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Cruise the Great Lakes Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Great Lake Steamship Service 1936

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Array Canadian Pacific Isicrric
$$$C+**&&^<st
CAPTURE the thrills that surround a delightful voyage
of the Great Lakes by sailing into the golden west
across Georgian Bay. Glamorous tales are told of this
now famed Summer Waterway. In 1615, Champlain and
his Indian friends blazed a trail to this Bay by way of
Lake Nipissing and French River thinking to find a path
to the Orient. That path was never completed, but in
its stead is a story of Indian warfare, the martyrdom of
Jesuit missionaries and the pluck and resourcefulness of
explorers, fur traders and lumbermen. Over 30,000
islands dot the shores of Georgian Bay— islands among
the oldest known to geologists. Of these the first easterly
group is the Christian Islands — Faith, Hope and Charity
— now Indian reservations of the Ojibway race. Far in
the distance are the Blue Mountains of Collingwood, and
to the right a group of rocky islands — the Westerns,
where stands a friendly lighthouse. There is gentle beauty
in the tree-clothed slopes of the shores, a sharp contrast
to the rocky pine-clad islands. Canoes, yachts and sailboats ply to and from the mouth of the Severn River —
summer cottages and camps form colourful patches along
the shores. Westward is Bruce Peninsula where stands
Cabot Head, the lime stone cliffs extending to Cape
Hurd, and what looks like a flower pot stuck in the waters
is Flower Pot Island. High on its rocky cliffs is perched
a lighthouse. Still westward close to the boundary line
is Cove Island. Midnight, the stars grow brighter, the
moon  sheds silver spangles across the  bay.
Banish life's cares by the
unique experience of an
Inland Ocean cruise ori M^icoll     IgbKe-H-usrori
HE boat train from Toronto arrives at Port McNicoll
in a little over two hours. There in the harbor
rides majestically a great white ship of the Canadian
Pacific fleet— the S.S. Assiniboia or the S.S. Keewatin.
The dock is a lovely flower garden except for the path
from train to ship. Back of this attractive foreground
are the huge grain elevators which line the waterfront.
Baggage is quickly transferred to staterooms and the
immaculate liner gently glides away with a group of
happy voyagers leaning on the brass rails of the Sun
Deck waving good-byes. There is an urge to linger
up there in the exhilarating breeze, but the bugle calls
for a welcome and tasty dinner.
Train-side is ship-side at Port McNicoll
\        !
|T^ANCING in the moonlight 'til midnight to the rhythm
*^ of the ship's orchestra, or a quiet game of bridge in
the cosy lounge with a pleasant interlude for light refreshments. You are amazed ct your appetite and the superb
service. As if the flamboyant sunset and the silvery moon
weren't enough, great shafts of lights from the Aurora Borealis
sometimes turn the heavens into one vast temple. Meanwhile the ship sails into Lake Huron, the second largest of
the Great Lakes, 207 miles long and 101 miles wide.
Sheltering the shores and forming the picturesque North
Channel is Manitoulin Island. This island once the scene of
fierce warfare between the Hurons and Iroquois, now boasts
prosperous farms and summer homes. After eight hours
refreshing slumber you glance out of your porthole—it might
be mid-ocean! A brisk stroll on deck with seagulls
sheeling overhead — then breakfast.
The
seagull—
a fellow-
traveller Excellent
seamanship
StlAani'$     'River
TTHERE is a friendly atmosphere in the dining
saloon, and you are actually losing count of how
many courses to your breakfast. Your waiter beams
too ! Through the diamond paned windows you
glimpse the change in the landscape. Here is the
prettiest and most frivolous bit of water you ever
hope to see. On each side of the river, which is
the International Boundary and also the channel
proper, are stretches of sandy beaches trimmed with
rows of birch and poplar. Everybody on deck in
summer sports togs, lazily enjoying the scenery or
joining in the games on the upper Sun Deck.
Mid-morning, and the great white ship cruises through
the narrow channel towards the Soo. The captain
stands at the bridge. An officer pauses to tell you
we have passed Frying Pan and Pipe Island, and that
the old chimneys and magazine on St. Joe Island are
all that remain of the historical fort. Now the country
takes on an urban guise — heavy smoke rises in the
distance. Eagerly you watch the shoreline. On one
side stands a mighty smelter pouring molten metal
from its furnaces. Even the 'littlest" on board is
fascinated. Then the ship docks at Sault Ste. Marie
where time is well spent in touring this attractive city.
The Veranda Cafe is
popular and cheery
Route-map of
St. Mary's River s*
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.«*
So«
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V
^AILING still westward, the ship enters the Soo Canal. Cashing water lifts
the ship until she towers the city. A thrilling sight! As she passes the
lock a shrill whistle sounds, and the stately liner heads for Lake Superior, the
world's largest lake. Absurd look the tiny craft that cut across the bows, and
truly wonderful are the big ungainly freighters. Every camera on board clicks.
On one side is the famous Bascule bridge that opens like a jack knife.
The orchestra
is a popular
feature
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77>e dining saloon—a charming setting for the tempting meals
■T is not long before you realize how majestic this lake is with its sparkling clear
water, bold rugged shores and wonderful climate. It is afternoon and you
partake of tea in the Veranda Cafe. Far away on both shores are mining and
lumbering towns, with some of the deepest copper mines in the world on Keeweenaw
Peninsular. Ship life is very agreeable — the bugle sounds for dinner — and
the chef excels himself again ! Another stroll around the deck until the glorious
sunset keeps you hugging the ship's rail.
Thunder Cape, the "Sleeping Giant" of Indian legend
One of the deluxe
double  bedrooms CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CANADIAN!
PACIFIC
Canadian  Pacific
GREAT LAKES
Steamship  Service
SUMMER 1936
First trip from Port McNicoll June 20 and from Fort William June 24
between   PORT McNICOLL - SAULT STE. MARIE
PORT   ARTHUR     -     FORT   WILLIAM
via GEORGIAN BAy - LAKE HURON - ST. MARY'S RIVER
WHITEFISH BAY -  LAKE SUPERIOR - THUNDER BAY
Whether you take a Great Lakes cruise as a trip in itself, or as a delightful interlude in your rail journey across the continent, the
voyage between Port McNicoll and Fort William is memorable. During the summer the great white ships of the Canadian Pacific
fleet provide each week two westbound sailings from Port McNicoll, and two eastbound sailings from Fort William and Port Arthur.
Trans-Canada passengers have the advantage of travelling via this attractive diverse route (representing about one-fifth of the total mileage)
at no extra passage fare, and only a small charge for meals and berth.
SOME ATTRACTIONS OF CANADIAN PACIFIC
GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIPS
"KEEWATIN" AND "ASSINIBOIA"
• These staunch white ships were built on the Clyde.
• All rooms have running water, and lights in each berth.
• Deluxe rooms, some with twin beds, are available at a small extra charge.
• Excellent cuisine and service.
• Steamships carry orchestras, for dancing and dinner music.
• Facilities for deck sports, including shuffle board, bull board, deck quoits, bucket quoits and deck golf,
• The rear portion of the upper deck, including the Veranda Cafe, is  enclosed,  providing  an   ideal  observation   room,  as  well  as
extra space for dancing.
• Steamships carry barbers and hairdressers.    Valet service is also available.
• Trains at Port McNicoll and Fort William go direct to ship's side.    No cross-town transfers.
SIGHTSEEING EXCURSIONS
Interesting sightseeing trips are available at Sault Ste. Marie, Port Arthur and Fort William during stop-overs of
Canadian Pacific steamers.
(1) PASSENGER FARES - ADULTS & CHILDREN
The Canadian Pacific S.S. "Keewatin" and S.S. "Assiniboia," that link the rails of the transcontinental trip, operate in passenger
service from June 20 to Sept. 16 Westbound and June 24 to Sept. 19 Eastbound, both dates inclusive. Through fares via the Great
Lakes Steamships between Fort William and points west thereof and Toronto and points reached through Toronto, are the same as by
rail, but additional amounts will require to be paid as follows for meals and berth on lake steamship, and separate meal and berth ticket
obtained from  Canadian  Pacific Agent:
BERTH IN
Outside Room Inside Room
♦Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William   $10.00 $9.00
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie        5.00 4.50     r     In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William        5.00 4.50     ,
* Includes following meals :—
WESTBOUND — Dinner after embarking at Port McNicoll, and all meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port Arthur or Fort William.
EASTBOUND — Lunch after embarking at Fort William or Port Arthur, and all meals up to and including breakfast on morning of arrival at Port McNicoll.
(Breakfast, at 75c, served on board steamer at Fort William on morning of sailing)/
ITINERARY OF GREAT LAKES STEAMSHIP SERVICE
PORT TO PORT PASSAGE FARES
First Class adults' fares :— One Way
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William   $24.25
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie, Ont      11.50
Between Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. and Port Arthur or Fort William..     12.75
Round Trip
$43.50
20.00
23.50
Meals and Berth
Extra,   as   shown
above.
Children five years or over and under twelve will be charged half fare and half the separate meal and berth charge, provided
each child shares a berth with an adult or two half fare children are berthed together.
For children under five years of age, when accompanied by parent or guardian or sharing berth with an adult or an older child,
no charge will be made, except that children under five occupying seats at table will be charged as follows for meals:
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William.   $ 4.00     1
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie         2.00     \     In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William        2.00     J
(a) If a child under five occupies a berth by itself it must be charged full meal and berth rate of $9.00 or $10.00 between Port
McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William, or $4.50 or $5.00 between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie or between Sault Ste.
Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William.    It will not be required to pay anything for transportation.
(b) Two children under five occupying a berth together will be charged the same as one child under five — see clause (a) above
— and for the second child, if occupying a seat at the table, the amount stated in second paragraph above according to distance. No
charge for transportation.
(c) Two children under five travelling in same party will not be given separate berths even on payments as per clause (a).
(d) One child between five and twelve travelling on a half-fare ticket will require to pay half the meal and berth rate shown
in clause (a), if sharing berth with an adult or a child of twelve years or over.
(e) Two children between five and twelve berthed together and each holding half fare ticket, will require to pay one full mea!
and berth charge as shown in clause (a).
(f) If one child between five and twelve holding half-fare ticket occupies a berth by itself or shares it with a child under five
years of age it will require to pay full meal and berth rate of $9.00 or $10.00 or $4.50 or $5.00 according to distance travelled and
type of accommodation (inside or outside) — except that a child of half fare age (i.e., between five and twelve) in three-berth room
with two adults will be required to pay only half the full meal and berth charge, according to the distance travelled.
(CONSULT ANY TICKET AGENT FOR FULL INFORMATION)
REDUCED AUTOMOBILE RATES
Automobiles, accompanied by one or more passengers each paying full first class fare,
will be carried :
Between Port McNicoll and Port Arthur or Fort William $12.00 ]
Between Port McNicoll and Sault Ste. Marie        7.00 > In Each Direction
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Port Arthur or Fort William      7.00 J
The charge for a camp automobile trailer will be the same as for an automobile.
It is not necessary that tanks be drained of gasoline.
(2)
BAGGAGE
150 lbs. of baggage will be carried free on
each adult ticket and 75 lbs. on each half
ticket. Steamer trunks not more than 14
inches in height may be placed in staterooms. Passengers will find it more convenient to allow trunks to be placed in the
baggage room on board where they can be
made readily accessible if desired, unless
bonded.
and connecting train services
STEAMSHIPS "KEEWATIN" & "ASSINIBOIA
//
WESTBOUND
Lv. Toronto	
Ar. Port McNicoll	
Lv. PORT McNICOLL
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE
Ar. PORT ARTHUR....
Ar. FORT WILLIAM...
Lv.   Fort William	
Ar.  Winnipeg	
Ar.  Calgary	
Ar.  Banff ,	
Ar.  Vancouver	
C.P. Boat Special
Steamship
C.P.R. train
1.30 pm E.T.
4.40 pm E.T.
5.00 pm E.T.
11.30 am E.T.
12.30 pm E.T.
6.45 am E.T.
• 7.50 am E.T.
••
No
1
7.35
am
C.T.
7.45
pm
CI.
10.10
pm
M.I.
1.30
am
M.I.
10.30
pm
P.T.
#No. 3
9.35 pm C.T.
8.45 am C.T.
7.45 am M.T.
11.10am M.T.
9.00 am P.T.
Wed.   Sat.
Thu.   Sun.
Fri.     Mon.
Daily
* Connection made at Fort William with No. 1.
**Cafe Parlor Car operated in train No. 1, Fort William to Calgary;   through  Sleeping
Car Winnipeg-Vancouver.
# Through Sleeping Cars operated between Fort William and Vancouver in train   No.  3.
Dining Car facilities on this train.
EASTBOUND
Lv.   Vancouver	
Lv.   Banff	
Lv.   Calgary	
Lv.   Winnipeg	
Ar.  Fort William...	
Lv.  FORT WILLI AM....
Lv.  PORT ARTHUR	
Ar. SAULT STE. MARIE
Lv. SAULT STE. MARIE.
Ar. PORT McNICOLL..
Lv.   Port McNicoll	
Ar. Toronto	
C.P.R. No. 4
Steamship
C.P. Boat Special
7.15
5.50
8.30
7.15
*6.00
12.00
1.30
9.30
1.30
8.30
8.45
11.30
pm
P.T.
pm
M.I.
pm
M.I.
pm
CI.
am
CT.
n'n
E.T.
pm
E.T.
am
E.T.
pm
E.T.
am
E.T.
am
F..T.
am
E.T.
Daily
Sat.    Wed.
Sun.   Thu.
it        •«
Mon. Fri.
• Occupancy at Fort William until 8.00 a.m. in Winnipeg - Fort William
sleeper, operated to connect with each sailing.
Breakfast, at 75c, served on board steamer at Fort William on mornings
of sailing.
Parlor Cars and Coaches operated in Boat Special train   between  Toronto and  Port McNicoll.
Standard Time governing rail and steamship schedules :
E.T. — Eastern  Time;    C.T. — Central  Time,-    M.T. — Mountain  Time;    P.T. — Pacific Time.
SEE CURRENT TIME TABLE FOLDERS FOR PARTICULARS OF EQUIPMENT OPERATED AND COMPLETE TRAIN SERVICE
WESTBOUND
STEAMER
EASTBOUND
Lv.
PORT McNICOLL
(5.00 pm)
SAULT STE. MARIE
(Ar. 11.30 am)
(Lv.  12.30  pm)
PORT ARTHUR
(Ar. 6.45 am)
FORT WILLIAM
(Ar. 7.50 am)
Lv. FORT WILLI AM
(12.00   noon)
Lv. PORT ARTHUR
(1.30 pm)
SAULT STE. MARIE
(Ar. 9.30 am)
(Lv. 1.30 pm)
Ar.
PORT McNICOLL
(8.30 am)
Sat.        June    20
Wed      June    24
Sun.       June    21
Thurs.    June    25
Sun.       June    23
Thurs.    July       2
Sun.       July       5
Thurs.    July       9
Sun.       July     12
Thurs.    July     16
Sun.       July     19
Thurs.    July     23
Sun.      July    26
Thurs.    July     30
Sun.       Aug.     2
Thurs.    Aug.     6
Sun.       Aug.     9
Thurs.    Aug.   13
Sun.       Aug.   16
Thurs.    Aug.   20
Sun.      Aug.   23
Thurs.    Aug.   27
Sun.       Aug.   30
Thurs.    Sept.      3
Sun.       Sept.      6
Thurs.    Sept.   10
Sun.       Sept.   13
Thurs.    Sept.   17
Mon.     June    22
Fri.        June    26
Mon.    June    29
Fri.        July       3
Mon.    July       6
Fri.        July     10
Mon.    July    13
Fri.        July    17
Mon.    July     20
Fri.        July    24
Mon.    July     27
Fri.        July     31
Mon.     Aug.     3
Fri.         Aug.     7
Mon.    Aug.   10
Fri.         Aug.   14
Mon.     Aug.   17
Fri.         Aug.   21
Mon.    Aug.   24
Fri.         Aug.   28
Mon.     Aug.   31
Fri.        Sept.      4
Mon.    Sept.      7
Fri.        Sept.   11
Mon.    Sept.   14
Fri.        Sept.   18
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Wed.    June    24
Sat.        June    27
Wed.    July       1
Sat.        July       4
Wed.    July       8
Sat.        July     11
Wed.    July    15
Sat.        July     18
Wed.    July     22
Sat.        July     25
Wed.    July    29
Sat.        Aug.     1
Wed.    Aug.     5
Sat.        Aug.     8
Wed.    Aug.   12
Sat.        Aug.   15
Wed.    Aug.   19
Sat.        Aug.   22
Wed.    Aug.   26
Sat.        Aug.   29
Wed.    Sept.     2
Sat.        Sept.      5
Wed.    Sept.     9
Sat.        Sept.    12
Wed.    Sept.   16
Sat.       Sept.   19
Thurs.    June    25
Sun.      June    28
Thurs.    July       2
Sun.      July       5
Thurs.    July       9
Sun.      July    12
Thurs.    July    16
Sun.      July    19
Thurs.    July    23
Sun.      July    26
Thurs.    July    30
Sun.      Aug.     2
Thurs.    Aug.     6
Sun.       Aug.     9
Thurs.    Aug.   13
Sun.       Aug.   16
Thurs.    Aug.   20
Sun.       Aug.   23
Thurs.    Aug.   27
Sun.       Aug.   30
Thurs.    Sept.     3
Sun.       Sept.      6
Thurs.    Sept.   10
Sun.       Sept.   13
Thurs.    Sept.   17
Sun.      Sept.   20
Fri.        June    26
Mon.    June    29
Sat.        June    27
Wed.    July       1
Sat.       July       4
Wed.    July       8
Sat.       July    11
Wed.    July     15
Sat.        July     18
Wed.    July    22
Sat.        July     25
Wed.    July    29
Sat.        Aug.     1
Wed.     Aug.     5
Sat.        Aug.     8
Wed.     Aug.   12
Sat.        Aug.   15
Wed.     Aug.   19
Sat.        Aug.   22
Wed.     Aug.   26
Sat.        Aug.   29
Wed.    Sept.      2
Sat.        Sept.      5
Wed.    Sept.     9
Sat.        Sept.   12
Wed.    Sept.   16
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 .."ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN" 	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        July       3
Mon.    July       6
Fri.        July     10
Mon.    July     13
Fri.        July     17
Mon.    July     20
Fri.        July     24
Mon.    July     27
Fri.        July     31
Mon.     Aug.     3
Fri.        Aug.     7
Mon.    Aug.   10
Fri.        Aug.   14
Mon.    Aug.   17
Fri.        Aug.   21
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN".	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
   "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        Aug.   28
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Fri.        Sept.      4
Mon.    Sept.     7
Fri.        Sept.   11
Mon.    Sept.   14
Fri.        Sept.    18
Mon.    Sept.    21
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
 "ASSINIBOIA"	
 "KEEWATIN"	
Before and after the regular Great Lakes passenger season, as shown above, special sailings between Port McNicoll, Sault Ste. Marie
and Port Arthur and/or Fort William are frequently arranged to provide for  freight shipments.    Passengers will be accommodated
on such sailings, when space is available.
(3) Steamships "KEEWATIN" and "ASSINIBOIA
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S.S.   "Keewatin"
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Captain F. H. DAVIS
Purser C. S. MIERS
S.S. "Assiniboia"
Captain JAS. McCANNEL
Purser GEO. BETHUNE
CLYDE - BUILT
Speed      -    -    -    -    -    -    -- 15 knots
Gross Tonnage  3880
Net Tonnage  2486
Length  350 ft.
Breadth  43 ft.
Depth  15 ft.
DECKS :   Main, Upper and Sun Deck.
A  indicates Upper Berth;    B Lower Berth;    C Sofa Berth.
UPPERIDECK — All Rooms except 1 and 5 have three berths each.
Room 1 has four berths and a long seat. Room 5
has two berths and a long seat.
MAIN DECK— All Inside Rooms except 101 and 149 have two
berths and a long seat; Rooms 101 and 149 have
two berths and a short seat only.
All Outside Rooms except 166, 168, 171, 173
and 175 have three berths each; Rooms 168,171
and 1 75 are Parlor Rooms with bathroom attached.
Rooms 166 and 173 are Parlor Rooms with twin
beds and private bathroom.
Room 177 has three berths with bathroom attached.
(4)
u
Printed in Canada 1936 f£rt Wfcvporf flrftur
Kakabekai
Falls, Fort
William
Port
Arthur
^VERYONE has been warned to rise early for the
magnificent sunrise, and you are glad not to have
missed the view of Silver Islet, once a famous silver
mine sunk 1,200 feet below the level of the lake, also
Thunder Cape rising almost perpendicularly. The captain
himself points to the "sleeping giant" on top of the Cape,
and tells its story. The ship passes close to Welcome
Island — a lighthouse guards the Twin Cities of Fort Wiliam
and Port Arthur, where stand the terminal elevators with
their enormous bushel capacity. This is the gateway to
the West, it is a popular resort ground — only a short
distance away are the Kakabeka Falls, a great picnic spot.
At Chippewa Park, established on an ancient Indian
Reserve, is a Zoo inhabited by wild animals and birds
native to those virgin forests — bear, moose, fox, cranes,
loons and herons. But your baggage is packed, the
ship slowly approaches the dock. Your lovely inland
voyage is over.    The gangplank is approaching.
w mm \
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feie1^0CRu3^
A NOTHER thrill in store — the Canadian
Rockies, a paradise for play in the Roof
Garden of the World. Gorgeous snow-capped
peaks, sky-piercing ranges encircling lovely
jewelled lakes. Mountains that you can ride to
the timber line. Glaciers, tumbling waterfalls,
great canyons, foaming torrents, trails for hiking,
and luxurious hotels and rustic bungalows where
you can loaf and play. Capital of this vast mountain empire is Banff Springs Hotel, with its warm
sulphur and cool fresh water swimming pools, mile-
high golf and tennis courts—built for sports lovers.
Lake Louise, probably the finest gem ever seen is
forty miles from Banff along a scenic motor road.
The Chateau Lake Louise stands by the lake.
On its margin grows a perfect Alpine flower
garden.
Baronial Banff Springs Hotel — overlooking the Ikf") kforric Great \gkez -Rouie
(Adapted from the notes of Captain James McCannel,
Master of the Canadian Pacific Steamship "Assiniboia")
THE five "Great Lakes" of the North American continent
(Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario) are really
fresh-water inland seas. They are drained ultimately
by the St. Lawrence River, which — with its tributaries —
flows to the Atlantic Ocean with the waters of a basin nearly
500,000 squares miles in size. 2,200 miles is the distance
from the head of Lake Superior to tide-water in the Gulf of
St. Lawrence.
From time immemorial these waterways were traversed by
Indians in their birch bark canoes, sometimes in peace and
often in war. The first white men to visit these inland seas
came up by river and lake in the birch bark canoes of the Indians,
which were light in construction and easily carried over the
portages. In 1615 Samuel de Champlain journeyed from
Montreal by way of the Ottawa River, Lake Nipissing and the
French River to the Georgian Bay and landed in what is now
known as Penetanguishene Bay. He was soon followed from
time to time by other explorers who had penetrated further
westward and sometime during the summer of 1623 Etienne
Brule arrived at what is now Sault Ste. Marie, and was the first
white man to gaze on Lake Superior, the largest and finest
body of fresh water in the world.
In 1649 Fathers Brebeuf and Lalemant were tortured and
murdered by the savage Iroquois near Georgian Bay, and
further away — near the Blue Mountains of Collingwood —
Fathers Daniel and Gamier met a similar fate. A short distance
from Port McNicoll a beautiful shrine has been erected to
commemorate the death of these martyrs. Now, during the
summer, thousands of pilgrims visit this shrine. Farther down
the Bay is the site of a former military and naval station, selected
in 1796 by Governor Simcoe and occupied by some of the
most famous regiments of the line.
Radisson and Groseillers made a survey of Lake Superior
in 1660 and 1661 and about the same time the Jesuits established their first mission on this lake. Some years later Joliet
was sent to investigate the copper deposits reputed to exist
there, and in 1678 Du Lhut established a fur trading post on
the present site of Fort William.
With the arrival of settlers, first from France, and later from
the British Isles, fwho usually located along the shores of the
lakes and rivers] it was soon found that the canoes were not
large enough to take care of the growing commerce of the
new world, and consequently they began building sail boats,
which  increased in size as the trade warranted.    In the early
years of the last century men began to build steamboats of
various types and designs, as it was found that sail could not
always give the service necessary, and by the middle of the
century it was a race between sail and steam, as to which would
be supreme. Sailormen looked with disdain on steamboats
and did not take kindly to that mode of propulsion, but eventually steam succeeded in driving sailing ships out of business.
During the '60's and 70's sailing ships reached their zenith
and from that time on began to decline. We find in the early
70's there were over 1,400 sailing vessels registered in Canada
and the United States, and from 1848 to 1875 many of these
made successful ocean voyages clearing from lake ports with
grain, square timber, lumber, staves, spars, copper and silver
ore for British ports. One brig, the "SEAGULL", loaded
farm implements at Toronto for Cape Town, and during the
same years British and Norwegian ships came up to the
Great Lakes ports.
To the west of the Great Lakes were two great fur-trading
companies. The Hudson's Bay Co., receiving the goods necessary
for the trade, transported them from England in their own ships
to York Factory and then sent them inland by canoe and York
boats. The North West Co., composed largely of Highland
Scots from Montreal, was a great rival to the former, and every
spring brigades of canoes were loaded at Lachine and these
hardy voyageurs paddled every mile of navigable water, coming
up by the Ottawa River, Lake Nipissing, the French River,
coursing along the shores of Georgian Bay, the North Channel,
Soo River, around the north shore of Lake Superior to the
Grand Portage; and then loaded into the north canoes, which
were much smaller, and carried by lakes and rivers to the remote
posts on the western plains. At the rapids and waterfalls all
this freight had to be unloaded and carried across on the backs
of the men; a very laborious work. These two Companies
were merged in 1821.
Today the scene is changed. The steamship now carries
on the work, and modern skill has succeeded in designing a
class of vessel most suited to the trade. The white-sided, Clyde-
built steamships of the Canadian Pacific Great Lakes fleet
maintain a convenient service between Port McNicoll and
Fort William for the passenger and freight trade. Travellers
wishing to make a trip by the Great Lakes will be well repaid.
There is no finer trip anywhere in the world than from Port
McNicoll to Fort William on one of the staunch Canadian Pacific
steamers, a distance of 542 miles over an enchanting lake and
river route.
This booklet describes a westbound cruise from Port McNicoll to Port Arthur and Fort William—
the voyage in the opposite direction follows the same interesting route and is equally attractive.
WORLD-WIDE SERVICE
• Great Britain and Europe
AIR-LINE ROUTE . . . Frequent sailings via the short St. Lawrence Seaway
from Montreal and Quebec (summer) . . . Saint John, N.B., and Halifax, N.S.
(winter) ... to and from British and Continental ports ... the majestic Empress
of Britain and other great Empress, Duchess and "Mont" ships of the CANADIAN
PACIFIC fleet set new standards of trans-Atlantic service.
FAST FREIGHT SERVICE provided by Empress, Duchess, "Mont" liners and
"Beaver" cargo ships.
• Canada and United States
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY (comprising 21,235 miles of operated
and controlled lines) reaches from the Atlantic to the Pacific, across Canada
and into the United States. The main line, Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles,
passes through the heart of the famous Canadian Rockies, with their crowning
jewels of Banff, Lake Louise and Emerald Lake, unsurpassed as vacation resorts.
Modern and comfortable trans-continental and local passenger train services
link the important cities, industrial sections, agricultural regions and holiday
resorts. Fast and efficient freight service. Convenient coastal and inland steamship
services.    Builds and operates own sleeping, dining and parlor cars.
•  Honolulu, Orient and South Seas
Regular sailings to  and  from  Vancouver and  Victoria  providing  convenient
passenger and freight schedules.
DIRECT EXPRESS ROUTE TO ORIENT . . . swift sister ships.    Empress of
Asia and Empress of Russia . . . Yokohama in 10 days flat!
VIA HONOLULU . . . The mighty Empress of Japan and her running mate,
Empress of Canada, make Honolulu in 5 days, Yokohama in just 8 days more.
SOUTH SEAS . . . Canadian Australasian Line fast modern liners to Honolulu,
Fiji, New Zealand and Australia.
• Round-the-World
ANNUAL WORLD CRUISE on the famous Empress of Britain, perfectly timed
to see world-renowned beauty spots at their best ... Other attractive cruises
to Mediterranean — East and South Africa — South-America, West Indies,
Norwegian Fjords, etc.
INDEPENDENT ROUND-THE-WORLD TOURS, choice of over 200
itineraries ... 179 offices maintained throughout the world to assist
CANADIAN PACIFIC patrons.
• Hotels, Express, Communications
HOTELS ... A chain of comfort across Canada from Atlantic to Pacific . . .
Fifteen hotels in leading cities and resorts, including Chateau Frontenac, Quebec;
Royal York, Toronto; Banff Springs; Empress Hotel, Victoria . . . Eight chalet-
bungalow camps in the Canadian  Rockies and at Ontario fishing resorts.
COMMUNICATIONS AND EXPRESS . . . owned and operated by the
CANADIAN PACIFIC . . . trans-Canada Service . . . world-wide connections . . . travellers   cheques — good   the   world   over.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
PRINCIPAL
Canadian Pacific Agencies
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Atlanta, Ga H. C. James 404 C. & S. Nat'I Bk. Bldg.
Banff, Alta. (Summer) J. C. Pike Canadian Pacific Station
Boston, Mass L. R. Hart 405 Boylston St.
Buffalo, N.Y W. P. Wass 22 Court Street
Calgary, Alta G. D. Brophy Canadian Pacific Station
Chicago, 111 T. J. Wall 71 East Jackson Blvd.
Cincinnati, Ohio S. E. Corbin . 201 Dixie Terminal Bldg.
Cleveland, Ohio G. H. Griffin 1010 Chester Ave.
Dallas, Texas P. G. Jefferson 1212 Kirby Bldg.
Detroit, Mich M. E. Malone 1231  Washington Blvd.
Edmonton, Alta C. S. Fyfe Canadian Pacific Building
Fort William, Ont H. J. Skynner 108 South May St.
Guelph, Ont ... W. C. Tully 30 Wyndham St.
Halifax, N.S A. C. MacDonald 413 Barrington St.
Hamilton, Ont A. Craig Cor. King and James Sts.
Honolulu, T. H Theo. H. Davies & Co.
Juneau, Alaska V. W. Mulvihill
Kansas City, Mo R. G. Norris 709 Walnut St.
Ketchikan, Alaska Edgar Anderson
Kingston, Ont J. H. Welch 180 Wellington St.
London, Ont H. J. McCallum 417 Richmond St.
Los Angeles, Cal W. Mcllroy 621 South Grand Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis J. A. Millington 1014 Warner Theatre Bldg.
Minneapolis, Minn H. M. Tait 611 2nd Ave. South
/P. E. Gingras Windsor  Station
* \F. C. Lydon 201 St. James   St. W.
..T.J. Colton Canadian Pacific Station
. . N. J. Lowes Baker and Ward Sts.
.. J. E. Roach Madison Ave. at 44th St.
. . R. Y. Daniaud 87 Main Street West
.. J. A. McGill 83 Sparks St.
. .J. Skinner 343 George St.
.. E. A. Kenney 1500 Locust St.
.. W. A. Shackelford Koppers Bldg., 444 7th Ave.
.. W. H. Deacon 626 S. W. Broadway
.. W. L. Coates
.. C. A. Langevin Palais Station
. . J. W. Dawson Canadian Pacific Station
. .C. B. Andrews 40 King St.
. .G. P. Carbrey 418 Locust St.
.. W. H. Lennon Fourth and Cedar
. .F. L. Nason 152 Geary St.
. .R. T. Wilson 115 Second Ave.
.. J. O. Johnston 529 Queen Street
.. E. L. Sheehan 1320 Fourth Ave.
. .J. A. Metivier. 91 Wellington St. North
.. L. H. Johnston
.. E. S. McPherson Old National  Bank Bldg.
L. N. Jones 1113   Pacific   Ave.
 U
Montreal, Que	
Moose Jaw, Sask....
Nelson, B.C	
New York, N.Y	
North Bay, Ont	
Ottawa, Ont	
Peterboro, Ont	
Philadelphia, Pa	
Pittsburgh, Pa	
Portland, Ore	
Prince Rupert, B.C..
Quebec, Que	
Regina, Sask	
Saint John, N.B	
St. Louis, Mo	
St. Paul, Minn	
San Francisco, Cal...
Saskatoon, Sask	
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont
Seattle, Wash	
Sherbrooke, Que	
Skagway, Alaska....
Spokane, Wash	
Tacoma, Wash	
Toronto, Ont {g/BFUSS?pee
Trois Rivieres, Que
Vancouver, B.C. . .
Victoria, B.C	
Washington, D.C..
Windsor, Ont	
Winnipeg, Man	
King and Yonge Sts.
J. A. Tourville 1262 Notre Dame St.
F. H. Daly 434 Hastings Street West
J. Macfarlane 1102  Government  St.
C. E. Phelps 14th and New York Ave., N.W.
W. C. Elmer  142 Ouellette Ave.
E. A. McGuinness Main and Portage
Antwerp, Belgium	
Belfast, Ireland	
Birmingham, England.
Bristol, England ,
Brussels, Belgium	
Dublin, Ireland	
Glasgow, Scotland	
Hamburg, Germany —
Liverpool, England
London, England ,
Manchester, England	
lMewoasiie-on-Tyne, Eng.
Paris, France	
Rotterdam, Holland	
Southampton, England..
EUROPE
. W. D. Grosset 25 Quai Jordaens
.H. T. Penny 24 Donegall Place
. .J. R. W. Taylor 4 Victoria Square
.T. W. Thorne 18 St. Augustine's Parade
. .G. L. M. Servais 98 Blvd.  Adolphe-Max
.. A. T. McDonald 44 Dawson St.
.. W. H. Boswell 25 Bothwell St.
,. T. H. Gardner Alsterdamm   9
. .M. L. Duffy Pier Head
/C. E. Jenkins 62-65 Charing Cross
' \G. Saxon Jones 103 Leadenhall   St.
. .R. L. Hughes 31 Mosley St.
. .A.S. Craig 34 Mosley St.
.A. V. Clark 24  Blvd. des Capuclnes
, .J. Springett Coolsingel   No.  91
.H. Taylor Canute   Road
ASIA
. . E. Hospes Opposite Blake Pier
.. W. R. Buckberrough 7   Harima-machi
.. G. R. Razavet 14-16 Calle David
.. A. M. Parker The Bund and Peking Road
. .B. G. Ryan 21 Yamashita-cho
Hong Kong, China..
Kobe, Japan	
Manila, P.I	
Shanghai, China... .
Yokohama, Japan. .
AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, FIJI
Adelaide, S. Aus Macdonald.  Hamilton   &  Co.
Auckland, N.Z., A. W. Essex, Traffic Agent for New Zealand, C.P.R., 32-34 Quay St
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Brisbane, Qd Macdonald,  Hamilton   & Co.
Christchurch, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Dunedin, N.Z Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Fremantle, W. Aus Macdonald,  Hamilton   & Co.
Hobart, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Launceston, Tas Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Melbourne, Vic H. F. Boyer, Freight and Pass'r Agent, C.P.R., 59 William St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Perth, W. A Macdonald, Hamilton,  & Co.
Suva, Fiji Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Sydney, N.S.W., N. R. McMorran, Traffic Agent for Australia, C.P.R., Union House
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Wellington, N.Z., G.A. Glennie, Freight and Pass'r Agent, C.P.R., 11 Johnston St.
Union S.S. Co. of N.Z. (Ltd.)
Always   Carry   Canadian   Pacific   Express   Travellers'   Cheques
GOOD THE WORLD OVER
Printed in Canada 1936 mmm:r v
f^WWm
Canadian Pacific

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