The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

The Royal York Hotel Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Canadian Pacific Hotels. Royal York Hotel 1930

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungtext-1.0229193.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungtext-1.0229193.json
JSON-LD: chungtext-1.0229193-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungtext-1.0229193-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungtext-1.0229193-rdf.json
Turtle: chungtext-1.0229193-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungtext-1.0229193-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungtext-1.0229193-source.json
Full Text
chungtext-1.0229193-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungtext-1.0229193.ris

Full Text

Array /?3o
I
a
m 1. Royal York Hotel;   2. Union Station;   3. Osgoode Hall;   4. Armouries;   5. Registry Office;   6. City Hall;   7. Canadian Pacific Building,
8.  Royal  Bank  Building;   9.   Dominion  Bank  Building;   10. St. James Cathedral:   11.  Convocation   Hall;   12.  University of Toronto;
13. Provincial Parliament Buildings, Queen's Park;  14. General Hospital;  15. Hart House.
SBeClTY
Many years before the first adventurous white man
penetrated inland in America, Indians had given the
name "Toronto", meaning "Place of Meeting", to the
place where their winding forest trails and water-routes
converged at an island-rimmed bay on the north shore
of Lake Ontario. "Place of Meeting" even more truly
today, Toronto at the present time is a great wide-flung
city of 750,000 people.    It is the capital and social,
political, financial and industrial centre of Ontario, and
is also one of the world's foremost cultural and educational centres. Its magnificent Government, university
and other public buildings, its beautiful residential sections, smart shops, theatres, parks and boulevards are
the background for the varied activities which annually
attract thousands of visitors to this charming and hospitable City.
VJTe CLIMATE
Toronto's situation on the shore of Lake Ontario is
responsible for the uniformly delightful climate which
the city enjoys at all seasons of the year. The summers
are long, and are distinguished by warm, bright sunshine
tempered by cool breezes that blow in across the far-
stretching waters. Excessive heat is seldom experienced.
The  winters  are  just  cold  enough  to make   the  air
bracing and healthy and although Toronto does not
usually have much snow, conditions are such that ice
skating and certain other forms of outdoor sport may
be indulged in during the season. Spring comes early
and as a general rule winter weather does not set in
until well along towards the end of December.
POINTS of INTEREST
Thickly dotted throughout the city are many parks and
pleasure resorts which may well be numbered among
Toronto's foremost attractions. Queen's Park, High
Park and Sunnyside, with its splendid bathing facilities
and almost countless amusement features, are theprincipal
ones. Among other attractions of which Toronto
boasts are the Lake Shore Boulevard, the magnificent
Provincial Parliament Buildings, the City Hall with its
famous clock tower, the University of Toronto with its
many beautiful structures, the Zoological Gardens, the
Royal Ontario Museum, the
Public Library, Exhibition
Park, the Coliseum, the
Art Gallery, Island Park,
etc., etc. Every person, no
matter what his age or
interest, can find plenty of
opportunity for entertainment and enjoyment in
Toronto. ft  ' •
Tk
Royal York Hotel
TORONTO
CANADA
Ihe Largest Hotel in Dritisn Empire
fHE ROYAL yORK, the largest hotel in the British Empire, and
one of the most palatial in the world, is the most recent addition
to the chain of Canadian Pacific hotels which stretch from the
Atlantic to the Pacific.    It was built at a cost of $16,000,000,
and opened in June, 1929.    Located in the heart of downtown
Toronto, it commands a magnificent view of Lake Ontario and
the lake front.    A subway connects the Hotel with Union Station where railway-
lines from all parts of Canada and the United States converge.    From the point of
view of convenience and scenic attraction, therefore, the hotel is admirably situated.
GENERAL PLAN
M
EDLEVAL LOMBARDY inspired the exterior architecture of the hotel. Grey
limestone is the material used. Considered as a mass, it consists of a solid
block, 340 ft. wide and 194 ft. deep, rising some 75 ft. from the street and containing
the main drawing room,
ballroom, convention hall
and banqueting room,
with their foyers as well
as kitchens; above this are
eleven bedroom floors,
planned in H form, the
recesses facing north and
south; the central block
of bedrooms continues
up five more floors to a
roof garden and above
this block narrows to a
central tower which rises
four floors to a steeply
pitched copper roof. At
night the central tower
is illuminated by flood
lighting.
CONVENTION HALL
PRINTED   IN   CANADA.    1930
£
*?7SCS
I
^V-  3, r?-%y DECORATION
In the interior decoration, ideas have been
drawn from those countries which have made
a definite contribution
to this art. Spaciousness
is the keynote struck.
On the Main Floor the
Italian motif is apparent
in the foyer. To the left
wide stone steps lead to
the lounge which opens
into the main dining
room. On the right is the
Venetian Cafe and a writing room. Pillars and
hangings of heavy brocade
in soft colors add to the dignity of the main dining room. The centre of the floor
is sunken and separated from the rest of the room by a metal railing. When dinner
or supper dances are in progress, this central portion may be used for the dancing
without inconvenience to the other diners. Rare taste and discrimination too
have been shown in the architectural design, the interior decoration and furnishing
of the lounges, the well equipped library, the quiet writing rooms and the cool,
spacious roof garden.
BANQUET HALL
DINING        Apart from the special dining  facilities  for  conventions and other
ROOMS large gatherings, the hotel has four dining rooms.    On the Arcade
Floor are the Coffee Shop—always a popular feature with guests—
and the English Grill. On the Main Floor are the Main Dining Room and the
Venetian Cafe. A choice range of meals is served in these dining rooms. There
are delicious club breakfasts, blue plate and table
d'hote luncheons and dinners while, of course, meals
a la carte are available in
all rooms. A complete
directory of the dining
room services is given on
page 10.
Two outstanding features
of the hotel call for special mention. The first
is the provision made for
conventions; the second
is the series of magnificent
suites with which the
hotel is equipped. main dining room convention
facilities
For conventions the entire
second floor and a mezzanine floor immediately
above have been specially
designed and set aside.
(See plans, page 13).
The second floor contains
a Banquet Hall measuring
approximately 165 ft. by
65 ft. (10,725 square feet);
a Convention Hall 140 ft.
by  65  ft.   (9,100  square
feet); and equipped with
a   stage   and   mammoth
Casavant   organ;   and   a
Ball Room 125 ft. by 45
ft. (5,625 square feet). These three rooms have a combined seating capacity for 2,800
persons and convention seating capacity for 4,070.  In the Convention Mezzanine are
located lounges, anterooms and galleries overlooking all three rooms. For committee
rooms ten private dining rooms on the Main Mezzanine are available. (See plan page
12).    Separate kitchen and service rooms, placed at the rear of the second floor,
immeasurably increase the efficiency of this convention unit.
THE GREAT    A word   may be added on the organ in the Banquet Hall.   On the
ORGAN floor of the hall, or on the stage that graces one end, reposes an
artistic console. Trace the wires that lead from the console and you
will find they lead to a chamber behind the stage and connect with a mammoth organ,
the largest and finest in Canada and one of the finest in the world. The only
five manual organ in the Dominion, it is the crowning achievement of Casavant
Freres, noted builders of organs. Concerts are regularly given in the hotel, the
grilles in the chamber walls pouring the music into the auditorium.
TYPICAL PRIVATE DINING ROOM
BALL ROOM
PUBLIC        Amplifiers
ADDRESS enable audi"
SySTEM     Tces ln a11
y three  rooms
on the convention floor to
listen in to the same programme or address which
may also be relayed to the
other public rooms of the
hotel. In addition each
bedroom is connected with
the hotel radio operating
room. To have an address
or programme brought to
the privacy of his own
room, the guest simply
telephones the office for a
loud speaker which is
plugged in. MOTION PICTURE
EQUIPMENT
The Convention and
Banquet Halls are fitted
with completely appointed motion picture projection rooms. The
equipment installed in
them is of the newest type
and the first of its kind
on the American continent. It consists of two
Super Simplex projectors,
Type "M," designed to
handle Movietone and
Vitaphone film—in other
words, all sound film.
For lighting effects, etc.,
there is  a  Brenkert  F-7
Stereopticon Dissolver with which can be used slides of any description or color
whereby thousands of different effects can be achieved.    There are also twenty-four
Brenkert Colorgraphs which run automatically by motor and give different colors
in the Halls.
ELEVATORS     In a hotel which is called on constantly to handle conventions
and other large public gatherings, efficient communication between
the floors is indispensable. This need is met by a battery of ten swift-moving
elevators equipped with the latest safety and micro-levelling devices. Another
battery ensures prompt room service.
KITCHENS   Adequate provision for meeting the physical   needs  of large  conventions has been  made.     A visit  to the gleaming  kitchens, the
butcher shop, bakery and pastry-
£&•&&&&£&&£&&&
ELEVATOR SERVICE
Suite
R
oom Nos.
Suite
Room Nos.
Art Moderne 525 •
527-   529
Louis XVI
569-
571-   573
Flower
625-
627 -   629
Chinese
669-
•   671-   673
Dutch
725-
727-   729
Russian
769-
771-   773
Venetian
825-
827-   829
Spanish
869-
871 -   873
Italian
925-
927-   929
Italian
969-
•   971-   973
Colonial
1025-
1027 -1029
Georgian
1069-
1071 - 1073
Queen Anne 1125 -
1127 - 1129
William and
Mary        1169-
1171 - 1173
Tudor
1225-
• 1227 -1229
Jacobean
1269-
1271 - 1273
Art Moderne 1244 -
1246 -1250
Flower
1344-
1346-1350
Dutch
1444-
1446 -1450
Tudor
1544-
1546 - 1550
Dutch
1644-
• 1646 - 1650
Tudor
1744-
1746 - 1750
cooks will reveal to the guest th
latest appliances in the culinary
art and show just how the modern
chef solves the problem of feeding
the five thousand.
SUITES     There are suites in the
hotel to suit every taste
—and every purse; comfortable,
compact two-roomed suites generally referred to as bachelor suites,
and comprising a double bedroom
and sitting room; suites for family
parties, period suites and finally the
vice-regal suite. In view of the interest the period suites have aroused
among the travelling public on
both sides of the border, a few
brief descriptions may be appended. FOYER,  CONVENTION FLOOR
ART MODERNE SUITE
525-7-9
Luxurious furnishings,
colors gorgeous or drab—
apparently incongruous—
are skilfully utilized in
this suite to produce an
effect characteristic of the
age. The walls of the living room are done in grey.
Divergent shades of brown
are used in the hangings
and curtains. Vividly contrasting shades of wood
are used in the furniture
which is straight lined,
efficient - looking and
essentially comfortable.
The coloring in the bed
rooms is almost luscious, the low swung beds with their half moon heads being
draped in flowered old gold silk. Gay Quaker-hat lamp shades and the modern
prints on the walls continue the spirit of the suite to the most minute details.
LOUIS XVL SUITE The general color scheme of this suite is grey and plum
569-71-73 color enlivened with gold.    Hangings and furniture cover
ings are French silks—in designs and colorings appropriate
to the Louis XVI. period. Some of the furniture of the suite is walnut with a
few of the outstanding pieces in satinwood. Among the most attractive of these
are the satinwood cabinet and the walnut writing desk.
The bedrooms are furnished in walnut with ormolu decorations. Curtains, bedspreads and furniture coverings, as in the living room, are French brocades with a
soft purplish grey as the dominant note.
FLOWER SUITE
625-7-9
Here the effect desired.was
one of cool lightness. Factors in achieving this
result have been the soft
green of the walls and the
sand colored rug with designs in delphiniums and
garden flowers. The chief
decoration of the sitting
room aside from the furniture and hangings are the
Maria Eaton flower pictures which really inspired the scheme. The
furniture is walnut,  the
hangings of flowered linen sitting room of Jacobean suite in which the blues and
purples of delphiniums
strike the guiding color
note.
One of the two bedrooms
is done in green enamel
and purples, the other in
French greys and purples.
In both these rooms a
dainty wall paper with
harebells and spring
flowers as decorations has
1   been used.
CHINESE SUITE
669-71-73
The walls of the suite are
old gold with a design in
lacquer reds and blues.
The doors and other woodwork of the rooms are finished in lacquer red, black and
dull gold—the whole being toned so that while vivacious the effect is not noisy.
Here the furniture has been done in a plum lacquer almost black with characteristic
Chinese decorations in gold and color. Hangings and furniture covers combine the
lacquer reds, blues and gold of the walls. A Chinese rug is used on the floor.
In the bedrooms lacquered furniture in Chinese design has been used and the hangings,
bedspreads and furniture coverings are in the well known Chinese tree pattern in blue
and white.
BEDROOM OF DUTCH SUITE
DUTCH SUITE    In this suite the atmosphere is that of the sturdy lowland Dutch.
725-7-9 ^e furniture is a^ dark Flemish oak.    To prevent the living-
room from being gloomy or sombre, however, in the furniture
coverings and curtains hennas and browns predominate. One of the most interesting
pieces is a tapestry map—
a copy of an original
Dutch map of New Amsterdam.
The bedrooms are so treated as to harmonize with
the living room but one
of the unusual features is
the quaint Dutch paintings on the bedsteads
themselves.
SPANISH SUITE
869-71-73
Spanish restraint in decoration characterizes this
suite. The small panelled,
slate colored doors are as
typical as the massive furniture,  the rich hues of
TYPICAL BED ROOM the coverings or the red tiled fireplace.
Corresponding touches of color are
found in the yellows, blues and reds
used in the designs on the raftered
ceiling. Among the many choice pieces,
one of the most interesting is the
Vargueno cabinet. Reproductions of
the old Spanish masters adorn the
walls.
GEORGIAN SUITE
1069-71-73
Greens and
plum are the
predominant
colors in this suite, the general type of
furniture being the fairly heavy mahogany which at this period had become
the fashionable medium in England.
This "heaviness" was the outcome of
the German influence over the early
Georges and mahogany was the new
and fashionable wood. The living room
has the characteristic high combination
desk and bookcase with period chairs
and gate-legged tables.
A WINDOW IN ROOF GARDEN
QUEEN ANNE SUITE     An atmosphere of aristocratic elegance has been achieved
1125-7-9 *n this suite—an effect produced by the beauty of the
productions of the cabinetmaker's art and the delicate
color tones of the decorations and furnishings. The panelled walls are finished in a
pale, monotone blue which admirably sets off the walnut doors and wainscoting.
Blue is the dominant tone of the window hangings, upholstery and unpatterned
carpet. Two beautiful pieces which arrest attention in the sitting room are
the dainty, double-leafed walnut table and the tall cabinet. The only wall
adornments are a couple of delicately framed prints of the period.   The bedrooms
continue the general
color scheme in the tones
of the draperies, curtains
and carpets.
WILLIAM AND
MARy SUITE
1169-71-73
In this suite blues have
been used combined with
greys and gold. Walnut
which was the favorite
wood between the oak
period of the Jameses and
the mahogany of the
Georges is used. The
furniture throughout the
COFFEE SHOP SITTING ROOM OF TUDOR SUITE
suite    comprises    reproductions    of
authentic William and Mary pieces.
TUDOR SUITE    The joiner's work
1225-7-9 played  an  impor
tant part in the
interior decoration of the Tudor
period when roofs were heavily raftered and oak panelling for walls came
into vogue. The characteristics of the
period are admirably brought out in
the present suite. The walls of the
sitting room are oak panelled, the
carpet is fawn and the hangings are of
dark, heavily flowered material. An
atmosphere of solidarity has been
achieved.
Among the interesting pieces are the Court cupboard and the lantern shaped reading
lamp set on a Crusader's shield. Prints of the day including one of the bluff King
Hal adorn the walls.
In the bedrooms the massive Tudor effects are continued but here the walls are done
in cream. The strong simple colors of the draperies and hangings are entirely in
keeping with the spirit of the suite.
VICE-REGAL SUITE This suite may be divided into two suites, one at each
16th Floor end of the long corridor and each consisting of a sitting
room and two bedrooms. The suite at the eastern end is
furnished in oak of Tudor design. Instead of a table behind the settee a reproduction
of an old vestment chest of the correct height has been used. The desk is a copy of an
old Bible-box desk. A Persian rug covers the floor and the general color scheme
throughout is dull blue. Some of the chairs are covered with old needlepoint embroidery. The bedrooms are in oak and the hangings and bedspreads in printed linen
of Tudor design.
The other suite has been done in the Colonial style. The settee and tables are reproductions of Duncan Phyfe pieces; the remainder of the furniture comprises reproductions of treasures now in American museums. The general color scheme here is
mulberry and green. Of the two bedrooms, one is carried out with the characteristic
four poster, the other
with the French sleigh
beds of Napoleon's time.
There is a dining room on
this floor which may be
used with either subdivision of the suite. This has
been done in mahogany
of the English Hepple-
white period.
There are also four bed-
sitting rooms in English
Georgian and four secretaries' rooms in grey
enamel furniture with
printed linen hangings—
the whole suite comprising fifteen rooms.
TUNNEL FROM STATION
8 ROYAL YORK HOTEL GOLF COURSE
OPENED The New
MAy 24th    Royal York
Hotel Golf
Club was organized primarily for Royal York
Hotel guests. The guests
of this hotel have first
and full privileges upon
payment of greens fee.
For full information
enquire at Travel Bureau
Desk, Main Floor.
THE NEW CLUBHOUSE
THE COURSE The course, while it is an easy one physically, is unquestionably one of the very finest championship courses on the
continent. There is a fine variety of holes and many of them will require accuracy
and length if par is to be
made. The greens are
large, beautifully placed
and thoroughly trapped,
and both fairways and
green are in excellent
shape as they will have
been conditioned for a
full year before opening.
From a landscape viewpoint Stanley Thompson's
job is a delightful one,
there being many groves
of pine, elm, maple, oak
and birch and the land
itself is naturally rolling.
SIXTH HOLE
THE CLUB  The   Club
HOUSE House   is
not only
nicely placed and architecturally attractive from
the outside but is unique
in its interior design.
The first or main floor has
spacious and comfortable
dining and lounge rooms.
The locker and bedroom
arrangement is thoroughly up-to-date.
This new club is conveniently situated to the west and north of the city proper,
being an easy twenty-five minute traffic-free ride over the Lake Shore Boulevard
and up the scenic Humber Valley past the historic Old Mill.
EIGHTH GREEN DIRECTORY OF SERVICES
Arcade Floor—Coffee Shop, English Grill, Exhibition Hall, Ladies' and
Gentlemen's Retiring Rooms. The following businesses are located within the hotel
and are operated by concerns whose names connote efficiency of service and excellence of merchandise: Broker, Drug Store, Florist, Furs and Ladies' Merchandise,
General Merchandise, Haberdasher, Hairdressers, Public Stenographer, Shoe Shine.
Main Floor—Hotel Office, Main Dining Room, Lounge, Venetian Cafe,
Writing Room, News Stand, Check Room, Telephones, Telegraphs, Ticket Office,
Public Stenographer, Porter.
Main Mezzanine—Private Dining Rooms, Ladies' Hairdressing Parlors,
Children's Play Room, Hospital, Ladies' and Gentlemen's Retiring Rooms, Check
Room, Lost and Found Office, Lounge, Library, Writing Room.
Convention Floor—Grand Foyer, Convention or Concert Hall, Ball Room,
Banquet Hall, Two complete Projection Installations, Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Retiring Rooms, Organ, Stage, Telephones.
Convention Mezzanine—Lounges, Check Rooms, Ladies' and Gentlemen's
Retiring Rooms.
Bedroom Floors—1,164 Rooms, all with Private Shower and Tub Baths.
Roof Garden—Check Room, Telephones, Ladies' and Gentlemen's Retiring
Rooms.
DINING ROOM SERVICE
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
Main Floor
Main Dining Room
Club Breakfast
also a la Carte
A la Carte
A la Carte also Sunday
Dinner Table d'Hote
Main Floor
Venetian Cafe
Table d'Hote also a la
Carte
Table d'Hote also a la
Carte
Arcade Floor
English Grill
A la Carte
A la Carte
Arcade Floor
Coffee Shop
Club Breakfast
Blue  Plate  Luncheon
Blue Plate Dinner also
also a la Carte
also a la Carte
a la Carte
u
PUBLIC SPACES, MEETING ROOMS, DINING ROOMS AND BANQUET ROOMS
Seating Capacities
Floor
Public Rooms
Dimensions
Area
Convention
Banquet
Dining
Arcade
Coffee Shop
60 x 50 ft.
3,000 sq. ft.
....
....
175
Grill Room
60x48 "
2,840
....
200
180
Exhibition Hall
72x30 "
2,160
•  •  • *
•  •   •  •
	
Main
Lobby
183x60 "
10,980
. .  . .
	
	
Lounge
115x46 "
5,290
. .  . *
....
Cafe
75x47 "
3,525
. .  .  •
250
200
Main Dining Room
130x64 "
8,320
500
460
Main
/Private Dining
\        Rooms (10)
Mezzanine
....:  m'"- ■ -
6,477
....
500
500
Convention
Banquet Hall
165x65 "
10,725
1,715
1,150
....
Convention Hall
140x65 "
9,100
1,500
1,000
...     a
Ball Room
125x45 "
5,625
855
650
Convention
/Check Rooms (2)
• •  • •
1,326 " "
...     a
Mezzanine
\ Lounge Rooms (2)
....
2,835
■     •     .     •
....
22nd Floor
Roof Garden
200x28 "
5,600
....
350
315
(above street)
Transfer Rates, Etc.—The Royal York is connected with the train level of
the New Union Station by a well-lighted and perfectly ventilated subway. "Red-
Cap" porters are available in the Station for the transfer of hand baggage to the
Royal York.
APPROXIMATE TAXI-CAB RATES
Between Royal York and North Toronto Station.       75 cents
Between Royal York and Steamship Docks       50 cents
Between Royal York and Leaside Air-Port $1.50
1-0 Royal York Hotel
TORONTO
ARCADE FLOOR
The Arcade Floor, reached by wide entrances from three streets, affords many comforts and conveniences.    In the well-
lighted and spacious Arcade, which occupies a large area in the centre of this floor, is a large Exhibition Hall.    Around
the Arcade are Shops, Bank, Barber Shop, Coffee Shop and Grill Room.    A well-ventilated subway
connects the hotel with the train-level of the new Union Station.
O
I
if)
o
lt
D
en
/
HOTEL AND UNION STATION
■ ElllKITOM 3IHIT
0   I   » t « STIC CT
The Royal York Hotel is situated on the north side of Front Street West.    On the south side is the beautiful new Union
Station.    An under-street passage way, wide and brightly-lighted, connects the two buildings.
11 Royal /ork Hotel
TORONTO
MAIN FLOOR
MAIN   MEZZANINE
By elevators or by broad easily-mounted stairways, guests come to the seclusion of the Main Mezzanine Floor.    Conveniently
close to the elevators are the Ladies' Hairdressing Parlors. Other notable features of this beautifully-equipped floor are the
Hospital, with doctor and nurse in attendance, Children's Play Room, Private Dining Rooms of varying sizes, Library,
Writing Room, Lounge, Check Room and Lost-and-Found office.    These open from the delightful
balcony looking down upon the Lobby.
MAIN  FLOOR
The spacious beautifully-decorated Lobby with its atmosphere of quiet and luxurious repose is the incoming guest's introduction to all that the Royal York offers. It has three wide, easy entrances, two from bordering streets and a third from the
subway that joins the hotel with the train-level of the new Union Station. Opening from the Lobby are the great Lounge,
Main Dining Room, Cafe and Writing Room.    Around the Lobby are arranged the Hotel Office, Elevator Hall, Ticket Office,
News Stand and other facilities.    Back of the Lobby is the Main Kitchen.
12 Royal /ork Hotel
TORONTO
CONVENTION FLOOR
CONVENTION   MEZZANINE
An attractively-furnished Mezzanine Floor adds to the beauty and convenience of the Convention Floor.    Here are Ladies' and
Men's Retiring Rooms, Check Rooms, Telephones and Radio Room, and the entrances to the galleries
of the Convention Hall and Banquet Hall.
CONVENTION  FLOOR
The entire Second Floor, specially designed and set aside for convention purposes. Ten High-Speed Passenger Elevators,
seven Service Elevators, and one Freight Elevator (five feet six inches in width, eight feet in depth, with a lifting capacity
of 3,000 pounds). The Concert Hall, Banquet Hall and Ball Room, have a combined area of 25,450 square feet, convention-
seating for 4,070 persons, and banquet-seating for 2,800 persons.    Amplifiers enable audiences in all three rooms to listen-in
on the same programme.
The Concert Hall has a Stage, Orchestra Pit, and a mammoth Organ, the largest and finest in Canada, and one of the largest
in the world.    Separate Kitchen and Service Rooms, located in the rear of this floor, immeasurably increase the efficiency
of this unrivalled convention-unit.
13 Royal / ork Hotel
TORONTO
TYPICAL BEDROOM FLOORS
8th to 12th FLOORS
B
CORRIDOR
CORRIDOR
IUHHI0UH A I <_ V   K K I   U U M
inDSnCI[E5OT!I}I[EI!X!iq
Twenty-Second Floor—Above Street Level—The Roof Garden of the Royal York, a bright, airy room with an area of
5,600 square feet and dining-seating for 315. From its broad windows marvellous views are had of the city, bay and Lake
Ontario. Like the Convention Floor the Roof Garden forms, with its Mezzanine, a self-contained unit having its own Ladies'
and Men's Retiring Rooms, Check Rooms, Kitchen and Service Rooms.    It is adequately served by High-Speed Passenger
Elevators, equipped with the latest safety and micro-levelling devices.
14 TO  THORNCLIFFE
RACE   TRACK.
SKELETON MAP OF TORONTO
MINNEAPOLIS
,rAO\Nes
KANSAS  CITY
IST.LOUtS
15 Canadian Pacific
Canada's National Enterprise
THE WORLD'S GREATEST TRAVEL SYSTEM
STEAMSHIPS
Canadian Pacific Steamships — two
fleets which unite America east and
west with other continents. Across the
Atlantic to Europe with approximately
3 sailings a week (Empresses, Duchesses
and other Cabin Class Steamships).
Across the Pacific to Hawaii, Japan,
China and Philippines (Empress Steamships, regular sailings). Connections
to Australia and New Zealand.
RAILWAY
The Canadian Pacific Railway (comprising 20,805
miles of operated and controlled lines) reaches
from Atlantic Ocean to Pacific Ocean, across
Canada and into the United States. Main line from
Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886miles. Fast,frequent
and luxurious transcontinental long distance and
local passenger services, linking up all the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural
regions and vacation resorts. Efficient and
dependable freight service.
HOTELS
The Canadian Pacific operates the
largest chain of hotels in Canada.
These number fourteen and stretch from
the Atlantic to the Pacific. Admirably
situated in the larger cities or at
holiday resorts, these hotels offer
unsurpassed convention facilities.
Nine Bungalow Camps are also operated by the Canadian Pacific in Ontario
and the Canadian Rockies.
TELEGRAPHS
Canadian Pacific Telegraphs
extend the entire length of
the railway and also reach
every point of importance in
Canada away from it. Over
200,000 miles of wire. Also
cable connections across
both oceans and working
radio arrangements.
EXPRESS
Canadian Pacific Express—
travellers' cheques to suit
all travelling arrangements,
and good all over the world.
Also a forwarding service for
package merchandise, with
world-wide connections —
including an air express
service.
CRUISES
Six  Famous Winter
Cruise s—
Round the World
Mediterranean (2)
West Indies      (3)
FARM  LANDS
Several million acres of
choice farm lands in Western
Canada for sale at low prices
and on long terms, including
irrigated land in Alberta.
Generous colonization policies that are helping to develop and settle the West.
ALL    UNDER    ONE    MANAGEMENT
Canadian Pacific Agencies Throughout the World
Canada and United States
Atlanta, Ga..
Banff, Alta	
Boston, Mass..
Buffalo, N.Y.
Calgary, Alta.
. K. A. Cook, 1017 Healey Bldg.
J. A. McDonald, C.P.R. Station.
. L. R. Hart, 405 Boylston St.
. W. P. Wass, 160 Pearl St.
.G. D. Brophy, C.P.R. Station.
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall, 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio M. E. Malone, 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G
Dallas, Texas A.
Detroit, Mich G.
Edmonton, Alta C.
Fort William, Ont H.
Guelph, Ont W
Halifax, N.S A.
Hamilton, Ont A.
Honolulu, T.H Theo
Indianapolis, Ind P. G
H. Griffin, 1010 Chester Ave.
Y. Chancellor, 906 Kirby Bldg.
G. McKav, 1231 Washington Blvd.
S. Fyfe, C.P.R. Building.
J. Skynner, 108 South May St.
C. Tully, 30 Wyndham St.
C. MacDonald, 117 Hollis St.
Craig, Cor. King and James Sts.
H. Davies & Co.
Jefferson, Merchants Bank Building.
Vancouver, B.C..
Victoria, B.C	
Washington, D.C.
Windsor, Ont	
Winnipeg, Man...
Antwerp, Belgium..
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, Eng.. .
Bristol, Eng	
Brussels, Belgium..
Cobh, Ireland	
Glasgow, Scotland..
Hamburg, Germany.
Liverpool, Eng	
.F. H. Daly, 434 Hastings St. West.
. L. D. Chetham, 1102 Government St.
. C. E. Phelps, 14th & New York Ave.
.W. C. Elmer, 34 Sandwich St. West.
.C. B. Andrews, Main and Portage.
Europe
Juneau, Alaska W. L. Coates.
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris, 723 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson.
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch, 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum, 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy, 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis F. T. Sansom, 68 East Wisconsin Ave.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait, 611 2nd Ave. South.
London, Eng	
Manchester, Eng...
Paris, France	
Rotterdam, Holland.
Southampton, Eng...
1
E. A. Schmitz, 25 Quai Jordaens.
W. H. Boswell, 14 Donegall Place.
W. T. Treadaway, 4 Victoria Square.
A. S. Ray, 18 St. Augustine's Parade.
G. L. M. Servais, 98 Blvd. Adolphe-Max.
J. Hogan, 10 Westbourne Place.
W. Stewart, 25 Bothwell St.
T. H. Gardner, Gansemarkt 3.
H. T. Penny, Pier Head.
C. E. Jenkins, 62-65 Charing Cross, S.W. 1.
G. Saxon Jones, 103 Leadenhall St., E.C. 3.
J. W. Maine, 31 Mosley Street.
A. V. Clarke, 24 Boulevard des Capucines.
J. Springett, Coolsingel No. 91.
H. Taylor, 7 Canute Road.
Montreal, Que F.
Moosejaw, Sask T.
Nelson, B.C J.
New York, N.Y F.
North Bay, Ont C.
Omaha, Neb H
Ottawa, Ont J.
Peterboro, Ont J.
Philadelphia, Pa J.
C. Lydon, 201 St. James Street.
J. Colton, Canadian Pacific Station.
S. Carter, Baker & Ward Sts.
R. Perry, Madison Ave., at 44th St.
H. White, 87 Main Street, West.
J. Clark, 727 W.O.W. Building.
A. McGill, 83 Sparks St.
Skinner, George St.
C. Patteson, 1500 Locust St.
Pittsburgh, Pa W. A. Shackelford, 338 Sixth Ave.
Port Arthur, Ont F. C. Gibbs, Canadian Pacific Station.
Portland, Ore W. H. Deacon, 148a Broadway.
Prince Rupert, B.C W. C. Orchard.
Quebec, Que C. A. Langevin, Palais Station.
Regina, Sask J. W. Dawson, Canadian Pacific Station.
Saint John, N.B G. E. Carter, 40 King St.
St. Louis, Mo Geo. P. Carbrey, 412 Locust St.
St. Paul, Minn W
San Francisco, Cal F.
Saskatoon, Sask R
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont R,
Seattle, Wash E.
Sherbrooke, Que J.
Skagway, Alaska L.
Spokane, Wash E.
Tacoma, Wash D
H. Lennon, Soo Line, Robert & Fourth Sts.
L. Nason, 675 Market St.
T. Wilson, 115 Second Ave.
S. Merifield, 529 Queen St.
L. Sheehan, 1320 Fourth Ave.
A. Metivier, 91 Wellington St. North.
H. Johnston.
L. Cardie, Spokane International Ry.
C. O'Keefe, 1113 Pacific Ave.
Toronto, Ont Wm. Fulton, Canadian Pacific Bldg.
Asia
Hong Kong, China G. E. Costello, Opposite Blake Pier.
Kobe, Japan B. G. Ryan, 7 Harima Machi.
Manila, P.I J. R. Shaw, 14-16 Calle David, Roxas Bldg.
Shanghai, China A. M. Parker, 4 Bund.
Yokohama, Japan E. Hospes, No. 21 Yamashita-cho.
Australia, New Zealand, etc.
J. Sclater, Traffic Manager, Can. Pac. Ry.,for Australia and New Zealand.
Union House, Sydney, N.S.W.
A. W. Essex, Passenger Manager, Can. Pac. Ry., for New Zealand,
Auckland, N.Z.
Adelaide, S.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Auckland, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
f Harry Boyer, C.P.R. Pass. Rep., 59 Williams St.
Melbourne, Vic \ Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
(Thos. Cook & Son.
Perth, W.A Macdonald, Hamilton & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of New Zealand (Ltd.)
Any of the agents listed above will be glad to make reservations at Canadian Pacific Hotels for intending guests.
Canadian Pacific Hotel Department
C. B. FOSTER,
Convention and Tourist Traffic Manager
Montreal.
D. J. GOWANS,
Asst. General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
A. ALLERTON,
General Manager,
Eastern Hotels,
Montreal.
H. F. MATHEWS
General Manager,
Western Hotels,
Winnipeg. m
*mm° CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CANADIAN PACIFIC HOTELS
* ALGONQUIN HOTEL, St. Andrews-By^The-Sea, N.B.
McADAM HOTEL,   -   «   .   McAdam, N.B.
CHATEAU FRONTENAC
PLACE VIGER HOTEL,
ROYAL YORK HOTEL,
ROYAL ALEXANDRA HOTEL,
HOTEL SASKATCHEWAN, *
HOTEL PALLISER,  *
* BANFF SPRINGS HOTEL,
* CHATEAU LAKE LOUISE,
* EMERALD LAKE CHALET,
HOTEL SICAMOUS,
HOTEL VANCOUVER,
EMPRESS HOTEL,        '"■ r      "
Quebec, Que.
Montreal, Que.
Toronto, Ont.
Winnipeg, Man.
Regina, Sask.
Calgary, Alta.
Banff, Alta.
Lake Louise, Alta.
Field, B.C.
Sicamous, B.C.
Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria, B.C.
*These hotels are open in Summer only
■
■:■;■...■
m
■     .    :

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungtext.1-0229193/manifest

Comment

Related Items