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Alaska Canadian Pacific Railway. British Columbia Coast Steamship Service 1939

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 :anadian
>ACIFIC
 Canadian Pacific Hotels
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C.
The largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking
the Strait of Georgia, and serving equally the business man and
the tourist. Situated in the heart of the shopping district of
Vancouver. Golf, motoring, fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer
excursions. Open all year. European plan. 3^2 mile from
station.
Empress Hotel, Victoria, B.C.
A luxurious hotel in this Garden City of the Pacific Coast.
An equable climate has made Victoria a favorite summer and
winter resort. Motoring, yachting, sea and stream fishing, shooting
and all-year golf.    Open all year.    European plan.    Facing wharf.
IN THE ROCKIES
Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan Valley, and stop-over point
for those who wish to see both canyons and mountains by daylight. Lake
Shuswap district offers good boating, and excellent trout fishing and hunting in season.
Open all year.    American plan.    At station.    Altitude 1146 feet.
Glacier House, Glacier, B.C.
In the heart of the Selkirks. Splendid Alpine climbing and glacier-exploring,
driving, riding and hiking. Open June 15th to September 15th. American plan.
1 >2 miles from station.    Altitude 4086 feet.
Emerald Lake Chalet, near Field, B.C.
A charming Cha.et hotel situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, amidst the
picturesque Alpine scenery of the Yoho National Park. Roads and trails to the
Burgess Pass, Yoho Valley, etc. Boating and fishing. Open June 15th to September
loth.    American plan.    7 miles from station.    Altitude 4262 feet.
Chateau Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta
A wonderful hotel facing an exquisite Alpine Lake in Rocky Mountains National
Park. Alpine climbing with Swiss Guides, pcny trips cr walks to Lakes in the Clouds,
Saddleback, etc., drives or motoring to Moraine Lake, boating, fishing. Open June
1st to September 30th. European plan. 3 l/2 miles from station by motor railway.
Altitude 5670 feet.
Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta
A magnificent hotel in the heart of Rocky Mountains National Park, backed by
three splendid mountain ranges. Alpine climbing, motoring and drives on good
roads, bathing, hot sulphur springs, golf, tennis, fishing, boating and riding. Open
May 15th to September 30th. European plan. 1 y2 miles from station. Altitude
4625 feet.
Hotel Palliser, Calgary, Alberta
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard, in this prosperous city of Southern
Alberta. Suited equally to the business man and the tourist en route to or from the
Canadian Pacific Rockies. Good golfing and motoring. Open all year. European
plan.    At station.
Royal Alexandra Hotel, Winnipeg, Manitoba
A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, appealing to those who
wish to break their trans-continental journey. The centre of Winnipeg's social life.
Good golfing and motoring.    Open all year.    European plan.    At station.
IN EASTERN  CANADA
Place Viger Hotel,
Montreal, Que.
Chateau Frontenac,
Quebec, Que.
McAdam Hotel,
McAdam, N.B.
The Algonquin,
St.'Andrews, N.B.
Open
A  charming  hotel  in   Canada's   largest   city,
all year.
A metropolitan hotel in the most historic city of North
America.    Open ail year.
A commercial and sportsman's hotel.    Open all year.
The social centre of Canada's most fashionable seashore summer resort. Open June 30th to September
8th.
HOTELS AND CAMPS REACHED BY
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Cameron Lake, B.C.
Strathcona Lodge, B.C.
Penticton, B.C.
Lake Windermere, B.C.
Field, B.C.
Hector, B.C.
Hector, B.C.
Moraine Lake, Alta.
Kentville, N.S.
Digby, N.S.
Cameron Lake Chalet
Strathcona Lodge
Hotel Incoia
Lake Windermere Camp
Yoho Valley Camp
Lake O'Hara Camp
Wapta Camp
Moraine Lake Camp
Cornwallis Inn
The Pines
4
i
WmMmm-2mm	
FROM Vancouver, B. C, to Skagway, Alaska, is a thousand
miles through an entrancing inland channel, winding between
islands and the mainland as through a fairyland. The
journey is made in the palatial yacht-like "Princess" steamers
of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Nine days complete the journey into this land of romance and
back, leaving the traveller at Vancouver to start the journey to
the East through the magnificent passes of the Canadian Pacific
Rockies. Some, indeed, who make the Alaskan trip have come
from the East, and already in the five hundred miles of railway
travel through the passes of the four great mountain ranges
between Calgary and Vancouver have had a foretaste of the
wonderful voyage through strait and fiord which awaits them
between Vancouver and Skagway.
Mystery—that is the keynote of the North—mystery and
silence. And because of its mystery there will always be an
attraction, something to draw men and to hold them. For it is
no mere legend that the North ever calls back those who have
once lived in the snows and the mountains, or through an Alaskan
summer.
Scarcely has one left Vancouver than there dawns the feeling
that here is a new life opening out. To the right is the mainland
of British Columbia—to the left, Vancouver Island, taking its
name from the intrepid explorer who sailed into the unknown
waters of the Pacific and found the mainland through an uncharted maze. To realize to the full the miracle of this thousand
miles of navigation from Vancouver to Skagway, one should
stand for an hour or so looking forward, picking out what seems
the channel the ship will take, and finding out how invariably
one's guess is wrong. For it is not always the mainland which
lies to the east. Often the mountains which tower up to the sky,
almost from the very deck of the ship itself, are but islands; and
other channels lie behind, with countless bays and straits
and narrow gorges running miles up into the mainland, twisting,
turning, creeping forward and doubling back, till they put to
shame the most intricate maze which Oriental mind ever devised.
And of such is the whole route which finally creeps, as through
the neck of a funnel, to the port of Skagway.
Leaving The voyage to Alaska can be divided into two
Vancouver parts. The journey from Vancouver to Ketchikan
is mostly through narrow channels, with steep
shores heavily timbered to the water's edge. The second part,
from Ketchikan to Skagway, is through wider stretches of water,
with glaciers, waterfalls and rugged mountains on either side,
and richly colored by the purple twilights of Alaska.
Leaving Vancouver, the Gulf of Georgia is entered immediately. In about nine hours Seymour Narrows are reached. At
certain times this is rather an exciting piece of water to
navigate, for the current rushes and boils through it like a
mill race. It is the narrowest part of the channel between the
mainland and Vancouver, and may possibly be bridged some day.
Alert Alert Bay, the first stop, is a pretty spot on Cormorant
Bay Island, near the shore of Vancouver Island. It is a quaint
and historic native settlement, famous for its totem
poles—huge poles with grotesque carvings of various images
that stand before the houses. These totems denote the ancestry
or clan of each family, and can be read by a native as anyone
Description of the  Inside Passage to Alaska is from suggestions by F. F. W. Lowle, late General Agent, Juneau.
Page One
1923
THIS COVER PRINTED IN CANADA
 !l»"-*ri^rpY|^X,r-
* « ii * m ; v,x,,•*  !IS
Princess Louise
Princess Alice
else would read a genealogical chart. Alert Bay has a modern
salmon cannery, a government hospital, and schools for the
Indians.
Prince Very shortly the open waters of Queen Charlotte
Rupert Sound are crossed, and afford a passing glimpse of the
Pacific Ocean stretching to the horizon. A few hours
later a shorter glimpse of the Pacific Ocean is caught from Mill-
bank Sound, and the beautiful Granville Channel is reached.
For about thirteen hours the journey is through a fairyland of
dark green, placid waters. Down the high, steep shores, heavily
timbered with fir, cedar and spruce, sparkle silver waterfalls.
So narrow and so winding are the channels that it is sometimes
rather a puzzle where the steamer can emerge. Prince Rupert
is the Pacific terminal of a transcontinental railway, and has an
extensive trade in halibut, salmon and other fish to the central
and eastern markets of the continent.
Ketchikan Shortly after leaving Prince Rupert, the third and
last stretch of open water is passed, Dixon's
Entrance. On the east side are passed the settlements of Old
and New Metlakatla, where a successful mission, founded by
Father Duncan, is conducted for the natives. Port Simpson,
with its old Hudson Bay Company's Fort, is close by, and United
States waters are entered shortly before arrival at Ketchikan.
Ketchikan (pronounced Ketch - e - can, an Indian name
meaning "evil smelling water," though there seems no reason for
this title at the present time) might be said to be now the most
prosperous town in Alaska. It is one that pleases by its bustling
air, its hotels, fine stores and banks. The waterfall, about fifteen
minutes' walk from the steamer docks, should certainly be
visited. In the late summer months thousands of salmon ascend
the falls in the river, and it is a wonderful sight to see the large
fish leap and find their way to the spawning banks. Ketchikan
has large cold storage and salmon canning plants.
Wrangell A distinct change of scenery occurs from now on.
The stretches of water become wider, snow-capped
mountains rise on either side, and the wonderful purple peculiar
to the Alaskan sunrise or sunset is seen. Wrangell (pronounced
Rang - gel, and christened from a former Russian governor) is
our next stop. It is a beautifully situated and interesting town,
near the mouth of the Stikine River, which serves the famous
Cassiar Country in the interior of British Columbia, known to
big game hunters the world over. A steamer service runs from
Wrangell up the Stikine.  Part of the old Russian fort still exists.
Taku The Wrangell Narrows are reached an hour or so out
Glacier from Wrangell, and for nearly two hours the steamer
proceeds at half speed through this narrow winding
channel, which can only be navigated at certain stages of the
tide. This passage between the islands saves a long detour around
Cape Decision, across a rough and open part of the Pacific Ocean;
it has been thoroughly well marked with buoys and lights, and
is one of the most beautiful parts of the coast.
Leaving the Narrows, the port of Petersburg, a flourishing
fishing centre inhabited largely by Scandinavian people, is passed.
Here history changes in its character. Hitherto it has been interwoven with that of the Hudson Bay Company, whose posts are
still scattered along the coast. But here is Alaska, which only
comparatively recently came under the sway of America. Until
1867, Alaska was a possession of Russia, which it so nearly joins
at the Behring Straits. Some traces of the Russian rule still remain.
We are now surrounded by the typical grandeur of Alaska.
Taku Inlet (pronounced Tack - oo) sends out hundreds of odd-
shaped ice-floes to meet us, as blue as indigo, floating by to melt
gradually in warmer waters. Slowly the steamer approaches the
two famous glaciers at the head of the inlet. The one on the
left is a "dead" glacier, a mixture of brown, white, and blue colors,
and is gradually receding. The other glacier is "alive," and
continually moves forward. It shows all the colors of the rainbow, according to the time of day or the position of the sun.
Huge masses of ice continually break off into the sea with a deafening thunder and float away like gigantic swans. Taku Glacier
is a mile wide, and extends for over ninety miles over the mountains to join Llewellyn Glacier. The vibration caused by the
boat's whistle brings down great pieces of ice weighing hundreds
of tons.
Juneau Three hours steaming up Gastineau Channel brings us
to Juneau, clinging to the base and sides of Mount
Juneau. Juneau (pronounced Ju - no, and named for its French-
Canadian founder) is the capital of Alaska, the residence of the
Governor, and the meeting place of the Legislature. Until some
time after the beginning of the late war, three of the largest gold
ore crushing plants in the world were situated close by—the
Treadwell, the Alaska Gastineau and the Alaska Juneau mills
and mines. Now only the last named remains. Juneau is an
up-to-date city, with all modern improvements, and has good
roads and automobiles aplenty. One particularly interesting ride
is by automobile to the face of Mendenhall Glacier. In the early
summer the steamer schedule on the northbound trip affords
time to make this excursion in daylight. (Time 2}4 hours, cost
$10.00 per car—or to the glacier and Auk Lake, 3% hours,
Paile Two
 Prince Rupert, B. C.
Ketchikan,   the first
stop in Alaska.
Indians   sell  curios   to
the visitors.
Totem   Poles   at  Alert
Bay.
Wrangell, Alaska.
Page Three
 Princess Louise—A Private Suite
Princess Louise—The Dining Room
$15.00 a car.) Another is by the mountain road winding up to
Perseverance Mine. The Territorial Museum in the Alaska
Brotherhood Hall has a wonderful Alaska collection which everyone should visit; the salmon hatchery is also well worthy of a
visit. Those so inclined will be well repaid by seeing the fine raw
fur stocks of local dealers.
Lynn With the possible exception of Taku Glacier, the trip
Canal from Juneau to Skagway provides the most wonderful
scenery of all. For over eighty miles we steam up the
arm of sea called the Lynn Canal, varying in width from one to
over five miles. Mountains of rock capped with snow, towering
glaciers and gushing waterfalls, canyons of all sizes and wild
shapes, and colors in restless variety, surround us. Passing a
United States Army Post, Fort William H. Seward, lying back
in Haines Inlet on the west side, we suddenly turn a point and
see Skagway ahead of us.
Skagway Skagway is the end of the northbound run. It is a
town which has loomed large in the history of the
North. When the gold rush started to the Yukon in 1896 the
landing was made at Dyea, which lies at the north of the other,
or western inlet, which completes the Lynn Canal. From Dyea
the trail led over the dangerous Chilcoot Pass, but word came
of the discovery of the White Pass, and in a day fifteen thousand
people left Dyea for Skagway, and in a day a big city had grown
where before was chiefly swamp. Skagway (pronounced as
spelt) is an Indian name meaning "much wind."
The steamer lays over about thirty-six hours, and ample
opportunity is given for the many diversions offered in summer.
These include "hikes" along the Skagway River, mountain
climbing, launch trips or angling.
The U. S. Government Road Commission have recently completed a footbridge across the Skagway River, which will allow
tourists to visit Fortune Bay and Smuggler's Cove—which owes
its name to the fact that it figured as the headquarters of the
"rum runners" during the gold rush. If the plans of the Skagway
Alpine Club are consummated Dyea will be accessible from
Skagway over this trail.
INLAND FROM SKAGWAY
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be
incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and fascinating "inside." Such a journey, difficult as it was in the early
days of the gold rush, can be easily undertaken, for Skagway is
the southern terminus of the rail line of the White Pass and
Yukon Route. A comfortable train, with large-windowed observation cars, will carry one through the magnificent, thrilling
scenery of the White Pass into the Yukon Territory, connecting
at Carcross and at White Horse with the commodious steamers
operated by the same company.
For those who are returning south by the same "Princess"
steamship, there are available the excursions to the West Taku
Arm or to White Horse. For those waiting over until the next
steamship, there is the trip to Atlin Lake—where, indeed, many
visitors linger much longer than such a brief visit. For those with
more time, there is the wonderful trip from White Horse down
the Yukon River to Dawson, beyond which one may travel
further down the Yukon and re-enter Alaska.
Over the The rail journey is a most spectacular one. The
White Pass salt tang of the sea is left behind, and the sweetness of lake and mountain air fills the nostrils.
Climbing up to Glacier Gorge, at Summit we leave American
territory, and the scarlet-coated Mounted Policeman greets us
as we enter Canada. A bronze monument, where the flags of
the two countries float side by side, marks the boundary line.
For a very short distance we travel through British Columbia,
and then at Pennington cross into the Yukon Territory.
On our left Lake Bennett begins—a long, narrow body of
water which the railway will follow for twenty-seven miles. It
is rather amazing to remember that Bennett, where a stop is
usually made for lunch, and which consists merely of a station and
its outbuildings, once had a population of several thousand and
teemed with life and excitement. For it was to this beautiful
lake, bounded by mountains of old-rose color, that the "trail of
'ninety-eight" led. Those who had survived the epic hazards of
the Chilcoot Pass camped on this lake, and hewed them lumber
to make the rafts, scows and other manner of water craft in
which to reach the golden land of their hopes. Little did they
know, of course, the perils of the White Horse Rapids; or if they
had heard of them, little did they appreciate them!
Along the ever-winding shores of this blue Lake Bennett,
looking out on a long mountain ridge, the railway runs, until the
little town of Carcross is reached. Here the Atlin and West
Taku Arm passengers exchange the train for the steamer.
White Horse Lewes and other little lakes are passed, and then
Miles Canyon and White Horse Rapids. On
still days their roar can be heard even in the town, about an hour's
walk distant. As we stand on the brink of this famous gorge, no
very vivid imagination is necessary to conjure up pictures of the
Page Four
 1. The Taku Glacier, near
Juneau.
2. Hikers returning from
a clay's glacier climbing.
3. Baby icebergs near the
Taku Glacier.
4. The result of a success
ful hunting trip.
5. An Alaskan Harbor.
Page Five
 old days. We can imagine the bold adventurers in their frail
craft nearing these death-dealing rapids, whose waters are
thrown from side to side in a long serpentine series of twists, and
which are so troubled that the water rides higher in the middle
than at the sides. Down they came in their mad rush to the
Klondike—not at intervals, but in a continuous procession that
was (in the words of an eye-witness) like traffic on a city street.
Some, becoming scared, jumped ashore as they saw their dangers,
and watched from the high cliffs the agonies of their boats; but the
majority stayed with their craft. And so few came through
unpunished! Those who did wasted no time in going back to
warn their competitors, but hurried on.
White Horse is a busy little town on the west bank of Fifty-
Mile River (also known as the Lewes River and sometimes as the
Upper Yukon). There is fairly good hotel accommodation to be
obtained. Trips to the rapids and other points may be made by
automobile over good roads. It is the terminus of the railway,
and the point of departure for the steamer trip to Dawson.
To the The journey from White Horse to Dawson and
Klondike back, one that can be made in about a week, is
the fitting climax of the trip "inside." Leaving
White Horse by steamer and turning in a north-westerly direction
down the swiftly-flowing river, the first notable sight is the wid-
ening-out of the stream known as Lake Labarge.
Giant towers and bastion-like projections of red rock stand
sentinel along the western shore of this lake, while on the east
great gray rounded hills of limestone, veined and shaded with
the green spruce, alternate with deep, wooded valleys and the
picturesque mouths of rivers.
Five-Finger On through the splendid scenery of the Lewes, we
Rapids come to one of the most thrilling experiences of
the entire trip—the shooting of Five-Finger Rapids.
Here the river narrows to 150 yards. Five great hulks of stone
rise to a height of forty to seventy feet. The waters rush foaming
between. Our steamer, guided by its skillful pilot, glides swiftly
through, almost touching the stone walls in its passage.
Rink Rapids, six miles below, gives a second experience of
this exciting form of navigation. At Fort Selkirk begins the
Yukon River proper, formed by the union of the Lewes and the
Pelly.
The surging waters have cut through the lower spurs of a great
mountain range. For a hundred and fifty miles the steamer plies
this route of ever-changing scenic grandeur. Winding around and
between countless islands, at times running close under the lee
of huge granite cliffs—now passing the swift, foaming White
River, where it mingles with the Yukon—then Stewart River
and Indian River—there is not a single mile of the way but holds
vivid interest. The trip from White Horse to Dawson takes about
forty-eight hours; the return journey takes about four days.
Dawson Dawson, once the focus of the world's greatest
gold rush, is now but a shadow of its former glory.
It is beautifully situated on a bend of the Yukon River, an up-to-
date, well-built and well-regulated city, with many fine homes,
comfortable hotels, and pretty flower gardens. Good roads
make possible many automobile trips to surrounding hydraulic
and dredge mining operations. The literary-inclined can make
a pilgrimage to the cabin occupied by Robert W. Service, the
"Kipling of the Yukon" during his long residence in Dawson.
From Dawson the steamers of the American-Yukon Navigation
Company can be taken down the Yukon River to Fort Yukon
and Tanana, and from Tanana up the Tanana River to Nenana
and way points.
To Atlin From Carcross through a chain of sapphire lakes,
mountain and forest-girt—this is a rare jewel of a
side-trip! It takes but little time, but there is more of sheer
beauty packed into that eighty-two miles than can be found in
any other place in the world.
Leaving Carcross by the commodious steamer "Tutshi" and
winding through Nares or Tagish Lake, the steamer traverses
Windy Arm, and enters Taku Arm, a beautiful sheet of water that
is almost completely shut in by the most inspiring mountain
scenery. A splendid view is afforded of Jubilee Mountain, reaching its snow-crowned head into the clouds. Steaming through
beautiful Golden Gate and up Taku Inlet the boat makes a landing at Taku, where a portage by a short railway line along the
bank of roaring Atlintoo River brings the tourist to the west
shore of Atlin Lake.
Here connection is made with the twin-screw motor-boat
"Tarahne" which makes the six-mile run across Atlin Lake to
Atlin City, the base of supplies for one of the richest hydraulic
mining camps in British Columbia.
Near the boat landing, and facing the lake within a few feet of
the shore, is the Atlin Inn, built and maintained especially for
tourists by the White Pass and Yukon Route. From its windows
a magnificent view may be obtained of the Atlin Mountains across
Lake Atlin, a mountain lake of surpassing beauty. The tourist
will find the Atlin Inn very inviting, the cuisine and service excellent. A stay here for a day or so, or for several weeks, will add
greatly to the pleasure of the Atlin trip. (Rates, European plan,
from $2.00 to $3.50 per day.)
There is an indescribable tonic effect in the Atlin climate that
will eventually make it one of the world's greatest summer health
resorts. Numerous side trips may be taken by automobile,
steamer, launch or on foot to many points of interest. Amongst
these are the placer gold mines, the fox farm, the Warm Springs,
and the Indian Village; and wherever one goes, one will find a
profusion of beautiful wild flowers in almost endless variety.
Then, too, there are delightful walks along the shores.
The principal event of the trip to Atlin is the afternoon excursion on the steamer "Tarahne." For about forty miles the boat
winds its way through the narrow mountain-ribbed passages of
the West Channel. The boat then passes out through Copper
Island Narrows, and the return is made down the other side of
these islands on Lake Atlin, where a magnificent view is obtained
of the huge Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
When the water is smooth, as it frequently is, and on its surface are mirrored the vari-colored verdure-clad hills and snow-
crowned mountains with their cathedral-like spires, the scene is of
sublime beauty and grandeur. And these reflections are not seen
merely for a mile or so, but mile after mile.
Those who like fishing will have an opportunity to try their luck
at landing lake trout, whitefish or the smaller but gamy grayling.
West Another beautiful scenic trip is that to West Taku
Taku Arm Arm, being especially arranged for the convenience
of passengers who are making the round trip from
Vancouver to Skagway and back on the same steamship, and who
cannot spare sufficient time to avail themselves of one of the many
other tours over the White Pass. It gives these passengers an
opportunity of seeing a maximum number of points of interest in
the short time at their disposal. It is a journey which takes the
visitor into the very heart of primeval surroundings, where giant
mountains raise their lofty peaks from the glittering glacial waters
of the Arm, which ends at what might be termed the "back door"
of the Taku Glacier that the traveller saw before reaching Juneau.
The route followed is the same as to Atlin, except that instead
of turning to the eastward to Taku Landing the steamer continues
up the head of Taku Arm into West Taku Arm.    The steamer
Page Six
 1. Juneau,    Capital    of
Alaska, and the Gastineau Channel.
2. California?—No,
Alaska!
3. Skagway,   end   of   the
steamship journey.
4. The Skagway Valley.
5. Skagway is famous for
its flower gardens.
::;'XXX7 X7»r7;X«»7X
Page Seven
 QastSoriicQ
arrives here about eight-thirty in the evening and lies over until
about five the next morning. The trip from Skagway to West
Taku Arm and return is made in about thirty hours.
Sporting A wonderful  variety of hunting is offered  the
Attractions sportsman in Northern British Columbia and the
Yukon Territory, where Nature has richly endowed its mighty snow-capped mountains, expansive inland
seas, vast areas of trackless wilderness and lonely tundra, with
giant moose, lordly elk and caribou, deer, savage silvertip grizzlies,
sheep, goats and many other forms of wild life. The fishing
offers an interesting side line to a big game hunt and the swift,
rocky, tumbling rivers, well stocked with gamy fighting trout, and
the mountain-rimmed lakes of unequalled beauty, all combine
to make this "roof of the world" a paradise for the sportsman.
More than a dozen varieties of bear are to be found in this mountain domain, ranging from the huge polar bear and terrible kodiak
right down through the different species to the common black
bear once found all over America. The different varieties are
numerous, according to location on the islands, along the coast
in the trackless forests, the mountain peaks and the ice floes.
These northern moose are the largest members of the deer
family and are plentifully distributed throughout the greater part
of this country. Magnificent trophies are brought out each
season. Caribou, too, are abundant and inhabit the treeless and
tundra sections of the interior. Mountain sheep and goat are
among the most prized game animals. Many other forms of wild
life, including smaller game, fur bearers, and bird life in particular, are prevalent.
While some of the more accessible localities are hunted each
year, the main big game districts can at present be limited to
five, viz. Kluahne, McMillan and Pelley Rivers, and White River
districts in Yukon Territory, and in Northern British Columbia,
the Cassiar, and Atlin and Teslin Lakes area.
It is suggested that intending sportsmen communicate direct
with the undermentioned for reliable information about the
hunting or other conditions in any of the above districts:
Kluahne Lake Districts Wm. Armstrong, Kluahne, Y. T.
M. E. Bones, Kluahne, Y. T.
Jacquot Bros., Kluahne, Y. T.
McMillan and Pelley River
District  .R.G.Thomas, White Horse, Y.T.
Ira Van Bibber, Selkirk, Y. T.
White River District Wm. Armstrong, Kluahne, Y. T-
M. E. Bones, Kluahne, Y. T.
Jacquot Bros., Kluahne, Y. T.
Telegraph Creek Hudson Bay Co.
Cassiar Mountains J. Frank Callbreath,
Telegraph Creek, B. C.
Geo. B. Ball,
Telegraph Creek, B. C.
Atlin and Teslin Lakes Louis Schulz, Atlin, B. C.
(The Taylor Drury Pedlar Co. have trading posts at Teslin,
Little Salmon, Carmacks, Selkirk, Ross River and Mayo. Parties
of practically any size can be handled and outfitted by this firm
through their head office at White Horse.)
Taku River For the accommodation of a limited number of
Camps tourists and sportsmen the Taku River Company
has established a comfortable camp on the Taku
River about 25 miles from Juneau, amid scenery of notable
beauty and grandeur. A large log cabin for dining and lounging
purposes with individual tents for sleeping quarters comprise
the camp, which is open from June 1st to the end of September.
Short trips of an hour or two take one to five glaciers, from
two of which huge icebergs are constantly breaking with thundering crashes. Lakes and mountain streams abounding in trout,
virgin forests and stately mountains, many of which have never
been climbed, with the surrounding country practically unknown,
offer a fascinating field for exploration with gun, rod or camera.
All information can be had from Dr. Harry C. DeVighne,
Juneau, Alaska.
Historical    The territory now known as Alaska was unknown
Notes to the white man till, in 1741, it was explored by
two Russian officers, Captains Vitus Bering and
Chirikov. Thirty-three years later it was visited by Spaniards
coming up from the Pacific, and in 1778 Captain Cook undertook
some surveys of the Coast. The first elaborate survey of that
Coast was made by Captain Vancouver in 1793-94. The Russians
formally assumed possession in 1799, when the Administration
was handed over to the Russian American Company, the chief
resident director being Alexander Baranov, who founded Sitka
in 1804. The reign of this Chartered Company ended in 1861,
when Prince Maksutov was appointed Imperial Governor.
Six years later, in the same year as that in which Canada was
confederated as the Dominion, the United States purchased
Alaska from Russia for $7,200,000, in order to obtain control of
the fisheries and fur trade, which at that time were the chief
known resources of Alaska. The gradual discovery of mineral
wealth culminated in the Klondike rush of 1897, and the rush to
the gold fields of Nome in 1900, since when the mining industry
has been stabilized.
A word in general relative to some Alaska words. Visitors
encounter the words "Sourdough" and " Cheechacho," distinguishing the resident from the new arrival. The first is a
compliment, meaning an old timer or one who has seen the ice
form and go out of the Yukon River in fall and spring. The
second is an Esquimaux word meaning tenderfoot, or newcomer.
Uppermost in the minds of everyone is the genuine friendliness
and ready hospitality offered by the "Sourdoughs." One of the
surprises is in the gardens of these residents. Nowhere can be
found finer sweet-peas, dahlias, asters, stocks, or pansies, or such
raspberries, currants, strawberries, blueberries and vegetables.
PRINCESS STEAMSHIPS
The "Princess" Steamships engaged in the Alaska business are
modern vessels of the most comfortable, sea-going type. They
are fitted with every convenience for passengers. Staterooms are
light, cosy and well-ventilated. The community rooms, consisting of dining-room, observation room, smoke-room, etc., are bright
and cheerful. The "Princess Louise" has a good dance-room.
All ships have ample deck space for promenading, sports and
lounging. The personal service provided in the staterooms, dining-room and elsewhere, and the cuisine, are of that high standard
which have made the name of the Canadian Pacific synonymous
with comfort and enjoyment.
The "Princess Louise" is of 4200 gross tonnage, with a length
of 330 feet, a width of 48 feet, and a depth of 18 feet. The "Princess Alice" has a gross tonnage of 3099, a length of 289 feet, a
width of 46 feet, and a depth of 17 feet. All these vessels burn
fuel oil instead of coal, and are fitted with wireless telegraph.
One of the July 1923 sailings will be performed by the "Princess
Charlotte," which has a gross tonnage of 3844 and is 330 feet
long, 47 feet wide and 18 feet deep.
Page Eight
 <*
1. Davidson   Glacier,
Lynn Canal.
2. Gold     Mining    near
Atlin—Washing    it
down.
3. The Atlin  Inn,   Atlin,
B.C.
4. The Tutshi, from Car-
cross to Atlin.
5. Llewellyn Glacier, seen
through the gorge.
Page Nine
 British Columbia Coast ServicQ
DISTANCES
To
Alert Bay
Prince Rupert
Ketchikan
Wrangell
Juneau
Skagway
Hours
14
22
8
7
11
8
Nautical Miles
183
287
101
99
148
100
nival ent to 1.15 statute miles.
SAILINGS
From
Vancouver
Alert Bay
Prince Rupert
Ketchikan
Wrangell
Juneau
Intended sailings are from Vancouver on June 9th, 16th, 23d,
30th, July 4th, 11th, 14th, 18th, 21st, 25th, August 1st, 4th, lltb,
15th, 22d, 25th and September 1st.    Sailing hour, 9.00 p.m.
Steamship sails also from Victoria on day previous to dates
mentioned, at 11.00 p.m.
CLOTHING, MEALS, ETC.
Passengers should provide themselves with a good, warm topcoat and a pair of walking shoes. The general weather is very
fine and warm, but a good covering for the evening or a damp
day is very desirable. The company does not supply steamer
rugs, but has arranged to carry on the steamers a limited supply
of rugs that will be rented to passengers for the round trip at a
nominal charge. The company does not supply the regulation
ocean liner deck chair, but supplies comfortable camp chairs
with backs, free of charge. A barber is carried on both steamships.
The meals provided on Alaska steamships are breakfast, lunch
and dinner, and, in addition, light refreshments are served in the
dining saloon at night without extra charge. Meals and berth
while the steamship is in port at Skagway are not included in the
passage money but can be secured if the passenger prefers staying
aboard to going ashore to a hotel.
Victrolas, with a suitable supply of records, are placed on these
ships.
IMMIGRATION INSPECTION
Passengers entering Alaska from Canada are required to pass
the customary United States Immigration Inspection at Ketchikan, the port of entry. This inspection is not strict so far as bona
fide tourists are concerned. Passengers will be asked by purser
for certain information regarding age, place of residence, business,
etc., for use in making up the manifest required by the Immigration Department, and will be given a card by him. This card
is presented by holder to immigration inspector, who boards
steamer on arrival at Ketchikan, and as soon as particulars shown
by purser on manifest are checked by the inspector, the passenger
is permitted to go ashore. There is a similar inspection by the
Canadian Immigration Department on arrival of steamer southbound at Prince Rupert. These inspections are largely formal so
far as tourists are concerned.
BAGGAGE
The usual free allowance of one hundred and fifty (150) pounds
of baggage will be granted on whole tickets, and seventy-five (75)
pounds on half tickets, with customary additional charge on any
excess weight. Steamer trunks, if intended for use in staterooms,
must not be more than fourteen inches in height. Any steamer
trunk of ordinary width and length can be placed under lower
berth if the height given is not exceeded.
Free Storage Passengers holding through tickets from eastern
points to the Pacific Coast, and making Alaska
trip from Seattle, Victoria or Vancouver, will be granted free
storage of baggage at the Company's wharves at the points
mentioned for not more than thirty days. After expiration of
thirty-day limit, regular storage charges will accrue.
Bonded Baggage Baggage may be checked through from
Seattle to Skagway, and if not required en
route may be forwarded under bond to avoid necessity of custom
inspection. If baggage is required en route it should be checked
to Victoria or Vancouver only and presented for Canadian Customs inspection before boarding steamer for Alaska. U. S. Customs inspection will also be necessary at Ketchikan, the first port
of entry into Alaska.
Southbound—Canadian Customs baggage inspection will be
made at Prince Rupert and U. S. Customs inspection at Vancouver (if passenger is traveling east via Canadian Pacific Railway) or at Seattle. Baggage checked from Vancouver or Victoria
to Skagway will be inspected by U. S. Customs officers at Ketchikan, or may be bonded if desired.
Baggage can be checked through from Puget Sound and
British Columbia ports to Atlin or Dawson, via the White Pass
and Yukon Route, without undergoing inspection by Customs
officers at Skagway, provided passengers hold through tickets,
and after it is once checked at starting point there is no further
examination or re-checking until arrival at destination, where all
baggage from United States points is subject to inspection. Baggage originating at British Columbia points can be corded and
sealed and sent through Alaska in bond without inspection. Baggage originating at United States ports, destined to points in
Alaska on the lower Yukon River below Dawson, can go through
to destination in bond without inspection.
HOTELS
The following hotels are situated at points en route to Alaska,
and at inland points beyond Skagway:
Ketchikan Stedman
Revilla
Wrangell Wrangell
Juneau Gastineau
Zynda
Skagway Pullen House
Golden North
Dewey
Portland
Carcross Caribou
Atlin Atlin Inn
Royal
White Horse White Pass
Commercial
Regina
Dawson Rochester
Royal Alexandra
Yukonia
Occidental
Most of the above are run on the European plan, rates from
$1.50 up.   Those on American plan, $5.00 up.   Meals a la carte.
Page Ten
 2.
3.
4.
5.
Auk Lake and the
Mendelhall Glacier,
near Juneau.
Summit Lake, at the
summit of the White
Pass.
N6
Lake
In the
Atlin.
The Sawtooth Range,
between Skagway and
Carcross.
The Boundary Line be-
tween two good
friends.
Page Eleven
 XXXXfc,-,.;.
"' "-'777 ,.;■■: :,:-;,..[■.■ ■    ' ■'■  ,:,".V, :V.\ ','v ... //
.fc-X' 7-77.:.7!...v: .■ ■ ■;7:77,7.':.;..:>■■■;;
*77Ǥli;:
1.    The Five Finger Rapids
of the Yukon River.
2.
Dawson.
3.
Fox farming is
perous Yukon
a pros-
indus-
try.
4.
On   the Yukon
rear Dawson.
River,
5.
The   famous
Canyon,   near
Horse.
Miles
White
Printed in U. S. A.
Page Twelve
 CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
AMERICA
Atlanta..
-ston.. .
i
....Ga.
. . Mass
. . Man.
falo N.Y.
Ippy Alta.
cago 111.
Jjncinnati Ohio
Cleveland     . . . .Ohio
Detroit Mich.
Duluth Minn.
Edmonton Alta.
Fort William..   Ont.
Halifax N.S.
Hamilton Ont.
Havana Cuba
imeau Alaska
nsas City.. . Mo.
Aetchikan. . .Alaska-
Kingston Ont.
Kingston. . .Jamaica-
London  Ont.
Los Angeles. . . .Cal.-
Mexico City.., . Mex
Milwaukee Wis.-
Minneapolis. .Minn.
.   Montreal Que.
yosejaw Sask.-
*Xlson B.C.
iw York N.Y.
.orth  Bay Ont.-
Ottawa Ont.-
Philadelphia. . .   Pa.-
Pittsburgh Pa.
Portland Ore.-
Prince Rupert. .B.C.Quebec Que.-
Regina Sask.-
St. John N.B.
St.  Louis Mo.-
St. Paul Minn.-
San Francisco.. .Cal.-
Saskatoon Sask.-
SaultSte. MarieOnt.-
Seattle. Wash-
Sherbrooke Que.-
Skagway Alaska-
Spokane Wash.-
Tacoma Wash-
Toronto Ont-
Vancouver B.C.Victoria B.C.Washington.. . .D.C.Winnipeg.. . . . . Man-
—E. G. Chesbrough, Gen. Agt.Pass. Dept..49 N. Forsyth St-
.—L. R. Hart, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 405 Boylston St.
-R.   Dawson,   District  Pass.  Agt Smith  Block
-D. R. Kennedy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 160 Pearl St.
-J. E. Proctor, District Pass. Agt C.P.R. Station
-T. J. Wall, Gen. Agt. Rail Traffic 140 South Clark St.
-M. E. Malone, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 430 Walnut St.
-G. H. Griffin, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 1040 Prospect Ave.
-G. G. McKay, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. . . .1239 Griswold St.
-David   Bertie,   Trav.   Passenger   Agt.... Soo   Line   Depot
-C. S. Fyfe, City Ticket Agent. 10012 Jasper Ave. East
-A. J. Boreham, City Passenger Agt 404 Victoria Ave.
-J. D. Chipman, City Passenger Agt 117 Hollis St.
-A. Craig, City Passenger Agent. .Cor. King and James St.
-Santamaria y Ca., Passenger Agent. .... .San Ignacio  18.
-J. L. McClosky, Agent.
-R. G. Norris, City Pass'r Agt. .601 Railway Exchange Bldg.
-F. E. Ryus, Agent.
-F.  Conway,  City  Passenger Agent.... 180 Wellington  St.
-George and Branday, Agents.
-H. J. McCallum, City Passenger Agent 161 Dundas St.
-W. Mcllroy, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept... 605 South Spring St.
—H. E. Bourchier, General Agent P.O. Box 1477
-F. T. Sansom, City Passenger Agent. .. .68 Wisconsin St.
-H. M. Tait, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 611 2nd Ave. South
(R.  G.  Amiot,   District  Pass.  Agent Windsor  Station
IF. C. Lydon, City Pass. Agent 141 St. James St.
-A.  C.  Harris,   Ticket  Agent Canadian  Pacific  Station
-J.  S.  Carter,  District Pass. Agent Baker & Ward St.
-F. It. Perry, Gen. Agt. Rail. Traffic..Madison Ave. at 44th St.
-L. O. Tremblay, District Pass. Ast 87 Main Street W.
-J. A.  McGill,  Gen. Agt.  Pass.  Dept 83 Sparks St.
-R.  C.  Clayton,   City  Pass.  As^t Locust  St.  at   15th
-C. L. Williams, Gen. Agent Pass. Dept 340 Sixth Ave.
-W. H. Deacon, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept 55 Third St.
-W. C. Orchard, General Agent.
-C.  A.   Langevin,   City  Pass.   Agent Palais  Station
-G. D. Brophy, District Pass. Agent. . Canadian Pacific Station
-G. B. Burpee,  District Pass. Agent  . .40 King St.
-E.  L.  Sheehan,  Gen.  Agt. Pass.  Dept 420 Locust St.
-B. E. Smeed, Gen. Agt. Soo Line Robert & Fourth St.
-F. L. Nason, Gen. Agt. Pass.  Dept 675 Market St.
-W. E.  Lovelock,  City Pass. Agent 115 Second Ave.
-J. O. Johnston, City Pass. Agent.
-E. F. L. Sturdee, G<m. Agt. Pass. Dept. . .608 Second Ave.
-A.  Metivier, City Pass. Agt 74  Wellington St.
-L. H. Johnston, Agent.
■E. L. Cardie, Traffic Mgr. Spokane International Ry.
•D. C. O'Keefe, City Passenger Agent 1113 Pacific Ave.
Wm. Fulton, Dist. Passenger Agt.. .Canadian Pacific Bldg.
F.  H.  Daly,  City Passenger Agt...434 Hastings  St.  West
L. D. Chetham, City Passenger Agent. .1102 Government St.
C. E. Phelps, City Passenger Agent. . . 1419 New York Ave.
J. W. Dawson, Dist. Passenger Agent..Main and Portage
EUROPE
Antwerp. . . .Belgium—A. L.   Rawlinson 25   Quai   Jordaens
Belfast Ireland—Wm. McCalla 41 Victoria St.
rmingham.. .Eng.—W.  T.  Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
istol  .Eng.—A.   S.   Ray 18   St.   Augustine's   Parade
ussels. . . .Belgium—C.   De   Mey 98   Blvd.   Adolphe-Max
Glasgow.. . .Scotland—-W.   Stewart • 25   Bothwell   St.
Hamburg . .Germany—Carl    Flugge Gansemarkt    3
Liverpool..... .Eng.—Thos. McNeil, General Agent Pier H^ad
[H. G. Dring, European Passenger Mgr. 62-65 Charing Cross
London Eng. < W. Baird, Asst. European Passenger Mgr. S. W. I.
(G. Saxon Jones, City Agent 103 Leadenhall St. E.C.3
Manchester. . . .Eng.—J.  W.  Maine 31  Mosley Street
Paris.......... France—A.  V.  Clark 7  Rue  Scribe
Rotterdam. .Holland—J. Springett Coolsingel No. 42
Southampton. .Eng.—J. H. Webb Can. Pac. Railway Bldg., 7 Canute Road
ASIA
.China—T. R. Percy, Gen'l Agt. Pass. Dept.
.Japan—A. M. Parker, Passenger Agent 1 Bund.
 P.I.—J. R. Shaw, Agent 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
. .China—A. H. Tessier, Gen. Agt. Pass. Dept. . .Palace Hotel Bldg.
. .Japan—G. E. Costello, Gen Agt. Pass. Dept 14 Bund
AUSTRALASIA AND PACIFIC OCEAN
. . . . S.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
. ..N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
... .Qd.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
. . .N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
. . .W.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
. . .T.H.—Theo. H. Davies & Co.
 Vic—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.), Thos. Cook & Son.
. . .W.A.—Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
 Fiii—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
. N.S.W.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
.. . .N.Z.—Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Hong  Kong.
Kobe	
Manila.
Shanghai. . .
Yokohama..
Adelaide	
Auckland. .
Brisbane..
Dunedin. . .
Fremantie.
Honolulu. .
Melbourne.
Perth	
Suva	
Sydney	
Wellington.
 *w
Printed in U. S. A.
Checked to Dec. 1922. <
  fil
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B|k                /mj^^mmjZ
Gwse4b*M6> ALASKA *^> 44z* J
• - ■ -   ■
 CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotels of High Standard at Low Cost
Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver, B.C.
Empress Hotel
Victoria, B.C.
Emerald Lake Chalet
Near Field, B.C.
Altitude 4,272 feet
Chateau Lake Louise
Lake Louise, Alberta
Altitude 5,680 feet
Banff Springs Hotel
Banff, Alberta
Altitude 4,625 feet
Hotel Palliser
Calgary, Alberta
Hotel Saskatchewan
Regina, Sask.
The Royal Alexandra
Winnipeg, Man.
PACIFIC COAST
Largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking the Strait of Georgia, and serving the
business man and the tourist. Golf, motoring,
fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions.
Open all year.   European Plan.
A luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen Playground, which, by its equable climate, is a
favorite summer and winter resort. Motoring,
yachting, fishing, shooting and all-year golf.
Crystal Garden for swimming and music.
Open all year.    European Plan.
THE ROCKIES
Situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, in picturesque
Yoho National Park. Roads and trails to the Burgess
Pass, Yoho Valley, etc. Boating and fishing. Open
summer months.    American Plan.
Facing an exquisite Alpine lake in Banff National Park.
Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips, swimming, drives or motoring, tennis, boating, fishing, in
neighbouring waters. Open summer months. European
Plan.
In the heart of Banff National Park. Alpine climbing,
motoring, golf, bathing, hot sulphur springs, tennis,
fishing, boating and riding. Open summer months.
European Plan.
THE PRAIRIES
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard. Ideal headquarters for the business man or the tourist travelling
to and from the Canadian Rockies, or beyond. Open all
year.    European Plan.
In the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan. Golf
and motoring.    Open all year.    European Plan.
A popular hotel in the capital of the Province of ManiT
toba and the centre of Winnipeg's social life. Open aljl
year.    European Plan.
EASTERN CANADA
The Royal York—The largest hotel in the British Empire.    Open all year.    European Plan.
Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel in the most
historic and romantic city of North America. Open ajl
year. Port for Canadian Pacific "Empress" steamships
to Europe.    European Plan.
McAdam Hotel—A commercial and sportsman's hoteL
Open all year.    American Plan.
The Algonquin—The social centre of New Brunswick's
*most popular seashore summer resort.   Open summer
months.    American Plan.
The Pines—Nova Scotia's premier resort hotel. Golf,
tennis, swimming pool. Open summer months. American Plan.
|gw|Cornwallis Inn—centre for excursions to Evangeline Land.    Open all year.    American Plan.
Lakeside Inn—Designed in attractive bungalow style.
Golf available for hotel guests. Tuna fishing. Open
summer months.    American Plan.
Lord Nelson Hotel. Open all year. European Plan.
(Operated by the Lord Nelson Hotel Co.).
Other Hotels and Lodges reached by Canadian Pacific
Yoho Valley Lodge, Field, B.C. French River Chalet-Bungalow Camp,
Lake Wapta Lodge, Hector, B.C. French River, Ont.
Lake O Hara Lodge, Hector, B.C. Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
Radium Hot Springs Lodge, Hotel Incola, Penticton, B.C.
Radium, B*a Harrison Hot Springs Hotel,
Moraine Lake Lodge, Moraine Lake, Alta.     Agassiz, B.C.
M°Hnt*Assiniboine Lodge, Banff, Alta. Cameron Lake Chalet, Cameron Lake
Devil g Gap Lodge, Kenora, Ont. (Vancouver Island), B.C.
For further information and reservations  apply to   hotel management, your local travel agent, or nearest Canadian Pacific Office.
Toronto, Ont.
Quebec, Que.
McAdam, N.B.
St. Andrews-by-the-
Sea, N.B.
Digby, N.S.
Kentville, N.S.
Yarmouth, N.S.
Halifax, N.S.
"■»•
IB   Enjoy a Pioneer
a cat ion! Adventure north
to
andthe
YUKON
/fit*/    X,'1
thivhich the Unh
ted States
Belotv-The ha$ed Alaska from ^^ of 98
Above—i»e Ll
% A cruise through inland seas walled by spruce -
clad, snow-crowned mountains, seas dotted
with Indian fishing boats—a cruise taking you through
land of totem poles and mammoth-ivory carvings,
calling at seaport towns where every second store is a
treasury of curios—a cruise to glaciers stretching huge
talons of ice into the sea—a cruise to a land of furs and
huskies—a cruise of sunny days and lingering twilights,
with Northern Lights and a Midnight Sun—a cruise that
links up with a railway running on cliffledges overlooking
the Gold Rush Trail of '98, and taking you to the frontier
towns and flower-bedecked magic of the tremendous
Yukon River—such a cruise must surely make you feel
that this coming summer the trip for you must be up the
Inside Passage on one of the Canadian Pacific] Princess
steamers to Alaska and the Yukon.
HI
 The charming Empress Hotel
A corner in
Butchart's
Gardens,
Victoria
12;
'&.P'^S0
'■•^■■■w>m7M.
XX& mm
'4m ~.*Tk-&* \i'f&,
ICTORIAwv
the evergreen playground
Vancouver and Victoria are the Canadian Pacific ports,
linked up with Seattle by the Triangle Service of Princess steamers.
VICTORIA, Capital of British Columbia, is a city of
gardens with a quiet English character that appeals
strongly to American visitors. The handsome Parliament Buildings include an interesting Museum illustrating the life and handicrafts of the Coast Indians.
The social centre is the Empress Hotel, ivy-clad and
set out with flower beds making a blaze of color. Near
Victoria are the celebrated Butchart's Gardens, in
which an old quarry has been transformed into a
paradise of bloom. Lovely motor drives take you to
the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory or along the
 V V V
atti
V
Harbour and City of Vancouver
©WESTERN CANADA AIRWAYS
«/ VANCOUVER
Canada'* qatewaii to the Pacific
Hotel Vancouver
Malahat Drive with its superb views of fiord and shore line
and distant mountains, or farther still through groves of giant
Douglas fir to Alberni. Golf is here the game of games.
Victoria owes much of its charm to its balmy climate.
VANCOUVER is Canada's commercial metropolis on the Pacific
Coast, with a superb harbour in a beautiful setting of mountain
background. The sub-tropical virgin forest has been retained
in Stanley Park, Vancouver's city playground of 1,000 acres.
Nearby are Capilano, Lynn and Seymour Canyons, Grouse
Mountain, and Indian River Park with many attractive seashore summer resorts. From the rose-garlanded roof garden
of the Hotel Vancouver, one looks over a great city to the
Fraser River and the Gulf of Georgia, or across the river to the
Lions. Port for busy lumber and mining industries, Vancouver
harbour is a hive of industry. This is a University City, and
has fine residential districts such as Shaughnessy Heights.
A "Princess" liner
d
an
IASKA..
133
 totem poles beckon a
picturesque welcome
to • • • •
Alert day
m
ALERT BAY on Cormorant Island off the East Coast of Vancouver Island is the
first port of call on the passage to Alaska. Here you are on the Southern frontier of Totem Pole Land, which extends North along the Pacific Coast as far as
Wrangell. Turn to the left from the quay on which you land and you find
these colorful heraldic emblems lining the street, while other totem poles
decorate the cemetery, which you soon reach if you turn to the right. Great
logs mark the pillars and framework of an old Indian communal lodge. This
is the tribal capital of thirteen Coast Indian communities, whose main activities
141
 »X"7s=1
a livinq..romantic museum
of ancient Indian lore is your
first port of call
consist in fishing. The native children
are picturesque and of happy disposition.
The totems are not idols, but represent
animal spirits friendly to the clan—the
particular friend of the Alert Bay Indian
being the Raven.
Leaving Alert Bay you get a glimpse of the
open sea while crossing Queen Charlotte
Sound from Johnstone Straits before entering the archipelago of islands along the
Pacific Coast of British Columbia.
Alert Bay greets a
u Princess"
 Chief Johnson's
famous totem pole
Prince Rupert
Ketchiiun
daqliqto lingers lonqer
and majestic peaks
qlow ivilh f lamina
hues!
PRINCE RUPERT and KETCHIKAN
are the ports of call on the following
day on the regular northbound
course of the Princess steamers.
Many million dollars have been spent
in building Prince Rupert from a
village on stilts into a substantial
town, market and harbour for a
large fishing fleet—Canada's largest
settlement in Northern British Columbia. Here is a small but interesting
 H-\
I ■'     '
mm :n
.....lifiPii m
Ketchikan, Alaska
© A. S. N|
rushinq waterfalls
roar the call of tbe
wild!
museum, and totem poles have been saved
for erection on dominant sites.
North of Prince Rupert we pass Port
Simpson, an old Hudson's Bay Company trading post,
to enter the first port of Alaska at Ketchikan. In addition to being an important fishing centre, Ketchikan
is the rallying ground of the Metlakatla, Thlinget and
A Far-North "penthouse"
Haida Indians. Three notable totem poles—Kyan's
Totem, Johnson's Totem and the Captain Cook Totem,
the latter surmounted by a stovepipe hat, attract the
visitor. Not far from the quay is a stream where in
season the salmon can be seen leaping the falls. If
there is time, walk up one of the stairways that climb the
hill back of the Ketchikan School Building which commands a fine view. f 7 j
 \VrANCEU and.
I
tlffm":
,*a^*"
, ;> JJfi^Ti
wv^3 *-*
TSef«««*"*
 the lure of an ancient
tradinq posh..unmatched
brilliance of the'ice-Giant'
Russian rule over the North Pacific is recalled  in the  name of Wrangell,  so designated from a former Russian Governor,
Baron Wrangell.    Gateway to the Cassiar
and the Stikine River, Wrangell at one time
hoped to benefit by the gold rush to the
Yukon, and still is the point of landing for
big  game  hunting  parties.    Opposite  the
dock is  the  interesting  Goonyah Totem,
and visitors will find much of interest in
Chief Shakes' house, with a notable grizzly
bear mask among its curios.
Passing    through    Wrangell
Narrows, the Princess steamer
comes within view of many
glaciers,  and at Taku  Inlet
pays a visit, at a respectful
distance,   to   Taku   Glacier,
which breaks off as it touches
the sea water, leaving sheer
cliffs of blue-green ice.  Bergs
are  continually  drifting  off
''Princess Charlotte" passing Taku Glacier
shore,  and  icefloes  swing  past  our  steamer.    No  more
thrilling spectacle can be imagined than that of this huge
mile-wide and ninety-miles-long, frozen-yet-living, river—
suggestive of a majestic force held in
leash by Nature. The opalescent surface
of the water and the fringe of dark forest
on   the   slopes  verging on the glacier
accentuate the luminous sapphire and
emerald facets of the rampart of Taku's
ice cliffs. Here indeed one begins to feel
something of the mystery and grandeur
of the North.
191
Mighty salmon leap up
these Northern streams
 r
Alaska's Lapital
gfi   City teems with
*MJ native art and Far
East treasures
JlNEAl
JUNEAU, our next port of call,
is the Capital of Alaska, and
epitomizes the history, romance, culture
and industry of that vast territory.
Perched on the lower slopes of a mountain, it owes its birth and growth to gold
mines such as the Glory Hole of the
Treadwell, though other industries have
come along to add stability. If time permits, the visitor should not omit a trip
to the Mendenhall Glacier, where the
mysterious action of a frozen river can be
studied at close quarters. Here one can
see a huge cave out of which pours the
underground river of the moraine. The
bus that takes you to the Glacier returns
by way of lovely Auk Lake, following a
road fringed with countless wild flowers.
The Museum at Juneau has fascinating
relics of Russian and even Chinese civilization in Alaska, as well as notable
specimens of Esquimaux and Coast Indian handicraft. Lectures are given at
convenient hours.
There are sightseeing aeroplanes available at Juneau for those who desire a
rapid bird's-eye view of this romantically
beautiful country. Gold Creek Basin, a
short hike from the city, is the site of
XXk};7',:
H»;«ilKfe:>
 ..77:"' _.,X7-,X.:
qood roads and
Cold Rush* landmarks
In addition to its political importance,
Juneau is a busy industrial and commercial
centre, serving as a distributing point for the
surrounding territory. There are churches of
June^w9 with Mount junna
Joe Juneau's and Dick Haines' first gold
strike. Launches will take you to Thane and
Douglas, sites of the low-grade gold-crushing plants.
The fur and curio stores should not be overlooked, as
they provide the opportunity of picking up worthwhile curios and works of native craft.
Mendenhall
Glacier
Nearby Petersburg
© A. S. N.
many denominations, including the Pro-Cathedral
of the Episcopal diocese of Alaska. Greek Catholics,
Roman Catholics, Methodists, Presbyterians and
Lutherans are among others represented. The educational facilities are also good, for this is essentially
a home town.
t in
 Princess decks are sunny
sailinq verandas for
fun afloat
The "Princess Charlotte" is 330 feet long,
with berthing capacity for 232 persons.
The "Princess Louise" is 317 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 210 persons.
The "Princess Alice" is 289 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 206 persons.
There's an excellent orchestra aboard to
provide inspired dance-music under the
twilights of near-midnight sunsets. Last
night out there's a Masquerade Ball . . .
no ordinary affair when you consider that
the merry throng have been under the constant spell of happy adventure. That glorious, carefree fun should reign supreme on
such a night, in such a setting, is inevitable.
Over the whole scene an experienced master
of ceremonies holds sway, arranges entertainment,  makes certain  that you  enjoy
  the summer sun seldom sets
on the silvery waters of
Lynn Canal
The last lap of our Northbound voyage is through the wildly
beautiful fiord named the Lynn Canal, in memory of a lieutenant
who served under the explorer, Captain Cook. Together with
Chatham Straits, of which it is an extension, the Lynn Canal is
one of the deepest and longest "faults" in the geology of the Pacific
Coast. The mountains on either side rise from 4,000 to 6,000 feet
above sea level, and show near their tops traces of ancient glaciers.
Boundary
between
British Columbia
and Alaska
International Boundary
Yukon and Alaska
Actual glaciers are seen on the Western
side — Davidson, Rainbow, Garrison
and Bertha — all offshoots from the
great Muir Glacier. Shortly before we
reach Skagway, Haines is seen on the
I 16!
 a peaceful panorama . . .
amid roarinq waterfalls
cliffs and canyons
Aerial view of the Lynn Canal
©   R. D
left—the gateway to the Porcupine mining region. mountain goat, is also on the left. Here was the
Chilkoot or Chilkat, source of the celebrated landing stage for the historic Chilkoot Pass of
Chilkat    blankets    made    from     the    hair    of      Gold Rush days.
U7l
 blossoms so huqe** so brilliant   |?    m**mm#m%/
rhey call it the city of flowersv v v Jli/lljWAY
V V
SKAGWAY is our Northern terminal port—celebrated in
the Trail of '98—once the bloodstained home of Soapy
Smith and his gang, and now more pleasantly associated
with a beautiful flower garden. Here, if you do not wish to
go inland before the return voyage to Vancouver, you can
arrange to stay on board the steamer while she is in port or
go to a local hotel, enjoying pleasant rambles in the vicinity
or short excursions by launch. Fortune Bay, Smuggler's
Cove or the Great Denver Glacier are within hiking distance. Old timers at Skagway can entrance you with stories
of Gold Rush days, and others can expatiate on the wild
and garden flowers which grow so luxuriantly in Northern
sunshine. And always there is the view looking down the
Lynn Canal, one of the most spectacular in North America.
18!
  i   i
tr cross, Yukon Territory
m
A worthwhile "pan'
The White Pass and Yukon Railroad takes
us in comfortable observation cars over a
mountain track which engineers blasted
mostly through solid rock to reach the
plateau from which the Yukon River draws
its tributary sources. From the car window
you can see patches of the trail up which
toiled the first prospectors, and at Dead
Horse Gulch you read the moving memorial
tablet to the pack animals who perished by
the way. At the International Boundary,
Canadian and American flags wave side by
side, and the red-coated "Mountie" takes
charge of law and order, for now you are in
the Yukon. Bennett, with its shell of an
old log church, is halting place for luncheon
and for those who wish to return on the
same day to Skagway.    Carcross (Caribou
INtAND
from Skaqway
where the lure of the
Gold Rush' linqers!
Crossing) is junction for the steamer trip
down Lake Tagish to Ben-My-Chree, an
exquisite garden growing at the foot of a
glacier. Here one realizes that the Yukon
is the home of huskies, those handsome
wolfdogs who in Summer are as easygoing as they are energetic in Winter. At
Carcross is the grave of Bishop Bompas,
pioneer missionary of the North, and here
a local Indian, Patsy Henderson, gives a
talk from personal recollections on the
discovery of Bonanza Creek and on Indian
methods of trapping.
Patsy Henderson, Yukon Lecturer
I 20;
Log cabin,
Carcross
 Garden
**~*tg£Z»
Fb
Whitehorse is for those who plan to take the sternwheel
steamer down the Yukon to Dawson or beyond. Just
before reaching Whitehorse, you get from the train a
glimpse of Miles Canyon, which, as a rule, you have time
to revisit by motorcar before the steamer leaves for
Dawson ...
Sailing on a Northern lake
Alongside the river banks at Whitehorse are some of the
pioneer sternwheelers, while newer ones may be seen
under construction. For this is the head of navigation on
the Yukon River. It is also an important outfitting point
for big game parties who nowadays are often conveyed by
aeroplane to the gamelands of the interior.
{211
 1
Centre—Hydraulic
Gold Mining
©  R. D
Bottom—Whitehorse —
starting point
of Yukon River
boats
© A. S. N
 From White Horse to Dawson, the sternwheeler takes two days, and four days to
return upstream. The fascination of this
trip can best be realized in the description
written by Frederick Niven and published by
the White Horse and Yukon Railroad. Early
in the season you may see herds of caribou
swimming the river on their way to Summer
pasture. In Five Finger Rapids, going up or
coming down, you get the thrill of a lifetime.
Dawson City itself is still rich in romantic
memories, and is also regaining some of its
old-time activity through new methods of
reclaiming gold. Robert Service's Cabin is
here, and the Indian village of Moosehide.
Here too are beautiful gardens—Mrs. George
Photographs in this booklet marked: {R.D} are by R. Dauphin;
{A.S.N.} by Associated Screen News Limited.
Black, Member of Parliament for the Yukon,
is the great living authority on the flowers of
this territory.
Some are not content with so brief a journey
to the North, and continue onwards by the
Yukon River Circle Tour, swinging round to
Fairbanks   up   the   Tenana   and   over   the
Alaska Railroad to Seward.   Others
again go North to stay.    But that is
another story.
In   this  way  tourists  to   the
North may visit Mount McKinley
National Park, the mountain itself
being 20,300 feet above sea-level, and
may visit Kenai Lake. Placer River
Canyon and Spencer Glacier.
f 2 3 ! Oldest Cabin in Dawson
©R. D.
 • 39% Less Ocean to Europe
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . Frequent sailings via the smooth St.
Lawrence Seaway from Montreal and Quebec /summer/ . . .
Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S. /winter/ ... to and from
British and Continental ports . . the majestic Empress of
Britain and other great Empress, Duchess and "Mont" ships
of the CANADIAN PACIFIC fleet set new standards of
trans-Atlantic service.
FAST FREIGHT SERVICE provided by Empress, Duchess,
"Mont" liners and "Beaver" cargo ships.
• Canada and United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY ^comprising 21,235
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, across Canada and into the United
States. The main line, Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles,
passes through the heart of the famous Canadian Rockies,
with their crowning jewels of Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald
Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts. Modern and comfortable trans-continental and local passenger train services link
the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural regions
and holiday resorts. Fast and efficient freight service. Convenient coastal and inland steamship services. Builds and
operates own sleeping, dining and parlor cars.
ALASKA—Frequent service by Canadian Pacific "Princess"
liners from Vancouver /connections from Victoria and
Seattle^ to Skagway and return via the sheltered "Inside
Passage."
GREAT LAKES—Canadian Pacific inland steamships sail
semi-weekly during the summer months between Port Mc-
Nicoll and Fort William via an attractive lake and river route.
• Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Regular sailings between Vancouver, Victoria and Yokohama, Kobe, Nagasaki, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Manila,
provide convenient passenger and freight schedules.
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT . . . swift sister
ships, Empress of Asia and Empress of Russia . .. Yokohama
in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . The mighty Empress of Japan and her
running mate, Empress of Canada, make Honolulu in 5 days,
Yokohama in just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS . . . Canadian Australasian Line fast modern
liners to Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
o Round-the-World
ANNUAL WORLD CRUISE on the famous Empress of
Britain, perfectly timed to see world-renowned beauty spots
at their best. . . Other attractive cruises to West Indies, Norwegian Fjords, etc.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice of
over 200 itineraries ... 179 offices maintained throughout the
World to assist CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Hotels, Express, Communications
HOTELS A chain of comfort across Canada from Atlantic
to Pacific . . . Fifteen hotels in leading cities and resorts, including Chateau Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto;
Banff Springs; Empress Hotel, Victoria... Eight rustic lodges
in the Canadian Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS  AND EXPRESS
operated by the CANADIAN PACIFIC
service . . . world-wide connections . .
travellers cheques—good the world over.
-    ■
"Empress of Britain" and Chateau Frontenac Hotel, Quebec
-7mf2mmM
:
Canadian Pacific Transcontinental Train near Banff
CANADIAN
l 24 1 ?m».
WORLD'S
TRAVEL
GREAT
s y S T
EST
E M
 CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotels of High Standard at Low Cost
Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver, B.C.
Empress Hotel
Victoria, B.C.
PACIFIC COAST
Largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, overlooking the Strait of Georgia, and serving the
business man and the tourist. Golf, motoring,
fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions.
Open all year.  European Plan.
A luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen Playground, which, by its equable climate, is a
favorite summer and winter resort. Motoring,
yachting, fishing, shooting and all-year golf.
Crystal Garden for swimming and music.
Open all year.    European Plan.
THE ROCKIES
Emerald Lake Chalet Situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, in picturesque
Near Field, B.C. Yoho National Park.   Roads and trails to the Burgess
Altitude 4,272 feet Pass, Yoho Valley, etc.    Boating and fishing.   Open
summer months.    American Plan.
Chateau Lake Louise Facing an exquisite Alpine lake in Banff National Park.
Lake Louise, Alberta Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips, swim-
Altitude 5,680 feet ming, drives or motoring, tennis, boating, fishing, in
neighbouring waters. Open summer months. European
Plan.
Banff Springs Hotel
Banff, Alberta
Altitude 4,625 feet
Hotel Palliser
Calgary, Alberta
Hotel Saskatchewan
Regina, Sask.
The Royal Alexandra
Winnipeg, Man.
In the heart of Banff National Park. Alpine climbing,
motoring, golf, bathing, hot sulphur springs, tennis,
fishing, boating and riding. Open summer months.
European Plan.
THE PRAIRIES
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard. Ideal headquarters for the business man or the tourist travelling
to and from the Canadian Rockies, or beyond. Open all
year.    European Plan.
In the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan. Golf
and motoring.    Open all year.    European Plan.
A popular hotel in the capital of the Province of Manitoba and the centre of Winnipeg's social life. Open all
year.    European Plan.
Toronto, Ont.
Quebec, Que.
McAdam, N.B.
St. Andrews-by-the-
Sea, N.B.
Digby, N.S.
Kentville, N.S.
Yarmouth, N.S.
Halifax, N.S.
EASTERN CANADA
The Royal York—The largest hotel in the British Empire.    Open all year.    European Plan.
Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel in the most
historic and romantic city of North America. Open all-
year. Port for Canadian Pacific "Empress" steamships
to Europe.    European Plan.
McAdam Hotel—A commercial and sportsman's hotel.
Open all year.    American Plan.
The Algonquin—The social centre of New Brunswick's
most popular seashore summer resort. Open summer
months.    American Plan.
The Pines—Nova Scotia's premier resort hotel. Golf,
tennis, swimming pool. Open summer months. American Plan.
The Cornwallis Inn—centre for excursions to Evangeline Land.    Open all year.    American Plan.
Lakeside Inn—Designed in attractive bungalow style.
Golf available for hotel guests. Tuna fishing. Open
summer months.    American Plan.
Lord Nelson Hotel. Open all year. European Plan.
(Operated by the Lord Nelson Hotel Co.).
Other Hotels and Lodges reached by Canadian Pacific
Yoho Valley Lodge, Field, B.C.
Lake Wapta Lodge, Hector, B.C.
Lake O'Hara Lodge, Hector, B.C.
Radium Hot Springs Lodge,
Radium, B.C.
French River Chalet-Bungalow Camp,
French River, Ont.
Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
Hotel Incola, Penticton, B.C.
Harrison Hot Springs Hotel,
Moraine Lake Lodge, Moraine Lake, Alta.     Agassiz, B.C.
Mount Assiniboine Lodge, Banff, Alta.   Cameron Lake Chalet, Cameron Lake
Devil's Gap Lodge, Kenora, Ont. (Vancouver Island), B.C.
For further information and reservations  apply to  hotel management, your local travel agent, or nearest Canadian Pacific Office.
PRINCIPAL
CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga	
Banff, Alta. (Summer)
Boston, Mass. .....
Buffalo, N.Y.	
Calgary, Alta	
Chicago, 111	
Cincinnati, Ohio. . . .
Cleveland, Ohio. . . .
Dallas, Texas	
Detroit, Mich	
Edmonton, Alta....
Fort William, Ont. .
Guelph, Ont	
Halifax, N.S	
Hamilton, Ont	
Honolulu, T.H	
Juneau, Alaska	
Kansas City, Mo. . .
Ketchikan, Alaska. .
Kingston, Ont	
London, Ont	
Los Angeles, Cal....
Milwaukee, Wis. . . .
Minneapolis, Minn..
Montreal, Que	
Moose Jaw, Sask. . .
Nelson, B.C	
New York, N.Y	
North Bay, Ont....
Ottawa, Ont	
Peterboro, Ont	
Philadelphia, Pa	
Pittsburgh, Pa.... .
Portland, Ore	
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Quebec, Que  .
Regina, Sask	
Saint John, N.B. . . .
St. Louis, Mo	
St. Paul, Minn	
San Francisco, Cal. .
Saskatoon, Sask. . . .
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont
Seattle, Wash....
Sherbrooke, Que. .
Skagway, Alaska.
Spokane, Wash.. .
Tacoma, Wash. . .
Toronto, Ont.....
Trois Rivieres, Que.
Vancouver, B.C. . . .
Victoria, B.C	
Washington, D.C. . .
Windsor, Ont	
Winnipeg, Man	
Antwerp, Belgium....
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, England.
Bristol, England	
Brussels, Belgium	
Dublin, Ireland	
Glasgow, Scotland....
Hamburg, Germany...
Liverpool, England . . .
London, England	
Manchester, England..
Paris, France	
Rotterdam, Holland...
Southampton, England
Hong Kong, China.
Kobe, Japan	
Manila, P.I	
Shanghai, China. . .
Yokohama, Japan.
. . . W. A. Shackelford 404 C. & S. Natl. Bk. Bldg.
.. ,J. C. Pike. Canadian Pacific Station
. . ;L. R. Hart. . .405 BoylstonSt.
.'. . W. P. Wass    .22 Court Street
. . . G. D. Brophy Canadian Pacific Station
. . .T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
. . .S. E. Corbin 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
. . . G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
. . . P. G. Jefferson : 1212 Kirby Bldg.
. . .M. E. Malone 1231 Washington Blvd.
...C.S. Fyfe Canadian Pacific Building
. . . H. J. Skynner 108 South May St.
. . . W. C. Tully 30 Wyndham St.
. . . A. C. MacDonald. 413 Barrington St.
. . .A. Craig  4 King Street West
. . . Theo. H. Davies & Co.
. . .V. W. Mulvihill
. . . R. G. Norris 201-2 Waldheim Bldg.
. . . Edgar Anderson
. . . J. H. Welch 180 Wellington St.
. . .H. J. McCallum 417 Richmond St.
. . .W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
. . . J. A. Millington 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
. . .H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave.,South
j P. E. Gingras Windsor Station
•   IF. C. Lydon 201 St. James St. W.
. . . T. J. Colton Canadian Pacific Station
. . . N. J. Lowes Baker and Ward Sts.
. . . J. E. Roach Madison Ave. at 44th St.
. . . R. Y. Daniaud 87 Main Street West
. . .J. A. McGill 83 Sparks St.
. . . J. Skinner 343 George St.
. . . E. A. Kenney 1500 Locust St.
. . . W. N. McKendry. . Koppers Bldg., 444 7th Ave.
. . . W. H. Deacon  626 S.W. Broadway
. . . W. L. Coates
. . . C. A. Langevin Palais Station
. . . J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
. . . H. C. James 40 King St.
. . . G. P. Carbrey 418 Locust St.
. . . W. H. Lennon Fourth and Cedar
i . . F. L. Nason 152 Geary St.
. . . R. T. Wilson 115 Second Ave.
. . . J. O. Johnston 529 Queen Street
. . . E. L. Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
. . . J. A. Metivier 91 Wellington St. North
. . .L. H. Johnston
. . .E. S. McPherson Old National Bank Bldg.
. . . L. N. Jones 1113 Pacific Ave.
f W. Fulton Canadian Pacific Building
"\C B. Andrews Canadian Pacific Building
... J. A. Tourville 1262 Notre Dame St.
. . . F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
. . . J. Macfarlane 1102 Government St.
. . .C. E. Phelps. 14th and New York Ave., N.W.
. . . W. C. Elmer. . . . Corner Ouellette Ave. and Chatham St.
. . . E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
EUROPE
.H. V. Gard Place de Meir 42
. H. T. Penny 24 Donegall Place
.J. R. W. Taylor. 4 Victoria Square
.T. W. Thorne 18 St. Augustine's Parade
. G. L. M. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
.A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
. W. H. Boswell 25 Bothwell St.
. T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
. M. L. Duffy Pier Head
•JG. A. Hobbs Trafalgar Square, W.C. 2
i R. J. Harden  103 Leadenhall St., E.C. 3
. R. L. Hughes  43 Cross Street
.A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
.J. Springett Coolsingel No. 91
. H. Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
. .E. Hospes .Opposite Blake Pier
. . W. R. Buckberrough 7 Harima-machi
. . G. R. Razavet. 14-16 Calle David
. .A. M. Parker, r. The Bund and Peking Road
. . B. G. Ryan. 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
Adelaide, Aus Macdonald, Hamilton 8c Co.
Auckland, N.Z A. W. Essex, Traffic Agt., C.P.R., 32-34 Quay St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle, Aus ; Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Freight and Pass'r Agent, C.P.R., 59 William St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Perth, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton, 8c Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W  . . .N. R. McMorran, Traffic Agent, C.P.R., Union House
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z G. A. Glennie, Freight and Pass'r Agent, C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques
GOOD THE WORLD OVER
PRINTED IN CANADA 1937
 VICTORIA— Capital
City of British Columbia.
Parliament Buildings, Provincial Museum. Butchart
Gardens. Naval Station
and Observatory at Esquimalt. Empress Hotel.
VANCOUVER— Canada's great port on the
Pacific at the mouth of the
Fraser River. Lumbering,
fishing, canning, mining,
manufacturing and trading
centre. Immense shipping
to Honolulu, the Orient,
Australia and New Zealand.
Stanley Park.   Hotel Van-
NANA1MO — An  old
Hudson's Bay  Company's
Fort.   Coal mines.
POWELL RIVER—
Paper mills.
ALERT BAY— Indian
village on Cormorant Island
separated from Vancouver
Island by Johnstone Strait.
Notable for its street of
totem poles, some of which
have been transferred to
Stanley Park, Vancouver.
OCEAN FALLS—near
the mouth of Dean Channel—reached by Alexander
Mackenzie on his Overland
passage across Canada in
1793. The site of an important paper manufacturing
plant.
BUTEDALE— on Princess Royal Island: Salmon
canning and fish oil production plant.
PRINCE   RUPERT—
port near the mouth of the
Skeena River with population of about 6,350. An
important fishing centre
with large cold storage
plants. Here also is a large
floating dry dock. Close by
on Digby Island is the
Canadian Government wireless station, and a little
further north is Port Simpson, celebrated in the annals
of the Hudson's Bay Company. Prince Rupert has
interesting fur stores.
PORT SIMPSON—
Site of the original Fort
Simpson built by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1834.
KETCHIKAN— The
southernmost town in
Alaska, well equipped with
canneries and cold storage
plants. Centre of platinum,
gold, silver and lead mines.
Curio stores and totem
poles. Salmon jump the
waterfall on Ketchikan
Creek in the late summer
months.
BEHM CANAL {on
the route  of   the
cruise)—with Eddy stone
Rock, a pinnacle 250 feet,
rising sheer from the sea.
RUDYERD BAY—
with the picturesque
WRANGELI^-vear the
mouth of the Stikine River,
which is navigable 180 miles
to Telegraph Creek, outfitting point for the Cassiar
big game hunting fields.
Totem poles and curio
stores. Named after Baron
Wrangell, Russian Governor of Alaska, in 1830. At
the north of Wrangell Narrows is Petersburg, formerly
a Russian settlement.
TAKU GLACIER—^
the head of Taku Inlet,
dropping sheer into the sea
—100 feet thick, a mile
wide and ninety miles long.
JUNEAU— Capital of
Alaska with population of
over 4,000. Fascinating
Museum and experimental
salmon hatchery. Fur and
Curio stores. Close to Mendenhall Glacier and Gold
Creek basin. Gold crushing
plants.
SITKA {Cruise only)
on Baranof Island—
formerly capital of Alaska
under Russian regime. Russian St. Michael's Cathedral founded 1848. Sheldon
Jackson Indian Industrial
School. National Park.
LYNN CANAL—Sp&
tacular fjord 80 miles long,
1 to 5 miles broad. Ice wall
of Davidson Glacier on the
West.
SJC4Gr.4Y-Atthehead
of Lynn Canal. Southern
terminal of White Pass and
Yukon Railway. Rich in
memories of Gold Rush
days and the Trail of *98—
Beautiful flower gardens.
Fishing. Trips to Atlin
Lake and Lake Bennett-
Miles Canyon and White
Horse Rapids. Or on to
Yukon and the Klondike.
V
Checked Cf.Ry. Lines Jan., 1937
 "(2?B
r*;
P^f THRILLS...^fe^ADVEKTURE
^
////// "> ^r
^
 Lehman's Steamship Agency
610 SO. OLIVE ST.
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
V TR. 5171 EST. 1888
' ■ l%!
 CANADIAN  PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotels of High Standard at Low Cost
PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver        Largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast,
Vancouver, B.C overlooking the Strait of Georgia, and serving
equally  the business  man  and  the  tourist.
Golf,   motoring,   fishing,   hunting,   bathing,
steamer excursions.   Open all year. European
plan.
Empress Hotel ^ luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen Play-
Victoria   B C ground, which, by its equable climate, has be
come a favorite summer and winter resort.
Motoring, yachting, fishing, shooting and all-
year golf. Crystal Garden for swimming and
music.   Open all year.   European plan.
THE ROCKIES
Emerald Lake Chalet Situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, in picturesque
Near Field, B.C. Yoho National Park.    Roads and trails to the Burgess
Altitude 4,272 feet Pass,   Yoho   Valley,   etc.    Boating   and   fishing.    Open
summer months.   American plan.
Chateau Lake Louise Facing an exquisite Alpine lake in Banff National Park.
Lake Louise, Alberta Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips, swimming,
Altitude 5,680 feet drives or motoring, tennis, boating, fishing, in neighbour
ing waters.   Open summer months.   European plan.
Banff Springs Hotel Ln the heart of Banff National Park.   Alpine climbing,
Banff, Alberta motoring,   golf,   bathing,   hot   sulphur   springs,   tennis.
Altitude 4,625 feet fishing,   boating   and   riding.     Open   summer   months.
European plan.
THE PRAIRIES
Hotel Palliser A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard.   Ideal head-
Calgary, Alberta quarters for the business man or the tourist travelling
to and from the Canadian Rockies, or beyond.   Open all
year.   European plan.
Hotel Saskatchewan In the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan.   Golf
Regina, Sask. and motoring.   Open all year.  European plan.
The Royal A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada,
Alexandra and the centre of Winnipeg's social life.   Open all year.
Winnipeg, Man. European plan.
EASTERN CANADA
Toronto, Ont. The Royal York—The largest hotel in the British Empire.
Open all year.    European  Plan.
Quebec, Que. Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel in the most
historic and romantic city of all North America.   Open
all year.   Port for Canadian Pacific "Empress" Steamships to Europe.   European  Plan.
McAdam, N.B. McAdam Hotel—A commercial and sportsman's hotel.
Open all year.   American  Plan.
St. Andrews, N.B. The Algonquin—The social centre of New Brunswick's
most  popular  seashore  summer resort.    Open  summer
months.      American Plan.
Digby, N.S. The  Pines—Nova  Scotia's premier  resort hotel.    Golf,
tennis, swimming pool. Open summer months. American
Plan.
Kentville, N.S. The Cornwallis Inn—centre for excursions to Evangeline
Land.   Open all year.    American Plan.
Yarmouth, N.S. Lakeside Inn—Designed in  attractive bungalow  style.
Golf available for hotel guests.    Open summer   months.
American Plan.
Other Hotels and Chalet-Bungalow Camps reached by
Canadian Pacific
Yoho Valley  Field, B.C.
Lake Wapta Hector, B.C.
Lake O'Hara Hector, B.C.
Radium Hot Springs  Radium, B.C.
Moraine Lake -       -       - Moraine Lake, Alta.
Mount Assiniboine Lodge Banff, Alta.
Devil's Gap Camp     -       -       -       -  Kenora, Ont.
French River Camp  -       - -J French River, Ont.
Hotel Sicamous -    ■   -       -       -       -       -       -        -       -       - Sicamous, B.C.
Hotel Incola - -       - Penticton, B.C;
Harrison Hot Springs Hotel    -       -       -       -    X-       -       --       Agassiz, B.C.
Cameron Lake Chalet      ... Cameron Lake (Vancouver Island), B.C.
On   beautiful   Lake  Atlin
Quits** 0ukincj6LtfKA
and! 'the (TJuJLgvl
EW THRILLS! New adventures! Cruise north to Alaska this year, and go in holiday-comfort on a
famous Princess liner. Enjoy, too, the varied festivities and world-experienced service of Canadian
Pacific . . . arranged with that wealth of knowledge which only years of successful cruise operation can give.
TO ALASKA and back is a two-thousand-mile nine-day cruise from Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
A modern Canadian Pacific liner is your home . . . gay with congenial companions and a happy social life . . .
complete with dancing, deck sports and informal parties. Your itinerary includes colorful Alert Bay with its
totem-pole village; Prince Rupert, Ketchikan, Wrangell, Taku Glacier, Juneau and a 36-hour stop-over at
Skagway. Longer stop-overs in Skagway are available if desired, including low-cost all-expense tours to
Whitehorse and Lake Atlin, specially arranged to connect with Canadian Pacific sailings.
You'll thrill to the dazzling panorama of changing scenery: smooth, almost land-locked "Inside Passage",
reflecting the rich rays of lingering sunshine . . . fjord-indented mountains with giant trees and glistening
snow . . . frontier towns perched on rocky cliffs or built on stilts . . . great salmon runs, active gold mines,
weird totem poles, tremendous flowers, old Russian landmarks, early Indian trading posts.
Truly no water journey in America excels in scenery and service the Alaska cruises of Canadian Pacific
Princess liners.
 The Empress Hotel
tyiet&UcL ...
cyAe Q/eteteen^jfiij
X OUR cruise has a beautiful embarkation point. Either
Vancouver or Victoria, in charming British Columbia, are worthy
of lengthy visits in themselves. They are in the heart of Canada's
Evergreen Playground, and possess every vacation appeal.
Victoria and Vancouver Island are rich in scenery. Victoria,
capital of British Columbia, is a charming bit of Old England
situated in the heart of Canada's Evergreen Playground. It is the
Evergreen City—a centre of flowers, hydrangeas, roses, hedges, oak
trees, holly, attractive bungalows, colorful gardens and parks.
Being the seat of government it is fittingly dominated by the stately
Parliament Buildings, as well as by the Canadian Pacific EMPRESS
HOTEL. Other attractions include the Provincial Museum which has
a fascinating exhibit of Indian life and culture on the Pacific Coast.
On Vancouver Island just beyond the limits of Victoria are the
famous Gorge with its reversible falls; the spectacular Malahat
Drive, combining mountain and coastal scenery; magnificent
Beacon Hill and other parks; sporty golf courses; Butchart's
famous Gardens, and the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory.
The surrounding countryside possesses a rare beauty reminiscent
of old England.
Seattle, the third point of possible embarkation, is one of the
most progressive cities in the Northwest. So, no matter where you
plan to start your cruise, allow time for sightseeing.
A    Princess Liner
. ■^x^.^v&^v A.:^,,..^.,.,:, y.:^.:.^^^
A quiet nook in Butchart's  Gardens
 Vi
ANCOUVER, Canada's gateway port to the Orient
and the commercial metropolis of British Columbia, is situated
at the confluence of the mighty Fraser River and the Gulf
of Georgia. Built regally upon hills sloping down to sheltered
waters, with the Coast Range of mountains as a background,
Vancouver has many attractions, commercial and recreational.
Its harbor is busy with shipping from all parts of the world.
Vancouver is known far and wide for the wonders of
Stanley Park—a natural reservation of 1,000 acres within the
city limits, famous for the primitive unspoiled beauty of its
giant trees and luxuriant foliage. Other attractions include
the Canadian Pacific HOTEL VANCOUVER commandingly
situated overlooking the Gulf of Georgia.
Canadian Pacific Alaska liners leave Vancouver in the
early evening. First night out you sail through smooth,
protected waters. Get up early next morning to watch your
passage through Seymour Narrows, and after breakfast you
go ashore for your first Far North adventure—Alert Bay.
The Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver's Golden Jubilee
in 1936 will be fittingly celebrated
by ten continuous weeks of
spectacles and fun, complete with
gaiety, carnivals, military, naval
and air displays, Olympics, historic
pageants and folklore exhibitions.
1936 is Vancouver's gala year:
stop-over on your way to and from
Alaska and join in the festivities.
 i
>*.*>•
5oU Br"
icfc$
'QO
y O . . . when Alaska and the Yukon leaped into
world prominence as a fabulous land of wealth that
lay in the golden sands of its rushing creeks and
rivers . . . when men swarmed over the snow-packed
mountains on a quest wherein the race was to the
swift and destruction stood ever near. Those exciting
days in the Klondike with their bonanzas and their
side play on life were amongst the most amazing
in the history of mari. The name of the Northland
was on millions of lips throughout the world. The
spell of the land gripped human souls. It was "placer"
mining for the most part and all one needed was a
pan, patience and luck. This history of '98 is a most
exciting chapter in the history of man.
The Bonanza was the greatest of the  Klondike
creeks, and its tributary, the Eldorado Creek,  the
(Mft^uskQaup   „
^      <2kaifl <+*$?.
richest, probably surpassing any known placer
deposit. The Klondike output approached its climax
in 1900, with a production of $22,000,000. Besides
gold, silver mining has been developed in the Yukon.
The fury of '98 is displaced by the allure of '36.
The Northland put a spell on those who made its
acquaintance then. It wields the same spell today.
The wild days of the Klondike are as dreams of
far-off centuries. Law reigns in the land. Yet it is
still a land of mystery and romance, its atmosphere
alive with memories of those exciting days at the
turn of the century. And this atmosphere is adequately recreated on these Canadian Pacific Alaska cruises,
with their attractive itineraries and fascinating
ports of call.
 (Inset) Top of totem pole      © R.d.
XXXX" :;
Alert Bay
IRST port of call is
colorful Alert Bay, an
Indian village, on small
Cormorant Island, and a
busier little place than you
might imagine from its
size. Salmon canneries invite your inspection and no
matter how many years
visitors have been trooping
into these canneries, they manage to make you feel as though it all exists
for the sole purpose of showing you the secrets of the trade.
Here is your first experience with those quaint totem poles. The
Indian cemetery offers some excellent specimens. If you don't mind
intruding upon the final resting-place of Red Skin Braves, you will
enjoy browsing among those grotesque exhibits of their ideas—for
all totem poles have a meaning and tell a story. In fact the totem poles
of the Indians of British Columbia are one of the most striking features
of the whole northwest coast. They are pictorial records of history
and mythology, as the Indians understand them.
After an afternoon hugging the shore and offering a broadside to
the great Pacific Ocean, if you are lucky with your long range glasses
you may pick out great whales at play, spouting like floating fountains.
You creep into the narrow channel again and spend your second evening
watching the sun paint pictures on the smooth waters ahead.
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Majestic Taku Glacier
IlliHIlS
fainee
of  sweet   sleep   you   arrive   at
go   ashore   immediately   after
ell N^r0ti;S
through yrra
XXFTER   a   night
Prince   Rupert,   to
breakfast. If you are interested in something different
in cities, you will enjoy this visit to the utmost. This
bustling community is built on a circle of rocky hills.
You marvel at the persistence of man in overcoming
nature's handicaps. Important as a fishing center and
a fur-trading post, it is Canada's largest Far
North city.
After about three hours of cruising from Prince
Rupert, passing en route an ancient Indian village,
an old Hudson's Bay Company trading post, and the
international boundary, your Princess liner glides
into Ketchikan, the southernmost town in Alaska.
This was an old settlement, whose Indian name
connotes "the town under the eagle".
Here salmon and halibut support large canneries
and cold storage plants. In the late summer at
Ketchikan Creek, the salmon leap and fight their way
up to the spawning banks. Mining is extensively
conducted.    Copper, gold, platinum, silver and lead
are all found within a radius of thirty miles. There
are many little curio shops, hotels, banks, stores—
beautiful walks through avenues of giant trees . . .
and an excellent collection of totem poles.
All the way up from Ketchikan you can see and
sense the change in scenery—wider waters, taller
mountains (and many more of them), waterfalls
pounding down the cliffs—bushier, thicker undergrowth, more abundant wild animal life, fewer settlements and wilderness that appears almost impassable.
Wrangell, another island village, is the next stop.
It was originally an Indian trading post under Russian
rule. Today, the ruins of an old Russian fort are still
to be seen, and some extremely old totem poles. Your
imagination will be stirred by tales of the big game
hunting, for Wrangell is situated at the mouth of the
Stikine River, which is the gateway to the Cassiar
big-game country.
"Taku ahead!" The cry is like the call of "curtain"
at the theatre. Everybody runs up front for a point
of vantage. As the boat sails up Taku Inlet, sentinels
 of oddly-shaped ice-floes come drifting down on their
way to warmer waters and oblivion. Soon you see giant
Taku Glacier itself. A mile wide, reaching back over the
mountains for ninety miles, and at least a mile thick, it
looms before you—sinister, yet beautiful beyond compare.
It is really TWO glaciers: the one dead, a mixture of brown,
white and blue colors, hardly moving but always drifting
backwards to its mysterious source. And the other alive,
the symbol of power untamed. Its brilliance in the sparkling
sunshine rivals the rainbow, the colors changing with each
hour of the day, according to the angle of the sun's rays.
When its edges crumble and plunge into the water, the
sound is terrific. A blast from the ship's whistle is echoed
by deafening roars.     Certainly there is no forgetting it!
The boat stands by at a safe distance long enough for
you to understand what geologists mean by the glacial age,
and although you will hardly be able to see the movement of
the giant, you can easily understand how such a force, on a
rampage could carve mountains, valleys, prairies. Certainly
there is no resisting it!
  -„ .'_'   •••••»•••    ■ •;
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The Princess Charlotte
0/&UA UeMu/Usmc y^W
1 HE CANADIAN PACIFIC maintains a year-
round steamship service to Alaska, and during the
summer months assigns to this service three of the
finest of its Princess liners, all of which are large,
modern vessels of the most comfortable, sea-going
type. They are oil-burners, and equipped with
wireless telegraphy.
The staterooms are comfortable, cozy, well-
ventilated, and designed to accommodate only two
passengers per stateroom. On each ship there are
a few de luxe rooms with private bath-rooms, and also
some with sofa berths.
All ships have large community rooms, dining
saloons, observation rooms, lounges, smoking rooms,
and spacious dance floors. They are well proportioned
and charmingly furnished. Delicious food, tastefully
prepared, with menus remarkable for their variety,
contribute to the distinction of Canadian Pacific's
Alaska Service. In addition to breakfast, luncheon
and dinner, light refreshments are served in the
dining saloon at night.
The Princess Charlotte is 330 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 232 persons.
The Princess Louise is 317 feet long, with berthing
capacity for 210 persons.
The Princess Alice * 289 feet long, with berthing
capacity for 206 persons.
There's an excellent orchestra aboard to provide
inspired dance -music rnder the twilights of near-
midnight sunsets. Last night out there's a Masquerade Ball . . . no ordinary affair when you consider that the merry throng have been under the
constant spell of happy adventure. That glorious,
carefree fun should reign supreme on such^ a night,
in such a setting, is inevitable.
Over the whole scene an experienced master of
ceremonies holds sway, arranges entertainment,
makes certain that you era joy yourself. Everyone
travels first class. Everyone has the opportunity to
know everyone else . . . very much after the style
of a house party!
"Mountie" at Carcross      © R-D-
Congenial companions
 (Inset) A "husky"
ft
F,
RESH from your Taku adventure, and
after three of the fastest flying hours of your
life, wherein one scenic thrill follows another,
you steam into the harbor at Juneau at about
7 p.m. The sun will still shine for a few hours
more, so don't let TIME mislead you!
Juneau is named after its French-Canadian
founder, who made the first Alaskan placer
gold strike near the city's site in the early
eighties. It is the capital of Alaska. Right
behind it, Mount Juneau shoots up an almost
perpendicular 3,500 feet.
And it offers much to explore. There's
the museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall.
Juneau, with Mount Juneau in the background
Capital of Alaska
City of Curiosities
It contains priceless curiosities: a lamp carved
in stone, old Chinese talisman coins, queer
trinkets, skeletons of first settlers; centuries-old
ivory and Indian art and craftsmanship.
There are many dealers in furs, and curios
and bargain signs are everywhere.
Good roads lead inland and "cabbies" will
drive for a small fare. You can visit Mendenhall
Glacier and go on farther to Auk Lake. Gold
Creek Basin, a short hike from the city, is the
site of Joe Juneau's and Dick Haines' first
gold strike. Launches will take you to Thane
and Douglas, sites of the largest low-grade
gold-crushing plants in the world, abandoned
in recent years.
 iM?^j^S^^gi^ig;ie^Mii;i^ffiW^
Glaciers near Skagway
<JjU*Vn  (jAJTbaf/
Mi
Scenery of the World
//
B,
*E OUT on deck early on the fourth morning for that delightful
eighty-mile sail through the Lynn Canal. It is the "Scenery of the world."
You will thrill to the early morning stillness and the low-angle rays of the
rising sun casting magic shadows.
Lynn Canal is from one to five miles wide, bordered on both sides by
towering mountains that rise straight to the clouds or bend away in graceful
canyons — sending forth gushing waterfalls from the snow-capped
peaks. The water itself is the perfect mirror to which waters are
inevitably compared.
Then around a bend—and suddenly, Skagway! Cruise's end . . . Tales
of Skagway have travelled to the remotest hamlet. It was Hell's Hole
in '98, one of the wildest, wickedest, "open" gambling, drinking places
on the face of the globe. Oldtimers will love to tell you of those old days,
including the legends of Soapy Smith or Frank Reid, whose bodies lie in
nearby, well-marked graves. But those days are over. Skagway today is
a peaceful and interesting city.
Alaskan flowers  rival  tropic  blooms   © R-D-
 Old church on the shores of Lake Bennett
V^ AN AD IAN PACIFIC Princess ships in regular service
stop over for approximately thirty-six hours in Skagway
before commencing their return voyage. Skagway has
been from the earliest gold rush days, the very doorway
to the interior. So your time, your pocket book, and your
yearning for adventure must determine whether you will
remain in Skagway, or go inland.
If you do not wish to make side-trips, you may arrange
to continue to live aboard the steamer or in a Skagway
hotel, and explore the immediate vicinity of that fascinating
city. And there are many marvels in Skagway to interest
you, not the least of which are the wild and cultivated
flowers and the woods that appear almost semi-tropical
with their dense undergrowth: proof indeed of the potency
•   .   .   New Adventures
Gateway to the Yukon
of twenty-hour sunshine. There are gardens in which
pansies measure three and one-half inches in diameter,
and nasturtium vines grow three inches in twenty-four
hours! In such a heavenly spot, enclosed in a background
of great snow-ridged mountains, you can hike along the
Skagway River to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the
Great Denver Glacier. Short excursions by launch vary
this attractive programme.    The fishing is splendid!
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit
would be incomplete without a journey to the equally
interesting and fascinating interior. Such a journey,
difficult as it was in the early days of the gold rush, can
now be easily undertaken, for Skagway is the southern
terminus of the White Pass and Yukon Route.
 HOSE returning south by the same
Princess steamship may, if they wish, see
the Skagway scene in one quick tour
and then be off inland. They can do it in
the   allotted   thirty-six   hours,   by   taking
one of two choices. One is by rail to Whitehorse where the
Yukon begins, seeing beautiful Lake Bennett, intriguing little
played-out "towns" of gold rush days, the international boundary
where Stars and Stripes and the Union Jack fly side by side, and
, picturesque country. The other choice is by rail over the
same route as far as Carcross, thence by boat on the silvery
mountain-hemmed waters of West Taku Arm, returning on the
southbound train from Carcross the next morning for Skagway
. . . and the trail home.
Those with more time will of course take the most important
trip of all, and visit the Klondike region itself. You take the same
trail the "rushers" took in '98, only you now go by rail, and in
comfort, on the White Pass and Yukon Route to Whitehorse
and thence via steamer from the Yukon to Dawson. It is truly
a spectacular journey, requiring approximately  one week's time.
Side trips available in conjunction with this trip to Dawson
(requiring extra time, of course) or to be taken as entirely separate
adventures, include excursions to Lake Atlin. (You can take this
trip and catch the next returning Princess.)
Descriptions of these trips are given on following pages.
Mendenhall
Glacier
© ARMBRISTEB
 © R.D.
/Jo^Uuiakcf-Hg !
Summit of White Pass and Yukon Route Railway
B<
)OARD those wide-windowed little cars of the White
Pass and Yukon Route, sit back relaxed, comfortable, and
take a LOOK at history. You can tell by the very tone in
the conductor's "all-aboard" that it's going to be an
exciting adventure.
And then you're off. Soon you're over the international
boundary and into Yukon territory. There at the left is
Lake Bennett. Follow it for twenty-six miles. And so
to Carcross. (Excursions to West Taku Arm and Lake
Atlin change here for steamship.)
Then on again, past little mountain lakes, and Miles
Canyon to stop at Whitehorse Rapids—what a name for
a watery graveyard! When you are watching those waters,
recreate the scene of '98 when hundreds perished there
in awful terror.
Then just a little farther—and rail's end, Whitehorse
itself and the  Yukon.     (End of trip from Skagway  to
Whitehorse that may be taken during the 36-hour stopover at Skagway.) The town is certainly an answer to
the clamor for something DIFFERENT!
And then on to Dawson by transferring to a White
Pass and Yukon stern-wheel steamship. En route you
travel WITH the current. There's an idea, a river in
America that flows north. Two days it takes . . . two days
of the unusual. It never really gets dark, so it matters
not in the least WHEN you sleep. But you will want to
be awake when you "shoot" Five-Finger Rapids. Talk
about   thrills!
Finally Dawson . . . dream city of the past, once headquarters for the whole Klondike, now almost a museum
of the hectic days.
It is rich experience. Really it is living history . . .
chapters out of the past.
 7X7 7X7 7 7;;;
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Steamer Tarahne on Lake Atlin.       © R-D-
(Inset) Dining on terrace at Atlin Inn. © RD-
QeautituJ?aG&e fit&n
WO trips to inland Alaska, popular because of
the spectacular scenery, are detailed below.
For both trips the route is the same to Carcross.
(See details, page 14.) You leave Carcross on the
steamer TUTSHI, proceed through a chain of
sapphire lakes—so smooth, so clear that they
reflect the wooded and snow-covered mountains
on all sides. Giant flowers in brilliant colors line
the lower mountain levels. You glide from one
little lake into another, never knowing where one
begins and the other ends 'till you come to the
Golden Gate and Taku Landing. Then on past
Engineer Mountain to West Taku Arm Landing
and that world-famous lodge in the wilderness—
Ben-My-Chree homestead. You sleep aboard the
TUTSHI, arrive back at Carcross in the morning;
then to your Princess and return on your
9-day cruise!
If you're going to Lake Atlin, you disembark at
Taku   Landing   and   take   a   little   narrow   gauge
railway across a narrow neck of land to the waiting
motor-ship TARAHNE (twin-screw motors) which
takes you to Atlin and its comfortable Inn. A
delightful forty-mile cruise is operated from Atlin
through narrow mountain-lined passages of Lake
Atlin's western channel, down through the island
narrows at the southern end of the lake and back
up the largest branch of the lake where you have an
amazing view of Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast
Range. From Atlin you retrace your path to
Carcross, and to your Princess at Skagway. Time
of the trip, four days ... or as much longer as you
wish to stay at Atlin Inn.
Arrangements have been made with the White
Pass and Yukon Route for attractive all-expense
tours to be operated at the season's height from
Skagway to Atlin and return, including a side
trip to Whitehorse. These tours will connect with
Canadian Pacific sailings as outlined in supplement
inserted in this booklet.
Photographs in this booklet marked  (R.D.)  are by R. Dauphin.    Other
photographs   are   by   the   Associated   Screen   News   Limited   and    the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
 WORLD-WIDE     SERVICE
• <»roal Britain anil Kuropo
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . Frequent sailings via the short St.
Lawrence Seaway from Montreal and Quebec (summer). . . .
Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S. (winter) ... to and from
British and Continental ports . .. the majestic Empress of Britain
and other great Empress, Duchess and "Mont" ships of the
CANADIAN PACIFIC fleet set new standards of trans-Atlantic
FAST FREIGHT SERVICE provided by Empress, Duchess,
'Mont" liners and "Beaver" cargo ships.
o i anada and I nilod Slalos
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising 21,235
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches from the Atlantic
to the Pacific, across Canada and into the United States. The
main line, Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles, passes through
the heart of the famous Canadian Rockies, with their crowning
jewels of Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald Lake, unsurpassed
as vacation resorts. Modern and comfortable trans-continental
and local passenger train services link the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural regions and holiday resorts. Fast
and efficient freight service. Convenient coastal and inland
steamship services. Builds and operates own sleeping, dining
and parlor cars.
•  Honolulu. Orion* and South *msi«
Regular sailings to and from Vancouver and Victoria providing
convenient passenger and freight schedules.
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT . . . swift sister
ships, Empress of Asia and Empress of Russia . . . Yokohama
in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . . The mighty Empress of Japan and her
running mate, Empress of Canada, make Honolulu in 5 days,
Yokohama in just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS . . . Canadian Australasian1 Line fast modern
liners to Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
•  Hound-1 ho- World
ANNUAL WORLD CRUISE on the famous Empress of Britain,
perfectly timed to see world-renowned beauty spots at their
best . . . Other attractive cruises to Mediterranean—East and
South Africa—South America, West Indies, Norwegian Fjords.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice of
over 200 itineraries . . . 179 offices maintained throughout the
World to assist CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Holol*. Kx|»roKK.C
ration*
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort across Canada from Atlantic
to Pacific . . . Fifteen hotels in leading cities and resorts, including
Chateau Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto; Banff Springs;
Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Eight chalet-bungalow camps in the
Canadian Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS ... owned and operated
by the CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . trans-Canada service . . .
world-wide connections . . . travellers cheques—good the world
over.
"Empress of Japan''''—Largest and Fastest Ship on the Pacific
CANADIAN
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
PACIFIC
 *
m
a
610 SO. ULIVt a
,Uc   .KT.FI F.S.   CALIFCfUj
Unity 5171
CANADIAN
 ./^ .
  CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotels of High Standard at Low Cost
PACIFIC COAST
Hotel Vancouver Largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast, over-
Vancouver, B.C. looking the Straitof Georgia, and serving equally
the business man and the tourist. Golf, motoring,
fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer excursions.
Open all year.   European plan.
Empress Hotel A luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen Play-
Victoria, B.C. ground, which, by its equable climate, has be
come a favorite summer and winter resort.
Motoring, yachting, fishing, shooting and all-
year golf. Crystal Garden for swimming and
music.  Open all year.   European plan.
THE ROCKIES
Emerald Lake Chalet Situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, in picturesque Yoho
Near Field, B.C. National Park.    Roads and trails to the Burgess Pass, Yoho
Altitude 4,272 feet Valley,  etc.    Boating and  fishing.     Open summer months.
American plan.
Chateau Lake Louise Facing an   exquisite  Alpine  lake   in   Banff  National  Park.
Lake Louise, Alberta Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips, swimming,
Altitude 5,680 feet drives or motoring, tennis, boating, fishing in neighbouring
waters.   Open summer months.   European plan.
Banff Springs Hotel In   the   heart  of   Banff  National   Park.     Alpine  climbing,
Banff, Alberta motoring, golf, bathing, hot sulphur springs, tennis, fishing/
Altitude 4,625 feet boating and riding.   Open summer months.   European plan.
THE PRAIRIES
Hotel Palliser A handsome  hotel of metropolitan standard.    Ideal  head-
Calgary, Alberta quarters for the business man or the tourist travelling to and
from the  Canadian Rockies,   or beyond.      Open all year.
European plan.
Hotel Saskatchewan In the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan.    Golf and
Regina, Sask. motou>g.   Open all year.   European plan.
The Royal Alexandra, A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada, and
Winnipeg, Man. the centre of Winnipeg's social life.   Open all year.   Euro
pean plan.
EASTERN CANADA
Toronto, Ont. The Royal  York—The  largest hotel   in  the British  Empire.
Open all year.
Montreal, Que. Place Viger Hotel—A charming hotel in Canada's largest
city. Open all-year. Summer port for Canadian Pacific
"Duchess" and "Mont" Steamships to Europe.
Quebec, Que. Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel in the most his
toric and romantic city of all North America. Open all
year. Port for Canadian Pacific "Empress" Steamships to
Europe.
McAdam, N.B. McAdam   Hotel—A   commercial   and   sportsman's   hotel.
Open all year.
St. Andrew's, N.B. The  Algonquin—The  social  centre  of  New  Brunswick's
most popular seashore summer resort.   Open summer months.
Digby, N.S. The Pines—Nova Scotia's premier resort hotel.  Golf, tennis,
swimming pool.   Open summer months.
Kentville, N.S. The Cornwallis   Inn—centre for excursions to Evangeline
Land.    Open all year.
Yarmouth, N.S. Lakeside Inn—Designed in attractive bungalow style.   Golf
available for hotel guests.   Open summer months.
Chalet-Bungalow Camps reached by Canadian Pacific
Yoho Valley Field, B.C
Lake Wapta   -       -  Hector. B.C.
Lake O'Hara Hector, B.C
Radium Hot Springs Radium, B.C.
Moraine Lake '      . Moraine Lake. Alta.
Mount Assiniboine Lodge Banff, Alta.
Castle Mountain Camp  Castle Mountain, Alta.
Devil's Gap Camp       Kenora, Ont.
French River Camp  French River, Ont.
Hotel Sicamous      -       - Sicamous, B.C
Hotellncola  Penticton, Ont.
Harrison Hot Springs Hotel Agassiz, B.C.
Cameron Lake Chalet   -       -       -       -       -      - Cameron Lake (Vancouver Island), B.C.
WMa.
Crui*e4.tv the Sand
of the Sunny. Niqht
kLASKA! Enjoy two thousand miles of smooth sailing to and from this land of mystery
and romance . . . cruise from Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle to historic Skagway and back, via the
famous "Inside Passage"! The Canadian Pacific's regular nine-day cruises to Alaska offer you
perfectly-planned adventures to the Land of the Midnight Sun.
A modern Canadian Pacific liner is your home . . . gay with congenial companions and a happy
social life . . . complete with dancing, deck sports, informal parties, and a dazzling panorama of
magnificent scenery. Your itinerary includes awe-inspiring Taku Glacier sparkling like millions
of diamonds in the brilliant sunshine . . . towering mountains with giant trees and glistening
snow . . . avenues of smooth, mirror waters reflecting the rich rays of lingering sunshine . . .
quaint villages perched on rocky cliffs or built on stilts . . . great salmon runs and nearby
canneries; active gold-mines, museums, Indians, totem poles, tremendous flowers, old Russian
landmarks, early Indian trading posts . . . places you've read about and wanted to see! And
of course the glorious sun!
Contrasts and beauty, fascination end glamour . . . that is Alaska . . . and these cruises bring
you to Alaska at its best.
Printed in Canada, 1935
Page   One
 Courteous service
H.
IERE is your unique opportunity to enjoy all the fun of an
ideal vacation, plus all the hospitality of a famous service and the
experience of experts in the art of cruising.
The Canadian Pacific "Princess" liners in the Alaska service are
well-equipped to provide the privileges and comforts of cruise-
life. They are under the supervision and management of men with
years of cruise experience . . . part of a service that is world-
renowned for its courtesy and attention to each individual's wants.
The broad decks and public rooms are popular for sports,
games, informal parties. Or, you may relax on deck, bask in
the sun and be invigorated by the tang of ocean breezes. Then,
enjoy the excellent cuisine . . . delicious creations of Canadian
Pacific master chefs . . . served in congenial surroundings.
There's an excellent orchestra aboard to provide inspired dance-
music under the twilights of near-midnight sunsets. Last night out
there's a Masquerade Ball ... no ordinary affair when you consider that the merry throng have been under the constant spell of
happy adventure. That glorious, carefree fun should reign supreme
on such a night, in such a setting, is inevitable.
Over the whole scene an experienced master of ceremonies holds
sway, arranges entertainment, makes certain that you enjoy yourself.
Everyone travels first class. Everyone has the opportunity to
know everyone else. Very much after the style of a house party.
Truly, it is a real cruise!
Page   Two
PHOTOGRAPHS IN  THIS BOOKLET ARE
COPYRIGHT AS FOLLOWS:
© A.S.N.-ASSOCIATED SCREEN NEWS,
LIMITED, MONTREAL
© G.M.T.-G. M. TAYLOR, ATLIN
 %fe
X* I,
2*.«
x\
*£***
A $1,000 "pan*
BtmonytM Douji.
of the Great Gold Rush
. . when Alaska and the Yukon leaped into world prominence as a fabulous land
of wealth that lay in the golden sands of its rushing creeks and rivers . . . when men swarmed
over the snow-packed mountains on a quest wherein the race was to the swift and destruction
stood ever near. Those early-days' scars are still there . . . deserted villages, untravelled trails,
monuments—stray evidence of man and his "cross of gold."
Those exciting days in the Klondike with their bonanzas and their side play on life were amongst
the most amazing in the history of man. The name of the Northland was on millions of lips
throughout the world. Men begged and borrowed the wherewithal to reach its rocky shores
and push into the bonanzas of Dawson Creek and the Klondike. The spell of the land gripped
human souls. Its mystery intrigued men. Its gamble lured the weak as well as the strong. Anyone could play the game. It was "placer" mining for the most part and all one needed was a
pan, patience and luck.  This history of '98 is a most exciting chapter in the history of man.
The fury of '98 is displaced by the allure of '35. Law reigns in the land. The fever has gone
with the fury and the wild days of the Klondike are as dreams of far-off centuries. Yet there
are few who can return to the scene without feeling the same spell in their souls. The spell is
adequately recreated on these Canadian Pacific Alaska cruises . . . even intensified in this
year of '35 when gold is again a universal topic!
Page   Three
J
 tJP
IIP"   T
^^w^w™ %
Two charming hotels
in Canada's
Evergreen
Playground
Empress Hotel, Victoria
NcrtJiMMxtuvl Ho /
from Vancouver, Victoria or Seattle
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver
/OUR cruise has a beautiful embarkation point. Either
Vancouver or Victoria, in charming British Columbia, are worthy
of lengthy visits in themselves. They are in the heart of Canada's
Evergreen Playground, and possess every vacation appeal.
Vancouver is built regally on hills which slope down to sheltered
waters. It is Canada's largest Pacific port, and its harbor is busy
with shipping from all parts of the world, and majestic Canadian
Pacific liners sailing frequently to Honolulu, Japan, China and
the Philippines. Ships of the Canadian Australasian Line also
leave Vancouver regularly for Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand
and Australia. Vancouver is active with commerce, lumbering,
mining and manufacturing industries, and its vicinity is a veritable
paradise of resorts and facilities for recreation.
Victoria, on Vancouver Island, is a charming bit of Old England.
Besides boasting splendid Parliament buildings (it is the capital
of British Columbia), it is a city of beautiful homes, parks, boulevards and gardens. The Provincial Museum has a fascinating
exhibit of Indian life and culture on the Pacific Coast. It is a
year-round resort city. Seattle, the third point of possible
embarkation is one of the most progressive cities in the Northwest.
So, no matter where you plan to start your cruise, allow time for
sightseeing.
Departure is in the early evening. First night out you sail through
smooth, protected waters. Sleep like a log. Get up early to
watch your passage through Seymour Narrows, and after breakfast
you go ashore for your first Far North adventure.
Page   Four
 Quaint Totem Poles at Alert Bay
xllert Boub
VrutbeKupei*
Where Indians and Gold Rushers Lived
offers some excellent specimens. If you don't mind intruding
upon the final resting-place of Red Skin Braves, you will enjoy
browsing among those grotesque exhibits of their ideas—for
all Totem poles have a meaning and tell a story.
IRST port of call is Alert Bay, an Indian
village, on small Cormorant Island, and
busier little place than you might imagine
from its size. Salmon canneries invite
your inspection and no matter how many
years visitors have been trooping into
these canneries, they manage to make
you feel as though it all exists for the
sole purpose of showing you the secrets
of the trade.
Here is your first experience with those
quaint Totem poles. The Indian cemetery
After an afternoon hugging the shore and offering a broadside to
the great Pacific Ocean, if you are lucky with your long range
glasses you may pick out great whales at play, spouting like
floating fountains. You creep into the narrow channel again
and spend your second evening watching the sun paint pictures
on the smooth waters ahead. After a night of sweet sleep you
arrive at Prince Rupert, to go ashore immediately after breakfast.
If you are interested in something different in cities, you will
enjoy this visit to the utmost. This bustling community is built on
a circle of rocky hills. You marvel at the persistence of man in
overcoming nature's handicaps. Important as a fishing center and
a fur-trading post, it is Canada's largest Far North city.
Page   Five
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Talru—the Mighty Glacier
On
HetchUionyWrtutqelt
♦ ♦♦
TO ALASKA! After about three hours of cruising
from Prince Rupert, passing en route an ancient Indian village,
an old Hudson's Bay Company trading post, and the international
boundary, your "Princess" liner glides into Ketchikan. This was
an old settlement, whose Indian name connotes "the town under
the eagle."    It is the southernmost town in Alaska.
At Ketchikan you find definite signs of the Far North. Salmon
and halibut support large canneries and cold storage plants.
(During the late summer months, at Ketchikan Creek, you can see
the salmon leaping and fighting their way up to the spawning
banks.) And the harbor is a picturesque haven for a mighty
fleet of small fishing craft. Mining is extensively conducted.
Copper, gold, platinum, silver and lead are all found within a
radius of thirty miles.
There are many little curio shops, hotels, banks, stores—excellent
short trips, including beautiful walks through avenues of giant
trees . . . and an excellent collection of totem poles.
Wrangell, another island village, is the next stop. The stay is short
and early in the morning on the northbound trip. Coming back
you have ample time to explore its attractions.
All the way up from Ketchikan you can see and sense the change
in scenery—wider waters, taller mountains (and many more of
them), waterfalls pounding down the cliffs—bushier, thicker
undergrowth, more abundant wild animal life, fewer settlements
and wilderness that appears almost impassable. Wrangell is an
enchanted little place with many historic landmarks. It was
originally an Indian trading post under Russian rule. The ruins
of an old Russian fort are still to be seen, and some extremely old
totem poles. Your imagination will be stirred by tales of the big
game hunting, for Wrangell is situated at the mouth of the Stikine
River, which is the gateway to the Cassiar big-game country.
"Taku ahead!" The cry is like the call of "curtain" at the theatre.
Everybody runs up front for a point of vantage. As the boat sails
up Taku Inlet, sentinels of oddly-shaped ice-floes come drifting
Page   Six
 Taku fjUuier
down on their way to warmer waters and oblivion. Soon you see
giant Taku Glacier itself. A mile wide, reaching back over the
mountains for ninety miles, and at least a mile thick, it looms
before you—sinister, yet beautiful beyond compare.
It is really TWO glaciers: the one dead, a mixture of brown,
white and blue colors, hardly moving but always drifting backwards to its mysterious source. And the other alive, the symbol
of power untamed. Its brilliance in the sparkling sunshine rivals
the rainbow, the colors changing with each hour of the day,
according to the angle of the sun's rays. When its edges crumble
and plunge into the water, the effect is as though an artillery
battalion were laying down a terrific barrage. A blast from the
ship's whistle is echoed by deafening roars.
The boat stands by at a safe distance long enough for you to
understand what geologists mean by the glacial age, and although
you will hardly be able to see the movement of the giant, you
can easily understand how such a force, on a rampage, could
carve mountains, valleys, prairies. Certainly there is no resisting
it . . . nor forgetting it!
Page   Seven
 ''Princess
l§*ur HetieUu
IHE CANADIAN PACIFIC maintains
a year-round steamship service to Alaska,
and during the summer months operates
three of the finest of its "Princess" liners,
all of which are large, modern vessels of
the most comfortable, sea-going type. They |
are oil-burners, and equipped with wireless "
telegraphy.
The staterooms are comfortable, cozy,
well-ventilated, and designed to accommodate only two passengers per stateroom.
On each ship there are a few de luxe rooms
with private bath-rooms, and also some with
sofa berths.
All ships have large community rooms,
dining saloons, observation rooms, lounges,
Page   Eight
 Charlotte
■
Home Afloat
smoking rooms, and spacious dance floors.
They are well proportioned and charmingly
furnished. Delicious food, tastefully prepared, with menus remarkable for their
variety, contribute to the distinction of
Canadian Pacific's Alaska Service. In addition to breakfast, luncheon and dinner,
light refreshments are served in the dining
saloon at night.
The "Princess Charlotte" is 330 feet long,
with berthing capacity for 232 persons.
The "Princess Louise" is 317 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 210 persons.
The "Princess Alice" is 289 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 206 persons.
Page   Nine
 §4i*l€€Bti
Capital of Alaska — Active city of
gold   mines . . .   Quaint   museum
of far north curiosities.
iRESH from your Taku adventure, and after three of the fastest
flying hours of your life, wherein one scenic thrill follows another,
you steam into the harbor at Juneau at about 7 p.m. The sun will
still shine for a few hours more, so don't let TIME mislead you!
Juneau is named after its French-Canadian founder, who made the
first Alaskan placer gold strike near the city's site in the early
eighties. It is the capital of Alaska and is the seat of all government departments. It fairly "hangs on" to earth, for right behind it,
Mount Juneau shoots up an almost perpendicular 3,500 feet.
And it offers much to explore. There's the museum in the Arctic
Brotherhood Hall. It contains priceless curiosities: a lamp carved
in stone, old Chinese talisman coins, queer trinkets, skeletons of
first settlers; centuries-old ivory and innumerable evidence of
Indian art and craftsmanship.
In the many stores you will be able to find similar items to bring
home as souvenirs.
Page   Ten
There are many dealers in furs and
bargain signs are everywhere.
Good roads lead inland and there are
any number of "cabbies" who will
take you for a small fare. You can
visit Mendenhall Glacier and go on
further to Auk Lake. Gold Creek
Basin, a short hike from the city, is the
site of Joe Juneau's and Dick Haines'
first gold strike. Launches will take
you to Thane and Douglas, sites of
the largest low-grade gold-crushing
plants in the world, abandoned in
recent years.
 SkMSMMMWUM
On The Lynn Canal,
Gateway To The Yukon, Northernmost Point
On Your Cruise ...
Alaskan flowers rival tropic blooms
B<
IE out on deck early on the fourth morning for that eighty-mile
sail through the Lynn Canal. It is the "Scenery of the world."
You will be able to see it again on your way back, but there are
artists who have returned for as many as twelve times for these
views. YOU will certainly want to see it twice. And this time
you see it with the aid of early morning stillness and low angle
rays of the rising sun casting magic shadows.
The canal is from one to five miles wide, bordered on both sides
by towering mountains that rise straight to the clouds or bend
away in graceful canyons—sending forth gushing waterfalls from
the snow-capped peaks. They are as full of character as any
mountain range you ever saw. The water itself is the perfect
mirror to which waters are inevitably compared.
Then around a bend—and suddenly, Skagway! Cruise's end . . .
Tales of Skagway have travelled to the remotest hamlet. It was
Hell's Hole in '98, one of the wildest, wickedest, ^open"
gambling, dancing, drinking places on the face of the globe. Old-
timers, some of them not so old at that, will love to tell you of
those old days, including the legends of Soapy Smith or Frank
Reid, whose bodies lie in nearby, well-marked graves.
Page   Eleven
 inland from $§uu§mmu§
Robert W. Service at his cabin in Dawson,
where his Northern poems were written
CANADIAN PACIFIC "Princess" ships in regular service stopover for approximately thirty-six hours in Skagway before commencing their return voyage. Skagway has been from the earliest
gold rush days, the very doorway to the interior. So your time,
your pocket book, and your yearning for adventure must determine
whether you will remain in Skagway, or go inland.
If you do not wish to make side-trips, you may arrange to continue
to live aboard the steamer or in a Skagway hotel, and explore the
immediate vicinity of that fascinating city. And there are many
marvels in Skagway to interest you, not the least of which are
the wild and cultivated flowers and the woods that appear almost
semi-tropical with their dense undergrowth;  proof indeed of the
potency of twenty-hour sunshine. Why, there are gardens in
which pansies measure three and one-half inches in diameter, and
nasturtium vines grow three inches in twenty-four hours! In such a
heavenly spot, enclosed in a background of great snow-ridged
mountains, you can hike along the Skagway River to Fortune Bay,
Smuggler's Cove, or the Great Denver Glacier. Short excursions
by launch vary this attractive programme. The fishing is splendid!
Interesting though Skagway is, the shortest visit would be incomplete without a journey to the equally interesting and fascinating interior. Such a journey, difficult as it was in the early
days of the gold rush, can now be easily undertaken, for Skagway
is the southern terminus of the White Pass and Yukon Route.
Page   Tv
 S.S. "White Horse"
in the Five-Finger Rapids
White Pass and Yukon Route
©A.S.N.
Jhiiupi to Aee...place*, to go
I HOSE returning south by the same
"Princess" steamship may, if they wish,
see the Skagway scene in one quick tour
and then be off inland. They can do it in
the allotted thirty-six hours, by taking
one of two choices. One is by rail to
White Horse where the Yukon begins,
seeing beautiful Lake Bennett, intriguing
little played-out "towns" of gold
rush days, the international boundary
where Stars and Stripes and the Union
Jack fly side by side, and rugged,
picturesque country. The other choice is
by rail over the same route as far as
Carcross, thence by boat on the silvery
mountain-hemmed waters of West Taku
Arm, returning on the southbound train from Carcross the next
morning for Skagway and the trail home.
Those with more time will of course take the most important trip
of all, and visit the Klondike region itself. You take the same trail
the "rushers" took in '98, only you now go by rail, and in comfort,
on the White Pass and Yukon Route to White Horse and thence
via steamer from the Yukon to Dawson. It is truly a spectacular
journey, requiring approximately one week's time.
Side trips available in conjunction with this trip to Dawson
(requiring extra time, of course) or to be taken as entirely separate
adventures, include excursions to Lake Atlin. (You can take this
trip and catch the next returning "Princess".)
Descriptions of these trips are given on pages 14 and 15.
Page   Thirteen
 Summit of White Pass and Yukon Route Railway
B,
&OARD those wide-windowed little cars of the White Pass
and Yukon Route, sit back relaxed, comfortable, and take a LOOK
at history. You can tell by the very tone in the conductor's
"ail-aboard" that it's going to be an exciting adventure.
And then you're off. Soon you're over the international boundary
and into Yukon territory. There at the left is Lake Bennett.
Follow it for twenty-six miles. And so to Carcross. (Excursions
to West Taku Arm and Lake Atlin change here for steamship.)
Then on again, past little mountain lakes, and Miles Canyon to
stop at White Horse Rapids—what a name for a watery graveyard! When you are watching those waters, recreate the scene of
'98 when hundreds perished there in awful terror.
Then just a little farther—and rail's end, White Horse itself and
Soool   ^_
ofthePosU
"On Our Way
To The Klondike"
the Yukon. (End of trip from Skagway to White Horse that may
be taken during the 36-hour stop-over at Skagway.) The town is
certainly an answer to the clamor for something DIFFERENT!
And then on to Dawson by transferring to a White Pass and Yukon
stern-wheel steamship. En route you travel WITH the current.
There's an idea, a river in America that flows north. Two days it
takes . . . two days of the unusual. It never really gets dark, so it
matters not in the least WHEN you sleep. But you will want to
be awake when you "shoot" Five-Finger Rapids.  Talk about thrills!
Finally Dawson . . . dream city of the past, once headquarters for
the whole Klondike, now almost a museum of the hectic days.
It is rich experience. Really it is living history . . . chapters out
of the past.
Page    Fourteen
 tX;
xl
Lake Atlin and the motor-ship "Tarahne'
JCohe /ttlin
West Taku Arm
I WO trips to  inland  Alaska, popular because of the
spectacular scenery, are detailed below.
For both trips the route is the same to Carcross. (See
details, page 14.) You leave Carcross on the steamer
TUTSHI, proceed through a chain of sapphire lakes—so
smooth, so clear that they reflect the wooded and snow-
covered mountains on all sides. Giant flowers in brilliant
colors line the lower mountain levels. You glide from
one little lake into another, never knowing where one
begins and the other ends 'till you come to the Golden
Gate and Taku Landing.
If you're going to Lake Atlin, you disembark and take a
little narrow gauge railway across a narrow neck of land
to the waiting motor-ship TARAHNE (twin-screw
motors) which takes you the remaining six miles to Atlin
and its comfortable Inn. After luncheon at the Inn you
are away in the TARAHNE again for a forty-mile
cruise. This time through narrow mountain-lined passages
of Lake Atlin's western channel, down through the
island narrows at the southern end of the lake and back
up the largest branch of the lake where you have an
amazing view of Llewellyn Glacier and the Coast Range.
From Atlin you retrace your path to Carcross, and to your
"Princess" at Skagway. Time of the trip, four days . . .
or as much longer as you wish to stay at Atlin Inn.
On the shorter trip to West Taku Arm, you remain on
the steamship TUTSHI. It holds its course straight down
from the Golden Gate, past Engineer Mountain to West
Taku Arm Landing and that world-famous lodge in the
wilderness—Ben-My-Chree homestead. You sleep aboard
the TUTSHI, reach Carcross in the morning; then to your
"Princess" and return on your 9-day cruise!
Page    Fi fteen
 W O R L D - W ID E      SERVICE
• Great Britain and Europe
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . . Frequent sailings via the short St.
Lawrence Seaway from Montreal and Ouebec (summer)...
Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S. (winter) ... to and
from British and Continental ports . . . the majestic "Empress of Britain" and other great "Empress," "Duchess"
and "Mont" ships of the CANADIAN PACIFIC fleet set
new standards of Trans-Atlantic service.
• Canada and United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising
21,235 miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches
from the Atlantic to the Pacific, across Canada and into
the United States. The main line, Montreal to Vancouver,
2,886 miles, passes through the heart of the famous Canadian Rockies, with their crowning jewels of Banff, Lake
Louise and Emerald Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts.
Modern and comfortable transcontinental and local passenger train services link the important cities, industrial
sections, agricultural regions and holiday resorts. Fast and
efficient freight service. Convenient coastal and inland
steamship services.
• Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Regular sailings to and from Vancouver and Victoria . . .
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT . . . swift sister
ships, "Empress of Asia" and "Empress of Russia" . . .
Yokohama in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . . The mighty "Empress of Japan"
and her running mate, "Empress of Canada," make Honolulu in 5 days, Yokohama in just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS ... Canadian Australasian Line fast modern
liners to Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
• Round-the-World
ANNUAL WORLD-CRUISE on celebrated "Empress of
Britain," perfectly timed to see world-renowned beauty
spots at their best. . . Other attractive cruises to Mediterranean—East and South Africa—South America, West
Indies, Norwegian Fjords, etc.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice
of 215 itineraries ... 179 offices maintained throughout
the World to assist CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Hotels, Express, Communications
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort from Atlantic to Pacific
. . . Sixteen hotels in leading cities and resorts, including
Chateau Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto;
Banff Springs; Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Eight chalet-
bungalow camps in the Canadian Rockies and at Ontario
fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS . . . owned and
operated by the CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . trans-Canada
Service . . . world-wide connections . . . travellers' cheques
—good the world over.
"Empress of Britain" and Chateau Frontenac Hotel, Quebec
Canadian Pacific Transcontinental Train near Banff
"Empress of Japan"—Largest and Fastest Ship on the Pacific
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
 —   PRINCIPAL   —
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  AGENCIES
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
£tla2t£V,Ga -;a-    -H- C- James 404 C. & S. Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta.  (Summer) . .J. A. McDonald Canadian Pacific Station
Boston. Mass    L. R. Hart      405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, NY.. W. P.  Wass 22 Court Street
Calgary, Alta G. D.  Brophy Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111        T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio S. E. Corbin , 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas P. G. Jefferson 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich M. E. Malone 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe Canadian Pacific Building
Fort VVilham, Ont H.  J.  Skynner 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont. . . . : W. C. Tully 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C.  MacDonald 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig Cor.  King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T.H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill
Kansas City, Mo R.   G.   Norris 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson
Kingston, Ont J.  H.  Welch 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H.J. McCallum Richmond Bldg.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis J. A. Millington 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave. South
Montreal, Que (£• £• Gingras  Windsor Station
IF. C. Lydon 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask T. J. Colton Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes Baker and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J. E.  Roach Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R.  Y.  Daniaud 87  Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J.  A.  McGill 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont J. Skinner 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa E. A. Kenney 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford Koppers Bldg., 444 7th Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon 626 S.W. Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C W. L. Coates
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin Palais Station
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B C.  B. Andrews 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo .G.  P. Carbrey 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W. H. Lennon Fourth and Cedar
San Francisco, Cal F. L.  Nason 152 Geary St.
Saskatoon, Sask R.  T.  Wilson 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. . . J. O. Johnston 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash E. L.  Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston
Tacoma, Wash E. S. McPherson Old National Bank Bldg.
Tr.rr.ni-r.  Onr / W. Fulton Canadian Pacific Building
loronto, unt |Q  R  Burpee      Canadian Pacific Building
Trois Rivieres, Que J. A. Tourville 1262 Notre Dame St.
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C J. Macfarlane 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C C. E. Phelps 14th and New York Ave., N.W.
Windsor, Ont W. C. Elmer  . 142 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
Antwerp, Belgium....
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, England.
Bristol, England	
Brussels, Belgium	
Dublin, Ireland	
Glasgow, Scotland ....
Hamburg, Germany . . .
Liverpool, England. . .
London, England	
Manchester, England..
Paris, France	
Rotterdam, Holland.. .
Southampton, England
«SS»-
EUROPE
. W. D. Grosset  25 Quai Jordaens
.F. Bramley. 24 Donegall Place
.J. R. W. Taylor 4 Victoria Square
. T. W. Thorne 18 St. Augustine's Parade
. G. L. M. vServais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
.A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
. W. H. Boswell 25 Bothwell St.
.T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
.H. T. Penny. . Pier Head
/C. E. Jenkins 62 Charing Cross
1 G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St.
. R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
.A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
. J. Springett Coolsingel No.91
. H. Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong, China  E. Hospes Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan W. R. Buckberrough 7 Harima-machi
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw 14-16 Calle David
Shanghai, China A. M. Parker The Bund and Peking Road
Yokohama, Japan B. G. Ryan 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for Australia and New Zealand,
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
32-34 Quay St., Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, Aus Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd. . . Macdonald, Hamilton &. Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle, Aus Macdonald, Hamilton 8c Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Pass'r. Rep., C.P.R., 59 William St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Perth. W.A     Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z Trav. Pass. Agt., C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers' Cheques—
GOOD THE WORLD OVER
, m       ■ PRINTED   IN   CANADA   1935
 VICTORIA— Capital
City of British Columbia.
Parliament Buildings, Provincial Museum. Butchart
Gardens. Naval Station
and Observatory at Esquimalt. Empress Hotel.
VANCOUVER— Canada's great port on the
Pacific at the mouth of the
Fraser River. Lumbering,
fishing, canning, mining,
manufacturing and trading
centre. Immense shipping
to Honolulu, the Orient,
Australia and New Zealand.
Stanley Park.   Hotel Van-
NANAIMO— An old
Hudson's Bay Company's
Fort.  Coal mines.
POWELL RIVER-
Paper mills.
ALERT BAY— Indian
village on Cormorant Island
separated from Vancouver
Island by Johnstone Strait.
Notable for its street of
totem poles, some of which
have been transferred to
Stanley Park, Vancouver.
OCEAN FALLS— near
the mouth of Dean Channel—reached by Alexander
Mackenzie on his Overland
passage across Canada in
1793. The site of an important paper manufacturing
plant.
BUTEDALE— on Princess Royal Island: Salmon
canning and fish oil production plant.
PRINCE   RUPERT—
port near the mouth of the
Skeena River with population of about 6,350. An
important fishing centre
with large cold storage
plants. Here also is a large
floating dry dock. Close by
on Digby Island is the
Canadian Government wireless station, and a little
further north is Port Simpson, celebrated in the annals
of the Hudson's Bay Company. Prince Rupert has
interesting fur stores.
PORT SIMPSON—
Site of the original Fort
Simpson built by the Hudson's Bay Company in 1834.
KETCHIKAN—     The
southernmost town in
Alaska, well equipped with
canneries and cold storage
plants. Centre of platinum,
gold, silver and lead mines.
Curio stores and totem
poles. Salmon jump the
waterfall on Ketchikan
Creek in the late summer
months.
BEHM CANAL (on
the   route   of   the
cruise)— with Eddystone
Rock, a pinnacle 250 feet,
rising sheer from the sea.
RUDYERD  BAY—
with the picturesque
"Punch Bowl."
WRANGELL— near the
mouth of the Stikine River,
which is navigable 180 miles
to Telegraph Creek, outfitting point for the Cassiar
big game hunting fields.
Totem poles and curio
stores. Named after Baron
Wrangell, Russian Governor of Alaska, in 1830. At
the north of Wrangell Narrows is Petersburg, formerly
a Russian settlement.
TAKU GLACIER—ta
the head of Taku Inlet*
dropping sheer into the sea
—100 feet thick, a mile
wide and ninety miles long.
JUNEAU— Capital of
Alaska with population of
over 4,000. Fascinating
Museum and experimental
salmon hatchery. Fur and
Curio stores. Close to Mendenhall Glacier and Gold
Creek basin. Gold crushing
plants.
SITKA (Cruise only)
on Baranqf Island—
formerly capital of Alaska
under Russian regime. Russian St. Michael's Cathedral founded 1848. Sheldon
Jackson Indian Industrial
School. National Park.
LYNN CANAL— Spec
tacular fjord 80 miles long,
1 to 5 miles broad. Ice wall
of Davidson Glacier on the
West.
SKAG WA Y—At the head
of Lynn Canal. Southern
terminal of White Pass and
Yukon Railway. Rich in
memories of Gold Rush
days and the Trail of '98—
Beautiful flower gardens.
Fishing. Trips to Atlin
Lake and Lake Bennett—
Miles Canyon and White
Horse Rapids. Or on to
Yukon and the Klondike.
Checked C.P.By. Lines Jixn.,1936
 CANADIAN PACIFIC
 A .- mm;
1777   ^
/» ft
^^^
II
Sa^ta(&a^GW^
 CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
Hotels of High Standard at Low Cost
Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver, B.C.
Empress Hotel
Victoria, B.C.
PACIFIC COAST
Largest hotel on the North Pacific Coast,
overlooking the Strait of Georgia, and serving the business man and the tourist. Golf,
motoring, fishing, hunting, bathing, steamer
excursions.   Open all year.  European Plan.
A luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen
Playground, which, by its equable climate,
is a favorite summer and winter resort.
Motoring, yachting, fishing, shooting and
all-year golf. Crystal Garden for swimming
and music.   Open all year.   European Plan.
THE ROCKIES
Emerald Lake Chalet   Situated at the foot of Mount Burgess, in picturesque
Near Field, B.C. Yoho National Park.   Roads and trails to the Burgess
Altitude 4,272 feet Pass, Yoho Valley, etc.    Boating and fishing.    Open
summer months.    American Plan.
Chateau Lake Louise
Lake Louise, Alberta
Altitude 5,680 feet
Banff Springs Hotel
Banff, Alberta
Altitude 4,625 feet
Hotel Palliser
Calgary, Alberta
Facing an exquisite Alpine lake in Banff National Park.
Alpine climbing with Swiss guides, pony trips, swimming, drives or motoring, tennis, boating, fishing, in
neighbouring waters. Open summer months. European
Plan.
In-the heart of Banff National Park. Alpine climbing,
motoring, golf, bathing, hot sulphur springs, tennis,
fishing, boating and riding. Open summer months.
European Plan.
THE PRAIRIES
A handsome hotel of metropolitan standard. Ideal
headquarters for the business man or the tourist
travelling to and from the Canadian Rockies, or
beyond.   Open all year.   European Plan.
Hotel Saskatchewan
Regina, Sask.
The Royal Alexandra
Winnipeg, Man.
In the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan. Golf
and motoring.   Open all year.   European Plan.
A popular hotel in the capital of the Province of
Manitoba and the centre of Winnipeg's social life.
Open all year.    European Plan.
Toronto, Ont.
Quebec, Que.
McAdam, N.B.
St. Andrews-by-the
Sea, N.B.
Digby, N.S.
Kentville, N.S.
Yarmouth, N.S.
Halifax, N.S.
EASTERN CANADA
The Royal York—The largest hotel in the British
Empire.    Open all year.   European Plan.
Chateau Frontenac—A metropolitan hotel in the most
historic and romantic city of North America. Open all
year. Port for Canadian Pacific "Empress" liners to
Europe.   European Plan.
McAdam Hotel—A commercial and sportsman's hotel.
Open all year.   American Plan.
The Algonquin—The social centre of New Brunswick's
most popular seashore summer resort. Open summer
months.   American Plan.
The Pines—Nova Scotia's premier resort hotel. Golf,
tennis, swimming pool. Open summer months.
American Plan.
The Cornwallis Inn—Centre for excursions to Evangeline Land.   Open all year.   American Plan.
Lakeside Inn—Designed in attractive bungalow style.
Golf available for hotel guests. Tuna fishing. Open
summer months.   American Plan.
Lord Nelson Hotel. Open all year. European Plan.
(Operated by the Lord Nelson Hotel Co.).
Other Hotels and Lodges reached by Canadian Pacific
Yoho Valley Lodge, Field, B.C. Devil's Gap Lodge, Kenora, Ont.
Lake Wapta Lodge, Hector, B.C. French River Chalet-Bungalow Camp,
Lake O'Hara Lodge, Hector, B.C. French River, Ont.
Radium Hot Springs Lodge, Radium, B.C. Hotel Sicamous, Sicamous, B.C.
(Operated by Miss C. Armstrong)       Hotel Incola, Penticton, B.C.
Mount Assiniboine Lodge, Banff, Alta.   Harrison Hot Springs Hotel, Agassiz,B.C.
(Operated by Erling Strom) Cameron Lake Chalet, Cameron Lake
(Vancouver Island), B.C.
For further information and reservations apply to hotel management, your local travel agent, or nearest Canadian Pacific Office.
vacation!
Enjoy a Pioneer
ition! Adventure norm
Alaska™
r-,...••''' ■
, ;„ut, ^ *•wiei s,otes
parcn
Above^
The HUt°"c
# A cruise through inland seas walled by spruce-clad,
snow-crowned mountains, seas dotted with Indian fishing
boats—a cruise taking you through a land of totem poles and
mammoth-ivory carvings, calling at seaport towns where every
second store is a treasury of curios—a cruise to glaciers stretching huge talons of ice into the sea—a cruise to a land of furs
and huskies—a cruise of sunny days and lingering twilights,
with Northern Lights and a Midnight Sun—a cruise that links
up with a railway running on cliff ledges overlooking the
Gold Rush Trail of '98, and taking you to the frontier towns
and flower-bedecked magic of the tremendous Yukon River—
such a cruise must surely make you feel that this coming summer
the trip for you will be up the sheltered Inside Passage on
one of the Canadian Pacific Princess liners to Alaska and
the Yukon.
[1]
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 xxi
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A corner in
Butchart's
Gardens,
Victoria
[2]
ICTORIA
the everqreen playqround
Vancouver and Victoria are the Canadian Pacific ports,
linked up with Seattle by the Triangle Service of Princess
liners.
VICTORIA, Capital of British Columbia, is a city of
gardens with a quiet English character that appeals
strongly to American visitors. The handsome Parliament Buildings include an interesting Museum illustrating the life and handicrafts of the Coast Indians.
The social centre is the Empress Hotel, ivy-clad and
set out with flower beds making a blaze of color. Near
Victoria are the celebrated Butchart's Gardens, in
which an old quarry has been transformed into a paradise of bloom. Lovely motor drives take you to the
Dominion    Astrophysical    Observatory    or    along    the
 ■■
V V V
Hartour and City of Vancouver
© WESTERN CANADA AIRWAYS
AIMCOUVEP*
Canada'* qatewaij to the Pacific
Malahat Drive with its superb views of fiord and shore line and
distant mountains, or farther still through groves of giant Douglas
fir to Alberni. Golf is here the game of games. Victoria owes
much of its  charm to its balmy climate.
VANCOUVER is Canada's commercial metropolis on the Pacific
Coast, with a superb harbour in a beautiful setting of mountain
background. The sub-tropical virgin forest has been retained
in Stanley Park, Vancouver's city playground of 1,000 acres.
Nearby are Capilano, Lynn and Seymour Canyons, Grouse
Mountain, and Indian River Park with many attractive seashore summer resorts. From the rose-garlanded roof garden
of the Hotel Vancouver, one looks over a great city to the Fraser
River and the Gulf of Georgia, or across the river to the Lions.
Port for busy lumber and mining industries, Vancouver harbour
is a hive of industry. This is a University City, and has fine
residential  districts  such  as   Shaughnessy  Heights.
Hotel   Vancouver
A "Princess" liner
and
LASKA..
[3]
 '2»mS
lilii'fe ,
■  ■' ;■; m---. ■
«
ft    •;..
...
totem poles beckon a
picturesque welcome
to .. •.
Alert Bay!
ALERT BAY on Cormorant Island off the East Coast of Vancouver Island is the first
port of call on the cruise to Alaska. Here you are on the southern frontier of Totem
Pole Land, which extends North along the Pacific Coast as far as Wrangell. Turn to
the left from the quay on which you land and you find these colorful heraldic emblems
lining the street, while other totem poles decorate the cemetery, which you soon reach
if you turn to the right. Great logs mark the pillars and framework of an old Indian
communal lodge.   This is the tribal capital of thirteen Coast Indian communities, whose
 a livinq.. romantic museum
of ancient Indian lore is your
first port of call
main activities consist in fishing. The native
children are picturesque and of happy
disposition. The totems are not idols, but
represent animal spirits friendly to the clan
—the particular friend of the AJert Bay
Indian being the Raven.
Leaving Alert Bay you get a glimpse of the
open sea while crossing Queen Charlotte
Sound from Johnstone Straits before entering the archipelago of islands along tl
Pacific Coast of British Columbia.
>\>>
f    V\ W
III
Quail*1
J tote"1 P°
streets an* *
West Coast Indian I
Children
Alert Bay greets a
"Princess'*
.
f\
' 4 &
'r$\     ■:-.-     '.-.J^fi9^
Vk*
^^^1
Each  totem has  a meaning
[5]
 Prince Rupert
Ketchikan
dai|liqht lingers lonqer
and majestic peaks
alow with flaming
hues!
Chief  Johnsons
famous   lotem  pole
© R. D.
fjClLI.
l*i«
PRINCE RUPERT and KETCHIKAN
are the ports of call on the following
day on the regular northbound
course of the Princess liners.
Many million dollars have been
spent in building Prince Rupert
from a village on stilts into a substantial town, market and harbour
for a large fishing fleet—Canada's
largest settlement in Northern British
Columbia.      Here   is   a   small   but
W
Prince   Rupert,
British
Columbia
 interesting  museum,   and  totem  poles  have
been saved for erection on dominant sites.
North of Prince Rupert we pass Port Simpson,
an  old Hudson's Bay Company trading post,  to enter the
first port of Alaska at Ketchikan.    In addition to being an
important fishing centre, Ketchikan is the rallying ground of
the Metlakatla, Thlinget and Haida Indians. Three notable
totem poles—Kyan's Totem, Johnson's Totem and the Captain
Cook Totem, the latter surmounted by a stovepipe hat, attract
the visitor. Not far from the quay is a stream where in season
the salmon can be seen leaping the falls. If there is time,
walk up one of the stairways that climb the hill back of the
Ketchikan School Building which commands a fine view.
[7]
  the lure of an ancient
tradinq post..unmatched
brilliance of the Ice-£iW
Russian rule over the North Pacific is recalled in the name of Wrangell, so designated
from a former Russian Governor, Baron
Wrangell. Gateway to the Cassian and the
Stikine River, Wrangell at one time hoped
to benefit by the gold rush to the Yukon,
and still is the point of landing for big game
hunting parties. Opposite the dock is the
interesting Goonyah Totem,  and visitors will
find much of interest in Chief Shakes' house,
with a notable grizzly bear mask among its
curios.       Passing   through
Wrangell Narrows, the Princess   liner    comes   within
view of many glaciers, and
at Taku Inlet pays a visit,
at   a   respectful   distance,
to    Taku    Glacier,    which
breaks off as it touches the
sea   water,   leaving   sheer
cliffs    of   blue-green   ice.
Bergs are continually drift-
[9]       Mighty    fish    leap    up
these Northern  streams
"Princess Charlotte' passing Taku Glacier
ing off shore,  and icefloes swing past our steamship.     No
more thrilling spectacle can be imagined than that of this
huge    mile-wide    and    ninety-miles-long,    frozen-yet-living,
river—suggestive of a majestic force held
in   leash   by   Nature.       The   opalescent
surface  of  the  water  and  the  fringe  of
dark forest on the slopes verging on the
glacier accentuate the luminous sapphire
and   emerald   facets   of   the   rampart   of
Taku's ice cliffs.   Here indeed one begins
to   feel   something   of   the   mystery   and
grandeur of the North.
 Alaska's lapilal
0]   City teems with
native art and Far
East treasures
Juneau
Hin w n n\nvi
JUNEAU, our next port of
call, is the Capital of
Alaska, and epitomizes the history, romance, culture and industry of that vast
territory. Perched on the lower slopes of a
mountain, it owes its birth and growth to
gold mines such as the Glory Hole of the
Treadwell, though other industries have
come along to add stability. If time permits, the visitor should not omit a trip
to the Mendenhall Glacier, where the
mysterious action of a frozen river can be
studied at close quarters. Here one can
see a huge cave out of which pours the
underground river of the moraine. The
bus that takes you to the Glacier returns
by way of lovely Auk Lake, following a
road fringed with countless wild flowers.
The Museum at Juneau has fascinating
relics of Russian and even Chinese civilization in Alaska, as well as notable
specimens of Esquimaux and Coast Indian
handicraft. Lectures are given at convenient hours.
There are sightseeing aeroplanes available at Juneau for those who desire a
rapid bird's-eye view of this romantically
beautiful country. Gold Creek Basin, a
short  hike  from  the  city,   is  the  site  of
Mmm&$mmmmmgmm^&m\. „	
I111S1M
 qood roads and
Xold RusK' landmarks
In addition to its political importance,
Juneau is a busy industrial and commercial
centre, serving as a distributing point for the
surrounding territory.   There are churches
Joe Juneau's and Dick Haines' first gold strike. Launches
will take you to Thane and Douglas, sites of the low-
grade gold-crushing plants. The fur and curio stores
should not be overlooked, as they provide the opportunity of picking up curios and works of native craft.
Nearfcy Petershurg
© A. S-
of many denominations, including the Pro-Cathedral
of the Episcopal diocese of Alaska. Greek Catholics,
Roman Catholics, Methodists, Presbyterians and Lutherans are among others represented. The educational
facilities are good, for this is essentially a home town.
 ft7;l!;Xft  .-.■-■"-■.'
enjoy ocean cruise luxuries on tbe   A Bf| A RD QUID
sheltered Inside Passaqe vvv/\DU/illllllHll
The   Canadian   Pacific   maintains   a   year-round   steamship   service
to Alaska,   and  during the  summer months  assigns to this service
three of the finest of its Princess liners, all of which are large, modern
vessels of the most comfortable,  sea-going type.    They are oil-burners,
and  equipped  with  wireless  telegraphy.
The staterooms are  comfortable,   cozy,  well-ventilated,  and designed to
accommodate only two passengers per stateroom.    On each ship there
Li 2]
"VV V
are a few de luxe rooms with private bath-rooms, and also some with
sofa berths.
All liners have large community rooms, dining saloons, observation rooms,
lounges, smoking rooms, and spacious dance floors. They are well proportioned and charmingly furnished. Delicious food, tastefully prepared,
with menus remarkable for their variety, contribute to the distinction of
Canadian Pacific's Alaska Service. In addition to breakfast, luncheon
and dinner, light refreshments are served in the dining saloon at night.
 Princess decks are sunny
sailinq verandas for
fun afloat
The "Princess Charlotte" is 330 feet long,
with berthing capacity for 232 persons.
The "Princess Louise" is 317 feet long,
with berthing capacity for 210 persons.
The "Princess Alice" is 289 feet long, with
berthing capacity for 206 persons.
There's an excellent orchestra aboard to
provide inspired dance-music under the
twilights of near-midnight sunsets. Last
night out there's a Masquerade Ball . . .
no ordinary affair when you consider that
the merry throng have been under the constant spell of happy adventure. That glorious, carefree fun should reign supreme on
such a night, in such a setting, is inevitable.
Over  the  whole  scene   an  experienced
[14]
 master of ceremonies holds
sway, arranges entertainment, makes certain that you
enjoy yourself. Every tourist travels first class. Everyone has the opportunity to
know  everyone  else   .   .   .
very much after the style
of a house party!
 the summer sun seldom sets
on the silvery waters of
Lynn Canal
The last lap of our Northbound voyage is through the wildly beautiful
fiord named the Lynn Canal, in memory of a lieutenant who served under
the explorer, Captain Cook. Together with Chatham Straits, of which it is
an extension, the Lynn Canal is one of the deepest and longest "faults" in
the geology of the Pacific Coast. The mountains on either side rise from
4,000 to 6,000 feet above sea level, and show near their tops traces of
ancient glaciers.
Boundary
between
British Columbia
and  Alaska
International Boundary
Yukon and Alaska
Actual Glaciers are seen on the Western
side—Davidson, Rainbow, Garrison and
Bertha—all offshoots from the great
Muir Glacier.    Shortly before we reach
 7  § X-fe;l
L
H&&    *
a peaceful panorama . •.
amid roarinq waterfalls
cliffs and canyons
Aerial view of the Lynn Canal
Skagway, Haines is seen on the left—the gateway the hair of mountain goat, is also on the left. Here
to the Porcupine mining region. Chilkoot or Chilkat, was the landing stage for the historic Chilkoot Pass
source of the celebrated Chilkat blankets made from     of Gold Rush days.
 wsm
blossoms so htiqe.. so brilliant   O     • **«/«#
Hiey call it Hie city of flowers vwJIi /KG WAY
V V
SKAGWAY is our Northern terminal port—celebrated in
the Trail of '98—once the bloodstained home of Soapy Smith
and his gang, and now more pleasantly associated with a
beautiful flower garden. Here, if you do not wish to go inland
before the return cruise to Vancouver, you can arrange to
stay on board the liner while she is in port or go to a local
hotel, enjoying pleasant rambles in the vicinity or short ex-
[18]
cursions by launch. Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove or the
Great Denver Glacier are within hiking distance. Old timers
at Skagway can entrance you with stories of Gold Rush days,
and others can expatiate on the wild and garden flowers which
grow so luxuriantly in Northern sunshine. And always there
is the view looking down the Lynn Canal, one of the most
spectacular in North America.
 ':&U!-',;;':■,
Alaskan
flowers  rival
tropic blooms
., ; :7-7:77W7y7~ 7 :ft.::ftft;:ftftftftft.;;. ..\:. ::ftft. ■ ftftftftftftftft ftftftft::; ft:ft:::ft::ft|:ftftftft:::ftfti ft ■: ft ?: ftft:.: ft.ftft:;::; ft    7::: ft    'ft :■:
mm4'^mm:'^''777 imm&m$gmm; 7 ~m-< -: ■■■■. ■ 7 ■■.: ■:;'.■..,::'
Indian curios are popular with tourists [19]
  ©R. D.
 mm
pan
The White Pass and Yukon Railroad takes
us in comfortable observation cars over a
mountain track which engineers blasted
mostly through solid rock to reach the
plateau from which the Yukon River draws
its tributary sources. From the car window
you can see patches of the trail up which
toiled the first prospectors, and at Dead
Horse Gulch you read the moving memorial
tablet to the pack animals who perished by
the way. At the International Boundary,
Canadian and American flags wave side by
side, and the red-coated "Mountie" takes
charge of law and order, for now you are in
the Yukon. Bennett, with its shell of a log
church, is the halting place for luncheon
and for those who wish to return on the
same day to Skagway.     Carcross (Caribou
INLAND
from Skaqway
where the lure of the
'Gold Rush' linqers!
Crossing) is the junction for a steamer trip
down Lake Tagish to Ben-My-Chree, an
exquisite garden growing at the foot of a
glacier. Here one realizes that the Yukon
is the home of huskies, those handsome
wolfdogs who in Summer are as easygoing as they are energetic in Winter. At
Carcross is the grave of Bishop Bompas,
pioneer missionary of the North, and here
a local Indian, Patsy Henderson, gives a
talk from personal recollections on the
discovery of Bonanza Creek and on Indian
methods of trapping.
Patsy Henderson, Yukon Lecturer
[20]
Log cabin,
Carcross
 Garden «« Bm^S
...., ■."    . i mm^rn^
-':■■■     "ftft.       """   ;77ft     ftftiftftftft: ft-       ■   ;    77,
"■    X "y:i'^ '   ,:      .   7::Sft.-;ll:.::,i.;::;;;
X- 7 * ■'
..;»xai.
.fir ,ll,f
Whitehorse is for those who plan to take the sternwheel
steamer down the Yukon to Dawson or beyond. Just
before reaching Whitehorse, you get from the train a glimpse
of Miles Canyon, which, as a rule, you have time to revisit by
motorcar before the steamer leaves for Dawson ...
Alongside the river banks at Whitehorse are some of the pioneer
sternwheelers, while newer ones may be seen under construction. For this is the head of navigation on the Yukon River.
It is also an important outfitting point for big game parties
who nowadays are often conveyed by aeroolane to the game-
lands of the interior.
[21]
 $m
Top—'Panorama of
Dawson City
© SHEELOR PHOTO.
Centrei-'Hydraulic
Gold Mining
© R. D.
Bottom~Whitehorse~
starting point
of Yukon River
boats
© A. S. N.
[22]
 An   Alaskan   "Husky"
LONDIKE
Caribou swimming the Yukon
an old stronqhold of
dauntless pioneers
From Whitehorse to Dawson, the sternwheeler takes two days, and four days to
return upstream. The fascination of this
trip can best be realized in the description
written by Frederick Niven and published by
the Whitehorse and Yukon Route. Early
in the season you may see herds of caribou
swimming the river on their way to summer
pasture. In Five Finger Rapids, going up or
coming down, you get the thrill of a lifetime.
Dawson City itself is still rich in romantic
memories, and is also regaining some of its
old-time activity through new methods of
reclaiming gold. Robert Service's Cabin is
here, and the Indian village of Moosehide.
Here too are beautiful gardens—Mrs. George
Photographs   in   this   booklet   marked:   (R.D.)   are  by
R.   Dauphin;   (A.S.N.)    by   Associated   Screen   News
Limited.
Black,  Member of Parliament for the Yukon,
is the great living authority on the flowers of
this territory.
Some are not content with so brief a journey
to  the  North,   and  continue  onwards  by  the
Yukon River Circle Tour,  swinging round to
Fairbanks up the Tenana and over the Alaska
Railroad to Seward.   Others again
go  North   to   stay.      But  that  is
another story.
In this way tourists to the North
may visit Mount McKinley National
Park,   the   mountain   itself  being
20,300 feet above sea-level, and
may visit Kenai Lake, Placer River
Canyon  and  Spencer  Glacier.
[23]
Oldest  Cabin in Dawson
©R. D.
 $   39% Less Ocean to Europe
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . . Frequent sailings via the smooth St.
Lawrence Seaway from Montreal and Quebec (summer) . . .
Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S. (winter) ... to and from
British and Continental ports . . . the majestic Empress of
Britain and other great Empress, Duchess and Mont
ships of the CANADIAN PACIFIC fleet set new standards of
trans-Atlantic service.
FAST FREIGHT SERVICE provided by Empress, Duchess,
Mont liners and Beaver cargo ships.
• Canada and United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising 21,235
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches from the
Atlantic to the Pacific, across Canada and into the United
States. The main line, Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles,
passes through the heart of the famous Canadian Rockies,
with their crowning jewels of Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald
Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts. Modern and comfortable trans-continental and local passenger train services link
the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural regions
and holiday resorts. Fast and efficient freight service. Convenient coastal and inland steamship services. Builds and
operates own sleeping, dining and parlor cars.
ALASKA—Frequent service by Canadian Pacific "Princess"
liners from Vancouver (connections from Victoria and
Seattle) to Skagway and return via the "Inside Passage".
GREAT LAKES—Canadian Pacific inland steamships sail
semi-weekly during the summer months between Port Mc-
Nicoll and Fort William via an attractive lake and river route.
Summer cruises from Owen Sound.
• Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Regular sailings between Vancouver, Victoria and Yokohama,
Kobe, Nagasaki, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Manila, provide
convenient passenger and freight schedules:
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT . . . swift sister
ships, Empress of Asia and Empress of Russia . . . Yokohama in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . . The mighty Empress of Japan and
her running mate, Empress of Canada, make Honolulu in
5 days, Yokohama in just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS . . . Canadian Australasian liners ply between
Vancouver, Victoria and Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia.
O  Round-the-World
ANNUAL WORLD CRUISE on the famous Empress of
Britain, perfectly timed to see world-renowned beauty spots
at their best . . . Other attractive cruises to West Indies.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice of
over 200 itineraries . . . 179 offices maintained throughout
the World to assist CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Hotels, Express, Communications
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort across Canada from Atlantic
to Pacific . . . Fifteen hotels in leading cities and resorts,
including Chateau Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto;
Banff Springs; Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Five rustic lodges
in the Canadian Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS . . . owned and
operated by the CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . trans-Canada
service . . . world-wide connections . . . travellers' cheques—
good the world over.
CANADIAN
[24]
feMsMy
Empress
Pacifh
■III
near Banff
WW:0m
Empress of Japan^Largest and Fastest Ship on the Pacific
PACIFIC •
WORLD'S   GREATEST
T R AV EL    SYSTEM
 #1 «1
PRINCIPAL
CANADIAN PACIFIC AGENCIES
-]
o
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga W. A. Shackelford 404 C. & S. Natl. Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta. (Summer).... .E. Officer  Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass. L. R. Hart 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P. Wass   22 Court Street
Calgary, Alta J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111  T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio. A. D. Macdonald  .201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas P. G. Jefferson  . 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich M. E. Malone 1231 Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe. Canadian Pacific Building
Fort William, Ont. . H. J. Skynner..-....- 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont.......... W. C. Tully   30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig 4 King Street West
Honolulu, T. H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris 201-2 Waldheim Bldg.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis J. A. Millington 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave. South
Montreal, Que /P. E. Gingras Windsor Station
\F. C. Lydon 201 St. James St. W.
Moose Jaw, Sask T. L. Colton Canadian Pacific Station
Nelson, B.C N. J. Lowes Baker-and Ward Sts.
New York, N.Y J. E. Roach Madison Ave. at 44th St.
North Bay, Ont R. Y. Daniaud 87 Main Street West
Ottawa, Ont J. A. McGill 83 Sparks St.
Peterboro, Ont T. G. M. Jamieson 343 George St.
Philadelphia, Pa E. A. Kenney 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. N. McKendry Koppers Bldg., 444 7th Ave.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon 626 S.W. Broadway
Prince Rupert, B.C W. L. Coates
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin Palais Station
Regina, Sask. J. C. Pike Canadian Pacific Station
Saint John, N.B H. C. James 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo G. P. Carbrey 418 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W. H. Lennon Fourth and Cedar
San Francisco, Cal S. E. Corbin 152 Geary St.
Saskatoon, Sask R. G. West 115 Second Ave.
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont J. O. Johnston 529 Queen Street
Seattle, Wash E. L. Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
Sherbrooke, Que J. A. Metivier 91 Wellington St. North
Skagway, Alaska L. H. Johnston
Spokane, Wash. E. S. McPherson Old National Bank Bldg.
Tacoma, Wash L. N. Jones 1113 Pacific Ave.
Toronto, Ont /C. B. Andrews Canadian Pacific Building
\G. D. Brophy Canadian Pacific Building
Trois Rivieres, Que J. A. Tourville 1262 Notre Dame St.
Vancouver, B.C F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
Victoria, B.C J. Macfarlane 1102 Government St.
Washington, D.C C. E. Phelps 14th and New York Ave., N.W.
Windsor, Ont. W. C. Elmer 196 Ouellette Ave.
Winnipeg, Man E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
EUROPE
V. Gard Place de Meir 42
T. Penny 24 Donegall Place
R. W. Taylor 4 Victoria Square
W. Thorne 18 St. Augustine's Parade
L. M. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
T. McDonald . 44 Dawson St.
, H. Boswell 25 Bothwell St.
H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
. L. Duffy Pier Head
A. Hobbs. Trafalgar Square, W.C. 2
J. Harden 103 Leadenhall St., E.C. 3
L. Hughes 43 Cross Street
V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
Springett Coolsingel No. 91
Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
Hong Kong E. Hospes Opposite Blake Pier
Kobe, Japan S. H. Garrod 7 Harima-machi
Manila, P.I D.C. Miller 14-16 Calle David
Shanghai, China A. M. Parker The Bund and Peking Road
Yokohama, Japan B. G. Ryan 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
Adelaide, Aus Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z A. W. Essex, Traffic Agt., C.P.R., 32-34 Quay St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle, Aus Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Freight and Pass'r. Agent, C.P.R., 59 William St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Perth, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W N. R. McMorran, Traffic Agent, C.P.R., Union House
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z... G. A. Glennie, Freight and Pass'r. Agent, C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific Express Travellers7
Cheques- GOOD THE WORLD OVER
PRINTED  IN  CANADA  1938
Antwerp, Belgium H
Belfast, Ireland H,
Birmingham, England J.
Bristol, England .T.
Brussels, Belgium G.
Dublin, Ireland A.
Glasgow, Scotland W.
Hamburg, Germany T.
Liverpool, England M
London, England /G.
IR.
Manchester, England R.
Paris, France  A.
Rotterdam, Holland J.
Southampton, England.. .. H.
 VICTORIA— Capital
City of British Columbia.
Parliament Buildings, Provincial Museum. Butchart
Gardens. Naval Station
and Observatory at Esquimalt. Empress Hotel.
VANCOUVER— Canada's great port on the
Pacific at the mouth of the
Fraser River. Lumbering,
fishing, canning, mining,
manufacturing and trading
centre. Immense shipping
to Honolulu, the Orient,
Australia and New Zealand.
Stanley Park. Hotel Vancouver.
NANAIMO— An old
Hudson's Bay  Company's
Fort.   Coal mines.
POWELL RIVER—
Paper mills.
ALERT BAY— Indian
village on Cormorant Island
separated from Vancouver
Island by Johnstone Strait.
Notable for its street of
totem poles, some of which
have been transferred to
Stanley Park, Vancouver.
OCEAN FALLS— near
the mouth of Dean Channel—reached by Alexander
Mackenzie on his Overland
passage across Canada in
1793. The site of an important paper manufacturing
plant.
BUTEDALE—on Princess Royal Island: Salmon
canning and fish oil production plant.
PRINCE   RUPERT—
port near the mouth of the
Skeena River with population of about 6,350. An
important fishing centre
with large cold storage
plants. Here also is a large
floating dry dock. Close by
on Digby Island is the
Canadian Government wireless station, and a little,
further north is Port Simpson, celebrated in the annals
of the Hudson's Bay Company. Prince Rupert has
interesting fur stores.
KETCHIKAN— The
southernmost town in
Alaska, well equipped with
canneries and cold storage
plants. Centre of platinum,
gold, silver and lead mines.
Curio stores and totem
poles. Salmon jump the
waterfall on Ketchikan
Creek in the late summer
months.
BEHM CANAL (on
the route  of   the
cruise)—with Eddystone
Rock, a pinnacle 250 feet,
rising sheer from the sea.
RUDYERD BAY—
with the picturesque
"Punch Bowl."
WRANGELL^near the
mouth of the Stikine River,
which is navigable 180 miles
to Telegraph Creek, outfitting point for the Cassiar
big game hunting fields.
Totem poles and curio
stores. Named after Baron
Wrangell, Russian Governor of Alaska, in 1830. At
the north of Wrangell Narrows is Petersburg, formerly
a Russian settlement.
TAKU GLACIER—at
the head of Taku Inlet,
dropping sheer into the sea
—100 feet thick, a mile
wide and ninety miles long.
JUNEAU— Capital of
Alaska with population of
over 4,000. Fascinating
Museum and experimental
salmon hatchery. Fur and
Curio stores. Close to Mendenhall Glacier and Gold
Creek basin. Gold crushing
plants.
SITKA (Cruise only)
on Baranof Island-—
formerly capital of Alaska
under Russian regime. Russian St. Michael's Cathedral founded 1848. Sheldon
Jackson Indian Industrial
School. National Park.
LYNN CANAL—Spec-    &
tacular fjord 80 miles long,     Sr
1 to 5 miles broad. Ice wall
of Davidson Glacier on the
West.
SKAG WA Y-M the head
of Lynn Canal. Southern
terminal of White Pass and
Yukon Railway. Rich in
memories of Gold Rush
days and the Trail of '98—
Beautiful flower gardens.
Fishing. Trips to Atlin
Lake and Lake Bennett—
Miles Canyon and White
Horse Rapids. Or on to
Yukon and the Klondike.
Checked C.P.Ry. Lines Aug., 1930
 ill      m
Apply to
  TGulkana      >. J
I   A   S   K   \        /      #1|
Ihitinal )
~-~^Baker/Mt.
POOLE BROS. CHICAGO
Alaska
SEATTLE..
VICTORIA..
VANCOUVER
via
ALERT BAY..
PRINCE
RUPERT..
KETCHIKAN..
WRANGELL..
TAKU
GLACIER..
JUNEAU..
to
SKAGWAY
and return
BY THE
"INSIDE
PASSAGE"
/*
if Location of Canadian Pacific Hoteis
1 Pase Two •
Photographs
if? this booklet are
copyright as
follows:
©a.s.n.—Associated
Screen News Ltd.,
Montreal.
©G.M.T.—G. M. Taylor, Atlin, B.C
Printed in Canada
 Guess we've both caught the spell
of the far North Country — folks
back home will hardly believe us
when  we  tell   them  all  we've  seen!
,000
-uUiA
zy ~J)cui (juuAjl
Totem Poles, Wrangell
©A.S.N.
A perfectly planned adventure into a land of romance and
mystery ... A luxurious coastal liner is your home, say with
congenial companions—providing a rich social life with dancing,
deck sports, informal parties. Its broad decks are your ringside seats for a dazzling show of far north scenery.
Actually you see: towering, jagged, rocky mountains covered
with giant trees, heavy underbrush and sparkling snow . _. .
endless avenues of smooth, mirror waters reflecting the rich
rays of long, lingering sunshine . . . quaint little villages perched
on the sides of rocky cliffs or built on stilts . . . and jutting out
into the inland waters, great salmon runs and nearby giant
canneries; active gold-mines, museums of rare old curiosities,
Indians, totem poles, old Russian landmarks, early Indian
trading posts, tremendous flowers—products of the long-shift
sun . . . places you've read about—heard about in tales of the
old gold rush days . . . huge Taku Glacier roaring like a den
of lions as the corners crumble and plunge into the dark waters,
sparkling like millions of diamonds in the brilliant sunshine . . .
And of course the haunting, tireless sun at midnight in June.
The beautiful and the unusual . . . that IS Alaska . . . and this
cruise visits Alaska at its best.
• Page Three •
 J^Ae jJUtwvcL art a. ftuat vJcaart luveX !
The Canadian Pacific PRINCESS liners in the Alaska
coastal service are luxurious in every way. Travellers
invariably say they feel just exactly as though they were
enjoying all of the comforts and fun of life on an ocean
liner.
And why shouldn't they? These Canadian Pacific
liners are under the supervision and management of
men with years of world cruise experience. The officers
and crews are picked men. They are a part of a service
that is world-famed for its courtesy and attention to
each individual's wants. They KNOW the life of a great
ocean liner and they preserve all of the traditions and
thrills.
There's an excellent orchestra aboard. They provide
inspired dance-music under the twilights of near-
midnight sunsets.
The broad decks are alive with sports, games, informal
parties. Last night out there's a Masquerade Ball . . .
no ordinary affair when you consider that the participants have been under the constant spell of stirring
adventure. That romance and glorious, care-free
fun should soar on such a night in such a setting, is
inevitable.
Over the whole scene an experienced master of ceremonies holds invisible sway, arranges entertainment,
makes certain that you will enjoy yourself.
And perhaps there's even real advantage in favor of
this sort of trip as contrasted with life on an ocean liner.
Everyone travels first class. Everyone has opportunity
to know everyone else. Very much on the order of an
exclusive house party! Truly it IS fun!
• Page Four •
 r**r; i
rrt
Wltf
xft
>4/ert Bay
Where Indians and Gold Rushers
Lived...
First port of call is Alert Bay, Indian
Village, on small Cormorant Island, a
busier little place than you might imagine
from its size. Salmon fairly leap into cans
before your eyes! Canneries invite you
to see how it's done and no matter how
many years visitors have been trooping
into these canneries, they manage to
make you feel as though it all exists for
the sole purpose of showing you the
secrets of the trade. And who doesn't
love to be treated that way!
Here is your first experience with those
famous Totem poles. The Indian cemetery offers some excellent specimens. If
you don't mind intruding upon the final
resting-place of Red Skin Braves, you
will enjoy browsing among those grotesque exhibits of their ideas—for all
Totem poles are supposed to have meaning and tell a story.
After an afternoon hugging the inland
shore and offering a broadside to the
great Pacific Ocean, if you are lucky
with your long range glasses you may
pick out great whales at play, spouting
like park fountains. You then creep
into the narrow channel again and spend
your second evening watching the sun
paint pictures on the smooth waters
ahead. After a night of sweet sleep you
arrive at Prince Rupert Island to go
ashore immediately after breakfast.
If you are interested in something different in cities, you will enjoy this visit to
the utmost. This bustling little community,
seemingly determined to do a whole
year's work in a few summer months, is
built on a circle of rocky hills. You marvel at the persistence of man in overcoming nature's handicaps. You must
actually climb a long winding staircase to
reach it! Important as a fishing center
and a fur-trading post, it is Canada's
largest far-north city.
• Page Five •
 Ketchikan
Ketchikan, Wrangell..
£7 OKU   UlOtCU/L
En.f.cr ALASKA! After about three hours of scenic
sailing from Prince Rupert, the ship snuggles into port
at Ketchikan, an old Indian settlement so named because
it is the Indian word meaning "the town under the eagle."
It is an island community, the southernmost town in
Alaska. The three hours of scenery include "close-ups"
of an old Indian village, an old Hudson Bay Company
trading post, and the international boundary. Your
ship passes within a stone's throw of them all.
At Ketchikan you find definite signs of the Far North.
It is a RICH town. Salmon and halibut support large
canneries and cold storage plants. (During the late
summer months, at Ketchikan Creek, you can see the
salmon leaping and fighting their way up to the spawning banks.) And the harbor is a picturesque haven for
a mighty fleet of small fishing craft. Mining is extensively conducted. Copper, gold, platinum, silver
and lead are all found within a radius of thirty miles.
The village has all of the aspects of a boom town.
There are many little curio shops, hotels, banks, stores—
practically everything you would find on a good "Main
Street back home. There are excellent short trips,
including some truly beautiful walks through avenues
of giant trees.   Special items of interest are an excellent
collection of totem poles which show the Indian's sense
off humor as well as his appreciation of the place of
the bird, bear, frog, fish, etc., in his everyday life.
Wrangell, another island village, is the next stop in
chronological order. However, the stay is short and early
in the morning on the northbound trip. Coming back
you have ample time to explore its secrets.
All the way up from Ketchikan you can see and sense
the change in scenery—wider waters, taller mountains
(and many more of them), waterfalls pounding down
the cliffs—bushier, thicker undergrowth, more abundant
wild animal life, fewer settlements and wilderness that
appears almost impassable. Wrangell Island is unmistakably within the domain of the land of the midnight sun. The village is an enchanted little place with
many historic landmarks. It was originally an Indian
trading post under Russian rule. The ruins of an old
Russian fort are still to be seen.
There are some extremely old totem poles. You will
have your imagination stirred by tales of the big game
hunting, for Wrangell is situated at the mouth of
the Stikine River which is navigable for some 170 miles
and is the gateway to the far-famed Cassiar big-game
country.
• Page Six •
 H<Mmm-r
We'll   never  forget  this!
Why there's every color of the
rainbow   on   those   icy   slopes  — and
what  a   roar as  those  edges crumble
and  plunge  into  the  sea
x
Taku Glacier
"Taku ahead!" The cry is like the call of "curtain" for
the last act of a mystery drama. Everybody runs up
front for a point of vantage. As the boat pushes up
Taku Inlet, sentinels of crazy-shaped ice-floes come
drifting down on their way to warmer waters and
oblivion. Soon you see giant Taku glacier itself. A
mile wide, reaching back over the mountains for ninety
miles, and at least a mile thick, it looms before you as a
sinister monster—yet beautiful beyond compare.
It is really TWO glaciers, the one dead, a mixture of
brown, white and blue colors, hardly moving but always
drifting backwards to its mysterious source. And the
other alive, the very symbol of power untamed.   It is
brilliant in the sparkling sunshine rivalling the rainbow,
the colors changing with each hour of the day, according
to the angle of the sun's rays. As the edges crumble
and drop into the water, the effect is as though an artillery
battalion were laying down a terrific barrage. A blast
from the ship's whistle brings down deafening roars.
The boat stands by at a safe distance long enough for
you to understand what geologists mean by the glacial
ase, and; although you will hardly be able to see the
movement of the giant, you can easily understand how
such a force, on a rampage, could carve mountains,
valleys, prairies. Certainly there is no resisting it . . ■
nor is there such a thing as forgetting it!
• Page Seven •
 :ft77 7:ft::;;,:
:7777'z:'.'7
WMWmS
ftlllP1-"'^     ''-""•III
Hx:' ■ . ,xxS-'"x£
2" 2,.- m 2mm a:
Shuffle-board is  only one  of the  Shipboard Sports
• Page Eight •
All Ships have Dance Orchestras
A Dining-room—Cool and Spacious
 Xlilliffift
mfMM
2§mmmmmm.
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^ 7:7:7ft:;7;p;:;. j:; 7ft. i-;-ei ■.:}:-:::; ft;;:" ft:.;: 7; • ■:. ;■ '.: -ft -ft.-,:: :;:'::ft:': ft,:;;;. \ ft. 7;: -' -ft:--.:.: .77-■ ft::.,, ftft;;-; -' :?;■ v ;:::ftftftft;::;-7 J:::: ft;ft ■ ,;ft,,:;::- ;ftft::;ft:-ft :;.-:,.:;■;
7:f7g7
,'i-X-'77; xft' 'XX:-.. X..':-■ iftft':X-:XX.X■ X-XXX":>' 777:■■ -7-■;:''.;'.:.XXi-.-Xi-'- >!■?;.;:
mm^uaIouA. LeaAtal at&ewieM- Mfure. «4t/<
/
The Canadian Pacific Princess Liners in the Alaska
service are all modern sea-going vessels. All are oil
burners. All have light, cozy, well-ventilated staterooms, accommodating two persons. All have large
"community" rooms, observation rooms, lounges,
smoking rooms, and spacious dance floors. All carry a
complete staff including barbers, ladies' hairdressers,
arrvei
manicurists, etc. The cuisines are excellent. Total
accommodations for passengers range from 222 to 260.
The furnishings and appointments of the Princess Liners
are all in good taste. The general effect is very much on
the order of an exclusive club. You will feel at home
immediately.
Typical Stateroom
Private Bath
• Page Nine •
 ftiiliNi
Ji
l4Wl£AAAA^
Fresh from your Taku adventure, and after
three of the fastest flying hours of your life,
wherein one scenic thrill follows another,
you steam into the harbor at Juneau at
about 7 P.M. The sun will still be good for
three or four hours more, so don't let the
TIME mislead you!
Juneau is named after its French-Canadian
founder, who made the first Alaskan placer
gold strike near the city's site in the early
eighties. It is the capital of Alaska and is
the seat of all government departments.
It fairly "hangs on" to earth, for right back
of its streets, Mount Juneau shoots up an
almost perpendicular 3,500 feet.
And it offers much to explore. There's the
museum in the Arctic Brotherhood Hall. It
contains priceless curiosities: a lamp carved
in stone, old Chinese talisman coins, queer
Capital of Alaska—Active city of
gold mines . . . Quaint museum
of far north curiosities.
trinkets, skeletons of first settlers; centuries-
old ivory and innumerable evidences of
Indian art and craftsmanship.
In the many stores you will be able
to find similar items to bring home
as souvenirs.
There are lots of dealers in furs and
bargain signs are everywhere.
Good roads lead inland and there
are any number of "cabbies" who
will take you for a small fare.   You
can visit Mendenhall Glacier and
go on further to Auk Lake.     Gold
Creek Basin, a short hike from the
city, is the site of Joe Juneau's and
Dick Haines' first gold strike.   Launches will
take you to Thane and Douglas, sites of the
largest  low-grade   gold-crushing  plants in
the world, abandoned in recent years.
• Page Ten •
 7%   »' "" 7,_Je
ft1'X;:r-»-;»SS:„::
:::::Xx:::X ^WSllftS?:'
ft-:-'"'ft-.-
^***":
X:
-ftX'
-^7^^^^
■^^^^^^^^
iX,';!^!*^!;^^^^^*^!^^
<^fcl^CM€^W^
On   The   Lynn   Canal, i
i
if j#^   Gateway To The Yukon,
And The Northernmost Point On Your
.ruise
Alaskan  Blooms
*Au Revoir!'
Be out on deck early on the fourth morning for those eighty miles on the Lynn
Canal. It is the "Scenery of the world." You will be able to see it again on your
way back, but there are artists who have returned for as many as twelve times
for these views. YOU will certainly want to see it twice. And this time
you see it with the aid of early morning stillness and low angle rays of the rising
sun casting magic shadows.
The canal is from one to five miles wide, bordered on both sides by Jack-and-the-
beanstalk mountains that rise straight to the clouds or bend away in graceful
canyons—sending forth gushing waterfalls from the snow-topped peaks. They
are as full of character as any mountain range you ever saw. The water itself
is the perfect mirror to which waters are inevitably compared.
Then around a bend—and suddenly, Skagway! Cruise's end... Tales of Skagway have travelled to the remotest hamlet. It was Hell's Hole in '98, one of the
wildest, wickedest, "open" gambling, dancing, drinking, "whoopie" places on
the face of the globe. Old-timers, some of them not so old at that, will love to
tell you of those old days, including the legends of Soapy Smith or Frank Reid,
whose bodies lie in nearby, well-marked graves.
• Page Eleven  •
 mmtm      i|gj0llli
Historic Church at Lake Bennett
©A.S.N.
JlnJUuvd4/wrn
Shcuyurvui
But Skagway need not be the end. In reality it is, and
has been from the earliest gold rush days, the very doorway to the interior. Your time, your pocket book, and
your yearning for adventure must determine your decision. It would be unfair to bring you to the doorway
without telling you what lies immediately beyond.
Most important, of course, is the Klondike region itself.
You take the same trail the "rushers" took in '98, only »
you now go by rail and in perfect comfort on the White
Pass and Yukon route to White Horse and thence via
the same company's steamers down the Yukon to
Dawson. It is a most spectacular journey requiring
approximately one week's time. (See details on page 14).
Side trips available in conjunction with the trip to
Dawson (requiring extra time, of course) or to be taken
as entirely separate adventures, include excursions to
Lake Atlin. (You can take this trip and catch the NEXT
returning PRINCESS—see page 15.) And even shorter
trips to beautiful Lake Bennett, West Taku Arm, or to
White Horse. The last three can be made on your 36
hour stop-over in Skagway.
• Page Twelve •
 (JttaxxA
Boundary between British Columbia
and Alaska
During Your 36-Hour Stay
In Skagway
Assuming that your time is limited and you
have only the thirty-six hours for "research"
—how can you make the most of your time ?
Perhaps you will want to make arrangements
to continue to live aboard boat or in a
Skagway hotel and explore the immediate
vicinity of Skagway?
There are many marvels, not the least of
which are the wild and cultivated flowers,
the woods that appear almost semi-tropical
with their dense undergrowth; proof indeed
of the potency of twenty-hour sunshine.
Why, there are gardens here in which pansies
5. S. ''Whitehorse*9
in the Five-Finger Rapids
You could never imagine
that these deserted streets
witnessed the wildest of the
wild days of the early gold rush
measure three and one-half inches in diameter and
nasturtium vines grow three inches in twenty-four hours!
In such a heavenly spot, enclosed in a background of
great snow ridged mountains, you can hike along the
Skagway River to Fortune Bay, Smuggler's Cove, or the
Great Denver Glacier. And there are excellent short
excursions by launch. The fishing is splendid. An
excellent way to discover how fast time flies I
Or, do you want to take in the Skagway scene in one
quick tour and be off for the inland?   You can do it in
■■ .   -     -ft--.-..'    :   -   ...ft-
mm-im
77-ftftftf:;
White Pass and Yukon Route
©A.S.N.
the allotted thirty-six hours. Two choices: The one
is by rail to White Horse where the Yukon begins,
seeing beautiful Lake Bennett, the intriguing
little dried-up, played-out "towns" of gold rush
days, the international boundary where Stars and
Stripes and the Union Jack fly side by side, and
everywhere rugged picturesque scenery. The other
choice is by rail over the same route as far as Carcross,
thence by boat on the silvery mountain-hemmed waters
of West Taku Arm, returning in time to catch the
southbound train at Carcross the next morning for
Skagway and the trail home. Details of both trips are
included on the following pages as part of the great
adventures — "All the way to Dawson" and "Lake
Atlin."
• Page Thirteen •
 There's Dawson City and
what stories it hides—
Let's go talk to some
of the old-timers and
get   it  all   first  hand
Cfvapttti out Oh
tkeQcubt
Or—"All The Way To Dawson"—
Board those wide-windowed little cars of the White Pass
and Yukon Route, sit back relaxed, comfortable, and
take a LOOK at history. You can tell by the very tone
in the conductor's "ail-aboard" that it's going to be
exciting adventure.
And then you're off. Soon you're over the international
boundary and into Yukon territory. There at the left is
Lake Bennett. Follow it for twenty-six miles. And so to
Carcross. (Excursions to West Taku Arm and Lake
Atlin change here for steamship.)
Then on again, past little mountain lakes, and Miles
Canyon to stop at White Horse Rapids — what a name for
a watery graveyard! When you are watching those
waters, recreate the scenes of '98 when hundreds
perished there in awful terror.
Then just a little further — and rail's end, White
Horse itself and the Yukon.   (End of trip from Skagway
Summit
White Pass and
Yukon Railway
7.7'XX\'.7-.X
to White Horse that may be taken during the 36-hour
stop-over at Skagway.) The town is certainly an answer
to the clamor for something DIFFERENT!
And then on to Dawson by transferring to a White Pass
and Yukon stern-wheel steamship. En route you
travel WITH the current. There's an idea, a river in
America that flows north. Two days it takes . . . two
days of the unusual. It never really gets dark so it
matters not in the least WHEN you sleep. But you will
want to be awake when you "shoot" Five-Finger Rapids.
Talk about thrills!
Finally Dawson . . . dream city of the past, once headquarters for the whole Klondike, now almost a museum
of the hectic days.
It is rich experience. Really it is living history.. .chapters
out of the past.
• Page Fourteen •
 Lake Atlin
Soke (Atiln
West Taku Arm
Two trips to inland Alaska, popular because of the spectacular scenery, are detailed below for your convenience.
For both trips the route is the same to Carcross. (See details, page 13.) You leave Carcross on the steamer TUTSHI,
proceed through a chain of sapphire lakes—so smooth,
so clear that they reflect the wooded and snow-covered
mountains on all sides. Giant flowers in brilliant colors line
the lower mountain levels. You glide from one little lake
into another, never knowing where one begins and the
other ends 'till you come to the Golden Gate and Taku
Landing.
If you're going to Lake Atlin, you disembark and take a
little narrow gauge railway across a narrow neck of land to
the waiting motor-ship TARAHANE (twin screw motors)
which takes you the remaining six miles to Atlin and its
comfortable Inn. After luncheon at the Inn you are away
in the TARAHANE again for a forty-mile cruise. This time
through narrow mountain-lined passages of Lake Atlin's
western channel, down through the island narrows at the
southern end of the lake and back up the largest branch
of the lake where you have an amazing view of Llewellyn
Glacier and the Coast Range. From Atlin you retrace
your path to Carcross, and to your "Princess" at Skagway.
Time of the trip, complete, four days... or as much longer
as you wish to stay at Atlin Inn.
On the shorter trip to West Taku Arm, you remain on
the steamship TUTSHI. It holds its course straight down
from the Golden Gate, past Engineer Mountain to West
Taku Arm Landing and that world-famous lodge in the
wilderness—Ben-My-Chree homestead. You sleep aboard
the TUTSHI, reach Cacross in the morning; then to your
"Princess" and the return on your 9-day cruise!
'Ben-my-Chree" Homestead ©g.m.t.
• Page Fifteen •
 ans the
• Trans-Atlantic
Air-line route to Europe . . . Frequent sailings via the
short St. Lawrence Seaway from Montreal and Quebec (summer) . . . Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S. (winter) . . .
to British and Continental ports . . the majestic "Empress
of Britain" and other great "Empress," "Duchess" and
"Mont" ships of the CANADIAN PACIFIC fleet set new
standards of Trans-Atlantic service.
• Trans-Canada
Rail . . . Fast passenger and freight services cover Canada
from coast to coast; coastal and inland steamships.
Hotels ... A chain of comfort from Atlantic to Pacific . . .
Sixteen hotels in leading cities and resorts, including Chateau
Frontenac, Quebec; Royal York, Toronto; Banff Springs;
Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Nine chalet-bungalow camps
in the Canadian Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
Telegraphs and Express . . . owned and operated by the
CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . throughout Canada . . .
world-wide connections.
• Trans-Pacific
Regular sailings from Vancouver and Victoria to Honolulu,
Japan, China, Manila.
Direct Express Route to Orient  .   .   .  swift sister ships,
" Empress of Asia" and " Empress of Russia" . . .Yokohama
in 10 days flat!
Via Honolulu   .   .   .  The mighty "Empress of Japan" and
her running mate "Empress of Canada"   make Honolulu in
5 days, Yokohama in just 8 days more.
South Seas   .   .   . Canadian Australasian Line fast modern
liners to Honolulu, Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
• Round-the-World
Annual World-Cruise on celebrated "Empress of Britain,"
perfectly timed to see world-renowned beauty-spots at their
best . . . Other attractive cruises to West Indies, Mediterranean, Norwegian Fjords, etc. . . . independent Round-the-
World tours, choice of 215 itineraries . . .179 Canadian
Pacific agencies throughout the World to assist CANADIAN
PACIFIC patrons.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
WORLD'S GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
Page Sixteen •
—   PRINCIPAL   ~
CANADIAN    PACIFIC    AGENCIES
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga	
Banff, Alta	
Boston, Mass ,
Buffalo, N.Y	
Calgary, Alta	
Chicago, 111	
Cincinnati, Ohio	
Cleveland, Ohio	
Dallas, Texas	
Detroit, Mich	
Edmonton, Alta	
Fort William, Ont. . .
Guelph, Ont	
Halifax, N.S	
Hamilton, Ont	
Honolulu, T.H	
Juneau, Alaska	
Kansas City, Mo	
Ketchikan, Alaska
Kingston, Ont	
London, Ont.........
Los Angeles, Cal ,
Milwaukee, Wis ,
Minneapolis, Minn
Montreal, Que	
Moose Jaw, Sask
Nelson, B.C	
New York, N.Y	
North Bay, Ont	
Ottawa, Ont	
Peterboro, Ont	
Philadelphia, Pa	
Pittsburgh, Pa	
Portland, Ore	
Prince Rupert, B.C . .
Quebec, Que	
Regina, Sask	
Saint John, N.B	
St. Louis, Mo	
St. Paul, Minn	
San Francisco, Cal. . .
Saskatoon, Sask	
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.
Seattle Wash	
Sherbrooke, Que	
Skagway, Alaska	
Tacoma, Wash	
Toronto, Ont	
Vancouver, B.C	
Victoria, B.C	
Washington, D.C. . .
Windsor, Ont	
Winnipeg, Man	
Antwerp, Belgium
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, England.
Bristol, England	
Brussels, Belgium	
Dublin, Ireland	
Glasgow, Scotland
Hamburg, Germany . . .
Liverpool, England	
London, England	
Manchester, England..
Paris, France	
Rotterdam, Holland	
Southampton, England
Hong Hong, China.
Kobe, Japan	
Manila, P.I...;...
Shanghai, China. . .
Yokohama, Japan. ,
. .S. E. Corbin 404 C. & S. Nat'l Bk.  Bldg.
. . J. A. McDonald Canadian Pacific Station
. .L. R. Hart 405 Boylston St.
. . W. P. Wass, (Liberty Bk. Bldg.) Cor. Court & Pearl Sts.
. . G. D. Brophy Canadian Pacific Station
. . T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
. . K. A. Cook 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
. . G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
. . H. C. James 1212 Kirby Bldg.
.-. M. E. Malone 1231 Washington Blvd.
..C.S. Fyfe Canadian Pacific Bldg.
. . H. J. Skynner 108 South May St.
. . W. C. Tully 30 Wyndham St.
. .A. C. MacDonald 413 Barrington St.
. .A. Craig Cor. King and James Sts.
. . Theo. H. Davies & Co.
. . V. W. Mulvihill
. . R. G. Norris 709 Walnut St.
. . Edgar Anderson
.. J. H. Welch. 180 Wellington St.
. .H. J. McCallum 379 Richmond St.
. . W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
. . J. A. Millington. 108 E. Wisconsin Ave.
. .H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave. South
/P. E. Gingras Windsor Station
• I F. C. Lydon 201 St. James St. W.
. . T. J. Colton Canadian Pacific Station
. . N. J. Lowes Baker and Ward Sts.
. . J. E. Roach Madison Ave. at 44th St.
. . R. Y. Daniaud 87 Main Street West
. .J. A. McGill 83 Sparks St.
. .J. Skinner 343 George St.
. . E. A. Kenney 1500 Locust St.
. . W. A. Shackelford 338 Sixth Ave.
. . W. H. Deacon 626 S.W. Broadway
. . W. L. Coates
. . C. A. Langevin  Palais Station
. . J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
. . C. B. Andrews 40 King St.
. . G. P. Carbrey 412 Locust St.
. . W. H. Lennon Fourth and Cedar
. . F. L. Nason 152 Geary St.
. . R. T. Wilson 115 Second Ave.
.. J. O. Johnston 529 Queen Street
. . E. L. Sheehan; 1320 Fourth Ave.
. . J. A. Metivier  91 Wellington St. North
. . L. H. Johnston
. .L. N. Jones. . 1113 Pacific Ave.
/W. Fulton  Canadian Pacific Building
' ] G. B. Burpee Canadian Pacific Building
. .F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
. .L. D. Chetham 1102 Government St.
. . C. E. Phelps 14th and New York Ave., N.W.
. . W. C. Elmer 142 Ouellette Ave.
. .E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
EUROPE
. . E. Schmitz 25 Quai Jordaens
. F. Bramley 14 Donegall Place
. W. T. Treadaway 4 Victoria Square
.A. S. Ray 18 St. Augustine's Parade
.G. L. M. Servais 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max
.A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
. C. L. Crowe 25 Bothwell St.
. T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm 9
. H. T. Penny Pier Head
/C. E. Jenkins 62 Charing Cross
I G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall St.
.R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
.A. V. Clark 24 Blvd. des Capucines
.J. Springett Coolsingel No. 91
.H. Taylor Canute Road
ASIA
... . A. M. Parker Opposite Blake Pier
. .. . B. G. Ryan    7 Harima-machi
 J. R. Shaw 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
 G. E. Costello No. 4 The Bund
. . . . E. Hospes 21 Yamashita-cho
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager,  Can.  Pac.  Ry., for Australia and New Zealand,
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
32-34 Quay St., Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W.A Macdonald,  Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Pass'r. Rep., C.P.R., 59 William St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Perth, W.A Macdonald,  Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z J. T. Campbell, Trav. Pass. Agt., C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always Carry Canadian Pacific   Express  Travellers' Cheques—
GOOD THE WORLD OVER

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