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Correspondence, 1912-1923 MacDonell, Father Andrew 1923

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 Fernhill Ranch,
Hovato,California,
March 27th., 1922.
Rev.and dear Father;
Your letter of February twenty-first arrived
while I was on a motor trip through southern California and
has remained unanswered for that reason.
I am indeed glad to hear that you are succeeding in your
immigration project; hut I agree with your London friend that the
time is not propitious to obtain capital for any scheme; regardless
of merit. Surely there can he no doubt of the success of a Catholic
magazine in Ganada....but,money has been almost unobtainable.
Perhaps things will be a bit easier from now on: financial men seem
to think so and there appears to be a spirit of incipient optimism
that did not exist last autumn.
As to B.C.,things there are flat,if one is to believe all that
one hears. I am in touch with Kappel (72nd.lad) who was formerly in my
office of the Trans-Pacific, he is now in real estate and at the moment
has reached the linit of depression, xhere are times when 1 wonder
how long it is going to take for B.C. to recover fully from those
unfortunate 'booms'.
Canada's only hope,in my humble opinion lies in the successful
culmination of the work in which you are interested. More men on the
land and in the development of natural resources. But,Canada,both
in the spring and autumn of last year was hopeless in many ways.
I made a rather exhaustive survey of statistics with one of the
faculty at McGill. The result after tabulation was really depressing.
There were men in Montreal who were hungry. Hot the ordinary rotter
type either; keen,intelligent,educated men who deserved better treatment from a government for whom some of them had undergone years of
hell in France and Flanders. True,th# war is over,and no one has been
more opposed to the policy of those men who expected the nation to
maintain them in luxury for the remainder of their lives because they
fulfilled their duty at the moment by serving at the front. Never-the-
less,they have a right to expest Canada to fulfill both her duty and
her war-time promises.....and she has done neither. It is a fact too,
that in many instances Britishers (I am including Canadians) are
left unprovided for while Americans are given positions. And,underneath
the surface,in the alleyWays of Eastern Canada,and Western Canada also,
there exists today a stronger pro-Bolshevik influence,a far more
radical element,in consequence. Of these things I know whereof I
speak.Refusing to believe many of the tales I heard,I accompanied
two friends { one a member of the R.N.W.M.P., on plain clothes duty,
and a reporter on the Montreal Star) on a tour of investigation of
conditions. The result was too astounding for words,
lhat we need more than anything else is to 'blow our own bugle'
a bit;to awaken to the fact that we are a unit of the British Commonwealth and develope a pride in and love for the Union Jack. And,the
only way to do it is by offering some assistance to the man who is
willing to help himself.No man is going to feel any loyalty for a
country where he must starve to death.
Continuous aping of Americans,and American methods will never
get us anywhere. I have improved greatly since coming here; shall be leaving again
shortly but as yet have not definitely decided on my destination.
For many reasons I should like to venture into the interior
of Mexico. There are many Scotch and English there;opportunities
are said to be very good,and I have lost so much money in the past
year and a half that I am most desirous of getting into something.
Please address me here,it will be forwarded at once. In event
I decide to return to Britain I shall probably see you. At the
moment there is apparently nothing for me in Canada.
Sincerely wishing you all possible success,and continued
good health,I am,
Obediently yours, g>oc(et£ of ti)e f|oip Jlame,
nmT,
FOR   CANADIAN   SOLDIERS.
Published by
Catholic Army Huts (Canada).
Printed by
St. Clements Press, Ltd.,
Portugal St., Kingsway,W.C. Sbott prater for IDictorg.
/"\ Eternal Father, God, our King,
^^ In the Name of Jesus and for
the Love of Jesus take our Cause
in Thy Hand and grant it Good
Success. FOREWORD.
LETTER from General Sir ARTHUR CURRIE,
K.C.B., K.C.M.G.
Corps Headquarters,
April 25th, 1918.
My attention has been drawn to the fact that in
one of the Divisions of the Corps there has been
formed the " Society of the Holy Name," the members
of which pledge themselves to honour the name of
God the Father and of Jesus Christ His Son and our
Saviour.
I would like to be enrolled as a member. I know
that on many occasions I shall probably fail, but, with
God's help, I shall try to keep His Name hallowed
and not to take it in vain.
In taking this pledge, our attitude should not be
merely a negative one. While pledging ourselves to
refrain from using blasphemous language, we should
endeavour by our words,  by our  actions, and  by the
3 octets of t{)e f|ol£ jBtatne.
FOR   CANADIAN   SOLDIERS.
It is proposed to form a Society among Canadian Soldiers.
The object of the Society is to honour the name of Jesus, and
invoke thereby the Blessing of God on our arms, and so
obtain victory.
If we are to turn to God and ask His aid, the first thing
we should do is to hold His Name in reverence.
Our Lord has so taught us.
When we begin the Lord's Prayer in which we ask for our
needs, He has taught us to begin by praying that God's Name
be "hallowed," that is, that it beheld holy, and with love
and reverence by us who are now coming to Him with our
petition.
The Name of Jesus demands our greatest respect. What
can more clearly and forcibly show the great respect due to
this Sacred Name than the words of the Apostle St. Paul ?—
" God hath exalted Him, and hath given Him a Name which
is above all Names; that in the Name of Jesus every knee
should bow, of those that are in heaven, on earth and under
the earth; and that every tongue should confess that the Lord
Jesus  Christ is in the glory of God the Father."    Phil. ii.
This Name also calls for our confidence, for "It is the only
Name under Heaven given to men whereby we must be
saved."    Acts iv. 12. Our Lord would encourage us te have this confidence without doubting, " I say to you if you ask the Father anything in
my Name, He will give it you."    John xvi. 23.
Again, when this name was to be bestowed upon Him we
were given to understand all that it meant to mankind, " And
thou shalt call His name Jesus, for He shall save His people
from their sins."    Matt. i. 2.
Accordingly we find that the Apostles learnt to have all
confidence in this Holy Name, and St. Paul lays down the
rule, "All whatsoever you do in word or in work, all things
do ye in the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ."    Col. iii. 17.
The Name of Jesus is holy, therefore it is deserving of
honour, and it is our duty to honour it. This Name is hoi}
(1) in its origin—
God is its Author. From all eternity He chose this
Name for His Only begotten Son, and caused it to be
announced to men. He prefigured It, and foretold It
in the Old Testament. It was prsefigured in Josue
(Joshuah), the son of Nun who led the chosen people into
the Promised Land, also in Jesus, son of Josedec
(Josedech) who led the children of Israel back from the
Babylonian Captivity.
He announced it to men by sending His Angel for that
purpose.
(2) Again, the Name is Holy because of the holiness of
Him who bore It.
In every case known to history, when a name becomes the
object of veneration it is in consequence cf the reverence,
love, and gratitude due to the person who bore the name.
In every age and every nation men distinguished by virtues
and noble deeds are held in honour.
8 But what are these all if we compare them with Our Divine
Saviour as man and as God ?
(6) The Name of Jesus is holy in its meaning.
This Name comprises all that God the Son has done to
merit to be so called. He merited this Name. "He hath
humbled Himself, becoming obedient unto death, even to the
death of the Cross. For which cause God also hath exalted
Him, and given Him a Name which is above all names."
Phil. ii.
The Name of Jesus, Our Saviour, comprises the whole
Gospel. "Neither is there salvation in any other, for it is
the only Name under Heaven given to men whereby we
must be saved."    Acts iv. 12.
Therefore as it is thus holy with threefold holiness, honour
It in your heart, with your lips, and in your actions.
Realizing what honour, reverence and love is due to this
Holy Name, the members of the Society will always utter it
with reverence and love and in prayer—will undertake on their
word of honour to avoid altogether its improper use in profanity,
cursing or in idle and vain talk, and in order further to honour
this Holy Name they undertake to avoid all ribald talk, every
form of foul language, especially such as partakes of lewd and
filthy indecency of speech.
Whoever will thus, for the sake of God and his neighbour,
discipline himself and restrain his tongue from offence may,
with the greatest confidence, approach the Eternal God in his
hour of trial, and in the Name of Jesus ask for the aid that he
needs.
There is a great example that may be quoted here. One
of the greatest and most successful leaders of men in this
France in which we are fighting was the Maid of Orleans, the
Blessed Joan of Arc. Her career is one of the most astonishing
episodes in the eventful story of France. When she, a simple
village   maid   following   the   bidding    of   her   inspiration,
9 • undertook to liberate her country, all the strong places therein
were in the hands of the enemy. In a few short months there
was a most wonderful transformation, and the power of the
enemy was broken. How was it done? It is a marvellous
story that cannot here be recounted. But among the first
rules laid down by the Maid for her soldiers was this—That
if they were to have the blessing of God on their arms and
achieve victory, they must restrain their tongues from all
profanity and blasphemy, and honour the Holy Name of our
Lord. On the banner that she always carried into battle was
inscribed the word " Jesus."
There was one old General who gave the Maid much
trouble. For many long years swearing and profanity were
second nature to him.
Like others,he had learnt to show the greatest respect to
the opinions and wishes of "Joan of Arc, and ardently desired
therefore to break himself of the evil habit. He made brave
efforts, and his frequent lapses into violent and profane language
were a source of great pain to him because he knew that they
offended his well-beloved leader. She, knowing his trouble,
made things easy for him, and allowed him to make use of
the phrase,"I swear by my Sword," thus giving him an outlet
for the explosions of his fiery temper.
The honour given by the efforts of the Maid to the Holy
Name of God, and the discipline and self-restraint that its
daily practice entailed upon the French soldiers were the sure
harbingers of most notable victory.
We are now fighting, in the greatest war of history, and
undoubtedly we are in need of the Divine assistance. We
have a just Cause—we are fighting for Right and Justice, and
God is in our quarrel.
Let us then begin to come nearer to God by honouring His
Name, by using it always with reverence, and with the utmost
confidence invoking it to gain strength and guidance to our
arms and so achieve victory.
10 A. MacD, k
A VOLUNTARY ADHESION TO THE
&otitty of ti)e Holy Jtame*
While it is not necessary to join the
Society to attain its objects, every officer
and soldier is earnestly urged to sign the
following form, and thus proclaim that he
will honour and invoke the Holy Name of
Jesus, and will avoid all profane and lewd
■*   talk, that God may bless our arms with victory.
(SIGN  AND   HAND  TO  ANY CHAPLAIN.]
(Name)
(Unit)
ijetCbt? pttJmtjSe to honour the Holy Name
of Jesus and avoid all profane and lewd talk.
(Date) thoughts of our hearts to show our faith, our confidence, and our trust in the love and power of Him
who gave His only begotten Son to die upon the
Cross, that whosoever believed in Him should not
perish, but sheuld have everlasting life.
May our  daily  prayer to  the  Great   Ruler of the
Universe be, Thy will be done.
(Signed)    A. W. CURRIE.
Major-General  Sir DA VID WA TSON,
K.C.B., C.M.G.,
G.O.C.   4th  Canadian  Division.
The remarks in this leaflet are of beautiful religious sentiment, and contain sound advice, which
should make all its readers better men.
I earnestly hope that every officer, N.C.O. and
man in the Division which I have the honour to
command will read and take to heart the contents of
this leaflet.
Major-General  L.  J.   LIPSETT,  C.B..   C.M.G..
C.O.C. 3rd Canadian  Division.
A man is all the better soldier for a firm faith and
belief in the Divine Power, but, irrespective of the
religious aspect, profane, obscene and boastful language
is unmanly and unbecoming. I am glad to think that it is not common amongst
our men.
I hope that the pamphlet will have a wide circulation in this Division and be sympathetically considered
bv alt ranks.
Major-General   A.   C.   MACDONELL,
C.B., CM G., D.S.O.,
G.O.C.   1st  Canadian  Division.
This little leaflet is timely, helpful and needful,
pointing out our duty in touching and convincing
language, supported by well chosen proofs from Holy
Writ. I am most anxious that it shall be placed in
the hands of all ranks of the 1st Canadian Division.
We shall all be the better for reading it, and adhesion
to the Society of the Holy Name will be a strong
prop to support many a man who might otherwise
transgress thoughtlessly or wilfully.
□ HYMN.
"For it is the only Name under heaven given to men
whereby we must be saved."
To the Name of our Salvation
Laud and honour let us pay,
Wnich for many a generation
Hid in God's foreknowledge lay.
But with holy exultation
We may sing aloud to-day.
Jesus is the Name we treasure.
Name beyond what words can tell;
Name of gladness. Name of pleasure.
Ear and heart delighting well;
Name of sweetness passing measure.
Saving us from sin and hell.
'Tis the Name for adoration.
Name for songs of victory.
Name for holy meditation.
In this vale of misery.
Name for joyful veneration
By the citizens on high-
'Tis the Name that whoso preacheth
Speaks like musjc to the ear;
Who in prayer this Name beseecheth
Sweetest comfort findeth near;
Who its perfect wisdom reacheth
Heavenly joy possesseth here.
Jesus is the Name exalted
Over every other name; .
In this Name, whene'er assaulted.
We can put our foes to shame;
Strength to them who else had halted.
Eyes to blind and feet to lame.
Therefore, we in love adoring,
This most blessed Name revere.
Holy Jesu, Thee imploring
So to write it in us here
That hereafter heavenward soaring
We may sing with Angels there.
6 octets of tf)e Holy JBtame,
FOR   CANADIAN   SOLDIERS.
It is proposed to form a Society among Canadian Soldiers.
The object of the Society is to honour the name of Jesus, and
invoke thereby the Blessing of God on our arms, and so
obtain victory.
If we are to turn to God and ask His aid, the first thing
we should do Is to hold His Name in reverence.
Our Lord has so taught us.
When we begin the Lord's Prayer in which we ask for our
needs, He has taught us to begin by praying that God's Name
be "hallowed," that is, that it beheld holy, and with love
and reverence by us who are now coming to Him with our
petition.
The Name of Jesus demands our greatest respect. What
can more clearly and forcibly show the great respect due to
this Sacred Name than the words of the Apostle St. Paul ?—
" God hath exalted Him, and hath given Him a Name which
is above all Names; that in the Name of Jesus every knee
should bow, of those that are in heaven, on earth and under
the earth ; and that every tongue should confess that the Lord
Jesus  Christ  is  in the glory of God the Father."    Phil. ii.
This Name also calls for our confidence, for "It is the only
Name under Heaven given to men whereby we must be
saved."    Acts iv. 12. I
Dec .22/23
SPECIFICATION FOR FOUR ROOMED ;
 POTTAGE FOR SETTLERS.
GSEBRALLY
The contractor to supply all labor,material,transportation equipment
and everything requisite for the proper carrying out of the construction.The owner
to place and carry the necessary insurance or to advise the contractor to do so at
the owners expense,such advice to "be ir. -v7ri.ting.The contractor to carry and pay the
necessary workmen's liability insurance. The owner to supply and stake out the site,
and hold the contractor free from any action for trespassing or infringement on the
rights of others,relative to the location of the site or other matters pertaining
thereto. Ho alteration from plans and specifications shall be made without the written
consent of the owner. Payments shall be made on estimates within fifteen days of the
conipl <?ti ?" -■-""   ' cottage in full.
GAREEffTRY
Spruce shall be used throughout in the construction with the exception
of the rough boards which shall be poplar,and the shingles which shall be cedar.Four
spruce sills made by spiking together *wo pieces of 2 x 6 spruce shall be run through
as a foundation on which to erect the structure. These shall be properly shimmed and
leveled with two by four wedges or short pieces of two by four material. The joists
shall be two by six two foot centers,and all partitions shall be two by four at two
foot centers as shall also the outside frames,with-single plate arid double cap. The
outside walls shall be covered on the outside with shiplay,building paper and spruce
drop siding.The whole of the inside walls partitions and ceilings,shall be covered
with either beaver board,or Canadian Wall 3oard,and strips of spruce lattice l£"
wide. In the case of the outside walls,the studding shall first be covered with,this
board and the strips nailed over joints. The ceiling joists shall be two by four at
two foot centers and the rafters shall be two by four at two foot centers,which shall
show a proper projection for eaves. The Roof shall be covered with number two boards
and shingles. Shingles to be number two. The floor joists to be first covered with
number two boards,and then number one spruce flooring six inches wide,with one ply
of tar paper between. Windows to be twenty four inches by twenty four inches two light
check rail,but without cord or weights. All inside doors to be five panel stock doors
two foot six by by six foot six and all outside doors to be same only two foot eight
by six-foot eight.Both to be 1 ~2r/&n.~ All interior window and door casings to be four
inch square stock.Windows to have proper stools with quarter round for apron and a
six inch base to be run around all rooms. Supply cheap window catch to each window
and cheap door set to each door. Supply and fix in place at roof and ceiling one
piece of gal-^nized iron 18" square,cut fflrr seven inch stove pipe. The one at the
roof to hav% proper collar riveted to same to make it watertight. Ho painting to be done
in this contract. @I!j? Nnu fork (tait0ltr #rl|oni Inarn
OFFICE   OF  THE   SUPERINTENDENT
328   WEST   14rH   STREET
NEW   YORK
Oct.   27,   1919.
Rev. A. MacDonell, O.S.B.,
740 View Street,
Victoria, B.C.
Rev. and dear Father:-
I have your letter of October 18th sent to
me through Archbishop Hayes. Here are some of the things I have
to say in reply to the questions you ask in your letter.
Our schools compare very favorably with the
public schools of Hew York City and with those of New York State.
In the entire state we are educating 249,000 children in Parochial
schools. Nearly all these tohildren take the Regents State Examinations of their own accord in the 6th, 7th and 8th grades.  For
the last twenty years they have done this and they have always
achieved signal success. Ninety-five percent of those entering
receive credit and a large portion of them get over 90$.
We never enter into any competition with the
public schools as such, but there is a widespread conviction in
every town, village and hamlet, that the Parochial schools are
doing better work. Business men say so and there is always a
demand for the graduates of our schools.
Our children are not handicapped in any way,
just the reverse. The children in the public schools are handicapped by their fads etc. and I say this advisedly because it is
impossible for the teachers to do the children justice. The
public school teachers are a splendid body of men and women for
whom I have the greatest respect, but for years past they have
not been able to do the good work they should do.
The State Education Law requires that
teachers in private and Parochial schools should be competent;
it does not require that they should be qualified or certified.
This would mean that they would have to be high schools graduates
and specially trained. All of our teachers, or nearly all, are
high school graduates.  All our religious teachers have State
certificates. (Hije Nnu fork (Eatfyalu: #rJ|anl Inarn
OFFICE   OF  THE   SUPERINTENDENT
328   WEST   14th   STREET
NEW   YORK
-3-
I regret that I am so very busy at the present
time that I cannot enter more into detail.  If there is any point
that I have failed to cover, please let me know.
With my best wishes, I am
Very sincerely yours,
~y
y;
Superint endent. ^vtt ^tile/fy.
«t
Canaba.
place Bow.den.. A.l.ta:»..
DATE...D.(e.c..*...„5.i.et.» 1923 »
to Mr.*.....E.»....D.*....Eo.D..oja«ll*	
Red....B.e.e.r.* A.l..t.a.«	
RE    Suggested pia^ Farm*
Bear Sir:«
Attached is a rough plan of the above plots, you
will note that I have altered  the rough plan we made on
the ground* as fallows*
1st, East line is moved 100ft» West»
and* The cottage plote are moved 5©ft* West*
Trusting this will be of assistance to you*
Should the cottages be built before a correct
survey is made, You should have the first lot start 55© f*
from the South West Corner and allow 6Q  Ft. front on the
road for each, eottage* —.—
Yours very  truly,
/&ejhA^/<Al-&*&A'£r.....   ....
Field Supervisor* N
wtm jfc>MMt»»
/J0-
/<*<?i—-K
■-
- $tf<?/V
/JTJ
W~~   //#*-~#f-~    /£J"*
S/joyfis/^y y&tm* of   Cof/ey?  P/&&
foc/ifs/rtetl   f#/*/n ffcct  D&* o
%. w>
ae eountry wneae papulation felt neat
intis*»telyuno personally all the diaadvuntagee which
follow in the w^xe ef warfare om •© wide a aeale ae
the Into world iter, was dorolft* Its population
not only suffered pereenull Its very economic
existence from a Serelan standpoint wan eusp ended
nnring the yeare of «uatrian occupation*
it reaelreu such nhnttering blows that
ono night reasonably anticipat« that in the days of
reconstruction it would on ono of the l&st to got
basis to neranl prosperity a a in*    to the astonish-
aent of the wo*, la, reports are now coming to hand from
indoposrrteat sources to tis effect tb*% this oesntry
is tho oaa country in, iurepo where tmesiplejmont end
want no not exit iffhii* eTeryhady any not no
getting "rich** in the ■anno in which we use tho
worn to-day, ail are woricin^ and tho general situation
le g&tisinoiory,    the explanation of this ie that tho
Serbian population la largely a rural one, an* the
people ef that country instead of Esther in* in tho
ewamloa ejentre* of the cities, have gene eae& en to
their farias, settled down to ?reductive wurk, nod
in the tery short sense which ha a elapsed einee tho
termination Of hostilities in spits of truly front
difficulties, they &nve to-day reached a settled eta to
ef affairs end n eemnen prosperity.
fho aero has had to faee price deflation
as we bare here* eat because his wants are not nany,
and he produces nearly everything that Ho need*, he
has shown tho world the way to recuperate fron what
appeared to  so ©verwhairaLn<3 disaster.
Ho, of course. Urea in n portion of .^repe
that One oarrled a tcenlng pepnlation for aany generations,
a pepnlation that until tho Inst few decades, howorer,
had no ehanee of renlisins what  jood lorernnent really
nennt and was not eennidered particularly progressive*
ie in Canada are not so well on the way
towards the solution of Our reconstruction pros-lens*
while It Meat ho ad nit ted ttevt a eensiaeiabie
portion of cur territory lien to the north of tho lino
eoysnd which the ordinary Athens at Jerainn oannot he
sueooeufuxly practiced, wo haro still naen land suitable
for ag -ore near existing railways end wine and
suitable areas still eel> to tho ^rown,  out
unfortunately not yet eerred by Uuilweys. ;
In view of our al; im to high a teasing among
progreaeivo nations and tho vide extent of ear productive
lends which are lying inle, the distress In our rural
ureas, and the uneiapleyneni in our urban sentrcs, are
not a creditable etato ef affairs.
It oust, of course, bo admitted that unlike
the 3erb. we nave net behind me   the experience of
centuries to mould our settlement plane and our farming
practice into tho form beet suited to our requirements*
jurm? the past denudes, however, mucn
experience has been gni&sm and many \9**9&» plainly
drawn Jew un to road, if we nave the vision to de so.
So far* as n nation, tut Uttls advantage
has seem taken ef the lessees experience has so plainly
taught*      Tint no elans of .farming nun mope to be
successful unices soil, ell** tie and marketing conditions favour ita prastloc, needs ns argument*
* few Instances Where these eenditienc have not
been editable, and where as n result, dieaater has
occurred are news noted*
In Southern alberta and death Vest ■ieekntehowan,
settler* have seem endonvenring to practice straight grain
farming in districts sheas xe in fa U for many years has
seen insufficient to previao tho moisture nesossary to grow
purine- crops*    sutamlly ansngh, as Banks, Lean Sompanies,
and MerohtntA, 1st alone the unfortunate farmers thorn-
selves know to their cost, dieaater has occurrod*
Natwithstnndinz this stats ef affair , our
innd Offices still snow n eensluerabl* amount of land
for sstUemsiiD in those diet riot a,      ?hft.t they are not
bslng settled in any quantity Is dus to the fleet that
without irrigation the werthlsssnsss ef the larger portion
of them from n general farming standpoint is now well*-
known, and net to tuay attempt on our part as a nation,
to steer settlement into mora suitable areas*
I tho VanresHi, wmtermsls aad Bins any
districts, vast of £en«s &ivor srosaln ; and en the
north side of toe Pease livar, a wary progreeslve
settlement broucht in eosutleurahie capital, erected
creditable buildings, and brought mash land under
cultivation*    Shey ess experiencing real marketing
difficulties owin? to distunes from transportation,
tasking unpwefitsbie the hauling ef grain at anything
out amy prices.
ther** art distrleta in aoutn-western ^anltsan
whore farms em which twenty-five er thirty y onrs ngo,
n thirty bushel to the were crop ef wheat was no
unaommon thing, hare bean few some years past averaging
from three to five buehel ts the aero crops*   at first,
drought, weeds, lesnsta, sell drifting, ete* wars biased*
2e-day untval analysis of sell hna shown that the real
troabls In tee many eneos is that constant dropping has
ss depleted the sell ef its nvutsabie nitrogen phosphor cue
and pwtnsn. and everyone is ho ginning to realise that the
real trouble is that the sell has teen "mined* until its
fertility la depleted to sash an extent that mdieal shangse will have to be made in farming methods, and some
years elapse before tho soil regains productivity*
un^rtunatcly, tho majority of tho farmere in these
onso propserous areas have e reserve of eapital
necessary to iaake urgently recuirsd changes in
farming methods* end to tide them over the years which
mast intervene before the soil of their farms is built
up again*
Backward conditions which exist in toe easy
scattered aettlementa in park and tush areas distant
from railways in Serthem oaaketeaesaa and northern
Alberta in addition to tho lack of prsgrcss eeen in other
nreae where transportation la setter but settlement
scattered owing to much useful land being unoccupied
snd owned by non-residents, provide obi est lessen
after object lesson on tho undesirablllty ef any but
compact settlement near railways*
Mm takes In settlement planning and in
agricultural methods like those mentioned above, nave
been smde by the ve*s*i« at earlier dates than ears*
fho Japanese nave a proverb which implies
that the wise man learns by the experience of ethers,
the foeliah one by his own expo lease, they Jaavo
no words to express their contempt for those whom
neither method can teach.
fire nave taken and are still taking the
stand that the responsibility for selecting land
which can he profitably fnrmed rests with the individual
settler, and nave surveyed areas containing ^rary class
ef land, and than, with the exception ef sash nreae ae
nave been granted to railways and other corporations,
or included in Merest   teeerves or irnrke, have thrown
practically everything open to settlement.
In seme instances where railways have been made
grtinte ef definite areas in tho districts through which
they sun, ws have permitted them to exchange lands they
claimed is be of inferior quality for hotter lands elsewhere*    We nave thrown open for settlement tho lands
the railways did not want*
It la agreed that the responsibility for his
ehoieo must still bo the settlor'a own*    ffe should,
however * at least protect him by withdrawing from
settlement, lands we know are unaultable, and shealA
provide supervision to ensure that the mistakes in
farming pyaetlee which are well known to here been
disastrous in the past are not repeated by aim*
awing his early years, If he is to make a euoeoac
of hie endeavour, his neae win bo toe close to the
grinuatone for him to have sufficient leisure to work
out hi* marketing problems to the beat advantage, and
unices the slevemment co-oper»tee with bin In working
out these problems to his best edvantage, they will be
tackled and solve* by middle-men whose natural coarse
i be to make marketing conditions as profitable as
possible to themselves. th national railwaya running at a lose,
owing to insufficient traff spite of ratec which
farmers claim mast come down in line with other costs,
and millions of productive serss unoccupied near these
railways, it would appear to be criminal felly for the
ion which must make gees the above mentioned definite
to permit settlement cm lends distant from railways,
oven if it had not been deaoaatrated that such settlement
cannot ask toss without transportation.
am fr.r, In spite of the exporlenee of the past,
we nave been conducting &^t settlement operatione along
the Sdine lines we followed a eanrter of a century
pawing no attention to distance from railways and the
relation to agriculture ef coil fertility and climate.
She time is rips for a shange if wo do net wiah our
settlement moth-.*a to remain tboae ef a nation 1 arning
neither by their own nor etbors* experience.
oils welfare deannds that we do not repeat
the mistake* nf the pact and permit mere settlement on
lands where soil, climate or distance from railroads
makes the failure of settlement a certainty*    It meat
empnatieelly demands that our future settlement be
planed as compactly as psraibie en suitable lands
near arletlnj lines o    railways*      «*nat susm
ianua ars alienated from the Crown-and generally epeak-
; hold by non-resident owners if well*knows.    It tn
alio -roll known that it takes some year* before a row
land farm can bo brought to full production and that
during the early years returns are comparatively small*
In order to start properly en n purchased sew
lane ioO acres near existing railways te*day,
settlor n*eds capital er credit weak as fellows:~
for Ian abuse, 160 ae* nt 115,00 to $19*00
per nore, say *..*.«**•*..*..t*««.«».«**•*«««»****^n«Q09
for purefeuse of horses, asms, a bread sow.
and tho smchinery n to start *#»*•«•««* 1,600
fc erect a cottage for himself and shelter
for bis stock **»*****»*•***•**•*****•**«•*#** ****•!,Sv9
provide aremnins expemsss until tbm farm
ssnottas ,ro-        vs .*••*.***«***.« ••*••••«»**•••*•» -
■
• *500
A3 tba return* for the initial years arc sun-il
where tho settlor has nat this amount of ospitni of his
asm, it is nedeesary, in or-Ssr to sm.a» hi* *ro|eet a
aafe business vents re for hia to obtain credit for aueh
balance as ho needs on ions terms and at reasonable r^t-«s
ef interest*
rnis preblan of finding tho nectsaevy capital on
suitable terms for qualified settlers who have inauffieiost
means, mast be aolved if we are to eatisfactorily settle —
up tb   vacant imds acm..
• 'io naaes
■■•.us* their j in XI
■x early date-,
to saabl- railways
must be rtmde in all service* if we «
»re to wenfe         is
period of dofj.    .  n at all
in addition.
do away wit -
y &re at present
wwsvr9iI«B    SAXey    u9 se*X   PaVwrvWI    V'
income tax*
In $y previous * i     . lea i
.gssted
tint t.
■
'                                                  ,
-aoil tness to
pettier* v          .t put
ijxty per coat to
VW"**.l#^Jj "*•■*♦ * **    J^vifc assail v
> at ten
per
it and -an twenty-
flr-
i that
payment  b<r> ;st.do  t* the v-            in lea
*rrae (uay thirty
current interest
year* J   , It-                                           ■      ..
rates, and that  in audit
advance
dollar for
'or
the purchase of                               la*
'".''    '                    I",-'-.       •'■       ,'. «!)•<-  -:                                "I    ■;
■                ■•'i ■         .  'V .- *:-
24,0 - ;. ■ > - « ■•'
toon
mil.                                    -o*te3
tm
.i > :;:..     u   Cron the
$vwmf and 6,000   ■      --ere* arc it
Of tide wast area, wuoh the larger j
districts una
er needs
clc^rin^ or          nage before it- e.
-  | .''ofitaal«
use*
-le a 0X0 a survey bat net been
mad-e Is enable mt® ti**-
to be made ly
suitable for snttXcme-,.
lands will total 8k- . ;00 acre*,
by far the 2ar :ej    -/op art ion e       lob win be found
to no lengor belong tc tn* Crown.
lands a® comprising 10,000,
«*re* um dlvldl area into average western farms
of «40 acre*, we get roughly 10,000 far***, or svsr
two thirds' the number a&ivia urn* at present
being' operated in Manitoba*
If all ns*ncic.>, ^lersrmmon; priv
asttled 10,000 cetunl fersscrs & year, reasons
settlement wou.       .   obtained in f ■   ■>. a
grant majority 0 !.&tsd an.
are near minting r«
In the s* sts in whisfll In* h%$ majority
,    Sstss lands are
in ti-    -   a aa*    . t cur woatsrn
pravlneas nan comprise may million «erea«
Bee cut sxpsrisnsta, af whlsb rope;- ill. shortly
be lands, nave demonstrated that il*a cont.
fire* is not only economical, but is nice >ie* •
Hill  II
To- free -.irawtag settlers
to ait ■       -ays *] I  better
. Lor
or the a*ti<
s>vwt we fears ■ :»ny :   ■
' railways*
irpeees nmenns t>o 9i,9Bt»wT* &ere««    we should
-Jrcwn
WItfe no payment
f4»0tt to #.c- tid xiji<s & portion ef the proceeds
to at ensure t chase
p*3 ■   jwstlen with lands near *   I     s.ng railway**
a bal&uoe a a should be used for settlement
risti waters idle* of government lands
I assist in prsvidlmg asttlsnent with
■*>■.->;: ik. -jy■■;■■>. ■■■•■.   ***: ssary t« insure  I M :t aveiai tn*
e past and benefit* by the experience al-
3 It w     -   be possible for
Gear sf liSig the assl*-
ad abovs to   .  ! ■-rehaaed
^x -mbM MpMm nmmt A
He* s financial arr<-
natal regard 4* the pnrsbn«s if stock and equipment*
Sly net ad#pf- * policy if alaiilfiicbica
action e "le land* a sale
at low prices r -a in < ..itien with
.." reanitti- i L*«
ah a ] -
1),     Would draw n bettor olaes ef settler
..csie stead and
sell '-
M'n u*h needed assistance,
*hj sh gpms* doe* not
<a, ti settlers en n»w arenag
»?}*     Would m ^vision
■• at 11' '      cost
4 J* -;ainst
arc ase assistance
nesecsnry if reasonably compact settlement
is to do ensured m&z ex.; railway*, at
an early date*
.>.w»y deficit*? ai     lb* stagnant oondi-
m ©f set ■■ ale-Mi ^#re**ive
*ettlament policy*
a* J. .-shten.
Ottawa, 86th Mats ltal. .nave i for t
.
scot-
;lflc 3ai
la-neat
NBaavenssawwll
Meet
the a?' EMPIRE SETTLEMENT ACT, 1922.
GOVERNMENT   SCHEME   FOR   AGRICULTURAL   TRAINING   OF   BRITISH
YOUTHS   IN   ALBERTA,   CANADA.
The Government of the Province of Alberta have entered into an arrangement with His
Majesty's Government to provide during the coming winter a course of training in agriculture
for youths and young men from this country (age desired, seventeen to twenty-five) at the
Provincial Agricultural School at Vermilion on the Canadian National Railway, one hundred
miles west of Edmonton.
The School, which it is proposed to reserve entirely from the 1st October, 1924, to the
31st March, 1925, for the purposes of the proposed course, is capable of accommodating 150
pupils at one time, and the proposed scheme can only be arranged if not less than 100 applicants
are selected and proceed to Canada to undertake the training,   --    -
Each applicant will be required to pay 30 dollars a month—roughly £7 10s.—for board and
lodging, and should, therefore, have in his possession on arrival in Vermilion not less than £50.
The actual training will be paid for jointly by the Government of Alberta and by His Majesty's
Government.
Further details regarding the proposed course may be obtained at the Oversea Settlement
Office, 3-4, Clements Inn, Strand, London, W.C.2, at the Offices of the Superintendent of
Emigration for Canada, 1, Regent Street, London, S.W.I, and from the various Canadian
Government Emigration Agents whose addresses are annexed. The course will include practical
outdoor work, and during the winter months, especially December, January and February,
instruction  in the laboratories and class-rooms.    It will comprise :—
(a) Field husbandry, including the handling of two, three, four and six-horse teams,
harrowing, ploughing, &c ;      -.,
(b) The care and management and-marketing of Jive stock %
(c) Farm mechanics, including carpentry, black-smithing, gas engines and farm motors,
and the mechanics of farm machinery ;
(d) Dairying;
■■      (e) The principles of poultry farming;
;      (/)  Horticulture, including vegetables and small fruits ;
(g\ The study of such insect pests; blights, mildews, &&, as occur in Western Canada ;
'.   (h) Farm management and economics, and. ■ ■;...
..J    (i)  Elementary veterinary science.
The Government of Alberta undertake to find each student employment as from the beginning
of April, 1925, for the ensuing summer upon a suitable farm within the Province. After a winter's
training at the Agricultural School and a summer spent in practical farm work, lie should have
no difficulty in finding continuous employment. The wages earned during the summer would
depend upon the age and efficiency of the individual concerned. The average rates in Alberta
last summer, for general farm hands were $40 per month for experienced men, and $25 per
month for inexperienced men, with board and lodging. Should a student desire a more advanced
course during the second winter in the Province, a five months' course will be available for him
at one of the Agricultural Schools free of cost except for the expenses of board and lodging.
It is the belief of the Alberta Government and of His Majesty's Government that the proposed training should place the pupils in an advantageous position to earn their livelihood as
farm workers, thus acquiring the local experience which is essential before taking up farming
in Canada, and in due course enable them to save enough money to start farming on their
own account. Applications may be made on the annexed form, and should be sent, in the first instance,
either to the Superintendent of Emigration for Canada or to the nearest Canadian Government
Emigration Agent. (See list on p. 4). A medical examination will be necessary before final
approval can be given. Approved applicants will, where necessary, be granted a loan of the cost
of their journey to Alberta under the Empire Settlement Act, the amount to be repayable in
periodical instalments after settlement.
July, 1924.
ONE    OF    THE    AGRICULTURAL    SCHOOLS    AT    ALBERTA.
:t AGRICULTURAL   TRAINING    SCHEME,   ALBERTA.
Preliminary Form of Application.
Name in full	
Address   	
Name of School
Place of Birth...
Age.
(Print your surname in block letters).
Present Nationality.
Father's name and occupation	
Has applicant ever worked on a farm.
If so, give particulars ... ...	
Will applicant have £50 on arriving at diSMM IJJ.QN	
♦Will applicant require assistance towards cost of passage, etc	
Name of person (Headmaster or Employer) to whom reference may be made as to character, &c.
(Signature of applicant).
Date.
* Assistance will only be given by way of loan.   The cost of the journey (3rd class) to
Vermilion is approximatelyj^24.
When completed this form should be forwarded to the Superintendent of Emigration for
Canada, 1, Regent Street, London, S.W. 1, or to the nearest Canadian Government Emigration
Agent (see over). List of Canadian Government Emigration Agents.
Aberdeen
Bangor
Belfast
Birmingham ..
Bristol
Carlisle
Dublin
Glasgow
Inverness (Sub
Liverpool
Peterborough..
Southampton..
York  ...
Agenc
y)'
116, Union Street.
310, High Street.
15-17-19, Victoria Street.
139, Corporation Street.
52, Baldwin Street.
54, Castle Street,
44, Dawson Street.
107, Hope Street.
35, Church Street. '
48, Lord Street.
Market Place. ■
8,. Canute Road.
Canada Chambers, Museum Street.
(b3/783)x    354    1000    7/24   H & S, Ltd.    Gp.S i, !ev«e*»r if, if as.
In a tmmmmAmi srtwatted ecme ttam mm ta Vm
•ttateter «n islgraftion entitled mtm imAm^^m frrcblsm,
and a dedtttlom*', it was stew In whs* nmsaair asm of the
dtffteoltles in the ear ef aeeeeaafsl Brittoh
Canada adjtfit be est
1, it is WAgeestlsmael tarn* British Settleesat la the
wsat dsaim»i# for C«^te«
2. (a)    it is a feet tnei tUere ie a
ftrlUafe surtealtwiate en* asm he cetatnad for fisnatfa If
lis I    $here ie a »l»tiv^y feapii> proper* Ian of
ewili nasars*. crofters* cottars* an*
bands that asntl be seeafed for fl«»§» if* an alfeatfy indicated,
tsslr present osnsU ticm la ©i»id<Ma**, cad -an la*elli«eat nee
taimm of their cesnaiasaft nee* efeonld tnay attamp* to asm a
atari in i i   ;s*
fk» aoottisto crofter tea a strong loam of tie soil*
ban cultivated the lead ail his life aahavo his fathers for
orations* - mwmm la rented* ana it Is smll in
eoiafltions Obtnlxti&g to the iU Lani, he htsa little »sns*
*ha» he leakea up Ma nfaft to Migrate he has a
to aeJl, ami Ma capital will ttmn ho amrtblsr ttea sm to
£S00 * aeldcra ansa* *S a lees to lasetaiwa and s §sta to
Canada, fee end Ms taUy »»ay ie vraleed at
of seli&rs*     Ml is earn* aefcimK a bM ear*
lis ems asm in oesatet to Gaaafta ia to 0!*ta4e a
m a fbam fenws ae watt ess*     an asm than feel
4. caa «re fe??e dlatiaet
istenatag cottier *•
(si     ia
esw caailp efeteta work: as*
and a aep**te eettare for hie fasdlr
to live fa;s
of:
feasance toe feaa little or ao taaase,
aed'eape e» tl» oaftlnaa^ farm «tll eat
ferUm M» eaew^i to waJtee a first pBp»s&*
m lesw s* fee ass children to eletbe
ass. feed,     ia win, ««refOre, see in little fmwepesi of
mf «f*ieto fee loft
Mm In weeteim 6a»ef& there ate sway
ofpsrtimitlec ef aoqmirlm& a
witb asaajesmUwalr swait aaal
dam, bet, en Una iher besd, there ass
no separate ooftepts en farms casta*
i first as-rival, ha e«s«M -Isaac Ms
-sti«» *s*a assn% saattat
IS» faiwr to i?«d» oxperl<
a little
(el Inks tme ease of an e»-s»wies ma
frta Oyeet Britain asm w*tsnes to
tgesllJp in ertar to obtain a
e &®w gas aeldier Settlement
«ie» ia as etfartaaats- iar amen i l
to wean for m f asmar on the prolate*
if .fee nan * ends end « lease nsnUr«
H^te ate preetieallr so fanaara in
mv warrieft metp*
i toad em^imm of Ms last spring* *• tie
«?p«* assjnai of the lba^«rlasmt of IsmlisatSem I left about
twenty fardlles at   imlpe$, Mai imsf mlaat fe* placed with
fe3«erc»     «m offieiala ef the :*n§a*fSa**at* las   * lb   *
eel^imtioa Seyarteant, the Srasa* mesa ell namdtog* and
T»ffjr ten fanlll.?e eera placed Is the three inset**© pteelnaee*
m farther flrtiewo • st ft* -%im» »*»**
maesSma title. pertp of nettles** 1 baft a te&afgamn from I
serlme; 5*a>ls noweeawsat eawsnt gaseenses to fames car a* peer
is-wifsrwtt p»r%% ami t; I      mar tfee >iserts tefssasnmt omci-4a
had* for eomeesofcs, <ieae their ntmest to fliKl atasfe pieces*
fee the oast, epas inanities far was* and
bet no seaaneei of
tfe 1 |p ana mast* acery prospect for
yaaamamet asms* amt me erae*sm»iitp to
, ate British a^4ottlt«rist of
aenaolag* sm>X he Is -^*fc .'or y*3
of nets* by Seem or etherwlae, to
ffo ©V ban te the scat eoeld entail
. propertlsante rials*
I ewftle Ito to as*n£re a farm ia tlm
wool* as* in greet part* solved fey fas epsta* of
filot ami wtl cji •
% tela enema, the settler ewsti fee
that on **nrt?»l ia tMi TOtmtjy * tensNwacr haste, • P**t of
Ism®-, ami mm vmaaeretlve fame mmte&m®w& wotUUI be   rovitf®* is*
as ■
poeeSble* aesare
H»*eby TO.-;«iina#
ue©e«r Us ufeilttp*
to »§§» m star* to a wsr-taat
asm plst #f !«• m dor
#sHS©i?tfe#d* -sad h-*  =mj14*
Mawesa Is fete
,.     little mass
Jsftar » year* en tee pare* be etsmli be tame]?
I fern ef Me cam* wttfc «a«*y abases ef
a ef it, an§ leswe tlva eottafse s
for ******* settler to basin as. be
{11* Mm   h msaber ef l or §**man glass win fee
•old* *n the aans' ef 8ed r**n*
lb I.    I tea amelllnc hens* will fee
m* 03? 1.1 @08P«etSj«t adafe* sash plot
(el.
a seatawl well will at
for iii tbsee eafctages*
to
$dI,   Sue fesar** lass* with propel
alar eertata ooBattttanit, for
or swea a third pesna «tn be
t* the eatsntss asttlar*    % will
al#p the lease before he sealers tale
oaoepatlon* end will bo legally bound
by ii» teatst*.
1st*   1% wttl peawiiiee ba satttrats Ms
flae*aore -plot in » h^bssefessslliaa fay
near an* aemerstsssa of either tin
em Vkmnmr ef tne Hat Seer twining
Fans, or of a es$ereiaey ef the Soldier
*h£*
!»!•
Cf)«   ffeaapser thets ia sat eppe*ta>Ity* he
atll aora tar *»$gB&onjina
laaein^ the • lama*
l«itltr;.. *       =.a bee any,   I    . a sera of
Ma vife can fstatly*
I ill ass c*a*r mSmmm to
i» oettba* pig** powitry ***•,
■ --ts the- n&nenss ef Me fieeNamre
il ittss*
aea* WQ eeses sua
and «*%»! to glee*
* l#i*s*
tab
:ely*
.-ss aill b<
cattle* installed nsiar wmdltleiis airdiar to
these h©i#mfs at the .Hat Beer Saaiai.
■ -■ ■ ;»*
Ose Umerset of the est to** I*
the I
gad this la the intuition of tho 3oM«ty9
ant ho will not naceaAirily be bemal to worh
sxolualeely ftsr hl*n.
It will to© so the interest of the fanuar to
treat the settler ssti* and Wm tear©'Ms
labottr troablea pafeSMefrtly Se1fe**$ for Ma*
(-31* It la fair to B,mwm that It tsfess *•*$:
little ttwtght to realise the imams©
eheafp that this era tarn, ebea once eat
going, waali aceoapllsh with regard to
farenWal tm tba seat*
I i troublea of the weat in regard to
agrlemltura ay® eamsod, to <telte a
aoasldorable extent, by the n»thode of
fazming in e*&tis there*       Grain alone is
often fftmn viwm mixed fa»i»g oould
-Howrlah to tba benefit of tho f htsjot*
and tho ooeat^*        One reoacn for this
Isj    the noeertaiaty tm& Instability
of .Carta belpt    plaeo in the country,,
y rried help in the rmmmr deseribod,
sad the f%mer has help at hand, vhen be
needs it, ami wl® a he does not require
It tho tsm eorStar fioea not leave tho
eoentiy but retires to Ma own plot of
Irnid to work. forhi?saslf*      Both employer
and employee are served, ami both well
i ttiafled*
2hi§ la also a beginning in tho formation
of the rural oowsnalty*     $here 1* happens
tfe&t a fee of those plots and eottagse
are established, there also will b© the
I. I* -I   I as for tie blaoksmita, the
1   - '  r, ti*© carpeatar, the sbeesaaher,
to p»»haae Ms plot of land a«d Ma
©otiajp, sad ply Ma trade, eeltieatlag
bia plot of i«ft as hia wetk allows*
le one csn clonbt tho itaiepee irportsaee
to th-   . <.. tJ?r of *. sehetne frawtSit SI.at
aaeb possibilities*
(4). -his syetew te an essoellent psyohologleal
effect - the settler on Me plot of land
will so© ahemd that he ia witbin joeasurehle
distaaee Sf   a vriring a perManent ham,
Bm It Is su^sstod seat the Scottish 1 -migrant
*tid iieeiety Initiate tfeia policy of the tisa-eor* plot ami cottage*
▼igoroee ©aapaiip, for fa-ids should b©
eoioaeneed*     99ia first objeetive shonld be s& to 100 eottsiges*
cettaejM of four roeae o&» be aup^lled oew^let© by the Pamadtan
aiadin Co«?af and delivered a* nearest rallisey siding, in say
■ art of Alberta, for   -576*00.    (#600)*
Should tha Society build twenty esttagaa
or one hundred cottages   -   aa S^Sel wewber weald b© bnllt by s
•£.
the Bra lab
.net, ass s third
mnmsmmt of
t under tho Britieh
should be
tfee teawa of the
ofettlewst
frea the
British ftSS*
a* uolcmlieat with the erect ins
flea-aere plsts, the doctet* will be
©ettagea on any rcsneh or tract ef wm
ba aciolred by the Aaelety for ^mediate
10, All these ecttefee to be %y
the settler, and to be paid for, -
to
of loan to
(el        fan cottage on the five-sere idiot
the OOUajS en rem land by individual
imh
(leal* A
AAy^vxjLr-^
£*JLre<^
-      C^tVlxOvl^p
"* ■* llll    f -"—t. *■
^^^kXXAA~-^A & ^
A*_<_^W^v cXf,/h.m.c.    /W^^.X^ y^^kr%y
txxs XcAX*xl",
^L^    *,'     A^>^_   de^UXZy  fe^^T.    <^C'    ^.^Cv-
y    4r1X^£  4   £*<^Ue*^A   fry  Ae&c^
/.•-/£
faXr A
'-   ^U/ lA cabU^~
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y ***■ »-ff^~ ^L-y'^^^y^ A^ (3^/. /o trebled, and oven quadrupled in price. When I
mentioned that the interest charged by Directors
and British Government was 6$f I was told that
both wore now practically out, and the interest
would be 6#*  To that I am not reconciled.  In
fact, I was so surprised at the time that I was
.struck dumb. I am always, in these matters, a
slow thinker, otherwise, I would have stuck to
ray guns as I should have done.
I have always considered 6f» on
land in Western Canada to be too high a rate of
interest. Such rates may be all right on industrial projects but on land, particularly, during
the period of depression, 6$ is usurious and immoral .
The .land is very good security
especially if it is bo be upgraded in price as
soon as the present occupant vacates. But the
upgrading of prices and' continuance of 6^ is just
plainly wicked and is clear evidence that the welfare of the settlers is not the paramount interest.
It means that measures are allowed that undoubtedly
militate against permanent settlement.
This procedure militates against
the interest of the settlers, against the bast
inteassts of the country. Prosperity of the farming
community is, and always will, secure stability and
prosperity of the country. Who would try to maintain, that the poverty and the servitude of the farmers during the depression has redounded to the good
of anyone? Man, despite better prices, since the
war commenced have not fully recovered their morale
and farming as a way of life is not at all in the
high esteem that is desirable and it deserves.
A* for the farm No, 82, It Is
sought by young Alph* Fisher who at present rents it.
It is not much of a farm. In fact, Fisher would not
have applied £»r it nod he knows it well, except for
the fjet th:..t across the road is'his father*s farm
and there is much moi* to this than would normally
appear. There are three members of this family
stricken by Infantile paralysis and helplessly crippled, dumb and witless. There is generous sacrifice
as well as courage implied in the purpose of hewing
his father.
As for farm No. 53, which consists
of a half section. It is sufficiently high priced.
dames Martin is anxious to get it. James Martin has
not been a good payer &t   far as his home place is
concerned. However, he* raised, and raised well, a
has y^£)^^yjLy^
<p
A9
A<j
^ziecw/iicm
!L JjJWTIOl |jf0FlL
GLASGOW.
S. If. Quince.
anV will not be responsible for any Property lost in the Hotel, unless riven in charce of the
Manager.
N.B,—Accounts  are rendered  daily  or weekly,   as circumstances  may require,  and  Visitors   are
requested to settle the same when presented.
No.
££> >
*o !
A>
r>
Brought forward,.
Apartments,    	
Baths, 	
1
\
(3
Fires and Lights,	
Breakfasts,  :	
Luncheons, die, 	
Dinners,  	
Dessert and Ices,  	
Biscuits and Sandwiches,	
Teas and Coffee,	
Soups, 	
Suppers, 	
Arrowroot and Gruel or Milk
Servants' Board,	
Sherry,	
¥
7
&
Jfo.
:1089,
0 64585.
Cateoonian
Iwao/Ccrmpan^.
Central StatiIPIIotel,
GLASGO^f.
PLEASE GIVE UP YOU
S. H.  QUINCE, Hotel Manager,
Per ......._..<«...: -.-.,	
NOTE.—Visitors are requested to pay their Bills at the Cashier's Office.
Cheques  arc not accepted In  payment of Hotel Accounts. n*.
*5X%
The Caledonian  Railway  Company also own  and manage
XtmJRRiNCJEs Street Station Hotel, EDINBURGH.
"V
Magnificent Views of the Castle and Gardens.
300 ROOMS. 70 BATHROOMS.
TERMS VERY MODERATE.
Telegraphic Address:   "LUXURY,   EDINBURGH.'
Intending Visitors to EDINBURGH can have accommodation
Reserved, and Luggage forwarded to above Hotel, upon
stating   their   requirements   at   the   Manager's   Office   HERE.
4H JOHN    STEWART.
FINANCIAL    AGENT
NOTARY PUBLIC
a. a. c. CODE
CONVEYANCER
5TH   EO.
UADYSMITH, V
ANCOUVER  ISLAND, B.C.
18th. February, 1920
Rev, and Dear Father:-
Yours of 16th, dated Seattle to hand.  The
preparation of the r-iap has been a large undertaking but I have at
last got it completed, I rushed off one copy and sent it to °t.
Peter's Seminary.  Other copies will be ready tomorrow and I will
distribute as you suggest,
I hope you will be successful.  The proposition looks better every angle it takes,  "Then I was l&oking
over the prices at the South end of the City I was amased. Our
prices are not nearly so high,  T asked Solly what price he puts
on the land lying to the Horth of the City (Between the Hospital
and the Football, grounds.  The Company is not offering this for
sale and he referred me to Mr. T7alkem the local agent.  Mr. "ralkem
told me the same story so T asked him to place a valuation on it
and he said that |450. per acre was the lowest valuation he could
prive and he thinks-this exceedingly reasonable.
T ennuired into the prices Hillier got
for lots in the Hillier Addition. Those' ranged from $300, to |500,
per lot.  The Hillier Addition is further removed from the City
limits than lot 96, is,   I am enclosing a map of the Southern end
which shows how prices range there.  This does not show Lot 96. as
the map is cut off just where lot 96 begins but it is quite easy
for vou to place it.
As soon as I get the other maps printed I
will
;nd them off.
With bast regards
Verv Sincerely Tours A
The Rif 1 eman' s Q,ue s t.
Of "wipers" and "snipers" good yarns I could spread,
But I'll tell you a yarn of my dug-out instead:
It measures, six "by four, and it isn't very high,
And, when the rain's about, it isn't very dry.
Sometimes I can sleep in it, but "sometimes" is most rare,
'Twas the rarity of "sometimes" that caused this affair.
I had been doing out-post duty, a rotten sort of game.
And then to dream sweet dreams of home
To that dug-out tack I came.
r
i,
Thnusting back the^ water-proof (in other words txy  door)
I saw stretched out before me, a form upon the floor,
"Poor mother's son," said I to me "I'll let the beggar sleep,
And  I'll sleep on the top of him, we'll make a pretty heap."
I was awakened shortly after, my matress move*, about,
Confound your eyes "be still," I said, "or I'll kick you out."
He had the sauce to argue, so, I gave him such a biff,
The place was in an uproar in less than half a jiff.
I draw the water-proof upon his language, 'Twas infernal,'
Then right away I fainted, I had slept upon the- Colonel.
•Atrw*   i4.iM 6&**4miHLAJL $>  w. f
KNOW ALL HEN BY THESE PRESENTS THAT I, RODERICK ANDREW MacDONELL,
formerly Pastor of the Roman Catholic Church at Ladysmith, in the Province of British Columbia, but now Chaplain of the 6?th Battalion Western
Scots, Canadian Expeditionary Force, do hereby soak®, nominate, constitutes
and appoint RONALD A. kaoDONELL, of Chemainus, in the said Province of
British Columbia, my  true and lawful agent and attorney for me and in my
name and on my behalf and for my sole use and benefit to sell, agree to
sell, leas©j conveyB or otherwise dispose of or deal with all my right,
title and interest ©f, in and to any and all real estate situate in the
Province of British Columbia belonging to me, or in which 1 may berin-
terested, to such person or persons, corporation or corporations, at
such price or prices and upon such terms and conditions as my  said Attorney shall see fit, and with full power for the purposes aforesaid or any
of them for me and in my name, and as my act and deed, to sign, seal,
execute and deliver all sueh conveyances, agreements, leases and other
documents as may be necessary, I hereby ratifying and confirming and
agreeing to ratify and confirm all and whatsoever my said Attorney may
lawfully do or cause to be done in the premises by virtue hereof.
IN WITNESS WHBREGT I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 20th
day of March One thousand nine hundred and sixteen.
SIGNED SEALED and DELIVERED  (
)
in the presence ofj_  .A
)
( «...•
Dated 20th day of March A.D. 1916
RODERICK ANDREW MacDONELL
TO
RONALD A. MacDONELL
POWER OF ATTORNEY
MACKAY & MILLER,
Barristers and Solicitors,
Victoria - B. C. Friee list ef Highland Equiptment as paid by the
Storm®nt Dundas & Glengarry Highlanders.
Kilts Tartan Macdanell ef Glengarry 42/-
_SperraKs_ 17/9
Hese Teps " Diced         '—   — - — _ -4/9— —
Garters               .... 1/4
Gaiters   (Tan      4/9
Cap Glengarries Diced 3/6 & 4/-
Deublets Green with Regt,Buttans 49/-
Waist & Shoulder Belts patent leather
and silver buckles         46/6
Waist Belts Patent leather (Drummers) 23/-
Full Plamds far pipers  ........ 36/6.
Belted Plaids far Drummers .... 26/6
Sh®ulder Breeches and earigraj 6/-
White Schell Jackets  22/6
Black Ceck feathers     2/6
The duty ®n all those a,rtlices will be 27|- %
less ICZ alse sales tax. ef 4ff£ freight and
packing cases.
These geeds ?/ere secured frem
Meere Taggart & Ce.
I8.Albisn Street
Glasgew Scotland
Messers R.G.Lawrie & C®.
62 Renfield Street
Glasgew   Sc&tland. 16,Harpur Street,
Theobalds Road,
London, W.C.
J^7 '?" *T'*
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SLA.    -A    £*- j
% » *   y *
4t_<7< Telegrams: Abbey,  Port-Augustus.
Telephone: Fort-Augustus No. 4.
Rail: Via Spean Bridge.
C^„    6~~AAjA^   /X.
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THE ABBEY,
FORT-AUGUSTUS.
SCOTLAND.
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OFFICE     OF
THE     DEPUTY    MINISTER     OF     IMMIGRATION
AND     COLONIZATION
OTTAWA,    CANADA
15th December. 1921,
Dear Father MacDonald,
This is to formally acknowledge the
receipt of your report of November 18th, describing
your experience while overseas from June last for
the purpose of encouraging settlers, especially
from the West Highlands of Scotland, and islands
adjacent thereto, to come to Canada.
I desire on behalf of the Department to
thank you for the splendid effort which you have
made, and to compliment you upon the results which
you achieved.
I am having your account for expenses
since leaving London placed in the hands of our
Accountant (Mr. Morisset) for his consideration.
Yours very truly,
The Hev. Father Andrew MacDonald
Charing Cross,
Ont.
WJ3//D. ■.G.BIach, Baq., 0t ' *• -'^eraber 9, 1921.
Deputy Minister,
Department. ©f Immigration and
Colonisation, Ottawa.
Dear Mr* Black:— -
I wish to place before you an individual case gk£ i
would be emigrant typical of hundreds of others in the highland*
of Scotland*
Herman Kacheed is a erof ter of a very good tZ>e* bard-
working, honest and in everything thoroughly reliable.    Ee rents
a large croft, has a stocfc of perhaps ten to twelve head ef
iiigliland cattle,  sixty aead of sheep and a pair of horses. By dint
ef very hard work, with the assistance of two grown up sons, he
is able  to  eke ©tit an existence for himself, wife and nine of a
family.    It is all  the  time upZ.ll work.    During the war, with the
better prices existing, he was able to pay off loans aade to hi®
by the Goverraaent for  the purpose of  ia. rroving his house and buying his stock.    He  is now free,  and is beginning to realise that
ifZe got  to Oaaada,  at  tZ    aa"->ense  of  t. o  r:c:c  labour new put on
very poor land,  in the new eoimtrjr lie would tw&m a richer and more
abundant re-aard.    Should he  sell  off he weuld realize        i   I £%QO
for the whole.    To pay for* fee transportation of himself and
family, at the pre sea:.    ■ a-crj,   t  \    i m of at least £228 would be
required. This would leave hia with only £,f2 to start life with en
this side, and that is just a little too anxious a proposition for
a father of a large family to undertake. Should seme scheme be
for the oi ling by which such a mm could be aided in the transperta-
tion of . ;;,:•    ... :".ly t© Canada lie would escie at once-f and he and
his very fine faaaily would be valuable settlers for Canada. I
■was  told by *'"r. ':'-lant,  Secretary of the Overseas Settlement Officec
in    ond-aa,   ,"..-.. o if the Dominien Government paid one half the Britisl
Government would pay the other half of transportation,  said that
for a selected number of such nen as 1 am in touch with -  J? 00 raen
with families and upwards*
If the above could not be Iraanediately put in hand
. or: m Baeleed is a man to whoa a loan of  transportation money
could be Eiade with the utmost security and with his large family
of workers he eoaia very soon repay every penny ef the loan. This
would leave him with his little capital  intact to- enable him to
Z:e a first a       at on a fans.
If either of the above su ejections could be put in hand
I could personally guarantee a very fine body of hardworking Scots
determined to better themselves,  aaa  waose value   to Canada could
not be Questioned*
Yours very truly, Telegraphic Address:
"SIGNET, EDINBURGH."
Telephone No. 1798.
66 A^kedetAeA  As/tee/,
Wc/tsPiv-cibyAj , f9 n
Dear Mir,
Eoyal| Co1tie aeeiety.
V
a««t#j|   ; e I   meeting of tho .oaiety
011 Wediieifdf..yii^tb aher ft  4»^>c
Tours xc
■fnl
<~^      ^tA^^UZOu^J
■meidp- lea,
;pointr. ■• >,.-i. wtA3—, , .-'i«ltte«<^-<M«~<w«
Rev Andrew MoDonell, u.S.B.,M.C.
Ardan jj'arms,
uhatham,
Ontario. LEXANDER   FrASER    LL.D.,   L ITT. D.
F. S. A. Scot. !Edin I
ONTARIO
BUREAU OFARCH.'VES
Nov.£0,19SO
My dear Father Andrew  :«
I wonder whether I could not hold you
tight in my claim for  "Kineras".  You know very well that   it  is
quite euphonic,not hard to pronounce and as to  the objection
that an explanation would be required all the time,the  fact
is that  its meaning has never been found by the most erudite
of Keltic scholars. Besides this it is on our old friend
Lovat's est ate,and I have the  extreme  satisfaction of knowing
that  in those troublous days following the overthrow of the
Catholic church in Scotland,my distant kinsman,Alexander
Praser of Kineras,was so possessed of that  fin£ Highland
sense  of hospitality as to make it a pleasure to  him not
only to  emtertain but to conceal and protect in his house
fl£ Kineras some  of the  fugitive priests whose lives were  imperilled and who would have been  seized and either boiled or
burnjb or caused to suffer some other unmentionable  torture,had
they been caught.   So you see that  I am putting forward a very
touching and pathetic appeal which I feel perfectly sure will
not only reach your heart but your  conscience. However this may
be,   I stand tip for  "Kineras" against all odds as a beautiful ana
fitting name for  the settlement.
I hope that the information regarding the settlement Alexander Fraser. LL D.. L itt. D
F  S. A. Scot  IEdin.)
ONTARIO
BUREAU OF ARCHIVES
which  I desire for the Archives,   shall be as complete as you
can possibly make  it.
With kind regards,believe me
Rev.Father MacDonell
R.R.I.Sharing Cross
Kent Co,
Yours very truly
Af^^ytL^'AcAnz<M Address all communications to
LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
,^uEMe^
PROVINCE  OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
VICTORIA, B.C.
June 1,   7
Rev.  Father Macdonell,
Charing Cross,
T,   Ontario.
Dear  Sir;-
I have been  informed by the  Honorable A.  M.«
ison,   Attorney-General for British Me,   that  some
discussion took pi recently with     >u ii   Ottawa re the
placing' of -settlers in Central British Columbia.
I am enclosing at       let giving jart3          vs
em available under the   E Settlement   Board,
and will be very glad to assist you i sible  to
this Board in the   securing uitable  to  this
Trince.
A poi  t y Impor ance  is that
place  the responsibi! fcion    a -our Lo< presen-
i                               'ge,   Yard er he- f, ..   ,
is very difficult to make  any arrangement  covering the bringing
in  of a large number  of  settlers without first raking  tl
.   btl '   absolutely cl  ar.
I  can,   however,   assure you that under ":
s,   this Board will be ready to  co-oper
t   t. .    :'." ]      extent.
Yours very tr
<W-T~W
J-'  ■•"  ''" a   - m- Address all communications to
LAND SETTLEMENT BOARD
PROVINCE  OF
BRITISH    COLUMBIA
VICTORIA, B.C.
June 1.   1
Rev. Father Macdonell,
Charing Cross,
HT, Ontario,
„r Sir:-
I have been informed by the Honorable A. "->
ason, Attorney-General for British Columbia, that
discussion took place recentl: ritl
placing' of settlers In Central Briti
n Ottawa re
Columbia.
the
I am enclosing a booklet giving particular:
of the system available under the Land Settlement Board,
and will be very glad to assist you in 1 slble to
this Board in the securing of settlers suitable to this
ovince.
A point of very great Importance :'
place the responsibility for selection on our Local Represen-
s "e, Vanderhw f,        . , ...
is "very ii  " alt to make any arrangement covering the' bringing
in. of a large number of settlers without first making
of settlement absolutely clear.
eondit'
to
the
I  can,  however,   assure you that under the
tions,   this Board will be ready to  co-operate
t ent.
Yours very truly,
<vvn^cV Address
the secretary
Immigration and colonization
■ffn
In your reply refer to no..
65183 Imm.
KINDLY DO NOT WRITE ON MORE THAN
ONE SUBJECT IN ANY ONE LETTER
F.G.3.-L.G.S.
■^t^Cj Jun.e...l,....1922....
Dear Father MacDonell:-
We have now secured an explanation
from our London Office as to the delay in the sailing of
the LAWRMOl family.  Mr. Smith says that Mr. Lawrence
applied to our Bristol Office .first in June, 1921, but
there being no position available, his case was deferred.  On March 6 last Mr. Smith wrote to the Oversea
Settlement Office requesting the issue of transportation and supposed that the matter had. been attended
to promptly. He was not aware until receipt of our
cable of April 22 that the transportation warrant
had been delayed;  as a matter of fact, it was delayed for five weeks in the Oversea Settlement
Office.
Yours very  truly,
Revd. Andrew MacDonell,
Arden Farm,
Charing Cross,
Ont. ftepaxtomA & Immigrattmt a# (LUtlMtiaaiunt,
'^ZA, A    ^mxxmtx&oX&mizU. T:AASA
File N°
fj, tdsntcm- Ayfoeey/,
QSWAAty&yAAty.
TELEGRAMS, PARAMOUNT, ABERDEEN.
TELEPHONE, CITY   2210.
March 11th .1922.
Dear Father MacDonell.-
Yours Feby 18th with list for holding back received
and understood.
1 sent the first list of forty five cases to London on the
4th March and have had advice of several passed for passage.
As the voucher books are issued we will get them back here
and from here get in touch with the C.P.Ry who will send
a man personally to book the party thus saving confusion.
Wired C.P.R. this morning to cable you to know destination
to book your people and others, it means a lot to get them
sent to Toronto and. then have them pay their fares to
Chatham,local fare.
1 fear the men y&u booked farther north and did not get
their O.S.I, forms or D Forms completed will be a wash out.
Only three or four have replied altogether.
The women will drag through the Spring before we get many of
them forward.
Those from Nairn and Mrs 0'Sullivan are to get away early,
are they to be booked to Charing Cross.
Yours truly
Canadian Government Smigrat OFFICE     OF
THE     DEPUTY    MINISTER     OF     IMMIGRATION
AND     COLONIZATION
OTTAWA ,    CANADA
15th December, 1921,
Dear Father MacDonald,
I am obliged to you for your favour of
the 9th instant, which accompanied your report and
in which is described the case of Horman MacLeod,
a crofter of good type, typical of many hardworking, honest, thoroughly reliable Scottish
people whose conditions in life would be improved
by  emigrating to Canada.   I am very pleased to
have this outline, and shall make use of it later
as opportunity arises.
I may add that_I am in receipt of a
letter from Mr. Macnagbten, Chairman of the Oversea
Settlement 3oard, in which he states that his
organization is now pressing upon the home government
the desirability of including in the estimates for
1922-22 the sum of £2,000,000 to aid migration to
seas Dominions, in order that the objects
set forth^rrr-ar-xesolution passed at the Prime
Ministers' Conference in July last shall be
achieved.
The Rev. Father Andrew MacDonald,
CHARIBG CROSS,
Ontario.
MS). OFFICE     OF
THE     DEPUTY    MINISTER     OF     IMMIGRATION
AND     COLONIZATION
OTTAWA,    CANADA
15th December, 1921,
Dear Father MacDonald,
I am obliged to you for your favour of
the 9th instant, which accompanied your report and
in which is described the case of Horman MacLeod,
a crofter of good type, typical of many hardworking, honest, thoroughly reliable Scottish
people whose conditions in life would be improved
by emigrating to Canada.   I am very pleased to
have this outline, and shall make use of it later
as opportunity arises.
I may add that_I am in receipt of a
letter from Mr. Macnagnton, Chairman of the Oversea
Settlement Board, in which he states that his
organization is now pressing upon the home government
the desirability of including in the estimates for
1922-23 the sum of £2,000,000 to aid migration to
eas Dominions, in order that the objects
set forth~T^r-arT?esorution passed at the Prime
Ministers' Conference in July last shall be
achieved.
Yours very truly,
wtd4
Deputy MlnIs ter-
The Rev. Father Andrew MacDonald,
CHARIHG CROSS,
Ontario.
WJ.B/ED. TELEGRAMS, PARAMOUNT, ABERDEEN.
TELEPHONE,  CITY   2210.
hiyemr reply please quote
File N?	
A
//6\ cAm&n- yy^eey,
'tyX/A/AAAl, office of
Tho Minister of ltoigratto» and Colonisation
Ottawa, Cantda.
Harch 6th, 1023.
Pear Father MaeDonell -
Fop tho purpose of helping and oaring
for settlers ?/hoa you bring out from Scotland and Great
Britain, end In order to enable them to settle securely and
permanently in Alberta, and also that the ease be used as
a central headquarters for your further work in colonisation,
the Government of Canada is leasing to the Scottish Immigrant
aid Society at One dollftr ■ year for a first period of five
years, the Farm and Buildings formerly used as an Indian School
situated near E©d Beer, in the Province of alberta.
If at the end of four years the Department decides to discontinue tlvs  lease, you will be given one
year's notice, which arrangement «iP assure you of having
a lease fop at least five years - the same to be renewed for
further periods, subject to one year's notice should the
Government require the para and Buildings for son© other purpose.
The Government a" Canada will also
iiaaediately allow you #6,000.00 for the purpose of making the
necessary repairs to the Buildings on the Farm and installing
of r lighting system.
If the success of the Scottish Emigrant
Aid Society, as indicated V the results in "bringing imi grants
to Canada, werrf.nts such action being taken, the Government td.il
also make a grant of #8,000.00 a year for the purpose of
promoting immigration and colonisation along the lines which -m
have discus sec.  This arrangement will oasrienoo with the year
1924 end "be continued each year until the end of 10S7, asking
e. total grant of f20,0OQ,00v.
Believe me,
Tours faithfully,
(sgd) GSAS, STSRAIT,
The Reverend A. MacDonell, acting Minister of XEw&nration end
at Ottawa. Colonisation. m
mrna^mm
DEPUTY  MINISTER
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
PROVINCE OF ALBERTA
Edmonton, May 30th, 1923,
In Your Reply Please Re-fer
To File No ff¥T.~
Bear Sir:
I have your letter of May 28th.
I have written Mr. Thos.Gelley, Immigration
Commissioner in Winnipeg, with respect to your request
for assistance towards the maintenance of the nurses
now employed. I do not think that this is a matter
for the Provincial Government, and I trust that
assistance will be given you through the Immigration
Department.
Yours truly,
DEPUTY MINISTER,
Revd. Father A. MacDonell,
The Arlington Hotel,
RED DEER,   Alt a. EDMONTON MORNING  BULLETIN -   JUNE  9th.
HEARS SENSATIONAL
REPORTS ABOUT THE
HEBRXDEANS UNTRUE|
f
OTTAWA, June 8.—The following Is the latest report received by
Hon. Charles Stewart, actnlg minister of immigration and colonization, with regard' to the settlement
of the Hebrideans In Alberta:
"Sensational reports  in  house Inaccurate.   jNineteen families are ar-
I ranged  for on  faians,  and  only  six
civilian  families at Red Deer wait-
j ing to he placed.    It Is expected to
{ have these families settled Immedi-
1 ately. Farms have been selected for
them.    Balance of party are es-ser-»
vice men in training on government
farm,   who  -cannot  toe  placed   until
qualified  by  the Soldier  Settlement
Board.     All  are  well fed  and  well
housed."
"V A    (ftftoernttmtt d € matin.
#t^
hiyou r reply olease quote
FileN0...Z55#
/Mi.
fllr
yy/7, l/n^^^y'rA^f^eX,
X)
IJA
TELEGRAMS, PARAMOUNT, ABERDEEN.
TELEPHONE,  CITY   2210.
Kay  3 8th,   1922,
"ear Father iacDonell,
o.   189, Ajchael   IcNeil,       astlebay,      BaJga.
I  have heard   to-day  from   the  Rev Father LlaeDougal3,
that  the   above man wishes   to pyoceed  to  Canada in September
along with his wife  and  two   children.
I  have   replied   that   the   case   cannot  he   dealt with
unti]   we  know  that you   are  in  a position   to  olace   this
family   at   that  late  date.       I   shall   be  glad   therefore   to  know
at your  early  convenience what you   can  do  in   the matter.
Yours  faithfully,
Jyilu^y
UNADIAI   GOvaimiMkllTiaaiGRATIGH  AGENT.
Rev"3   Father MaeDonell,
Arden Farms,
Charing  Cross,
Ontario. -*■—
THE    UNIVERSE,    FEBRUARY    18,    1921.
BEGBROKE PLACE
OXFORD
House for Convert Clergymen
The Committee responsible for the maintenance of this
house, opened to give a welcome and some preliminary
training to converts who desire to serve God in the priesthood, is in urgent need of funds to continue this good
work. Up to the end of the first year, twelve students
had been placed in various Seminaries or found Vocations
in Religious Orders, and four others, after time given for
due reflection, had returned to lay life.
We depend entirely on the voluntary contribution! of
Catholics interested m Am Convex on of England,
Please do not pass this eppeal b--, but send a subscription
or donation to either rf the following :—
Very Rev. Mg-. H. F. HINDE, M.A.,
Vice-Chairman of the Committee,
36, Altenburg Gardens, London, S.W.ll.
Very Rev. Mgr. BARTON BROWN,
Warden,
B;gbroke Place, Near Oxford-
CHARLES ROBERTSON, Esq.,
__ Treasurer,
31, The Drive, Hove, Brighton.
ANOTHER NEW MISSION
IN  EAST ANGLIA.
EAST DEREHAM, NORFOLK.
(Population about 7.000
Do Help us to Build a Church
IN   HONOUR   OP
"THE   SACRED   EEARr   &
ST.  MARGARET   MART."
- In the year 1773 East Anglia had but 12 Chapels and as many
Priests. To-day'there are-within the same limits about 60 Churches,
Chapels, and Stations, exclusive of Convents, though not all can
boast of a resident Priest. Not a very startling advance for 147
years ; still it is something to be thankful for, remembering that in
this part of England we have no great industrial centres like Manchester or Sheffield. These 50 Churches of to-day are mere specks
in the enormous acreage of East Aruclia. How uro they to suju>U'_
the needs ot scattered Catholics, oi to reach the convictions ana
touch the hearts of the thousands who have never seen a Catholic
Church, heard Catholic teaching from Catholic lips, or met a
Catholic idlest?
Our only solution is to open up New Missions if we can but
RELY UPON YOU to "Keep the Flas Flying!- YOU have the
Conversion of England at heart. Here, then, is a splendid opportunity for ALL to help in the erection of another home for the
Blessed Sacrament. For the present, Holy Mass (served from
Fakenham)is said in a room which is now too small for our ever-
increasing congregation.
ENCOURAGING NEW8:—A VALUABLE SITJT has been
purchased for the proposed New Church- Will YOU now help vts
to build the Church as an ACT OF REPARATION to the Sacred
Heait of Jesus? To raise funds for Church-building means.untold
anxiety and tedious efforts—we dare not shirk the responsibility,
Immortal Souls are at stake'. We earnestly appeal to ALL
LOVERS OF THE SACRED HEART for immediate help-NO
SUM TOO LARGE, NO SUM TOO SMALL—to bnild the Church.
Just a plain, simple, humble home for the Adorable Heart of Jesus.
Address-Rev. FATHER GRAY, c/o R. Kirby, Esq.,
Market Place, EAST DEREHAM, Norfolk.
University and  School.
TOWARDS   FEDERATION.
ASSOCIATION  OF
THE CRUSADE OF  PRAYER FOR
THE   SOULS   IN   PURGATORY.
ESTABLISHED   AT THE BRIDGETTIXE HOUSE OF SYOX
ABBBY. CHUDLEIGH, SOUTH DEVON, 1892, WITH THE
APPROBATION OF THE BISHOP OF PLYMOUTH.
Thi9 Association received the blessing of the Supremo
Pontiff, Leo XIII. on July 12lh, 1893. It also received that
of his successor, onr late Holy Father, Pope Pius X. His
Holiness Pope Benedict XV.. on April 10th. 1916, gave his
blessing and approval to it. as well as Ms blessi-g to all
the Associates.
The OBJECT OF THE ASSOCIATION is to pray for the
deceased who have a special claim on the members' prayers
and suffrages, such as Relations, Friends, Neighbours, and
Priests and Reunions, whilst at tho same time the Roir
Sorts in general aro included, particularly the souls of those
•who have died in consequence of the war.
For particulars of the Association and for Enrolment or
Members, Application must be made to THE SUPERIOR.
SYON   ABBEY.   CHUDL-EIGH.   SOUTH   DEVON,   E\«-
In connection with tho Crcsaob is published " Trie Poos
Bodls' Friend and St. Joseph's Monitor," a Monthly Magazine, originally and still chiefly devoted to plead the cause
of tie Faithful Departed.
Subscription 2s. yearly, post free, payable in advance.
6in«Ie Copies 2d„ post free.   Specimen copies sent free.
The magazine can be obtained from " The Manager,"
Office of the "P.S.F.," Syon Abbey, Chudleigh, S. Devon,
or from Messrs. Simpkin. Marshall A Co., 31 and 32, Paternoster Row, London, E.C.; or from Messrs. Burns & Oates,
28. Orchard Street. London,  W.
A limited space is allotted for advertisements. The scale
of charges may be obtained from " The Manager," Office of
r' P.S.F." 5892
CHARMING
OIL
PAINTINGS
Mrs. H. H. GOUVERNE,
DUTCH LANDSCAPES
Prices on application,
121, Harinkade, Scheveningen, Holland
We are glad to see from the new number of the Inter-
UniwrHty Magazine that .the movement towards
federation among the Catholic University Societies is
making steady progress. During this term the temporary committee will, it is hoped, draw up a Constitution, which will be agreed upon, and on the next
occasion on which University men and women can meet
together, as they did at Liverpool, there is a good hope
that they will do so. as a definite Federation. -Links
are also being forged with Catholic Universities abroad,
and a deputation from England has been invited to
the Congress of Czecho-Slovak Catholic Students at
Prague in July.
An interesting by-product of the Federation movement is the scheme for the vblication of literature of
the sort needed by U.nivosi students. I.U.M. gives
very full and encouraging reports of the progress of the
various University Societies, and the story of the
foundation of thafc-of Durham is especially interesting.
We are grateful to see that the Universe has been of
so much use to the Northern students, whose representative writes:—
Every   reader   of   the I.U.M.   should   get   the
Universe, too, and every reader of the Universe
should take the I.U.M.
Letters on editorial matters should be sent to Father
Martindale,  at  Campion House, Oxford, and business
letters to Miss T. Taylor, 41, Windle Street, St. Helens,
Lanes. . The subscription for a year is 3s. 6d., post free,
and single copies are Is. 2d. each.
The Recent London Dinner.
One of the most interesting features of the London
University Students' dinner, which we reported last
week, was the presence of Miss Tuke, Head of Bedford
College, whose arrangemenls for Catholic women
students, and especially Religious, have been so ample
and generous.
Miss Tuke's personal testimony to the qualities of
her Catholic students was deeply appreciated. She said
that she had noticed that these were always distinguished by the note of loyalty. She was not merely
alluding to members of religious orders, for whom it
was by their rule and training comparatively easy, but
also to those who were living, in the world. When
Catholic students entered Bedford College she always
looked from them for something different in outlook
and character from those from other schools. The
education of the intellect must be accompanied by the
forming of character. That was successfully carried
out in Catholic schools.
Glasgow Annual Reunion.
St. Aloysius' College, Garnethill, Glasgow, was the
scene of an interesting meeting of the above 'Varsity
Sodality, the occasion being the annual.reunion of the
graduate and undergraduate members. In the unavoidable absence of the President, Prof. J. S. Phillimore,
LL.D., J.P., the- chair was occupied by the Prefect,
Mr. P. McGlynn, M.A., Humanity Lecturer in the
University, and a distinguished company included Mr.
L. P. W. Renaif, B.Sc, Lecturer in Zoology at the
University and a Vice-President of the Sodality ; MY.
Brown, M.A., History Lecturer at the University;
Ore. Colvin, Scanlon, Conway, Henry, Bastable, and
Maguire; Messrs. T. White,.B.L., Frank.Corway, B.L.,
Downie, the artist, Wm. Thornton, LL.B., Tom Murrav,
L.D.S., B. Dempsey, L.D.S., Ernest J. T. Thompson,
M.A., secretary of the Students' Union, representing
the University; P. A. Wilson, M.A., President of the
University Liberal Club; RonaM MacPhail, sub-editor
of the University Magazine; Jas. Higgins, representing
the Catholic Institute ; J. Kay, representing the Glasgow
Catenians; R. E. O'Keefe, representing tho Edinburgh
University Catholic Students Union; Councillor O'Hare,
B.L., as well as over 100 undergraduate members of
the Sodality. Rev. Fathers Dinley, S.J., Rector of St.
Aloysius' College; E. D. Hanson, S.J., Headmaster;
Rota, S.J., Chaplain to the Edinburgh Union: and
Bullen, Chaplain to the Sodality, were also present.
The proceedings took the form of a smoking concert,
an excellent programme being sustained by '' The Merry
Four," " The Five Jocks," and Dan Fraser (by kind
permission of the managers of the Royal, Pavilion, and
Olympia. Theatres respectively), as well as many clever
" turns " from members of tl; Sodality, and the general
student body at the University. At an interval, during
which refreshments were served, a specially convened
meeting of the graduate members of the Sodality was
held to organise the new graduate section of the
Sodality. This was followed by a short address from
Mr. E. j. T. Thompson, Secretary of the Union, who,
in regretting the absence of the President of the
Students' Union, Mr. D. Hamilton, M.A. expressed
his pleasure at the cordiality and warmth of his reception, and his pleasure at the flourishing state of the
Catholic Students' Sodalitv. The Chairman then intimated that Celtic F.C., per Mr. T. White, B.L., had
made a gift to the Sodality of the sum of £10 10s., that
a similar gift had been received from the Glasgow
Catenians, and that Air. Downie, the artist, had gifted
to the Sodality a picture, the proceeds from its disposal
to be handed over to the Sodality Funds.    (Cheers.)
The second part of the programme was then completed. A hearty vote of thanks was afterwards accorded to the artistes, the managers of the theatres,
and Mr. Peter Berry and Dr. P. Maguire, who acted
as efficient accompanists, on the motion of ,Mr. P. A.
Wilson, M.A., President of the University Liberal Club.
On the motion of Mr. L. P. W. Renaif, B.Sc, a vote
of thanks was also accorded to the Reunion Committee,
the  members   of  which  were  Messrs.   E.   J.   Boyle,
Cowener, A. Brans, and D. Kelm. The meeting then
terminated with a spirited rendering of the 'Varsity,
chorus, " Ygorra."
Birmingham Newman Society.
The Rev. C. C. Martindale, M.A.,-recently gave a
lecture on " Genesis and Evolution " to the B.U.N.S.,
as the Birmingham Society is familiarly called. Mr.
Power presided. The lecturer explained that Genesis
was written to counteract the prevailing current of
Eastern philosophy, the cardinal tenet of which wsja
the belief that all matter was inherently evil, and therefore man was irresponsible. He quite cleared up any
difficulty the students might have had with regard tc*
the division of the work of Creation into days.
Rugby football at Ware.
The introduction of Rugby football at St. Edmund's
fully justified itself in the display given by the first XV.
in the first outside match, against Mr. Fuller's XV.
Mr. Fuller, the well-known member of the Old Merchant
Taylors', Mr. HuskisKon, and Mr. Burnege, members
of the same club, undertook the initial instruction in
the game at the College at the beginning of last term.
Mr. Fuller's XV. consisted largely of past and present
members of the O.M.T., and when it is known that
the visitor's pack was led by Mr. Huskisson, the present
captain of the O.M.T. and captain of the South of England team of 1920, the standard of play achieved by,
the College XV. merits no little praise.
The game was keenly contested throughout. The zeal
shown by the College was admired on all sides, particularly by the supporters of the visitors, most of whom
were keen enthusiasts of Rugby football. The final
score—20 points to 19' point6 in favour of the visitors—
is sufficient testimony of the keenness of the game.
The tackling by. the College XV. merited the praise
which it received, and but for several instances of plucky
and determined tackling the score would probably have
been more to the disadvantage of the College.   ■
The scorers for the College were: i L. Biggie, the
College captain, two tries, one converted by himself
and the other by R. Sherwin; V. McCarthy, one try,
converted by R. Sherwin; and a dropped goal by J.
McEntee.
THE  S.V.P.   SOCIETY.
The Need of Catholic Guardians.
The importance of Catholic representation on boards
of guardians and borough councils was strongly emphasised at the quarterly meeting of the Society • of St.
Vincent de Paul, held at St. Joseph's School, High-
Kate, on Sunday last; Qyex two hundred Brothers
attended the meeting, but the President, Sir John
Knill, and the secretary, Mr. Leonard C. Lindsay, were
unavoidably absent. Brother White (E. Finchley) took
the chair, and there were also present the Very Rev.
Father Cuthbert, C.P. (rector of St. Joseph's), Father
Chrysostom, C.P., Brother J. J. Sheehy (President of
the Local Conference), and Brother Whitehead. Many
new members were also introduoed.
Brother White, in opening the proceedings, appealed:
for extra visitation of the poor on the part of the
Brothers. Many of them apparently thought that if
they had no financial assistance to offer, there was no
good to be done, whereas the chief objedt of theif Society^
was that of caring for the spiritual needs of the poor,
rather than looking after their temporal needs.
In welcoming the Society, Father Cuthbert emphasised the same point.* Modern philanthropy, he said,
had entirely failed in this respect. The-Society had
accomplished a wonderful work in enlisting the services
of laymen all over the world to work for the poor.
The Brothers were always the prudent and efficient
helpers of the clergy, and through their offices the
Church was extended and its efforts facilitated. Though
their conference was. in a flourishing condition, there
seemed some hesitation on the part of some to take
up the work of visiting the poor, owing to a false impression that the latter had no wish for strangers to
come into their homes. He said that this was not the
case, and the Brothers need never be afraid of undertaking the task.
A Call for the Young.
Father Chrysostom having spoken, Brother Sheehy
gave an account of the present position of the Local
Conference, which, though having a small membership,
had, he felt, accomp^hed much in their work.
Brother Whitehead gave a detailed account of the
course to be adopted when applying for outside Poor
Law relief. Though such applications had to be made
direct to the Relieving Officer, a Brother could pave
the way by introducing the ease. Be also outlined the
general rules obtaining in connection with outdoor relief
in boards of guardians.
It is hoped to draw up a list of specimen cases for
the guidance of Brothers, and application should be
mad3 to the secretary of the Secretariate of the Poor
at the Society's offices, B2,  Victoria Street, S.W. 1.
Brother Whitehead appealed to members to get the
support and active co-operation of young men. It would
be of the utmost use if they were to get them elected
to boards of guardians, and they would be found to
take a whole-hearted interest in the work. Brother
Flynn supported the appeal. Brother Jones, who has
had much experience in this connection, said there
was still a suspicion of bigotry on public bodies, and
if the Catholic poor were to get all that was due to
them, it was up to the Brothers of the Society to be
in a position to make successful efforts in this jdirection.
On the motion of Brother V. St. Laurence, a vote
of thqijes was passed to Father Cuthbert: for his
presence.     Prior   to   the   meeting,    Father   Cuthbert THE    UNIVERSE,    lEBRUARY    18,    1021.
13
*' Though Dead He Speaketh."
CARDINAL   MANNING    ON    IRELAND    IN    1867.
His Pastoral Read in all Westminster Churches ;?.st Sunday.
"Ever since I was of age to know the history of Ireland, all the sympathy of my heart has been
with its faithful, noble, and martyred people."
His Eminence the-Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster issued the foil >wing Pastoral Letter on
Quinquagesima Sunday to be read last Sunday, in addition to the one previously issued and publicly
read on Sunday week :—
DEAR REVEREND FATHER
Ho ror and outrage, in the
i e u! my own flock,
,n of lawful aspirations,
:hy. or, even, actual co-
The tragedy of Ireland continues and becomes still more acute,
form both of aggression and of repression, are reported da~ by thty.
In the midst of this welter ind confusion I have grave reason to tear iii.
impelled by legitimate  love of country and urgent longing for the realisax i
are unwarily allowing themselves to become implicated, by active sympi.
operation, in societies and organisations which are in opposition to the Vaws of God and of the
Catholic Church.
A similar danger arose in London in 1867, and Tny great Predecessor, the then Archbishop
Manning, in words inspired by zeal for God's honour, and burning with h s constant and unfailing
love for Ireland and her faithful people, uttered the needed warning.
I take that warning, heard fifty-four years ago, and I make it my own «o-day.
The name " Fenianism V is now no longer in use, but the activity that it connoted is still alive,
and the denunciation of the second Archbishop of Westminster applies in unchanging measure to
that activity to-day, by whatsoever name it may be caUed. It may be known unerringly by its
principles, by its teachings, aid by its fruits.
I desire the words of my Predecessor to be used continually for the s feguarding of the whole
flock, and for your guidance, dear Reverend Father, in the direction of inciii idual consciences.
Parliament will meet again next week with the firm purpose, it is to b. hoped, of dealing justly
and promptly with this tragedy of Ireland. Urge your people to be const; nt in prayer throughout
Lent for this intention, and let them have it in mind whenever they hear Ms ss or receive Holy Communion.
.   I enjoin that this Letter and the enclosed reprint of the Letter of Archbishop Manning be read
to the faithful in all our Churches on Sunday next, the first Sunday of Lent.
May God bless you all and have you ever in His keeping,
FRANCIS CARDINAL BOURNE,
Archbish:-* 0)  Westminster.
PASTORAL   LETTER
of his  Grace Archbishop Manning for
the Feast of Saint  Patrick, 1867.
■'?«7ised for
I Xfartv-vatgofK '"fl-3
oj space.—Editor.)
On this feast of St. Patrick I speak to you with a
mixed feeling of jov and sorrow. The Festival of your
great Apostle and Father brings vividly before us the
grace which through him has descended upon you, and
upon your children, and likewise his glory, which
through your faith is always increasing both on earth
and in heaven.
Excepting the Apostles of our Divine Master,
there is perhaps no Saint whose spiritual children
are so faithful and so fervent, so numerous or so
widely spread.
They are in Ireland, England, and Scotland, in
Canada, throughout the United States, on the shores
of both their seas, in the West Indies,'in India, in
Australia, in the Islands of the Pacific.
it is a wonderful fact in the Providence of God that
when the English tongue "began to contradict the
Catholic Church, the children of St. Patrick took it
as if their own, and have spread the Catholic faith
wheresoever the English speech is heard : not only
throughout the Empire of Britain, but wheresoever the
Anglo-Saxon race and language have extended. North
America and Australia are evidently marked out for
a great future. Empires will one day rise out of them :
and in their destinies the children of St. Patrick must
bear a large proportion.
Saint  Patrick and  his Children.
St. Patrick has left on record his confidence that the
people whom God had given him, in the ends of the
earth, would never be lost to his inheritance; and that
confidence has been signally justified, . The children
of St. Patrick have continued faithful to their Saint
i'u'i will. :i fidelity not sui[Mj»eii by any nation
of the Christian world. This day bears witness throughout the world that you are steadfast to the faith he
taught you, and to the laws which he delivered to
you.
He" has taught you to believe the Holy Catholic Faith,
to hold fast by the Catholic Unity, and to adhere,
even at the cost of life, to the Vicar of Jesus Christ.
By hie example and by his words he has taught you
the duty of mortification, of detachment from the world,
and of peacefulness. This is the inheritance of the
children of St. Patrick, and these are the fruits he will
look to find in return for all his toil. And I bear witness that in steadfast adherence to the Catholic faith
and to the Catholic Church, and in close filial union
with your pastors, you show yourselves to be the true
children of St. Patrick, throughout this great city and
in all the world.
This, then, is the cause of my joy.
An Accumulation of Evils and Sufferings.
But I have also a cause of sorrow. It is because the
country we love so well is at this moment in affliction.
You have a right to know my thoughts at such a time
as this, and I have a duty to warn and to guide you.
God forbid that I should be silent when I ought to
speak, or that I should in mistaken prudence keep
back from vou what vou ought to know.   I do so the
more freely because ever t'nce I was of age to know
the history of Ireland, all Hie sympathy of my heart
has been'' with its fairhfr. noble, martyred people.
If my prayers or my effoi ran avail anything, they
shall never cease for firela
The  centuries   of  eyi e    --u
bittered    seven-iota    ru     ..   ;-.:. .:       ■; ^,  ■
religion, have left upon Ireland an accumulation of evils
and sufferings which generations alone can remove.
But removed they must and will be, if only the
gradual and onward movement of England and Ireland
to perfect unity and equality be not hindered by
violence.
Past  and  Present.
There is no returning; upon the past; The wheat in
the ear cannot go back into the stalk, nor the stalk
into the blade. As the world moves onward, the
Providence of God calls into existence new social orders :
and out.of them arise right, justice, and sovereignty.
For this reason the Apostle says, ■' Let every soul be
subject to higher powers: for there is no power but
from God : and those that are. are ordained of  God."
In these words St. Paul is speaking of the Heathen
Empire of Rome: of a civil power always active in
persecuting the Church. He declares the government
of the Empire to be from God, and to have a claim
upon the conscience of Christians to obey it. If so, the
Empire of Great Britain has the same rights and claims,
the same obligation on our conscience, and on our
obedience. To rise against it, is.to resist the ordinance
of God : and they that resist shall receive to themselves
not only the penalties of man, but the judgment of
God.
We have long ago warned"those who praised,
flattered, abetted, justified, glorified the revolutions
of the Continent, and above all the revolution in
Italy, to take heed lest their own principles should
recoil upon themselves.
They have recoiled upon us now. The same antisocial, anti-Christian principles, whieh have been conspiring in the dark' e Government of the
Sovereign Pontiff, have now conspired against the
English monarchy.
The Cardinal then goes on to deal at length with
the claims made in an argon of '-fenianism" that
decisions on points of ethics must be made on the
responsibility of the individual, not of the Church. To
this the Cardinal rejoins that the Church is infallible
both in faith and in mortis; and that the clergy are
to teach the laws of the latter as well as the former.
Clandestine Societies.
- He then deals with the suggestion that Fenianism is
not expressly condemned, is not a secret society, and
is not against the Church's luu-.
1. First, it is not necessary that a secret society
should be condemned bv name. All seditious societies
are condemned by definition, by description, and by
identity with those which are condemned by name. In
the Allocution of September 14, 1865, the Holy Father,
after renewing the condemnations of Clement XII.,
Benedict XIV., Pius VII., Leo XII., declares that the
last-named Pontiff condemned all the clandestine
societies which had been specially named, and (' all
others whatsoever, by whatsoever name they might be
called, which conspire against the Church and civil
power, and prohibited them to all the faithful under
the severest pain of excommunication. "-
2. Secondly, < iccidents. This'is asserted in
the Encyclical of ' which it is declared that " all
clandestine societies, whether ami oath of secrecy b"
exacted in them r Hot, together with their followers
and abetters, ai, ted." This condemnation falls
upon all societi, • t conspiracies, open or secret,
■against the Churel: or the civil power. In order to
perfect certainly ...n this point, the Archbishop
Dublin, in 1864, ron-ulted the Sacred Congregation of
Propaganda, which on June 7, 1864, answered in these
words: '"The seer, - societies, of which there is question in the Pontifical Constitutions, are understood to
be all such as purpose to themselves anything against
the Church or Hm civil Government, whither
require  an  oath  of secrecy  or not.''
3. Lastly,  all   ^ loh    conspiracies,  whether   dire
against  the  Chui.■ h   Mid civil  power,  or against    the
Church alone, t th<   State .More,   are bv  •■
.  liie Allocution of
1847; and the Apostolic Letters of 1860; and finally
i;i the Encyclical of 1864, which condemns the proposition, " that it is lawful to withdraw obedience,
and to rebel against legitimate sovereigns."
Let no man then deceive you. Trust to no guides or
teacher* who contradict the voice of the Vicar of Jesus
Christ.
A Pledge of Better Things.
My heart bleeds for the Catholic people of Ireland.
I know its history, its sufferings, its wounds; the sting
which lias been planted in its conscience, its heart, its
faith, its highest, noblest instincts. I know- that in the
past the wound has gone to the quick, that the iron
has entered into its soul. I know, therefore, the present
danger of its sons. Much that is good in them rises
up in behalf of their homes and of their faith. It is
their higher, purer, most human, and deepest-instincts
which are worked upon : and the past has ripened in
them to take the influence of evil counsels coming from
abroad. Letters from Ireland telL me that many who
have become entangled in this sinful rising have done
so in full belief that it was a holy cause.
They were men who loved their faith, who went,
before meeting the hour of danger, to make their
peace with God: unconscious of doing wrong,
misled, confused in mind by the consciousness of
all that Ireland has suffered, and over-persuaded
by evil voices and the false principles I have here
exposed.
Even in this there is a pledge of better things. /"
The Worst  Enemies of  Ire'-nd.-
- k   i.    "'■-3  SH*^1   * .jinrl   I   S!»y fn
open  the  eyes,   if  openiti   thov   can   lie, who
think to pacify and to tranquillise Ireland, or even to
calm and govern it, while they put public dishonour
and legal contempt upon the faith and the Church of
Ireland. They who would undermine the faith of
Ireland by mixed education and by mercenary conversion, are the worst enemies of the peace of Ireland,
and of the union of the two kingdoms. In the measure
in which they succeed, in that measure they weaken
over the<Irish people the mightiest power of obedience,
faith in the Church of God.
At this moment much that is noble, generous,
pure, unselfish, manly, humane, and even religious
in the heart of Irishmen, is alienated-by the wrongs
of the past, and wounded by much that survives
both in the letter and in the spirit. And this
alienation is the invitation to foreign sedition, and
the predisposition to all manner of moral and
social disease.
Wheresoever the violence of this world enters it
destroys those that use it. The revolution in France
sacrificed Ireland in 1798. Bloodshed.--misery, executions, widowhood, social hatreds, and .thirty-years more
of penal laws were the consequence. The revolutions
of 1848 all but sacrificed it again. .
Why should Ireland be always between the upper
and nether millstone, between England and France,
England and Revolution, England and America,
broken and ground to powder.'
Work together with the wise and peaceful providence
of God, and all is before us.   There is a tide in time
as in the  waters of the sea.    All things are moving
onwards, and-no human hand can turn the current back.
Scotland  h$..;  been  lifted   to  the   prosperity   of
England;  Ireland must be lifted to equality with
both.    Every badge of oppression and of persecu-
tion must be effaced from the statute book, from
the face of society, from the heart of the people.
The Church and faith of the Irish people must be
the Church and faith of Ireland. The Catholic Church
in all the amplitude and dignity of public recognition.
Tight, and law, must be acknowledged by man as it
is constituted and honoured by God. It was a senseless illusion to ignore the breadth of Ireland beyond
the Pale. It is a more senseless fiction to ignore the
Catholic Church, which alone is recognised by Ireland
and by the world.
Catholic, Ireland always was, is, and always will be.
Thwart or violate its faith, and it can never be at
rest. Honour and cherish its dearest treasure, and it
will be peaceful, loyal, and content. When the faith
of a people has free expanse, society prospers. And
society springs from the furrow; labour builds homes,
villages, towns, with all the acts of life and gradations
of social order so fine and closely knit that the Commonwealth is one, with one action, heart, and will.
Commonwealth is a common welfare:   and such Ireland, will be if the god of this world do not enter in
to mar the work of peace :   if our rulers be wise and-
just, and  if  you.  children of  St.   Patrick,  keep his
word and are true to his example. (Dec.   22/23,
SPECIFICATION     FOR     FOUR    ROOMED
BOTTAG3  FOR  SETTEERS
GENERALLY .     .
The  contractor  to supply all labor,   material,  transportation,
equipment  and  everything requisite  for the proper  carrying out   of the
construction.     The  owner to place  and carry the necessary insurance
or  to advise  the contractor to do  so at  the  owners  expense,   such
advice  to be  in writing.     The  contractor  to oarry and pay the
necessary workmenrs liability  insurance.     The   owner to  supply and  stake
out  the site,   and hold the contractor  free  from any action for
trespassing or   infringement  on the rights  of others,   relative to
the location  of the  site  or other matters p^etaining thereto.     No
alteratioja__frQm_plB,ns and  specifications  shall be made without
the written consent  of the  owner.       Payments  shall be made  on estimates
within fifteen days  of the completion of each cottage  in  full.
CARPENTRY
■J
Spruce whall be used throughout in the construction with
the exception of the rough boards which shall be poplar, and the
shingles which shall be cedar.  Four spruce sills made by spiking
together two pieces of 2 X  6 spruce shall be run through as a
foundation to which to erect the structure.  These shall be properly shimmed and leveled with two by four wedges or short pieces of two
by four material. The joists shall be two by six two foot centers,
and all partitions shall be two by four at two foot centers as
shall also the outside frames, with single plate and double cap.
The outside walls shall be covered on the outside with shiplap,
building paper and spruce drop siding.  The whole of the inside walls,
partitions and ceilings, shall be covered with either beaver
beaver board, or Canadian Wall Board, and strips of spruce lattice
if" wide.   In the case of the outside walls, the studding shall
first be covered with, this board and the strips nailed over joints.
The ceiling joists shall be two by four at two foot cenfefers and the
rafters shall be two by four at two foot centers, which shall
show a proper projection for oaves.  The Roof shall he covered with
number two boards and shingles.  Shihgles to be number two.  The floor
joists to be first covered with number two baards,  and then number
^/spruce flooring six inches wide, with one ply of tar paper between.
Windows to be twenty four inches by twenty four inches two light check
rail, but without cord or weights.  All inside doors to be five panel s^ock
doors two foot six by six foot six and all outside doors to be same
only two foot eight by six foot eight.  Both to be 1 3/8".  All interior
window and door casings to be four inch square stock.  Windows to have
proper stools with quarter round for apron and a six inch base to be
run around all rooms.   Supply cheap window catch to each window
and cheap door set to each door.  Supply and fix in place at
roof and ceiling one piece of galvanized iron 18" square, cut for
seven inch stove pipe.  The one at the roof to have proper collar
riveted to same to make it watertight.  No painting to be done in this
contract. *
I  \ Dee.22/23
38tt»Iff-IQISl4| MB Full" HOC£l3D
 mm% ¥<a c^mA^u^^.
V--^-fWri.-,i'ilvX
The contractor to- supply all  labor ♦material, transportation oquipraonb
and everything requisite for the propar carrying oat of the construct ion.'Bis owner
to place and carry the necessary Insurance or to advise t«o contractor to do so at
tho owners expense,such advice to be in writing.The contractor to carry and pay the
necessary woricsen's liability insurance. She owner to supply and stai® out the site,
and hold the contractor free from any action for trespassing or infringement on the
rignts of othe re, relative to the location of the site or other mat tore pertaining
thereto* 2fo alteration froia .plans .and specifications shall be iaad@ without the written
consent of the owner* Payments shall be made on estimates within fifteen days of the
caapletion of each cottage in full*
.spruce shall be used throughout in the construction with, tho exception
of the rouah boards #j.ich shall be poplar,and the shingles f-hicb shall be cedar.Four
tpruee sills made by spiking together ^wo pieces of Z x 6 spruce shall be run through
ae a foundation on which to erect the structure* fhttse shall be properly BM»st# &m
leveled with lag by four wedge® or short pieces of two by four arterial* The joiote
shall be two by six two foot centers,and all partitions shall be two by four at two
foot centers as shall also the outside frames,with single piate and double cap.  The
outside mils shall be cohered on the outside with ©hiplay,building paper and spraee
drop ©idlag*She whole of the inside m&lls, partitions and eel lings, shall be covered
with either beaver board,or Canadian tall Board,snd strips of spruce lattice l|**  -
wide*  In the case of the outside walla,the studding efcall first be- covered with,this
board ana tho strips nailed over joints* The ceiling joists shall be two by four at
two fi.-ot centers and the rafters shall be  two by four at two foot cent ore,which shall
show a proper projection for eaves* The Roof shall b© severed with number two boards
and shingles*. Shingles to be number two* Tho floor joists to be first covered with
number two boards,and then nuabor one spruce flooring six inches wide,with ono ply
of tar paper between. 1'lndc^s to be twenty four inches by twenty four inches fm light
oheefc rail,but without cord or veights. All Inside doors to be five panel stock doors
two £0fflt sis by by six foot six and all outside doors to be same only two foot eight
by six foot elght*£oth to be 1 S/8". Ail interior window and door casings to be four
inch square stoQk.'&indows to have proper stools with quarter round for apron and a
six inch base to be run around, all rooms* Supply cheap window catch to each window
and cheap door set to each door* Liapply and fix in pl«-.;e at roof and coiling one
piece of galvanised iron 16" square,cut for seven inch stove pipe* Tho one at the
roof to have proper collar riveted to same to mSm it watertight* So-painting to be done
in this contract* DCS/C-Hc-13/211218.
21st December 1918.
From;- A.D.C.S.(E.C.),
O.Li.F.C,
Oxford Circus House,
245 Oxford St., London, W.l.
To:-   Capt. (Rev) R.A.MacDonnell, LLC,
12th Infantry Brigade,
4th Canadian Division,
B.E.F.,   France.
Dear Er. MacDonnell,
I am sorry to say that the Government
policy is now against the creation of any new
offices, so as I was unable to obtain an official
position for you with your majority, I de^ci&ed
to send over Father 0'Gorman, who has rank
already, to do what he can on the Lines of
Communication.
I have written to Er. French asking
him to see that you get leave to Paris as soon
as Sir Robert Borden arrives there as he is
likely to do in the near future.   I would be too
late for you to come to England now to see him.
Please accept my sineerest Christmas
wishes and believe me to be'always,
Sincerely yours,
Lt.-Colonel,
WTW/1. A.D.C.S, (E.G.) DCS/C-Mo-13/14119.
January 14th. 1919.
FROM:  Office of Director of Chaplain Services,
Overseas Military Forces of Canada,
245 Oxford Street, London, T?.l.
TO:   Captain (Rev) A. MacDonnell, M.C.,
12th. Inf. Brigade, 4th. Can. Division,
B.E.F., France.
Dear Rev. Father,
I have your letter of 5th.
January.  I too was disappointed that I did not
succeed in getting you appointed D.A.D.C.S. (L.of C)
but as no more promotions ere being put through I
thought you would be seriously handicapped in such
a position with the rank of Captain.
I certainly will give you every
consideration if such an Expeditionary Force as you
mention should be formed.
I think your attitude on the
venereal question is absolutely correct and you
should keep hammering at it to maintain our standards
I will try to get the facts and figures that you
mention but they are very carefully guarded at the
present time so I suppose I shall have to do some
tall wangling to get them; however, I will do my
best for you.  One thing that General Foster told me
was that tader the prophylactic treatment the percentage of diseased men had greatly increased and he
was thoroughly alarmed and almost in despair over
the situation.  Please do_not quote the General^ im
tJ^hJasfcfaer•  The facts, however, will help you in
the matter.
Sincerely yours,
Lieut-Colonel,
A.D.C.S.(R.C).
WTW/S. 649-M-10417
R.Mc.28
department of jHilttta anb Befeitce,
#ttatoa, Canaba, Oct, 17th,1919.
CHAPLAIK  SERVICES.
Capt. Rev. R. A. MaoBonnell, M.C.,
740 View Street,
VICTORIA,
B.C.
Dear Father,
Archbishop Sinnott has just told me
that you are ready to take up the Chaplain work
at Winnipeg. Xinaiy tell me if it is your intention to remain in the service, because the position in Winnipeg is permanent.
After your experiences Overseas, it
will, indeed, be a boon to secure your services.
Yours devotedly,
Lieut-Colonel,
A.D.C.S. (R.C.)
CANADA. homlott,
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SxponBes incurred in r@
Hebxi&ean Settlement.
As soon a© th® Hebrideana heard that there was to be
© nominated Passage scheme by which they would b© enabled
to secure passage to Canada, and, immediately an notice
of sal© of steak being published by one of last year's
Delegates, ther© was a rush of each to get Ms sal©
published before bis neighbor.      i-he result was that all
the Hearideal® who earn© to Canada this spring sold off
their cow ©r cows & what few sheep St horses they had list
fall a by the time they could leave Scotland in April,
many had already mad© very serious inroads upon their
little capital*
slhen they arrived in Alberta therefor® in May last
it was found that many ®% then had no money.    r£hey had
large families ft had not the therewithal to feed than*
The only possible ©ours© to follow therefor© was to feed
them while housed at Red Seer and get them placed as soon
as possible.
It was very difficult*, practically impossible to
get farts labour f m them, as farmers had no accommodation
ox separate cottage for ran with such large families «
besides# these Hebrideana were so determined to get land
of their own that they refused to go out working for others
lest they should r&as an opportunity of getting a farr..
fh@y mad© us© of their stay at Red Deer learning
Canadian matho&s * harneasiag horses, four horse hitch,
plowing with gang pie®, etc*
. She ecu were taken in email parties to view farms
and in almost every case the railway far© had to be paid
for them & when finally the whole farily moved to their
new home, the transportation had to be loaned to Wmhbi
lease of this last appear© In expense account.
About 11160 has lm&ti loaned in small sums from |1G to
|100 as grub states, etc.
- An epidemic - - E -
An epidemic of meaalee added to our troubles.
But as soon as the evil showed itself precautions were
immediately taken to prevent serious effects. ilursea
were installed and © ©rail hospital was set aside and
th© situation was thoroughly well" handled.
The feeding of the multitude was accomplished
to the entire satisfaction of the Bebrideans who at©
mor© flesh meat in those two months than they did for
years before, and it was done economically.
The maintenance of the whole Eebridean party
works out at about ?B& -p&T head per M&*   fh© party
settled, numbers about 1540 souls & they arrived in RoA
Peer in th© first week is May and were all dispersed
Ss  in thair new homes on the g&th day of July.
(2im dispersal could have been accomplished
more speedily were it not for the outbreak of measles
and also on© or two accidents & a birth.
HaoBonald i.ondon,
JSovesu/o- 1 .-th,  iy^i.
1 1 '   -i.erpoal on ruea „   XWM  ~ i-th ,vdtti*
I——r-stii^U-r—-e^.—mm k. V. "~ $BB*& .
I viant  t;o uixn i-    ©en h Colonel
I  al«o a.,"-    r.    oxou, ... for J   ,  ■ :-„      rnett
ice. I £©t vO>le hints
to de. -   .  ■   i ■ n.
fts.r ,iie emi eertaiB
i'-.^iiiex? Bte |
: fefl     ■■ . • t
■• ■ :i . ' ■ I
with. i\>u?i<: t etroBg r>,r.ir
«ai        • but In mst i r re, sepeeli I
i    •
a ©in a, sot ©a ;,.u*;h for their dm
eake, but for the future of their children.
I ftjfieefl   it .c-'ort te,    Xen
trrthsrrick*
lij <uy  f.o I • f»irt
ae?; e I  took     . .   1        w c     •
tfeeei on  fsaOtta  there r  recruits fwss
-rick.
j   the • re  ijiclin*
f.enneth to  go* BBBfa both
gav* their natu   .
•o.-'.    u - I went to Mnataseett.
sehsss© there, i  on 1-    . poydsstft*    i   spent
9 in  this   U   -.riot geing up to th* ! ocfinevi
Th* re eeveral keen BW nuke e»ealle«rt
tfc«3 *or. at e noUiii; »w for their wort   »  want
of .   i , t in  the -       v;   i      -ru
,     ^itjj n:i h and
his brothers ar« likely to      ,    i.o oevtrul *;irlf   . ties.
rie alt© ©ill pre
felloe above example in ©hart U. e*
.   it   <:-<   :■-.
J B   X  MKt   i ©iJ i©   BX$fl Wf
keen •    .■ .     ul   I  nr, doubtful i     fee ©ill  WW© JttB*
no .      I explaiaad ©©hewn to a bb •     _ n.
Wc I to 11  iii to  the 61«B v-
a -iui   - -   ■ ■ .•    ■ riot.
will s   ■   !<«>.:- .»;::   v.;   it,  eapsei   ..  j   i.-..in    in
X. i:
= ,<   i".
•   fe*gp
.sinloalmaidArt, Ql©a&B - , .       The *feoie of tbl©
u\z\$?j |« in  I  i        | t|«Are <me
or ttm ma bled     rbbJ
ihea t&er* :,i# BJtBiBB*       It ia a qaeiftiosi ct
and eonfidenae *
Au«B«t aid I *i»it©4 Veert       & «N©r« 2
a large &@atin   . <i-e       RBBfeer »«t#a i.-. nri  i  ,
quite & few mmmt*
. v   thia  ti*s© I had 'srittttn a©BOB© to =-.- r).   an.
I  hmt taken aacteo  la jwtka k«o;« eBV aobosteo, b«s*idc« ukiefc ;.
had spoken to g*«ny of the Bflnpl <,  ao tiu t x.
were exacting a ■
iii   . .. tie-- arch.
:*© a411 b« $ut  a an e^ostutt frcfi thi-..  i
auttte* is liwcan in i&ly*      i lu^ve
co*»op«rutien o.' thtf a ,    rid  thi a is ui  [
I       -<2»
In the eeettta -      ;e seating
»t Cx. j.      on, h; ;    ..                                  trie- copied by good and
d workifsg fnraer© or crat?ter« end t
o «iit5r<tte if thin           .  i- • ng«d»                     Bl
«? of nor*           host© on .                't*l of
thefii  *#iil have  ;                                          Blf  HHBBh
Le&>ti: 3d i refi on to th« b ont
bjp several *tl© aBBj aaxlota* t© igtva tfe«&X WiatQB  aa Baraepaotiwa
ealgr&ate*      1 hitve turn ao*%« 110 na*n;   .
iaied on U*« i: .     it ©a ad.
.-swaged for steetln&a - lieanrtfh aa eybri
Benbcoui  .
&3>ok* lit idJBJB neetitijjn BrtBJ
©aa*es.      Iftieit ato^iitg at horni fctJn
tt*? h^,' to  atin;" tB jeeula. I left th© Sola**,  in
order t© go to London to eeneeAt Colon 1    . iSsith itsa\ the
oversea *i«ttl«aent office on the beat bsjj- of handling the
RearideaB ©ita attatt* o eatp.-
a to leave either 8iet a
to eastc        . I   .    . ij both   ji to atwaaer &«
Bi ti
cm jssy Bt   see*© 4= j d
aade it p^ basisvZ-     < , t5 of the
l©l«a to &-. Vk*
unatln&ia    .. ttBf  BftBBat BBi«« -Zr further ^sork
in
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Lk elth Coloii-l ;j.Mit.h. a IdBBt » ©Bfi^ to ooa© Mfith ste
to the @*e£B©a BettieBMmt », btf t«54a8B diffiendtiea w^re
ex*'--refi   BJ ,    n'       aa la        I    .n#flK*J3*t land*:   q
-hivh S .  akin ITm m. Ith
so g©v I . ;ion fe» Bajer KBrj^ o: m to
:«.        ?hio  BBB   R  Bl     BBfe   B*   ttta  BtllUlll   v>:j %Ut»
*a4or --tnovBiaBB ©neny and pmotio-a ltti0wiwrtg;e in
regsrd to BB© B© /•.   for c ya s»«o asid ©ostaa
y is»i«t«f uat of «o^: ii; t
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Married                                 41
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JSxpenaea incurred in r©
Hebxi&ean settlement.
As aeon a© th© HBbrideana heard that there was to be
a nominated Passage scheme by which th©y wrould b© enabled
to seour© passage to Canada, and, icxiediataly on notice
of sal© of stock being published by one of last year's
©©legatee, there was a rush of each to get his sal©
published before his neighbor.      1'he result was that all
th© Kebxideans who cam© to Canada this spring sold off
their cow or cows & what few sheep & horses they had last
fall & by the tine th©y could leave aootlsnd In April,
Many bad already ciade mry serious inroads upon their
little capital.
iifhan they arrived in Alberta tharefor© in May last
it waa found that sunay of than 'had no 5son©y«    They had
large families & had not th© wherewithal to feed them,
Tm only possible course to follow therefore was to feed
them while housed at Red Beer and get them placed as soon
as possible*
It was mr^ difficult, practically Impossible to
get fare, labour for them* as farmers had no aoooinciodatlon
ox separate cottage for ran with sueh large families -
besides, these nebrldeana were so determined to get land
of their own. that they refused to go out working fox others
lest they should nias an opportunity of getting a £am,
They ©ad© us© of their stay at Red Peer learning
Canadian laethods - harnessing horsea, four horse hitch,
plowing with giaig plow, etc*
. She can were taken in etaall parties to view fams
and in alaoat ©very case th© railway far© had to be paid
for their, & when finally the whole far&ly sioved to their
new hoiae, th© transportation had to be loaned to thar.«
Hon© of this last appaaxa in expense account.
About ill£G has been loaned in assail sums froo f 10 to
C-100 as grub states, etc.
- An epidemic - • s
An ®pi&@fsi© of rseasles added to our troubl©a.
But as soon as the evil showed lts©lf precautions were
lisredistely taken to prevent serious ©ffacte.,    ilurees
war© installed and a srrall hospital was set aside and
th® situation was thoroughly wall handled*
Th© feeding of the multitude was accomplished
to the entire satisfaction of th© Hebrideana who ate
more flesh neat in those two months than they did for
years before, and It was don© economically.
The laaintenanee of th® whole Hebrldean party
works out at about y2b $®r head per day*    fh® party
settled, numbers about 340 souls a they arrived in Red
Peer in th© first week in May and vara all dispersed
& in their new hotaaa on th© Sbth day of £uly*
Th© dispersal could hav® been aoooiaplishad
more speedily were It not fox th© outbreak of nsaalea
and also one or two accidents & a birth*
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TELEGRAMS, PARAMOUNT, ABERDEEN.
TELEPHONE, CITY   2210.
File N?.
dji y .'31.
Z/6) LAnAAAA?., ^AiVTeeYy,
'AAYAtArt/.
J! ct UU, C J.     J    t-.,o uUii 'vj.j. j     -
 fcnj Your letter of . January.; 14-tu. reacted me
.ay,   ana  it  gitvJbs me  the  consolation  of anovZip  that you
sZll yaaiU/., .progress,   gJLthoush   souew-iat.  index inzt   .
We  are  dragging  or; withn^fee  cases.       As
rj   net litexaiy even  to the exta it
1 j :. ■ is wh s re  su ch  places  are
ks and numerous odder petty
their  aadaaa;dical   Dualities
sire  tne best  or  earl;-- i wisii
cs   instead  of general   information.
to-c
ou may know, these peoplj
i :;.;;
.a naue.s
instructions, althou
I take it iron y«u t
■ae were  dealing  in m
I nave   it  from Father "ac
;. 4*Vi a "■**    "  d - r> T j*»i - -~ - "•■ "" 1        i a i3»     cr - /"* q ■--'» e» v»o f "sn     "i" '-■'■ 1 cs    t.t-c>i~
a c , Ui 1 k> 1     - - -C A-1.' - U I . £ g C ■> J- J-     -1 Ci o     c. j     o C^iii vl4%i -tii      vlilS      IS ag/
photographs   in vezy  slowly,   and in  cases wher
we take it  on  ourselves to go up to Henderson
third one,   and  eventually you will   receive a
we  Co not get  the money  or
account  ux  &^o   o< c*.
1 O    g© w u XXX^
7 two  com*
get trie
bill  if
elves.       I presume you  got my o"i
linea up  so   w
minute for the want  of a
,Te   ayeyy
.d us up
ich ■petty
Let me dear from you  the  latest  gossip  fror;
0 D vfitWS. * IS    i/ii    -Z_J_ 3*Gi£    x UsC Gzj/      uO   ilOlu   Oxlj     01    wXl 0    ZO   a ®XX     ^-* 1«J*
will  oe  the next man.        It  is possible that  Colonel  Smith may
"be  In Canada  shortly   to  discuss  the new emigration p. '
the future Minister of Emigration.
- V>  V 7 ,   -i-   \j.
¥a/
i -<*-•' 2.
•
■
-
IISA   ■<..-■      :....•■-■-
-   . -    sjsoir
v.
fe' have a gooaly list  of women whose nana
nave
suomitted  to
*     ..... \J a'\Q i i ,        Ux.l C     J *a, SXi &** VJ 6X1 w X C'jJ_     i OX      '■-,-'.; 1 wCbX 4*w * ■*• W d      cL
Tien to  getting assisted passages,   ana also   some men,   all  of
whom are   in your group.       Mr.  Idoxon advises me  that he  is   to
sudmit  these  cases   to   the Goto anient  of Ontario  before he  can
advise  about  assisted passages under such  conditions,   so   that
if you   see  loherty  or ahoever the deputy Minister is.  you
talk this  natter over nulla  in do.ronto..       .1 weald
o c
u u    a
;re have
pr'A
a. s.plendiu type,   and juagm,; froi
ar auicher of  intellect
V] ■■*.: '<■* £3      T 1 Y\       T :'"   O 1   Y*     t4 S '-~\ O T* Q
ilCUA. C      UI.   J        UI 1 t?JL> J.       ; J Cfc polo }
CA'h
Yours aery  sincerely,
WVEHRMEBS     EMIGEATIS
b-.       .Piease note  taat
last  September.-
■
,s increased
Rev, Father Andrew MacDonell,
Aent County, Ont. FORM    93
WINNIPEG
Head Office
REGINA
MCCALLUM-HILL  BLDG,
EDMONTON
508 TEGLER  BLDG.
PHONE 5337
/
7
Carter-Halls-Aldinger Company
LIMITED
ENGINEERS AND   BUILDERS
John C. Weston,
District Manager
Railroad and  Public works
Steel Construction and
Fireproof   Buildjngs a  specialty
Edmonton,
CANADA
December 28/23.
Rev.  A. Mac Donell,
Ard-Moire,
Red Deer, Alberta.
Reverend Sir:-  RE. COTTAGES FOR SCOTTISH EMIGRANT AID SOCIETY
er
we
are enclosing herewith two copies of the blue
print which we promised to send on to you, and wish you would
look over them, giving particular attention to the layout of
the rooms and advise if this layout is not satisfactory to you.
As agreed verbally, with yon and Mr. Conroy, acting for your
society, we will construct eighteen of these cottages, according
to plan and specification, for $700*00 (Seven Hundred Dollars)
each.   The understanding being that six will be built in more or
less a group at Red Deer, on the premises pointed out, six at
or near St Albert, two near Wetaskiwin, two near Lacombe, and two near
Camrose.
We would liketo start work on these just as soon as
possible, so that we can take advantage of all the good weather
during the next two or three months as we understand you want
these all ready for April 1st. We can easily do this, if you can
make your financial arrangements, so that we can get our payments
as the cottages are completed and inspected.
We wish to thank you for the business
will do our best to turn out good buildings fo:
the compliments of the Season, and wishing you
trip, we are
and assure you we
* you.  Wishing you
a pleasant  and  successful
JCW/W
Yours very truly,
CARTER)^ jhta
Fer. f
' District Manager. S.  B.  MORRIS,  MANAGER
CAPITAL $100,000.00
Private Investors Should
Communicate with us
We have Exceptional
Advantages for the
Investment of Funds in
Mortgage Securities on
Improved Farms in
Elgin County.
The Garden of Canada
V    ^^yfefedh,     _ ~ ^... yy'"'>eb=r''    g   «§§    ■£     m   "^H     &   -^Pl     m     enffc--;:- ■■' -                           ■ f ■    Jfe   \.
REAL ESTATE
^3 v- I •friwSi LfiA&tndfciaLjCMft.*^ lav-1J
Farm Lands and Town
Property for Sale
on Easy Terms
oj? Payment
INSURANCE
Fire, Life and Accident
Conveyancing
Commissioner for Taking
Affidavits
Notary Public
'^sAJAJ^f f^^pST ;
AND
Brokers.
References
The Molsons Bank
Bradstreets
R. G. Dun & Co.
- ,
PRIVATE FUNDS LOANED ON   MORTGAGES AT LOWEST RATES WITHOUT DELAY
STEAMSHIP AND  RAILWAY TICKETS
CANADIAN GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT AGENT,  FARM  LABOURERS SUPPLIED
RoDNEY9 OnT.
Issuer of Marriage
Licenses
f&p,   24th-1922
Rev
d.   Father McDonnell
Chs
Rev
ring  Crete,Oni,
a.,   Sir;-                    |   Re  Scotch  immigrants- farm
labourers-
Some  days ago  T notieed  in  the Toronto 9
lobe en article
in  reference  to your "bringing  cut a number  of Scotch
Highlanders,   and e»king for places for them,
I hsve teen engaged fcr some years
in "bringing  out
farm  labourers  and domestics,   and have p
laced e goodly
number,   I can place  some  of  the people y
ou purpose bringing
out  provided they  are  experienced farmers and willing
to work,
Should any   of them want to buy  farms  I have a  number
listed with me fcr sale and would be pleased to show
intending purchasers the same,   in  some cases  immediate
possession can be had,
If you are again advertising  or inserting an article
in  dhe press,  you can  if you so  desire make  use  of my
nsras es  a person  to whom farmers   in need  of help may  apply,
Kindly advise when you expect the first consignment  ?
Yours tiruly
S.B.  Morris
Schools and churches near all the lends, A^tyw&vxml rt famxgmtxm znb (ttrtvmzatim,
(Brfptmrnrnt $( Canada. ^Z'*
File N? -Ey 7v»
JjJil/I/   i;;lQ J- *
y^K /ynAA9n^Zyi%eey^l
QWyUYAYAAA,
>&nA.
TELEGRAMS, PARAMOUNT, ABERDEEN.
TELEPHONE, CITY   2210.
11th March,   1922,
Dear Father Macdonell,
The  case of JTo.   70 John MaclTeil,  *o   is
not eligible for free passage.
Father Mac In tyre writes us  to-day
saying that 3rou advised him they were being granted £18
each to be paid back  to   the Ontario  Government   in easy
instalments.       I have  sent the papers of these people up
to Mr.   hoxon and await his  reply,   but  in the meantime  I
doubt very much  if any married, woman with a family like
this will  be assisted as  stated  in your letter,   for the
reason that   she  is not   going out  to   domestic  work for
anybody  else,   but to   assist  in her husband's home,   and
as you know,   she has  two young  children.
I will advise you  the  result  of Mr.
IToxon's  reply.
Yours  truly,
CAITADIA1T    GOVEEdMSMT    EMIGRATIOU    AGEUT.
Rev.   Father A. Macdonell,
Ardan Farms,
Charing  Cross,
Kent  County,   Ont.,
CA17ADA.
u>zU^£j^ -& uZglZ^o &   j* cn^Lf/^y t»y^ ^ EMPIRE SETTLEMENT ACT, 1922.
GOVERNMENT   SCHEME   FOR   AGRICULTURAL   TRAINING   OF   BRITISH
YOUTHS   IN   ALBERTA,   CANADA.
The Government of the Province of Alberta have entered into an arrangement with His
Majesty's Government to provide during the coming winter a course of training in agriculture
for youths and young men from this country (age desired, seventeen to twenty-five) at the
Provincial Agricultural School at Vermilion on the Canadian National Railway, one hundred
miles west of Edmonton.
The School, which it is proposed to reserve entirely from the 1st October, 1924, to the
31st March, 1925, for the purposes of the proposed course, is capable of accommodating 150
pupils at one time, and the proposed scheme can only be arranged if not less than 100 applicants
are selected and proceed to Canada to undertake-the training.   ~
Each applicant will be required to pay 30 dollars a month—roughly £1 10s.—for board and
lodging, and should, therefore, have in his possession on arrival in Vermilion not less than £50.
The actual training will be paid for jointly by the Government of Alberta and by His Majesty's
Government.
Further details regarding the proposed course may be obtained at the Oversea Settlement
Office, 3-4, Clements Inn, Strand, London, W.C.2, at the Offices of the Superintendent of
Emigration for Canada, 1, Regent Street, London, S.W.I, and from the various Canadian
Government Emigration Agents whose addresses are annexed. The course will include practical
outdoor work, and during the winter months, especially December, January-and February,
instruction  in the laboratories and class-rooms.    It will comprise :—
{a) Field husbandry, including the handling of two, three, four and six-horse teams,
harrowing, ploughing, &c ;
(b) The care and management and marketing of live stock ;
(c) Farm mechanics, including carpentry, black-smithing, gas engines and farm motors,
and the mechanics of farm machinery;
(d) Dairying; I
(e) The principles of poultry farming';
(f) Horticulture, including vegetables and small fruits ;
(g) The study of such insect pests, blights, mildews, &c, as occur in Western Canada ;
(h) Farm management and economics, and M
(i)  Elementary veterinary science. :
The Government of Alberta undertake to find each student employment as from the beginning
of April, 1925, for the ensuing summer upon a suitable farm within the Province. After a winter's
training at the Agricultural School and a summer spent in practical farm work, he should have
no difficulty in finding continuous employment. The wages earned during the summer would
depend upon the age and efficiency of the individual concerned. The average rates in Alberta
last summer, for general farm hands were $40 per month for experienced men, and $25 per
month for inexperienced men, with board and lodging. Should a student desire a more advanced
course during the second winter in the Province, a five months' course will be available for him
at one of the Agricultural Schools free of cost except for the expenses of board and lodging.
It is the belief of the Alberta Government and of His Majesty's Government that the proposed training should place the pupils in an advantageous position to earn their livelihood as
farm workers, thus acquiring the local experience which is essential before taking up farming
in Canada, and in due course enable them to save enough money to start farming on their
own account. _ Applications may be made on the annexed form, and should be sent, in the first instance
either to the Superintendent of Emigration for Canada or to the nearest Canadian Government
Emigration Agent. (See list on p. 4). A medical examination will be necessary before final
approval can be given. Approved applicants will, where necessary, be granted a loan of the cost
of their journey to Alberta under the Empire Settlement Act, the amount to be repayable in
periodical instalments after settlement.
July,  1924.
ONE    OF    THE    AGRICULTURAL    SCHOOLS    AT    ALBERTA. AGRICULTURAL    TRAINING    SCHEME,   ALBERTA.
Preliminary Form of Application.
Name in full.
Age.
(Print your surname in block letters).
Address   	
Name of School
Place of Birth.
Present Nationality.
Father's name and occupation ,
Has applicant ever worked on a farm.
If so, give particulars	
Will applicant have £50 on arriving at QfetcBewl I'.M.Ufi	
* Will applicant require assistance towards cost of passage, etc	
Name of person (Headmaster or Employer) to whom reference may be made as to character, &c.
(Signature of applicant).
Date.
* Assistance will only be given by way of loan.   The cost of the journey (3rd class) to
Vermilion is approximately j§24.
When completed this form should be forwarded to the Superintendent of Emigration for
Canada, 1, Regent Street, London, S.W. 1, or to the nearest Canadian Government Emigration
Agent (see over). List of Canadian Government Emigration Agents.
Aberdeen
Bangor
Belfast
Birmingham ...
Bristol
Carlisle
Dublin
Glasgow
Inverness (Sub-Agency)
Liverpool
Peterborough...
Southampton...
York	
116, Union Street.
310, High Street.
15-17-19, Victoria Street.
139, Corporation Street.
52, Baldwin Street.
54, Castle Street,
44, Dawson Street.
107, Hope Street.
35, Church Street.
48, Lord Street.
Market Place.
8, Canute Road.
Canada Chambers, Museum Street.
(b3/783)x    354    1000    7/24   H & S, Ltd.    Gp. 3 Ob*  ^*-ati>olic  immigration ^Association
(UitcorporaUttg all tye Catholic (Tljll&TEmigraUoit Societies of <5reat Britain)
Specially Blessed by His Holiness the Pope
Under the Patronage of the Cardinals, Archbishops and Bishops of England and Canada
SECRETARY:  RIGHT REV. MONSIGNOR HUDSON, COLESHILL, BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND
CANADIAN HEADQUARTERS
ST.  GEORGE'S HOME
1153 WELLINGTON ST.
OTTAWA    :    ONTARIO
UNDER THE CARE OF THE
SISTERS OF CHARITY OF ST. PAUL
ALU COMMUNICATIONS TO  BE ADDRESSED
TO  REV. MOTHER SUPERIOR
OFFICE HOURS:
9 A.M. TO 12.30 NOON, AND2 P.M. TO 5.30 P.M.
SATURDAYS, 9 A.M. TO 1 P.M.
ST.  GEORGE'S HOME,
1153 WELLINGTON STREET
OTTAWA, ONTARIO
J
h*£A!..
6
-**.
-19 a
Phone Sherwood 1703
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^jxJbJAt cdlSL      yoJla^AtZb     (A5&ji-u>    /ka^    clcx^     ^c^    /£^2c,     U*-^    (£
(mj.   I toCb    of    Qauaj    yz> oZZ*Zo u_CLeuv-e> CONFIRMATION
iob/msb        Minr.ig.nr,2 ow mnmBA'ziQ® & MMVMUfSQl*
Father Maodonnoll, Ottawat  April 2,2nd, &9£&<
Chatham,
Ontario•
Camxot understand do lay Lawrenc* family*
B&t© oaUlod London for report.
W, jr. Blaok,
Ohg« last* ^xtt ^tttemenf
z
Canaisa.
^4
V-
Ottawa - 1st May, 1922.
The Rev. Father F. D. Macdonell,
Arden Farms,
Charing Cross,
Kent Co.,
Ont.
Dear Father Macdonell,
I saw an account in the"Toronto
Weekly Star" of April 22nd, of the progress of your
work of bringing Highland Scotsmen to Canada.  The
paper intimated that Bishop Fallon and youself are
giving the full facilities of the Arden Training Farms
to both Presbyterians and Catholics, and that recently
your advertisements have appeared in various Ontario
newspapers asking for employment for these settlers
near Presbyterian and Catholic Churches respectively.
It also intimated that a large party of more than
one hundred men were now on the ocean.
Please accept my hearty congratulations on the broad spirit in which your work
is being undertaken, and best wishes.for its success.
If at any time my assistance will be of any use to
you in this work, please accept my assurance that
it will be freely given.
When you see Bishop Fallon,
please convey to him the appreciation of a Protestant
of the broad-minded spirit in which your work is
being undertaken.
Again wishing you every success,
Yours very-v truly,
Commissioner ]$tyw&xmt d $mmx$xixtwxx && €d0xxxzatxmf
A    ($0£xxxxxxmi d Cmmfot.
/nyour reply please quote
File N?	
Sgpf
Jkh
III
f
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i a
J?^&&r>
TELEGRAMS, PARAMOUNT, ABERDEEN.
TELEPHONE,   CITY   2210.
/AAAYYa.
lag  3th  1922.
Dear Father MacDonellt-
5o.274.Alan YacPoriald.   .
Following letter from the Supt. Emigration for your
dec i si on•
•Father MacDonell nay be agreeable to this alteration
in the applicant's programmeZu-t as rule we do not encoup
ige emigrants of this type to arrive in Canada so late in
the pear.
You nap gave some further information on the subject.
Sighed.
J.Obe; S .ith,
Supt. Emigration for ^anada. *
This information together with names of others sent for
your decision in rxy  letter of April 21st. 1922.
Yours faithful'
Canadian G-overn/i
rent.
Office
August.

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