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Montreal and the Laurentians Canadian Pacific Railway Company 1939

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Array And
the
MONTREAL
LAURENTIANS
CANADIAN   P A C I F 1 C | CANADIAN  PACIFIC  HOTELS
Chateau Frontenac
Quebec, Que.
The Place Viger
Montreal, Que.
Royal York Hotel
Toronto, Ont.
The Pines
Digby, N.S.
Cornwallis Inn
Kentville, N.S.
Lakeside Inn
Yarmouth, N.S.
IN THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC
The social centre of the most historic city in North America. Command'
ingly situated on Dufferin Terrace, it affords magnificent views of the St.
Lawrence. It is an ideal stopping point for either the tourist or the business
man. Golf, motoring and easily reached fishing are available. Excursions can
be made to Montmorency Falls, the shrine of Ste. Anne de Beaupre, etc. In
winter a splendid centre for winter sports.    Open all year.     European plan.
A charming hotel that makes an ideal centre for those who prefer quiet and
yet wish to be within easy reach of the business and shopping districts. Clcse
to the docks. The Place Viger adjoins Place Viger Station and is 1XA miles from
Windsor Station.    Open all year.    European plan.
IN ONTARIO
The largest hotel in the British Empire and one of the most palatial in the
world. Subway connection with Union Station. Royal York Hotel Golf Club
for guests1 convenience.    Open all year.    European plan.
IN NOVA SCOTIA
Nova Scotia's premier resort hotel. Excellent golf and tennis. Glass*
enclosed sea-water swimming pool.    Open summer months.    American Plan.
A new hostelry replacing the former hotel of the same name. Open all
year.    American Plan.
A convenient hotel designed in the bungalow style. Open June 1931 for
summer months.    American Plan.
The Algonquin
St. Andrews, N.B.
McAdam Hotel
McAdam, N.B.
IN NEW BRUNSWICK
The social centre of Canada's most fashionable seashore resort. Two golf
courses (18 and 9 holes), bathing, yachting, boating, deep'sea and fresh-water
fishing, tennis, etc. In summer has through sleeping car service to Montreal.
Open summer months.    American plan.    One mile from station.
A commercial hotel at an important junction point. Ideal centre for excursions
into a magnificent fishing and big game country.   Open all year.   American plan.
Royal Alexandra Hotel
Winnipeg, Man.
Hotel Saskatchewan
Regina, Sask.
Hotel Palliser
Calgary, Alta.
Banff Springs Hotel
Banff, Alta.
Chateau Lake Louise
Lake Louise, Alta.
Emerald Lake Chalet
near Field, B.C.
Hotel Sicamous
Sicamous, B.C.
Hotel Vancouver
Vancouver, B.C.
Empress Hotel
Victoria, B.C.
IN THE PRAIRIES
A popular hotel in the largest city of Western Canada. Open all year.
European plan.    At station.
A new hotel in the old capital of the Northwest Territory. Most central
hotel for the prairies.    Open all year.    European plan.
A handsome hotel in this prosperous city of Southern Alberta. Open all year.
European plan.    At station.
IN THE ROCKIES
A Scottish baronial hotel in the heart of Banff National Park. Open summsr
months.    Special rates for two weeks or over.    European plan.
A wonderful hotel facing an exquisite Alpine Lake. Swimming, motoring,
Alpine climbing with Swiss guides.    Open summer months.    European plan.
A charming chalet in Yoho National Park. Climbing, hiking, riding, fishing.
Open summer months.    American plan.
Junction for the orchard districts of the Okanagan Valley and stop-over
point for those who wish to see the Canyons by daylight. Open all year.
American plan.
ON THE PACIFIC COAST
The largest hotel on the north Pacific coast.   Open all year.   European plan
A luxurious hotel in Canada's Evergreen Playground on the Pacific coast.
Crystal Garden, for swimming and music.   Open all year.   European plan.
HOTELS AND BUNGALOW CAMPS REACHED BY CANADIAN PACIFIC
French River, Ont French River Camp
Nipigon, Ont Nipigon River Camp
Kenora, Ont Devil's Gap Camp
Banff, Alta Mt. Assiniboine Camp
Moraine Lake, Alta  Moraine Lake Camp
Banff-Windermere        1 Castle Mountain Camp
Automobile Highway/Radium Hot Springs Camp
Hector, B.C Wapta Camp
Hector, B.C Lake O'Hara Camp
Field, B.C Yoho Valley Camp
Penticton, B.C Hotel Incola
Cameron Lake, B.C Cameron Lake Chalet
Agassiz, B.C Harrison Hot Springs Hotel lADKENTlANS
Z&XmHr'M*.
■ ^r "!5(w^ <
? ;M;> .: ■-.'.','.-,-
Montreal from Mount Royal
A thronging harbor front, a serrated sykline, towering warehouses,
giant industries, beautiful residential districts and public parks—
Montreal, and yet not Montreal, for no such merely physical description
can capture that individuality which makes the city one apart.
To see this city one climbs the mountain from which it derives its
name—Mount Royal. Below is a multitudinous array of roofs which
shelter the million inhabitants of the city. Beyond the roofs is the
gleaming ribbon of the St. Lawrence with towering grain elevators on
its edge, warehouses, piers. Duchesses of the Atlantic dock here one
thousand miles from the sea. Brimming grain boats from the Great Lakes
disgorge their cargoes. The second port of the North American continent! M€NT HE4L
Instinctively as one looks down the mind goes
back to the days when the Mountain was nameless
—when the only shelters on the island were the
tepees and huts of Iroquois Indians—when game
abounded where public squares now stand—when
these giant bridges were not yet and the only craft
on the St. Lawrence was the canoe. The centuries
roll back. Ships, shops and factories disappear. In
the distance a sail cautiously approaches. It is
Cartier and his band of intrepid explorers, out
from St. Malo, discovering the St. Lawrence to the
western world. Decades pass. A trading post has
been established within the present limits of the
city by Samuel Champlain, founder of Quebec.
But Montreal's day has not yet come. It was left
to Maisonneuve in 1642 to establish the permanent
settlement—Ville Marie—from which the present
city has grown. The curtain again rises. The guns
of the Seven Years War in Europe have re-echoed
across the Atlantic. The Battle of the Plains of
Abraham has been fought. Wolfe and Montcalm
lie dead. Npuvelle France has passed to British
hands.
Montreal at this period is a thriving settlement
almost exclusively French. On the banks of the
St. Lawrence between Montreal and Gaspe 70,000
habitants are living under the French seigneurial
system but owing a different allegiance. The
vicissitudes of war are followed by the difficulties
of peace. The interlude of the American invasion
passes. The era of development has begun. Today
the city is the greatest in the Dominion.
THE TWO CULTURES
But history alone does not explain the charm of
Montreal, so down you go from the brow of the
Mountain to explore the streets and perchance
capture this elusive quality. At some corner a
newsvendor displays his wares on the pavement—
newspapers and periodicals in French and English.
In French he passes the time of day with a purchaser.
Ycu approach and he addresses you in English.
A street car stops and the name of the street is
called in both languages by the conductor. Theatre
placards, advertisements, public notices, even the
postage stamps you buy are bilingual.
And these churches which seem to rise on every
hand? In this Gothic structure, 7\[otre Dame on
Place d'Armes, the ten thousand kneeling worshippers speak French as their mother tongue; in Christ
Church Cathedral—English and so on through the
entire list, now French, now English. You feel
sure that you have caught the secret of Montreal's
appeal. It is the combination of the French and
English customs.
Then you wander along St. Denis street where
children are prattling in French, where spiral
staircases run up the fronts of the houses and green
jalousies keep out the sun. Or down to Bonsecours
market to which the habitant brings his produce
Notre Dame Church
and the bargaining is done in French—the French
of the cities and the French of the countryside.
It captivates you—this French quarter and you
think seriously of abandoning your first opinion and
ascribing the charm of Montreal to the Gallic element. No sooner done than the cosmopolitan
aspect of the city strikes you. There are other
languages than French and English on the streets
and other newspapers on the stands.
So with your opinions all ajumble, you fall to
comparing the city with its older sister Quebec.
Both are predominantly French though Quebec
more obviously so. In Montreal the hand of the
modern builder is more in evidence, for its citizens
are very much preoccupied with the serious business
of living. The old city of Champlain, on the other
hand, is not so commercial. It has a very proper
sense of the dignity befitting its age—a tendency
to keep business as the means and not the end of
living. Montreal is more assertive; but it has also
a very wholesome respect for tradition. If it has
its thronging harbor front and financial district, its
centres of trade and commerce, it has also its seminaries and convents, its educational institutions like
McGill University and the Universite de Montreal
where knowledge for its own sake is pursued. It
has the progressiveness of the American but is not
Americanized—the virtues inherited from the
seigneur and habitant yet a very real sophistication.
It has its banks.   It has also its shrine of healing. St. James
Cathedral.
Dominion
Square
Cartier
Monument,
Fletcher's Field
Entrance to
McGill University M C N T I   ■ 4 ■
'--P
MONTREAL AT PLAY
Your riddle is still unsolved. Montreal is as
enigmatic as ever. So you study its people at their
avocations. They are a sport loving people these
Montrealers. In the vicinity of the city are numerous golf courses. At Bluebonnets or Dorval the
racegoer is as keen as at Ascot or Longchamps.
They have fallen to the lure of baseball and in
winter ice hockey is a passion with them. .They
love hunting and fishing and within their province
have abundant facilities for the enjoyment of both.
They delight in a good automobile and from the
city superb motor roads radiate. Innumerable points
cf interest are scattered along them. There is the
Trappist Monastery at Oka where the silent
brothers perform their daily tasks. In agriculture
and dairy farming they excel. Who has not heard
cf Oka cheese? Or there is Lachine with its rapids
to shoot—a quaint old French town dating back to
the time of LaSalle, hero of Mississippi exploration,
who believed on reaching this spot that he had found
the gateway to China—la Chine. There is the
Indian reservation Caughnawaga, the old fort at
Chambly, the house occupied by Thomas Moore
at Ste. Anne de Bellevue and a wealth of other
points of historical or scenic interest.
You have explored the city and the surrounding
countryside. The latter is more simple, you
conclude. You can almost define its attraction.
But the lure of the city baffles you. Kipling ran
sacked the beauty spots of the world to describe
Victoria. No such catalogue can explain the
attraction of Montreal. Duality of culture-
historical background—the jostling of the old and
the new - location - cosmopolitanism,
above them all there is a something
which cannot be defined and which
if it could would be destroyed. The
charm cf Montreal is-well Montreal.
Four interesting books on old
French Canada are published by the
Canadian Pacific:—
"Old Montreal with Pen and
Pencil" written by Victor Morin..
LL.D.; illustrated in colors by
Charles W. Simpson, R.C.A.
($1.00).
"A Quebec Sketch Book"
written and illustrated in colors
by Esther Brann.   ($1.00).
"Chansons cf Old French
Canada" harmonized by Margaret
Gascoigne and illustrated by Ethel
Seath.    (50 cents).
"Legends of the St. Lawrence"
written by Katherine Hale and
illustrated in colors by Charles W
Simpson, R.C.A.   ($1.00).
THE LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS,
stretching like a great crescent over an odd
million acres between the St. Lawrence River
and Hudson's Bay, form one of the most delightful
and unspoiled vacation fields of this continent.
Green rolling hills, pleasant valleys where
winding rivers flow into tree-fringed lakes—the cool
fragrance of dark forests, laden with the smell of
balsams and spruce—the play of light and shade on
hill-slopes, and distant glimpses of purple mountains
—this is the Laurentian country. The lumberjack
the priest and the habitant farmer wore the first
path into the mountains; they are still there, these
sturdy French-Canadian pioneers, with their clustered buildings and quaint villages, and their path
has served for the entrance of the railway.
Visitors must remember, however, that the
beauty of the Laurentians is not always visible from
a railway window, nor even from a main highway
Except for a few miles around Ste. Marguerite,
these beauties may be seen only by taking crosscountry roads over routes leading out of the valley.
It is not only in summer, however, that the
Laurentians are thronged with pleasure seekers
This region is a vast, natural winter playground
where such sports as ski-ing and tobogganing are
the order of the day with dancing rounding out the
evenings. Convenient Canadian Pacific "ski
specials" are operated during the winter months.
A map of the Laurentian Mountains district will
be found at the end of this booklet, with a classified
list of tourist hotels and boarding houses on the
reverse side. LAURENTIAN MCUNTAINS
EASILY REACHED
The Canadian Pacific
runs out from Montreal
north-westerly to Mont
Laurier, and brings the
Laurentians within two or
three hours' ride. During
the past few years popular
resorts have sprung up—
others are being developed. What is it you seek?
Sophisticated holiday life
with good music, dancing,
golf, tennis—or the rougher pleasures cf fishing,
hunting, camping, and
long canoe-trips? You
will find them all in this
attractive region.
ST. JEROME
(33.2 miles from Montreal)
From either Place Viger
or Windsor Station, in
Montreal, the train runs in
a north-westerly direction
across the Island of Montreal, past Bordeaux, across
the Riviere des Prairies to
He Jesus, with its pretty
little villages of Ste. Rose
and Laval des Rapides.
One more bridge over the
Riviere des Mille Isles
brings the train to Rosemere, on the mainland.
These four villages are on
the water, the two rivers
being branches of the
Ottawa River, and offer
all summer attractions of boating, swimming, tennis
and golf, within easy commuting distance from
Montreal.
Proceeding along the mainland, the village of
St. Jerome is passed. The gateway to the Laurentians, this pretty little village was founded by
Father Labelle, the pioneer of this district. His
monument stands in front of the village church.
The picturesque Riviere du T^prd flows through the
village which also boasts a golf course. Playing
privileges are extended visitors. After St. Jerome,
the landscape changes with the nearness of mountainous country.
SHAWBRIDGE
(41.8 miles from Montreal)
Less than two hours after leaving Montreal,
Shawbridge is reached—the gateway to numerous
summer settlements. Lying on the bank of the
North River, where boating and bathing are excellent, the village itself contains hotels and boarding
A trio of bathing belles
^f*
houses while on the outskirts a Lodge overlooks its
own lovely golf course with its background of
mountains.
Good gravel roads have replaced what a few
years ago were trails used only by logging camps
and pleasant excursions may be taken into the
surrounding country.
Taking the road in north-easterly direction, and
climbing between tall spruce and cedar past Lac
Martel, Lac Fournel and Lac l'Abime and through
the quaint little village of St. Hippolyte, Lac
L'Achigan is reached. L'Achigan has a circumference of about twenty-six miles, and presents a
most beautiful shore line, with rugged fir and pine
and the gay roof of cottage and camp seen through
the trees. There is probably more organized holiday
making in the lake district around Shawbridge than
in any other spot in the Laurentians, but so vast is
the country that the organized camps scarcely
disturb the landscape. On a beautiful sandy beach
is a dance hall and refreshment parlor, and around
the lake are summer hotels and boarding houses. LAURENTIAN MCUNTAINS
Lac L'Achigan
OTHER LAKES
Two miles east of Shawbridge lies Fourteen Island
Lake, where each of its fourteen fir-covered islands
has its summer cottage; while its over three miles of
shore, where the green of the fir is varied by the
white of the birch, holds many cottages and camps.
Probably from an airplane one could see how
Fourteen Island Lake, Lake Echo, Lake Connolly
and Lake L'Achigan are joined by a series of narrow
winding straits; but from the road only an endless
variety of bays may be seen, delightfully sheltered
where canoes are paddled about aimlessly and idle
bathers lie stretched in the sun.
South of Shawbridge, a short walk over the hill,
lie five charming lakes, each with long established
summer colonies, and in their quiet aloofness it is
difficult to believe that the village lies on the other
side of the hill. They are Marois, with its tennis
club, Guindon, Violon, La Roche and Ouimet. These
lakes, like the others in the district, hold bass, and
the streams, trout.
PIEDMONT
(46 miles from Montreal)
Ten minutes after leaving Shawbridge the train
stops at Piedmont, which presents a different scene.
At Piedmont there are no golf club or dance halls,
only the quiet of green hills and a peaceful river
with sandy bathing beach.
From the station, the view
up the hill discloses the
little winding street which
forms the village, consisting of a few houses and a
country hotel. From the
village are delightful walks
on quiet side-roads where
one can forget that the
main highway to Ste.
Agathe runs through the
village. One mile up a
pleasant road leads to St.
Sauveur, a pretty little
village at the foot of Mt.
Corbeil.
MONT ROLLAND
(49 miles from Montreal)
From Piedmont the train
climbs steadily upward to
Mt. Rolland, where there
is a hotel conveniently situated across the road from
the station.       Close by
flows the Riviere du Nord,
but it is not the smooth
sluggish stream seen earlier.    Here it rushes sharply and tumultuously over
boulder and stone.  The village follows the slope of
the hill, and higher up are boarding houses and
hotels. Like Piedmont, Mont Rolland is a delightful
spot for a restful recreation.
STE. ApELE
From Mont Rolland it is a mile's steady climb to
Ste. Adele, a pretty little French Canadian village
charmingly situated with delightful views of the
surrounding country. Mont Rolland lies far below,
and the lower streets of Ste. Adele itself seem far
away when the upper level of the village is reached.
Above, on Ste. Adele Mountain, a large cross has
been erected, slightly smaller than that on Mount
Royal in Montreal, but—like it—illuminated at
night. From the valleys below its appearance is
particularly beautiful when lighted, as from its
height, with the surrounding hills in complete
darkness, it shines like some celestial spectacle.
STE. MARGUERITE
(53.6 miles from Montreal)
Leaving Mont Rolland, the train pulls five miles
farther north and 270 feet higher to the station of
Ste. Marguerite. Below, a pale green among the
rocks and trees, is the St. Margaret Country Club,
the oldest golf club in the Laurentians, and one of The
Horseshoe,
Ste.
Marguerite LAURENTIAN MCUNTAINS
Ste. Marguerite Valley from
Ste. Marguerite Lodge
From Ste. Marguerite it
is a delightful drive south
to Lac Pic, through picturesque woods of stiff
tamarack and cedar. Two
miles farther on are The
Cascades, tumbling over
the rocks in rugged beauty
not far from its companion
La Chute du Capitaine.
Eeside the rapids are rocky
ledges popular as picnic
grounds, and not far away
is a dance hall, frequented
by summer visitors from
Ste. Marguerite and surrounding districts. Returning to Ste. Marguerite, this time from the
hills above, Lac Masson
lies below like a glittering
jewel.
VAL MORIN
(57.3 miles from Montreal)
the most picturesque in existence. Non-members
are accommodated at the Club when introduced by
members or furnished with other suitable introductions.
Then there is Ste. Marguerite Lodge, superbly
located and equipped with all modern conveniences.
It is but a hundred yards from the station and offers
many attractions.
A mile from the station is the Chalet Cochand,
open all year round. The hotel overlooks three
lakes where trout are to be had in season. There
are facilities for golf, tennis and riding, while there
is also a swimming pool.
The little car climbs higher, and after a final
steep ascent Lac Masson appears in view. This
lake is delightfully situated between high green
hills, and so steep is the hill on which the village
of Ste. Marguerite perches that the houses seem in
considerable danger of falling into the lake. In Ste.
Marguerite are hotels and boarding houses, boating,
bathing and fishing in Lac Masson, and, for diversion, many delightful drives and walks to surrounding lakes and mountains.
Above them all Mount Venus stands like a challenge, and must certainly be climbed. Almost
directly north are Lac Oolahwan, summer home of
the Y.W.C.A., Lac Charlebois and Lac des Iles.
One of the points of reconnoitre is "Old Baldy,"
and from this mountain fifteen lakes may be counted
on a clear day. The country around Ste. Marguerite
is particularly beautiful in autumn, and the summer
visitor often stays on or returns after the first cold
weather has changed the maple to scarlet and the
birch to gold. This time he packs his gun instead
of fishing rod, and brings home the deer and partridge instead of trout and bass.
From Ste. Marguerite the train glides around
closely wooded curves, with here and there tantalizing glimpses of rock above and the versatile North
River in the valley below. This river displays itself
one instant as a tranquil pond pillowing fat lily pads,
and the next glimpse, round a curve, it is a wild
stream rushing over rocks and boulders, a veritable
mountain torrent. Just before the train pulls into
the station at Val Morin the river presents its most
alluring surprise. It lies spread over the valley,
motor launches hurrying across its surface, and
sparkles proudly under the name of Lac Raymond.
In Val Morin is every variety of life for the
summer vacationist. There are boarding houses to
suit every purse, a tennis club where anyone may
play, boating and bathing on the lake, and fishing
up the river, which, for two miles before it widens
into the lake, is navigable by boat or canoe.
The Val Morin Country Club has a beautifully
kept 9-hole course, and gives privileges to summer
guests. For accommodation there are several good
hotels and boarding houses at the village and on the
lake. Motor boats convey guests across the lake
from the station to one popular inn set among the
pine and white birch, which come down to the
water's edge into a shady bathing beach. There
are many hikes for picnickers from the village, one
popular day's outing being up to a cabin on Bear
Mountain, where the fire ranger's lookout may be
seen. From this spot eighty mountain peaks may
be counted without completely surveying the
horizon.
Three miles north east of the village, over a steep
rocky road, is another low rambling inn, truly
worthy of that name and with all its tradition of
culture and hospitality.   The wide verandah over- St. Margaret
Country Club LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
looks Scroggie's Lake, itself a part of the estate to
which the inn belongs, with bathing and boating
equipment, and inside the inn is to be found all the
charm of the old world set against a background of
the new. Mine host will show you his library,
5,000 volumes, and here by his wide stone fire-place,
surrounded by print-lined walls, you may admire
the color of old china and glass. The inn's guests
have golfing privileges at the Val Morin Club, and
a motor makes trips to suit the golfer's convenience.
Around the hills of Val Morin are cottages and
bungalows, charmingly well-kept, whose owners
return year after year to contribute to the deservedly
high standing of Val Morin as a summer resort.
STE. AGATHE
(63.7 miles from Montreal)
Ste. Agathe, six miles north of Val Morin, was
among the first of the Laurentian resorts to become
generally known. Its 1,207 feet altitude, with clear,
sunlit air, makes it an ideal health resort, and
sufferers from hay fever find relief in its hills. Below
the village, Lac des Sables stretches its sinuous
length in innumerable bays and inlets. Its eight
miles of circumference are bounded by a splendid
motor road, and the journey round the lake may be
made by motor boat. As its name suggests, Lac
des Sables has plenty of sand for bathing beaches.
The roads around Ste. Agathe are splendid gravel
highways, and side roads as good as the main highway take the traveller to the lake district around.
Near the village is the Laurentian Golf and Country
Club, providing that amusement which to so many
nowadays is as necessary as food and rest.
LAKE MANITOU
South from the village, an excellent road leads to
Lake Manitou, one of those inexpressibly lovely
lakes where spruce and cedar grow so close to the
water's edge that it shines a deep translucent green,
only distinguishable from the trees by its sheen.
On its shores are many delightful summer homes;
and a picturesque bit of road, between two stiff
rows of Christmas trees, leads to the ruins of an old
club, once the property of the Comte d'lvry. Lake
Manitou lies below, its little capes and bays touching
so nearly its green islands that one must turn away
completely baffled in any attempt to give it a logical
shore line. In the lakes around Ste. Agathe trout
and bass are to be found.
Another road leads south past Lac Castor, on
which stands Camp Kinkora. This is a summer
colony for boys, established and maintained by St.
Patrick's Church, Montreal.
The view from the adjoining hills of this pretty
settlement with its rustic bridge and cosy little
Gothic chapel is one of surpassing beauty. The
road leads past Salmon Lake, where the salmon are
planted, and on past Lac La Croix, on which is a
very popular summer colony. A little farther is
Lac St. Joseph; from the mountain road there is a
splendid view of the lake, with low hills on the
opposite shore, and the little village of St. Adolphe
de Howard, with white church and busy saw-mill
10 LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
tucked way in a corner.
Beyond Lac St. Joseph
there are six or seven lakes
to be reached by hiking
or by canoe. Of these,
Lacs St. Denis, Bois
Franc, Jaune, Cornu, Les
Trois Freres, Ste. Marie
and Beauchamp offer excellent trout fishing.
LAC
ARCHAMBAULT
From Ste. Agathe another road leads twenty
miles into the northern
country of Lac Archambault, and to a comfortable and well-equipped
chalet, where all the conveniences of modern life
lie on one hand and the
great north on the other.
The road from Ste.
Agathe to Archambault
leads north past the few
neat farms in the immediate neighborhood, past
Lac Brule, with its summer
cottages, and west over
the Prevost Road to S.e.
Lucie, a little habitant village on Lac Menard, with
a dozen or more summer cottages on its shore's edge.
Here the road turns north again, passing great areas
that twenty years ago were destroyed by fire.
Where the second-growth forests are young and
green, taking root first in the valleys and ravines, is
the feeding ground of deer and moose tempted from
the heavier woods by the tender shoots; and here
is the hunter's country.
Higher and higher the road leads over the hills,
range upon range of mountains appear below, and
at last Lac Archambault glitters into view. This is
the district described so enthusiastically by Morris
Longstreth in his book on the Laurentians.
Here are innumerable trails to follow, guides
being obtained at the chalet, and, as your guide will
tell you, "Plenty beeg feesh, oh oui!"
ST. DONAT
Beautiful Lake Ouareau is not very far away,
where Camp Ouareau, an excellent girls' camp, is
situated. Then there is Mount Rocher to be
climbed; from it on a clear day, Mount Royal, in
Montreal, may be seen, and some 28 lakes may be
counted.
A trip to the little habitant village of St. Donat
must be taken. It lies three miles away, past Lac
Archambault, where the Fathers of the Blessed
Sacrament have their Retreat. In this district the
scattered farms are more rude, the wayside shrines—
marking some calamitous occasion, fire or drought—
Lac Tremblant Beach
more numerous, and the land is very like that made
famous through the pages of "Maria Chapdelaine."
On the rough verandah of a little hut sadly lacking
in paint, a native son may be seen with his fiddle,
and we forget that his fences are tumbling down
when we recall that he is playing the old, old airs
de son pays unrecorded by line and bar, and preserved
from generation to generation by just such fiddlers
as he. The church of the village is large, wooden
and square. One thousand parishioners worship
in it, and come from many a lost trail. After
the service, they collect about the steps, where
someone reads announcements of fairs, races, hay to
sell or live-stock lost, while all the gossip of the
week must be heard before reluctant faces are
turned away from its friendly doors. Not far north,
Lac Pembina brings the trail to an abrupt end.
IVRY
(67.4 miles from Montreal)
North from Ste. Agathe is Ivry Station, but it is
a mile farther north to the village of Ivry. Both
station and village bear the name of the Comte
d'lvry, who at one time owned a great part of the
country hereabouts. The village is situated on the
north end of that picturesque Lake Manitou, the
southern end of which is approached from Ste.
Agathe. Four miles from Ivry lies Lac La Brume,
noted for its trout and bass in summer, and for its
excellent partridge and deer hunting in autumn.
11 L4URENTIAN     MCUNTAI N *
Comparing
notes
Bathing at Lac Manitou LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
The Mackay House, Lac Quenouilles
edge of the lake, with
tennis, swimming and
boating for daytime pleasure, and dancing at night.
Besides hotels, there are
two well equipped camps.
From Lac Superieur the
Boulee and the Devil's
Rivers, both containing
trout, may be reached.
There is also good hunting
in the valley of Devil's
River, moose and deer
being found. Lac Superieur is the entry point to
this hunting region and is
an excellent base of operations. For the climber
there are innumerable interesting peaks including
the Red Cliff which thrusts
its sheer red precipice
above the Lake.
LAC QUENOUILLES
ST. FAUSTIN
(76.9 miles from Montreal)
Continuing from Ivry, the train reaches St.
Faustin, a little French-Canadian village by the
side of Lac Carre—-a lake, as its name implies, perfectly square in outline, and so regular as to appear
artificial. On its shore, close to the station, are
hotels with tennis, boating and bathing. In lakes and
rivers around are plenty of trout and bass to tempt
tennis players to leave the courts and take to the
forest. In the autumn the hunter who is willing to
go some distance into the woods will find both deer
and moose. Guides for hunting and fishing may be
procured at the hotels. There are many delightful
drives and hikes from St. Faustin.
LAC SUPERIEUR
North of St. Faustin, seven miles of excellent
gravel road leads by the side of the Boulee River—
a swift running stream down which the lumbermen
float their logs to the Ottawa—to Lac Superieur.
Somewhere between Ivry and St. Faustin the North
River is lost sight of, and for a time the Boulee acts
as guide and sign post. The beautiful Lac Superieur
is only two miles long, but it lies at the feet of
twenty mountains. One dark little island, perfectly
round, breaks the surface of the water. On its shore
are excellent hotels, conveniently situated on the
Six miles northeast of
St. Faustin lies Lac Quenouilles, beautifully situated   in   a   hollow   surrounded with verdant
hills. This lake can be reached from Ste. Agathe by
a new gravel road—a distance of twelve miles.   In
the opinion of many this three mile stretch of water
is one of the fairest lakes in the whole Laurentian
region.    There are several camps in the vicinity
which  provide  excellent  accommodation  for  the
fisherman who wishes a regular outdoor life.  There
is a choice of six excellent trout lakes within easy
walking  distance  from  these  camps, while  good
sport  may   also  be  enjoyed   in  the   neighboring
streams, the Archambault and the Noir.
For those wishing a more varied entertainment
there is The Mackay House with all summer perquisites of tennis, dancing and boating.
LAC PREMIER
Three miles south of St. Faustin is the prettiest,
clearest little lake that ever mirrored the blue sky.
Lac Premier. On its shore, almost lost to the
world in its seclusion, a new summer lodge has
been opened.
ST. JOVITE
(85 miles from Montreal)
From St. Faustin the train proceeds nine miles
farther north to St. Jovite, a neat, progressive little
village by the side of the Boulee River. In the
village and vicinity are cottages to rent, and several
reasonably priced boarding houses.
14 LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
Where speckled beauties lurk
The grey rocks of Lac
Ouimet, three miles north
of St. Jovite, have been
made famous by a popular
inn which is open summer
and winter, and for over
thirty years has had to
turn away would-be patrons in spite of larger
buildings and increased
accommodation. The inn
is beautifully situated on
Lac Ouimet, itself a part of
the estate to which the
inn belongs, and looks
across at Mont Tremblant
(2,474 feet), the highest
peak in the Laurentians,
and a dozen blue hills in
the foreground. The inn's
private car meets all
trains.
Every kind of outdoor
sport—including golf, tennis, boating and swimming
—is offered, while the inn
stables provide horses for
riding. Complete camping outfits, including guides,
may also be obtained for fishing and hunting trips
to the northern lakes. On summer evenings an
orchestra provides music for dancing, and the ballroom floor is always comfortably filled in spite of
strenuous days. In winter, the inn is the centre of
an equally great festivity of winter sports.
LAC MERCIER
(90.6 miles from Montreal)
Five miles north of St. Jovite, the train reaches
lovely little Lac Mercier, beautifully set between
low green hills with Mont Tremblant towering
over all. On the shores of Lac Mercier is a pleasant
summer colony, with several hotels and boarding
houses. The lake provides means for aquatic sports,
while there are many attractive walks into the hills
about. From the hotels guides may be obtained to
conduct fishing and hunting parties into the mountains, while in Lac Mercier itself are grey, red and
salmon trout. In the autumn the woods about
shelter deer and moose, and accommodation may be
found at hotels and boarding houses for the hunting
season.
To Lac Tremblant, the journey is made over two
miles of very good road, past numerous habitant
farms, over La Petite Cachee, and around a last
curve when the lake suddenly glitters into view—
stretching for seven miles, its surface studded with
dark green islands. Here the beauty of the mountains cannot be surpassed with Mont Tremblant
towering majestically over all. East trails lead to
Lac Vert and Lac Caribou; there is another trip up
the Cachee River to Bear Falls, and canoe trips that
may last hours or days as the fancy pleases.
LAC TREMBLANT
Lac Tremblant has the charm of the unexplored,
streams that may lead to some surprisingly beautiful
spot as yet unrecorded. At the lower end of the
lake, there are four hotels, while one lodge is operated
by Gray Rocks Inn. The summer cottages are
mostly at the upper end of the lake, and their owners
are working together to guard the beauties of the
lake while making it the comfortable habitation of
man. Mont Tremblant itself is under government
supervision, 14,750 acres around it having been set
aside as a National Park. Fishing in season is, however, permitted within the limits of the Park.
The Provincial Government Fish Hatchery at
Mont Tremblant is well worth a visit.
LABELLE
(100.1 miles from Montreal)
Leaving Lac Mercier station, the train takes a
long curve around the lake, to disclose a new aspect.
The mountains appear to have moved back, and
cultivated fields make a more frequent appearance.
Labelle is a charming little French-Canadian village,
with a pretentious grey stone church and red brick
convent. The village streets fall abruptly from the
station over the wildly rushing Riviere Rouge, and
climb the hill again. Both in the village and at
Lake Labelle, six miles from the station, one may
find hotel accommodation.
The road to the lake is an excellent gravel highway, leading through delightful country where
birch and poplar have taken the place of spruce
and cedar. Your guide will tell in picturesque
language the story of the great fire that swept the
15 LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
Anywhere north of Montreal
Free building lots are offered for clubs or families
on the shores of Big Lake Nominingue and Lac
Ste. Marie.    Apply J^pminingue Tourist Bureau.
For information regarding hunting and fishing in
this superb region, which abounds in three kinds of
trout, dore, moose, deer and bear, application
should be made to the K[ominingue Tourist Bureau,
Nominingue, Quebec.
BARRETTE
(147.9 miles from Montreal)
Barrette is the gateway to a superb sporting
region. A short distance from the village are Lac
des Ecorces and Lac Gauvin where Waltonian
dreams come true.
On the shores of Lac des Ecorces and but a mile
from Brunet station is the well equipped Red Pine
Inn which caters primarily to the fisherman, the
hunter and the canoeist. The Lake itself abounds
in dore and pike while the surrounding lakes and
streams in the territory of the inn offer speckled,
brook and grey trout. In the fall there are moose,
bear and deer for the hunter. Guides and all
necessary equipment may be secured at the inn.
Rosario Wester of Mont Laurier, Que., will gladly
furnish further information.
Twenty miles north of Barrette is Lac La Corne,
a hunting and fishing paradise. Here an excellent
camp is operated by Joseph Dufour, proprietor of
the Hotel des Lacs, Barrette.
MONT LAURIER
(158.1 milesfromMontreal)
Leaving Barrette the
train continues to Mont
Laurier, a town once known
by the romantic name
of Rapide de L'Orignal
(Moose Rapid). The town
follows the undulating
hills on either side of the
Lievre River, and possesses
two of those quaint
wooden-covered bridges
now so rarely to be seen.
It has well-equipped modern hotels, several boarding houses, tennis courts,
general stores, banks and a
normal school. It has a
beautiful grey stone
church, and is the seat of
a bishop and the county
town of Labelle County.
On the hill behind the
town stands the newly
restored illuminated cross.
Around the town are excellent gravel roads, and
an autobus service conveys visitors to Maniwaki, Hull and Ottawa.
One of the most beautiful lakes in the whole
Laurentian district of beautiful lakes lies about
twenty miles north of Mont Laurier, Lac de Cerf
(Deer Lake). It is reached by an excellent motor
road, and at the south end of the lake the road reaches
within twenty-five yards of the lake. This is the
only gentle approach, as around the remaining
thirty-mile shore stand great rocks, some of them
cathedral-like, standing sheer cliffs of stone hewn
and polished by Time itself. Here the forest is
untouched, and on this shore of primeval loveliness
only a few summer cottages exist.
Farther north, there is still a whole region of
lakes unexploited and almost unexplored. Only
their names are known—Lac Tapani with its pioneer
settlement at Ste. Anne du Lac, Lac Eturgeon, Lac
d'Argent, Lac Brochet, Ferme Neuve, Lac St. Paul,
Mont St. Michel. Their very names sing a rhythm
of magic, and those venturesome spirits restless for
new worlds to conquer need only apply to the
Secretary of the Municipality at Mont Laurier,
when all information regarding fish, game, camping,
guides, and accommodation will be given them.
ST. GABRIEL DE BRANDON
Although it is not situated on the Mont Laurier
line, but at the end of a branch line from the
Montreal-Quebec line, Lake Maskinonge is really
part of the Laurentian country. St. Gabriel de
Brandon, its headquarters, is some 76 miles from
Montreal, with a direct service up this branch via
Lanoraie.
18  LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
Marguerite
St. Gabriel is set amongst beautiful hills at the
outlet of Lake Maskinonge, 700 feet above the
summer level of the St. Lawrence River. Historically St. Gabriel is interesting, for it was founded by
those hardy British pioneers, the United Empire
Loyalists. The old Loyalist graveyard still stands,
and interested visitors make pilgrimages each year
to read with reverence the names half obliterated
on the simple slabs. The English village is high up
the hill, where the houses have guarded their colonial
tradition, but with the advent of the railway a new
village has sprung up near the station. In both
parts are hotels, summer cottages, privately owned
and for rent, and boarding houses.
Lake Maskinonge is twelve miles round, with
pine wood close to the water's edge and a magnificent sandy beach comprising the greater part of
the shore line. In the lake there is excellent boating
and bathing, and some fish may be caught, the maskinonge after which the lake is named being fairly
plentiful. The real fishing, however, is ten or more
miles towards the mountains, where the inlets, the
Mastigouche and the Maternbin, beckon the fisherman into far-away trails towards the mountains
where the iron rails have not as yet pierced the
solitude.
There are beautiful walks and drives around St.
Gabriel, one good road extending as far as fifty
miles to St. Michel des Saints, a quaint little village
reminiscent, as are many of the other villages in
this remote countryside, of Normandy or Brittany.
Camp Orelda, one of the most popular of the Laurentian boys' camps, and Camp Marian, a haven
of pleasure and sunshine for young girls, are both
located on beautiful Lake Maskinonge, and near it
in a pine grove is the very popular St. George
Chalet. In the autumn, when the hills around St.
Gabriel are orange and gold,
the village is a hunters'
paradise, for the woods harbor deer and moose, and
guides may be obtained for
journeys into the mountains.
OTHER GATEWAYS
Brief mention may also be
made of other gateways to
the Laurentians and other
districts in this vast domain
which will appeal above all
to the sportsman.
As an alternative to the
Montreal-Mont Laurier line,
the tourist may proceed along
the north shore of the Ottawa
River by the Montreal-
Ottawa section of the Canadian Pacific transcontinental
main line. At Montebello,
74>2 miles from Montreal, he
will find the aristocratic Log Chateau and Seigniory
Club of Lucerne-in-Quebec. Further along the
"North Shore Line" Buckingham provides a convenient entry to the famous Lievre District. The Lievre
River, which flows through this region, is with the
exception of the Gatineau River the most important draining the western Laurentian Mountains,
and the district itself is attractive to the fisherman,
the hunter and the canoeist.
GATINEAU VALLEY
From Ottawa a branch line runs north via Hull
through the Gatineau Valley to Maniwaki. The
Gatineau Valley, sometimes called "The Valley of
Ten Thousand Lakes," has long been a favorite
holiday resort with the Ottawa resident and is now
becoming more widely known. Chelsea, Wakefield,
Low, Kazubazua and Gracefield are some of the
resorts in this region. With Maniwaki, Kazubazua
and Gracefield are excellent bases of operation for
the fisherman and the hunter.
PONTIAC DISTRICT
From Ottawa another branch line runs through
Hull along the north shore of the Ottawa River to
Waltham, traversing that delightful section of the
Ottawa Valley known as the Pontiac District. The
country is the foothills of the Laurentians and to
the north grey rocky hills stretch into a horizon of
far-off mountains. The Pontiac is a healthful region
with everywhere the resinous odour of pine.
Waltham, the end of the steel, is chiefly known as
the starting point for the innumerable leased trout
lakes that lie to the north.    While the lakes are
20 LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
leased, the wildly rushing Black River is only half
a mile away and it abounds in pike, bass and pickerel.
TEMISKAMING AND KIPAWA
From Mattawa, on the Canadian Pacific transcontinental main line, a branch runs north to
Angliers and taps the superb sporting possibilities
of this section of western Quebec. In the vicinity
of the line is a vast region of unspoiled wilderness,
dotted with innumerable lakes, rivers and streams
where fish and game abound and where every phase
of outdoor life and sport—camping, canoeing, fishing and hunting-—can be enjoyed in fullest measure.
It is pre-eminently a moose country, the monarch
of the forests being found in comparatively large
numbers in the "bush" encompassing Lakes Kipawa
and Temiskaming and adjacent waters. Deer, too,
are numerous and possibilities for black bear are
good, especially on an extended trip.
FISHING IN THE LAURENTIANS
There are as good fish in the sea as ever were
caught—and in the lakes of Quebec too, for that
matter. Only they will stay there in spite of you,
unless you give a little consideration to the "when"
and "where" and "how."
The "when" for trout is of course in the months
of May, June and September, though the fisherman
who rises early enough will find the fish rising too,
and may get a pretty fair string, even in July and
August. In the latter part of May, however, and in
June he must come prepared to combat the black
fly and mosquito, so that early May and September
are the ideal months.
The "where" is almost any lake in the Laurentians, with the exception of a few where fishing was
so wonderful twenty years ago that there isn't any
now. The lakes in this pathetic category are the
few whose shores are thickly settled, and there
is hope even for these, as considerable attention has
recently been given to restocking. The great
majority of the lakes, especially the smaller ones,
are the home of the red or speckled trout, and many
of them contain fine grey trout as well. Ouareau,
Archambault, and the little lakes adjoining are
particularly fine for trout-fishing, while bass are
taken from Lac des Sables, L'Achigan, and several
lakes farther north.
The "how" will have to be left to the fisherman's
own judgment, for there was never a fisherman yet
who didn't have his favorite fly and tackle, and his
favorite method of playing a fish.
And, last of all, there is one factor in the game
which you can't ignore, which may take you to a
perfect fishing stream in perfect fishing weather
and leave you unrewarded by a single catch, or may
bring you a full basket when by all the rules of
angling you shouldn't have a bite—and that is that
A man's
unexplainable, intangible thing that the other fellow
always seems to have, and which we call "fisherman's luck."
HUNTING
When the leaves begin to turn, your thoughts
will often wander to forest trails and mountain
lakes. You will see the sudden flight of the startled
partridge, you will see deer hesitant on the border
of the lake, you will measure the antlers of the
moose, and then ... off to the wilderness.
Even the settled district may yie d you a good
bag of partridge, and further from civilization these
birds become plentiful. Deer, too, are scattered
over the whole district, but they are shy of man,
and chiefly frequent the forests a little distance
from the railway. The whole Black Mountain
region and the woods from Tremblant north to
Mont Laurier afford good deer-hunting.
But the great ungainly monarch of the forest is
the chief test of the hunter's skill, and his habitat
is in even remoter regions. An occasional moose
has been shot as far south as Tremblant, but they
21 H     End of a
Perfect
Day LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
are found in greater numbers in that wonderful
nunting country to the north of Nominingue and
Mont Laurier which has been referred to already.
The season for moose is usually September 10th
to December 31st.
For deer usually September 1st to November 30th.
For partridge usually September 1st to December
15th.
Further particulars as to favorable districts, game
laws, guides, etc., in the Province of Quebec may
be obtained from the General Tourist Agent,
Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal.
CANOE TRIPS
No sound but the steady dip-dip-dip of paddles,
a shout to warn of "white water" ahead, a sudden
tensing, a swirl—and smooth water again, then a
landing where a break between the trees discovers
a trail, a short portage, another mile or two of
water, and camp under stars that grow pale before
the ruddy camp-fire! If you've ever tried it you
need no invitation to try it again. And if you are
an expert canoeist you need only a hint as to a
suitable starting place and the goal will take care of
itself, with a little help from map and compass.
Some of the best starting-points for threading by
canoe the maze of lakes and streams in the Laurentian
district are Lac Superieur, Tremblant, Archambault,
Lac Saguay, Labelle and Mont Laurier.
A very interesting trip for experienced canoeists
is to go up the Devil's River from Lac Superieur,
into Lakes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, then into Great Devil's
Lake, Lake Cypress, and other small lakes into the
Mattawin River, passing St. Michel des Saints, a
good starting point for trips north towards Lake
Clair and Lake Mondonac. The Mattawin River
can be navigated, with a few portages, down to the
St. Maurice River, whence return can be made
to Montreal from Grandes Piles by rail.
From Tremblant you may get into the Macaza
district; or by way of Lacs Vert, Caribou, Mitchell,
Long, Clair, Truite, you may enter the Grand Lac
Cache, and return to Tremblant in three or four
days—but don't attempt this on your first canoe
trip!
Archambault will launch you into a chain of
smaller lakes.
From Labelle you may reach, by way of Cameron
Lake and several smaller lakes, the Maskinonge
River which is part of a canoe route to the Ottawa.
From Labelle also you may reach Lac Caribou and so
enter the Cache region again.
From either Lac Saguay or Mont Laurier entry is
made to the extensive Kiamika district, and from
Mont Laurier a paddle up the Lievre River to Lac
Tapani will bring you close to Lac Piscatosin, from
which you may start south to the Gatineau, down
which you may, as well as the Lievre, paddle to the
Ottawa.
Further information and suggestions for some
excellent canoe trips in the Laurentian Mountains
may be obtained from the General Tourist Agent,
Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal
ACCOMMODATION
It is only fair to the prospective visitor to the
Laurentians to warn him not to expect all the
luxuries and conveniences of city life in some little
hotel or boarding-house planted on the edge of a
mountain lake. There are many places he should
never try to see if a constant supply of hot water is
more to him than the glory of the hills. The hotel
business in the Laurentians is in its infancy, but
there are hotels and boarding houses that give
comfort and shelter and good food for a very modest
charge per week. Others try to provide the chief
conveniences of city life while retaining some of the
simplicity of the mountains; their number is increasing each year.
A certain minimum acquaintance with the French
language will add greatly to the pleasure of a
vacation in the Laurentian Mountains.
CAMPING
If you have no summer home in the Laurentians,
and if you are tired of hotel or boarding-house life,
remember that dwelling in tents is as old as the hills
themselves—or very nearly—and that camping
adds spice to any vacation. The Laurentians are
ideal for this. From almost any station you may
take a road that will bring you in twenty minutes
into the heart of the woods or to the border of some
little lake. There are places where you may rent a
location for your camp for the season, places where
you need only ask permission, and places where you
may pitch your camp unheeding because there is
no one to be asked about it anyway.
The style of shelter may vary from the tiny
canvas tent that may be moved every day if the
fancy takes you to the big marquee with its wooden
floors and canvas divisions, or even the little portable
bungalow. But a camp's a camp for a' that, and
means freedom and old clothes, and performing the
rites of cleanliness in the lake instead of a tub or
wash-basin, and coffee boiling over an open fire,
and the smell of sizzling bacon, and nightly camp-
fires, and friendship and mirth.
The organized camps for boys and girls are
preparatory schools for later camping-out, and for
many other things as well, and though they are
few in number they are all excellent. As any of
these camps will send you full information on
request, only their names and situations are given
here.
23 LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
Camp girls in the Laurentians
FOR GIRLS
Camp Marian: Operated by the Diocesan Camp
Corporation, at St. Gabriel de Brandon.
Camp Oolahwan: Y.W.C.A. for Senior and
Junior girls, on private lake in Laurentians, 8 miles
from Ste. Marguerite Station.
Camp Ouareau: A camp for school-girls on Lac
Ouareau, about 24 miles from Ste. Agathe.
Camp Read: A physical training camp for girls,
8 to 18 years. On Lac Kai-Wa-Sunto, 3 miles from
L'Annonciation.
FOR BOYS
Camp Tamaracouta: Montreal Boy Scout Camp,
10 miles from Piedmont.
Camp Kanawana: Montreal Y.M.C.A. Boys'
Camp, on Lake Kanawana and Lake Becscies, near
Piedmont station.
Camp Kinkora: on Lac Castor, 4 miles from
Ste. Agathe, conducted by St. Patrick's Church,
Montreal.
Senior Y.M.C.A. Camp: on Lake St. Joseph, 6
miles from Ste. Agathe.
Camp Agaming: for boys, on Lac Archambault
St. Donat de Montcalm, about 26 miles from Ste.
Agathe.
Camp Orelda: on Lac Maskinonge, near St.
Gabriel de Brandon.
Camp Lewis: on Lake Dupuis, 7 miles from Ste.
Marguerite.
Camp Nominingue: Nominingue, Que., a private
camp for 100 boys.   For information, apply F. M.
Van Wagner or Hay Finlay, McGill University,
Montreal.
Lac Grenier: A summer camp for younger boys,
8 miles from Ste. Marguerite, conducted by Rev
A. C. Muller.
FOR ADULTS
Camp Pembina: on Lac Pembina, 4 miles beyond
St. Donat de Montcalm, about 29 miles from Ste.
Agathe.
Killarney Club: on Lake Cochrane, 3 miles from
Lac Mercier. (For ladies only—operated by the
Grey Nuns).
Otoreke: Y.M.C.A. camp for men (St. Adolphe
de Howard), on Lake St. Joseph, 8 miles from
Ste Agathe.
GOLF
There are six courses in the Laurentian Mountains, which in the midst of remarkably beautiful
surroundings offer excellent sport. The fees are
reasonable, so that the golfer may enjoy golf in the
mountains every week-end during the season at a
very moderate expenditure, including his hotel bill
and train fare.
Ste. Agathe: Laurentian Golf and Country Club.
St. Jerome: St. Jerome Golf Club.
St. Jovite: Gray Rocks Golf Club.
Ste. Marguerite: St. Margaret Country Club.
Shawbridge: Laurentian Lodge Club.
Val Morin: Val Morin Golf Club.
There is also the  Bellevue Golf Club at St
Eustache.
The majority of the photographs in this booklet are copyright by The Associated Screen News, Ltd., Montreal vTT/^TTAn^r   nnTTT?
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CANADIAN
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Laurentian Mountains
[District North-west from Montreal J
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Scale   of   Miles
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M TOURIST HOTELS,
BOARDING HOUSES AND CAMPS IN
MONTREAL
IN THE LAURENTIAN MOUNTAINS
The following abbreviations are used in this Directory:—
A   American Plan (i.e., rate includes room and meals).
B   Hotel sends out its own booklet to enquires.
C   Hotel has also cottages to rent.
E   European Plan (i.e., rate means room only). #
S    Open in Summer only, in some'cases extending into Fall.    All
other hotels not so marked are (so far as is known) open all
the year.
RAILWAY STATION.    The railway station (or port of landing) for
every point is always that bearing the same name as the  town
unless otherwise mentioned, and unless shown as on another
railway, is always a Canadian Pacific Railway station.
POST-OFFICE ADDRESS.    The post-office address of the hotel is
always that of the station, unless otherwise mentioned.
DISTANCE.    The^distance shown is that from the station mentioned.
RATES.    The rates quoted are the lowest stated by the hotel itself.
Whilst every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy in this
directory, the Canadian Pacific Railway cannot accept responsibility
for mistakes or changes in this information, all of which has been supplied
by the proprietors of the various hotels, etc., themselves. This particularly applies to rates. Nor can the Canadian Pacific Railway be
responsible for the standards of service and accommodation of any
hotels in Canada except those under its own management. Travellers
who use this list and find any changes, additions or corrections necessary
would confer a favor upon users of subsequent editions by reporting
same to the General Publicity Department, Canadian Pacific Railway,
Montreal, which also publishes a full list of hotels, boarding houses and
camps at business and tourist centres along the Company's system.
Proprietor
No.
Rate
Rate
Distance
Town                       or
Plan
of
per
per
from
Manager
Rooms Day
Week
Station
ALCOVE
River View Mrs. H. Fitz-
patrick	
A
10
2.00
12.00 up 100 yards
The Homestead...Mrs. M. Fox	
A
7
2.50
15.00
100 yards
ANGERS
Angers L. Legault ...
A
10
2.00
10.00
\i mile
AYLMER
British E. C. Hillman...
A
25
3.50 up 21.00
400 yards
Windsor L. Chamberland.
A
15
2.50
13.00
100 yards
AYLMER EAST (Trolley from Ottawa)
Boarding House...Mrs. F. Metcalfe.
E
7
1.00
5 min.
Holt A.M.Holt	
A
32
3.50 up
20.00 up
5 min.
BELLERIVE
Chateau Bellevue.J. E. Fortier	
A
25
2.50 up
15.00 up
600 yards
Villa Bellerive... .E. Boyer & Co...
A
15
3.00
15.00 up
130 yards
BERTHIER JCT.
Villa des
Voyageurs A. Lavallie	
A
10
2.00
11.00
20 yards
BERTHIERVILLE (Station, Berthier)
Chartier House... .Mrs. J. E. Chart ier
A
23
2.00
10.00
300 yards
Canada Coulombe &
Genereux	
Manoir de
A
30
3.00
12.00
Opposite
Berthier P. A. Gariepy...
A
40
5.00 up
25.00 up
\i mile
Victoria P. Guevremont..
1
A
20
3.00
15.00
50yar
ds
25
30
8
25
3.00
2.50
3.00
2.00
3.00
2.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
2.00
3.00
Proprietor No.    Rate
Town or Plan    of        per
Manager Rooms Day
BRUNET
Red Pine Inn R. Wester     A
BUCKINGHAM
Palace N. Charet     A
Windsor ... J. B. Bergeron...    A
BURBIDGE (P.O., Messines)
Commercial F. Nault   AC
Paulin A. Paulin     A
CALUMET
Calumet House... .J. Brunet     A
Gale House G. P. Pouitin....    A
York House W. Milway     A
CAMPBELL'S BAY
Ottawa House Mrs. E. Smith... AC
Ronnaco A. H. O'Connor..    A
CAMBRIA (Station, St. Jerome)
Lily Crest Mrs. Ward   AS
CARILLON (Station, Point Fortune)
Carillon Inn A. Anderson     A
Souveraine A. Chevrier     A
CHELSEA
Laurentian Lodge.E. B. Bambrick.    A
DALHOUSIE MILLS
Commercial Ranger Bros     A
Union—  D. Campeau     A
EAST TEMPLETON
Central Mrs. V. Damase
Sabourin     A
Hotel O. Bourdon     A
ENTRE LAC (Station, Ste. Marguerite)
Balmoral  Mrs. W. Gregoire    A
Chartier House....F. D. Chartier...  AS
Entre Lac W. A. Gregoire...  AS
FASSETT
Central R. Racicot     A
National E. Lalonde     A
Hotel I. Desrosiers     A
FERME NEUVE (Station, Mont Laurier)
Belisle  Mrs. T. Belisle...    A
Chateau des
Laurentides I. Godner     A
Larocque  A. Larocque     A
FORT COULONGE
Lawn's H. R. Lawn     A
Jewell. R. Labine     A
Rate
per
Week
Distance
from
Station
40    3.50 up 22.80 up     lmile
15.00
14.00
18.00
14.00
15.00
15.00
3 miles
3 miles
150 feet
70 yards
100 yards
20 miles
30 yards
50 yards
100 yards
18    2.00      12.00       10 miles
12.00
12.00
1 mile
1 mile
10    2.50      15.00     500 yards
2.50
2.50
14.00
14.00
120 yards
100 yards
2.00 up 10.00 up
2.00      	
\i mile
3 min.
2.50
3.00
3.00
2.00
2.50
2.50
14.00 up
12.00 up
15.00
14.00
12.00
12.00
8    1.50
2.50
3.00
3.00
2.00 up
9.00
12.00
15.00
2.50
FOURTEEN ISLAND LAKE (Station, Shawbridge)
Laurentian House. Mrs. C. A. Dyke.  AS       17
Villa des Monts... H. Desjardins.... ACS     12
GATINEAU
Wabash Inn B. Maloney     A
GRACEFIELD
Gatineau Valley
Rest A. La Fontaine...    A      16
Morin Hotel D. Morin     A       25
17.50
12.00 up
12.00
12.00 up
11 miles
10 miles
10 miles
500 yards
300 yards
50 yards
12 miles
12 miles
12 miles
Y2 mile
1 mile
2 miles
2 miles
10    2.00     10.00       Hmile
GRENVILLE
Dominion O. Lanthier     A
Victoria M. Lessard     A
11
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
20.00
8.00
12.00
HAWK LAKE (Station, Buckingham Jet.; P.O., Inlet)
Hawk Lake Lodge H. C. Yank ACS      6    2.00     12.00
6 miles
700 feet
2 miles
2 miles
22 miles
1
No.    Rate
Plan    of       per
Rooms Day
...J. O. Pelletier..
E
.J. Simard     A
33
10
Proprietor
Town or
Manager
HULL
Central	
St. Louis	
Standish Hall
Hotel H. Levesque     A
Windsor Hotel R. Boucher     E
IVRY
Villa Fleury M. L. Fleury ACS    20
KAZUBAZUA
Kazubazua D. Emond     A       10
Rate
per
Week
l.OOup	
3.00     12.00 up
Distance
from
Station
1 mile
V2 mile
40    3.00 up 28.00 up   % mile
KINGSMERE (Station, Chelsea)
Kingsmere Lodge. G. H. Wattsford.   A       12
KIPAWA
Kipawa Capt. J.
Cunningham...    A
LABELLE
Hotel du Nord.... A. Labelle     A       28
Larocque A. Larocque     A       14
Villa Lajoie L. Jubinville     A       15
LAC BRULE (Station, Ste. Agathe)
Boarding House.. .Mrs. Somerville.    A
LAC DES ECORCES (Station, Barrette)
Lac des Ecorces...R. Wester ABCS
LAC DESERT (Station, Labelle)
Bellevue E. Labelle     A
Boarding House...H. Bruneau ACS
Boarding House.. .E. Laflamme     A
Green Hill G. Thonnessen...    A
LAC DUHAMEL (Station, St. Jovite)
Villa des Ombres..O. Ladouceur   AS
LAC GUINDON (Station, Shawbridge)
Frasercroft Mrs. N. B. Evans ABS
Lakeview Cottage.Mrs. A. Castell..  AS
Pines Mrs. A. Rouet...  AS
LACHEVROTEERE
Oscar O. Naud     A
LACHUTE
Desjardins H. E. Desjardins AB
Lachute J. Berniquer, Jr..    A
Mapleview Mrs. A. Nicoll...    A
Tamarae Lodge.. .Mrs. W. E.
Richards     A
Windsor D. Duchesneau..    A
LAC LABELLE (Station and P.O., Labelle)
LaClairiere. L. Genet    AS 30    2.50
Pine Beach G. Ingles   AS 9    2.00
LAC L'ACHIGAN (Station, Shawbridge)
Bay View D. Beauchamp... AS 30
Hazelmene C.Green   AS 18
(P.O., Beauchamps)
Kilkenny Cottage.E. H. Quinn     A 18
Parkdale Lodge.. .J. Smith ABS 30
(P.O., St. Hippolyte)
LAC MASSON (Station, Ste. Marguerite)
Belmont E. P. Gauthier...    A 40
Belec H. Belec     A 7
Chateau Quinte... .M. Zonn ABS 100
Chartier W. Chartier     A 40
Manoir U. Grasson   AB 67
Mount Rose M. Spires   AS 30
3.50     20.00 1 mile
2.50     10.00     V/2 miles
2.50     15.00     V/2 miles
30    3.25             100 yards
3.00      15.00       \i mile
2.50      14.00       30 yards
2.00      14.00 5 miles
30
3.00
25.00
5 min.
15
8
3
7
2.50
2.00
2.50
3.00
15.00
14.00
14.00
18.00
12 miles
13 miles
13 miles
12 miles
15
3.00
12.00 up
3 miles
17
10
18
2.00
2.50
2.00
12.50
12.50
12.50
2 miles
4 miles
3 miles
12
2.50
8.00
15 yards
30
12
8
3.00 up 15.00
2.50      15.00
1.50      10.00
100 yards
250 feet
3 miles
9
25
5.00
3.00
14.00
15.00
12 miles
20 yards
14.00 6 miles
12.00 up    6 miles
3.00      18.00
2.50     12.00
7 miles
7 miles
3.00     12.50     8K miles
2.50      15.00 up    6 miles
3.00
2.00
5.00
3.00
5.00
4.00
16.50 up 5 miles
12.00 up 5 miles
30.00 up 5 miles
15.00 up 4 miles
20.00 up 5 miles
20.00 up 4 miles
Rate
per
Week
3.00
2.00
3.00
2.50
17.00
12.00
20.00
15.00 up
3.00 up 21.00
3.00 up 17.00 up
3.00     18.00 up
3.00     16.00 up
Proprietor No.    Rate
Town or Plan    of        per
Manager Rooms Day
LAC MERCIER
Braeside G. Clarke ABCS    9
Camp Breard F. Breard     A       12
Lac Mercier Inn...F. D. Barrette... A 26
Laurentian House. Mrs. B. E. Hunter ABS 20
Manoir Mercier.... Mrs. V. Suprenant   A       12
Royal Hotel J. A. Chapman...ABSC   26
Shadynook Reg'd.K. W. Harrison.. ABS    60
Windermere J. Grenough ABS    30
LAC QUENOUILLES (Station and P.O.
Boarding House.. .0. Touchette     A
Hollywood Home.Mrs. H. O.
Baetzhold   AS
Mackay House.... A. F. T. & M.
Wayte ABS
LAC SAGUAY
Saguay E. Richard   AC
LAC STE. MARIE (Station, Kazubazua)
Hotel W. Laramee     A 5    2.00     14.00
Central Hotel E. Poirier     A 7    2.00 up 12.00 up
LAC SUPERIEUR (Station, St. Faustin)
Camp Riopel L. Riopel   AC     50
Chateau Dubois...A. Dubois ASC    29
Grenon A. Grenon     A       20
LAC TREMBLANT (Station, Lac Mercier)
Lac Tremblant....R. A. Meuilleur..  AC     50    3.00
Les Cedres A. Lauzon ACS     12    2.50
Manoir Pinoteau...L. Pinoteau     A       35    3.50up
Plaza A. Seguin   AB      30    3.00
LAKE ECHO (Station, Lesage)
Ashford House.... Mrs. E. Ashford. ACS    20
LAKEFIELD (Station, Lachute)
Elms ..C.Evans   AS        9
Kerr's Farm A.O.Kerr     A       22
Lake Side Lodge.. M. A. Sherritt...   AS        6
L'ANNONCIATION (Station, Annonciation)
Camp Read (Boys'
and Girls' Camp)..Major R. T.
Lafond ABS     ..
Laurentides P. E. Jeannotte..   AC
L'ASCENSION (Station, Annonciation)
Delisle C. Delisle  AC     20    3.00
Travellers A. Labelle     A       12    2.00
LESAGE
Chartier D. Chartier     A       12    3.00
Cedar House H.Simpson   AS      14    2.00
LES HAUTEURS (Station, St. Jerome)
Binette House E. Binette   AS
Distance
from
Station
\i mile
33^ miles
15 yards
% mile
200 yards
50 yards
H mile
% mile
St. Faustin)
8    2.50     15.00 7 miles
12    2.50      14.00 up    6 miles
36    3.00     18.00 up    9 miles
11    3.00     14.00     100 yards
8 miles
8 miles
7 miles
7 miles
7 miles
4.00 20.00 up
3.00 17.00 up
2.50      16.00
16.00 up 2 miles
15.00 2 miles
22.00 up 2 miles
16.00 2 miles
2.50     16.00     3^ miles
2.00
2.00
1.75
30    3.50
10.00 §y2 miles
10.00 up 13 miles
12.00       10 miles
25.00     3H miles
18.00 up  20 yards
18.00       13 miles
10.00       13 miles
14.00 up    3 min.
12.00 5 miles
10    1.50       8.00 4 miles
Apply Apply       5 min.
10    2.50     15.00 6 miles
LUCERNE IN QUEBEC (Station, Montebello)
Log Lodge  AB
MACAZA
Villa des Pins Mrs. A. Trudeau. A
MANIWAKI
Central A. Nault  AC     26    2.50
Chateau Laurier...W. Lepine  A      45    3.00
Maniwaki P. Lauriault  A      25    3.00
MASCOUCHE
Mascouche M. Bourque...... A       10    3.00     10.00
MASSON (Station, Buckingham Jet.)
Central Mrs. T. W.
Fournier  A
14.00       \i mile
10.00 up   50 yards
15.00       Y2 mile
1 mile
15    2.50      15.00      150 yards
, Proprietor No.     Rate    Rate    Distance
Town or Plan    of       per       per from
Manager Rooms Day    Week     Station
8
17
14
2.00
2.50
3.00
3.00
10.00
12.00
4    3.00
40    3.00
McGREGOR LAKE (Station, East Templeton; P.O.
Boarding House.. .P. Hamilton ASCB   10    4.00
MILLE ISLES (Station, St. Jerome)
Boarding House.. .Miss E. Pollock..  AS
Mountain View— H. Dey   AS
MONTEBELLO
Commercial HotelC. E. Deschamps    A
Central W. Poirier     A
Pere Lavictoire... .Mrs. L. J.
Laverdiere     A
MONT LAURIER
Chateau Laurier. ..G. Sabourin     A
Central Ouellette &
Finkler     A
Nouvel Z. Dorion........    A
Summer Cottage.. Dr. Grignon	
MONT ROLLAND
Des Monts G. Maille     A
General A. Page     A
Mont Rolland J. H. Maillie.....    A
MONTREAL
Place Viger* Can. Pac. Ry... EB
Berkeley Hotel.... I. N. Rollman...    E
Breslin Hotel.     E
Carre Viger N. Chenier     E
Corona A. P. Sandt   EB
De La Salle E. H. Frappier...  EB
Ford Hotel Ford Hotel Co...    E
Grand Central U. Leclair     E
Grand Union E. Archambault.  EB
Hawthorne J. D. Eagan     E
Hotel Wilhelmina.M. E. Stewart...  EB
Iroquois. H. Gariepy     E
Killarney House
(Ladies only) Sister McDougall AB
Mount Royal V. G. Cardy   EB
New Carlton Mrs. A. R. Martin EB
Oxford H. Roger     E
Pennsylvania
Hotel I. Rollman     E
Prince of Wales.... F. Larin     E
Queen's A. Raymond   EB
Ritz-Carlton C. E. DesBaillets EB
Russell J. Thouin....     E
Ryan's Mrs. A. Ryan—    A
St. George's HotelA. Cloutier     E
Victoria J. Payette     E
Windsor A. Raymond   EB
Y.W.C.A     E
♦Place Viger Hotel at Place Viger C.P.R. Station;
hotels shown is from Windsor Street, C.P.R. Station.
NAMUR (Station, Montebello)
Fairfield House... J. H. Davis     A
Italie J. Binda     A
NEW GLASGOW (Station, Shawbridge)
Broadview House.Mrs. F.W.Curtis AS      30    3.00      15.00
NOMININGUE
Godard J. Godard   AC
Hotel F. E. St. Jean....    A
Manoir Valiquette.L. Cornich     A
OKA (Station, Como)
, Perkins Mills)
25.00        12 miles
12 miles
12 miles
25
15
6
13
15
20
115
81
15
45
100
150
750
32
80
17
31
80
25
1100
100
30
100
75
475
200
100
52
14
50
750
3.00
2.50
Apply
2.50
2.00
3.00
Apply
5.00 up
1.50 up
1.00 up
2.50 up
3.00 up
1.50 up
1.50 up
1.00 up
2.00 up
1.50 up
1.00
2.00
5.00 up
1.50 up
2.00 up
9.00       l/2 mile
15.00       Hmile
18.00       10 min.
20.00up  Mmile
15.00       V2 mile
12.00       70 yards
Apply     	
15.00     200 yards
      \y miles
14.00       50 yards
    At Station
      400 yards
12.00 Close
5.00 up    1 mile
         6 blocks
      300 yards
       5 blocks
7.00       Opposite
6.00 up 100 yards
7.00 up   y2 mile
9.00 up   4 blocks
7.00
12.00
Mmile
2 blocks
y mile
Opposite
y mile
2.50 up 12.00 up
2.00 up
Apply
i.50
3.00 up
1.50 up
1.50
3.00 up
.75 up
4 mile
        y2 mile
Apply     60 yards
        y2 mile
7.00     220 yards
21.00 up  Opposite
7.00 up    1 mile
7.00      150 yards
      120 yards
      150 yards
distance of other
10
8
3
10
10
2.80
2.00
3.00
2.00
2.00
14.00       20 miles
        18 miles
9 miles
14.00 up 220 yards
14.00 Close
12.00       y2 mile
Lavigne.
.L. Lavigne     A        8    2.00     14.00     1M miles
Proprietor No.    Rate
Town or Plan    of       per
Manager Rooms Day
OTTER LAKE (Station, Campbell's Bay)
Exchange A. Vadneau  AC      18    2.50
PAPINEAUVTLLE
Commercial A. Leduc     A       25    2.50
Victoria W. St. Pierre     A       20    3.00
PIEDMONT
Devonshire Lodge Mrs. E. A. Elliott AS      22    2.00
DuNord T.Michel     A       12    2.50
Hill Crest Inn A. Thibeaudeau.    A        9     	
Piedmont A. Mageau     A       25    3.50
PLAISANCE
Hotel J. St. Pierre   AC       8    2.00
POINTE AU CHENE
Bay View H. Maroche     A       11    3.00
POINT FORTUNE
Cottage H.J. Labrosse...   A       27    3.00
QUYON
Fairbanks W.J. Fleming....    A       25    2.50
ROCKWAY VALLEY (Station, St. Jovite)
Laurentian House.Mrs. A.E. Sinclair  A        9    1.75
ROSEMERE
ThornclifTe House.A. Gilmour   AS      20    3.50
STE. ADELE (Station and P.O., Mont Rolland)
Rate
per
Week
12.00
15.00
12.00
12.00
9.00 up
14.00
15.00
12.00
12.00
15.00
15.00 up
11.00
20.00
22
8
9
13
35
Ste.
22
9
20
9
Boarding House.. .Mrs. A. Lafleur..    A
Central Hotel W. Granger     A
Central A. Therrien     A
Latour R. Latour     A
Maison Blanche... A. Marin     A
ST. ADOLPHE DE HOWARD (Station
Camp Otoreka W. H. Spearman. ABS
Chateau Minto C. Corbeil   AC
Creek Cottage A. Lampright....  AS
Escourt A. T. Syratt    A
Labelle A. Labelle     A
Villa Bellevue Mrs. R. Lachapelle    AS
STE. AGATHE
Allard F. Allard     A
Bellevue W. Morin.     A
Belmont Hotel J. A. Liboiron....    A
Castle des Monts.. Z. Goldberg ABS
Laurentide Inn C. W. Honey.....  AB
MacKay House...A. F. T. & M.
Wayte ABS
Raymond Z. Raymond   AC
Trout Lake Hotel. Levine Bros     A
Vermont Mrs. F. Greenberg ASB
Villa du Repos Mrs. E. Morino..    A
STE. ANNE DES PLAINES (Station,
Desjardins Hotel..H. Desjardins.... A
ST. BASILE
St. Basile G. Hardy     A
ST. DONAT DE MONTCALM (Station
Bertrand Camp... N. Bertrand ACS
Camp Agaming
(Boys) C. B. Powter.... ABS     ..
Camp Pembina....W. J. Jacomb ABS    20
Lac Archambault. O. Villeneuve     A      25
St. Donat Chalet..T. Wall. ABCS  40
(P.O., Lac Archambault)
2.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
15.00
18.00
15.00
18.00
3.00 up 18.00 up
Agathe)
....      14.00
3.00 up 14.00 up
2.50      15.00
2.50      16.00 up
2.00      14.00
10    2.00      13.00
10
10
25
53
35
3.00
3.00
2.50
15.00
15.00
15.00
5.00 up 30.00 up
4.00 up 25.00 up
36
30
50
70
22    2.50
Bruchesi)
8    3.00
3.00 18.00 up
3.50 up 20.00 up
3.50 up 22.50 up
5.00up30.00up
12.00
Distance
from
Station
14 miles
150 yards
300 yards
M mile
1 mile
Mmile
l/2 mile
70 yards
50 yards
500 yards
1 mile
12 miles
1 mile
\y2 miles
1 mile
1 mile
1 mile
1 mile
5 miles
6 miles
9 miles
6M miles
9 miles
8 miles
5 min.
y2 mile
y mile
y mile
y2 mile
11 miles
V2 mile
V/2 miles
Vy2 miles
Y/2 mile
5    2.50
Ste. Agathe)
..     3.00     14.00
      Apply
5.00 up 35.00 up
3.25      18.00
6.00     35.00
16.00     500 feet
14.00     V/2 miles
25 miles
27 miles
30 miles
26 miles
18 miles
„/—■
Proprietor No.    Rate
Town                       of Plan of       per
Manager Rooms Day
ST. EUSTACHE
Bellevue E. A. Girard  A 25    3.00
Riviere du Chene. N. Robin  A 23    3.00
Stonehaven Mrs.W. G.Taylor   A        6     ....
Union J. E. Robitaille.. A 16    3.00
Vanier House Mrs. A. Vanier... A        4     	
ST. FAUSTIN
Barnett J. Barnett  AS 40
Hillside Cottages.Mrs. F. Fyfe  AS 23
Mountain View.... J. A. Dufour  A 20
Rockland Cottage.Mrs. S. Hemsley AS 12
Square Lake Inn.. A. Braze  AC 46
Travellers E. Legault  AC 15
ST. FELIX
Hotel J. A. Coutu  A 19
Manoir Lac Noir..Beaudoin & Frere  A 25
St. Felix J. L. Bruneau.... A 25
ST. GABRIEL DE BRANDON
Chateau Bellevue.G. Gouin  AC 28
Commercial U. Desrochers... A 26
Laurentide House. A. H. Ryder  AS 13
Manoir du Lac A. Granger  AS 42
Manoir St. Gabriel P. Bouliane  ACS 55
Sandy Beach
Heights Mrs. A. Nichols. AS
ST. HERMAS
Hotel A. Charbonneau. A         3
Tourists J. Verdon  A 10
4.00
2.50
3.00
2.00
3.00
2.00
Rate    Distance
per        from
Week    Station
15.00       M mile
20.00     220 yards
10.00 up \y2 miles
12.00     175 yards
15.00       J mile j
25.00     300 yards
15.00 up    4 min.
Town
15.00
14.00
20.00
14.00
1 mile
y mile
2 min.
5 min.
3.00 up 12.00 up 15 yards
2.50 15.00 10 miles
2.00 up 12.00       y2 mile
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.50
4.00
20.00     300 yards
15.00      100 yards
15.00 up  Hmile
20.00       y2 mile
20.00 up    lmile
20    3.00     16.00 up  y2m.\\Q
2.00       8.00
2.00     10.00
50 yards
4 miles
ST. HIPPOLYTE (Station, Shawbridge; P.O., Lac L'Achigan)
Boarding House.Mrs. D.
Beauchamp  AC     24
L'Achigan Hotel..E. Forget     A       12
Morin Lodge Mrs. L. Morin....  AS      10
Pine Cottage G. Gingras   AS      15
ST. JANVIER
Bienvenue S. Racine     A
3.00 15.00 up   10 miles
.... 18.00     $y2 miles
2.50 14.00 up    7 miles
2.00 12.00 9 miles
8
ST. JEAN DE MATHA (Station, St. Felix)
General A. J. Brunelle     A       13
ST. JEROME
Lapointe A. Lapointe  A
St. Jerome E. Plouffe  A
Victoria A. Maurice  A
ST. JOVITE
Cedric J. O. Corbeil   AC
Chalet des Brises.E. J. Darvill     A
Chateau Filion L. Sordi     A
Dufour S. Dufour     A
Gray Rocks Inn.. .F. H. Wheeler... ABC
Lynwood F. W. Wheller....  AS
Manoir Soumis E. W. Soumis—    A
Onontio Ethel W. Lee....    A
Ontario Farm Miss E. W. Lee..    A
Pines P. E. Marion   AC
Villa Bellevue H. Carriere ABS
40
25
40
17
25
20
35
100
10
27
5
10
30
23
2.50     17.50       M mile
3.00     10.00        8 miles
4.00 1.00 600 yards
3.00 14.00 10 yards
3.00 up 21.00 up     1 block
3.00 15
3.00 16
3.50 21.
3.00 up 25
4.00 up 26.
2.50 14.
3.00 16
3.00 15.
2.00 12.
4.00 up 22.
3.25     20.
.00 50 yards
.00 up 3 miles
00 3 miles
.00 up    1 mile
00 up V/2 miles
.00        3 miles
.00     500 yards
,00 5 miles
00 up 5 miles
.50 up 3 miles
00     Zy2 miles
ST. LAZARE
Central G. Leduc...    A        8    2.50     15
ST. LIN
Canada F. Chaumont....    A       13    2.50     12.
STE. LUCIE DE DONCASTER (Station, Ste. Agathe)
Boarding House...L. Forget     A       12    2.50     12.
60 yards
}4 mile
9 miles
Proprietor
or
Manager
STE. MARGUERITE
Chalet Cochand...E. Cochand     A
Lac Charlebois
Hotel P. Gauthier     A
St. Margaret
*  Country Club.. .G. M. Cummings   A
Ste. Marguerite
Lodge T.Wall,Jr ABS
Summit Inn G. Poitras   AB
See also Lac Masson.
ST. PHILIPPE
American House...J. E. H. Lefebvre   A
No.
Plan    of        per
Rooms Day
Rate    Rate
40
20
33
25
20
5.00 up
3.00
4.00 up
4.00 up
3.00 up
per
Week
25.00 up
18.00
33.00 up
25.00 up
16.00up
Distance
from
Station
ly miles
9 miles
y mile
100 yards
4 miles
25    3.00     20.00     200 yards
Chateau Ste. RoseF. Marsil	
A
25
3.00 up 18.00 up
y mile
Laval C. Clermont	
A
30
3.00
15.00
1 mile
LeBel E. LeBel	
A
8
3.00
15.00
1 min.
Manoir Ste. Rose..M. Gagnon	
A
25
3.00
15.00
\y miles
ST. SAUVEUR DES MONTS (Station, Piedmont)
Central C. Chartier	
A
9
2.50
i7.oo;
1 mile
Kamp Kanawana. Y.M.C.A.,
Montreal	
AS
8.50
6 miles
Prevost L. Prevost	
A
12
2.00
10.00
1 mile
Villa des
Laurentides Miss O. David...
A
7
2.00
12.00
1 mile
STE. SCHOLASTIQUE
Longtin J. F. Longtin	
A
25
3.00
12.00 up
x/2 mile
STE. THERESE
Central A. Cloutier	
AC
25
3.00
500 yards
SHAWBRIDGE
Bellevue N. St. Aubin	
AC
8
2.50
14.00
160 yards
Bridge House G. Knott....	
A
14
3.00
16.00
M mile
Glenbower House. G. A. Shaw	
A
20
2.50
12.00
5 min.
Hillcrest W. R. Woods....
A
6
4.00
15.00
250 yards
Riverside House. .Mrs. A. Marshall
A
30
2.50 up 12.00 up
> 300 yards
Shawbridge Inn... L.H.Archambault A
12
2.50 up 12.00 up
> 200 yards
SHAWVILLE
New Pontiac
House A. G. Proudfoot.
A
25
3.00
15.00
200 yards
TAMARACOUTA (Station, Piedmont)
Camp Tamaracouta
(Boy Scouts)	
ABS
9 miles
TERREBONNE
Central ..           .J. A. Quenneville
A
14
3 00
15 00
y mile
y2 mile
Happy Home A. Devoyeau	
A
12
3.00
THURSO
Commercial Z. Myr6	
A
25
3.00
15.00
y mile
Union A. Deslauriers...
A
5
2.00
60 yards
TIMISKAMING
Tem-Kip Camp...F. W. Arnott	
AB
9
Apply Apply
25 miles
VAL BARRETTE (Station, Barrette)
Boarding House.. .L. Lafleur	
A
3
1.25
200 yards
Des Lacs J. Dufour	
AC
15
3.00
14.00
70 yards
VAL DAVID
Homelike CottageMrs. C. Lallier...
A
10
3.00
12.00
3 min.
■■■ f
Proprietor No.    Rate    Rate    Distance
Town or Plan    of       per       per from
Manager Rooms Day    Week     Station
VAL DE BOIS (Station, Buckingham Jet.)
White Deer LodgeJ. A. Larivee ABC 5
VAL MORIN
Brise des Bois
Chalet Mrs. G. Brisebois   A 16
Camp Maupas E. Maupas ABCS 40
Highland Inn F. A. Scroggie...  AB 32
Laurentian
Chateau B. Witkow ABC 25
Laurentian Lodge. S. Sailer     A 50
Legault Cottage.. .J. Johnson     A 14
Mount-View J. Hatrick ABS 44
Orchard House.... Miss I. Corner... ABS 25
Pinehurst Inn H. L. Stansfield. ABC 50
Poplars Mrs. M. Piggott.    A 6
Val Morin L. Clement     A 8
Villa Lapierre A. Lapierre   AC 25
Villa Mon Repos. .Mrs. C. Paquette   A 10
4.00     25.00 up  37 miles
4.00 20.00 y mile
3.00 18.00 y2 mile
4.00     25.00     2M miles
5.00 up 25.00
3.50 18.00
2.50 15.00
2.50 15.00
2.50 16.00
5.00 up 30.00
3.00     20.00
2.00      	
3.00 15.00
2.20      15.00
up
up
1 mile
5 min.
1 mile
1 mile
2 miles
y mile
1 mile
1 mile
M mile
1 mile
VILLE MARIE
Bellevue A. Juteau     A
Ville Marie A. Loiselle     A
WAKEFIELD
Boarding House.Mrs. M. Nesbitt.   A
Chateau Diotte.. .A. Diotte ABC
Wakefield Inn .. . .The Misses
Lindsay   AB
WALTHAM
Waltham L. Lacourse    A       20    2.50     17.50       40 yards
25
20
5
20
3.00
2.50
2.00
3.00
15.00
12.00
10.00
20.00
10    3.50     23.00
350 yards
300 yards
y mile
y mile
1 mile
GOLF COURSES ALONG THE LINE OF THE
CANADIAN PACIFIC IN THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC
Town or City
Name of Course
Holes Yards
Beaurepaire Beaurepaire Golf Club  18 4,220
Como Como Golf Club  9 2,500
Cowansville Cowansville Golf Club  9 2,600
Drummondville.. .. Drummondville Golf & Country Club 9 2,750
Grand'Mere Grand'Mere Golf Club  18 6,439
Hudson Heights... .Whitlock Golf Club  18 6,400
Hull Fairmount Golf Club  9 2,800
Knowlton Knowlton Golf Club  12 3,350
Lachute Lachute Golf Club  9 1,615
Levis Levis Golf Club  9 2,857
Lucerne in Quebec. Lucerne in Quebec Golf Club  18 6,515
(Montebello)
Magog Hermitage Golf & Country Club  9 3,029
Montreal Beaconsfield Golf Club  18 6,221
 Country Club of Montreal  18 5,968
 Elm Ridge Country Club  18 6,250
 Forest Hills Golf Club (Lachine Links) 18 6,190
 Hampstead Golf Club  18 6,033
"         Islesmere Golf & Country Club  18 6,665
 Kanawaki Golf Club  18 6,185
 Club Laval-sur-le-Lac  18 6,400
 Marlborough Golf & Country Club.. 9 2,900
 Montreal Island Golf Club  18 6,000
• • Mount Bruno Country Club  18 6,543
 Municipal Golf Course  18 6,350
 Prairie Valley Golf & Country Club.. 18 6,200
 Rosemere Golf Club  9 2,700
 Rosemount Golf Club  9 2,950
 Royal Montreal Golf Club  18 6,265
 Senneville Country Club  18 6,267
 Summerlea Golf Club  18 6,370
 Summerlea Golf Club  9 3,169
Quebec  .Kent Golf Club  18 5,416
 Loretteville Golf Club  9 2,700
 Orleans Golf Club.  9 2,350
 Ontaritzie Golf Club  9 2,000
 Quebec Golf Club  18 6,456
St. Eustache Bellevue Golf Club  15 3,432
St. Jerome St. Jer6me Golf Club  9 2,750
St. Johns St. Johns Golf Club  9 3,200
St. Jovite Gray Rocks Golf Club  9 2,600
Ste. Agathe Laurentian Golf & Country Club  9 2,700
Ste. Marguerite... .St. Margaret Country Club  9 2,239
Shawbridge Laurentian Lodge Club  9 2,700
Shawinigan Falls... Shawinigan Golf Club  9 3,190
Sherbrooke Sherbrooke Country Club	
Stanstead Dufferin Heights Golf Club  9 2,600
Thetford Mines... .Thetford Golf Club.  9 2,520
Trois-Rivifcres Three Rivers Golf Club  9 2,500
Val Morin Val Morin Golf Club  9 3,100
Windsor Mills Windsor Mills Golf Club  9 2,600
10 '<'   %
.^£mx
MONTREAL
LAURENTIANS
And
the
C;A CN A D 1 A N   PAC I Fi CI

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