recently released their first major vinyl effort Spot the Difference which quickly rose to the top of the alternative charts all over North America.
The diversity of the band's a reflection of the
various members. Sax player Stumuk is a true
musical veteran. His credits include stints with
James Cotton, Frank Zappa and Maxine Nightingale, though he claims his deepest roots are in
the L.A. school system which gave him his
musical start in a marching band.
Drumer Willie Dredd got his start marching in
a high school band too. He has been playing pro
fessionally since he was fourteen, following up
his classical and jazz studies by playing for a
while with John Mayall's Blues Breakers.
Classical music was the basis of Mike Rub-
bidge's musical career. He studied cello for seven
years before picking up the bass to play with the
likes of the Kingbees and (gulp) Rick James.
Sugarcane Harris has a background in the
blues and a reputation for surviving the tempestuous, everchanging West Coast music scene
with his musical agility and a taste for bringing
his electric fiddle to the front of any musical style.
Tupelo Joe is the least experienced musician
in the band. He played with L.A. fixture Levi Dexter before picking up his guitar, mandolin and
harmonica and joining Tupelo Chain Sex.
Limey Dave claims to be "a musical illiterate."
He admits to getting caught up with the early
punk scene in London, but he grew disenchanted
as the music grew more established and predictable.
The energy that emerges from the contrasting
characters and experiences of the individual
band members fuses into a sound and style that
pillages nostalgia as it plunges wrecklessly into
the future.
"We take our stuff from everywhere," says Joe.
"Even musak. We can take the tackiest bit of D SCORDER      A Gu de to CITR fm 102 cable 100
melody, something you would hate to listen to,
and do something to it."
"We change the content" adds Dave. "Though
we lean on different traditions, we want the sound
to be very much today."
Tupelo's use of the familiar is a definite highlight of their sound. Stumuk opens a very punki-
fied version of "America" (from West Side Story)
with a stereotypic sax solo, "Take Me Out to the
Ball Game." The lyrics are hard and biting, the
sax sweet and funny, the lead lines shift quickly
between guitar and violin, so that it becomes difficult to tell what instrument is doing what.
This revival of traditions has become an
established trend in alternative music. But where
many bands and musicians are dealers with their
musical roots with purist traditional renderings,
Limey Dave sees a need for something different.
"Some bands seem intent on giving you
bloody history lessons. It's important to us to take
all those diverse musical elements and use them
as tools to come up with something that's very
1985."
It seems to work. Tupelo's sound is as different
as it is diverse. And amid the conscious calamity
of the music, they have an active, fun loving stage
act.
"Anything can happen," laughs Stumuk. "Hats
and other props will just appear on stage. Some-
time's we'll all just pile onto Dave, because he
can take it. Hell, one night a black high school
drum band did a solo on the dance floor."
This high-energy stage presence manages to
avoid pretentions. It seems more like natural buffoonery among good friends. It too is a reflection of the closeness of the band, a virtue which
plays an important part in creating the music.
"We just get together with a couple of cases
of beer and jam," says Dave. "We're pretty good
—I like to think very good friends and we try to
have a good time. If someone wants to try something different, we'll completely change a song
and see what it sounds like. That way the material
is constantly evolving."
The good times and on stage zaniness belie
the heavy satire of the lyrics. "It's like a sugar-
coated pill," says Limey Dave. "It's a lot easier
to absorb the grim reality of what is going on in
the world with a sense of humour." The lyrics take
the form of free-flowing narratives that comment
on the more undesirable aspects of Reagan's
America.
When I talked to the band about their politics
the discussion was random and refreshing. They
do not, probably cannot, preach a didactic point
of view. They just sound like ordinary folks upset
about the injustices and corruption around them.
"The government is playing Big Brother when
it should be just the janitor," intones Dave. "They
go around wasting tax dollars on stupid projects
when they should be taking care of people."
Back at the Luv-A-Fair Tupelo Chain Sex
reaches the end of their set with a crazy rap/funk
number. Two hundred people can make a lot of
noise when their hearts are into it so the band
returned promptly for a crazy encore. Who would
have thought that Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries
could be such a convincing introduction to an
eclectic, hard-driving version of The Sweet's
"Ballroom Blitz."
The band left the stage, the system had blown
a fuse. The crowd chanted "Chain Sex, Chain
Sex..." and no one left. Management promised
a return gig the next night but that was not
enough. Finally a fuse was found and the band
played on.
Perhaps the difference in Tupelo Chain Sex
live is best summed up by Tupelo Joe: "You know
how it is with most bands live. The songs are all
different but the sound stays the same. You know
what to expect. We don't want to be like that."
They're not. Tupelo Chain Sex will come back'
to Vancouver. The next move will be yours.
—Kawika DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
August 1985
PROGRAM
WEEKDAY PROGRAMMING
WEEKDAY REGULARS
7:30 am    Sign-On *
8:00 am    WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
1:00 pm    LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
4:30 pm   AFTERNOON SPORTSBREAK
6:00 pm    DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW, INSIGHT and
a DAILY FEATURE.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
MONDAYS
MONDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
7:30-10:30 am
Adventures in poetry. Thanks... Thanks to Ina
Roelants for coming in to read her poetry;
Thanks to Patrice Leslie for learning to push
the right buttons; Thanks to Peter Courte-
manche for his fatherly help; Thanks to
myself, Esi Zarmis, for getting up at five.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-1.00 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker. Listen
for the following 11 pm features:
05 Aug.  Abdullah Ibrahim's Dollar Brand. A
masterful album by this great South
African pianist, composer. A record
not yet heard in Canada: Ekaya's
Home.
12 Aug.  Composer Gary McFarland s musical
treatise on America written in 1968.
America the Beautiful...an account
of its disappearance, McFarland's
masterwork!
19 Aug.  Thomas "Fats" Waller. Vocals, piano
solos and band tunes by one of
Jazz music's foremost
entertainer-musicians.
26 Aug. Miles Daves' Bitches Brew. Miles'
best-selling and one of the most
musically influential albums of the
latter 20th Century.
TUESDAY
DOG'S BREAKFAST
7:30-11:00 am
A goulash of aural surprises and "Over the
Fence" radio drivel some time around 9:00.
Special orders will be taken. Your waiter: Paul
Funk.
POWER CHORD
5:00-6:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
PLAY LOUD
Late night 1:00 -4:00 am
Where no distinction is made between art
and garbage. Headphone listening is strongly
recommended. Aural surgeon; Larry Thiessen.
WEDNESDAYS
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
4:35-6:00 pm
Now with host Mike Dennis and assistant
host Kamel Gill. Look for a possible new
time slot for this popular show.
JUST LIKE WOMEN
6:20-7:30 pm
Woman, heal thyself with Ann and Lil's
remedy for the Old Boys' Network: an hour
of news, interviews, and music. A shot in the
arm for all women, and for any man who
likes them.
SCIENCE FICTION ANONYMOUS
11:30-12:30 am
This month: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the
Galaxy Parts l-IV
THE KNIGHT AFTER
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by. This show will
really mess up your hair!
THURSDAYS
GET UP OR DONT
7:3010:30 am
Get up or get down or eat or bathe or leave
or listen or sleep with host Don Chow.
VINYL DISASTERS
3:00-6:00 pm
But host Janis McKenzie doesn't limit herself
to vinyl. Join her as she stumbles through
other people's fun-filled records and tapes
and tries to keep the studio from blowing up..
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Top of the Bops approaches rock'n'roll from
the broader perspective of its roots in country, country swing and rockabilly as well as
R&B, jump blues and doo wop.
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00 pm-Midnight
CITR's best-loved station members, Jason
Grant and Mel Brewer, join forces to give you
the latest on the local scene.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
7:30-10:30 am
CITR's latest magazine show with everything
from music features to Youth Focus to info
on the arms race.
YOUTH FOCUS
10:30-11:00 am
02 Aug.  Effects of Media on Youth
09 Aug.  Music of Youth—Reflections of a
Lifestyle
16 Aug.  Youth Rights
23 Aug.  Immigrant Youth and Foreign
Students
30 Aug.  Youth and Education
OVER THE WALL SHOW
11:00 am-1:00 pm
With your host Brian Maitland, featuring a
cross-section of the latest from the L.A.
psychedelic scene to the hottest polka tunes.
Music to do your housework by.
OOH, ARE YOU IN A BAND?
1:00-3:00 pm
...because if you are, you can be a guest on
this show, maybe even win a fun-filled evening out with lovely host and quintessential
groupie Stacey Fruin.
FRIDAY NIGHT FETISH
6:20-9:00 pm (09 Aug. & 23 Aug.)
Life after Life After Bed. Host "Rev." Garnet
Harry says this is CITR's only serious religious
broadcast, but don't believe it (unless you
subscribe to the Church of Alice Cooper).
THE BIG SHOW
9:00 pm-Midnight
Why pay money to get into a nightclub on a
Friday night? If Big InternationAl can't get you
dancing, no-one can.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Eccentric but unpretentious fun with Steve
Gibson and Andreas Kitsmann. DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
U I D
WEEKEND PROGRAMMING
WEEKEND REGULARS
7:30 am    Sign-On (Saturdays)
8:00 am    Sign-On (Sundays)
Noon        BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
6:00 pm   SAT./SUN. MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of
current affairs and special features.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
THE ALTERED ALTERNATIVE SHOW
7:30-10:30 am
Jennifer and Todd bring you G-rated interviews with local luminaries, man-in-the-street
opinions and lots of requests.
THE FOLK SHOW
10:30 am-Noon
Everything from traditional to the most
contemporary folk music. See DISCORDER'S
Behind the Dial feature on page 6 for more
information.
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
Join CITR's music directors as they take you
through the station's new and exciting Spin
• List. Turn to page 21 for your own copy.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
4:00-6:00 pm
A program featuring African music and
culture with hosts Todd Langmuir, Patrick
Onukwulu and Dido. Tune in for the latest
news from Africa, plus special features at
5:00 pm.
PROPAGANDA!
6:30-9:30 pm
Today In History and the usual eclectic mix
of music, spoken word, political commentary
and humour. High Profiles, and other
features. Host Mike Johal; Operator Don
Miller; Production Stacey Fruin, Brent Kane.
High Profiles:
03 Aug.  Paul Weller sings about the U.K.
10 Aug.  William S. Burroughs
17 Aug. Son of Revenge of the Words—live
recorded poetry from Pitt International Galleries.
24 Aug.  Frightwig—featuring an interview by
Mike Johal
31 Aug. Snakefinger—featuring an interview
by Mike Johal
Interviews:
03 Aug.  The Cramps
10 Aug.  PAND-Pertorming Artists tor
Nuclear Disarmament
Features:
10 Aug.  AEIOU-The Artists Educational and
& 24        Iconoclastic Organization (Un-)
Limited is here to bring you the bad
news from Canada and around the
world. With the state of world
politics as it is we hope to be
around for a long time!
17 Aug.  Reading-Richard Jobson (ex-The
Skids, The Armoury Show) reads
10:30 On a Summer's Night, based
on a book by Marguerite Duras.
PYJAMA PARTY
9:30 pm-1:00 am
Your hosts Mike Mines and Robin Razzell
present everything from ambient music for
snoozing to upbeat tunes for popcorn and
pillow fights.
TUNES R' US/
MUSIC FROM THE TAR PITS
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Lots of music, a little chit-chat and loads of
fun. Listen for Handyman Bob, Groove Jumping, and, the first Saturday of every month,
Music from the Tar Pits—aural dinosaurs
courtesy of the Knight After, Random
Cacophony, and Tunes 'R' Us.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am-Noon
20th Century music in the classical tradition-
Mahler to Medernal, Scriabin to Xenakis, all
styles, media, and nationalities. Hosts: Lynn
Price and Paul Smith.
04 Aug.  UBC Contemporary Players.
11 Aug.   20th Century British composers
Peter Maxwell Davies, Michael Tippit
and more.
18 Aug.  Louie Andriessen.
25 Aug.  Charles Ives.
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in reggae with host George Family
Man Barrett, Jerry the Special Selector, the
Major Operator, and Collin the Prentice.
SOUL GALORE
3:00-4:30 pm
Focusing on Black-American popular music of
this century, this program takes you from the
birth of the blues through doo-wop, soul and
funk, from Massachusetts to California and
everywhere in between.
THE SHADED GREY AREA
4:30-6:00 pm
Simply devoted to providing standard CITR
fare (if such a thing exists) on a day otherwise given over to specialty programming.
Tyler Cutforth rotates the grooves and/or
magnetic bits and takes requests.
NEITHER HERE NOR THERE
6:30-8:00 pm
Relevance? What relevance? Music, interviews,
comedy and readings of prose and poetry
with hosts Chris Dafoe and Paris Simons.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
8:00-9:00 pm
Confirmed so far: The Young Fresh Fellows at
the Zulu Revue, recorded last April, to be
aired 04 Aug.
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Probably Vancouver alternative radio's most
alternative show. Mark Mushet searches the
world over for experimental, minimalist,
avant-garde, electronic, and other non-
mainstream sounds.
04 Aug.  The Amazing Peter "Thoosh" Marter
will be the guest. An ecclectic and
predictably esoteric look at the
kinds of music available via mail
order new music distribution
services.
11 Aug.  The Recommended Quarterly. A
magazine/compilation disc of new
material from Britain's Recommended Records and November Publications. Aslo, the new LP by Steven
Brown and Benjamin Lew.
18 Aug. Stefan Tischler, one of the group
Port Said, is back in Vancouver to
escape the pleasantries of NYC in
midsumer. He has brought a variety
of tapes from a group of people in
New York who work in the grey
areas of non-academic electronic
music. We'll also be hearing the
work Stefan has done since leaving
Port Said.
25 Aug.   "Live" musique concrete/tape
collage/performance/event. Utilizing
both of the station's studios, Larry
Thiessen and myself will orchestrate
a show consisting of invited taped
# sounds produced especially for the
event. A live mix/layering of work
by the two of us, Clemens Rettich,
Greg Nixon, Stefan Tischler, and
more. If you would like more information call 669-0398.
THE EARLY MUSIC SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Join host Ken Jackson for music from the
Renaissance and Baroque periods, presented
at an appropriately early hour.
05 Aug. J.S. Bach-Leipzig Chorales Pt. II
12 Aug.  Archangelo Corelli
19 Aug.  Vivaldi—Gloria
26 Aug.  The Court of Burgundy (15th Cen
tury); W.A. Mozart—Symphony in D
Major (Academy of Ancient Music)
-and lots more. DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
August 1985
Vinyl    Verdict
Bryan Ferry
Boys and Girls
6iO LICK" "WIMPY" "WELL PRODUCED"
3 "Lounge Music" "Smooth as a Lizard's
Bum"
Those seem to be the words on most well-to-
do rock connoisseur's lips when dealing with the
notion of Ferry's purported artsiness and how it
relates to the mainstream of popular music.
Sound a tad pretentious? Well, I'll put it this way;
How many of you actually expected some kind
of avant-garde rock statement from a post-Avalon-
solo record from Bryan Ferry? Don't laugh. There
is still a surprisingly large number of people who
refuse to believe that Ferry bought into the
"business" years ago and that it's truly amazing that he is able to produce such consistently
outstanding work within the confines of that
"business." No, Boys and Girls is by no means
an adventurous album despite its being produced by the driving force behind Roxy Music, one
of the most influential and unique rock bands of
the 1970s. It is, however, an excellent LP and one
that should serve to lend some credibility to the
top 40 and the idea that popular audiences can
sometimes surprise with an unexpected show of
sophistication.
But surely...where can something like this differ from the bulk of material from all those "Toto"
clones? The fact is that Ferry's heavily mannered
vocal stylings and sense of style in general have
made it, relatively unaffected by the impurities
of the "business," into the eighties.
The material on the album? Oh sure. It's slick,
wimpy, well produced, smooth as a lizard's bum
lounge music. And on that level the record is
flawless. It has the calculated hit single in "Slave
to Love," the 35 to 40 dance hit in "Don't Stop
the Dance," "The Chosen One," and "Stone
Woman", and the sly inclusion of a subtle, slightly
eccentric and above all gorgeous pair of tunes;
"A Wasteland," and the title cut "Boys and Girls"
that Ferry says was deliberately designated as
a title cut so that it would draw the attention of
radio programmers to the more subtle and
interesting.
The playing is tight. Very tight. In fact I would
say it borders on being inspired. Not surprisingly, many of the late period Roxy players are included in the roster along with a few surpises,
namely David Gilmore, Mark Knopfler, and Tony
Levin. Otherwise, the credits on Avalon will suffice, should you lose the inner sieve of Boys and
Girls.
Lyrically, the words forlorn and terminal heartbreak come to mind, glazed, of course, with that
splash of ennui that made even the most absurd
Roxy tracks somewhat alluring. The back/front
cover depicts a dishevelled, cigarette-puffing Bry
with that "I just got laid by my lover for the last
time" look on his face. And you thought he was
happily married. Then again, when the market
calls...
If this review is trying too hard to drip with the
same ennui and awkward grace that Bryan pos-
seses, well...maybe I'm just a jealous guy. How
did that song go? "I wear my heart on my
sleeve..."
—Mark Mushet
Linda Thompson
One Clear Moment
PERHAPS SOME BACKGROUND INFORMA-
tion would help to understand and appreciate this LP. Linda Peters began as a child actress,
but turned to music when she found she could
sing well enough to be appreciated in the folk
clubs of London in the late '60s. She fell in with
Fairport Convention where she met and subsequently picked up Richard Thompson:
"Richard was unbelievably introverted then.
Basically, he went out with women who picked him up, threw him over their shoulder and
took him home. I like men like that, 'cause I'm
quite forward."
They were married in 1972, and shortly afterwards Richard became a Sufi Muslim. Linda
tagged along into this male-oriented world of self-
denial: no drinking, no laughing, no loving-
hoping that outer contraction would lead to inner
expansion. Such was the intensity of her enforced inferiority in this environment that when she
started to sing again, with The Albion Band,
Richard was furious and she was "dissolved" by
the sect.
Richard packed in the ardent stuff and rejoined aboth Linda and the music scene, inspired
by the punk explosion of '77. Later, with Linda
pregnant, Richard did a solo tour of the USA,
where he met and fell in love with Nancy Covey,
a Los Angeles folk promoter. So Linda was ditched again.
The break-up coincided with the release of
their LP Shoot Out The Lights, and the supporting tour was a fiery affair, culminating with Linda
hitting Richard over the head with a Coke bottle.
Suddenly freed from years of imposed restraint,
she describes the situation thus:
"I suddenly went from being this lady with
three children—covered in scarves, with my
eyes to the ground—to stealing cars, drinking
vodka and living on anti-depressants. I felt
fabulous!"
Which brings me, finally, to the new album.
There are some outstanding tracks here, with lots
of deep, soul-searching descriptions of the breakup, although the whole LP is inappropriately
sugar-coated by smooth production. However, the
overriding impression I get is one of unbridled
optimism emanating principally from the opening
track, "Can't Stop the Girl," with its infectious
Calypso beat asnd defiant chorus:
"The tide's on the turn, all is right with the
world;
You can duck, you can hide, but you can't stop
the girl.
Cry like a baby, baby! Hide from the world;
You can run to Mama, but you can't stop the
girl."
She has a beautifully clear voice which
disguises the obvious anguish of songs like "Telling Me Lies" (probably the best song on the LP)
and "In Love With the Flame."
Other highlights are the delightfully kinky
"Take Me on the Subway:"
"Take me on the Subway,
Take me on the moon,
Take me in the car park,
Take me with a spoon,"
and a tasteful cover version of the soul classic
"Just Enough to Keep Me Hangin' On."
On the whole, about half the LP is excellent,
the rest is over-produced filler, but she is certainly
a fascinating person who, with a more inspired DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
producer, could begin to scale the lofty heights
so consistently enjoyed by her former spouse.
—Steve Edge
REM
00 SOU KKJOIV U/tm THIS KJIHILISIIC
RWlSH Qoe* TO YOU ? ...
Fables of the Reconstruction
IRS
IT NEVER CEASES TO AMAZE ME HOW
rock critics can create the kind of pressure,
the expectations that they have created for REM.
Of course, REM have always been what some
call a "critics' band" but it has reached the point
where many are given to rash statements to the
effect that REM are redefining American music
or that they're an archetypal American band. I
suppose the praise is justified in that not a few
of the young bands I see in clubs sound a lot
like REM and many people describe a whole
genre of rock music as "the REM thing." That's
fine as far as it goes but to say that the REM
sound is representatively American is a blatant
generalization. The (North) American musical
fabric is too diverse to allow four white boys from
the South to sew a decent suit.
The REM sound is more like a modern Southern chapter of the American myth, an elusive and
often ambiguous picture of life south of the
Mason-Dixon line so wonderfully conceived that
it can touch people regardless of where they live.
The mystique is only enhanced by their new
album Fables of the Reconstruction. This is the
moodiest record REM have made to date. From
the uncharacteristically taut plodding of "Feeling Gravity's Pull" to the closing strains of the
truly pastoral "Wendell Gee," REM take us on
a journey of recollections. The title is an apt one
because there is a narrative quality that pervades
the album. The stories are difficult to follow, but
the band are so successful in creating a real
sense of setting that we are convinced that this
must be the stuff of legend.
I don't want to give the impression that this is
an album full of ballads. Actually the record is
full of lively upbeat tunes, except that it's paced
like a roller coaster ride—fast, slow, up, down,
all around.
Indeed the pacing of the record plays an integral role in establishing the dual themes that REM
seem to be exploring. Many of the faster songs,
particularly "Driver 8" and "Auctioneer (Another
Engine)" are about going places, moving and
migrating, although the destination always
seems uncertain. Trains play a major symbolic
role as they always have in the American myth,
and for Michael Stipe, trains seem to represent
an escape into the unknown, to places only
hinted at in whispered rumours and legends;
perhaps reminiscent of Huckleberry Finn and the
Mississippi riverboats in the writings of Mark
Twain.
The slower songs achieve the opposite effect.
There is a sense of security and contentment
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August 1985
about songs like "Wendell Gee" and "Green
Grow the Rushes" that suggests the kind of
solitude one feels just by lying on the riverbank,
staring up into the sky and letting the mind
wander. Two notable exceptions are "Old Man
Kinsey" and "Feeling Gravity's Pull." Again their
slow tempo suggest solitude and reflection but
of a darker, more intense, almost morbid kind.
Here there is a feeling of anxiety instead of contentment, inertia, rather than motion and discord
overwhelming harmony. The effect is is unsettling
and somewhat claustrophobic.
But what does it all mean? Your guess would
be as good as mine, but probably different. REM
songs tend to defy definitive interpretations, due,
in no small part, to Michael Stipe's often unintelligible singing style. The fact that they refuse to
include lyric sheets with their records proves that
they consider the words themselves to be of
secondary importance. Indeed, Stipe's approach
to singing seems to be one that favours using
words to create melody rather than to say something and it is largely this approach that is responsible for their trademark sound.
He gives us a catchphrase here and there so
that we can occasionally mumble along with him,
but how we interpret the lyrics is an individual
concern. REM have always used ambiguity to
their advantage and on Fables of the Reconstruction the effect of that ambiguity is one that invites personal interpretation. Thus, it is easy to
form attachments with the songs, because they
tend to constantly churn the subconscious and
stimulate the imagination. This inspirational
quality is something that REM have been successful in recreating on a consistent basis.
At the same time, they have avoided staleness,
and in the face of being a favourite with the
critics, shrugged off the pressure of maintaining
high standards. It's a gift, I guess, because
Fables of the Reconstruction doesn't include a
single dud. Overall the album sounds thicker and
lusher, and musically, the songs are more complex. REM travelled to England to record the
album with noted English folk producer Joe Boyd
at the controls (instead of Mitch Easter and Don
Dixon) and it might be that he is partially responsible for the extra instrumentation that augments
what are usually basic arrangements. It's these
little things like the banjo picking on "Wendell
Gee" and the horns (gasp!) on "Can't Get There
From Here" that give the songs the added flavour
of authenticity. The latter, powered by a pseudo-
funk bass line, is, I suspect, to be taken tongue
in cheek, a subtle poke at the notion that the
REM sound is a synthesis of the spectrum of
American music.
REM are simply masters at capturing a mood
and conveying it with fresh, honest, uncontrived
feeling. I suppose it is small wonder that they
have garnered such critical praise and typical
that they really haven't risen above cult status.
These guys are just too good for that. Tell all of
your friends.
—Steve Robertson
The Rangehoods
Roughtown
Big D Records
ROUGHTOWN, BY THE RANGEHOODS IS A
deliciously refreshing record, bursting with
vitality. Pop and country influences come together to form a bright, upbeat sound with a
unique feel and texture.
Steve Pearson's high-pitched, nasal vocals are
reminiscent of the Dils' Chip Kinman, but occasionally become whiney. Pearson uses strong,
catchy melodies, with lavish harmonies supplied
by Pat Hewitt (guitar) and Tony Lease (bass),
which lends a strong country flavour to the overall sound. The guitars (played by Pearson and
Hewitt) are bright, jangly and clean, interspersed with sporadic choppy rhythms and haunting
ethereal licks on top. Don Kammerer keeps the
drumming solid and sparse, adding only the
most necessary of fills.
The songs on Roughtown are basic pop songs,
dealing with the usual material: being unpopular
at school, losing a girlfriend, etc. The music
ranges from being hardhitting, fast-paced and
punchy, to being melancholic, slow and heavy-
hearted. The vocal style changes accordingly, DISCORDER     A Guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
from sounding almost brattish in "Not A Boy,"
then moving to a weepy, choked sob in "Used
To Be You."
The Rangehoods sound simultaneously like
the Dils and the Modernettes at their most
country-ish. Although the songs may seem cliche
and conventional, the memorable melodies,
jangly guitars, slithering lead solos and punchy
beat make Roughtown a very impressive record.
Particularly outstanding are the songs "Rough-
town'" and "Not A Boy."
—Sean Newton
Nick Cave
and the Bad Seeds
The Firstborn is Dead
THE FIRSTBORN IS DEAD: A LONG BLACK
train, rumblng on iron rails through the Deep
South. Through Selma, through Tupelo, through
Laredo, the fog-bound swamps of the Okefeno-
kee, collecting all that is twisted, heathen and
"uncivilized" in America. Nick Cave is the
mournful engineer; Mick Harvey and Barry
Adamson pour the coal, driving the train, inexorably, to some dark destination. This leaves
Blixa Bargeld (a modern Lead-belly?) to accompany the train, wallowing next to Cave, trying
desperately not to fall off.
On rails of pain (on rails of pain and suffering)
There comes a train (There comes a train long-
suffering)
On rails of pain (On rails of pain and suffering)
O Baby blow its whistle in the rain
("The Black Crow King")
The train lurches, it shudders, but it never
leaves the rails, laid straight by Cave's pitifully
poisoned lyrics. He, an Australian living in England, found this train in West Berlin two years
ago, but has only now learned how to run it. You
will find no idolatry here, but Cave certainly owes
Robert Johnson, Blind Lemon Jefferson, and
Screamin' Jay Hawkins a great deal for his train.
They were pioneers of the evil blues, but nobody
sings the blues quite like Nick Cave. Strophe and
antistrophe are melded with a foreboding gospel
sound in Cave's best lyrical performance yet, it
is a celebration of the dark.
The raging fires of Cave's depression, the
stigma of the Birthday Party's finest effort, the
Bad Seed EP has been replaced by a monster
known as Memory. The train is piloted by a man
who puts his personal anguish on display on
stage, on album, on tape, but can never rid him
self of it. While the listeners can, in his eyes, only
partly relate to his pain, he is always left with the
memory the life experience.
And I'm still here rolling after everybody's gone
I'm still here rolling after everybody's gone
I'm still here rolling and I'm left on my own
Those black birds they have flown
and I am on my own.
Make no mistake, I don't find this train beautiful. I find an ugliness so powerful that it can easily
be misconstrued as beauty. The melody of
"Knockin' on Joe," a haunting piano line, is
breathtaking until you see that the brutality and
anger beneath it (the song is about prisoners on
chain gangs who would practice self-mutilation
to avoid heavy, often murderous labour) have be
restrained to create a marvellous sorrowful face-
ade. This masquerade is typical of Cave's America, where mass murderers perform as clowns
at children's hospitals, and "pillars of the community" don hoods and burn crosses on summer evenings. These things are on the train, in
"Tupelo," "Wanted Man" (a wonderful adaption
of a Dylan composition) and "Blind Lemon Jefferson," but they are expressed as an ambience
of corruption, not as individual transgression.
One drawback to this train: the ride is long and
lonesome, the end uncertain. The Birthday Party,
and subsequently Nick Cave, have been accorded cult status. This train, despite its excellence,
will carry only devout pilgrims, with a minimum
of virgin travellers. None of them will be happy
when they disembark. Happy for having taken
the train, yes; happy in themselves, no. They will
tell their timid friends: "You can go to hell in a
handbasket, but, I'll take the train."
—Jason Grant
TRACK
E
^S^
Final     3 J
CLEARANCE4]
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August 1985
DESPITE MANY RECORD
distributors' (and stores') refusal to stock 7-inch records and
the megacompanies' insistence on
issuing limited edition lazer-
etched, scratch and sniff, picture
disc 12-inchers, the little 7-incher
keeps on chugging. It is especially
popular with fledgling new bands
and record labels which, like their
methods of releasing vinyl, prefer
to go the least expensive way possible: basic guitars, drums, and
vocals. This month we look at the
possibility, in the minds of the
multi-billion dollar music industry,
the deepest of the underground
burrowers: the punk/hardcore/garage crowd.
ANOTHER KIND OF BLUES
Explosion Blues
(Collector's RPM Undergrowth)
Collector's RPM takes another
step forward into the music industry (their first release being the very
successful Undergrowth '84 compilation tape set), this time with a
5-song 7-inch record. Part of the
band's name might be misleading;
if this is blues, it's undoubtedly the
fastest blues I've ever heard. What
it is is high-energy, drivin' rock with
obvious punk influences, the most
notable of those being that of
G.B.H. Ex-House of Commons'
guitarist Neil Embo has written
some really creative material here,
complete with lots of hooks and
guitar power. "Explosion Blues"
and "What's Going On" are the
best cuts, both feature memorable
choruses and lots of punch. The
8-track production gets the job
done, although the bass guitar
could have cut through clearer. The
packaging on this record is first-
rate though, and guess what? It
comes on blue vinyl! Hey, check it
out.
THE CATATONICS
Hunted Down
(Anorexic/Nympho Records)
A 5-song 7-incher this time and
it's full of ball-blasting hardcore
thrash: angry and unrelenting. This
record is nothing really original, but
it is undeniably powerful. What it
does sound like is a well-produced
live recording, even though it was
done in the studio. Some hardcore
bands can't seem to transfix their
live energy (if they indeed have
any) to vinyl; this lot has, and does.
Oh yeah, these good ol' boys are
from Camillus, New York, if that
means anything.
DRUNKS WITH GUNS
3-Song EP
(Cheap Beer Records)
Okay, now this is nasty and raunchy. But very slow dirge-like raunchy. It's comparable to Lux Interior
on valium meets FLIPPER for a
night of pub-crawling. With titles
like "Punched In the Head" and
"Bloodbath," you just know this
isn't any Donny and Marie revival
act. It's kind of hard to make out
the lyrics, but I did manage to
make out something about "giving
drugs to little kids" amidst the
various belches. Still, some people
enjoy this type of music. Could
become a collector's item.
WHITE PIGS
Evil Stalks the Innocent
(Songs of Sin Records)
Here's something you don't see
too often, a 3-song live recording
pressed onto a red vinyl 7-incher.
This is the WHITE PIGS' 2nd vinyl
release, the first was a studio-
recorded 7-inch, so I guess the
next logical step is a studio 12-inch
EP. Who knows? Maybe they can
keep going to the point whre they
can put out a 5 full-sized record set
of a live performance just like
Laurie Anderson did.
All kidding aside, this isn't too
bad of a record. The sound quality
is decent, and the band is capable
of coming up with some infectious
riffs. The Satanic lyrics are sung in
a manic fashion. Hardcore!
BEYOND POSSESSION
Telltale Heart
(Rooter Records)
Despite struggling local alternative music scenes, Canada's
Prairie cities have managed to
spawn some dynamite bands.
Some examples which spring to
mind are Winnipeg's PERSONALITY CRISIS, and Edmonton's K.D.
LANG and S.N.F.U. Now comes
Calgary's BEYOND POSESSION,
a band which fuses the speed of
hardcore with the guitar virtuosity
of the newer metal bands such as
METALLICA. The songs are done
at a breakneck pace, but still manage to retain enough melody to be
catchy. Singer Ron Hadley's harsh,
intensely sung vocals compliment
the ferocious music. BEYOND
POSSESSION'S 6 songs on this
7-inch are all concerned with personal topics except for the Edgar
Allan Poe-esque "Telltale Heart —
the title cut. Eerie!!
NOT FOR SALE
A Few Dollars More
(Rabid Cat Records)
Rabid Cat Records in Austin,
Texas is one of those fledgling
record labels devoted to helping
out newer brands. And one of those
bands is MJT FOR SALE, also
from Austin'. They are more of a
pop band than anything, but here
is a lot of energy contained within
these grooves. A clean guitar
sound, harmonized backup vocals,
and tempting hooks make this a
pretty neat record. The singer
sounds Jjke Joe Jackson, and
that's a c'ompliment. All 3 songs
are good and bouncy, and the
lyrics to "War Economy" hit home,
even though I'm not American.
Well done packaging and production round out a nifty release.
—Mike Dennis
t
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DUKES OF STRATOSPHEAR
PREFAB SPROUT
VARIOUS
Little Creatures
Low Life
Fables of the Reconstruction
Walking in the Shadow of...
In Ekstasy
Arrive Without Travelling
Let's Wreck the Party
Love Not Money
Wildweed
Food Gas Lodging
Real Night Time
Too Cool to Live, Too...
Full Force
Life's a Riot/Between the...
Tunes From the Missing...
Double Album
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Steve McQueen
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STAN RIDGWAY
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EGGHEAD
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Wrong World
Panic/Tainted Love
Talk to the Birds
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Grimly Fiendish
Happy Man
Theme/Dunken Augen
Poisoned EP
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At the Beach
Ball of Confusion
Omaha
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Bodybag
Strangely Wild EP
Knock It Off
You Trip Me Up
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Such a Grind
Reagan's Back
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'(
HMMD
"M you see There in M news
where in Wevaio. something
happened to all the good, people?*'
<ei made dinner last night and
just set it on the porch. Joe
went into quarantine Monday,
uou know."
"Let's test your stupidity quotient.
How many tons does a mail van
weigh? "•
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The Roving Ear R K
This month from the Bahamas. . .
August 1985
IT FELT LIKE I'D BEEN FLYING FOREVER,
catching the red-eye flight to TO. with a 2-
hour stopover in the exciting airport and
then connecting on to Nassau. It was verging on
14 hours by the time the white sands and emerald waters of the atolls off New Providence Island
broke the monotony of the ocean horizon. I'd just
about had enough of the airplane muzak (which
is piped through plastic tubular earphones and
which changes pitch with every change in altitude and cabin pressure) and so I let my mind
drift off, dreaming of laying myself bare to the
beautiful syncopated beat of island music and
getting high off the natural energy of the live
music and customs of a foreign land.
I stumbled off the plane into Customs and
there was greeted by a small stage off in the corner made up to look like a tropical grass hut. Inside sat three Islanders playing the kind of music
I'd just wistfully been thinking of. While everyone
else streamed by hurrying on to get through
Customs I stopped to take in the musical novelty.
The three were older black men with sun-worn,
wrinkled faces who stared ahead with emotionless faces, seemingly out of touch with the lively
music they were playing. It wasn't long before
I caught their eye and with some grins of appreciation the music increased in vitality. The guitarist played a hollow-bodied electric which looked
as if it was kept outside during the monsoon
season, the bassist's amp looked as if it was
used as a tire stop for a delivery truck, and the
percussionist played a variety of kettle drums and
bongo drums that defy description. The music
was clean as a surgeon's knife, and I stood there
in the heavy, fragrant air mesmerized after my
sleepless night by the intertwining syncopated
rhythms and notes of those musicians. I closed
my eyes and the melody evoked images of vast,
white-sand beaches, palm trees and the dreamy,
numbing effect of dark rum. As I danced around
to the irrestible rhythms I thought, "It IS better
in the Bahamas...", but little did I realize at that
moment, that was as close as I was going to get
to island music in that part of the Caribbean.
The Bahamas are a little group of islands lying just off the southern coast of Florida, not
actually in the Caribbean. The whole economy
is supported by the tourist trade. American influences are overwhelming. Most of Nassau's radio
and TV comes directly from Florida. The local
Bahamian radio is more like a BBC radio operation, where music is somehow played between
the news and "James Lancaster Smith-Jones
who left 89 living relatives" 's obituary. The Bahamian youth go to Florida for vacation and university, and American money is as much a part of
the economy as Bahamian money. It is no
wonder that American music has such a stronghold on the Bahamian music scene.
The Bahamian population must be one of the
highest per capita purchasers of car stereos,
ghetto blasters and walkmans in the world (it
helps being a duty-free area). No moment was
left in solitude, no sunset without a fanfare. After
a while I began to realize what is intuitively obvious: American music DOMINATES. Billy Ocean
is BIG, as is M. Jackson, L. Ritchie, D. Ross,
Teddy Pendergrass, and an assortment of other
American R&B musicians. It was a lot of work
to find anyone who'd even heard of the likes of
the Twinkle Brothers, Mikey Dread, and co, and
you should have seen some of the looks I got
when asking about the local music scene (I stopped to talk to a few young Bahamian girls who
were dressed in pseudo-trendy garb like miniskirts and leather vests and unusual coiffs and
found out that they were hookers!!).
Finally I found some guys in an out-of-the-way
record store who enthusiastically played some
Jamaican reggae and gave me a list of some live
gigs for the week. Although I didn't attend all of
the shows (there are some places in Nassau that
a little white girl shouldn't go to alone at night)
I managed to get to a couple of live, festival-like
gigs. In those I witnessed a parade of groups who
covered the previously mentioned American artists with a small mix of pretty good reggae.
I would like to think that I was just unlucky and
couldn't/didn't find original Bahamian music (I'd
just missed a Twinkle Bros, gig by days). The
Commonwealth of the Bahamas is a politically
stable country where the people are content to
allow the American way and the big bucks from
the casinos and hotels be as much a part of their
lives as the Queen. As such, there is no driving
force, no "angry youth" to drive the Bahamian
musicians to create a musical identity with a
message as the Jamaicans have successfully
done.
After a hectic week in Nassau I relocated to
one of the outer, rural islands. I'd pretty well given
up an active search to find authentic Bahamian
music. One sweltering day I stopped to watch a
couple of boys jigging needle fish off a small
dock with just a line and a safety-pin. As time
passed they began to relax in my presence and
talked easily back and forth in their unintelligible
Bahamian dialect. I was just about to leave when
one of the boys turned to me with his toothy grin
and sang...
"We arr de whirld...we arr de chill-ren..."
I groaned aloud, wishing once again that I had
gone to Jamaica instead.
—Beverly Demchuk  tflunrnK *.m<
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THEB0NELESS0NES
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