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Breakfast menu from the Mountaineer train Canadian Pacific Railway Company. The Mountaineer 1926

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  "THE MOUNTAINEER"
BREAKFAST
PRODUCTS   OF   THE   CALEDONIA   MINERAL   SPRINGS
MAGI   "SALINE"  WATER, SPARKLING
DUNCAN   "APERIENT"   WATER, SPARKLING
HALF PINTS        PINTS
15 25
Berries  with  Cream 35
BRITISH COLUMBIA APPLES
Baked Apple 15, with Cream 25 Table Apple (One)  10,  (Two)  15
CANTALOUPE,  (HALF)  30 ORANGE,  WHOLE  15 SLICED 20 ORANGE JUICE 30
BANANA SLICED  WITH  CREAM  25 STEWED PRUNES WITH  CREAM  25
Sliced Pineapple with Bran Muffins 35
Stewed Rhubarb 25
CEREALS  WITH   MILK 20,  WITH  CREAM  30
GRIDDLE CAKES  WITH  CANADIAN   MAPLE  SYRUP 30
Grilled Alberta Whitefish 65
FISH
Fish Cakes 40, with Bacon  50
Broiled or Fried Lake Trout 65
CHOPS, STEAKS, ETC.
Broiled or Fried Chicken (Half) 1.25 (20 Minutes)
BROILED SIRLOIN  STEAK  1.50 SMALL STEAK  1.00 LAMB CHOPS  (ONE)  45;  (TWO)  80
BACON   (THREE)  STRIPS 35;   (SIX)  STRIPS 65 BROILED  HAM  65
HAM  AND  FRIED   EGGS 65 SAUSAGE 60 BACON AND FRIED  EGGS 65
ONE  STRIP   BACON:   WHEN   SERVED  WITH   OTHER  ORDERS   15  CENTS
Fried Tomatoes with  Bacon 60
Creamed Diced Chicken with Green Peppers 75
CALF'S    LIVER    WITH    BACON 65 " THE MOUNTAINEER "
A LA CARTE
EGGS
BOILED  (ONE)  20;  (TWO)  35 SCRAMBLED 35 FRIED   (ONE)  20;   (TWO)  35
SHIRRED 40 POACHED ON TOAST  (ONE)  20;  (TWO)  40
OMELETS: PLAIN 45 TOMATO OR CHEESE 50 JELLY,   HAM  OR SPANISH  60
BRITISH COLUMBIA POTATOES
FRENCH  FRIED 25 HASHED  BROWNED 25
PRESERVED FRUITS, MARMALADE, JAMS OR JELLIES 25
(in individual jars)
STRAWBERRIES PINEAPPLE RASPBERRIES
CRABAPPLE JELLY BRAMBLEBERRY JELLY QUINCE JELLY
STRAWBERRY JAM RASPBERRY JAM
ORANGE  OR  GRAPE  FRUIT   MARMALADE
PRESERVED  FIGS 35 INDIVIDUAL COMB OR STRAINED  HONEY 25
BREAD AND BUTTER SERVICE PER PERSON
TOAST   15 HOT  ROLLS  15 CORN   MUFFINS  15
MILK TOAST 30 BRAN   MUFFINS  15 CREAM  TOAST 40
WHITE,  BROWN AND  RAISIN  BREAD   10
TEA, COFFEE, ETC.
COFFEE, POT 20  (served with cream or hot milk) COCOA, POT 25 TEA, POT 20
NESTLES   MILK  FOOD 25 HORLICK'S  MALTED  MILK 20
INSTANT POSTUM  20 INDIVIDUAL SEALED  BOTTLE  MILK  15
FOR BOTTLED AND OTHER BEVERAGES SEE SPECIAL LIST
WAITERS  ARE   FORBIDDEN   TO   ACCEPT   OR   SERVE   VERBAL  ORDERS
PASSENGERS     ARE     REQUESTED     TO      INSPECT      MEAL     CHECK     BEFORE     MAKING      PAYMENT.      AND      IN     CASE     OF     ANY     OVERCHARGE     OR
UNSATISFACTORY    SERVICE.    REPORT  THE   MATTER  TO  THE    STEWARD    IN   CHARGE   OF   THE   CAR   OR   TO
W. A.  COOPER,
MANAGER,
SLEEPING,   DINING,   PARLOR  CARS
RESTAURANTS  AND   NEWS   SERVICE
MONTREAL
SOUVENIR COPY OF THIS MENU CARD  IN  ENVELOPE, READY FOR MAILING,  MAY BE    HAD ON APPLICATION TO
THE  DINING CAR STEWARD ■ BLACKFOOT TRAVOIS AND CAYUSE.
By Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance.
Chief Buffalo Child Long Lance, the author, is a full-blooded Indian, a chief of the blood tribe of Alberta. He is a graduate of
11 Carlisle, where he gained a reputation in university sports. The chief was appointed to West Point in 1915, but relinquished this appoint-
w ment in 1916 to go overseas with the Canadian forces. Entering the field as a private, he served with distinction, was twice wounded and
§§ returned at the end of the war with the rank of captain. He is at present writing a history of the Indians of the Canadian plains, British
§§§ Columbia and the North Country.	
/^VN the opposite side of this menu two Blackfoot squaws are seen with their horses hitched to the travois—the
^^ Indian's wagon. Previous to the coming of the white man into Alberta, the Indians carried all of their
worldly possessions on this crude, yet handy, contrivance, which consists of two crossed-poles dragging behind
the horse and bearing between them a skin hammock. Besides the tepee covering, bedding and other living
necessities, one or two children are also placed on this hammock and transported from camp to camp. The baby
is carried in its little moss-bag on the mounted mother's back, and another child usually sits behind her.
Before the horse was introduced on the northwestern plains, which was just over one hundred years ago,
the Blackfeet and other Plains Tribes hitched the travois to their dogs, massive animals bearing a strong strain
of  the  timber  wolf.
The Blackfeet were the first Indians of the plains to obtain the horse, having stolen a small herd from the
Kootenays of the Southeastern British Columbia, in early part of the last century. The Kootenays had acquired
the nucleus of their herd from the Cayuse tribe, of Oregon, which caused the Indian pony to become universally
known  as the  "cayuse."
When the horse first came among the Blackfeet, they did not know its use. They had never seen an animal,
outside of the dog, which could be domesticated, or which could outrun the buffalo; nor one that was invulnerable
to the attacks of large beasts of prey, such as the mountain lion and the buffalo-grizzly. The horse was so powerful, capable and noble in bearing, they regarded it as a sacred or supernatural being, and they ascribed its origin
either to the lakes or to the sun. When, later, they learned from tribes to the south that the horse could be ridden
and used as a pack animal, they immediately associated it with the dog, which had been their only burden bearer.
As a result, all western tribes still refer to the horse as a "dog." The Southern Sioux call the horse, shunka-
waken, meaning, "holy-dog"; the Northern Sioux, shunka-tonka—big-dog; the Crees, mist-atim—big-dog; and
the  Blackfeet,   ponoka-mita—elk-dog.
The coming of the horse, with its great speedand endurance and its fearlessness, unleashed the fighting instinct
of the Plains Indian and made of him a ferocious raider. He soon became the most expert horseman in the world.
In battle he would often taunt the enemy by galloping up and down in front of their position, with nothing but the
sole of his moccasin showing above the animal's back. Riding at a terrific pace, he would sometimes dive under his
horse's neck and come up on the opposite side, repeating this performance again and again in the midst of a shower
of  enemy  arrows.
When going into battle a Blackfoot warrior would tie up his horse's tail, append a feather to its fetlocks,
and a scalp to its chin, and paint his "Medecine"—usually some animal—on its withers and thighs'. ^ If the horse
had been wounded in a previous battle, the wound would be painted where it occurred. The print of a hand
on the horse's shoulder, in red paint, meant that it had run down an enemy in battle.
Grazing in the background of this photograph may be seen a part of the Blackfoot herd of 4,000 horses,
which range on their large reserve, bordering upon the south side of the Canadian Pacific Railway tracks from
Bassano to Namaka, Alberta—a distance of forty-six miles.

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