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 diScOAPeR
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ISSUE    J
•Interview - Pr^p
•New Vinyl iron
Rip Rig & Bani
•Ramones
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JUNE 1983
VOL. I NO. 4 DiScORDER
tA guide to CITR fm 102
*^ r API c -«v»
Roxy Music has always been,
primarily, Bryan Ferry's band as
documented by the continuity
of Roxy's sound throughout his
solo albums. Phil Manzanera,
on the other hand, has seen fit
to enlist a greater variety of
musicians and musical styles,
particularly jazz (most evident
on the excellent but obscure
Quiet Sun project "Mainstream")
for his own albums, thus
making his solo career the most
interesting of all the Roxy
offshoots. Roxy was in town on
Monday, May the 9th, and after
devoting an entire day to the
seemingly impossible task of
interviewing the band, I, with
the help of Paris Simons, was
able to get a very productive
and informative hour long talk
with Phil (as Bryan was "busy").
As it turned out, Phil had much
more to say anyway and was
quite taken by the fact that
someone was interested more
in his own work than Roxy's.
The following interview took
place Tuesday evening
following their performance
and serves as general overview
of his views on the current
version of Roxy and of his past
solo outings.
Discorder — Do you find you're
leaving North American
audiences in the dark when you
play the older songs? I noticed
that you didn't play anything
from the first album last night.
Phil — Yeah. It's something we
don't really think about alot but
on this tour particularly it's
been brought home to us.
Somebody else mentioned it
and I thought that's quite right.
There are probably a lot of
tracks that people have never
heard, people who've just
gotten into Roxy with "Flesh
and Blood" or "Avalon" and
they're hearing all these other
tracks. That's alright though.
We're not trying to hide them.
We're quite proud of them.
Discorder — Bryan was saying
that he thinks his wearing a
white dinner jacket on stage in
America perhaps had something to do with the bands' lack
of acceptance there.
Phil — Yeah. I think that
possibly did have something to
do with it. One always hopes
that the music will win through
and, really, we've always gotten
the music together first and
then thought of an attractive
way to present it. I guess
because of the way we were
initially promoted in America
the image side just got all
messed up and it's taken a long
time to actually make any
headway. Although, having
said that, "Avalon" has done
twice  as  well  as  "Flesh  and
INTERVIEW:
ROXY MUSIC'S
PHIL MANZANERA
Blood" in America and we're
now playing about twenty dates
there and they're all pretty big.
Twice as many people as
before, four years ago, have
shown up, so we are actually
making progress there
America has always been a bit
of an enigma for us though.
Discorder — How do you find
Roxy's and your own music
progressing?
Phil — It's changing all the time.
What has happened is that all
our methods of working
together have changed,
especially Bryan's and mine, to
a certain extent. I think having
the facility of a recording
studio, alongside my house,
one can feel more relaxed, take
more risks, spend more time,
and use it as a base. What we
tend to do is to do the creative
part and the actual writing in
the studio, whether it's coming
in with a few chord sequences
and building something up to a
certain shape, or just starting
from scratch. Then we'd go to,
maybe, New York and use the
studio there for a particular
reason and then go back home,
regroup, assess the tracks, and
carry on working on them,
chipping things away and
adding things to them. It's
something we started with
"Flesh and Blood", which was
when the studio was first built,
and on "Avalon" we really used
what we had learned about
recording   techniques   and
writing. We're writing a lot more
material now. We've got more
choice and that means that lots
of different types of music are
coming out and to me it's
sounding quite different. It
seems to be developing. From
"Flesh and Blood" to "Avalon"
seems to me to be a
progression. The tracks we
chose for "Avalon" all fitted into
a certain mood and that mood
happened to be quite "laid-
back". There were other
numbers that were more "up"
but they didn't fit into the idea of
having an album as a very
strong mood.
Discorder — Do you find you're
able to experiment enough
within the context of Roxy's
material?
Phil — It depends what you
mean by experiment. The show
we're putting on with Roxy
leaves certain areas for soloing.
That's the only area in which
one can supposedly
"experiment". The solos can be
different every .night but the
structures have to be the same.
When you have eleven people
on stage it can sound like a
horrible mess if you don't have
some pretty strict guidelines for
everybody, especially with all
the technical problems and
things like that. If it was a four
piece situation like, for
instance, King Crimson, when
they go out on tour it's much
easier to structure your songs
so that you could leave one
section totally free and up to
whatever happens each night.
We used to do that in Quiet Sun
and that's fine when you've got
about four people and they're
all instrumentalists. It's
impossible in any other context
and it's also very difficult to do
that sort of thing with vocalists
because there's normally
nothing for them to do and if
you have them all scatting away
it can sound like a bad night at a
jazz club!
Discorder — I noticed Bryan
and Andy haunting the back of
the stage during any solos that
didn't involve them.
Phil — It's a shame really that
there isn't more scope for Bryan
to play a few solos, because
over the years he's played some
nice melodic piano and synth
things. It just seemed like there
were too many people this time
to fit it in. The only little break
he gets is his little harmonica
thing. We used to do a lot more
things like that when the band
was smaller but, on the other
hand, because we've done all
that before, over the years, it
just seems like we'd be
repeating ourselves.
Discorder — Do you have any
plans to tour in a separate band
like, say, 801 or as a solo artist a
la Robert Fripp?
Phil — I really don't have any
plans at the moment, but if we
decide to take a break again,
because we're all such
workaholics, we'll probably all
be out there doing something.
Last time we had a break I did
go out and do some concerts of
which the 801 was the first and
then I went on tour with another
band, another version of the
801.
Discorder — Who did that have
in it?
Phil — Paul Thompson on
drums, David Skinner on
keyboards, who played with
Roxy on the "Manifesto" tour,
Bill MacCormick, who was the
bass player and a writer of a lot
of stuff with me, and goes back
a long time, to Quiet Sun and
most of my albums, Simon
Ainley on guitar, and then we
had a series of guest players.
Andy Mackay and Eddie
.Jobson came on tour for a few
dates as did a couple of guys
who used to be in 10cc. Kevin
Godley and Lol Creme.
Discorder — They were also on
your "K-Scope" and "Listen
Now" albums and you
appeared on their "Freeze
Frame" L.P.
Phil — Right. We played
colleges and things like that for
about twenty dates. If I did it
again I'd probably do
something different. It was just
an experiment. The most
successful think like that
though was the first 801, the
proper 801.
Discorder — You don't find that
people think of you, primarily,
as Roxy's guitarist? How did
801 as a band on its own merits
come off at first?
Phil — The first time it was just
an interesting experiment.
having Eno and a lot of those
players. The times were sort of
different and it wasn't anything
like that, but the second time,
when there wasnt anybody
really in the main core of the
band who was in a major band
or anything, it did tend to be a
bit that way and that's why I
didn't actually like it that much.
The whole point of doing a
project like that is to work with
some interesting people and
next time, if I did it again, I'd
probably do something like the
first 801 project.
Things to watch for in the
future: a Roxy album featuring
some of the "up" tracks from
the Avalon sessions, perhaps as
part of a greatest hits vol. 2, and
with any luck, a tour by Phil on
his own, doing some of his own
material. He also has every
Roxy gig, going back to 1973,
on tape and as the band feels
Viva didn't do all it should have
for the band's live performances, we may even see
another live album come out on
EG records. DISCORDER June, 1983
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fill 108 Cable 100
CvllUE11
EdHors:
Contributors:
Jennifer Fahrni
Norm Baldwin
Mike Mines
Carol Harvie
Features Editor.
Steve Hendry
Michael Shea
Harry Hertscheg
Sukhvinder Johal
Jeff Kearney
Mark Mushet
Steve Robertson
Distribution:
Harry Hertscheg
Ian Warren
Layout
Printing:
Mike Mines
Web Press Graphics Ltd.
For copies of any photographs contact CITR at 228-3017.
'Apologies go out to Chris Dafoe whose name was used as an
endorsement for SUB Games Room last month without his
permission — Ed.
letters
to the
airhead
CITR, UBC Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T2A5
CITR Listener's
Survey Results
Total number of survey respondents ... 274
Have listened to CITR 258
Have not  16
Frequency at which respondents who listen to
CITR tune in to...
101.9 FM 69.8%
100.1 Cable FM  37.6%
How   often   respondents   listen  to  CITR...
once a year: 3.3%
once a month: 4.4%
once a week: 6.9%
a few times a week: 28.1%
daily: 48.5%
never: 5.8%
did not say: 3.0%
Have problems picking up CITR (% of the 224
respondents who commented)...
Note: The range of ages for listeners was from
11 to 70 years old. Three of the respondents
were elementary school students, 15.3% were
secondary school students, while another
15.3% of the respondents were 30 years old
and over (and nearly all of them were regular
listeners, including the 70 year old mother!).
Aspects of CITR listeners like/not like...
yes:
71.4%
no:
28.6%
Make-up of respondents...
Students:
59.5%
Non-students:
40.5%
Age breakdown of respondents.
Total average:
22.8 years
Non-students:
27.2 years
Students:
20.0 years
Just UBC students
22.0 years
Non-UBC students:
18.2 years
Music
86.8%
6.2%    E
News
22.9%
20.5%    j
Sports
7.8%
39.1%
Public Affairs Programs
20.5%
17.8%
Music of our Time
31.0%
12.8%
Sunday Brunch
8.5%
10.5%
Reggae Show ("Rockers")
27.9%
14.7%
Rabble Without a Pause
34.9%
9.7%
Fast Forward
21.3%
5.8%
Jazz Show
17.8%
24.4%
Folk Show
10.5%
43.8%
Random Radio
26.0%
4.3%
Mini-Concerts
70.0%
2.7%
Final Vinyl
51.2%
6.2%
Generic Review
19.8%
11.2%
Public Service
Announcements
28.3%
13.2%
No commercials
77.9%
2.3%
In the wake of the CITR Listener's Survey
we've decided to forego Charles Slade's
cultural corner for this month, and devote this
space to something a little more pertinent,
namely the survey results. Those who
responded took great care in filling out the
survey. As a result, we have a pretty good idea
of what our listeners think about the station.
Although it did not appear as a category on
the survey form, many people commented on
our announcers, who were generally given a
real beating. Since we give our DJs more on-
air freedom than virtually any other station in
town, content (and indeed competence) is
bound to vary. We don't want to standardize
our format, although we are constantly
endeavouring to upgrade technical
competence.
Another problem area was the weakness of
our signal. We realize that for many people our
radio signal is, at best, marginal and often
non-existent. We're always exploring avenues
of improvement in this regard, but
realistically, a significant improvement is
something we can only dream about for the
time being.
Although we have collected all the surveys,
we still encourage you to write letters and
comments to the station (or the Airhead in
particular) about anything and everything,
whether it's music-related or not. We look
forward to hearing from you.
In the meantime, here is a sample of some of
the interesting and enlightening comments
already received from you, the listener:
•CITR is killing music.
•Vancouver  does   not  have  a  decent  FM
station.
• Don't go ultra professional, like commercial
stations. Keep some of that easy atmosphere.
• More heavy breathing and suggestive
material.
• Institute an on-air dating service.
• Like to hear more weirdos on the air.
•Tell    us   about   some   of   your   psychic
experiences.
•Make the DJs funnier — tell more jokes.
•Less juvenile horseplay, more decent music.
• Go country.
• More ethnic music.
• Less rock and much more classical music.
• Don't change the type of music you play too
much; you have to remain listenable. I can
think of nothing worse than listening to hours
of hammers hitting anvils labelled as
experimental music.
•Play some normal music, assholes (sic).
• More folk music.
•Less gay disco music and more gay punk.
•More punk music. That's all we want to hear.
• I'd like to hear a less condescending attitude
on commercials.
• More of your own commercials, more airtime
in mornings, and personalized CITR coffee
mugs.
•Your   public   service  announcements  are
wonderfully tasteless.
•Your public service announcements could
be a hell of a lot better.
•Very, very entertaining PSAs.
•Stop those noxious pseudo commercials.
• CITR must not be run down by crass
commercialism.
•Some commercials for fund raising?
•Never mind a power increase within 5years,
you've got to do it now. Hold benefits to raise
the money for it.
• I would be willing to pay an annual fee to
accomplish higher power and stereo.
•If I walk around the room I sometimes can't
get the station.
• More power to blast — off the air. Go for it.
• More watts and radiating power just sell
your soul to technology.
• Nuke the fuckin' place.
• No deejays.
•The guy with the monotone voice has gotta
go, or take some voice lessons — he's bloody
boring.
•Sack all your DJs.
•I am positive that all of you have at least one
French class behind you; that could help your
pronunciation if you thought it out before
going on air If someone doesn't know how
to   pronounce   French,   Italian  or Spanish
words, just call me up before you go on the air
— some of you sound atrocious.
•DJs think after they speak.
•DJs ramble on and on about nothing before a
song.
•Don't polish up DJs too much! They remind
me of '68 CKLG-FM. Off the wall. Great.
•Your DJs should throw in the towel, but don't
get any C-FOX reject DJs!
•Guest DJs to broaden 'alternative' scope.
• I think that you should program what music
you play more on merit and less on some
vague definition of what is 'alternative'.
However, most of what you play is excellent,
far better than any shit you're likely to hear on
some garbage commercial station.
• It's fine not to be a typical top 40 station and
play all the new and unheard of music — but
sometimes you carry it too far. a little pre-
screening of some records would be nice.
CFMI seems to be putting the heat on you.
• Innovation down 10 points.
• Less of the same crap over and over.
• Mix it up!
• Smarten up!
• More intellectual and provocative discussion
on social and political science.
•A touch more political awareness. We are the
Nazis of the Eighties.
•What you play is considered 'commercial' in
Europe and elsewhere.
• Fast Forward is a bit pretentious as are the
Saturday night Englishmen.
• Less Canadian content.
• Too many DJs are uninformed, they sound
like they've never been out of Point Grey.
•Open-mindedness towards local bands with
promise. More demos.
•Should showcase more local 'underground'
talent.
• More international news and film news on
reports.
Cont'd on p. 6 DISCORDER June, 191
PAPER FAIR '83:
The Art of Celebration
Paper is indispensable to modern
civilization. What would we do without books,
newspapers, computer read-outs, paintings,
photographs, comics, kites, lanterns,
streamers, cards, kleenex and toilet paper to
name but a few of the daily dimensions of
paper?
At the Paper Fair, held at the Robson Square
Media Centre. (June 21-25) paper will be
celebrated in all its glory. In conjunction with
the Community Arts Council of Vancouver,
the Fair will focus on an exhibition of paper
creativity by Canadian artists and crafts
people. Highlights will involve demonstrations of origami, kite making, Chinese lantern
craft, kirigami, and calligraphy. The B.C.
Forestry Foundation will explain the
papermaking process by video, and children
will be able to partake in actual "hands-on"
papermaking. At the Paper Boutique, buyers
can indulge in a delightful binge of paper gift
items; fairgoers can even experience music
played on paper instruments!
Here is a smattering of what can be seen at
the exhibition:
1) international Collection of Children's
Artwork
Betty Nickerson. sociologist and founder of
the organization, "All About Us", will exhibit
her multicultural collection of children's art.
As the largest in the world, the collection
encompasses 250,000 works ranging from
drawings and paintings to original stories and
poems.
The purpose of this display is to promote the
creativity and artistic sensibilities of children.
Children are seen as communicators with
concerns and interests worthy of adult
consideration. By providing an opportunity
for children to explore their imagination, art
stimulates self-awareness and understanding.
One of the prevailing themes to be
presented at the exhibit is "Love of the Land".
Children acknowledge the land as the source
of their nourishment and well being. They
demonstrate their concern for the
environment and visually plead with adults to
stop tampering with nature.
2) Musical Gestalt
Theo Goldberg, a professor in music
education at the University of British
Columbia, will exhibit his studies on the
relationship of music and visual images.
Through the use of computers, music is
interpreted in its visual form. In trying to
explain this electronic process, Professor
Goldberg cites the painting of the Mona Lisa
as an example. Using a computer to focus on
an exact point on the face of the Mona Lisa,
the entire picture can be re-interpreted by the
computer through a series of digits. Music too,
can be expressed by these digits. Thus, an
exact collation between the music and its
visual image can be demonstrated.
At the Fair, electronic music will be
interpreted by abstract, geometrical images
on paper. The notion is: what you hear is what
you see...
3) Gyotaku: Fish Impressions
Barry Ross is not an ordinary artist. As a
commercial fisherman, he has mastered the
Japanese art of "gyotaku", a process similar to
the stone rubbings of the ancient Chinese.
This skill has created an extraordinary set of
fish prints. Barry makes his living in the
summer months fishing the B.C. coast; in the
winter, he retreats to the South Pacific aboard
his 42 foot yacht. After rummaging the waters,
beaches and market places for nonconformist
fish, Barry then reproduces the most unique
specimens in watercolour on fragile paper
from Japan. Each print is exquisite and
meticulous in form: the effect is one of grace,
tranquility, and tradition.
Selected works of Barry Ross will be on
show at the Paper Fair. The majority of his
prints, however, will be exhibited at the
Community Arts Council Gallery during the
month of June.
Carol A. Harvie
WOBBLE and his
MERRY MYSTICS
COME TO TOWN
trite reggae material...."
Wobble since went on to form
The Human Condition — a
short-lived ensemble that
presented its unexpected
farewell show at Paul
Raymond's famous former sex
theatre in London's seedy
Soho. The show was a sell-out
but the last one of its kind
marking the end of Wobble's
period of non-vocal, post-PIL
new wave jazz.
Continually the intrepid
explorer, Wobble journeyed to
Deutschland where he
instigated successful collaborations with various members of
PIL's only possible precusors,
the German experimentalists
Can. The amalgam, consisting
of Wobble, Jaki Liebezeit, and
Holger Czukay, released a four-
track EP in 1981 containing the
blistering How Much Are
They?....('what's your name?....
Susan....hahahaha').
And it seems with the
Invaders of the Heart, Wobble is
continuing along on a positive
track in the right direction as
news of their brilliant live
performances is received from
the UK and Europe. The
following is an excerpt from a
concert review written by John
Gill in the City Limits magazine,
30 December 1982.
"His post-PIL work with the
likes of Holger Czukay, Ben
Mandelsohn, his previous
Human Condition and the
shadowy A. Gaunt MacKinaw
have brought about a state, not
to mention a new line-up, where
all manner of world musics ebb
and flow in a breathless,
sweeping flux, driven along by
Wobble's volcanic bass and so
diverse yet natural as to defy
pigeon-holing...he's producing
exotic, improvised music with a
furious dance undertow and an
inspired range of differences.
The most important white
European band to emerge this
decade."
Put your money on it and let
Wobble and his Invaders
capture your heart at the
Commodore this month. In the
meantime, familiarize yourself
with Wobble's exotic blend of
aural delights on his most
recent disc, The Bedroom
Album or any one of his twelve-
inch 45 releases available as
imports in the local specialty
music shops.
Michael Shea
On Thursday. June 9th,
Vancouver will undoubtedly
witness one of the more
interesting and unusual
musical events to happen in our
city for quite some time as Jah
Wobble brings his Invaders oi
the Heart tour to the
Commodore stage.
Mr. Wobble, ever the
adventurous and daring
explorer on vinyl, is attempting
an equally hazardous expedition by visiting selected
locations in this vast and
occasionally inhospitable
continent without any record
company support. His
association with those who are
only interested in making
money from music has, in the
past, been tempered by his
caustic wit and humorous
criticism addressed directly to
those who could make or break
his career within the rigid
corporate structure. As a result,
Jah Wobble's several record
releases have been randomly
available thorugh haphazard
distribution, and few of them
have been given the proper
exposure and full attention they
ultimately deserve.
Yet. despite this fact. Wobble
remains quite the enigmatic
figure — one that conjures
exotic images enhanced by his
new material which concentrates on what he likes to call
'Islam punk'. The band he
works   with   now   are   called
Invaders of the Heart — a name
taken directly from the Sufi
mystical tradition, and in one
way or another, pertains to that
or those who or which receive
and give the love of the divine.
Confused?....you should be.
Wobble's influences are as
eclectic as the music he makes
and his perspective remains
unsullied by the status quo. But
perhaps a few historical notes
are in order to clear the haze a
bit.
Taken from a recent publicity
brief, Scott Piering writes from
London: "After short and
uninspiring stints as a cab
driver and road manager for
Johnny Thunders, John
Wardell, Tottenham football
supporter and friend of former
Sex Pistol John Lydon, was
invited to join Lydon's new
musical enterprise. Public
Image Ltd., as bass player.
"After leaving PIL for the
usual 'musical reasons', the
ambitious John W. — having
assumed the moniker Jah
Wobble — started a solo career
writing songs and playing bass
which resulted in his 1980
Virgin LP The Legend Lives
On.... The European press was
not overly enthusiastic about
the album, but neither had they
been about the first two Sex
Pistols singles nor the two
Virgin Wobble singles. On both
of the latter, Wobble takes the
piss out of the over-exposed.
•ELECTRONIC VIDEO
•5 PIN BOWLING
•PINBALL
•BILLIARDS
AND        REDEEM YOUR COCA-COLA
FUN CAPS
AT
SUB GAMES ROOM
Downstairs Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
Open: Monday to Saturday 8am -12:45 at night
Sunday 10am - 11:30pm
Any Advanced Bookings — Please call
SUB GAMES ROOM 228-3692 DISCORDER June, 1983
NON-FICTION
The Blasters (WEA)
This is it. That all important
summertime record perfectly
suited for tying on the dancing
shoes and cuttin' loose. Non
Fiction is essential music to
any all night bashes you may be
planning, it can't be beat
cranked out for those radio and
ghetto blaster wars with the
people beside you at the beach,
and it is made for those warm
nights cruising around town
with the windows rolled down
and the tape deck blaring out at
full volume. All in all, as much
a part of a B.C. summer as a
beer strike.
What The Blasters have
come up with on Non Fiction
is a real treat. It is one of those
records that is so alive and
vibrant that before you know it
your toes are tappin' and your
head is bouncing in time with
the beat. It's also a record that
rings true in its celebration and
treatment of American Music .
The Blasters unlike all the
"cats" around these days who
are slicking their hair back,
wearing leathers, and striking
50's poses have a sense of
tradition and dues paying about
them. Theirs is no pose, they
sound as if they've been playing
and listening to straight ahead
rockin' all their lives and they
intend to keep on doing so.
Where Non Fiction differs
from their highly acclaimed
debut album is that they have
become just that much better
since then. The debut album
had a number of great songs in
Marie Marie , American
Music ,      I'm    Shakin ,    or
Border Radio , but it also
lagged in places. Non Fiction
is strong the whole way
through. There isn't a bad track
on the whole record and some
are truly exceptional. Jubilee
Train , for example, is a
timeless bit of Americana which
echoes back to the depression
era songs of Woody Guthrie but
shares sentiments which are as
relevant today as then. It should
be   required   listening   at  the
BLACK SWAN is one of the city's original alternative record
shops. Initially specializing in jazz, folk and blues, the focus has
expanded providing a carefully selected, yet diverse
representation of current domestic and imported rock, electronic,
20th Century classical and ethnic music streams.
A generous exchange program enables us to present one of the
best used record selections in Vancouver. We also stock music
publications and carry tickets for many local concert productions.
2936 W. 4th Ave.
734-2828
UBC STUDENTS
BROADCASTING CLUB
We will do quality videos
at reasonable rates.
Weddings»Sports Events«Bar Mitzvahs
Childrens Parties«Other Events
S.U.B. Rm. 237  Box 110
228-2072
Smithsonian. Boomtown with
Bill Bateman's rolling — or
should that be chugging —
drumwork and Phil Alvin's
harmonica is another standout.
Then there are the ones which
inspire bouts of non-stop
dancing like Barefoot Rock or
One More Dance . Hell, they
will all get you going.
The production on the album
is also a real plus. Whether it
was the change in studios or
simply feeling more comfortable behind the board, the
sound is right on the mark.
There's much more warmth and
a greater fullness to their
sound, especially on Phil
Alvin's vocals.
So if you're searching for an
album that will take you
through the summer and
beyond in style and spirit, you
need look no further than Non
Fiction. It's not trendy, hip, or
terminally fashionable but has a
straightforward honesty and
vigour that will never fade. With
this on your turntable, a bottle
of tequila on the table and some
people on a makeshift
dancefloor, you've got the
ingredients for a great evening.
— Sedro Wooley
POWER CORRUPTION
and LIES
New Order (Factory)
A grower. That's what this is,
a grower. For me, it's grown
from "lots of disappointment"
(and almost as much dislike) to
"enjoyable".
A cop-out opinion? Quite
right, for I must admit to being
somewhat puzzled by certain
aspects of this second offering
from New Order. For instance,
why has the recent hit Blue
Monday been re-titled 586 and
included here as the fourth
track on side one — with new
lyrics, no less. Also the third
track on this side, The Village,
strikes more than a passing
resemblance to last year's
Temptation single. Shady
dealings? Or just plain rip-off?
This may seem like a harsh
judgement, for two singles off
an album is hardly uncommon,
but most of the remaining six
tracks don't deviate much from
the musical formula established by the above two.
Age of Consent is an
energetic opener, despite the
suspect lyrics. Bernard
Albrecht is obviously a lot more
self-confident about his vocal
abilities (check out those
dancefloor yelps — ow! I
thought only Michael Jackson
could do those well), and the
song is classically rounded off
with some grandiose synth
lines. The improvement in the
vocals is more apparent in the
second track, We All Stand; no
longer are the vocals shrouded
in the mix, they're now
individual and resonant.
With simple yet effective
synthesizer rhythms established on the aforementioned
third and fourth tracks, we
proceed into one of the
stronger cuts on the record,
side two's opener Your Silent
Face. Six minutes of essential
dance, it also has interesting
lyrics (not the bands strongest
point): "a sign that leads the
way/A path we cannot
take/You've caught me at a bad
time/So why don't you piss off",
and again that warm majestic
synth that makes you want to
embrace the speakers. The
momentum is maintained by
Ultraviolence and Ecstacy
(pass me the vocoder,
Moroder), before the final cut,
Leave Me Alone, which is, er,
well, puzzling. Gone are the
omnipresent synth tracks and
in comes the guitar again. This
sounds more like the direction
one would think the band might
have taken. I mean, who would
have thought that Ceremony
would lead to Blue Monday? If
you can accept this direction
then this is a fine album. If, like
me, you haven't quite decided
yet, then — it may grow on you.
There's even some roses on the
cover	
— Sukhvinder Johal
QTReport:
Albums
ARTIST
DISTRIBUTOR
SHRIEKBACK
SPEAR OF DESTINY
THE UNDERTONES
THE MEMBERS
GUN CLUB
PHIL SMITH
DEAD KENNEDYS
EDDY GRANT
THE BIRTHDAY PARTY
RIP RIG AND PANIC
RAMONES
NEW ORDER
ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN
BLACK UHURU
VARIOUS
THE STRANGLERS
VIOLENT FEMMES
TEARS FOR FEARS
U2
THE BLASTERS
XTC
WALL OF VOODOO
HEAVEN 17
BOW WOW WOW
KLAUS NOMI
JOAN ARMATRADING
VARIOUS
BILL NELSON
FUN BOY 3
HERALD NIX
DAVID BOWIE
THE PASSAGE
NEW AGE STEPPERS
R.E.M.
EURYTHMICS
PIGBAG
PETER TOSH
PYLON
AZTEC CAMERA
SEX GANG CHILDREN
Care
Grapes of Wrath
The Sin of Pride
Uprhythm, Downbeat
Death Party EP
The Phil Smith Album
Plastic Surgery Disasters
Killer on the Rampage
The Bad Seed EP
Attitude
Subterranean Jungle
Power Corruption & Lies
Porcupine
The Dub Factor
Pillows & Prayers
Feline
Violent Femmes
The Hurting
War
Non-Fiction
Great Fire EP
Call of the West
The Luxury Gap
When the Going Gets Tough...
Simple Man
The Key
Seattle Syndrome 2
Chimera
Waiting
One Night Only EP
Let's Dance
Enflame
Foundation Steppers
Murmur
Sweet Dreams Are Made of This
Lend An Ear
Mama Africa
Chomp
High Land, Hard Rain
Song & Legend
WEA
CBS(UK)
EMI(UK)
ARISTA(US)
ANIMAL(UK)
ZULU
FRINGE
CBS
4AD(UK)
VIRGIN(UK)
WEA
FACTORY(UK)
WEA
MANGO(UK)
CHERRY RED(UK)
CBS
WEA
POLYGRAM
WEA
WEA
VIRGIN(UK)
A&M
POLYGRAM
RCA
RCA
A&M
ENGRAM(US)
PHONOGRAM(UK)
CAPITOL
RECORD
CAPITOL
CHERRY RED(UK)
U-SOUND(UK)
A&M
RCA
Y(UK)
CAPITOL
DB(US)
ROUGH TRADE(UK)
ILLUMINATED(UK) DISCORDER J
ATTITUDE
Rip Rig and Panic  (Virgin-UK)
Caught between an idea and
an attitude, that's Rip Rag and
Panic. The idea is that the world
is clamoring within webs of
despairand pain. The attitude is
to make an album that sounds
like the whole thing may be
giving the earth a headache.
That being said, it may come as
a surprise that I enjoy Attitude,
much in the same way I enjoy
hot mustard.
Attitude centers around a
musical and lyrical battle with a
Beast which plagues the human
condition or in this case is
playing in the horn section. The
effect is jarring, never spacious,
and needn't be danced to.
The Beast. I don't really like
calling it a Beast so I'll call it
Phlogiston (not wholly
inappropriate: you could look it
up). Phlogiston is plundering
souls and hearts then returning
to the studio to grapple with its
existence and some trumpets.
Rip Rag and Panic have agreed
to sit in here I believe.
Phlogiston is remarkable for
many things. Firstly, it
(remember, don't blame it all on
men) creates some nasty
visions of human beings
wallowing like so many
walrusses (walrussi?) getting
pooped on by large sea birds
(or heaven, depending on how
far you want to take
creationism). Secondly,
Phlogiston is really a blessing
in disguise: this rather
unpleasant reflection of life is
all that Rip Rag Winkle require
to awaken from two previous
albums' rest and to start
crossing that tightrope from
despair to hope (their imagery,
not mine).
In effect, Phlogiston is
ensuring its eventual downfall
on this album by its own
forceful presence. If this hadn't
done it, Phlogiston's personal
habits around the studio would
have.
Rip Rag Winkle get so
inspired at playing with the sum
total of man's inequities to man
that at one point they begin to
sing like Martha and the Muffins
("Do the Tightrope").
Fortunately, several belches
from the foaming Phlogiston in
the corner force them to check
their optimism and admit
"there's something really
wrong going on" just two songs
later ( How That Spark Sets Me
Aglow ).
By the album's second side
the band is becoming more
militant in their approach to the
would-be bandleader of misery.
Alchemy in This Cemetry
becomes a battle of lungs as all
present throttle the last living
squeals out of trumpets and
small furry animals. Phlogiston
laughs back at Bear the Beast
but clearly its days are
numbered when the producer
refuses to order it a pizza.
Viva X Dreams sends the
dismal one packing for good at
Attitude's close. But the
wonderful denouement piano
solo which wraps it all up
should not deceive us.
Somewhere on the highways
and byways of this planet
wanders Phlogiston still,
stinking dirty but lovingly
cradling that horn of discord in
an irony too blatant to ignore.
— Steve Hendry
THE GRAPES
Spear of Destiny
I must admit that I was almost
ready to slag off this record
before I'd heard it, if only
because I thought Spear of
Destiny was a particularly silly
name for any band fronted by
Kirk Brandon. After listening to
The Grapes of Wrath I remain
convinced that Spear of
Destiny is a rather obscure and
pompous name for Brandon's
new outfit, but that's where my
criticism ends. As an album The
Grapes of Wrath easily
outstrips Brandon's only long-
play effort with Theatre of Hate,
Westworld . That album was
characterized (and some would
say marred) by the thick, bass-
heavy and often fuzzy
production of Mick Jones, and
as a result the sound of Theatre
of Hate, was identified with the
sound of Westworld, which is
all well and good, but
undoubtedly constricting.
Since Brandon and ex-TOH
bassist Stan Stammers
comprise half of Spear of
Destiny, it is not surprising that
the band retains a good deal of
the brooding, yet highly-
charged atmosphere that
Brandon's wailing vocals and
Stammers' reedy bass drones
brought to Theatre of Hate. The
difference lies in Nick Launay's
immaculate production, which
gives Brandon's songs a
dimension of subtelty always
lacking in his work with Theatre
of    Hate.   On   this   album.
OF WRATH
(CBS-UK)
Stammers' bass is mixed lower ,
and the result is a remarkably .
layered sound in which guitars <
and particularly horns are given '
lots of room to breathe. Songs '
like  The Flying Scotsman and
The Wheel command '
attention, not because we are '
pounded into the ground by
their sheer weight (as often was
the problem with Theatre of
Hate) but because their effect is
narcotic rather than oppressive.
Brandon has never been one
to lay his cards on the table, and
The Grapes of Wrath is no
exception. Some have said that
his lyrics are ludicrously
obscure and that Brandon's
often indulgent romanticism
has clouded the album's
"message" (if indeed it has
any). Certainly, head-
scratchers like "Quietness
raped by the solution in its
scheme" (Solution) support
this view and harken back to
criticism of the band's name,
but Brandon's murky mysticism
doesn't bother me too much. I
like listening to this album too
much to care what Kirk
Brandon dreams about or how
well he expresses it in words.
The Grapes of Wrath does
something for me everytime I
listen to it and that's the
important thing with any music.
Isn't it?
— Steve Robertson
ClfinReport: Singles
1 TALKING HEADS
2 BAUHAUS
3 THE ACTIONAUTS
4 BIG COUNTRY
5 THE TEARDROP EXPLODES
6 NEW ORDER
7 ORANGE JUICE
8 DUB RIFLES
9 STYLE COUNCIL
10 THE THE
11 CLOCK DVA
12 ELECTRIC PEACE
13 MALCOLM McLAREN
14 MALARIA!
15 PUNILUX
16 SPEAR OF DESTINY
17 EDDY GRANT
18 THE CREATURES
19 THE CHAMELEONS
20 PETE SHELLEY
21 RUTS DC
22 REDRUM
23 JAH WOBBLE
24 BOB MARLEY
25 IMPLOG
26 CHRIS & COSEY
27 LEISURE PROCESS
28 THE MAISONETTES
29 THE MONOCHROME SET
30 YAZOO
Swamp
She's In Parties
Hash Assasin
Fields Of Fire
You Disappear From View
Blue Monday
Rip It Up
Stand
Speak Like A Child
Perfect
Resistance
Kill For Your Love
Soweto
Your Turn To Run
Golden Corsets
A Flying Scotsman
Electric Avenue
Miss The Girl
Pleasure & Pain
No One Like You
Weak Heart
Danger/Never Know Your Narr
Invaders Of The Heart
Buffalo Soldier
She Creatures/Breakfast
Look Down
Cashflow
Heartache Avenue
The Jet Set Junta
State Farm
SIRE
B.B.(UK)
"DEMO TAPE**
PHONOGRAM(UK)
MERCURY(UK)
POLYGRAM
POLYDOR(UK)
NOTOWN
RESPOND(UK)
EPIC
POLYDOR(UK)
BIG K(US)
CHARISMA(UK)
JUNGLE(UK)
RHINO(UK)
BURNING ROME(UK)
PORTRAIT
WONDERLAND(UK)
STATIK(UK)
GENETIC(UK)
BOHEMIAN(UK)
**DEMO TAPE-
ROUGH TRADE(UK)
ISLAND
LOG(UK)
TONE DEATH(UK)
EPIC
QUALITY
CHERRY RED(UK)
MUTE(UK)
CARE
Shriekback (Y Records-UK)
From their inception nearly
one year ago, Shriekback's
highly-touted reputation was
based more on what their critics
saw as their potential rather
than on the goods produced.
Certainly the group, with Dave
Allen (ex-Gang of Four), Barry
Andrews (ex-XTC), and Carl
Marsh forming the nucleus, had
released two superb singles
and an equally fine six-song
album that gave those who
cared something to praise while
seemingly waiting for Shriekback to emerge from the wings
with their tour de force. But, as
is most often the rule rather
than the exception, the
expectations unfortunately
exceed the actual.
Apply this to the case of Care,
the first full-length album from
Shriekback. What perhaps
might have been a fairly solid
'omini-album' (as with Tench),
has resulted in a fragmented
selection of mildly invigorating
cuts to the quite unlistenable.
The latter would fall under the
uise of experimentation, or at
least to the ears of those who
are undertaking the experiment. For instance, take Hapax
Legomena or Into Method —
two tracks that might have
sounded quite intriguing while
working them out in the studio,
but after repeated listenings
within the context of an album
they seem more like filler than a
conscious effort to complement the less obscure
selections.
On the other hand, Shriekback shine when applying their
adventurous perspective to the
bass and percussion dominated tracks that, with a little
imagination on the part of the
listener, are actually quite
danceable. It is the almost
tangible aural texture of these
Shriekback compositions that
is most appealing. The vocals
are understated, in some
instances inaudible, and are
more like the fibre that weaves
its way in and around the
instrumentation to eventually
hold the beat in place.
Unfortunately, even these
songs seem to remain static —
beginning and ending and
leaving the listener yearning for
more. Too much of Care
sounds like an exotic mood
piece, and yet because of its
fragmentation, succeeds
neither as such nor as an album
of particularly outstanding
cuts. It is a puzzling product
from a group that is obviously
not afraid to take musical
chances. Let us hope that they
continue to do so and, in the
future, realize the potential that
their collective talents
seemingly possess.
As an added note, the album
should soon be available in
Canada on WEA Records;
included on it will be the
excellent single My Spine is the
Bassline. Better to wait for that
than to spend your hard-earned
dollars on inflated import
prices.
— Michael Shea THE RAMONES,
STILL HAVING FUN
On Friday, May 6, one of
America's best loved bands, the
Ramones, played the Commodore Ballroom. Like their
previous visits here, the crowd
was wildly enthusiastic,
complete with swan dive
competitions off the stage. The
band was here in support of
their most recent album,
Subterrannean Jungle, the
review of which appeared in last
month's Discorder. Longtime
CITR DJ Cliff Clayton managed
to secure lead guitarist Johnny
Ramone for a few minutes after
the show. Being aware of Cliff's
reputation, Johnny was only
too happy to answer his
questions.
Discorder: You seemed
bothered by the crowd
tonight.
J.R.: The crowd was very good,
but a few people did get out of
hand. They don't need to act
like that.
Discorder Surely you have had
to put up with worse.
J.R.: Many times, but we are
trying to give the best show
we can, and little distractions
like beer cans being thrown at
me don't help a great deal.
Discorder What is the worst
instance of mindlessness in a
crowd that you have ever
encountered?
J.R.: That's easy. One night in
Hamburg, Germany a few
years back, the whole
audience just beat each other
up for the entire show. They
weren't even listening to us.
Discorder One of the many
legends about the Ramones is
your 1976 tour of England.
Many people feel it was the
catalyst for pushing punk
rock over the top. How did the
band view that tour?
J.R.: What you are describing is
what we had hoped would
happen. We realized people
pick up on things quickly over
there, and we thought we
might start a trend.
Discorder Did you have a
similar feeling while
recording your first LP?
J.R.: In a way. We felt that an
album from us would help to
stimulate the New York club
scene, which at that time was
limited to CBGB's. and a few
other places. We began at
CBGB's doing just one night a
week. We got our friends to
come and watch, and told
bands like the Heartbreakers
to play there. Before long, we
were getting a small
following. The other popular
Listener's Comments cont'd from P. 2
•Your  news  (not  the  special  features)  is
gutless and little different from establishment
media.
•Try a completely different way to do news
and public affairs — guerilla news, OK?
•How about a show for Joe Goebbels?
• If you have to have a Jazz show, please put it
at some other time than Monday evenings...it
ruins my night. Perhaps Saturday night when
I'm out would be okay.
•Get rid of the morons on Rabble Without a
Pause.
•No live sports, please (yawn!).
•Too much specialty programming of late,
leave that area for Co-op Radio!!!
•Sometimes the schedule  is  not too well
adhered to.
• More freestyle.
• Cut out all this trendy electropop b.s. and
return to a completely fluid format.
•The best format is no format.
• More bizarre music like before, it is getting
far too mainstream.
• More variety in music.
•CITR sounds like CFOX of the post-punk
explosion.
•You, Co-op, and CBC are OK.
• Less musical snobbery, more live
recordings; higher DJ standards (ie. fluent
speech and less of it).
•Re requests: "I'll see what I can do" — that is
an attitude that just won't do.
• Keep the sets relatively short, otherwise we
get confused about who sang what.
•Do something about those few undynamic
DJs — use "whopee" cushions!
• Do profiles of the disc jockeys in
DISCORDER.
•DISCORDER   may   well   be   CITR's   best
feature.
•Tell whoever makes up your charts to stop
reading NME.
• Not so UBC oriented; save public service
crap for Co-op Radio. Cover sports that you
won't hear anywhere else. Cover sports for
institutions you want involved, like BCIT, the
colleges, vocational institutes or SFU. But
keep it brief.
• Keep up local news coverage and tell
students if administration or AMS screw up.
• CITR should be the only station played in
The Pit! Not all the other shit.
• You should let the guy with thefunny looking
suits work The Pit discos more often.
•The Soft Rock late-nite music was a good
idea,  but the  wrong  venue.  I'd  gladly go
somewhere with music by CITR.
• Don't want to see you guys go preppy or
normal!
• Don't let the bee-boppers influence you!
• Your public service announcements should
include the fact that Earth will be demolished
to make way for a hyperspace bypass by the
Vagons.
• Not enuf stuff by women, more humour,
more poetry.
•You hate more than you love.
•You're perfect.
• Get this shit off the air.
• Loss of license would be an improvement.
• Don't be slaves to the CRTC.
•There's finally a station other than...(yucks).
•There are too many self-congratulatory
spots about how good a station you are.
• Become more professional at it (with time it
will come).
•Strive for a higher quality of amateurism.
• Don't start taking yourselves too seriously.
• Stay personable and don't get too
successful.
• Bigger is very, very rarely...better. Don't lose
that personal, homey touch you have!
• Keep it up!
•Thanx for the chance to give input.
band at the time was Television, whose manager, Terry
Ork, started doing the
booking for the club. He saw
us as "the competition", so he
wouldn't give us any work,
which was ridiculous,
because our musical styles
were so different. Television
was doing Lou Reed type
material, while we were just a
wild rock and roll band. When
Sire Records finally signed
us, Terry had no choice but to
book us more often.
Discorder What made you
decide to use Mosrite guitars?
J.R.: I went to a guitar store and
they were the cheapest
original there. I've used a
$50.00 Mosrite on almost
every Ramones song.
Discorder The guitar sound on
the new LP is much more pronounced than on the last two
albums. Is this a case of
Richie Cordell liking your
sound, or of you finally
putting your foot down?
J.R.: Richie likes a loud sound,
but I sat through every minute
of the record making sure his
hand was on the volume
control. With the last two
records we had little or no
involvement with the
mastering, but now we are
starting to understand what it
takes to finish an album.
Discorder Trouser Press ran a
long article with band rating
their own records. Do you still
agree with what you said?
J.R.: Definitely. End of The
Century is our worst record,
due to the song quality, and to
Phil Spector's production.
Pleasant Dreams is almost as
bad, but neither record is
actually terrible. They just do
not sound like the Ramones
ought to sound.
Discorder: And the best
Ramones LP is....?
J.R.: Rocket to Russia.
Discorder Did you intend for
Baby I Love You to be
released as a single?
J.R.: Yes, but not like it turned
out. I should have realized
that with Phil Spector it would
not turn out like we wanted.
The song only picked up
minimal AM airplay, even in
New York, although it did
fairly well in England.
Discorder Did you feel that by
doing a Phil Spector oldie you
might finally have a hit?
J.R.: Absolutely, and we were
very wrong.
Discorder: Why wasn't It's Alive
ever released in North
America?
J.R.: Sire figured if our studio
albums were not selling, then
why would a live LP sell? It's a
shame, I enjoyed doing that
record, I would like to do
another.
Discorder Let's talk about
more positive things now.
How long did the new LP take
to record?
J.R.: About six weeks. We had it
all ready beforehand. We
rented a cheap studio so we
would not be rushed. It was a
very inexpensive LP, about
$25,000.00.
Discorder How many more
albums do you think the
Ramones will make?
J.R.: Two albums ago, some
people said it was all over for
us. We knew we could make
better records, so we kept on.
I know we can continue to
improve, but we will probably
only make two or three more
albums.
Discorder: You have no
complaints about how your
career has gone?
J.R.: None. I'm 31 years old, and
I'm still working. When we
started, we figured our first LP
would be our last.
Discorder You never thought
you would become a major
act?
J.R.: Well, there was a time
around the third LP when we
thought we might become
huge, but we gradually began
to accept the fact that we were
a cult band. I don't want it any
other way actually, being in a
cult band is fun, and the fans
are great. Why end up doing
the same things every other
band does? I don't see how
bands like that have much
fun, and we are definitely
still having fun.
ELVIS • BOWIE • SINATRA • SKA
We Pay Top Prices for Rare,
Clean Records
COLLECTOR'S RPM
10% OFF ANY
PURCHASE WHEN
YOU BRING IN
THIS AD!
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DISCORDER June, 1983
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Mondays. AMNESTY ACTION
A community access program produced by the UBC chapter of
Amnesty International.
Political KHIings by Governments
Individual Prisoners of Conscience
Continued Suppression in the Soviet Union
The Status of Human Rights in the Two Nicaraguas -
the One Before and the One After the Revolution
Tuesdays   UBC ON TAP
June 7:    Herpes: A Disease of Living with Paul Levindusky,
a research assistant at the UBC Herpes Clinic.
14:     Managing Stress with UBC psychologist Lynn Alden.
21:     Soviet Leader Yuri Andropov: The Next Chapter in
Soviet and World Politics with UBC political science
professor Paul Marantz.
28:    The Highly Volatile Vancouver Housing Market with
UBC commerce professor Dennis Capozza.
Wednesdays   SPEAKER'S CHOICE
Newspaper Publishing: Truth or Profits with
Gerald Haslam, publisher of The Province.
The State of Privacy in Canada: Was Orwell Right? with
Peter T. Burns, dean of UBC's Faculty of Law.
Urban Revolutions: Past and Present with UBC history
professor Christopher R. Friedrichs.
Land Use in B.C.: An Ecological Perspective with
UBC plant sciences professor Bert Brink.
The Opera: "An Exotic and Irrational Entertainment"
with UBC music professor French Tickner.
Thursdays   CROSS CURRENTS
June 2:     Race Relations and Social Context with University of
London sociologist Dr. Mullard.
9:    The Place of Minorities within Canada and their
Relationship to the New Constitution and Charter of
Rights with Thomas Berger, (former) B.C. Supreme
Court judge.
16:    The United Nations Special Session on Disarmament
in New York (Summer 1983) with Tina Klassen and
Keith Shanks of the UBC Students for Peace and
Mutual Disarmament.
23:     The Crisis Centre with Gary Mavis, executive director
of Vancouver's Crisis Centre.
30:     Women and Technology in the Work Place with Equal
Pay Information Committee (EPIC) members
Lena Jones and Marion Pollock.
Fridays...DATELINE INTERNATIONAL
Amnesty International: A UBC Perspective with UBC
Amnesty International president Steve Fedder.
The Use of the Death Penalty in the People's Republic
of China with Amnesty International.
The Disarmament Movement throughout the World
with UBC political science professor Dr. Wallace.
24:     Strategies for Eliminating the Risk of Nuclear War with
General Nino Pasti, former deputy commander of the
NATO Nuclear Command and now an independent
Italian senator and leader of the Italian peace
movement.
jly 1     The annual Canada Day no show — sleep in and enjoy
the holiday!
1     SUNDAY             MONDAY             TUESDAY          WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
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FORWARD
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FAST
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JAZZ
I   Midnight
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Till 4 a.m. Daily
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CITR PROGRAM PROFILE :
FAST FORWARD
Fast Forward was initially
born out of a frustration with
the so-called "new music"
scene and the inconsequential
fashions and trends that it
spawned. I found that when I
first did a show on CITR. and
started playing anything
vaguely bizzare that people
would phone me up and plead
for me to play the Clash or the
Jam or other station favorites.
Not to belittle that music
however, it's just that it simply
isn't new. These bands have
merely created a new, more
pretentious, status quo of pop
music. You can't judge any sort
of progress on the merits of a
three minute pop song. When
playing an ethnic, jazz,
industrial, or classically
inspired track results in a flood
of phone calls asking for the
same old pop music, mainly of
the "new" British variety, it's
obvious to me that alternative
radio hasn't fulfilled it's promise
of being just that; an alternative.
A new rut is just the same as any
other rut and those who
criticize commercial radio and
who are guilty of the
aforementioned    offence   are
fcj» dV"* <A,$pMVf **EE!f
Fust ctib>*iJ " Puck.' "
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Of TWlK COYruFf but  FbwerfnU      '
hypocrits of the first order. One
person who sent in one of our
surveys put it in a nutshell when
he said that we shouldn't be
afraid of "mixing it up" and of
making the listening audience
scared of switching the dial for
fear of what they might miss.
Fast Forward tries to do that,
limited only by the extent of my
record collection and the time,
energy, and money it takes to
discover new things. Contrary
to popular belief, there are
thousands of bands, artists and
what have you, that are
producing some very fresh and
innovative sounds even if they
do, at first, attack your
conception of music and/or art.
Fast Forward isn't really a
specialty show. It's just one
persons idea of what alternative
radio is all about, and although
one isn't always able to adhere
to a set of principles, you can at
least provide a personal
perspective that is different to
the rest and is, hopefully,
interesting to others. Fri & Sat                         ^>
June 3 & 4
Al Foreman
Le Petite Fro mage
June 10-11
Explosives
From Austin, Texas
June 17-18
BeBop Band
50's & 60's MOR
June 24-25
The Jones Band
returns from Seattle
Closed July 1
Open July 2
One Night Only
The B-Sides
MONDAY thru THURSDAY
DISCO
9:30 P.M. to 2:00 A.M.
\,
Coming Soon: SATELLITE T. V.
Featuring continuous movies, sports & concerts
"SCHOOL'S OUT BUT THE
GOOD TIMES ROLL-ON"
DOWNSTAIRS STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
miiiHMiiHiiiiia
J

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