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The St. Lawrence route to Europe Canadian Pacific Steamships Limited 1920

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Full Text

 The St. Lawrence Route
to
EUROPE
ftyA^s^y
Canadian Pacific lo
CANADIAN PACIFIC
St. Lawrence Sea-way
FLEET
GROSS REGISTERED
Empress of Britain
40,000
In Service 1931
Empress of Scotland
25,150
Empress of Australia
21,850
Empress of France
18,350
Duchess of Bedford
20,000
Duchess of Atholl
20,000
Duchess of Richmond
20,000
Duchess of York
20,000
Montroyal
15,650
Montcalm
16,400
Montrose
16,400
Montclare
16,400
Minnedosa
15,200
Melita
15,200
Metagama
12,400
TO and FROM EUROPE
by
THE S'LAWRENCE
Canadian Pacific
SHORT SEAWAY
THE EMPRESSES DON WHITE:
The Empresses of the Atlantic make their appearance
this season with gleaming white hulls and with a ribbon of colour beading the main deck—to match in
beauty the scenic shores, sparkling waters, and golden
sunshine of the St. Lawrence Seaway.
White Empresses of the Atlantic
Printed in Canada 1930 II
%
;■
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC FLAWRENCEDWSEAWAY
/7">^^ HE Canadian Pacific St. Lawrence Sea-Way provides the shortest
//■^T and most delightful route to and from Europe. Its two great ports,
iw/ Montreal and Quebec, situated respectively 970 and 832 miles
^^-^ from the open sea, are actually nearer than New York to Liverpool,
Southampton, Cherbourg, Antwerp and Hamburg.
Voyaging along it on a Canadian Pacific steamship, you spend only four
days on the open Atlantic. The first two days are passed in an entrancing
journey down the salt, tidal waters of a majestic arm of the sea, between
shores of unbelievable romance and beauty. Instead of sailing straight out
from a harbour into the wave-bound horizons of the ocean, you travel for
forty-eight pleasurable hours between river-banks clothed in green meadows, forests and farmlands, with little white villages here and there at
the foot of sloping hills, with cattle lowing in the fields, children at play
on the wharves, and with village church-bells ringing out the Angelus or
calling to mass and vespers.
Every mile of the journey along the smooth, sheltered waters presents
vistas of the most appealing charm—scenes that stir your imagination and
send your memory harking back to the eventful days when Indian braves
were the overlords of these verdant hills and valleys, and when the French
pioneers on these shores held precarious tenure of their little forest clearings
by force of arms.
The early history of America unrolls itself before your eyes as the shores
speed past. This great sea-way was discovered within forty-three years of
the landing of Columbus in America. While farther south the English
settlers were still struggling for a foothold on the Atlantic coast, the gallant
French explorers had ascended the St. Lawrence and penetrated into the
very heart of the continent. The banks of the St. Lawrence are still French,
for they are peopled by the descendants of the men and women who left
Normandy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to build their
homes in the New World.
Below the city of Quebec, the character of the St. Lawrence is but little
changed since the days when Cartier and Champlain viewed its wild
beauties from the decks of their venturesome little craft, and dreamed of a
pathway to the golden East. Vast landscapes stretch away into the soft
blue ha2;e on both sides—rolling hills, virgin forests and meadows that have
as yet hardly been touched by the axe and plow of the pioneer.
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11
St. Lawrence Sea-Way
31 Arms of the Sea
OF ALL the great sea-ways
leading into the interiors of
the continents, there are but four
of primary importance from the
viewpoint of navigation. One of
these is in the ancient east, the
turgid Yang-tse-Kiang, which drops
down from the soaring mountains
of Tibet to the treeless, densely
populated plains of China, and rolls
its sullen, yellow flood northeastward to the sea, 3,100 miles from
its source.
Another begins as a tiny trickle
of water flowing down the eastern
slopes of the cloud-hung Andes
in South America, and grows and
grows until, when at last it comes to the ocean, it is veritably a sea in
itself, 160 miles in width, the Amazon, "the ship-wrecker."
The third and longest of all is the Mississippi, great "Father of Waters,"
4,221 miles in length from the head-waters of the Missouri to the last sands
of the delta which its brown waters build unceasingly in the Gulf of
Mexico below New Orleans.
The fourth is the St. Lawrence, at once an arm of the sea, a mighty river,
a chain of immense fresh-water lakes, and a salt-water tidal pathway paradoxically sheltered by twin parallel shores. The St. Lawrence takes its
farthest source west of Lake Superior, in the little River St. Louis that rises
among the low hills of Minnesota, down whose opposite slopes flow the
natal waters of the Mississippi.
For the first 1,008 miles, the St. Lawrence's path to the far-away ocean
lies through the Great Lakes, the gigantic glacier-formed basins whose
alluvial valleys like an immense open "V" edge the rim of the Laurentian
Shield, Canada's vast storehouse of precious minerals. Its current hidden,
but never lost, in the widespread waters of these inland seas, the St. Law
rence establishes its own identity at Kingston, where its clear blue waters
flow out of Lake Ontario through the beautiful wooded maz;e of the
Thousand Islands.
One hundred and fifty miles farther on, just above the Island of Montreal, the Ottawa River flows in, augmenting yet further the enormous
volume of water that sweeps steadily, almost imperceptibly along northwestward in search of the open sea, still all of 970 miles away.
At Trois-Rivieres, 72 miles below Montreal, tidal water begins, the
pulse of the parent sea, and at Quebec, 66 miles farther down, 40,000-ton
steamships can ride in and out of the harbor on a 16-foot tide. A few miles
below Quebec, and still 820 miles from the open sea, the water becomes
salty, and for forty hours steamships, with their prowrs pointed directly at
Europe, speed along on calm ocean water, incredibly paralleled on port and
starboard by the forests, mountains and farmlands of Lower Quebec. Past
Cape Race the open sea stretches away. Four short days to the east lies
Europe.
I 4
City of Three Rivers
© D.N.D.
Wide Rippling Waters
151 ■
;
I
Discovery
WHILE a prisoner at Pisa in
the closing years of the thirteenth century, Messer Marco
Polo dictated to Rusticano an
account of his amazing travels by
way of Bagdad, Khorassan and the
Gobi Desert to the Great Khan's
court in far-away Cathay; and
thereby set in motion the train of
explorations which resulted in the
discovery of the St. Lawrence
Estuary. Two centuries later,
Columbus, in search of Cipangu -
and the Indies of whose wealth
Marco Polo had told, landed on an
islet near the mainland of America. In 1497, John Cabot, out from Bristol
on a similar mission, landed on the shore of one of Canada's eastern provinces, 13 months before Columbus caught his first glimpse of the mainland
of South America at the Boca del Sierpe on the coast of Venezuela.
Other daring navigators, driven westward from the stone quays of
Dieppe, Lisbon, Mira, Honfleur and Madeira by the same dream of a
northern water passage to the treasure-chests of the Mongols, followed in
Cabot's wake, but until Jacques Cartier sailed from St. Malo in 1534 all
were fated to miss the Gulf of St. Lawrence, whose entrance, the portal to
a land incomparably more wealthy, pleasant and beautiful than all the
Cathayan realms, lay hidden behind the hilly shores of Bacallaos (Newfoundland).
From tiny bay to tiny bay, the intrepid Cartier crept up the St. Lawrence
to the foot of the rapids now known as Lachine. In the span of two years
he penetrated into the heart of the continent, reaching as the climax of
his discoveries the converging point of the greatest inland waterways of
the world.
Basques, Bretons and English swarmed into the St. Lawrence during the
seventy years following, but there was no permanent settlement of the
shores until Samuel de Champlain, "Father of New France," established
his colony at Quebec in 1608.
Then in 1634, Nicolet discovered Lake Michigan, and six years later
Chaumonot and Breboeuf looked on Lake Erie. In 1641 Raimbault and
Jogues reached Lake Superior and in 1659 Radisson and Chouart were off
on the wanderings that brought them to the headwaters of the Mississippi,
to Lake of the Woods and the watershed that drains northward into
Hudson's Bay.
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A Duchess Speeds the Short Sea-Way
St. Lawrence, near Deschambault
© A.S.N. %
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MAP OF  TRAVEL TIME
between   TYPICAL CITIES
Gild EUROPE
IKANS/s
CITY
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Montreal
TODAY, Montreal is the
largest city of Canada, the
second largest port of America,
and the largest inland port of the
world. It is also the leading financial and industrial centre of Canada
and next to Paris, Marseilles, Brussels and Bordeaux, is the largest
French-speaking city of the world.
Mount Royal, still almost as pri-
mevally beautiful as when Jacques
Cartier climbed to its summit in
1535, overlooks the multitudinous
roofs of a city of more than one
million inhabitants.
Just below Mount Royal nestles
the tree-lined campus of McGill
University, and farther east lies the Universite de Montreal. To the south
is the broad band of the St. Lawrence, dotted with lake-ships from Port
Arthur, Duluth and other inland ports, and with ocean steamships coming
and going from and to all the ports of the world. The river's nearer shore
is lined with towering grain elevators, giant warehouses, jutting piers, and
close behind them is the ancient city. Here are Place d'Armes and Notre
Dame; the grey Sulpician Seminary behind its thick walls; Notre Dame de
Bonsecours, the sailors' church; the Chateau de Ramezjay; the City Hall;
the Law Courts; the head offices of important banks and companies; the
Stock Exchange; and many and many a little crumbling building eloquent
of the bygone days. A little to the east is the Place Viger Hotel, close to
the cafes, churches and residential streets of the French city	
Then the day comes in the old city when the summer breezes and sunshine, the green trees and lawns and nodding flowers in the parks and
squares join the smiling hotel clerk and the bell-boys in wishing you "Bon
Voyage, Bon Voyage!" Memory of this day will never fade from your
mind. Your taxicab rolls down the long hill through splashes of sunshine
glinting from old walls and roof-tiles, through the mase of traffic in the
financial district, past Notre Dame's broad steps, and turns sharply into
little St. Sulpice Street, at the foot of which lie the Canadian Pacific piers.
Attentive stewards whisk your hand-baggage aboard, friends bid last
adieus, and the great liner is warped out into the clear waters of the mighty
seaway. The tiny, panting tugs are shoo'd away, the ship's engines begin
their rhythmic, scarce-felt throbbing, and the prow swings downstream,
pointed along the wide, smooth waters of the deep channel which runs
almost as straight as an arrow past Trois-Rivieres, Quebec and Father
Point to the open sea and the end of your journey in Europe.
Montreal drops swiftly astern, the Miraculous Virgin above Bonsecours
spreads her hands wide in farewell blessing, and long after the spires and
gables of the city disappear, Mount Royal's great cross glistens against the
morning sky. Tramp-steamers, trim yachts, ferries, great passenger ships
and little barges slip by, and the distant Laurentian hills loom blue in the
north.
10
St. Lawrence Sea-Way at Quebec
Quebec City and the Chateau Frontenac
in:
© A.S.N.
I ii.
11
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Quebec
INTO view come the little old
fort and statue on the shore at
Vercheres, where in 1692 Madeleine de Vercheres, a maid of fourteen years, successfully defended
her father's home for two long days
against the repeated attacks of Irb-
quois, her little army consisting of
herself, two younger brothers and
one very old man. Then Sorel
appears at the mouth of the historic
Richelieu, and the river widens
into Lac St. Pierre, made familiar
to English-speaking Canadians and
Americans by Drummond's verses
about the cook on the lumber barge.
Treading the wide blue waters, flinging back the miles one after one in
ever-interesting procession, the liner speeds along past Yamachiche and
Pointe du Lac, and comes opposite Trois-Rivieres, situated at the triple
mouth of the St. Maurice flowing in from the north. At Trois-Rivieres,
eight hundred and ninety-eight miles from the open sea, the first heaving
of the tide is felt.
Then come Champlain, with its oddly diminutive wharves; Descham-
bault, the scene in 1775 of mercy-tempered tragedy; Pointe au Platon, with
its majestic panoramas; Sillery, on little Sillery Cove below the cliff; the
tremendous span of the Quebec Bridge passing in the sky above the masts;
and there over the bow, across the calm waters of its incomparable harbor,
appears the old dream-city of Quebec, its rocky heights, ancient turrets,
citadel and Chateau Frontenac etched in unforgettable beauty of line and
color against the evening sky.
This historic seaport is one place whose innate charm cannot be imprisoned between book-covers. Descriptions may prepare you in a fashion
for the spell-binding beauty of this ancient walled and turreted capital of
French Canada, sprawled in such haphazard grace across the brow and
slope of its giant rock, but that is all. They can never paint for you the
arresting grandeur of the old city itself, the majestic thrust of Cape Diamond
above the blue St. Lawrence, the pastoral serenity of the Island of Orleans
and the dim misty splendor of the Laurentian hills in the background.
Just as much a part of Quebec as its market-places and squares is the
Chateau Frontenac, the palatial hotel which lifts its soaring towers high
above the roofs of Lower Town. Few hotels equal and none exceeds this
magnificent hostelry in exterior and interior beauty and in the perfection
of its service, and every year it is the rendezvous for visitors from all over
the world.
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Chateau Richer
©I.A. cMy"' :'
"Below Quebec
SAIL out from Quebec's incomparable harbor on the flooding
tide, aboard one of the white Empresses of the Atlantic, or aboard
any one of the other eleven liners
of the Canadian Pacific's Atlantic
fleet. Bid last adieu to old Quebec,
gazing down from the heights
above you, as it has gazed down for
centuries upon its people leaving
it for the distant sea. Look once
more across the river where Levis
opposes its beauty to that of its
sister city. Look north to the high
Falls of Montmorency where they
draw their filmy white curtain
against the green hills.   See little
Petronille on the Island of Orleans, and St. Frangois with its parish church,
originally built in 1683 when tiny ships and canoes were the only boats to
ply up and down the broad sea-way. Catch one last glimpse of little Mont-
magny among its fields—and turn now to marvel anew at the broad channel
that stretches away northeastward before the speeding prow of your ship.
All your fondest imaginings could never picture the novelty and delight
of such an ocean journey as this. The tides rise and fall, the water is salty,
but the ship drives along as on a sea of glass. No great waves threaten to
drive you cabinwards or interfere with the laughing crowds who play all
day long in the shade of the sheltered decks. The green shores keep steady
pace with the ship, interposing forests and hills against the distant horizon
in an ever-changing, ever-beautiful panorama. Here and there little bays
dent the shores. Fishing smacks gleam white on the sands and against the
tiny wharves, and the inevitable church-spires rise above the huddled roofs
of the white-washed cottages.
At Father Point the pilot goes over the side, and the ship heads on to
the open sea still another day distant. The north shore retreats farther and
farther away, to vanish entirely from your sight at Cap Chat. Ste. Anne
des Monts and Mont Louis slide by on the south. The cliff, flag-staff and
a few houses are all that can be seen of Cap Madeleine, a lonely signal
station built on the site of a Jesuit mission established in 1651. Fame Point,
the last signal station on the Gaspe coast, is left behind, the white walls and
red roofs of the little cottages of the fisherfolk leaving you with a colorful
remembrance of this romantic coast.
Four days alone remain of shoreless journeying; behind you are two
memorable days of voyaging down the sunlit path of the St. Lawrence,
voyaging that began at the ancient seaports of Montreal or Quebec and
carried you seaward through the beautiful romantic countryside of French
Canada. You have many happy memories, and only one regret; the days
were all too short for the multitude of interests on every side.
A Duchess of the Atlantic
111
An Empress of the Atlantic
All
114:
1151
AM
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f.
/ ^ . r'"'   r-; (
Empress of Britain, in service 1931, tf de luxe /Iyer 0/ 40,000
tons gross register, 24 \nots speed—to ma\e the Atlantic
crossing in five days—a giantess of the sea that will set new
standards of luxurious ocean travel
Fassengers' Automobiles
PASSENGERS on Canadian Pacific steamships who desire to take their
automobiles with them to Europe have at their disposal the excellent
arrangements completed by the Canadian Pacific.
The cars may be driven to the dock, where they are accepted as baggage,
uncrated, at reasonable rates, which include ocean transportation, port
charges, preparation of the car for the road (including initial supply of oil
and gasoline), Customs registration, membership in the Royal Automobile
Club of London, or the Automobile Association of England, plates, driving
license and all necessary Customs permits and documents required for
touring Great Britain and the Continent.
A lower schedule of rates is offered to passengers who desire to arrange
their own Customs formalities, European driving privileges, etc. This
schedule of rates covers, in addition to ocean transportation, port charges
and preparation of the car for the road.
Cars may be booked for the return voyage via Canadian Pacific steamships at rates which are substantially lower than double the one-way fare
and valid for one year from date of eastbound sailing.
Photographs marked .
© A.S.N, are copyright by Associated Screen News, Montreal, Que., Canada
© I.A.       are copyright by Interprovincial Airways Limited, Grand'Mere, Que., Canada
© D.N.D. are copyright by Department of National Defence, Ottawa, Ont., Canada
World Wide Organization
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Edmonton
Montreal
Montreal
Nelson
North Bay
Ottawa
Quebec
Saint John
Saskatoon
Toronto
Vancouver
Victoria
Winnipeg
Alta.
Que.
Que.
B.C.
Ont.
Ont.
Que.
N.B.
Sask.
Ont.
B.C.
B.C.
Man.
CANADA
R. W. Greene
D. R. Kennedy
G. S. Reid
J. S. Carter
C. H. White
J. A. McGilt
C. A. Langevin
G. E. Carter
G. R. Swalwell
J. B. Mackay
J. J. Forster
L. D. Chetham
W. C. Casey
106a Canadian Pacific Bldg.
201 St. James Street W.
St. Catherine and Metcalfe
Cor. Baker and Ward Sts.
87 Main Street West
S3 Sparks Street
Palais Station
40 King Street
115 Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Canadian Pacific Building
Canadian Pacific Station
1102 Government Street
Cor. Main & Portage
UNITED STATES
Atlanta
Boston
Buffalo
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Detroit
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Los Angeles
Memphis
Minneapolis
New York
Omaha
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Portland
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Spokane
Tacoma
Washington
Ga.
Mass.
N.Y.
111.
Ohio
Ohio
Tex.
Mich.
Ind.
Mo.
Cal.
Tenn.
Minn.
N.Y.  -
Neb.
Pa.
Pa.
Ore.
Cal.
Wash.
Mo.
Wash.
Wash.
D.C.
K. A. Cook
L. R. Hart
W. P. Wass
E. A. Kenney
M. E. Malone
G. H. Griffin
A. Y. Chancellor
G. G. McKay
P. G. Jefferson
R. G. Norris
Wm. Mcllroy
Canadian Pacific
H. M. Tait
E. T. Stebbing
H. J. Clark
J. C. Patteson
W. A. Shackelford
W. H. Deacon
F. L. Nason
E. L. Sheehan
G. P. Carbrey
E. L. Cardie
D. C. O'Keefe
C. E. Phelps
1017 Healy Building
40S Boylston Street
160 Pearl Street
71 East Jackson Blvd.
201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
1010 Chester Avenue
906 Kirby Building
1231 Washington Blvd.
Merchants Bank Bidg.
723 Walnut Street
621 South Grand Ave.
Porter Building
611 Second Ave. South
Cor. Madison Ave. & 44th St.
727 Woodmen of World Bldg.
1500 Locust Street
33S Sixth Avenue
148a Broadway
675 Market Street
1320 Fourth Avenue
412 Locust Street
Old Nat. Bank Bldg.
1113 Pacific Avenue
14th and New York Ave.
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, HAWAII
Adelaide Aus. Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland N.Z. A. W. Essex, N. Z. Shipping Co.' Bldg.
Auckland N.Z. Union SS. Co. of New Zealand
Brisbane Aus. Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch N.Z. Union SS. Co. of New Zealand
Dunedin N.Z. Union SS. Co. of New Zealand
Hobart Tas. Union SS. Co. of New Zealand
Honolulu T.H. Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Melbourne Aus. H. Boyer, 59 Williams Street
Perth Aus. Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva Fiji Union SS. Co. of New Zealand
Sydney Aus. J. Sclater, Union House
Sydney Aus. Union* SS. Co. of New Zealand
Wellington N.Z. J. T. Campbell, c/o Union SS. Co.
Antwerp
Basle
Belfast
Bergen
Berlin
Birmingham
Bristol
Brussels
Bucharest
Budapest
Cherbourg
Christiansand
Cobh
Copenhagen
Dundee
Glasgow
Gothenburg
Hamburg
Havre
Helsingfors
Kovno
Krakow
Lemberg
Liverpool
London
London
Malmo
Manchester
Moscow
Newcastle-on-Tyne
Oslo
Paris
Plymouth
Prague
Reykjavik
Riga
Rome
Rotterdam
Southampton
Stavanger
Stockholm
Tarnapot
Thorshaven
Trondhjem
Vienna
Warsaw
Zagreb
Belgium
Switzerland
Ireland
Norway
Germany
England
England
Belgium
Roumania
Hungary
France
"Norway
Ireland-
Denmark
Scotland
Scotland
Sweden
Germany
France
Finland
Lithuania
Poland
Poland
England
England
England
Sweden
England
U.S.S.R.
England
Norway
France
England
Czech-Slov.
Iceland
Latvia
Italy
Holland
England
Norway
Sweden
Poland
Faroe Is.
Norway
Austria
Poland
Jugo-Slav.
EUROPE
E. Schmitz
Dr. A. Im. Obersteg
W. H. Boswell
L. Kirkwold
A. W. Treadaway
W. T. Treadaway
A. S. Ray
G. L. M. Servais
D. Kapeller
G. v. Braun Belatin
Canadian Pacific
A. Normann
J. Hogan
M. B. Sorensen
H. H. Borthwick
W. Stewart
G. W. Hallstrom
T. H. Gardner
J. M. Currie & Co.
Finska Angfartygs
Canadian Pacific
W. Richardson
C. W. J. Cramb
H. T. Penny
C. E. Jenkins
G. Saxon Jones
G. A. Perrson
J. W. Maine
H. V. Gard
A. S. Craig-
E. Bordewick
A. V. Clark
Weekes, Phillips Co.
W. D. Alder
Iceland Steamship Co
L. Callaghan
A. Ross Owen
J. Springett
H. Taylor
H. N. Pedersen
J. H. Kullander
Canadian Pacific-
Magnus Skaling
Olaf Ruud
F. A. King
G. Hyna
A. W Bradshaw
ORIENT
Canton
Dairen
Fusan
HankoW
Harbin
Hong Kong
Keijo (Seoul)
Kobe
Macao
Manila
Mukden
Nagasaki
Nanking
Peiping (Peking)
Shanghai
Shimonoseki
Tientsin
Tokyo
Vladivostock
Yokohama
China
Manchuria
Korea
China
Manchuria
China
Korea
Japan
China
P.I.
Manchuria
Japan
China
China
China
Japan
China
Japan
Siberia
Japan
25 Quai Jordaens
9 Place de la Gare Centralt
14 Donegall Place
Guldskogaarden 2.
Unter den Linden 39
4 Victoria Sq.
18 St. Augustine's Parad©
98 Blvd. Adolphe Max
Calea Grivitei 157
VII Baross—ter 12
46 Quai Alexandre III.
10 Westbourne Place
Vesterbrogade 5
88 Commercial St.
25 Bothwell Street
S. Hamngatan 43
Alsterdamm 9
2 Rue Pleuvry
Aktiebolaget
Laisves Aleja 15
Basztowa 16
Grodecka 93
Pier Head
62 Charing Cross .
103 Leadenhall St.
Norra Vallgatan 94
31 Mosley Street
20 Kuznetzky Most
34 M or ley Street
Jernbanetorvet 4
24 Blvd. des Capucines
10 Millbay Road
Poric 22
Aspasia Blvd. 3
130 Via Del Tritone
91 Coolsingel
Canute Road
Skandsegaten 1
Vasagatan 8
ul Pilsudskiego 19
Johanna Restorfs
Fjordgaden 17
6 Opernring
117 Marszalkowska
Canadian Pacific
Jardine, Matheson & Co.
Cornabe, Eckford & Winning
Y. Tanaka & Co., 25 Daichomachi, 1 Chome
China Travel Service
International Sleeping Car Co.
G. E. Costello, Opposite Blake Pier
J. H. Morris, 21 Teido Street
B. G. Ryan, 7 Harima-machi
A. A. De Mello
J. R. Shaw,  14 Calle David
Wm. Forbes & Co.
Holme, Ringer & Co.
China Travel Service
Wm. Forbes & Co.
A. M. Parker, 4 The Bund
Wurui Shokwai
K. M. Fetterley
W. R. Buckberrough
International S/C Co.
E. Hospes, 21 Yamashita-cho
Passengers are cordially invited to make the Canadian Pacific offices throughout the world
their headquarters and have mail and telegrams addressed in our care.
Wm, Bailantyne
Asst. Steamship General Passenger Agent
Montreal
P. D. Sutherland
General Passenger Agent, Cruises
Montreal
H. B. Beaumont
Steamship General Passenger Agent
Montreal
H. M. MacCallum
Asst. Steamship General Passenger Agent
Montreal
Edward Stone R. E. Swain
General Passenger Agent General Passenger Agent!
Hong Kong London
W. G. Annable
Asst. Steamship Passenger Traffic Manager
Montreal
J. J. Forster
Steamship General Passenger Agent
Vancouver
H. G. Bring
European Passenger Manager
London
Wm. Baird
Steamship Passenger Traffic Manager
Montreal
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
GOOD
EXPRESS   TRAVELLERS
THE WORLD OVER
CHEQUES ■&MA^m:u?A
STEAMSHIPS
WORLD'S^
GREATEST]
TRAVEL
SYSTEM

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