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St. Andrews by the Sea, New Brunswick, and the Algonquin Hotel Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1900

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Array   CJTT
ST ANDREWS
SEA
FISHING BOATS AT ST. ANDREWS
ATURE has done much for St. Andrews, New Brunswick. No prettier
place can be found on the Atlantic coast for a summer holiday. Here
are two of the best golf courses in America. Here, also, the visitor finds
a delightful bathing beach, excellent boating, numerous tennis courts and
croquet lawns, an electric-lighted bowling green, charming drives, good
fresh and salt-water fishing, pleasant society and many other attractions.
The golf links at Joe's Point, overlooking Passamaquoddy Bay, are unrivalled in North
America. They are under the skilful care of John Peacock, a well-known professional,
trained in the Royal and Ancient game at St. Andrews in Scotland.
Perfectly constructed roads, forest-lined and shaded, run in all directions, reaching
sheltered spots by ocean and inland lake. The favorite drives are to Chamcook
mountains and lakes, and to the Glebe and Bocabec (seven miles) at the head of
Passamaquoddy Bay; the shore road bordering the river; the Bar road to Mowatt's
Grove, and at low water across the bar to Ministers Island. This latter drive presents
the novelty once experienced by the Children of Israel—that of going through a passage
in the sea which had fallen back on either side. This drive takes one through the bed of
the ocean twenty feet below sea level at high water. Add to these attractions the invigorating sea breezes and you understand why St. Andrews is the perfect summer resort.
(£c/. 2/ fo I
ST ANDREWS *v «i* SEA
ALGONQUIN   HOTEL,   ST. ANDREWS-BY-THE-SEA
HE Algonquin Hotel is a worthy link in the chain of Canadian Pacific
Hotels, which are celebrated the world over for their general excellence of
equipment and service.    Recently reconstructed in concrete as a fireproof
building, this hotel stands on a site of 28,000 feet, and has accommodation
for 250 guests.    The dining room measures 41|x 112 feet; the lounge room
26J x 89J feet and the drawing room 27 x 38^ feet.    There is a children's
dining room and also a very cosy smoking room.    Ninety-seven of the bedrooms have
private baths, and twenty-two have private lavatories.    Most of the bedrooms have
hardwood floors, and the keynote of the furnishing is tasteful simplicity, as befits a
summer  hotel.    With the object of mininjiising the risk  of fire, automatic  firedoors
have been provided, dividing each floor into five sections which can be isolated in case
of an outbreak.
Each of the bedrooms has a sea outlook.
The cuisine is unexcelled. The hotel is open every year from about June 15th
until about September 15th. Rates from J$4.00 per day and $24.50 per week upwards.
Applications for rooms, rates and floor plans may be made to the Canadian Pacific
Railway, Hotel Department, Montreal, Canada, or the Manager, Algonquin Hotel,
St. Andrews, N.B. A  CHILDREN'S DANCE AT THE  ALGONQUIN   HOTEL
ANY of the leaders of commercial, political and professional life in
Canada and the United States spend the summer months in and
about  St. Andrews.    The Algonquin has been visited by H.R.H.
the Duke of Connaught and the Duchess of Connaught, Earl and
Lady Grey, Lord and Lady Minto, Viscount Bryce, the late Duke
of  Sutherland,  Lord  Charles  Beresford,   Lord  Desborough,   Sir
Robert and Lady Borden, and numerous other leaders in British and Canadian society.
The Hon. Charles J. Bonaparte and other distinguished American guests have spent
their summers at the Algonquin.
There are a number of charming estates around St. Andrews, included among
which are the beautiful summer homes of many well-known men. Ministers Island,
the summer home of Sir William Van Home, is one of the beauty spots of Eastern
Canada. Its well-kept roads, flowers, and interesting live stock, together with the
novel design and location of the buildings, are greatly admired by all visitors. The
owner is exceedingly generous in permitting inspection by visitors, the Bar Road,
which connects the estate with the mainland, being one of the favorite drives at low
tide. The brisk, invigorating air of St. Andrews appeals to the hard-working business
man, who knows that a seaside home in summer is the best of all tonics. ST ANDREWS ^ ih<? SEA
ON THE   SITE  OF OLD  FORT  TIPPERARY  IS  THE   RESIDENCE OF   SIR   THOMAS   SHAUGHNESSY
HE glamor of historic association envelops the entire region.    Over three
centuries ago—in the summer of 1604—the adventurous Sieur des Monts,
piloted by the intrepid Samue} de Champlain, came from France with a
patent royal of all the territory in America between the 40th and 46th
degrees of north latitude.    The expedition crossed the Bay of Fundy and
ascended the Schoodic  (now St. Croix) river to a small island (Doucet's
Island) three miles above the present site of St. Andrews, which was fortified against
the forays of the Indians.    Later, on thei establishment of the independence of the
United States, a number of United Empire Loyalists came across the border and
settled at St. Andrews. There are houses still standing in the town which were brought
from Castine, Maine, while in the Episcopal Church is displayed the royal coat-of-arms
brought by the Loyalists from Wallingford, Connecticut. Afterwards St. Andrews was
a garrisoned town, and the sites of old Fort Tipperary and the Block House are quaint
reminders of the ancient means of defense of this border-town.
Another connecting link with the early part of the last century is Greenock Church,
with its quaint, high-towering pulpit and old-fashioned box pews. This edifice was
completed in 1824. ST ANDREWS *>v tf» SEA
THE   INN,   ST. ANDREWS,   N.B.
N addition to the splendid private summer homes of St. Andrews, a few delightful cottages have been erected in close proximity to the Algonquin Hotel. They
are not designed for housekeeping purposes, but are taken care of by the hotel
servants. The occupants take their meals at the hotel, which simplifies housekeeping. These cottages are supplied with electric light and hot and cold water
from the hotel, with which there is telephonic connection. The Hotel Department of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Montreal will supply information regarding
the rental of these houses. The demand for summer homes in St. Andrews far exceeds
the supply, and considerable building is now in progress.
The Inn at St. Andrews is also under the management of the Canadian pacific
Hotel Department. It is a well-furnished, homelike place, designed to meet tlfe approval of those who like comfort and modest surroundings, coupled with gdbd service.
The Inn has many friends, who like its convenient location to the station and wharfs
and the singular good taste shown in the interior decorations. Children, especially,
love the Inn, for there is ample room for play. Make reservations early for the Inn, as
the accommodation is limited. Rates, $3.00 per day, and special terms by the week, on
application to the manager of the Algonquin and Inn, St. Andrews, N.B., or the
Canadian Pacific Hotel Department, Montreal. §M§m-yp pp'v.
THE   BOWLING  GREEN,   ST. ANDREWS ST ANDREWS *>v the SEA
M
JN#
BATHING  IN   KATIES   COVE
ONE  OF THE  ATTRACTIVE  ROADS  AROUND   ST.   ANDREWS ST ANDREWS *v <a* SEA
THE   NEW CASINO  AT  ST.   ANDREWS
ONE of the special features at St. Andrews is the new Casino overlooking
the tennis courts, directly opposite the main entrance of the hotel. This
structure is built with wide verandahs and low, overhanging roofs, giving
it an exceedingly picturesque appearance. In the basement of the new
building are located three modern bowling alleys, where followers of the
game can test their skill under ideal conditions, also a splendid billiard
room with numerous tables. The main floor of the Casino is devoted to a magnificent
auditorium adapted for the social functions of the season and dancing every evening
to the music of a fine orchestra.
.
There are few, if any, resorts in America that can boast of more artistic and
attractive summer homes and surroundings than St. Andrews. Conditions for a
summer residence here are ideal. The influence of the sea in tempering the climate,
the charm of well-kept roads, wooded hills, and excellent boating facilities, are only a
few of the attractions which lure visitors and summer residents to this delightful
place. There is something about this quiet town that supplies all the needs for
relaxation and repose. In St. Andrews is eliminated the hurry and the tension of
modern life. At the same time it is not so remote from the world as to be merely
dull. The visitor can rely on finding pleasant society, and children are sure of
a good time ST ANDREWS by the SEA
LOOKING  TOWARDS   KATIE'S  COVE FROM  THE  ALGONQUIN   HOTEL
HERE is excellent sea bathing at half a dozen different places about St.
Andrews, the most frequented spots being the Block House Beach and Katie's
Cove, the latter a charming place only three minutes' walk from Algonquin
Hotel.    Here a number of bath houses have been constructed.    Owing to
the comparative shallowness   of the Cove, the water is warm, pleasant
and  refreshing, and here children, as well as adults, may bathe in safety.
There are no grander yachting waters in the world than those of Passamaquoddy
Bay.    There  is an absolute freedom  from  squalls  or  storms,  which  render  them
perfectly safe, so that inexperienced persons may venture out without danger.    The
bay  is  annually  visited  by   yachting   parties   from   New  York,   Boston and  other
Atlantic coast cities.
Steam yachts, motor boats and smaller pleasure craft can be chartered by the
hour, day or week at reasonable rates, and during the season many excursions are
made to Deer Island, Campo Belle, Grand Manon, N.B., Eastport, Pembroke, and
Lubec, Me., up the St. Croix and to various points of interest on Passamaquoddy Bay
and adjoining waters.
Great enjoyment may be obtained in fishing for tommy cod and smelts off the
wharves and the operation of seining the weirs after the sardine herring piave been
impounded is very interesting to strangers. ST ANDREWS by the SEA
ST, ANDREWS  IS   CELEBRATED FOR  THE  BEAUTY OF  ITS  GOLF COURSE
OLF at St. Andrews, on the 18-hole, 7,000-yard course, is a pleasure long
to be remembered.    For beauty of location these links are supreme, and
lovers of the royal game find conditions here almost ideal for the enjoyment of this popular sport. The fees per season are $10.00 for gentlemen
and $7.50 for ladies, while monthly and daily rates are equally moderate.
The links are conceded to be the finest in North America, and second
only to old St. Andrews, Scotland.    There is also a 9-hole course.   The most beautiful
inland course can never compare with links such as one finds at St. Andrews, where
the sea breezes keep one cool in the most strenuous game, and the golfer arrives at
the last hole ready for another round.    Golf is a game for old and young, and there is
no golfer in the world who would not be delighted with this, the premier golf course in
the Dominion of Canada.
Bowling may be enjoyed at St. Andrews on a well-kept, electric-lighted green,
which has a splendid outlook. The green is in close proximity to the Algonquin Hotel,
and is maintained in excellent condition throughout the summer season. The climate
at this popular resort is so exhilarating that lovers of this great game can play it here
with a zest and comfort that add additional enjoyment. ST ANDREWS te «*> SEA
npHERE are two courses on the St. Andrews golf links— one of eighteen holes and the other of nine holes.   In the above plan the nine
A hole course is shown with solid lines, and the full course with dotted lines.    The greens are well kept and the hazards well selected. ST ANDREWS by the SEA
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IN the inland lakes and rivers in the vicinity of St. Andrews-by-the-Sea the fishing is excellent. There are about twenty lakes
within a radius of fifteen miles. The fisherman can go tc nearly all the best lakes and streams in the morning, returning in the
evening. In the lakes, during June, land-locked salmon and lake trout may be readily taken with the fly. In July, August and
September, in deep water, the same fish may be taken with line bait, or by trolling.  

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