Open Collections

The Chung Collection

Chung Logo

The Chung Collection

Georgian Bay Canal Commission : transatlantic passenger and freight traffic and steamship subsidies Evans, W. Sanford (William Sanford), 1869-1949 1918

Item Metadata

Download

Media
chungpub-1.0056475.pdf
Metadata
JSON: chungpub-1.0056475.json
JSON-LD: chungpub-1.0056475-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): chungpub-1.0056475-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: chungpub-1.0056475-rdf.json
Turtle: chungpub-1.0056475-turtle.txt
N-Triples: chungpub-1.0056475-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: chungpub-1.0056475-source.json
Full Text
chungpub-1.0056475-fulltext.txt
Citation
chungpub-1.0056475.ris

Full Text

Array i^ERIM^EPORT &),ii
■AliBAMi^
BY
W^SAITOFORD EVANS
PRINTED BT ORDER OFAPARLJAMENT
*~mEU   Ef
BMH
PRINTER T#THR KING'S MOSI^XCEIJ^KNT^UEa^
1918
nggSH
$Si$ijfj  8 GEORGZ V
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
A. 1918
INTERIM REPORT No. 3
GEORGIAN BAY CANAL COMMISSION
TRANSATLANTIC PASSENGER AND FREIGHT TRAFFIC
AND STEAMSHIP SUBSIDIES
BY
W. S.ANDFORD EVANS
PRINTED BY ORDER OF PARLIAMENT
OTTAWA
J. de LABROQUERIE TACH#,
PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY
1918
[No. 142—1918.]  8 GEORGE V SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142 A. 1918
INTRODUCTION.
In the -Interim Report, 1916 (pp. 67-79) it was shown that "the conditions of
ocean transportation largely determine the distribution of international commerce",
and that in certain trades, such as the North Atlantic, liners are the controlling!
factor rather than tramps. Liners, which are vessels upon a fixed route and with a
definite schedule of sailing dates, may be exclusively freight-carrying vessels, almost
exclusively passenger-carrying vessels, or vessels fitted to carry both passengers and
freight. On a good trade route this last class, the " combination liners," is probably
the most successful type of.'ocean carriers. Having some passengers and some high-
class freight, these vessels can afford to complete their loading with other suitable
freight, at rates the tramps cannot meet. The volume and distribution of passenger
traffic become therefore very important factors in the problem of freight traffic.
The kind of loading a vessel can secure on any particular route will determine the
profitableness of that route as compared with alternative or competitive routes. The
route that offers the best loading will tend to attract vessels from other routes until
the numbers fixed on each route are such that all vessels of the same class are securing approximately the same return. Canada's problem yras thus stated in the Interim
Report (p. 76):—
Canada has never yet been able to secure at Canadian ports enough vessels
to carry all tbe Canadian exports; that is, no measures so far taken to that end
have been sufficient to seriously disturb the simple economic balance of the load
factor along the North Atlantic coast. In so far as the proposed Georgian Bay
canal would be expected to very greatly increase the proportion of Canadian
exports through Canadian ocean ports, it will clearly be necessary to arrive
at some estimate of the permanent counteracting force of the general load
factor, or at least of the cost involved in maintaining an ocean service on a
/■ less favourable economic basis than that prevailing on competing routes.
The general freight "load factor" in the North Atlantic trade was examined
in that report, but it had not been found possible to make a statistical study of the
passenger "load factor", nor of the effect of steamship subsidies, both of which, it
was pointed out, must affect the ability of liners to successfully handle somewhat
irregular freight loads.
This report presents certain statistical compilations which may form, at least
partially, the groundwork for a study of the problem of passenger traffic on the North
Atlantic in its relations to general traffic, and of the operation of Canadian mail
subsidies and steamship subventions in relation to the general, traffic problem. As
material for these compilations returns were obtained from the steamship
companies, showing traffic by vessels in detail, and for certain facts the ships' manifest
at Montreal, Halifax, and St. John were checked over for the years 1911, 1912, and
1913. The compilation of this material occupied several months, but it was found
necessary to start from the basic details in order to secure what was essential to*
supplement the statistics in official publications. The time available has not permitted
any further Working over of this material, nor the completing of such a study a§
would trace tendencies and suggest conclusions. The statistical tables must therefore
be submitted with only a few descriptive notes.
142—li H GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
>M    1|1 8 GEORGE V, A.  1918
TRANSATLANTIC PASSENGER TRAFFIC. '        -
Under this general heading the following tables are presented:—
1. Table 1 showing the total transatlantic passenger traffic at United States and
Canadian ports, compiled for the years 1898-1915, distinguishing passengers inbound
And passengers outbound, the number of steamers in each direction, tiiat is, the number of sailings of vessels carrying passengers, and also the average number of passengers per steamer.
2. Table 2, a comparison of the inbound and outbound transatlantic passenger
traffic at New York, Boston and at Canadian Atlantic ports, taken as a whole, for
the years 1899-1914. This table shows the ratio of inbound and outbound passenger
traffic in each case, that is, in the year. 1899, for example, 2.04 passengers were carried
inbound to.New York for each one passenger carried outbound, while at Boston the
ratio was 1.94 to one, and at the Canadian ports 3.86 to one. The averages of the
ratios for the whole period are also shown. '§!M
3. Table 3, showing by months for the years 1910-15, inbound and outbound
transatlantic passenger traffic at Canadian ports and at the principal United States
ports, namely, New York, Boston and Philadelphia, except that returns for Boston
arid Philadelphia were not available for the year 1910.
4. Table 4, an analysis of the ,transatlantic. passenger traffic at all Canadian
Atlantic ports, by months, into saloon passengers, second-class passengers- and third-
class passenger, and showing the total number of passenger steamers inbound and outbound during each month for the period 1910-13.
5. Tables & and 6 showing the proportions of the totals in table 4 which arrived
at and departed from Montreal and Quebec, ancLHalifax and St. John, and giving also
the average number of passengers per steamer, inbound and outbound. Montreal
and Quebec are treated as one port, for passenger service and so are Halifax and St.
John.
6. Table 7, an analysis of total passenger traffic at both Atlantic and Pacific
ports, by months for the fiscal years 1910-11 to 1914-15, showing classes of passengers
and destination, whether to Canada or to the United States.
7. Tables 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 showing details of arrivals, by month's, of passengers
destined to Canada, at the United States ports of Portland, Boston, New York,
Baltimore and Philadelphia.
8. Table 13, showing certain summary returns for the years ending June 30,
1912, 1913 and 1914, from the Canadian Immigration reports, from steamship returns
and from the United States Immigration reports. These are the three main sources
from which all the material in this report are derived. This particular table in
addition to presenting some interesting summary facts shows that totals as compiled
from these different sources do not always correspond. It will be noted, for example,
that the Canadian Immigration reports give a total inbound passenger traffic at
Canadian Atlantic ports in 1911-12 of 264,200, while the steamship returns show a
total of 267,868, and there are differences also in the other two years. Again the
Canadian Immigration reports show an inbound passenger traffic, destined to the
United States, in 1911-42, of 23,816, while the United States Immigration reports
show an inbound passenger traffic to the United States, through the Canadian ports
in that year, of 29,152, and there are even greater differences in the other two years.
Tbese discrepancies may be accounted for in various ways, but all that need be done
here is to call attention to the fact that discrepancies exist and that, therefore, it will
not he possible to strictly check one table against another in this report; but, as the
discrepancies are not often serious, they will not affect any general conclusions which
may be based upon the compilations.
Canadian Immigration returns take account only of passengers arriving at Canadian ports, but they publish returns showing all passengers arriving whether immi- GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION 5
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
grants or not. Canadian official statistics have taken no account of the outgoing
movement of population and in this respect are seriously defective. The balance
between incoming and outgoing passengers over a series of years will give very
important information in connection with the rate of increase of the population, which
a record of arrivals alone or of professed immigrants alone cannot possibly do. If the
facts in this report were supplemented by the United States returns of the movement of population into the United States from Canada it would be possible to figure
out the net increase pr decrease in Canada due to the incoming and outgoing of
populations.
The importance of passenger traffic in the general traffic problem has been pointed
out in the introduction. If combination liners can secure better loading at United
States ports than at Canadian they can earn more on United States routes from the
passenger end of the business, with the result either that vessels at United States
ports can afford to carry freight at slightly less rates than vessels from Canadian
ports, or that there will be more combination liners attracted to the United States
routes which then will have a relative increase in available freight room. Table 4
gives the details of the transatlantic passenger traffic at all Canadian ports for the
years 1910-13 and the numbers of inbound and outbound steamers in each month.
Examining first the numbers of steamships sailing in and out it will be noted that in
the four years 1,712 vessels with passengers were entered inbound at Canadian ports
while 1,242 vessels secured outward passengers in the transatlantic trade; that is, out
of every 100 vessels carrying passenger traffic westbound only 72-54 vessels were able
to siecure passenger traffic eastbound. If the numbers of vessels on the Canadian
routes are deducted from the totals in table 1 for the same years it will be found that
5,702 vessels arrived at United States ports with passengers in this period and that
5,280 cleared outbound with passengers, that is, out of every 100 vessels arriving at
United States ports no less than 9<2'-5l9 were able to secure passenger traffic for the
return journey.
Dividing the total numbers of passengers in and out by the numbers of vessels
it will be found that inbound each vessel on the Canadian route had on the average
657 passengers while outbound the very greatly reduced number of vessels carried
only 275 passengers eachr For the United States "ports the figures are 848 passengers
in and 460 passengers out. Taking the inbound figures it is apparent either that
larger vessels were employed and were justifiable upon the United States routes or
that the passenger earnings were very much /better than on the Canadian routes. It
is with regard to the Outgoing passenger traffic, however, that the most important
difference is shown. The United States ports were able to load out with passengers
on the average a little over 92 vessels out of every 100 arriving and could give each
of these vessels 460 passengers on the average, while the Canadian ports could load
out with passengers only a little over 72 out of every 100 and could give each of
these vessels on the average only 275 passengers.
Another very important aspect of this question is found in the distribution of the
inbound and outbound passenger traffic throughout the year. The more even this
distribution the more economically or the more profitably it can be handled. If now
table 3 be examined and particularly if the traffic at the port of New York be compared
with the traffic at all Canadian ports, it will be seen how much better distributed from
the traffic standpoint is the passenger movement in" and out of New York than that for
the Canadian routes. If the figures in these two columns are presented diagramatically
the advantages of the port of New York will strikingly appear. The inbound traffic at
New York is comparatively light for about three months in midwinter, and it is
ordinarily heaviest in March, April, May, and June. There tends to be a falling-off in
midsummer, with an increase again in the autumn, but on the average for eight months
in the year there is a very satisfactory distribution of the inbound load. Much the 3ame
general characteristics are found in the outbound load except that the months of 6
GEORGIAN BAY CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
heaviest traffic are not the same as for inbound traffic, thaf is, the heaviest movement-
outbound tends to be in May, June, and July and again in November and December.
Taken as a whole, however, the traffic is reasonably well balanced throughout the year.
A diagram of the traffic at Canadian ports presents an entirely different problem.
From a very small movement inbound in December and January, the traffic mounts
rapidly to an extreme peak in the month of May and then as rapidly declines a£ain,
offering a difficult load for' economic handling. The outbound traffic presents much the
same characteristics as the outbound traffic from New York, but, as has been pointed
out, it is much smaller in proportion.
From tables 5 and 6 it is possible to make a comparison between the two chief
Canadian routes, that to Quebec and Montreal and that to Halifax and St. John. Out
of every 100 vessels carrying passengers to Quebec and Montreal during the period
1911-15, 87*13 vessels carried passengers outbound, while out of every 100 vessels
arriving at Halifax and St. John with passengers only 52*17 obtained passengers outbound. The Quebec-Montreal vessels on the average carried 616 passengers in and 478
passengers out, while the Halifax-St. John vessels carried only 506 in and 316 out. The
monthly distribution of the inbound traffic was unsatisfactory in both cases, but the
chief* difficulty with the Quebec-Montreal traffic was the excessive peak in May and
June. The outbound passenger traffic, while smaller in comparison, was fairly well
distributed, reaching its peak in the month of November. The Halifax-St. John route
has important inbound traffic only in the months of March and April and important
outbound traffic only in the month of December. It will be understood, of course, that
many liners on the St. Lawrence route during the period of open navigation there
switch to the Halifax-St. John route during the winter months, and therefore the
characteristics of the traffic to and from all Canadian ports should be considered when
estimating the business open to liners in the Canadian trade, but if the business of
Canadian ports rather than of Canadian vessels is to be considered then the characteristics of the traffic returns for these ports.must be taken into account.
The figures given in table 1 for the total transatlantic passenger traffic are
interesting ,if studied in connection with the general economic and other conditions
which affect the movement of population. The inbound passenger movement to North
America increased very rapidly from 18#8 to 1907, but fell off very sharply indeed in
1908, in which year it amounted to less than 40 per cent of the total of 1907. The
inbound traffic increased rapidly again, but somewhat irregularly, reaching its culmination in 1913, but in 1914 had fallen away almost one-half, while the total for 1915
was less than one-quarter of that of 1914. The connection between the curves of this
inbound passenger traffic and the curves of general economic conditions must attract
attention. It is interesting to note also that the outbound movement was relatively'
greatest during periods of depression. In the year, 1908, for example, some 76,000 more
people left the Atlantic ports than arrived at these ports, and in the war year of 1915
the balance stood some 98,000 people against North America.
The above notes may illustrate the bearing of the general facts of passenger traffic
on Canada's practical transportation problem. The compilations will be found useful
in many other lines of enquiry than those indicated. Canada's problem is to secure the
handling through Canadian ports of the greatest amount of traffic possible without
economic loss, and an understanding of the conditions that operate to set limits to
this traffic is necessary before effective measures for development can be planned GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION 7
iffl '
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 1.—Total Transatlantic Passenger Traffic* United States and Canadian Ports.
/
Vnof
Inbound.
t
Outbound.
^.V."'
Steamers.
Passengers.
Passrs.
per
Steamer.
Steamers.
Passengers.
Passrs.
per
Steamer.
1898	
374,688
517,115
671,126
705,838
937,963
1,106, .247
978,102
1,250,831
. 1,520,842
1,725,736
687,646
1,276,605
1,450,545
1,170,770
1,473,498
1,866,801
956,049
209,562
209,545
232,983
294,704
267,170
311,769
397,238
525,175
411,843
524,525
772,574
864^372
488,921
608,224
740,760
706,122
718,373
683,576
308,328
1899	
1,206
1,200
1,287
1,338
1,480
1,406
1,477
1,653
1,759
1,539
1,631
1,787
1,767
1,810
2,050
1,647
668
423^
560
548
701
748
695
847
921
981
447
782
811
662
813
910
581
314
1,111
1,087
1,206
1,207
1,378
1,369
1,410
1,460
1,575
1,501
1,503
1,649
1,626
1,610
1,737
1,437
617
209
1900	
271
1901	
221
1902	
258
1903,	
288
1904	
384
1905	
^  292
1906	
359
1907	
490
1908	
586
1909	
325
1910	
369
1911	
456
1912	
439
1913	
414
1914	
476
1915	
500
Totals	
25,705
18,879,964
i
Av.     685
23,483
9,066,202
Av.       373
Inbound steamers to outbound steamers as 100 to 91.35.
*Cmpiled from, steamship reports.
Table 2.—Comparison between in- and outbound Passenger Traffic, at New York,
Boston and Canadian Ports.   (Transatlantic).
Year.
i
]
New York
•
Boston.
Canadian Ports.
Inbound
Outbound
Ratio
Inbound
Outbound
Ratio
Inbound
Outbound
Ratio
1899	
409,743
541,053
565,559
713,735
805,869
732,715
959,731
1,156,861
1,286,331
,506,669
1,016,727
1,045,855
771,642
993,638
1,260,590
675,191
200,144
253,814
227,166
263,545
340,791
447,643
343,658
439,865
658,042
726,337
401,371
494,938
594,275
558,649
547,060
528,742
204
25,768
24,582
37,541
65,022
76,189
76,865
74,515
90,060
91,066
44,399
66,185
74,697
61,002
70,746
96,929
58,569
13,287
13,822
18,429
23,196
25,888
37,711
29,196
33,922
40,153
44,525
27,075
31,227
35,260
34,343
37,389
41,909
1-94
1-78
204
2-81
2-94
203
2-55
2-66
2-27
0-99
2-44
2-39
2-73
2-06
2-59
1-41
44,950
62,817
55,144
80,287
115,699
100,347
122,690
166,272
244,171
111,296
134,818
235,114
259,721
302,241
368,317
158,616
11,642
17,755
13,375
15,152
18,769
25,459
27,929
36,247
55,971
63,252
46,605
64,269
82,737
89,842
112,230
90,856
3-86
1900	
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
0
2
2
1
1
2
1
15
49
71
37
64
79
76
95
69
53
11
29
78
31
26
3-54
1901	
4-12
1902..	
5-29
1903	
6-16
1904.....	
3-94
1905...	
4-49
1906	
4-59
1907	
4-01
1908	
1-75
1909	
2-89
1910	
3-67
1911	
3-14
1912	
3-36
1913	
3-28
1914	
1-75
12,876,145
7,026,040
.
1,034,135
487,432
2-19
2,562,500
772,090
Average of ratios from
1899 to 1914, inclusive
1
97
3-43
Steamship reports.
j 8
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 3.—Transatlantic Passenger Traffic in- and outbound at Canadian and
aJ||_Northern United States ports^by Months, 1910.
Month.
Canadian
Ports.
X
January..
February   .
March. vSy.
April   ..   .
May..   ..
June.   ..   .
July.   ..   .
August..   .
September-.
October.   .
November.
December..
Total..
INBOUND.
New York.
4,561 46,723
7,9-60 63,950
. 1'8,228 127,461
30,525 124,778
38,154 117,457
30,422 88,890
22,165 70,147
22,644 94,571
24,601 99,125
20n36& 92,036
11,472 72,835
5,952 57,912
235,114 1,0-45,8515
Boston.      Philadelphia.       Total.   .
January..
February- ,
March..    .
April. |||1|
May..
June.   ..
July.   ..   .
August..
September.
October..
November.
December.
Total
OUTBOUND.
1,885 20,063
1,545 ' t .    15,743
1,462 26,351
2,335 40,786
5,569 49,3<89
8,761 67,952
8,889 57,636
5,204 39,131
6,177 38,298 -
6,564 38,950
X4.6>5_.. I        53,2-52.
9,473 W    47,353
64,269
494,938
Steamship reports.
TaABLE   3   (2).
—Transatlantic Passenger Traffic in- and outbound at Canadian and
Northern United States Atlantic Ports by Months, 1911.,
INBOUND.
Month.
January..
February
March..    .
April.   ..
May....
June.   ..
July.   ..   .
August..
September.
October..
November.
December.
Total
Canadian
Ports.
3,821
7,801
29,472
34,345
47,473
30,503
24,374
17,159
28,216
18,915
9,235
5,242
256,754
New Tork.
30,131
41,014
78,813
87,070
84,533
60,680
51,306
58,566
84,304
78,667
58,968
57,590
Boston.
733
2,876
3,150
10,335
7,746
6,487
2,'867
5,229
7,693
7,090
5,186
1,510
Philadelphia.
' ' 2,570
2,260
4,474
5,386
7,291
3,936
3,793
3,172
3,5^4
4,153
4,174
4,897
771,642
61,002
49,651
Total.
37,265
53,941
116,909
137,136
147,043
101,606
82,340
84,126
123,757
10-8,825
77,663
69,239
'1,138,869'
January..
February
March..   .
April.   .. [
May..
June.   ..
July.   ..   .
August..
September.
October..
November.
December.
Total
1,937
1,848
I 2,301
'3,415
8,019
11,844
9,449
6,163
7,243
6,815
1&504'
10,687
OUTBOUND.
28,086
24,317
38.08.6
40,63-6
62,076
72,259
65,023
50,098
46,196
44,830
£#£1,744
60,924
319
999
1,026
2,459
5,080
4,576
3,800
3,082
3,505
3,049
4,619
2,756
713
741
798
1,279
2,318
2,142
2,477
1,631
964
1,226
1,419
2,6-85
80,226
594,275
35,260
19,236
31,005
27,905
42,211
47,789
78,493
90,821
80,749
60,974
57,808
55,920
78,286
,.,77,052
728,996
>fc« GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
SESSIONAL PAPER No
Table 3 (3)
142
Transatlantic Passenger Traffic in- and outbound at Canadian and
United States Atlantic Ports by Months, 1912.
Month.
January..
February  ..
Marjch   ..
April	
May	
June	
July	
August ..
September..
October..   ..
November..
December..
Total *. •
January   ..
February   ..
March  ..
April   ..
May.	
June	
July.   ..   ..
August..
September..
October..   ..
November..
December..
Total IS
Canadian
Ports.
4
7
28
30
53
33
27
26
30
20
16
7
,544
,351
,418
,319
,110
,241
,221
,913
,658
,637
,373
,911
INBOUND.
New York.
32,883
44,397
85,753
91,904
102,729
85,533
71,572
88,335
129,802
109,274
84,831
66,625
Boston.
1,426
1,144
3,733
8,369
6,957
7,694
6,279
6,251
11,870
8,821
4,819
3,393
Philadelphia.
2,643
1,532
4,904
3,715
7,290
6,227*
5,567
4,951
5,295
5,979
6,673
4,915
Total.
41,496
54,424
122,808
134,297
170,086
132,696
110,639
126,450
177,625
144,711
111,696
82,844
285,696
993,638
OUTBOUND.
70,746
69,691
1,409,771
2,451
27,922
161
1,155
'■£$&, 31,689
2,205
25,902
1,239
229
29,575
2,767
36,934
1,717
249
41,667
3,415
42,111
2,694
685
48,905
8,062
-5-3,193
3,570
1,549
66,374
10,491
63,991
6,259
2,472
83,213
8,317
54,395
4,729
1,376
68,816
' 7,573
43,776
1,764
1,502
54,615
6,596
35,824
2V513
434
45,367
• 7,911
49,450
2,399
1,181
60,941
16,665
66,422
4,620
1,78-0
89,487
12,961
58,729
2,678
34,343
1,653
14,4-85
76,021
89,414
-558,649
696,891
Table 8 (4).—Transatlantic Passenger Traffic in- and outbound at Canadian and
Northern .United States Ports, by Months, 1913.
Month.
January	
February   ..
March..   .. |2il
April "'..
May..   ..   ..   .
June.   ..   ..|§^
July   ;.
August..   ..   ..
September. .
October	
November.. ..
-December...    ..
Total
January	
February   .. $M
March..    .. J||
April ■;.
May	
June unii
July AM
August..   ..   ;
September..  -..
October	
November..    ..
December.,    ..
Total  ..   .
Canadian
Ports.
8,633
9,565
27,997
44,421
60,084
57,013
. 39,958
34,337
25,774
21,873
10,764 '
7,911
INBOUND.
New York.
37.160
56,336
99,475
127,220
12-7,921
144,161
114,118
121,672
137,257
127,365
85,649
■ 82,436
Boston.
2,387
2,461
v5,478
4,768
i-0,475
10,671
11,894
7,466
19,471
11,739
6,186
3,933
Philadelphia.
2,146
3,564
4,790
6,729
9,382
7,780
8,089
6,979
8,439
6,433
5,65-0
4,145
Total.
50,356
71,926
137,740
183,138
207,862
219,625
174,059
170,454
190,941
167,410
10.8,069
98,426
348,460
1,260,590
96,929
74,126
1,780,105
outbound!
2,835
35,629
580
334
39,3-88
2,662
•22,378
1,586
437
27,063
3,072
29,696
1,277
563
34,607
3,314
38,278
2,507
731'
44,830
9,695
56,379
3,697
1,384
71,155
12,021
60,775
7,566
' 1,564
§|f lEw
12,404
60,529
6,188
• 1,421    '
' '.50,542
10,162
#*'43,579
2,867
1,154
#£"57,7%2
10,441
40,407
3,864
937
55,64,9
11,365
||£ 41,211
1 2,849
1,087'
56,512
17,669
52,837
.1,577
1,221
83,120
12,961
•65,363..
■.2.s.ai„
* 1,965
83,120
108,501
547;06Q.
37,389_
12,918 "
■705,868 10
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 3 (5).—Transatlantic Passenger Traffic in- and outbound at Canadian and
Northern United States Ports by Months, 1914.
Month.
January. ..
February ..
March..
April	
May	
June.   ..   . |
July	
August..   ..
September..
October..   ..
November..
December..
Total   ..
January. ..
February ..
March..
April	
May..   ..   ..
June	
July	
August..   ..
Sejptember..
October..
November..
December..
Total  ..
Canadian
Ports.
4,259
5,797 -
18,338
26,409
28,946
18,552
14,749
15,546
13,289
4,049
3,324
1,635
151,893
4,550
3,675
4,323
5,620
14,533
15,162
12,709
9,344
6,973
5,945
6,579
5,916
INBOUND.
New York.
38,281
41,656
85,634
112,584
98,395
62,817
56,207
49,924
51,346
39,195
21,824
17,328
675,191
95,229
OUTBOUND.
35,672
26,851
41,589
46,223
76,207
81,886
71,237
26,476
29,404
32,108
34,249
26,941
528,742
Boston.
2,350
1,976
5,994
6,025
9,712
9,045
5,822
5,166
7,165
2,818
1,834
672
58,569
1,481
1,030
1,798
3,609
4,431
10,601
6,067
1,997
806
2,847
5,075
2,167
Philadelphia.
2,631
2,257
3,843
6,852
4,651
3,-717
2,961
2,537
1,623
. 1,053
698
349
32,172
Total.
47,521
51,686
113,809
150,870
141,704
94,131
79,639
73,173
73,413
47,115
27,680
19,984
917,825
473
42,076
442
31,898
708
48,418
583
57,035
1,648
96,819
2,455
110,104
1,664
91,677
1,819
39,635
889
. 38,072
723
41,623
1,001
5-0,904
1,296
36,320
41,909
13.201
679,081
Table %, (6).—Transatlantic Passenger Traffic in- and outbound at Canadian and
Northern United States Ports by Months, 1915.
Month.
January. ..
February ..
March....
April	
May	
June	
July	
August..
September..
October..   ..
November..
December..
Total  ..
January.   ..
February   ..
March..
April.   ..   p
May	
June	
July	
August..   ..
September..
October..   ..
November..
December..
Total  ..
Canadian
Ports.
841
1,616
2,530
2,761
3,065
2,688
1,859-
2,191
1,939
2,856
2,858
1,384
26,588
3,672
5,580
3,172
7,244
9,051
15,373
9,47-0
8,050
6,961
7,556
7,450
5,907
INBOUND.
New York.
11,323
9,935
16,150
16,421
19,466
13,084
12,778
14,286
15,832
16,247
12,352
8,181
166,055
OUTBOUND.
14,042
11,115
9,750
11,812
14,007
18,790
20,987
27,688
26,788
22,443
19,032
12,691
Boston.
481
603
825
2,538
1,358
623
934
1,125
763
1,000
655
1,353
12,258
735
76-7
646
690
522
632
890
1,528
1,265
996
1,926
1,035
Philadelphia.
66
71.
510
272
40
959
570
58
114
223
500
930
Total.
12,761
12,225
19,505
22,230
23,889
16,687
14,711
17,602
18,534
20,103
15,865
10,918
204,98-0
18,319
17,520
13,682
19,746
23,803
34,295
32,277
37,166
35,014
30,995
28,408
18,633
89,486
.209,045
11,632
2,395
309,858 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
11
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 4.—In- and outbound Transatlantic Passenger Traffic at all Canadian Ports
(Monthly), 1910. pf
INBOUND.
Ill No. of
Month.                           Steamers.        Saloon. 2nd. 3rd. Total.
January             19                  195 335 3^,531 4,561
February              17                   ig-5 1,378 5,397 7,960
March              28                   414 4,282 13,532 18,228
April              30                   843 6,392 23,290 30,525
May '.              42                   937 8,287 28,930 38,154
June              43                1,198 7,029 22,195 .30,422
July               41                 1,424 5,990 14,751 22,165
August               42                 2,369 6,3-85 13,890 22,644
September             38               3,290 6,847 14,464 24,601
October              41                1,338 6,'6Si6 12,370 20,364
November              34                   557 2,642 8,273 11,472
December              26                   283 1,280 4,289 5,052
Total                   401              13,033 58,003 164,078 235,llT
OUTBOUND.
January             12                  200 496 1,189 1,885
February              15                   185 424 936 1,545
March              16                   151 389 922   N •         1,462
April              21                   362 838 1,136 2,335
• May              32                   910 2,458 2,201 5,569
June              34                1,959 4,349 2,453 8,761
July              38                1,767 3,768 3,354 8,889
August               31                    796 1,697 2,"7ll    Ii 5,204
September             .36                1,055 1,896 3,227 6,177  j
October              34                   563 1,434 3,567 5,564
November   ...    ..              29                    437 1,655 5,473 7,465
December              23                   462    1,923   7,098 9,473
Total 77"        321                 8,837 21,166 34,266 64,269
Steamship reports.
Table 4 (2).—In- and outbound Transatlantic passenger Traffic at all Canadian
Ports (Monthly), 1911.
INBOUND.
No. of
Month.                           Steamers.        Saloon. 2nd. 3rd. Total.
January..              15"                 179 869 2,773 3,821
February..   ..              20                   293 2,150 5,358 7,80-1
March              33                   743 7,889 20,840 29,472
April              28                   909 6,240 27,196 34,346
May              52                   995 10,326 36,152 47,473
'June              45                   979 8,006 21,518 30,503
July              42                1.893 6,970 15,611 24,374
August               33                 1,670 5,882 9,607 17,159
September   .'              44                3,519 9,114 16,583 28,216
October              42                l,15t 6,903 10,856 18,915
November              33                  431 2,397 6,418 9,253'
December || 16 .     29j   1,035  3,912   5,242
Total             403               13,069 67,781 175,724 256,574
OUTBOUND.
No. of
Month.                      Steamers.   Saloofc.    -    2nd. 3rd. Dept. Total.  ,
January         9              195              418 1,261 63 1,937
February ......         10               174               441 1,126 107 1,848
March          21              219               561 1,429 92 2,301
April          22               543            1,033 1,729 110 3,415
May          31            l,i06            3,190 3,613 110 8,019
jUne                   35           2,163           4,428 5,121 132 11,844
July  .'          35            1,083            4,230 3,996 140 9,449
August          30               757            1,803 3,514 89 6,163
September         34              792           1,984 4,369 98 7,243
October          31              568           1,591, 4,567 89 6,816
November          26              475 .         1,695' 8,255 79 10,504
December          15              425           2,814 7,388  60 10,687
Total        299            8,500   '     24,188 46,368 1,169 80,225 12
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
3|| 8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 4 (3).—In- and outbound Transatlantic Passenger Traffic at all Canadian
Ports (Monthly), 1912.
INBOUND.
No.  of
Month.                            Steamers.        Saloon. 2nd. 3rd. Total.
January              19                    225 1,034 3,285 4,544
February              18                   353 1,803 5,195 7,351
March    ..             30                   741 6,245 21,432 28,418
April              24                    619 5,006 24,695- 30,319
May..               50                 1,166 11,041 40,903 53,110
June              39                1,218      • 8,151 23,872 33,241
July               44                 1,319 6,537 19,366 27,221
August iii               41                 2,435 8,098 16,380 26,913
September              46                2,629 9,443 18,586 30,668
October              38                1,052 6,711 12,874 20,637
November              38                    565 3,463 11,345 15,373
December..              25                   263 1,445 6,203 7,911
Total   ..    ..    ..    .. Ti           412              12,585 68,976 " 204,136 285,696
OUTBOUND.
No. Of
Month.                      Steamers.   Saloon.         2nd. 3rd. Dept. Total.
January          11              175               510 1,681 85 2,461
'February '..         13               245               513 1,39-0 57 2,205
March.    ..%[          18           .254               601 1,825 87 2,767
April          22               543            1,033 1,729 110 3,415
May          36            1,067            3,203 3,662 130 .8,062
June          34            1,702            4,963 3,726 100 10,491
July..    ..          28            1,120:            3,442 3,663 92 8,317
August          34               847            2,596 3,996 134 7,573
September,   v.          31               764            2,077 3,637 128 6,596
October          33               666            1,752 5,386 107* 7,911
November          30               496            2,353 13,698 118 16,665
December          17              502           3,102 9,291 66 12,961
Total        307            8,371          26,145 537684 1,214 89,414
Table 4 (4).—In- and outbound Transatlantic Passenger Traffic at all Canadian
Ports (Monthly), 1913.
INBOUND.
No. of ^p
Month.                             Steamers.        Saloon. . 2nd. 3rd. Total.
January              25                    304 1,994 6,365 8,663
February.    .". ■'■'&',               27                    321 2,517 6,727 9,566
March.   ..   .#           33                    647 6,941 20,409 27,997
April              45                    850 9,567 34,004 44,421
May   .'.              57                1,336 10,928- 47,920 60,084
June              59                1,232 10,781 jiff     45,000 57,013
July |    •#':              50                1,305 8,065 30,588 39,958
August              48                2,659 10,059 21,619 34,337
September   ..   §5$              44                2,263 9,174 14,337 25,774
October..              47                1,135 6,957 13,781       $S?21,873
November -WM          36                   445 2,989 7,330 10,764
December                     25                   263    1,445 6,203 7,911
Total   .J§|§fc... JS Ti           496              12,760 81,417 254,283      -     348,460
OUTBOUND.
No. of
Month.                      Steamers.   Saloon.         2nd. 3rd. Dept. Total.
January          14              257               621^8   1,896 #r. 61 2,836
February          14               247              562 1,775     i*Wffi;'IS 2;662
March          21               298               801 1,886 87 3,07.2
April          20               409               916 1,930 59 3,314
May          37           1,145           3,778 4,621 151 9,695
June ||   ....         26            1,754            5,493 4,597 177 12,021
July   ..   ..   %:          35            1,442            4,611 5,962 389 12,404
August          36               732            2,648 6,547 235 10,162
September          33               868           2,609 6,888 176      ^-10,441
October          31               640            2,214 8,363 148 11,365
November.    ||          31               415            2,846 14,076 232 17,569
December.^   ..    ........         17              502           3,102 9,291  66 12,961
Total S..;' ;£   ... J;   ;   315            8,709          30,101 67,832 1,859 108,501 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
ta
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 4 (5).—Summary, 1910-13, Transatlantic Passenger Traffic.
*$
Inbound.
OutbOUnd.
■*^%£.       l-Plll
Total
Number of
vessels
carrying
passengers.
Average
Number of
passengers.
Total
Number of
vessels
carrying
passengers.
Average
Number of
passengers.
Ratio of
outbound
passenger
vessels
to   inbound
Canada	
1,712
5,702
657
848
1,242
5,280
275
460
72-54
United States	
92-59 to 100
Table 5.—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Montreal and Quebec, 1911.
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. of
Month. Steamers.
April  4
May  45
June    ..v'-.v?" 38
July I   ..   .'.   .. 38
August  ,29
September    .. 39
October.'.  38
November.   _  21
Total        252
Passengers
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Total.
per
Steamer.
290
1,235
;'fe 2,501
4,026
1,006
936
9,953
,33,729
44,618
991
894
7,674
" 20,674
29,142
767
1,813
6,892
15,021
23,726
888
1,605
5,771
9,932
1   17,308
570
3,378
8,871
14,947
2 7*, 19 6
690
1,118
6,918
10,375
18,411
4S0
344
1,935
4,711
6,990
333
10,378
49,249        111,790        171,417
Av.  716
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
April	
May ||.	
June  ..   AM; • •
July	
August	
September   |l|p •
October..    ....
November   ..
Total	
Steamship reports.
No. of
Passengers
Steamers.
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Dept.
Total.
per Steamer
31
1,106
3,190
3,613
110
8,019
ifpss
35 m%
2,163
4,428
5,121
132
11,844
338
£#§-35
1,083
4,230
3,996
140
9,449
270
30
767
1,803
3,514
89
6,163
205
34
792
1,984
■ 4,369
•   98
7,243
213
31
568
1,591
4,567
89
6,816
220
25
438
1,549
7,650
78
9,715
389
221
6,907
18,675
32,830
736
59,248
Av.  271
Table 5  (2).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Montreal and Quebec, 1912.
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.   ..
October..
November.
Total    ..
No. of
Passengers
Steamers.
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Total.
per
Steamer
43
1,141
10,739
36,701
48,581
1,129
33
1,162
8,212
22,077
31,461
947
38
1,244
6,364
17,520
26,128
662
35
2,354
7,958
|    14,323
2-4,635
703
39
2,367
9,251
15,698
27,316
704
34
1,016
6,557
11,615
19,188
566
26
405
2,780
7,271
1-0,456
738
248
9,689
51,861
126,206
186,756
Av.  778 14
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 5 (2).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, etc.—Continued.
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
May	
June	
July	
August  ..
September   ..
October..
November   ..
Total.   .
No.
of
Passengers
Steamers.
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Dept.
Total.
per
Steamer,
31
909
2,721
3,075
126
6,831
217
34
1,702
4,963
3,726
100
10,491
308
28
1,120
3,442
3,663
92
8,317
297
1      34
847
2,596
3,996
134
7,573
222
31
754
2,077
3,647
128
6,606
213
33
666
1,752
5,186
107
7,811
240
28
480
2,130
12,213
98
14,921
532
219
6,478
19,681
35,506
713
62,550
Av.
261
Table 5 (3i).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Montreal and Quebec, 1913.
Month.
April	
May	
June  ....
July	
August	
September.   ..
October	
November.   ..
Total..   ..
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. of
Passengers
Steamers.
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Total.
per
Steamer.
7
72
1,739
5,416
7,227
■
1,032
40
1,302
9,836
37,680
48,818
1,220
41
1,208
10,255
35,673
47,13'6
1,150
40,%
1,282
7,871
25,706
34,869
871
41
2,604
9,781
19,802
32,187
785
38
2,220
8,975
13,139
24,334
641
37
1,093
6,729
11,753
19,575
529
ii   26
402
2,640
5,037
8,079
311
270
10,183
57,826
154,206
222,215
A
v. 817
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
April	
May	
June..   ..   ..
July	
August  ..
September   .,
October..   ..
November   ..
Total.   .
No. of
Passengers
Steamers.
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd..
Dept.
Total.
per
Steamer
• *
35
1,049
3,640
4,306
* • •
145
9,140
260
26
1,754
5,493
4,597
177
12,021
470
35
1,442
4,611
\ 5,962
389
12,404
354
36
732
2,748
6,547
235
10,262
282
33
868
2,509
6,888
176
10,441
316
31
440
2,214
8,163,
148
11,165
528
31
415
2,846
14,076
232
17,569
566
2.27
6,518
24,061
50,539
2,502
83,0-02
Av.
397
Table 5 (4).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Montreal and Quebec, 1914.
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. of
Month. Steamers.
April  6
May  39
June  37
July  33
August .. 26
September  21
October  10
November  11
Total       183
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Total.
per Steamer,
19
1,009
2,423
3,451
572
1,078
«,834
18,977
26,889
690
814
5,0-28
11,733
17,576
476
924
4,665
8,703
14,292
433
1,919
8,007
5,002
14,928
674
2,693
6,314
4,205
13,212
629
240
1,865
1,886
3,991
399
127
1,603   $
1,415
3,145
286
7,814
35,325
54,344
97,483
Av. 507 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
15
SESSIpNAL PAPER'No. 142
Table 5 (4).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, etc.—Continued.
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. Of
Month. Steamers
April	
May	
June	
July	
August..    ...    ..
September	
October	
November	
December.   ..
Total	
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.      Dept.      Total,
Passengers
per Steamer,
39
771
4,379
7,625
* • •
392
13,167
338
35
1,426
5,583
7,677
380
15,066
431
28
1,009
3,851
7,550
299
12,709
454
28
540
1,837
6,846
121
9,344
333
11
223
673
6,072
5
6,973
634
11
66
1,561
4,268
51
5,945
540
10
106
1,247
5,150
62
6,565
656
1
19
129
601
5
764
754
163
4,159
19,260
45,789
1,315
70,523
Av. 517
Table 5 (5).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Montreal and Quebec, 1915.
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
May	
June	
July  ..   ....
August	
September.   ..
October  ..
November.   ..
Total.   ..
No. of
Pas
sengers
Steamers.
Saloon. '
2nd.
3rd.
Total.
per
Steamer
10
26
1,325
1,703
3,065
306
12
63
•   1,198
1,427
2,688
224
10
48
873
938
1,859
186
9
35
1,094
1,062
2,191
243
9
•  • •  •
852
1,087
1,939
215
8
•  •  •  •
1,027
1,829
2,856
/
• 357
7
•  • ■   •
555
1,541
2,096
299
65
172
6,294
9,587
16,694
Av. 261
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. Of
Month.                 Steamers. Saloon.
May            8 47
June.         13 314
July..   .,         10 257
August   ..   '.         10 174
September           8 67
October........          9 86
November           9 53
Total.         67 988
Passengers
2nd.
3rd.
Dept.
Total.
per Steamer
1,351
7,653
.  #
9,051
1,131
1,583
13,424
52
15,373
1,184
1,561
7,565
87
9,470
947
998
6,855
23
8,050
805
803
6,076
25
6,961
879
808
6,653
9
7,556
839
1,125
6,242
30
7,450
828
8,229
54,468      226
63,911      Av. 943
Table  5   (6).—Summary  1911-15,   Transatlantic  Passenger   Traffic.
1
Inbound.
Outbound.
Ratio of
outbound
passenger
vessels
to inbound.
——
Total
Number of
vessels
carrying
passengers.
Average
Number of
passengers.
Total
Number of
vessels
carrying
passengers.
Average
Number of
passengers.
1,018
616
897
478
87-13 to 100 16
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 6-—-Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Halifax and St.- John, 1911.
inbound passengers:
Month.
January..
February
March..   .
April.   ..
May..   ..
June..
July..   ..
August..
September.
October..
November.
December.
Total.
No. of
Steamers.
Saloon;
2nd.
3rd.
Total
15
179
869
2,773
3,821
20
293
t|L 2,150
5,358
7,801
33
743
7,889
20,840
29,472
24
619
5,005
24,695
30,319
7
59
373
2,423
2,8-55
7
85
332
944
1,361
4
80
HI 78
490
648
4
65
111
475
651
5
141
243
63.6
1,020
4.
38
P»$    85
531
654
12   l£0*
£1i- 94
462  .
1,707
2,263
16
.'   296
1,035
3,912
-6,242
151
^,691
18,632
64,784
86,107
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. of
Month.
January ..   ..
February	
March	
April	
May , A&kAsi.
June	
July.....   §§e#|l
August  ..  *0  ■.'.-.
September  ..
October  ..   ..
November   .. -j|||Il
December -,. ;Mk&i
Total   .. _|||[|
Steamship reports.
;amer
3.    Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Dept.
Total
9
195 ~
418
1,261
63.
1,937
10
174
441
1,126
107
1,848
21
219
661
1,429
92
2,301
22
643
1,033
1,729
110
3,415
1
15
37
425
146
2,314
605
,388
1
60
789
10,187
78
1,593
4,913
13,5-38
433
20/477
Table 6 (2).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Halifax and St. John, 1914.
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
January.
February.
March..   .
April.   ..
May..   ..
June..
July..   ..
August. .
September.
October.   .
November.
December.
Total.
No. of
Steamers.
Saloc
19
226
18
353
30
741
34
760
7
25
6
56
6
75
6
81
7
106
4
36
12
160
25
263
2nd.
1,034
1,803,
6,446
7,539
302
141
173
140
192
1614
683
1,445
^    3rd.
Total.
3,285
4,544
5,196
7,351
21,132
•2-8,318
29,746 •
38,045
4,202
4,529
1,825
2,022
1,845
2,093
2,057
2,278
2,888
3,185
1,259
1,449
4,074
4,917
6,203
7,911
174
2,880
20,051
83,711
106,642
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
January..
February.
March.   ..
April. .
May  ..
June..   ..
July..   ..
August..
September.
October  . .
November
December
Total
No. of
Steamers.
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Dept.
Total
11
175
510
1,681
85
2,451
13
245
513
1,390
57
2,205
is *ml
254 .
601
1,825
87
2,767
24
457
701
1,860
101
3,119
5
168
482
687
aMM
1,331
2
17
"9F
26
502
1,817
223
3,102
6,132
1,485
9,291
18,219-
20
66
420 —~
1,754
12,961
2'6.588 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
17
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 6 (3).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Halifax and St. John, 1913.
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
January	
February  .. '..
March	
April	
May ,
June	
July..   ....   .,
August	
September..   ..
October	
November..   ..
December..   ..
No. of
Steamers.
Saloon.
2nd.
3rd.
Total
25
304
1,894
6,365
8,563
17
321
2,517
6,727
9,565
33
647
•7,131
20,409
28,187
38
778
7,828
28,588
37,194
17
34
992
10,240
11,266
18
24
526
9,327
9,877
10
23
194
4,832
5,099
7
55
278
1,817
2,150
6
43
199
1,198
1,440
10
42
228
2,028
2,298
10
43
349
2.293
2,685
31
247   .
1,333
5,817
7,397
Total,
222
2,561
23,469
99.691
125,721
Month.
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS
j No. of
Steamers.    Salobn.
January..
February.
March.   ..
April..
May.   ..   .
June..   ..
July..   ..
August..
September
Octob.er..
November
December
Total.
14
14
21
20
2
257
247
298
407
96
2nd.
3rd.
Dept.
Total
621
1,896
61
2,835
562
1,775
78
2,662
801
1,886
87
3,072
916
1,930
59
3,314
138
315
6
555
19
292
2,630
90
1,599
5,66-8
12,473
20,275
154
15,549
445
27,987
Table 6 (4).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Halifax and St. John, 1914.
INBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. of
Month.                             Steamers. Saloon.
January.         26 269
February          26 218
March         41 502
April          36 413
May           9 70
June            6 33
July..   ..   • . m            4 19
August            4 67
September •        2 40
October..   ^            1 14
November           4 8
December  ♦   .. 12  96
Total        171 1,749
2nd.
3rd.
925
3,065
1,703
2,876
4,959
12,877
4,393
18,152
204
1,783
256
688
117
321
248
303
17
20
19
25
35
136
, 674
865
Total.
4,269
4,597
18,338
22,958
2,057
977
457
618
77
68
179
1,635
13,550
41,111
56,410
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
No. of
Month. Steamers.
January..  20
February.   ..'  18
March  20
April..  26
May  3
June • 2
July	
August    •• ••
September '..   ••
October	
November	
December  7
Total |||.jy A. 97
142—2
Saloon.
297
190
249
348
66
14
2nd.
722
714
907
1,274
402
63
3rd.
3,295
2,529
2,988
3,756
858
19
Dept.
236
142
179
242
40
67
14
914
Total.
4,550
3,575
4,323
5,620
1,366
96
1,231
5,019
4,141
17,586
40
14
5,162
879
24,706 18
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Ta^BLE 6 (5).—Transatlantic Passenger Movement, Halifax and St. John, 1915.
INBOUND PASSENGERS. ttl
Month.
January	
February..   ..
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August ,
September.
October	
November..   ..
December..
Total
No. of
Steamers.
8
9
8
8
2
6
41
Saloon.
40
38
13
39
130
2nd.
319
621
864
917
128
473
3,322
3rd..
482
957
1,653
1,805
634
911
6,442
Total.
841
1,616
2,530
2,761
762
1,384
9,894
OUTBOUND PASSENGERS.
Month.
January..
February.
March   ..
April..
May.  ..  .
June....
July.   ..  .
August  ..
September
October..
November
December
Total
No. of
Steamers.
10
9
7
9
41
Saloon.
150
129
37
l-8>6
502
2nd.
628
824
633
1,055
1,116
4,256
3rd.
2,841
4,594
2,427
5,926
4,755
20,543
Dept.
53
33
75
77
36
274
Total.
3,672
5,580
3,172
7,244
5,907
25,575
Table 6 (6).—Summary, 1911-15, Transatlantic Passenger Traffic.
Inbound.
i
Outbound.
Ratio of
outbound
passenger
vessels
to inbound.
p
Mj   gS
Total
Number of
vessels
carrying
passengers.
Average
Number of
passengers.
Total
Number of
vessels
carrying
passengers.
Average
Number of
passengers.
Halifax and St. John	
759
506
396
316
52 17 to 100 I
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION ft 19
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 7.—Destination of Inbound Passenger Traffic at Canadian Ports, Fiscal
Years April, 1910, to March, 1915
STEERAGE, IMMIGRANTS, TOURISTS, AND RETURNED CANADIANS.
1910-1911.
%^                t^ To lifted Per cent to
Destination.                                        To Canada. States. Total. United States.
North Sydney             2,477 1,110 3,587 31*0
Halifax             1>976 68 2,044 -3*3  -
St. John              1,307 59    . 1,366 4*3
Quebec             7,531 2,946 .   10,527 28*0
Total           13,341 4,183 17,524 23*9
1911-1912.
North Sydney             2,499 1,013 3,612 28*8
.Halifax             3444 72 3,216 2*2
St. John             l}18g 59 if247 4*7
Quebec.             8,353 2,091 10,444 20*1
Total           15,184 3,235 18,419 17*5
1912-1913.
North Sydney             3,071 1,082 4,153 26*1
Halifax -             2,669 53 2,722 1*9
St. John             1,182 W0       50 1,232 4*1
Quebec             8,143 1,532 9,675 16'8
Total           15,065 2,717 17,7^2 15*3
1913-1914.
North Sydney.             4,003 1,141 5,144 22*2
Halifax -..   ..            2,548 82 2,630 3*1
St. John..                 944 26 970 2*7
Quebec             8,810 1,434 10,244 14'0
Total           16,305 2,683 18,988 14*0
1914-1915.
North Sydney             2,674 895 3,569 25*1
.  Halifax..   '.             1,269 118 1,387 8*5
St. John                 640 4 644 0*6
Quebec             4,827 3,011 7,838 38*4
Total           16,305 2,683 18,988 14'1
* Including Victoria and Vancouver.
Annual reports, Immigration Branch. \
Table 7 (2).—Destination of Inbound Passenger Traffic at Canadian Ports, Fiscal
Years April, 1910, to March, 1915 ifi
STEERAGE, IMMIGRANTS, TOURISTS, AND RETURNED CANADIANS.
1910-1911.
|pi To United |||| Per cent to
Destination.                                          To Canada. States. Total. United States.
North Sydney             5,363 1,990 7,363 ^f   27*1
Halifax '    ..   •"•          40,352 5,724 46,076 12'4
St   John                    26,492 3,536 30,028 10*6
Quebec        127,153 24,560 151,713 16*1
Total         199,360 35,810 235,170 15*2
Sffl 1911-1912.
North Sydney '•  ••            4,890 1,261 6,151 20*5
Halifax.'           41,171 4,010 45,181, 8*95
St   John  .   .'           30,355 1,974 32,329 6*1
Quebec. •        146,334 16,956 162,290 9*8
Total         222,750 23,201 245,951 8*95     j
142—2^ 20 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 7 (2).—Destination of Inbound Passenger Traffic, etc.—Con.
STEERAGE, IMMIGRANTS, TOURISTS,   AND RETURNED CANADIANS.—Con.
1912-1913.
Destination.                                                                   To United- Per cent to
To  Canada.        States. Total. United States.
North Sydney   ....            6,015               1,342 7,357             21'1
Halifax           59,854                9,562 69,416             13*5
St.. John           29,073                2,604 31,677                8*2
Quebec         160,856             15,227 176,083                8*6
Total         255,798              28,735 284,533              10*1
SB 1913-1914.
North Sydney             5,750                1,553 7,303              21*2
Halifax           64,232              10,828 75,060              14*4
St.  John           20,416                2,437 22,853              10*6
Quebec         185,783              29,849 215,632              13*8
Total         276,181              44,667 320,948              13*9
:?M 1914-1915.
North Sydney             3,554                1,251 4,805              26*0
Halifax           19,956                2,946 22,902              12*8
St. John :             9,091                    680 9,771                7*0
Quebec s          76,359         4  14,574 90,933              16*1
Total         108,960              19,451 128,411              15*15
Table 8.—Arrivals of Ocean Passengers Destined to Canada at   United States Ports,
by Months—April, 1910, to March, 1915.
PORT OF PORTLAJSTD, MAINE.
Month.
Saloon
passengers.
Steerage Passengers.
Total
Saloon and
Steerage.
Immigrants.
Tourists.
Returned
Canadians.
Total
Steerage.
1910.
April	
14
1,295
3
208
1,506
1,520
May
.
November	
4
153
239
196
471
1,285
2,375
153
266
229
576
1,444
2,516
157
December..
2
4
4
6
6
25
29
101
153
135
266
1911.
January	
229
February •....
1
36
20
577
March	
1,480
April '.	
2,536
May	
July	
November	
277
242
3
2
15
24
295
268
295
December	
5
273 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
21
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
PORT OF PORTLAND, MAINE.—Concluded.
Month.
Saloon
passengers.
Steerage Passengers.
Total
Saloon an
Steerage.
Immigrants.
Tourists.
Returned
Canadians.
Total
Steerage. .
1912.
January	
-
565
488
2,906
7,162
8
5
13
30
Ill
156
422
595
685
649
3,341
7,787
685
February.	
649
March	
3 341
April	
32
7,819
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
147
665
507
811
5,743
9,703
1,527
1,064
27
17
1
8
18
15
8
10
65
76
265
729
778
137
36
3
157
747
584
1,084
6,490
10,496
1,672
1,100
30
157
December	
747
It 1913.
January	
584
February	
1,084
March f r
6,490
April	
29
10,525
May	
1,672
June..       	
4
1,104
Julv..               	
30
November	
185
468
40
181
912
2,347-
1
11
17
96
31
152
590
587
203
. 575
71
333
1,517
2,913
203
December	
1
576
1914.
71
333
March..
9
2
15
14
1,526
April.         	
2,915
02
10
19
15
3
16
13
34
21
39
23
53
36
39
1915.
1
1
24
54
36
Returns furnished by the Immigration Branch. 22
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
|H 8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 9.—Arrivals of Ocean Passengers Destined to Canada at United States Ports,
by Months—April, 1910, to March, 1915.
PORT OF BOSTON, MASS.
Month.
1910.
April	
May	
June	
July.'.	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December.
1911.
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July...	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December.
1912.
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December.
1913.
January—
February1...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December.
Saloon
passengers.
10
19
Steerage Passengers.
Immigrants
6
10
2
11
31
27
11
27
31
19
21
12
8
24
35
11
21
19
26
20
5
217
126
29
77
88
37
14
32
Tourists.
5
58
73
637
294
96
27
61
96
40
79
33
30
6
533
458
244
259
165
115
170
111
65
67
46
50
82
859
467
372
297
65
122
116
55
40
8
11
4
Returned
Canadians.
1
3
3
14
1
12
16
5
43
18
4
1
11
19
38
30
19
24
Total
Steerage.
33
32
15
2
10
53
123
98
63
72
38
33
17
10
4
229
150
34
131
110
41
14
34*
6
69
92
675
324
115
52
61
130
75
94
35
Total
Saloon and
Steerage.
9
56
26
76
28
117
157
1,016
94
569
63
435
61
365
28
101
45
172
32
150
5
60
22
62
229
150
34
131
120
60
14
34
6
69
92
681
334
115
52
61
130
75
97
35
32
34
16
27
586
586
582
613
331
358
322
333
240
267
167
198
204
223
128
149
75
87
71
79
64
84
117
1,040
604
446
386
120
198
170
65
62 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
23
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
PORT OF BOSTON, MASS.—Concluded.
Month.
January, it.
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December.
1914.
January..
February.
March	
1915.
Saloon
passengers.
4
3
7
21
42
13
56
30
46
13
8
6
Steerage .Passengers.
Immigrants.
23
18
108
77
650
66
63
314
38
24
12
27
5
4
6
Tourists.
5
1
1
7
3
20
4
1
2
2
Returned
Canadians.
23
45
70
72
174
46
22
90
38
60
14
44
15
4
6
Total
Steerage.
51
64
179
149
831
115
105
408
76
85
26
73
22
10
12
Total
Saloon and
Steerage .j
55
67
186
170
873
128
161
438
122
98
34
79
22
10
14
Returns from Immigration Branch.
Table 10.—Arrivals of Ocean Passengers Destined to Canada at United States Ports,
by Months—April, 1910, to March, 1915.
PORT OF NEW YORK, N.Y
Month.
Saloon
passengers.
Steerage Passengers.
Total
Saloon and
Steerage.
Immigrants.
Tourists.
Returned
Canadians.
Total
Steerage.
1910.
April
3,652
2,243
1,022
562
707
627
463
461
426
308
431
1,755
3,650
2,041
935
538
511
479
560
,538
763
^^av                                        ....
Jnlv
123
150
122
77
162
109
164
190
,242
152
201
205
179
216
121
163
286
17
16
56
80
85
65
53
117
92
109
347
614
376
218
234
222
252
\     233
156
205
804
728
584
514
. 543
406
544
2,103
4,329
2,435
1,214
791
759
805
830
718
987
927
September	
878
October	
706
November	
591
T")f»/»pm ber
705
1911.
6
4
1
65
18
61
19
26
74
37
24
19
515
February	
708
March..	
2-29
4,57
May	
2,587
1,415
Jiflv	
996
938
1,021
951
November	
881
1,273 24
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 10.—Arrival of Ocean Passengers D'estined to Canada, etc.—Con. ,
PORT OF NEW YORK, N.Y.—Concluded.
Month.
1912.
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1913.
January.!	
February	
March	
April. :	
May..;	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1914.
January	
February	
March	
April	
May 	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1915.
January	
February	
March %
1910-11	
1911-12	
1912-13	
1913-14	
1914-15	
Saloon
passengers!
285
332
267
239
256
167
136
326
182
199
139
259
77
24,6
321
390
508
259
315
314
294
327
230
204
242
206
345
416
402
325
306
173
102
220
127
120
76
119
122
1,097
2,649
2,547
3,634
2,058
Steerage Passengers.
Immigrants.
OOi
583
3,109
4,375
3,328
2,372
1,234
1,405
1,356
1,904
825
947
524
1,318
3,981
8,224
5,576
3,259
1,815
1,277
801
1,020
613
637
344
377
1,511
3,892
2,895
1,112
632
320
153
326
246
182
94
123
232
12,657
14,244
23,569
25,454
10,207
Tourists.
28
20
32
37
48
23
47
31
23
19
18
2
4
12
18
20
26
81
9
64
13
20
14
16
8
19
26
20
21
47
21
12
7
6
16
6
14
7
100
423
282
316
177
Returned
Canadians.
372
752
995
695
351
301
436
412
343
262
223
293
404
1,154
1,577
1,102
510
" 298
430
352
269
230
272
311
423
942
1,180
924
479
308
• 381
347
564
286
219
161
264
432
948
3,852
5,869
6,716
5,545
Total
Steerage.
78b
975
3,893
5,407
4,071
2,926
1,582
1,872
1,791
2,266
1,105
1,172
821
1,734
5,153
9,821
6,704
3,850
2,122
1,771
1,166
1,309
857
925
663
819
2,479
5,092
3,840
1,638
961
713
500
897
538
417
261
401
671
13,705
18,519
29,720
32,486
15,929
Total
Saloon and
. Steerage.
1,068
1,307
4,100
5,646
4,327
3,093
1,718
2,198
1,973
2,465
1,224
1,431
898
1,980
5,474
10,211
7,212
4,109
2,437
2,085
1,460
1,636
1,087
1,129
905
1,025
2,824
5,508
4,242
1,863
1,267
886
602
1,117
665
537
337
520
793
14,802
21,168
32,267
36,120
18,437
Returns furnished by the Immigration Branch t GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
25
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 11.—Arrivals of Ocean Passengers Destined to Canada at United States PortSj
April, 1910, to March. 1915.
PORT OF BALTIMORE, Md.
Month
Saloon
passengers.
Steerage Passengers.
Total
Saloon and
Steerage.
Immigrants.
Tourists.
Returned
Canadians.
Total
Steerage.
1910.
1
1
1
May	
1
3
1
13
1
3
1
13
1
July	
3
1
September	
13
October	
November	
1
1
1
6
.1
1
\
2
6
. l
December	
. l
1911.
January	
.
1
2
February	
6
March	
April	
1
1
1
May	
June	
1
2
6
1
2
1
2
6
1
2
  i
July	
  2
August	
  6,
September	
1
October	
  2
November	
2-
3
December..'	
27
10
30
10
 30
1912.
Jannarv      	
  10
^
March..	
31
8i
10
11
1
2
1
33
82
10
11
1
 33
April        	
 82
Mav         	
 10
June                      	
 H
Jnlv          ......	
,
  1
T)pfip>Trih»ar                      	
18
18
•
 18
1913.
*
10
10
10
—
1
1
1
^
14
14
 14 26
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
PORT OF BALTIMORE, Md.—Concluded.
Month.
Saloon
passengers.
Steerage Passengers.
t
Total
Saloon and
Steerage.
Immigrants.
Tourists.
Returned
Canadians.
Total
Steerage.
1914.
January	
*
-
February .'	
4
4
15
19
4
4
18
19
4
March	
4
April	
3
18
May	
19
July	
•
August	
15
15
 15
September	
October	
November	
December :	
1915.
January	
March	
Returns from Immigration Branch.
Table 12.—Arrivals of Ocean Passengers Destined to Canada at United States Ports,
April, 1910, to March, 1915.
PORT OF PHILADELPHIA, Pa.
Month.
Saloon
passengers.
Steerage Passengers.
Total
Saloon and
Steerage.
Immigrants.
Tourists.
Returned
Canadians.
Total
Steerage.
1910.
April -.	
489
88
4
11
3
10
12
6
4
3
3
17
53
123
2
4
5
10
5
11
12
1
490
88
4
11
8
10
12
6
4
3
3
17
53
124
2
4
5
10
5
11
12
490
May	
88
June	
4
July	
11
August	
3
September	
10
October	
12
November	
6
December N ^»..
'          4
1911.
January	
3
February	
3
March. %	
17
April	
53
May	
1
124
June	
2
July.*	
4
August :	
\
i
September	
10
October	
5
November	
11
December	
12 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
27
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 12.—Arrival of Ocean Passengers Destined to Canada, etc.
PORT OF PHILADELPHIA, Pa.—Concluded.
•Con.
Saloon
Passengers.
Steerage Passengers.
Total
Saloon and
Passenger.
Month.
Immigrants.
* Tourists.
Returned
Canadians.
Total
Steerage.
1912.
January	
81
18
47
27
130
90
5
5
1
82
18
49
27
130
90
5
5
82
February	
18
March	
2
49
April.	
27
May	
130
June	
90
July	
5
August	
5
September	
October	
13
1
11
3
8
8
460
130
42
41
24
'              20
7
13
1
11
4
8
8
461
133
43
48
24
20
14
13
November	
1
December	
11
1913.
January	
4
February	
8
March	
8
April	
461
May	
7
140
June	
43
July            	
48
August            	
24
September..	
20
October            	
*
14
December..            	
40
15
1
38
48
17
5
7
2
41
16
2
43
55
19
41
1914.
January            	
16
February          	
8
10
1
10
March           	
53
April                          	
56
Mav                             	
19
Jnlv
2
3
8
11
3
14
19
5
6
8
14
19
N^nvATn hftr
4
4
■*
1915.
-
Returns from Immigration Branch. 28
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 13.—Transatlantic Immigration and Passenger movement through Canadian
Atlantic Ports, July, 1910, to June, 1914.
Canadian Immigration Reports—
Immigration to Canada, via Quebec, St. John and Halifax.	
Immigration to United States via Quebec, St.'John & Halifax	
Immigration to Canada and United States via Quebec, St. John and
Halifax	
Total inbound passenger traffic at Quebec, St. John and Halifax.....
Inbound traffic to the United States at Quebec, St. John and Halifax
Reports of Transatlantic Passenger Movement—
Total inbound Transatlantic passenger traffic at Quebec, St. John
and Halifax	
Total outbound Transatlantic passenger traffic at Quebec, St. John
and Halifax	
Excess of inbound traffic at Quebec, St. John and Halifax	
United States Immigration Reports—
Inbound traffic through Canadian Atlantic Ports to United States....
Outbound traffic through Canadian Atlantic Ports from United States
Excess of inbound traffic through Canadian Atlantic Ports to United
States	
Immigrants to United States through Canadian Atlantic Ports	
Years ending June 30.
1911-12.
191,614
21,120
212,734
264,200
23,816
267,868
79,756
188,112
29,152
12,675
16,477
15,443
1912-13.
241,997
33,615
275,612
330,694
37,170
336,356
106,026
230,330
52,435
11,805
40,630
28,776
1913-14.
145,556
34,573
180,129
240,389
36,115
242,404
125,253
117,151
51,310
13,682
37,628
30,791
CANADIAN IMMIGRATION.
Certain tables on immigration returns are here presented, and also a sketch
diagram representing for the fiscal year 1913-14 the main routes of the total immigration to Canada in that year, .with the proportion arriving by each route. Table 14 gives
the details of the arrivals of immigrants by these different routes by months for the
.period beginning April, 1910, to March, 1915.
Table 15 shows by months for the same period the destination by provinces of
immigrants arriving at Atlantic ports, distinguishing direct immigration through
Canadian ports and indirect immigration to' Canada through United States ports.
Table 16 is a summary by years of table 15, showing in addition the percentage of the
total immigration which arrived via United States Atlantic ports.
Table 17 gives the arrivals of immigrants at each Canadian port for the same
period, showing separately the number - destined to Canada and the number destined
to the United States with the percentage of the latter to the total arrivals at each port.
Table 18 gives the percentage of the total immigration to Canada via Atlantic
ports destined to each province and table 19 gives the percentage of the total immrigra-
tion to Canada arriving by each of the principal United States and Canadian Atlantic
ports with percentages of the total direct and the total indirect arrivals.
Table 19 gives the percentage by ports of the total Canadian immigration arriving
by all principal eastern ocean ports.
From table 14 it will be seen that the Canadian Atlantic ports are the chief gateways of immigration to Canada, having received during the fiscal years 1910-11 to
1914-15 over 86 per cent of all immigrants to Canada arriving by ocean ports and over
56 per cent of the total immigrant arrivals to Canada, including in the total immigrants
of United States origin. The month of May is the month of the largest immigration
through ocean ports, while the month of April tends to be the largest month for arrivals
of immigrants from the United States.  The United States ports received the largest GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
29
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
numbers of immigrants destined to Canada in- the months of March and April, but
with the opening of the St. Lawrence route the numbers using United States routes
rapidly decline. On the other hand, the St. Lawrence route carries by far the greatest
proportion of immigrants destined to the United States which use the Canadian routes,
as shown by the figures in table 17. The percentages for the whole period covered in
this table of total immigration through each of the chief Canadian Atlantic ports,
which was destined to the United States, show that 50-39 per cent of all immigrant
arrivals at North Sydney were in transit to the United States, and at Halifax 14-59
per cent, at St. John 10-74 per cent, and at Quebec 14*69 per cent.
The total arrivals at Canadian ports of immigrants destined to the United States
for the above period was 150,392 (table 17), while the total arrivals at United States
• Atlantic ports of immigrants destined to Canada in the same period was 139,051.
That is to say, indirect traffic is fairly well balanced and over a longer period wonld
probably be found to be practically equal. This is no doubt due to the general agreements between steamship companies in the North Atlantic trade covering steerage
passenger business. The important point is that the Canadian routes handle a total
number of immigrant passengers approximately equal to the total number of immigrants destined to Canada. The immigrant business of'the Canadian routes has therefore been limited by the numbers of immigrants destined.to Canada and has to meet
the problem of the movement of this traffic in the form of a sharp peak in the month
of May.
It has already been pointed out that official Canadian statistics do not report
passengers departing from Canada, but only passengers arriving. There is a regular
outflow of population. In the summary to table number 4 it will be seen that in the
years 1910-13, 798,220 third-class passengers arrived at Canadian Atlantic ports, but
that counting the numbers of deported no less than 206,392 third-class passengers
departed from Canada, so that the net gain in this period was only a little over 74 per
cent of what the figures for the total arrivals might seem to indicate. During the same
years 276,177 second-class passengers arrived and 101,600 departed, and of saloon passengers the arrivals totaled 51,447 and the departures 34,417. The total of all classes
of passengers arriving was 1,025,844 and the departures were 342,409, or a little over
one-third. These figures take no account of passengers from Canada to Europe which
sailed from United States ports, but the information necessary to distinguish in the
outbound movement the passengers from Canada using United States ports and passengers from the United States using Canadian ports is not at present available. In
table 4 it appears that the months of departure of the largest numbers of third-class
passengers from Canada are November and December and that the departure of
second-class passengers are considerable also in the same months. This suggests a
flow of labour due to the seasonal nature of employment, and if the ocean traffic'
figures were supplemented by returns of movement across the border into the United
States some important light might be thrown on the labour problem in Canada.
The distribution of immigrant arrivals through Atlantic ports by provinces of
destination as shown in tables 15, 16, and 18 is of distinct interest. The smallest percentage of immigration was destined to the Maritime Provinces and during the period
covered this percentage rather showed a tendency to decline. The proportion destined
to the province of Quebec was not only larger than that to any other province except
Ontario, but showed a marked tendency to increase. The percentage destined to
Ontario ranged from 35*65 per cent to 39*45 per cent and the tendency was slightly
upward. The proportion destined to the three Prairie Provinces was smaller than
probably was popularly understood and tended slightly to decrease. In 1910-11 the
three Prairie Provinces received only 31-90 per cent, while in 1914 the percentage had
been reduced to 27*42. British Columbia received a steadily declining percentage of
the whole. 30
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 14.—Canadian Immigration, by routes, each month, April, 1910, to March, 1915.
Month.
1910.
April	
May :	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December	
1911.
January	
February	
March	
Total...
Via
all ocean
ports.
27,819
33,395
23,639
16,019
14,287
13,778
13,592
8,098
4,906
3,146
5,816
25,147
189,633
Via
Canadian
Atlantic
ports.
21,860
30,307
21,569
14,893
12,799
12,263
12,570
7,192
3,976
2,206
4,554
21,478
165,437
Via
Victoria
and
Vancouver.
522
540
917
521
700
777
510
271
428
427
293
539
6,466
Via
United
States
ports.
5,437
2,548
1,153
605
788
738
512
635
502
513
969
3,130
17,730
From
United
States.
20,363
14,194
10,943
9,199
10,490
10,256
9,801
7,207
5,249-
4,315
4,889
14,545
121,451
Total.
48,182
47,589
34,582
25,218
24,777
24,034
24,393
15,296
10,155
7,461
10,705
38,692
311,084 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table 14.—'Canadian Immigration, by routes, etc.—Continued.
31
Month.
Via
all ocean
ports.
Via
Canadian
Atlantic
ports.
Via
Victoria
and
Vancouver.
Via
United
States
ports.
From
United
States.
Total.
April	
35,283
46,060
27,973
18,609
13,096
17,593
13,646
7,946
4,945
3,848
5,389
26,139
27,863
42,517
25,936
16,940
11,934
16,261
12,773
6,179
3,520
2,383
4,109
19,122
700
1,085
903
1,098
579
746
466
962
348
242
185
391
6,716
2,458
1,034
571
583
586
607
905
1,077
1,223
1,095
6,626
16,397
15,370
12,035
11,012
17,019
11,484
10,256
8,113
5,679
4,341
5,752'
16,252
51  680
May	
61 430
June	
40,008
29,621
30 115
August	
September	
29,077
23,902
16,059
10,624
ffl
8 189
October	
November.	
December	
1912.
January	
February	
11,141
March  ,
42,291
Total	
220,527
189,441
7,605
23,481
133,710
354,237
April	
41,437
48,421
32,145
21,739
19,558
20,690
16,711
12,322
7,262
5,872
6,776
30,490
28,736
43,790
43,281
*    19,523
16,808
18,624
13,823
10,505
5,171
4,364
4,181
20,140
598
919
1,132
811
1,225
'540
860
789
483
428
408
536
12,103
3,712
2,732
1,405
1,525
1,526
2,038
1,038
1,708
1,080
2,187
9,814
21,494
18,101
13,748
12,557
13,309
10,450
10,481
7,895
5,763
5,028
5,572
14,611
62,931
66,522
May	
June	
45,893
July	
34,296
August          	
32,867
September	
31,140
October	
27,192
November          	
20,217
December         	
13,025
1913.
January %	
February	
10,900
12,348
March	
45,101
Total	
263,423
213,836
8,729
40,858
139,009
402,432
April             	
54,025
•    58,892
52,292
31,658
22,140
15,323
13,183
7,044
5,393
2,472
3,114
11,787
33,767
49,850
46,123
28,656
19,875
13,982
11,673
6,872
3,957
1,906
2,431
8,897
1,012
1,342
1,422
822
898
398
367
319
237
fe       144
102
317
19,246
7,700
4,747
2,180
1,367
943
1,143
853
1,199
422
581
2,573
19,260
14,247
11,491
9,042
9,681
9,159
7,450
5,942
4,268
3,398
3,468
10,124
73,285
May..            	
73,138
June            	
63,783
July              	
40,700
August	
31,821
September \	
24,482
October... .•	
20,633
November	
12,986
December	
9,661
1914.
January	
5,870
February   	
6,608
March	
21,911
Total	
272,348
227,014
7,380
42,954
107,530
384,878
April         	
23,686
23,754
14,431
8,830
4,728
2,956
1,959
1,642
886
362
ip    592
1,184
16,587
19,571
12,835
8,010
3,964
2,725
1,560
1,352
614
237
424
898
720
602
418
122
107
29
49
32
43
Iff    16
32
33
6,379
3,581
1,178
698
657
202
350
258
229
109
146
253
11,748
8,965
7,573
6,644
5,372
3,330
3,408
2,579
2,050
1,887
1,975
4,248
35,434
May	
32,719
June          	
22,004
July	
15,474
August	
10,100
September..           	
6,286
October..                 ■-..
5,367
4,221
2,936
1915.
2,249
2,567
5,432
Total	
85,010
68,767
2,203
14,040
59,779
144,789
Annual Reports, Immigration Branch. 32
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
CO
1
O
>>
rO
■S
r^
o
PM
o
»i-i
■+»
ri
o-t
1—1
+*»
<
s
-♦J
eJ
+J
OQ
"^
0)
•4->
• rH
ri
E>
n3
ri
cS
ri
c3
• P-l
■71
»o
ffl
rH
ri
c-S
T-I
O
,3
o
Cj
t-i
•iH
cs
ri
o
o
•.r-t
+->
-t-3
C3
<=?
OD
• r-4
T-I
Od
fl
ct3
ri
o
co
CP
ri
•i—i
>
o
P4
>»
ri
c
• r-1
CJ
ri
• iH
+3
03
CD
fi
*o
(x*
►a
«
H
a3
03 O
O
03
o
X
<
c3
I*
CJ
-f3
03
00
03
CQ
03
X*
O
-*3
n
c3
J-i
03
-*3
fl
o
o
ffl
.a
ffl
O
ffl   02
as
03 O
o3
+»
O
*8
a
03
o
03
o
Eh
CO
0
fl
o3
O
e3
+3
o
H
CQ
fl
03
o
o
Eh
fl
03
O
03
+3
O
fl
e3
O
e3
+3
O
Eh
fl
03
O
03
+3
O
CQ
fl
03
O
0Q
Xi
+3
fl
o
ootQiOirtcoriieoeocM
>OiHMWIOONH CO.
Mr-ii-11>. »© !>• t>- C3S »©
N WNiHi-lrti-l
OSrHiHOONMWN®!-I CO OS
COCOOO^^Ii-IOOOOCNJCMO^*
COOStOOOOO<MCOCqe3i*01>.rt<
MMrHMHrHrHrH
<MMONC»«M>OlNH^
O»00CN>eaiO»W5'**OSt^*5
CM"<*<CqcO-'*<00I>-r^00CO
CNCMCOCMTrtTHi-li—I
M5N*OiHeOTt WfflCO
t^Ot^OOOOSt^t^at^
eoco
t>.»ocNio»oc3»eo>o>oooot>.
HW}»N T-I
i-lfflMNNNCOOPJOO
t-i th co oo eo cq     thhh
COOOOaOCOO ON OS
»O"0NNOOM00
0»00O«0^iHl>.t^00^
»-t W N IH rH iH IH
iHt^eOO»^*DNOO»01>0>0
©NUJMOSH^NSMON
eqt~oot~»Oi-icocMooiococo
cqeM^eoi—iththi—i
i-lt^*>.O«N»OC<IC000cP
t^»ossiT-ioo-*ieOi—io«0
THCM MNi-IHi-'H
iHWNi-ir>csorHc»
rt<OC3»^*l>-^t<00«D>a*3
N CO OS t-IO5 00 00WIM
ofc<rT-rTrt
OM»OiMt-i«Oa-0(NCOMiHCO
eooO"tf©eocMeqi>.cMCM©TH
>-ieoeocoi>-'^*'^o»eoo!i>oeo
e^fcafeoc*!".-"*     th
T|(tOOCO(NT-IHiOOO©
©NO'l,'ONNMC»a
CMTHCM,^>OW5t>-C<jeNO
csTco co cm th th th th
CM-*OSt^OSOS-*t«CO.t^
«ooooeoecec^*iTrjieNi
CO t—I TH
iHOcoeoeMco-^eMeMirtos^
THt~eMOSC<lTt<eMeOT*leMIOO»
CMCO1-1
o»o«ocMi>-eot-oiot^
t^oeoeococNicocO'TiH©
T-I ^< C39 t—I t-I t-I
050ooo->#ooo<oiacNi
COihOOOCOtHCOiHCO
oo^ooi-ioioooouscq
CM CM t-H t-I
OaCOO>C»C»OiHO!DiMC<105
rtHHOOMOrfOOO^H
T-HcOT-iTtioeoTiio>cNe»'^cM
CM CM COCM iH       t-I
•^T-iTiHT-iiocx)'^*»oeoos
0»CMCOi—ieM'^Ot>»»000
1—ieot>->o-r(i-5tit>-THCMW
tHCM CO CM t-I i-H t-I
TfiCOCOlOOOS^iOCq
iHONOOOOOOJ^H
t^OSTH<M000000»OCO
cnTcmcmt-T
•^iase3S©'»*aST}IOS»OOOCDCNI
OOOCOOOOO«OCMOOCMOSeOTtl
i-I^IIO»tJIiOU50(NC610N
CM CM COCN i-ti
COOTt*'^(00«Dl>-Trtt^O
■^<OCOCM«0«DOO»0*aOCM
CM'^CJS,^l>-"5<OeO<MO
CsT CO CO CM t-I Hi-IH
COCO CM OO OOOOOOOO
00T-l«Oi-HCMCMeO^CO
eo i—c
OSCOC©OOi-i©»OCNieOOO©»©
irtco©i>.co»oeoeo-«*ieoc©o»
CM CO t-I
<MT-icoo5i>.©c39»oeoi-a,
C»NiHONC»t-HO^IC<I
»0 OS t—I t—I 1—I TH
ooez>^t<cDO'-icc>t^^*i
eq cs © <o «o co o c» n
eot^ocqoot>oo^**cM
CM CM CM th
«OMN»C»C*il>e<10«ON
lOOtOOMi-iQOinoOfflNTtl
HTjicoioeo>*>^OT.i os ^ th
C<ICMeOCM'
i—icjsoo»OT-i«ooo«0'*e3»
loesiT-rii—i -* n co os cm o»
t—I CO tJi i© !D CO U5 N N 00
CM CM CO CM t—i t-I i—l
0»irtTHTrJICOiHI>.»QeO
ooooNnooM>o
OiOOJtHXIO^IOOtJI
io io eo cm i—i t—i i—i i
eooot>.io«iOi—inioiocoho
OCOi—lOONNlOt-IIO-^O
co«C>T-ieo«OTHooeocM^ioo>o
Ttnot^^tlCMi—ICMi—I
WWOCOiOt-iO't'OOO
HCSQOhO CM OS OS O CM
■^«ooo»oooTj<<oeMi—io
CO CO t^-* CM CM CM i-H
CQ
P
O«0tJIN00«0«iOC6
r*iTfit^^icMeoeo»OTt<
1>>CM
cnho tjtih Nr^os"*eot^os»o
«ocMi^eo^ooTi»^i«oeooso»
t-i COOS CM
CO CM CM i—l CO IO CO CM OS tH
Tjii-e^ososeot^oocoo*
tHHNUJHH
T-I
OSCOt—eMlOJOiHiOH^
«OCOCMCO»OCMt^t^O
«W00i-l00>OO5N^I
^4 io eo cm i—i th i—i
TrtCOCOTiHOOTjHOOTHCSUCOGSHO
■Or-i^eocsieocMi—11O1—irjio
cqiON^TtiowcHT^t^Tji
COUJNtJICMi-I'Nh
(Mi—IOOCMC39COtJ4CMCOI>.
->.oocoeMOooi-iTHcoeo
CMrjHiHOSCOeMCOCMOnO
CO TjT ->T •cj?" cq CM CM i-H
eMooTtieocDeoo»ocM
OCMOO^HCO«OOSrtHO
MCO>O00O0>C0N>0
OStH1>.»0»0'^-^CMtH
■OT)ioo>o>ONOt>iooweo
OOCOTHOOOSTtlCMTHrHOCJSO
OS05C35»0?-»OCOI>'CMCM>a*SC3S
HOOCOtOQ CO.tJ< CO >o"cM tH
co-eo os Oi h cq.t>- io co th
O'O'OOS'^OOO'^OOCO
-rJ4THt^cOl>-OTHOrtlCM
th cnToT »o"i>^ CM CO t» 00 CO
CQ
•^iir-iocoeoTfcoocM
laOCMHOi-iCOCOirteM©
OscM»ocoeoeocMeMeo
TH tH
"OONocooeqooi-iooeoi>-
Ot(IONNIOM«5i-i 00 J>- tH
CMCOCMCOO^CNCMeMCMeOTlH
tHCM*
HiOOOOOOONOOiOijI
>OCOCMeM>OC3STt<«OTHC3)
Tt*^*OC3St>.TH»Ot^t^OO
W^IHH
ooi-icsNcooscqioo
^OCMCMC0 00 1>CM»0
CM^O«OCO»OeO»OCM
a^OI>^-^rJi''*''i4rcNrTH
Orfli-HCOCMOOOOOS^CMaaaOCO
COOSTHOCMOOOO^fOiHCMiO
NUSNCftCOOM^OCSCvlTjl
t-n^os" ^aTos" co     co^jrcM"T-T
cMcooscoeo^oi>-coo
»oooeoi>.oo©-*oot>>t^
Oscot^ososoococMt-eo
H(00>OONeMO
OMiO^HHNHM
«0-*iOC<ItJICOi-IN
coosesst^co^aiOaaOt-
co >o co CNTesTcM cm"i-T
©Tt<iOCO->-CM^I00-*eO(M.t~
oeoo-^oO"*THiHOsoo>OTj*
»ooocMoOTHTHt>THcoeococo
c^^co^c^Tcmcmcm'th
oococMcoeoeortieoio^H
Tt«»O*>.C©»OCO00-«**CJSiO
t>00»OCMCO^CO»OTH»O
cot^osioeoeo^co
CO
1
•OMNOOOO-ifC*.
»0^»©THTHJt^0000O
■^1 TjH CM irt CM tH         tHCM
tH
NOStJICOi-hOOOO^OON
•*0«DOO>ON>OtJIiOMCO>0
tH CM»OCOCOCMtHtHtHtHtHCM
tH
NONNNCO^INCOO
CMOCM*OOS«OOSOOt>.i-l
COCMi—IOOtHOOCOCO^CO
ih CM tH
"OOM^iOHONTti
COCOOO-*Ot~'*C<JCO
THTjicocOTj<cM^tieo>o
CM^COCMCNTcMCNrTH    *
co»OTHcocot^cocooeoeoo
lOCMtiicoeocOTiHt^^iocoos
C0COCOTH«O00«OO»t~CN|i—i»o
i-IC01>»eOCMi—ICMCMtH
cocoiooscooococq^
CM»OTtlOiOeOOS>OCM-^»
r(i©Tj'TjH*Oecicqi-ib-cjs
CM^OOTjIeOCOCOCM
COOO'*OCO'*©OON
»Oi—iCOiOOaOiOi-ICO
COHOIQIOIQNNIQ
COOe<ICOTjlONNT|l«TtlCO
ooeot^»oeo»aO-*t~TiHo»aO'^
CMCOOt>CMOCOcDOCO>OCO
OOCMCOCMCMCOTiHCNlcOTll
eoosoot^i>-THcot^cM^i
CMCMtH^CMiHOOOSCO
iOCOOOINNhtJI
l>-CMCMeMTH       tHtH
iHCMTl<eOOO.l>-OOCMC3SOSlO
i-l       CM^COCM CM        tH tH
i—liOCMCOOCOCMt^OOCO
CM tH CO *>• 00 CM CM        tHCM
OOCMrJlOOSOSCJSt^eO
NOHCONCOOOOO
^OOiOiQiO-ONiO
eq»ooo'*oo'*NMiaoo
t^eM^iTHoeo-^icOCMaseocsi
CMCOOt>>CMOCOCOOtO>aOCO
t»i>-iHoseMCNicNi«ooooo
Ht>NC6C»03Ttl©OH
CMCMtHCOiHOOOOSCO
OS
. _g ffl
ffl
OS
«•§
ffl
ffl
tt» B"2 3S00O)
{3
fl
fl
sxi-
g-fflj ftri £    3" fl S?5 O ffl
%>?
ffl
SJ
S^ffl
CM
tH
OS
+3
m
&-& o
>>
u
03
fl
fl
u
H
9
•° Ih
+3    fl     ffl
El   ffl ^
C3§>^
Sffl  03  0,03  Rm  3 »Q GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
33
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
aa>-.t»» H»Q CO H© t- © CO t—  ©  M   ©
©?cj t^ •>• © © cc m< eo eo cq h os m
OS lO lOtOQIOWONCOHOCOIN
CM CO CO CO tH HH th
Hos©»oi>-Mi»OMieo©coeo
iHCQi—icoeoeo©HoqM*eot>»
Hcq©Mi©i>M<eooqcqH
M«©©
"*«0 © h CM Hffl CO © OS © ©©eo
COCM CM CO >o © i—I OS CJS © i—i C3S iO co
T-*»H HNOJHNMHHH
©HHt^eoeocqMi©i>©t-
CO »0 rJH CO © 00 M< CM       CO CM tH
com* *5
co eo »o
1HN
COH
© ©
r-M<
h^hOhCjo^hOION
ioc»iOTticOTiHeqc<iHe<iMN
M<eo©eoHi>-cocq©©eoH
th cq eo cq th i—11—i
cqoo»©ooMiHco©Mi©cq©
N00>SHC0>O>OaHOHIQ
H»oooo©M<cqc«cqH
oo © »o
HMtJI
©CM
Trtcq
com*
■aOUS«0«iH'*CONM©HO
cocMioosco>oeo©©eo»oco
co»oeocc©H©sM<©ooMieo
• cq^eoeoTHTHT-T
OHOM>NO> CO tO CO M< ©
>OOCMlOO*OCOOOa*OCON
hmhNMOOWtHHH
oscq cq
i—I iO ©
iHi-KOOCftOOSOHOO^i
©i>-oqosM«©.t-ooeooqi>-»o
rH i—I CO »© -V Cq tH
«ON
CO ©
oscoeoco©co«o©iHoo©©
coM'cqcqeoM<»ot-HcqeoeM
CMCOtH
COa*>-OS
co >o
CO H
at-CO
M<M'©©cqMiM't^i>-©»oe>q
OiOMOaWaOiOOOt^HNOO
eMcot^cq«o©ooco©t»cocq
icococq'
i—icot>>M<aoM<M'©cq©co©
HUJOCJtONHHOO'^OSlO
HCqoOMHOO©eOHH
co io eo
tH COt-
OOtH
coco
O0M«
«o oo co co i>- eo t- at-'OO os © co
eo©eO'^eocqeo©»o»OTHOs
WTjiiHoeoTiiosNCNioeo
>owcon(no"*c<1>oc<ihc5
ctsiomi©oo©iooooo©mi©
HN^iCOONOMHHH
■*QH
cq 10 ©
eo >o M< eo th th
©00t-O©Ml00Ml©©©C0
eOHeoeoeo©©»oi>t>.oo©
H C-Ml M*t—•
«N
COCO
oooqcowcqooeot-HOiOMi
COMIOMCONNOOHCONH
cq co th
ION
at-© 0000 © Cq H »OMi Oq © ©      • OS CO ©
io cq os © u5 th co © I-- eo h m<     h^ho
HNH^HOCQQONHHH TH
©M<
cqM<
coco.
os©©©oo©©eo©osco©
©©©HOscqr-ioccoo coco
cqcqco©oocqooHt-coM<eo
cq coco CO'
at-CO
»o io
TH©
OONONCOWISOOMOCO
©t^cq©cqcocooooocq©os
i©»©cjOHoo©»oeoM,HcoM*
.       «       .CO "       -       -       -
COt-t-     -COCqHH
cNit^eMiHt~-eo^tieocNi©»ooo
Jt-©©»O»a0TH00'!aH©t-Cq©
NM^IO>OMO>OHHH
cq © io
tH COCO
th cq cq th th
©*>■     t^Hoooescoooo'O'^O'*
co io     © i> cq co ih cq th os © oo m< t>-
h       h os cq © eo th
cq
CqNINNWOOMOSOJXOI
co >0 h cq i>. © oo ©     eo h h
fM^IHH
cq cocq
M<
oo ©
coos
©M<
HCD©MIMI©©©©©©M<
©O©eo©»o©oseoeo co cq
i©M*©oooq©M<cqM<©»QM«
cq m* t--© eo cq h
ooio-^cqcoTtiocoHNO
M»MiMicqco©o»oooMi©»o
e>teoNc>, cono^ihhh
o coco
i—i co ©
h cq CM H H
os ©
cq eo
COM*
nHcq
(OioiocqooujcjooiOHfMo
eoco^cocoHio^NTjiiOTji
©M* coco ©THt-cqcq coco©
cq cq i-Tco th os"i-T os co^»o cq th
H H Cq H H
M CO M< cq © COM* iH rtl OS t— ©
©Mt-©ooeoeoeococoTj*eq
00©eo00©MiM<00M<©©eo
cq ©»o
>o cc-*
H£<> »0
H^OOCftlOWHH
coomio©iQ«oo©thco©
WNOiONOH^lHCOO}©
HOOOO'OCONHH
tH CO tH
CO CO
>o cq
M«t-
oo«o©©rjico©cqcqocoos
eo»o»ooo©co©©»o©i^io
M*©eooo©»QHt^.Miioeo»o
M«t—cocmh
©lOH
ON
t~©
cot-
COH
oo©©cqascqcocoeoiHCOi—i
OSi—i00©cO»o»OM*l>.M<b-00
»©»OO»00©»O©»Ot-HM<eO
THTHco©t>-©©oo>©»cJcqTH
ooeoOaO-t—co©h»ocomih
ONhOOI>hCSHIO>ON
©>>eocoM(ooHioeo»o»ocq
CO »0 !>• M CO H i—I
locooo
oot-cq
tH M*
co»q
Mtc©
Ml ©
eoaNHONfflcoosoHTji
©cqcoi-Hor-oo»o>ocqcoM<
i—icqcqeoo»cot»co«aOcoiocq
HHTJHHTfCOOO'^CONHH
co©cqcq©coeoTHcqeq©eo
cq©osM,i-ieo©THO©M*»o
»Q©»OOSH©t>.©©M,COH
© © co
co©oo
htJKOMH
eo io
OM<
CMMl
t— cooo»OMioocqiHcqi>-cq©
N00>0-#Nhi0Ohhhi0
cqM<©t~©iHcoeocqcqcqeo
cq m* th h
cq©io©t>-Mi©cqcqcoco©
©cqeocq©t^THooeooo»o>o
THTHMt-CMCqiHlH
lOt-M*
nth eo
oo
M< cq
cq cq
Cq"rH
©cqoscocqosMicqt-©©oo
cqM<*>-©eo»oeo>OM»©M«oo
ooi>-i—nocq»OTHCoeo©coco
cq"© co cq oo M* eo cq,H
M*eot>-cqcq©Mi©©©THi>.
cqooiocqi—iioMJr-t^i—'os©
Tji^tiHeqosNwN loeocq
io os os
ajiOTh
th com1 cq •
Oh © o *o © cq os ht? © cq cq »o
Jf-O CO C3S »Q !>• OS © © >0 iO th lO O
OS© M< M* i—I M © M1 iHOS©©CO >o
cq cq     th h
o th o cq eo © © mi oooo co © io *>■ »ab
i^© »o © © m* ©>oos© t^os eoeo©
cqiHioMoocoeocq
ffl
fl
PQ
a
• o
•|H
03
{h
bO
-f3
f-l
o
ft
ffl
tf
a
a
a
<
THCO
i-HO©CO©COMItHCOOOO©
th     ©©©m*m<co     m th eo
COCN»OC0»O©M'!—ihNNi-i
eo      CO M1 M1 CO tH th th h
h cq »o
Ml © »0 M* 00 © »Q CO !>• i—i Ml OO        M »0 ©
CO CO H i-H r—i H OS M1 00 H *>• CO        COCO©
cq th io m* oo © cq cq     co
©co
*ooo
OS »o
■QIQIOCOCQHNCOrjliOe^iO
NCXIOSHQOeqiONTjIOTtlN
MlM^©CO00M<©OS©*OCOM^
TH Cq TH rH
g s
> ffl
o co
eo
H
©
>S
2 £ g:fl
ffl
.sis
ax*
ca
^2
W)-S +3 •? ffl
O ta O
M<
rH
©
O ffl
>>
fe  fl^
~ * E*n >>©
t-I
ffl
■Sxi
»0
OS
+3
03
fl
>>b0
142—3
■" © is
O ffl
ffl
ffl
■ so c3 a*i On g
S    fl-d
Ms I*
34
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
Table 16.—Destination of Immigrant Traffic at Canadian Atlantic Ports, fiscal years,
April, 1910, to March, 1915.
UH 1910-1911:
To United Per cent to
Destination.                                        To Canada.         States. Total. United States.
-North Sydney             2,718               1,640 4,358 37*7
Halifax          33,658                5,721 39,379 14*5
St. John           22,441                3,524 25,965 13*6
Quebec '.         106,621 24,298 130,919 18*6
Total         165,438 35,183 200,621 17*5
1911-12.
North Sydney             2,845               1,210 4,055 29*8
Halifax           34,874                3,996 38,870 10*3
St. John.           25,772                1,954 27,726 7*1
Quebec    ..        125,950 15,530 141,480 11*0
Total..-.,   j         169,441 22,690 212,131 10*7     -
,                         .      . .^——
1912.-1913.
North Sydney..             1,182               1,333 2,515 53*0
Halifax           51,727                9,494 61,221 15*5
St. John           24,163                2,603 26,766 9*7
Quebec         136,764 15,217 151,981 10*0
Total         213,836 28,647 242,483 TFT
1913-1914.
North Sydney                665 \ 1,425 2,090 68*2
Halifax           52,794 10,819 63,613 17*0
St. John           15,619                2,437 18,056 13*5
Quebec         157,936 29,780 187,716 15*9
Total.         227,014 44,461 211,475 21*0
1911-1915.
North Sydney                447-             1,247 1,694 73*6
Halifax            19,956                2,946 22,902 12*8
St. John             5,042                   680 5,722 11*9
Quebec .'.   ..   ..          49,431 14,538 63.969 22*7
Total ~       64,876 19,411 94,287 ,   20*6
Annual Reports, Immigration Branch. &jjm
Table IT.—Destination hy Provinces of Canadian Immigration via -Canadian and
United States Ports, fiscal years, 1910-11 to 1914-15.
Province.
Maritime Provinces..
Quebec	
Ontario j
Manitoba	
Saskatchewan	
Alberta ,
British Columbia..
Maritime Provinces  .
Quebec	
Ontario    ..   .,
Manitoba..   ..   ..   ..
Saskatchewan	
Alberta	
British Columbia..   .,
1910-1911.
Via
Via
Per cent
Canadian
United States
via
Atlantic
Atlantic
United States
Ports.
Ports.
Total.
Ports, ^ft:
8,887
336
9,223
3*64
25,594
4,045
29,639
13*65
58,0-09
7,291
65,300
11*16
26,001
1,851
27,852
6*64
14,647
1,046
1>5,693
6*65
13,681
1,184
14,865
7*96
18,610
1,973
20,583
9*59
1911-12.
9,341
271
9,612
2*82
29,363
5,296
34,659
15*28
68,629
9,866
78,495
12*58
29,941
s>l  2,672
32,613
8*20
16,553
1,571
18,124
8*67
15,837
1,494
17,331
8*62
B       19,766
2,309
22,075
10-45 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
35
SESSIONAL PAPER No.  142
Table 17.—Destination by Provinces of Canadian Immigration, etc.—Continued.
1912-1913.
Via Via                               Per cent
Canadian United States                           via*
Atlantic Atlantic                       United States
Province.                                          Ports. Ports. Total. Ports.
Maritime Provinces           11,768 452 12,220               3'70
Quebec           38,014 10,240 48,254 20'14
°ntano           80,504 17,827 98,331 18*18
Manitoba -           30,596 3,671 34,267 10*72
Saskatchewan jj   ..   ..          17,674 2,654 20,328 13*06
Alberta           16,901 2,562 19,463 13*17
British Columbia    ..          18,379, 3,449 21,828 15-79^
1913-1914.
Maritime Provinces             9,561 565 10,126               5*58
Quebec           55,100 10,150 65,250 16'55
Ontario i           84,014 19,293 103,307 18-65
Manitoba..   K           29,734 3,981 33,715 11.80
Saskatchewan           17,600 2,796      |§|g2.0,396 13*70
Alberta           16,633 2,996 19,629 20*38
British Columbia..   ..   ..   ..   ..   ....          14,372 3,171 17,543 18'08
1914-1915.
Maritime Provinces           3,819 187 4,006               4'67
Quebec           14,735 3,787 18,540 20'42
Ontario..   .- ;   ..          26,131 6,537 32,668 20*01
Manitoba             8,391 1,005 9,396 "10-70
Saskatchewan             6,086 812 6,898 11.77
Alberta j        5,650 759 6,409 11-85
British Columbia             3,93'6 952 4,888 19'08
Annual Reports, Immigration Branch.
Table 18.—Percentage Distribution of Canadian Immigration via Atlantic Ports by
Province of Destination.
•
1910-11.
1911-12.
1912-13.
1913-14.
1914-15.
Maritime Provinces	
5-04
16-18
35-65
15-21
8-57
8-12
11-23
4-51
16-28
36-87
15-32
8-51
8-14
10-37
4-80
18-95
38-61
13-46
7-98
7-64
8-57
3-75
24-17
38-26
12-49
7-55
7-27
6-50
4-84
Quebec	
22-38
39-45
Manitoba..	
11-35
8-33
7-74
5-90
Table 19.—Percentage Distribution by Ports of total Immigration via Eastern
Ocean Ports.
Port.
North Sydney	
Halifax	
St. John	
Quebec	
Total direct..
Portland	
Boston	
New York	
Philadelphia \	
Baltimore-...	
Total indirect
142—Si
1908-09.
2-84
16-15
15-88
52-22
87-09
1-91
0-80
10 02
005
0-02
12-91
1910-11.
1-48
18-35
12-25
58-22
90-30
1-99
0-42
6-92
0-36
001
9-70
1911-12.
1-34
16-38
12-10
59-18
89-00
3-21
0-91
6-68
0-17
003
11-00
1912-13.
0-46
20-33
9-49
53-72
84-00
5-95
0-72
9-30
0 02
001
16-00
1913-14.
0^25
19-56
5-79
58-55
84-15
5-23
0-94
9-36
0-31
0 01
15-85
1914-15.
0-54
16-72
6-08
59-72
83-07
2-91
1-55-
12-45-
001
0-01
16-93 36
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
STEAMSHIP SUBSIDIES.
Under this heading there are presented:
1. Table 20 a summary statement of the direct aid to shipping paid by leading
maritime nations and table 21 a summary of the indirect aid granted by the same
countries. The facts and figures are compiled from information available covering
in most cases the calendar year 1913 or the fiscal year 19-12-13.
' 2. Table 22 giving for the years 1912-13 to 1914-15 the numbers of sailings
Inward and outward at all Canadian ports from and to the principal countries of the
world with the total registered tonnage of shipping in each case. 'This table is of
general interest as giving a summary view of the extent and distribution of shipping
to and from Canadian ports.
3. Table 23 showing for the years 1911, 1912, and 1913 the numbers of passengers
carried inbound and outbound by vessels receiving Canadian subsidies and also. by
non-subsidized vessels, grouped according to lines and showing the total amount of
subsidy paid to each line.
4. Table 24 showing for the years 1911-1914 numbers of round trips in each
service by each subsidized company with the average tons of freight, the average number of mail bags and the average number of passengers and of live-stock carried on each
trip and the subsidy paid.
5. Table 25 showing the ratios westbound and eastbound of transatlantic passen-
■ger traffic in subsidized and non-subsidized vessels, that is, giving the load factor in
each of these classes of vessels by companies and also the average load factor for each
company.
6. Table 26 a summary of freight carried outbound by subsidized vessels in the
transatlantic services and distinguishing freight of Canadian origin and freight of
United States origin.
7. Table 27 giving by months the cargoes inward and outward at Montreal in
the transatlantic service for the years 1911, 1912 and 1913.
8. Table 28 giving a summary of grain cargoes carried in subsidized and non-
subsidized vessels for the years 1911, 1912 and 1913 by companies -and distinguishing
in each case the quantity carried in the summer service and in the winter service.
Canada in 1913 paid under the head of mail subsidies and steamship subventions the large total amount of $2,198,903. Erance, under the three headings of
direct bounty, navigation bounty, and postal subventions paid in 1912, $10,718,576.
Japan for the year 1911 had paid under various heads a total of $6,805,334. These two
countries have been the most heavily subsidizing countries in the world. There follow in order Austria-Hungary, United (States, Great Britain, Canada and Germany.
Relatively to the amount of traffic and the extent of the steamship services, Canada's
subsidies have been very much greater than those of the United States or Great
Britain, while it is interesting to note that they were before the war more than twice
as great as those paid by Germany. The direct aid granted would, however, have to
be studied in connection with the various forms of indirect assistance as set forth
in table 21. Whatever conclusion may be arrived at as to Canada's grants comparatively, there is no doubt that Canada has been making a very large contribution
toward 'Steamship services. The question is whether the expenditure of this money
has secured proportionate results and.whether the plan on which it is distributed is
designed to meet the special needs of Canada's traffic problem. The facts given in
tables 23 to 28, inclusive, should furnish material necessary for an intelligent discussion of this question. In table 23, for example, it will be seen that vessels receiving no subsidies carried more passengers inbound than subsidized vessels. During the
year 1913, Canadian Northern vessels and also certain vessels of the White Star-
Dominion line were included in the subsidy list. These vessels had during the two
previous years been operating as non-subsidized vessels and their change from the one GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
37
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
list to the other gives totals for the subsidized services in 1913 greater both in inbound
and outbound passengers than for the non-subsidized services, but in the totals for
the three years the non-subsidized services carried more passengers inbound but fewer
outbound. Table 25, which gives the ratios of westbound to eastbound transatlantic
passenger traffic, shows that on the whole the subsidized vessels obtained a very much
more favourable load factor than the non-subsidized vessels. By the summary for
all lines it is seen that in the year 1912, for example, the subsidized vessels carried
2.72 passengers inbound for every one passenger carried outbound, while the non-sulh-
sidized vessels carried 3.90 inbound for every one outbound, and the relative position
of the subsidized liners was still more favourable in. the other two years.. The subsidized liners seem to have done a regular passenger business almost as favourable in
its load factor as the business at leading United States ports, while the non-subsidized
liners carried the peaks of the load and^ had a much mOre irregular business, which
becomes still more evident when the number of sailings in and out of the two classes
are compared. In the three years the subsidized liners carried passengers inbound
on 523 trips and were' aftle to load passengers out on 469 trips, while the non-subsidized
vessels loaded passengers inbound on 793 trips, but were able to obtain outbound
passenger business on only 465 trips, and both in and out the non-subsidized vessels
carried fewer passengers per trip than the subsidized vessels.
Canada's freight problem is to send to Europe every year probably not less than
four tons of freight for every one ton of freight she imports from Europe. In the
Interim Beport, 1916, it was pointed out that Canadian ports handled outward only
between two and three tons of freight for every ton inward and that the balance of our
outward shipments are distributed among the United States ports. Erom the totals
in table -27 it will be seen that the port of Montreal in the three years 1911, 1912 and
1913 handled from 1-7 to 2-4 tons outward for each ton brought inward. If now the
average tons of freight per trip carried by subsidized liners in the Canadian services
be examined as set out in table 24 it will be noted that many of the vessels carried
very small freight loads and that many had almost equal cargoes inward and outward
and perhaps a heavier inward 'than outward load, and other vessels again were very
much better freight 'carriers and contributed toward moving the excess of outbound
freight. It has not been practicable within the time to work out the freight loads of
the non-subsidized vessels so that direct comparison between the two classes cannot
be made. $Mh
Grain has constituted the chief bulk cargo exported by Canada and in table 28
the total quantities of all grains carried by subsidized and by non-subsidized vessels
from Canadian ports are shown for the years 1911, 1912 and 1913. Erom this table
it appears that the non-subsidized vessels carried 69,000,000 bushels while the subsidized vessels moved less than 42,000,000. The figures in this table show also the
relatively important part played by passenger vessels, that is, by combination liners,
in the movement of grain. The passenger vessels, subsidized and non-subsidized,
earried some 65,900,000 bushels as against 45,290,000 carried by freight liners.
Class of accommodation, regularity, and speed are proper objects to be considered
in public policy as well as freight and passenger carrying capacity. It becomes a
question as to what are under given conditions the more important objects to be
served and what can afford to be paid for the service desired. If details of the mail
matter carried by the Canadian subsidized liners were obtained and the weights of the
various classes of mail matter figured at the commercial postal rates for ocean carriage, it would be possible to figure out what Canada has been contributing for the
kind of services furnished and the result could be viewed in relation to the passengers
and freight carried, which again could be studied in their relation to the freight and
passenger load factors presented by Canada's total business. 38
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
H3
•r-l
Q
15
+»
o
CO
ta
od
T-i
t^
o
tH
eo
o
OS
ed
Oi
t-i
OS
!>.
O
CO
rH
CO
cq"
OS
rH
cq"
rH
CO
cq
cq
00
»d
cq"
©
rH
je
CC
eo
eo
o
00
CO
Subsidy
to
Lifeboats.
-
^"^^r-i:
os
r-1
OS
o>
Training
of
Seamen.
IIP?:
oo
cq"
Extension
of Routes
s. s.
o
cq
od
cq
»d
Maintenance
Bounty.
Annual
Bounty is
paid  per
gross ton.
AustrialS.S.
Co.  174,580
Colonial
Subvention.
rH
CO
00
©
CO
*
Admiralty
Subvention.
»
o
cq
OS*
cq
Postal
Subvention.
00
ed
00
eo
ui
CO
o
o>
ed
OS
T-I
cq
Mileage
Basis
1*121,409
Weight
Basis
1,494,670
rH
rH
cq
cq
■o
T—1
Mileage
Basis
1,450,432
Contract
Service
876,960
1,046,010
Navigation
Bounty.
Oi
tH
CO
OS
00
i-H
fPf^Sfli
o
OS
ed
CO
cq
%
©
o
o
T-i
00
Construction
Bounty.
Cq
OJ
00
I—i
CO
Gross ton
S.S. Iron or
steel 8-12
Sailing
vessels
iron or steel
2-84
Wood or
combination
2-03
Special custom    facilities goods
used   S.   S.
Yds. Preferential R. R.
I
)
>
!
t
OS
co
H3
Country.
CN
a
r-
*-
a
i
|
i
c
p
a
S
ft
i
i
i
i
i
>
c.
i—
o
f-
cc
t:
p
a
"a
C
cc
a
0
c
)
1
>
1
;
1
i
I
!
i
cc
rH
1
cq
T—1
o:
rH
U
ec
<E
c
OC
• a-a
Ph
cc
4
-r=
<s
-r=
cc
T3
ffl
-r=
• |H
rt
ti"*
£*^
>2ai
a
+-
PC
at
a
e
C
i
>
I
>
i
>
h
K
6
P
ft
J
•+=
(X
>
CC
f-
C
i
r-
r-
o
r-
f-
«
a
s=
a
C
a
i
i
>
i
i
>
i
1
!
t
)
OQ
rt
o
• iH
rt
>
Xi
S3
CQ
rd
OQ
03
ffl
CQ
*3
rt
c3
OQ
ffl
CQ
,n
.OQ
c3 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
39
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
-r->
ffl
CO
ft
rt-ih
t-i
CD
rd
o
OS    .
vrt co
©_
fH   2
© o
P4
aiftSS|
rrj m|-«  ri fl3   aj)
"^ d     2 5
-23^rd
55       c3M «
k^© P ©-£
"j3os *h +s^3
© CO  P  5->-J
ffl   «f^is rt
-pte.g rt ©
OQ        "-1   S  *H,
rt   .-r^*" rt"
' O g Jh «
T3
+3
o
CD
t-i
.ri
m
►4
M
EH
OQ
tl
ffl
rt
o
p.
• r-1
rfl
CO
o
OQ
rt
03
o
r-»
o
flrfl
d
-r»
r-l
©
o
CQ
ffl
CT)
r»
OQ
d
*H
ffl
rd
+3
o
rd
O
+->
^O    *
rt © 63
O 8 Jh d •Jh'tJ
fflrXfflo^^rtJi
gCJ  ffl«i=ir^  ffl  OQ""1"
OQ
ffl
03
j*
• fH
03
+3
rt
ffl
*H
ffl
«TH
ffl
fH
A*.
OQ
ffl
• iH
-r>
rt
*H
O
P.
o
m
-H-H
rt
o
• tH
-f3
ffl
H
§£
•I-I
il
o
rto
© +3
.d d
-p o3
*H
-3 bO
© rt
rt.S
"3 63
03  +3
+3 .-H
t-I f-t   .
ffl1"1"1 +3
"§+= e3
03 o3 Jh
©2-3
^o*l
rt«aaH    d
03  O  P
ffl
CQ
ffl
00    >i   ■_:
•S^rH    a^
*h e3 Q
OQ  H  S
. CD'S ffl
i> ° >   .
s © s >>
rd hfi,d +»
02   ffl ^
P-**3„-T3
rd   £   rt««H
la'C o3 O
rS    a ©
• ■H «   ffl
d 2 fe 2
o-d ©«"
--J3-P
rt      2*3
.SP-3 Sb^
©ffl ffl 43
o rt" d
«a_i ag
os ti -.*0
-*   Mrd  oj
oo     .2
t-i rt 43 d
<D ©'-I ©
© ©,£ ©
•i-4
OQ
CJ   CQ   ©
O rt. bfl
t3I
rtS>
•H   rJ.rH
OQ fc
Pf?bC bD
O ©d rt
■ >W^
rt
o
©
rd
-r*
o
d
©
©
fid
0Q
•+3
d
03
fH
• rH   03
6
p
CQ
©
iH
S-l
o
ffl
03
.A.       on
0Q 4J
d   .«
03+? ©
5h  ffl  ffl
-L3  ffl
OQ	
{-=5*3
c3 ©
k. d.
>? d«
fH CO
O CO
'£9
g
S © ©
bp-d o3
^h O-rS
..ns P!
Pi ffl   ffl
rd   JH   ffl
OQ 0«tJ
n-asp
?d   d  »H
-£jH0
>>ftfS»,g
JH        <»rH       rr!
03 0Q f3
,F3 ffl-g
^i ffl ra
O     **
rt
O
"5
,«o ©
©*""£
r-H     •      03
•rir-i +3
d      QQ
£ °
rt+s
o
*H     .   .rH
-p    Ti
ffl OQ oj
03 ©-S
fee's
rt-«
o
09
0Q-
©
-P
03
*H
2 *.d
rt o*3
t3 &.Z,
ffl x d
h ffl o
fc!   © OQ
© ><!       p
"H    fj       ..*H
2    m\    fl r*-l <
3_H    OQ'rH
03   DO'S +3
>>©   $
.2    Mr.
©+=    0,2
"H —H >H
ft'd i^l^
^^5rOP
02
rt   Pi O
O "aH .^.
^H
03
0Q
OQ
ffl
O -r?
rtcd
rt
ffliTn
0
03
rt
0Q *3
*h rt
rt *
o
■ iH
rt d
in ©
CQ S
rt
o
©
o
03
rt
bfi
• rH
ffl
Sh
o
-r;  rt rt
*d MO
o © rt
rt«<H -ij
W) O 03
o3 d
'rH    ©*d
rt   02
O   CQ   OQ
•|H    fflr-H
02   F*   02
d bO a)
d rt >
►rH   r^
W) cQ+T
aB e3 d
-£■£ 2
s ©a
G   rH   rn   2
3 ass
9"rt
it's
a
rH   ■
rt   ©•£
0Q-rH    vn~
© g.S 08
e3"*-|'3 &d
Es >>.rd d
rr   aj)
 1 «a-|     13 V
rt^rd OQ
,r"1           OQ ^
-r=«£-HH ffl
rt   rt
M©
•rH +3
©
tl
J-2S
rt^
t—  OQ
T*4   02
•     ©
t^-H
o*^3
^ ©
■e©
-§►
-^-*3
• r—l     I   i—H
£ o5 d<d
fH    ffl.rH    t.
© g
>sS
OQ^
rt
S  OQ
"3
«P   rH
as^-s-g
d-S
.2 mTS
rd
0Q
©
di5
"H rt
Oor"
d
03©
©
-P
03
©
OQ
©
d
03
e3 a
ftid
©^
fn prj
c3 .rn
o3 ©^Td rt g
© ^fH 0 0 o £
OQ
^fXi^rQ^
l> bfi
2©cS
rd   02MH  .
^26°
-H   „ -P
•—i   OQ-rH
09   03   2
»rl    S
^~> +3    O
^ bfi'co
rr» +=>   fH
"8 85
fH
©
-Sa
CO
■ i
p
03
►-3
*H
o
2 •
>  0Q
**TA
ffl ffl
02   CQ
©s
I ©
M
rt
— 40
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
33
33
O
<1
-«-s
O
<D
t-t
.t-i
3
CM
H
t-H
<
a?
fH
• rH
*3
la
©^
rd
43
O
OQ
•+3       .
d  OQ
ffl   ©
■Iq
OQ
d S
-d§
©«*H
rt °
OQ
fH
ffl
d
o
p
•r-(
rd
o
43
CQ
d
d
o
Hi
02
©
+3
d
«
>i
<S
J*
.r-l
d
(^
'd
• rH
+3
d
©
fH
©
©
fH
fa
03
©
•i-H
HP
rt
+3
fH
O
P
o
h
*<H
rt
o
• rH
+3
P
a
©
H
bO
rt
•iH
02
03
O
O
"an   ©
0-0
dg
•43 H
d
>
fH
©
OQ
©
rt
©«*h ,02
rd   °'©
"^ bO-rJ
d
">H-rJr3
©     - 3
^ d 2
rt 3 68
rn   N
CQ   2   ©
'3 d
X    3    ©-H
..&2 d d
rd
02
ffl0©
rd©©
■+3 »rj eo
t^t^cq"
K*osco
*3   I    I
d oo os
P©©
Oi ©
©
©
»o
eq
os
o
rH
os
rt o o
O v"»'    fH
o
*43 0Q
rt
©Tl
£ >>
rQ    O
d-^S
MHO
lt ©
•d dos
2 f-o
d +3 eo
rt   02 ^a
12 d
fJ43   cj
d ffl j>
© 43    3
00
fn O OU
^02O^
d -*3
* rt
'■s
j3 ©r/ d
d g3? a
• rH "£>    fflrM
Ml-3
o >hwcq
.« ©     00
■^H ©
(S «* 1~t    ►>>
.y    OQrH    rt
.+3   fflf^t-5
i, ©_L
r!|-
.fn o3
so a
d   rn   O
© 5>"
05   0"*h
3 « 2
g 43 rt
Prt es
*d o
fH    0-=
vd rt£
O)  ffl  03
2^©
^     ©        -
© o ©
'—'CO   fH
fH     I
c3 io
ffl ©
*s
*H
P.5
"43
©
©co
10 ©
©
ffl
,£2
O
+3
r ffl
©   >H
© ©
00-if
S8.ES
••HH ©
O©
©^
©rH
OS©
cq ^3
71 d
0
COrd
o.-H
©
©os k.
rH rH   (S
+»""h
rO
*3
ffl
d
gee
©^!
w©
fJJ rH
fH      i.
Px*
rH
+3       .
d rt
© d
m
a> a>
19
rgl
X    1
P IS3
1
• rH
• rH
Uj
rd
fH
rH
o«i>
rd
O
+3
U-(
+3
rt
0
07
c3
rt
©
IT,
uu
fH
O
©
CQ
5
fed
^rt
ffl    fH    ©
.3    ffl    O
bfi^g
H -r3«rn
-2   d   O
^ 2^
r2    S    rt
S^cq d
c3
bflO
2 2
02
CQ  j.
© o
gr^ffl.©
OQ
d
02 -S
©
ffl
*rH
fH
P
©
CQ
d
rd
ffl
fH
rt
p
+3
rt
ffl
©
fH
ffl
P
2 © i
a-e
p
ffl Q)
> bfi ©
o.Srd
fn^ bfi
o_g d
«TH |U *iH
fH
Ti    0
OTi
® rt
CO   r&
fig
03O
PR
bfi+3
rt   02
"   ©
sag
+3 o
©  .
5 +3
© 03
P n*RN
'©
«a_00
o   -
43
+3    ©
rt ©
©«fl
0fH
fH ©
©S
P 03
a
OQ
©  +3
+3   ffl
0    '
rH    W
©•5
ffl +3    03
02
"  r*
00     i3^ d
rt ©-£ rt
fn  03       ,C
1^3 si-9
.15 © °°*Sj3
P   ffl<J   .,   r>
>>a   ©^
p §
fH
d
o
o.d
08 += J ffl o3
rt
tnrt
03  ffl
,dpq"
O
•3
rt
d
•3     |3
68 g 2
d 2 a
OQ   03   02
02 UJ +3
3 02
o   -©
ffl   ffl   02
5P3 d
+3    03-rH
d
• i-l
ll
©
•+3
d
d
ed
06
rd
ffl
fH
08
T3-rt rt ©
3 © bfl ©
B    ffl-rH    fH
d^    ffl««
**       fe-3
•rH    ©   O    "
ffl d     .-+3
rtrSf^
43 oa^_ ©
2® o B
-f3«M
02  O
d —
O   d
i bCO «
• S  rt  ffl  2
fH
© d ©
d r^H
*!§
T3
rt ©
•S {».2
02^2 d
© fn
g*3£
H    ,£>-"
r^S^
rt e3 ©
08+3 pj
rt
e3 O H -j3
OS «rH    CaJO
+3 ^'P
3 ©       c3
III!
03'
1
ffl OQ M rt
~ rt
d ©
^rt^
5   -^
-d a
-+3 5
r>   *3   ffl
02
bfl ffl
rt
fH
rt
o
t>
03
d
o8
P
+3"o ft*
02 bfl 3+=
d J, §
ffl d i d _
S.<f<     S     ffl    ©
h  pj  OQ  CD B
ffl
u^-j   ffl  3
ffl-^^.d
ffl*
ffl   02
r. 1 1
-«    ffl
03
OQ
©.2 ffl©
o> +3 +3 _>
T* JT«> r^     r—(
©
ffl
rt
•rH
CO
>H    =
© Prt
fH-f3    {H    H
d.
®-*2   d
'So© d *
•r-t    t^> W
^- )h       ^
•^ol^-*3
ilMg
!i3M ti
t«  i.
© d
+3 ©
*2   OQ
3
©
©^
rd^
+3    O
cq rt
fH    fH
©2
>o ffl
03
fH
d   .'
•+3
"».2
bfl
P fH
ffl*
- 2
©rd
+3
S©
©Is
t» d
^Ti
.2 ^
fH    ©
© d
p
d^
rfa
03 bfl
68
«s bfi ©
0 rt ©
•1-1   Sh
&-HS
r*
*3
«a^-i
3
• rH
Tl
Hi
rt
^2
©
43
>>
p
rd
m
+3
arH
a
• rH
Tl
02
x>
d
0
rn
$,
©
fH
00
©
©
rH
£
rd
+3
0
+3
Oi
cq
03
F—H
03
■ rH
fH
©
43
fH
rt
d
O
•»H
fH
08
Hs
a
Ah
drt h
d-°d
©
© d
■r-i £_i «rH
-H3 «4-l •—I
^rt'd
P.&
d^!
02
©_
fjTJ
C d rt
r*i 3
43 02 ro
3  ©  02
- d^iS
0"3 oq d
rd
43
©
ffl
d
TrH
OQ
•3 ffl
©rd
>43
fH
8.S
tf£ •
1 rt d
*pH
oq i3
Pm
"S'd rt
3  OQ
<j
JL   02   f-i     L
P*rH   ffl   C8
©•a
"S.tJ S "43 rt
© rt
ffl
ffl
0
©^
3
fH
•«   W) OQ     .03^
rt .  boa
3 -rH <h
ffl ffl
fH    ffl
d ©
rt d tn
2hI
p
d
fH
fa
©
•rt fn
3'
d
rrH,d   043.3
H^   rn ar\   ..
03
fH
©
bfl
©
grd-Sr?'0.-
fflr£-rH    ffl    fH     g
flHH +3  M 43  3 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
41
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
>»
t-i
+3
d
d
O
O
rCf
o
OS
CD
a
o
*H
MH
03
o
GQ
fH
o
«t-.
33
rt
03
a
o
t-i
*H
CO
33
Fh
03
»o
£
T-I
+3
■3
o
1
*<*H
r-l
CO
tH
33
o*>
CD
tH
fH
CD
•v
+3
tH
53
CO
fl)
rd
33
CD
J3
fH
03
S
CO
33
33
t-i
eft
a
33
£
S3
S3
O
H-l
m
33
t-i
CD
fl")
fc
f>s
+3
d
'crt
CD
o
W)
CK
«r3
CD
CD
CD
rd
CD
+3
i>
&D
a>
d
•rH
-3
t-i
• rH
d
o
TJ
61)
0t3
CD
oq
*H
o
+3
S3
CD
B
CD
+3
03
+3
0Q
>s
H
03
a
a
!3
OQ
oi
©*
H
rJ
pa
■<
H
rH-chCO
:S
■ rn cq b- -<*i © ws cq •* ^ eo t-   •
• »©
•eo
• ©00 Cj ©
TS
ffl
2 &
c ©
O 43
EH-2
bfl
rH rH ©
• Cq ta © Th rH © © CO rH © »o     •
•00
•©
• CO rH ta 00
©CNrH
■ rH
■ co © 00 © cq cq co cq © © t-   •
• cq
• cq
• eot^b-o
©t>-00
-©
© CO rH •>• CO         rH©©rH      •
• t^
•cq
• ©     t^ i>-
1-H>.©
-co
© rH         rH rH         fM UJ fN H      •
• Th
•cq
• t- .   cqcq
«©
00 cq
co                          cq
•cq
T-i
rH
1
cq"
l
rH
ffl
«H
OS
rH
OQ
cq to©
■*a
■ rH *>•© Tjt »0 ^*t rH t> 00 © ^1      •
•t~
•CO
• 00 rH rH CO
©©cq
•CO
© r-1                rH                IO TiH
•00
-cq     rn eo
rt*©
cq
eo   -
O   OQ
r
•             ..                                                                       .
ry   03
r^-l   ©
r>
rH
rH
©©CO
• i—1
• cq © i-h ta eo t>-   .^icocq©   •
■cq
•00
• cq    -©os
• »o
^3
©
© IO CO
•ta
••*NrOOOON
• © t«- cq eo    •
■©
•©
•os
•IOCS
• eo
■DON
•cq
•OrHNfflOffl
•Cq ©OOrH      •
©
• rH
•©
.Thf~
• i-H
2 S
rt ©
O 43
EH .2
bfi
edos"©s
•od
1>- rH         © t>-
•HHt>Ttl       •
•©"
•od
• rH
•os"od
■ T-i
03
T3
S
d
is
CO 00 eo
•cq
Tjl Th          T-H
• cqooeo
• rH
•CO
•©
• © CO
Th
r-l
|
OS rH
ed
©
co
Cl
rH
eo
rH
©
fH
43
d
©
rH
i
03
© eooo
•T+t
• rn © cq cq Th ta
■t~ T-i ->• eo     ■
©
CO
CO
■ eo y-i
r-
O
t^TjHcq
■00
cq eo         T-i
00©
ta
rH
eo
■ rHTh
«'©
cq
ta
O   03
•»
.»
►>r   03
£-i   ©
>
rH
rH
00 CO 00©
eo
■©coco   -t^eo©©cqeo©   -
©
-#
cq
■ cq ©
ta
"3
©
-H Th cq os
•eo
b-t^eo
• ta-^t go o ta ta co   •
cq
13
■©
•!>•©
■CO
©i>.oot~
cq
© © ©
■©©t^ThO0©rH      ••
rH
©
cq
oo eo
rH
2 S
rt   ©
©-£
EH-2
bfi
Th t^oToaa
OS*
■^i  T*
•rHlfJ       CM Cl co-t>i    •
ed
■<*
oT
■cTud
ed
00 00 eo
Th
©00
■ l—1 rH         rH © 'rh
©
t^
Th
eo
ed
t—i
■
»© rH
ed
!>■
cq-
rH
i
cq
rH
©
rH
©
fH
OQ
00 IO "* rH
ta
oqt~ co
©oocq©oo©cq   -
CO
*»
■*
Th CO
co
00 10 cq
©
rHCO
rH                H5N
cq
cq
Th
rH
^  ©
T-"
rH
CO
O   03
•a
*y  0Q
<H   ©
r>
rH
rH
©OS Th      -
lO
t^iO©
ocqcq©cq>OrH   •
cq©oo
©©Tf.I>.
o:
rt
©
t~©t^
©
t^eooo
© tO © © rH tHU OS      •
io co eo
>ooo-*©
O
cqooTh
Th
cq ta 00
©eoo©eoThoo   •
00 rH ©
©rrl© 00
*a
OQ   vf
rt   ©
O 43
EH-2
bfi
©odos
i-i
©© ©' N
• cdesTudod-* t^ir~   •
eooocq
ed    cq"od
©
<MCO
00
rH ta ■*&
cq cq     cq ta     rn   •
lO        tJI
ta     i-it—
T-i
rH
i
Th rH
Th
cq
eo
i-h             cq
rH
rH         rH rH
*rh
rH
©
T-i
©
fH
•
rH eo »o
ta
t-.t~ rH
© rn cq rn co © cq    •
IO
cq
<© rH © ©
t>
03
© co    f&
T—1
©cq
CO rH        rH I©         rH ,&%g
©
rH
Th          Th Th
^"©
eo
cq
cq
O   03
£
•.
»
>
T-i
rH
00 cq© ©
b-
eo © t*< eo co © t~ ■>* co co co   •    •
CO
©
©   -©cq
CQ
ffl
co j-h eo ©
OS
oq© oooo © © cq i-h© © ©   •   •
©
rH
Th
co io
©
-rh-cq©©
»0
t^iorHio©oo©cqoocq00   •   ■
rH
t**
©
i© CO
eo
03   ft
rt ©
co^dos
Th
Cq ©«3 rH eO>3 O COTh>0 rH     ■     ■
->^
t>T
rH
edeo
ed
Cl lO
rH
rHrH          TjH Cl rH 1—1 CO rH (N
-ch
t—
OO
cq eo
eo
00
-3
rH
1
O 43
r. oq
tH'—i
bfi
ta
cq
©                CO                       CO
r-1
cq
cq
T-i rH
fH
d
CO
©
1^
£
rH
OS    -
rH
rt
OQ
O0 rH© eo     ■
T-i
i-h ©© rn oo cq-rhcocq ©cq   •   •
t^      •
Th       •
OS    1
Th©       ■
Th
HI
rn eo
Th     ■
OS              © Cq              00       rH     -v   •
Th     ;
*>•   •
©
coco   •
rH
•  ©
■"*             Hi
cq   ■
eo                                    ;      •   •
O   03
—
'A                                                              •     ■
ty oq
r^H   ©
r>
rH
rH                                                                         •      •
00©©©©00">-'^©HHHco©>O->-r—nOaaOooooo^coeocoeocq^eoosooc
•3
©
rHoseor-ioorH©oo©^r>o©eoeo«ooo©rHos'0'5tt©rHeococoosrHCNi»o©
.">• © CO © © Th 1©         i-H © CO© CM 00 ©©!>•»© ©rHrHt--rH ©        t— rH © CSI OS ©
2  fH
rt   ©
. eo .t~ © cq cq 00 cq     cq •*>■ cq Th os t~ rn © Th © r-i oo     cqeoco     »© i-i -ch rn t-ho
1 co ©              t^               Th eo     eo          Th©     tU i-h     cq      ^tt     eo          »©     ©
eo
T-I
|
o 43
EH -2
bo
©
© rH                       r-1                       !>•                rH                       Cq                               rH         rH         Cq                rH
M3                                                         1
cq
fH
rH
©
•
00l>-ThrHrH©T-lrHrHThThCqaO00rH00rH0Sa^t--CqrHrHCqrHt-Th»©CqrH'«*
rH
03
i-h cq               cq               r^ cq     eo          rH©                   -^     Th     ^o          -&     Th
—*   ©
Th                  cq              cq
O   02
•.                                      —
ry   OQ
£-i ©
rH                                                             1—1
43
Ti
n   ■
c
d
/
a i
en     •
03
r-i
d   .
OQ   CQ43     •
• Sh
OQ     .
43
• rH
ei ©43    •
£_>
OQ  <"
fH
c
•3
bl
rt
.—
t
cc
4-=
• rH
t=
1
1
43
S
<
f-
<
xt
43
s
c
cc
-fl
•S
fH
•
rt
fl
i-<
rfl
OQ
•rH
+3
• —4
fH
«
•aM
Ti
fi
M
43
OQ
c3
H
rd
OQ
-fH
43
• rH
fH
rt
•rH
•3
rt
H
43
oq
ffl
rfl
OC
»—
43
• rH
fH
rt
©
CC
OQ
-r=
"3
tH
43
0Q
rd
OQ
•rH
43
.-^
fH
rt
od
Ti
rt
rS
'w
r-i
Ti
rt
"d
fa
OC
t:
rt
0!
I-H
CC
• 1—
•I—
fa
T.
1
1
i
1
cc
bl
fH
TJ
d
Ti
a
OQ
©
fH
DO
<
—
• r
^b
rt
r-H
•rH
s
fH
rt
0C
TJ
P
-^
M
>
a
1       '
.T.
• —
rfl
c
i
rC
c
1
c
rW
fH
o;
5=
c
P
Dutch East Indie
Dutch West Indie
ffl
ffl
rt
d
fH
fa
d
ffl
• -H
fH
<
rfl
ffl
d
©
fH
fa
i
1=
o5
fH
ffl
c
a      •
••ri
03
w
rt
rt
o:
s
I
ffl
HI
43
H
O
fa
d
05
©
rt
d
fH
fH
©
43
arH
Ti
* ©
6
©
*r*
X
©
2 42
CO
33
g
©
CD
+3
CD
aA
OQ
33
rH
03
d
• I-H
33
CD
r^
CD
-H
d
CD
J5
r—H
03
CQ
CD
i>
d
• rH
o
&D
03
CD
OQ
o
+3
d
CD
<D
-H
03
+3
OQ
>s
H
03
a
a
d
OQ
OS
CM
-3
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
OQ
rt
03
43
rt
O
ta
T-i
4
r-1
©
rt
©
03
Ih
rt
©
o
43
H
OQ
•rH
bfi
©
fH
co
cq
O
>©
©
03
OQ
©
CO
Th
rH
I
CO
rH
©
©
2 **
rt  ©
©-£
EH-2
bfi
©
t-L
oo
>©
00
©
OQ
03
©
>
CO
rH
T-I
©
Ti
©
2 C
d ©
O-P
EH-2
bfi
©
Sh
cq
rH-
eo
cq"
08
*y 03
£-i ©
r>
cq->•©©© oo
T*i©cq>©rHcq
l—i © ■rh © .-h »©
co ta oo
Th©
rH CO
cq
OS 00 © '
icqcq
T-I ©
T-H©
CO
OS 00
00 r-t
00 CO
<l>.CO
© ©cq
cot~cq
»© © rH
»©1©1>"*
T-i -rjl
cq
00©rH
©rH
rH CO
CO
!©ThTh COrHCO
cqcoio© oo cq
ta rH ThTh »©©
cq co
CO©Th
cqi©
cq
rH CO rH l© IO rH
cq cqt-
rH©
ed
03
Ti
fH
c3
fl.
>©
T-i
I
rH
©
Ti
©
2 *h
fl ©
043
EH-2
bfi
©
fH
ooeoeo©©©t^©
©eoosoo«ocq©-^t
1-HOOCqCOOOCOrHrH
i>-eo
cq
t+i cq •
eo»©'
ico>©
I rH 00
03
ry   03
r^aj   ©
r>
OrHlHOO-HrCNO
Cq rH rH r-l rH OS
y-i ©
cq"
Th
r-l
I
CO
rH
©
Ti
©
2 S
fl ©
©15
EH-2
bfi
©
fH
cq
cq
"Ch
©
03
OQ
©
>
ta
cq oo rn oot>-
©»©©©©
©t~©©©
eo*o Th eo»o
iHfflrHHN
■O^IOrHCO
cqcqrHrH
lHi>
cq"
©©©©eot^^too
0000©>-©Thr-iOOTh
©cirHcoioeoco©
icq-<h©Th©
I       OOCOt- rH
©
eo"
cq
© cq i© oo oo t— ■
eocqcq
oo
oocq©eo©   • >©
oocqcq oo--H   •©
t- © © rH©      «t~
Th-"-h cq COrH
cq cq i© cq
©
cq t- -* ©'oo
Thcqeo
oo
oo
CO
00
OS
eo
cq"
cq
cq-ch
©i>-
© ©
od©
cqcq
rHosoocqco»o©eorH
»© CO © rH © Cq © Th ©
O0©Th00OO»©r-»©»©
co © i© ta cq
rH Cq Th ©
oo
©
cq
r-i cq © co cq Th i
eocqcocq
©
•OCO© rH OS
t»OSCOrH»©
rH Th ©»© i—I
© ©oot^co
COrH©Cq
©
ta
co i© cq co Th
cq     ©cq
oscqt^ cq
oot-»© os
©©©!>•
TheOThed
t+i     t^cq
cq
co"
Th Cq©rH
Th     »©cq
Cq
rH
©
03 ©
fl ft
O   ©
EH oq
.1-1
bfi
©
fH
»©i©oeo»©cocqoscot~Ttioo»©
cq©©©©cq-chcq©rHThtr-©
eOrHiHN-#OrHNCOOOOCOrH
eo
eo©Th cq ©
rH ©      cq ©
cq
rHCq©CO
co     i-Hcq
oo
i©
©
03
CQ
©
>
rHr~lrHt^00©t~©'**tCqCSI©T*f
cq rn     ©co     eo    t>-cq
© Th
cd r-T
OQ O
© ffl
rt •■"*«—
d P" be 3
©•fl
fH
©   ©
lt.rfQS
©
d
02.2
•SQ-SEfa
HI
03
©
43
d
. 43
>>CQ
£*&
I ©
oooo
t-cq
00 CO
Th
cq
rH©
<h
©
rd
43
03
rt d
3 3
'3 8
oo
OQ  OQ   r
CO
co
lr-
TSj*"
iHN
X>.Th
cq eo
©t*
-tfcq
©
ta
co
cq"
cq
»©
Th
cq
i©
rH
©
©ThOSOO
CO 00 CO rH
eo©Th©
©co     ©
!»©
»©
©
co
*#oo
©os
cq eo
OOr-T
eoeo
OSi—H>-l©rHO0©Cq
©rHCO©ThrHrHCO
•© rH 1-1,00 ©cq-ch
©"    »©cq"cq"»©rH
©
HNiHfMiHNMH
c3
d
d
Ti
d
o
CQ
©rt
ol'WJ S
OQ
©
• rH
n
d
HI
43
03
©
^
d
-9
o
O
r-l©
cq »©
oocq
cq"
cq
CO
©"
co
cq
cq"
©
eo
©
eo
©
©
©
oo
i©
ta
©
©
>©
©
©
id
»©
©
cq"
©
»©
cq cq ©-t~- oo co oo
OS cq »© CO t~- 00 ©
eo co cq i^ rn co eo
»©Thcq
icq
Th
Th
©
cq"
eo
eo
rH Cq Cq rH rH rH rH _
cq
00
d<i
d
0Q««H
43^*
d ©^
CO  ©^r^
d
Ti
*.» Art 3 fee*-"3_ci    rt  -A.
art--^43r2rd grt   SlSrd   fl      "rd
s t h s p73US © jr-9.9 a *.a
OQ
©
•rH
Ti
d
HP
03
©
eo
os
co
cq"
00
OS
Th
©
cq
eo
od
eo
©
»©
ta
cd
oo
©
od'
d
43
o
EH
£3185 g^ g § gj fl g-c-C d § §rg I o KS g ^^ 3 S'SJ?   «^ K S
ZfafafartcCCQGQCQMpPcOrtrtWfafa
■+3 P«a
-   OQ  >> fl
d o bo©
© Safe
»H   P.E    O
CS-rHT
ft.**
*-trt
ffl  3
ffl M
ffl ©
© a
tn d
03
43
fH
O
P
©
fl
o
.r^
43
d
bfl
r>
d
rt
a
03
©
Ti
d
fH
E-t GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
43
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
d
rd
o
+3
OQ
33
•d
03
o3
<r-l
• rH
l—I
03
w
03
CD
t-i
+3
d
rf
o
OQ
•e
o
CD
rd-
+3
+3
03
CD
m
03
H
rH
CD
&D
d.
CD
CQ
0Q
03
o
• rH
+3
d'
03
03
0Q
d
c3
*H
H
O
>>
rH
03
d
OQ
CO
H
,-H
«
H
.
© eocq-    ©cqcq     Thcq ©     cq^co     cq ©cq     ©hn     eo»ooo     t--coco
0Q
co ta cq     t~oo<©     ihihn     oooo©     ©coos     oocq©     -rhoocq     ©os©
COCO CO        OS CO CO         © rH©        1© t© rH        OS CO CM         rH © rH         CO t- Th •      rH CO >©
fH
©
t5
a
w
rHCMTh        rHNCS        Thb-Cq        COThCOTrHCOThCqCO        Thr-ll©
fl
©
0Q
COrH^rh         COl-HTJh         rfl rH ©
o
rQ
43
fl
o
03
d
fa
© © If
>           rH © ©           O CO 00           t^t^Th           © l>- CO           © t— CO           -H 00 ©           OS © 00
d
© co a
d     ©Th-*     ©Th-*     cqeoeMcocqeocqcqcqco
r"
■1                        rH         rH         r-l
d
£
43
O
.
© ta t
h       «5h«
3        00 © Th        CO©©        ■**< •<*< 00        00 © 00       ©©>©        Cq rH COL.
FH
0Q
ta ■© r
h     © eo e<
3     eo>©©     cqior--     co^t©     cooeo     i©ocd     i—!•«,>»
fH
©
©OC
5       CO © C
s     ©©©     cot- eo j oooot-     t-i t- oo     cot~ co     ©Thco
VM
© CO p
3        CO k© Ol
D     eo eo ©     rn rh ©     icjihn     co© cq     ©coco     rHTh co
*
fl
t^  ThC
q     oo-<*c
q     © Th eo     cq rHeo     cq i-hco     eo     Th              »-h     t-i     rn
Ti
©
1"
H                               T-
H                      rH
rt
fl
03
0Q
d
©
rQ
fl
HI
fa
00©Tl
t     «>-»©c;
i     eococc
i      cq >© i>-      ©t^eo     t-i cq eo     i©©Th     c-q h eo
6
©*^t>
©t~r>
©t^t>
,         »©rH CO         Th rH CO        1© Cq t»         Cl         CO         CO rH tJI
r-
1                       r-
1        rH        r-
1
£
.
CJ rH C
5         ©TJIC
3        Cq©r-
h     cq © «
j     cqosr-
i     ©©©     cooo*-h     t>-©af-
03
ta oo c
5         I© b- C
5        ©-ch"1
5       O0t^>f
3       CO CO if
9     oocq©     Th oo eo     osoos
fH
©
Thcq t>
eo©c
i     ta     tt
j     ta ta r-
i     © cq c
I        rH © rH        © i© O        rH © ©
Ti
fl
bfl
d.
©
cq     c
i     cq     c
5       rH       r-
i         CO         ^
^     eo     n
■i     eo     Th     cq      co     -tfi     ta
fl
o
Xi
43
03
0Q
d
fa
rt
fl
o
©
t-eoc
>     i© i© oc
)     oocq C
>      t^eocr
)     ©coo
>     © © cq     .—i cq eo     oscqrn
N
•
rH        C\
1         rH         r-
1                        r-
i     cq     cf
>     cq     c
i     cq     eo     cq     cq     cq     eo
.ri
o
Ti
• ri
0Q
rQ
fl
t
£
3rWe?r*
oooa
)         I© OOC
>      ©cq C
i  t eococc
3            TfT+IO.
)   1  OOCOTj
1       ©     -O
>     cq cq Th
0Q
©ThC
:      © © cc
3       © CO c
.r       Cl ©c
1           © .© 1-
i   ' eoooc
1       »©
If
3     i-h cqeo
fH
©
bfl
eoThoc
)        Ot^OC
)     "* cq cc
)     ©t- c
3        00 ■* C
5         rHThCC
3        CO
cc
3         ©TH©
rt
rH©C
3       001OC
I             -r*l©©
i         rH© OC
)       >© COO
3         CO CO CC
©
o
>       rH       cq
o
Ti
fl
a
o
rQ            "
fl
1—1
d
©
OQ
0Q
d
fa
H.        C
1                        r-
4
cq     c
i     cq     c
i     eo     e<-
3
rH        -rH
OO rH O
>       t+i©h4
i     oooo cc
)       cq 00C
3        ON C
3         rH OOO
>       »©
tr.
)     cq -i-h eo
o"
rH CO h^
1      rH cq cc
1              rH c;
i     ta     cc
>     Th     te.
)     ta     tr.
)     cq
CN
i      co     eo
^
t~ cqo
1          UH OOO
>     cq eo»c
)        -oooc
.©co
i     0Q
rHNO!
)         rH©r-
H         rH CO t>
ThTj
i
■©o
>
•©©
fH
©
bfl
cq eow
}         COOCC
>          -*©T.
1
■ rH r-
i
•-ChTh
.
© cqr-
i         ©t~CC
>      eot^C
>
Ti
fl
(MrHTJ
i         OrHTl
*         h* rH CC
>
fl
©
fl
03
■
o
Xi
43
fl
o
OQ    "
d
fa
© CO CC
>     cq ©oc
)          ThThOC
)
■ rH r-
i
ThTl
i
rH r-
i
©CC
>
■t>-t^-
'rt
d
ooeor-
r-
i     oo-^tc;
1                        r-
1      ©The*-
1                        r-
>
1
. •
©
I
•3
•rH.
.
©t~CC
>     owe
)       OOTrhCS
1
co o-
3
©C
3
ThTt
i
CO CC
i
OS©
0Q
OQ
© ©c
)           Th COI>
eocq cc
)
■tate.
)
©O
>
rH r-
i
©c
>
rH rH
rQ
fH
ta eocs
i     cq oo c
)       COt^CC
)
©C
3
eocc
3
cqc:
i
t^l>
eoeo
fl
©
xn
^i
bfi
fl
oo co cc
© eoc
i     taoitr.
>         NMr
>     oo oo t>
i     cocoes
00 oc
)
00«
)
©cc
i
cow
i
ThTh
©
r-
1                        r-
1                      r-
1
fl
03
a
£
o
i d
rQ
fl
r-i
fa
©1©»C
CO »© OC
1       >© «© C
*^i>
©c
•
ThTf
©©
©©
•
OOThC-5
oo»©cc
1       © i© IC
rH r-
•
i—1 r-
'-£'
rH rH
O
r-
T—
r-
£
f-H       •
f-i     •
*H       •
fH
•
fH
fn
fH
•«
f-
•
©    .-
©  .-
©    a*
ffl   •
ffl       •
©     •
ffl         •
ffl .•
as
as
as
'as
as
as
as
as
Sum:
Wint
1911
Sum
Wint
1012
Sum
Wint
■1013
Sum
Wint
1911
Sum:
Wint
1012
g-gec
-H"H '"
^5l>-©
Sum
Wint
1011
Sum:
Wint
1912.
t^
CO
©
©
©
©
©
cq
CO
rH
©
©
©
©
©
i©
eo
rH
©
©
©
©
©
©•    .-*»>
i>-
"     00
©
©
©
ta
©
rH
00
©
©
O       a.
©
cq
o
©
lr.
■a
S.
«k
jjt
Bt
•«.
cq
l>.
ta
'ta
»©
00
©
»©
ta
Th
T-i
rH
rH
CO
t-.
00
fe5
#*%
«&
€»
e©
«r%
sfer
ss>
w
bfi
fl
v
TS^.
fl  OQ
t)
r—i  fn
ffl OQ
^
fl  0Q
• ri
©
fl
•rH    ajj
fH
->    P
03
fa
• rH
§a
H
|J"
fl
o
a«
d
• rH
03
2
flg
d £
Ti
d
"d
fl
d
rt •**
-    d
o
3
O
Q 44
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
33
•*S>
"ri
d
rd
o
+3
OQ
33
d
03
03
«+H
.t-I
i—l
03
hi
03
CD
t-i
+3
d
o
o
CO
+3
H
o
CD
rd
+3
03
CD
m
03
H
m
CD
d
CD
co
CO
03
PH
CD
• rH
-H
d
03
r-H
+3
03
CO
d
03
fH
H
<+-i
o
fH
03
8
d
OQ
CO
»3
H
J
I>.©t-
© 00 Tfrl       ©Cl
rH         UOrfa
i       i© © i©       ©©©       ©©OC
I>
t>
OQ
oo»© er-
1        rHt^OS         © 1© CC
>         !>-©CC
>       © COCO      r»© CC
>        CD h# —
os
os
fH
©
bfl
eo Th oc
CO © t>
i© t- c
I          COlHlf.
1         ThOTt
1       l©©>©
1       © 00 OC
eo
eo
0
»©cqt^
cqcq»©     eoThoo     ©>Oih     ©eo©.   ©i-hco    »©thi>
■i—i
T-i
rt
fl
i—1        rH        rH        rH        r-l        Cs
1
1       rt
©
fl
o
03
03
d
rQ
43
s
O
fa
b-TjIrH
© COCO
os coio
© © ©
ta oto
^<t t>- r—
cq>©i>
T-H]       •
rH
d -
IMrH Th
CO r-in*
cq tht|
MHrf
rHrHCq
rH        (M
rH         i-h
eo
CO
*
|
d
43
o
t- CO ©
ThCO*>
©©©
■© eo oo
HH r—ll©
© cq oc
OOOO©
cot^>©
EH
03
©i-HCN
ThCOI>
I© CO r-
>©eooc
©cq ci
co -H/i cz
© -HH r-
cq eoeo .
*H
©
©
eocq io
t^©l>
00 rH ©
T-iOi ©
cq cq h*
taoitn
CO © ©
cq eO»©
coco©
©©c
© cq cq
eo»© ©
eo*©oc
H* »© c
cq eo©
CD ©»©
Ti
a
a
rH         rH
CO rH Tt
Cq rH Ht
Mt-l-HH
rH         rH
rH        CN
rH         r-
rn   . cq
03
OQ
o
OS
#sgsslg"i"
rQ
fl
HI
fa
at-   "Ch   TH
CM COM3
©co>©
©©©
•© ©1©
T+H>- rH
co ta cc
rH CO ©
o
cqrtTfi
COrH Th
CqrHT}!
MrHTf
rH rHCq
rn     cq
T-*             TH
eocq >©
fc
2
t^ coco
CO 00tJ<
© Cq rH
•OOOO
!©©»©
©CO©
t^
t^
03
O0©00
rH t>-©
© ■©  ©
OO
©eoeo
at— © ©
©
©
§3
co©o
00©1>
»©t^cq
CD©
ThOTh
"   I©  ©  a©
CO
eo
©
•
bfl
i©     ©
cqcq»©
COH* cc
©eo©
CO rH 0C
rH     ■
rH
Ti
fl
rH        T-i
T—1        rH
rt
©
rt
OQ
TS
o
rQ
43
fl
o
03
d
fa
-
N'CNrH
©coco
© CO ■©
COCO
i©©i©
T*tt~rH
rH
rH
ffl
19
• rH
Ti
o
cq     co
CO rH Th
Cq rH-rh
rH rHCq
rH      cq
CO
eo
i
.rH
OQ
rQ
t^©i>
Theoi>
© © ©
5**^
T-H rr
Th rH »C
© cq oc
oo t> ta
fl
03
©oooc
"ChC©I>
taeO t—<
iS£
00 OC
©cq ci
CO-rHh c
cqeo©
CQ
fH
©
CO CO t-i
t~©i>
00 rH ©
ta ■©
cq Cq Tf
taaita
cq eo ta
fl
O
bfl
COrH I©
©©C
©cqcq
©©
eo»©oc
T*t>©C
Se
cd©»©
fl
©
03
T-i            TH
CO rH Tt
CqrHTt
T-l_        y—
rH          d
rn     cq
a
0Q
o
3
rQ
fl
r-i
fa
t^co ©
cq co »o
© © >©
00 OC
ta ©•©
TflNr-
rH 00 ©
d
cq     co
COrH Tt
CqrHT+l
rH rH Cl
TH          Cl
eocq >©
[*-i*>v'i-'
ThTh
»© CO  T—
© © OC
i    *"
03
»©l©
»>■ »© oc
©Thr-
fH
t^t^a
eo»©©
ii^'i
t
©00 OC
©
•
bfl
rH rH
COTh©
ta thi>
rt
fl
rH      cq
a
©
1     a
03
o
rQ
43
fl
o
0Q
d
fa
I
©©
©©©
■
cq»©t»
Ti
d
rH rH
eO rH h*
rH        t—
i
©
fc
• rH
rt
.rH
*
COCO
>© cq t^
co co cc
03
03
co eo
>©>©©
©Th r-
rQ
fH
coco
rH CO "3
© © CC
fl
©
m/i
«.     —
a.       •.
CQ
rt
fl
a
o
rQ
fl
HI
bfl
fl
©
OQ
0Q
d
fa
ThTh
eo©cq
eo     Tt
•
cqcocc
rH        1—
'v
rH rH
© i-h i—
CO I© OC
»
o
rH rH
•Si
COr-lTt
rH         t—
fc
f-
1      •
t-
1
£-
f-i      •
fr
I
f-i
f-
©   •
© .
ffl .
ffl     •
©   :
ffl
CD
. CD
a ©
ss
S ©
a ©
as
as
:   a.©
S 8
a"S«
S-rH r-
CQI>H
CQt>-r-
:  gq£S
rH 43
H-H r-
i   a d^
i  a««
13-iH r-
1         CQ!> r-
1         CQr>"rH
o
©
©
©
©
00
ta
cq
i—i
rH
«r»
o
i©
T—1
CO
rH
rH
o
cq
TJ*
Th
©
«r»
c
o
-rH
rt
OQ
rt
fH
-
©
• rH
©
rt
a
o
rfl
43
—i
..-1
Hi
©*
0
Q
fH
O
fc
03
fl
o   •
•rH
d
©
h)
43
CQ
1
©
43
"rH
rfl
d
03
•r-t
Ti
d
d   »
3
fl
•fl?
o
OQ
•rH
£
q
)
?
1 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
45
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
1,557
12
1,569
5,669
26
5,695
ta cq t>-
cq     cq
l© r-H CO
eo     eo
21,257
26,691
47,948
37,010
45,971
82,981
»© co eo
cq-ctn>.
-*© CO
ThOOCO
rH
1,557
12
1,569
5,669
26
5,695
»ocqi>.
cq     cq
i© t-i eo
eo     eo
21,257
26,691
47,948
37,010
45,971
82,981
TH CO©
«OTht>.
Th©eo
ThOOCO
rH
fai
ffl
a
S
43
rt
•rH
cq
rH
CS
CC
a
a
s
cc
fH
ffl
43
rt
•►H
eo
rH
©
rH
CQ
ciocq                  i©ooeo                  ©cqcq     t
th eo-#                  co co eo                  ©cqcq
»© ©I©                        t-rH©                         i© i© ©
OO ©00                          tH© t--                          hNO
»©cqt~               .  eocq oo                  oocq©
rH
rH 00 ©                               ©©©                               © © 1©
cqt^©                  th os ©                  eooocq
cq     cq                  cq     eo '                cq     eo
t~ »>- T
H                                     I© CO 00                                     1© rH CO
rH©C
q                   i©th co                   th cq eo
Th rH If
j                   t^t^Th                   eot-©
TH©.*>
co co eo                   cq i©co
j
t^00>f
s                  ooo©                  cqcqTh
rH         C
j                  iHHjq                  cq rn co
cq rH e»
3                                     CO CO r-
h                   © cq cq
»©»©c
3                      Thlr^C
)                   t"-eo©
Cl 1-1-4
t                             CSIrH^d
ti                  cq cq«©
tacoa
J                   -Hrieot"
•HH © CO
OSUSt
<                  »©cqt>
Th © Th
cq-cht"
i-H© l>
tscq ©
©t^CC
3                   cq coc
>                 •© cq oo
/
cq     c
3                           CO       Tj
i                                          T-i           T-i
rH-rJUT
3                          NCOC
3                               rH © ©
T*teoi>
eo eot"
© rH cq
rH         r-
i                                         T—1            T-
i                       „   t-I        rH
00 rH O
>    I                      l© rH cc
3                               Th © ©
rHTh tT
>                                 THt-OC
)                                     »©Th©
oot^w
3                            »©rHeC
3                               00 rH©
cq©«
3                               rH ■HH1C
)                               NCCrH
©-ChTJ
i                    t-i iocs
3                       00 © ta
rH        r-
1                               -rH         r-
1                                              T-i
cq ©C
i                  ioxcc
>                   cq © oo
t^©CC
I                               © ©CC
i                  eo eo ©
rH        CC
1                               rH        CC
1                               rH rH Cq
r^t^Tt
1                                  rH IO CC
>                                     ©Th©
rHNCt
>                                  -rH-rtlie
i                         V©C*J oo
cq i©t>
CO 1© r—
i                  it-cqos
©cq r-
1                                     © 1>- I>
i© i© ©
CqrH-ct
i                 cq thtj
i                  eocq©
jl
©T+tT*
cn t^o.
© ©CO
00 ThC
oo»©e«:
cot^©
T—
i                           i—
rH      cq
©  CO •©
-t                    © Cl cc
rH a© ©
© ©cc
-chTflOC
© t-- eo
tocoo
cq »© t>
■<*»©©
'  oo-©ec
»© Cq t^
-ch cqt^
OHJr
t- i© C
CO© ©
r-
r-
rH         rH
1
© rH r-
cotacc
O0©Th
co»©cc
00t^»C
co© eo
r—
T—
T—
i
CN
|
rr
43
fH
O
OC
*-
IT
fa
4-
4-
H
0
fa
rt
03
a'ifc
fH
c
fa
rt
05
>'Vt
rt
■ d
Ti
03
rt
rH
>iTi
XT*
rH
d cs
d o:
OS
rt d
cq*
•rH    B
eo
rt r-i
rH       *Sf'
r~i    S*
H
-3 od
rH
r-H    03
gg
s
wc
©
e3 43
Ti
rrl «8
^5 43
*«
rt o
fi o
rt
rn"   «cH
-h" ^EH
• d
e8 rt
d rt
o3 rt
ntre
Joh
ntre
Joh
ntre
Joh
o   •
o   •
C3     •
m
cc
\%
GO
i
H-i
l
03
rt
fH
fl
43
©
rt
rfl
03
a
03
©
43
CQ 46
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
• rH
co
rQ
d
OQ
d
oj
T3
CD
N
'B
•t-i
cc
rQ
d
CQ
cs3
H
+3
ft
• rH
rd
CQ
od
CD
+3
CQ
I
fH
+3
OQ
H
T3
id
CD
d
t>s
d
-o
fn
t-I
OS
■73
■73
d
d
CD
r-H
C\S
CS
O
+3
CQ
CP
rH
$
Pi
^
+3
CQ
■rt
id
IT?
OJ
p<
J,
fH
<D
Ph
CD
&fl
oS
U
CD
i>
OS
d
• rH
o
rd
CQ
CQ
O
• r-i
+3
CQ
• rH
+3
03
+3
02
H
03
a
rt
• rH
02
rQ
fl
CQ
■   s-
© ©.
IdrrH
-HTj
•HH    ©
/-, »rH       •
HO.
fH   fS'—t
N
H
d
43
O
tH
43
0Q
©
43
03
d
w
I
d  U
©   ffl
03   rt<
03
dirt
^ ©  •
**-! 'rH    a«v
O   fH.S<
r_    03  43
©   ffl
r-j    ©
>y   WD
d
43
o
tH
43
03
©
43
03
d
rt *■*
So.
a
O-rH    ri
fH     Ol
.       i-l --H
S d-43
fcj
d
43
o
tH
43
0Q
©
43
OQ
03
H
-e a
©
fH
fH
«*H
©
Oi
O
rt
OQ
©
fl
• rH
O
fH
H
d
©
d
4->
O
tH
43
0Q
©
43
0Q
d
H
fc°T!
43
43
fl
©
bfl
c3
fH
o
fH
©
fl
o
©
ffl
• rH
!>
fH
©
CQ
fH
03
|S
©
eo
43
a
©
CQ
©
eo
a
©
CQ
!©©©»©
t~ocqt^
CO CO rH CO
cq©cq©
CqrH©Tj4
"•ch©*"©.©"
i-h ^t cq r-i-
■HH I© I© CO
©
eo
% ©
Oi c
© fl
CQ •  r%
*©©©©
Jt»©00©
00 00 oocq
ci © cq «©
cq th cq©
Th OS H*Trh
rHT*icqi^
Th l© rH
©Th
00©
©I©
cq ©
•*oq
Thi*>r
©i—i
©©
cq»©
©•©
I© CO
•r-i eo
eoeo
rH 00
©©©©
©©OO
©©©©
©O©©
©©©>©
1© ta ta eo
©©
©©
©©
©©
©©
1© 1©
eo eo
©©
©©
©©
©o
©o
I© a©
eo eo
©eo©©
©coo©
©coo©
©00©©
©»©©©
©oToTt-T
CNlrH i-H rH
»©©
»©t~
I©
rfJ«
©CO
00
«!"»
I©©
J© t^
ta
rlHlH|C«
i©eo
00
oocq 00 00
CSNHifJ
•"Ch»© Th rH
©o©t-
CO CO CO©
t^cq ©cq
©Th
Theo
Th cq
>©Th
eoeo
©eo
rH rH rH rH rH N IN N rH l—I rH rH
COCO rH 00
©©-*©
t^ -HHTHrH
©ca^
rahs        rH|C*
cq COCO©
rHCM
cq eo eo»©
NMtHN
©©©©
COTjtCOt^
rH 00 CO 00
©Thcq©
rH ©
cotr^
OOt^
COCO
rHH^l
cqt~
0 00 o co
00 00 Th 00
t^COTh rH
!-HirtaH|«rH|-<aa
n|-*
cq© ©
CD © »© CO
cq co© eo
Th"3»©l©
•>-©©©
hNOh
t^JC^oocq
ta 1©
»©»©
»©Th
cq rH
cj ©
t-i©
t^t~ ■© cq
©Th>Q©
©"ch© rH
©Th rHI©
rH Cq rH ©
CO©rH CO
•^iThcqeo     eoThHjieo
cq ©
eo>©
oot~
rHCq"
©Th
eo-ch
©t^
I OO rHI©
I iHlr <CT
•HlM
CqrHt- O
cq
■«|HJ
10 © ©co
©-*t~r-P
©CO©rH
eoeorHcq
cq rHcocq
OOhhtH
cq©cq 00
t-jjcoco
t~©
©cq
©00
-#©
t-- CO
rH©
• eo|HJ,
cq oo»©Th
co© 00 00
©O©©
co co »© eo
eo rH © cq
©© 00 »©
1© i—i
eoeo
00©
cq 1©
©©
t^oo
cq
cq
OiOOifJ
©eoThcq
co © © ta
©»©© ©
01000
ifJ-*ir;N
»©->.©Th    Tht~r~-«tf
©»o
T*<«©
•*©
COrH
eooo,
COrH
t— cq
00-ch
«© CO-i—I •HJ
COMMN
rHCO O ©
©©rH ©
•cq
eocot^ ©
Tht-l>-OS
©»©!>©
eO00J>Tc©
-*CJ ©rH
NrfliHM
»© i©l>©
*t H^l ^aj ^a
eo >© co 00
OO rH rH l©
r>.Hrf.eo©
ccTeoeorH
>©l©ThTh
Cq rH coco
cq eo©»©
cq^Th-^cT
00©
t^oo
©©
cT
oocq
t^©
©CO
cq"rH
rn Th co cq
Tjit^i>-cq
© •©  CO CO
Th r-Tcocq*
t^ t^cqcq
CO-HH|r~ 10
t*ost^»©
rH »© © ©
^-©ThCO
© co 00©
co©©t»
cq cqcq co
1© 1© © >©
1© © a© CO
eoTjit^co
MtHtJIiH
cq co
©CO
coco
cq-chcocq     cqeoeocq
ta eo
aota
t^ta
•©cq"
Tjicq 00 cq
Oi   eO  •©   ■©
©©CO-*
©"■i©~i>ri>r
CO CO >© CO
©cq©eo
eo© ©Th
■^Tcocoi©""
N00OM
cq cq © i©
>©Th © —I
cqcq cqcq
tJI»©       ©N
cq ©©©
H|MrH|«
cq©"#oo
TjlThTh co
©
fl
fl
d
o
cd
• ri
ffl
d
fa
fl
d
O
rt
fH
o
rt
d
O
©
©
• rH
>
fH
ffl
CQ
CQ
GQ
rt
d
ffl
©
O
rt
e5
d
fa
rt
d
O
©
rt
fH
©
43
OQ
©
rfl
ffl
rt
d
COt^ Th»ft
©coco co
©t^oo cq
co eoeo-*
»©eo co 00
cqcq cq i-h
O
o
>s
rfl
43
03
03
d
fH
fl
fa
d
43
• rH
fH
rt
43
d
©
fH
rt
d
d
d
rt
d
d
O
03
43
.rH
tH
ffl
43
d
©
<H
o
Ti
rt
03
d
Ti
03
rt
d
O
03
43
• rH
Pi
rt
43
03
©
1-1
o
Ti
c
d
d
Ti
03
rt
. d
O
d
43   .
'S *
rt-e
43 .a
e3>
rl_,
ol
Ti*
d **
^ a
§d
o
o
h1
Ti
u
X
03
d
H
rt
rd      .
o c
*-> o
•Ti
43 w
GQ
fH
©
43
rt
fl
d
03
§ a
rt
d
©
©
.Q
©
3
a
Ji   tH
03 ©
•© "tS
Sh   0Q
43   ©
a-43
O ffl
Ti
fi
03
X
03
fH
©
43
fl
Ti
fl
d
©
d
W
|t a
O   03   fl
^> ©CQ
rfl
•   ffl
43   W
GQ
Ti
fc
03
fl
rflr-H
o o
H) O
a
•   fH
43    ffl
GQ >
*Hl
•th T3
'■b a
fH
©
43
d
Ti
d
d
fH
©
fl
OQ
H
rn cq eoTh
T-i rH rH rH
© © © os
rH cq COTh
rH rH rH rH
© © © ©
CO*
rH y-i
OS©
COTh
rH rH
©©
rHCq COtJI
i-H rH tH rH
© © © ©
rH cq eo-*
rH rH rH rH
OS © © ©
rn cq eo*
.rH rH rH rH
© © © © SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
25,000 00
23,660 71
25,000 00
20,312 49
3,000 00
6,000 00
6,750 00
3,000 00
8,250 00
9,000 00
11,625 DO
8,250 00
i-i
oo©i>.eo
CO COrH »©
v                 rH
•H
t>- ©t- ©
CO Cq rH rH
•  rHrH
•eo
■Th
■ rH
nfHIrHKT
fc~Th Tjl©
O  •©  ©  00
©©«©©
•hh >© ta cq
Wl'aairHlCIHiN
TrhrHcqcq
•
©©»© ©
cq co© ■©
COCO COrH
r4n
eo eocq eo
rH I© Th 00
t^Tjt© ta
rH rH
rH|C*                Hteai
rH»© Cq rH
1—1
rH rHCq
«{•#
»>.©©©
cq i© eo*o
cq ©cq»©
voVT-C©
© ©Th cq
CO COrH oo
cqoooo©
eoeo-^Th
OS © OOOO
cq t~eq cq
ta co oo as
t>>© ta eo
NOSfflrH
Jt-©H*0O
■hj t~ eoeo
rH rH rH rH
cq »© rH OS
©eo©cq
©i>.cq»©
eO rH CSI rH
Ott, cota
«310"*N
1>- CJ COrH
eo«©»©*o
NrHNCS
© Th cq ©
H# © © CO
■HHTt co cq
co co ■© CO
cqcqcqcq-
-ctico©-*
r**
rH CCI >Or4
rH rH rH rH
d
D
>
rfl
43
•rH
£
03
OQ
©
rt
fH
3
fa
i
6
O
a
• i-i
rfl
03
a
d
©
43
CQ
fH
©
43
OQ
a
p
•r-
H
rt
c
oc
T
C
C
P
St. John, Halifax and London.
Summer and Winter.
St. John, Dublin and Belfast.
Winter.
o
bl
03
05
(—H
o
Ti
rt
03
rt
rd
o
»-3
43
0Q
T-i
rH
©
i—1
cq
T-i
©
rH
co
rH
©
rH
Th
rH
©
1—1
■i—i
rH
©
rH
cq
rH
©
rH
CO
rH
©
rH
T*«
rH
©
rH
rH
rH
©
cq
rH
©
rH
CO
rH
©
rH
Th
rH
©
1 48
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
TaiBLE  25.—Ratios,  Westbound  to  Eastbound,   Transatlantic Passenger  "traffic  at
Canadian Ports.
Line.
Season.
In
Subsidized
vessels.
In Non-
subsidized
vessels.
Total
passenger
traffic.
Allan Line, including the two Empresses.
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter .
Total	
1911
1911
1911
1912
1912
1912
1913
1913
1913
2-34
2-71
2-45
2-53
2-34
2-46
2-04
2-26
2-10
4-63
33-62
7-61
3-41
8-60
4-57
2-92
106-77
6-21
2-52
3-40
2-77
2-65
2-58
2-59
2-07
2-56.
2-20
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer,	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
1911
1911
1911
1912
1912
1912
1913
1913
1913
6-03
11-63
6-77
6-52
11-95
6-89
10-40
3-78
8-91
6-03
1,006-62
1,006-62
25-26
8-73
6-52
»
204-63
204-63
6,214-00
6,214 00
35-89
8-78
10-40
10-53
10-43
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
1911
1911
1911
1912
1912
1912
1913
1913
1913
f 214
3-65
18-81
18-81
4-72
■V*
2-98
2-83
013
2-36
2-47
2-70
2-49
3-90
2-83
mm
8-70
8-70
3-18
2-92
2-47
2-47
2-47
2-53
2-49
Summer	
Winter... i%j,
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
1911
1911
1911
1912
1912
1912
1913
1913
1913
2-39
3-36
2-58
2-20
2-56
2-30
2-39
3-36
2-58
2-20
2-56
2-30
202
2-05
203
2-02
10-82
10-82
3-08
2-27
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
19J1
1911
1911
1912
1912
1912
1913
1913
1913
206
1-72
1-95
2-21
2-97
239
206
1-72
z
1-95
2-21
2-97
2-39
2-12
M   216
2-14
2-12
2-16
2-14
 , 1	 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
49
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
Table  25.—Ratios,  Westbound   to  Eastbound,   Transatlantic  Passenger  Traffic  at
Canadian Ports—Continued.
Line.
Season.
In
Subsidized
vessels.
In Non-
subsidized
vessels.
Total
passenger
traffic.
Miscellaneous Lines	
Summer.	
Winter	
Total	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
1911
1911
1911
1912
1912
1912
1913
1913
1913
11-61
11-61
18-30
13-65
2,224 00
30-55
6-52
176-57
14-57
18-30
[fflljggr:
13-65
2,224-00
30-55
-  I
6-52
176-57
14-57
All Lines       	
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
Summer	
Winter	
Total '
Summer	
Winter	
Total	
1911
1912
1911
1912
1912
1912
1913
1913
1913
2-34
3-60
2-72
2-54
2-99
2-70
2-04
2-48
216
3-50
5-46
3-90
3-46
6-28
4-06
5-58
27-46
8-36
2-92
4-29
3-27
3-02
4-07
3-34
2-72
4-56
3-19
142—4 f
1
50
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
CD
o
• t-i
I
x>
GQ
P«
• rH
xi
cp
1
03
CD
+3
m
Ti
<0
N
CO
1
i>s
rQ
<D
• t-i
rH
t-i
c3
O
r£
bo
.t-t
<D
U
Ph
«f-i
o
t>3
H
c3
*3
OQ
CD
m
oo n ■* oq © eq ta
■*
eo t-i -h-i t» os i^ xa
.   OS
OOOOONON
t^
-*OSt-
Hr>         -+3
O •* co h* co eo •*&
N
OS eo O cq >0 eo eo
"i*
rH OO CO CO 00 OS t^
cq
•^■**tcq
Nl>0©0®-tji
N
-* co cq co oi -i os
■*
CN rH CO CO CO O cq
rH
N^lrH
60     ©rt
OOOOaOOOaOlO
N
eo os-* eo i-h o cq
00
O0 rH CO CO CO CO rH
CO
Ir^OOco
*
®^h  rt  Q
>Ti ffl.s
03          02   g
§    §8
NNrHMUjeOH
o
U) N © ^t >0 rH iH
rH
CO t» O rH cq 00 rH
IO
OHIO   .
rt
+3
O
th     cq        -cq
00
eo     cq          cq
O
rH
cq     cq         rH
t^
COON
rH
1  a
|
CqiaOaaOH*         • IfS CO
•*
i-h os on   • eoeo
CO
0»0 os cq    -eoeo
00
•HHCO00
OSCq -*rH     -
cqo
o
©TfiON     ■
COOS
eo
ONifiiO     -
ON
CO
oeoco
■
OSN rH-HH      ■
-*oo
ta
rn cq coos   •
ta i—i
■*
OS COCO rH      -
OrH
Cl
»o^t cq
2    iH"*3
rt 3 rt
^^   BD   C3
OO eO ■*
iota
eo
eoosH*t»o   •
©CO
OS
IQHIO
CO-*
o
CO OS O
N nco
eo
ta
©UJ^lH     ■
os
t~
eoeo eo
t~
T-H
IfJNiH
OS©
a
rH
eo
cq
cq
eo cq cq
'a
-t3
O
to cq os co co n cq
o
iocq-* oos-*tos
co
OS CO t^ 00 t> •*# rH
OS
o coos.
EH
rn cq oo cq co co-*
n
eo rn ta tata co co
00
HrHNNCOQOO
»o
NXiO
_u
cqooocqocqeo
cq
co i-h oo eo Os eo t^
OS
CO 00 OS rH CO O rH
00
cqosoo
§5
o.SP
•>* cq o o os ta os
r-1
OOCBNiHCSO
00
cq os O eo eo eo t~
ta
rH oo »o
o     ta cota o»
ta
C3S <M rH Cq IO rH
ec
O       NrlNH
■**
lOCC^
rH         rH
■*
cq     cq         t-i
i>
Cq        rH               rH
»o
•Hlt^lO
FH©
to    -»Qeo    • ^H co
->*
OtHtH     -     -OO
»o
*>-rH->.©      • rH Cq
»Q
Ttnata
*
•
ta
1QCO
lOH
rH
rJIIQIQ
oo eo
oc
OrH OUS
ooo
o:
rH coos
e—^s—N^^
rt
*»»"l
©
eo
T-i
cqcq
o
eo»oo
cqeo
T-H
Cq-rHCO
00 CO
l>
OHN
eo ta co
r/i   *<     ^
r.
.       •.       •.
r.
—             «.
■          ..    —    ••
eo-<jieq
bfl
2 fl-e
rt   03   rt
■«*
N
ci
tj*     cq
rH
OS
cq
ec
CMOS CO
•   •   •
• -H
rH
! cq
cq
NON
tH
O   03   ffl
rH rH
o
GQ
©
+3.
03
1?
EHga
CO
•H< rH OS -HH CO
i>
cq oo co rn i>- co oo
CN
■HH rH OS CO CO rH -H^
CN
t~- cq cq
rHNN
CQ
•*
•^CftrHNCC
cc
CO Cq rH Tjl rH O Oi
ec
eo ■«* »o ta t~ oo -*
OC
i     co coco
ta tJ*i>.
-fi.
">4t
eo     cqNoc
e
cq co ■<*! cq »o o h*
cq
. ta io oo •>* co oo cn
oc
OCqoO
©-*©
rt
Srd
rt bfi
Si
ta
HrJI           Cq VO rH
c
o     eo     cq oo
»c
ocqeo     rHcq
-*
oto"-*
cq-*oo
©
+3
• IH
rt
P
CO
co
1  oc
ta     i-h
t>
•eo                  t-h
to
00N»©
oco»o
rH
©lOOOO     'HC
cr
rHiijCBN    • eoec
T—
eoTftcq cq    -oo^t
ec
o th eo
*
I
eocq os i>
no
o.
IMCBON
M3CC
OC
OS C0«0 O
oot>
i>
OOON
*"*•*—.^•*
©
eo NO eo
rH IC
-et
to eocq os
cq»c
<N
eo cq corH
■rHOC
-H'
i     H*cq ■*
Cq iottJI
rt
*i-4
03   5h +3
rt ^ B
^ s a
OSCOCO        'if
tata
-*
rHCOCqUS
oscq
c
MrHIO
cqec
ec
■«*t OeO
Mirjtv
«5t>"5
co
cc
©lOrjHrH
00
l>
eoeo eo
t^
C
eoNO
N os cq
bfi
rH
cc
$5-
CN
CM
eocq cq
oo oo os
•i-4
N_a-W^ '
o
rt
•5
a
,
OCqiONNNCS
cc
eo -^jt ^t os cq oo >—
T—
>o cq oo ta t>- eo i>
1>
eo rn jc^
aeoeq o
rt
03
N cq ■* eo i-h eo N
ec
r^ oo -hh o •**! cq -r*
(N
00 It-rH Cq rH O >C
t>
eocqb-
NOIO
+3
N o cq rn oo Tft N
CO
o i> Tt< rn tji eo cq
1>
it» cq i-h i>. o cq oc
a
i     cq t» os
NO-*
rt
2r£3
rt   bD
O-rH
r.  ©
oo cq eo o eo os N
•\—
O OS eO t^ OS rH O!
ec
iHNrHUJlOO«
c
>        rHCO O
>« tJHN
c3
eo     rHcotooo
N
■H^ rH O Cq Th rH
cc
l>-         CO rH CJ O
o.
NOCB
O COOS
o
rH
cc
cq     cq          rn
ec
rH        rH                rH
-^
1       COCO h*
Noseo
'o
J       •
cq CO-nJt
cq eo-*
rH rH rH
rH rH r-1
-f3
03
• rH
'o
+3
•
9 OS OS
OS OS OS
■ 'o
rH rH rH
rH rH rH
PQ
03
• rH
tH
+3
03
•rH
Ti
PQ
-H
PQ
rt
c3
Ti
rt
Ti
r—H
O
o
03
rt
03
\
a
*H
©
>
•rH
1
o
rt
O
P.
ftH
©
•I-I
'A    rl
o
+3
i—■
o
o
ft
(H
©
r>
•I-I
o
rO
+3
•*
<
1
5
o
•-9
u
rt
r=H
O
*-9
t<
rt '
xi
*H
H>3
©
1
1
H
•+3
CQ
©
03
©
-t3
02
o
H»
©
+3
03
a
©
<
0
3
Ti
ti
S3
©
rd-p
©  OC
rt 05
. rt
o
'.Ti
CQ
H
«8
•iH
►—1
rQ>
©
rCl-*
ffl a
rt ec
1
1
. rt
o
rt
Ul
rd+;
o m
si ce
fl
O
Ti
rH
0
m
03
©
a
rt
rt
e3
bfi
• rH
03
*rH
•rH
Wc
© g
X2.C
" o3£h
.JsJ  ©
>^rAH^
ll^Sb
i o * a
» © rtjS
. rt
• o
:h1
rt
'   fl   er
o3 o;
i««H   *-
e<
'  J
E-
03^3
^ ©
^rAi   %
• © rt J
•rQrd^
■ rt
• o
•Hi
M
'   rt   ^
o3 *
<H    J-
0
1
X
03
*TH
irH
rSN
©  it
r0 2
0323
« ©
ii^ga
© a a
© fl «
. n
■ o
'h1
Ti
Ld et
o3 «
«*H     f-
oc
1
a
e
H
rt" 3 rtrrt 03
r-H    03—H        r                r   CC
•
-H    C3 —1        I-S        -   «
5rt c§g|tgrt
r-H    C3 r—H        r                rfl!
o
{H
bfi
©
03
r-H
fl
o3 ™ e3 rt fl rt ,*
© * grrtrrtrc; «
i3«Si3 o o o^
rt^d rt"-3^^ g
os ". os rt rt rt „,
»h eo iH'T'o'Srt
+s«a +3^ o o j
rt3 rt^^1^ e
03 "* e3 fl rt rt rf
^3«Si3 o o ols
As aHit-st-s *
§rTH§CQCQCQC
o3
o
'a
H3
O
+3
+3
O
EH
SrUScQCQCQC
r?WI§.GQCQGQC
'l
cq
CO
-*
<
1
rH
rH
rH
1
9
OS
OS
OS
>
H
T—
r—
IH
03
+3
(H
O
ft
©
rt
©
©
rH
©
a
a
o
O
Ti
fl
03
©
Ti
03
fH
EH
03
H3
o
©
bfi
e3
+3
fl
©
©
ti
©
fH GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142
51
Table  27.—Cargoes, Inward and  Outward,  at  Montreal—Tons   Measurement  and
Weight.
INWARD.
1911.
April  	
May *   [[   .. 156,992
June  96,364
July  124,380
August " ,  100,863
September..    .. 102,071
October  146,2i06
November  125,383
December  	
Total  852,259
1912.
1913.
• • • •-«*•
14,001
143,063
148,882
76,143
110,914
109,004
140,708
108,262
102,144
109,925
94,2.53
105,358
109,284
136,142
108,042
787,897
828,228
OUTWARDS.
April ^  	
May  215,130
June  212,93>8
July..   .. .-  207,710
August  197,611
September  189,272
October    .. 217,651
November ».   .. 193,254
December $  5,253
Total  1,438,819
3,581
234,056
293,712
247,749
326,163
207,952
290,219
243,124
303,017
220,149
272,401
243,136
244,667
255,405
267,091
14,627
—
1,666,198
2,000,851 52
m
r&
0
GQ
n3
CD
• rH
H
rH
c3
O
SP
CD
O
03
t-i
O
t>S
H
03
pi
OQ
00
1-3
CQ
■<
H
GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
8 GEORGE V, A. 1918
w
u-
o
a
■ 03
CD
+3
CQ
■rtJ
CD
0Q
r^
m
"d
c3
-d    fc
CD      i-h
I  <
■■a   rt
o
m
<
rH
O
CQ
i
§
CQ
OX)     CQ
fH **
03
Q
H->
o
tH
N lOiOCOeOCO
N irj >0 CO 00 CO
t>> cq cq •^jh co rn
*-h oo •* ta ta ■*&
NONHN©
Oio-HHoeqi©
Tjl rH ^1 rH CO rH
■*oeqeo
O-rJt Cq rH
■*ooeq
OH
eoeo
COrH
OOtHO
eooooo
-*090
ta co
<*o
•HH  T-H
loequoeo     eoeo
-* o rn oo T(t eo
os ohn r-i cq
OS©WO-*N
©MlOOHH
N rH cq CO-^t 00
co o oo cq ooo
i eo
eo-*
cq ta
Till©
OS
-*
o
ON
00 "5
ooo
»©
rH
OO
cq-*
ON
OCO
-*o
ON
00 rH
eo-*
OrH
-*0
oeo
oo ta
rlH
too
Cq Tjl COrH
ioh     -*eo
oeo     co oo
cq
-*rH        N O
e3
O
rQ
fl
Ul
i
fl
o
fc
o
CO
00
00
CO
00
00 00-HH
00 CO CO
os -hh eo
rHt»HI
cqeoN-
OrH CO
-HH OSCN rH
oeocq co
-*->*oeo
oeo
eoeo
eocq
OW*N
co co o co
•*-*oeq
ta
iocq
■*n
-fta
ta-r-i
eo-
•*
o
o
eo
N
CO
CO
cq
oo
H*H©
rHN
-*o
HN
ocq
co
eo-*
cq ta
-*i©
cq
T-H
CO
ON
CO-*
ooo
eq-*
eo
eo
n
eo
NO
coo
oeo
OO       rHCO
-HH O        ON.
con     OiOi
cq co
OrH
OrH
o
o
00 CO
co-*
COrH
CO
rQ
rt
CQ
co>o n o cq eo
o ta ioon eo
o cq cq oeo rn
cq oocqNrHTjT
oo«o ■*•© os
cq ta io -* ta ta
COrH COrH »© rH
T-H
cq
CO
N
CO
o
-*
00
00
N
cq
o
rH
co
co
rH
N
ta
«.
a.
•>.
rH
rH       *.|<
T-H -
5°
tH
©
fl
H3
rCj
till
• rH
'. ©
tH
tH
Xi
fi
m
a
o
fc
CO
ta
o
o
cq
rQ
fl
CQ
at
u
©
ti
©
bfl
rt
©
at
02
o3
Ph
rQ
fl
CQ
i
o
fc
eo
rH
O
N
>"*
00
O O CO
ONeo
Neoeo
os eoeo
•*HI>
CM rHrH
o ooo
CO ooo
eoNo
Cq rHN
NttJO>
CO      ■*
eo
rH
cq
eo
eo
eo
*a
eo
N
-*
cq
-*
n
•*
S3
o
o
o
eo
co
rH
o
HON rH
Os co »o co
rH-*00CO
ncoion
os co ta co
o o co cq
uo
U0 f-H
eoco->
iO CO
oocq
cq*c<f
ion
cq»o
eo t-i
-*
o
o
CO
n
CO
00
N
o
o
eo
cq
oo
io
cq
co
co
•■*
CO
-*
eo
eo
N
eo
•*
CO
o
Neo
eoeo
ON       -!t«CO
•HH rH rH CN
con     eoeo
COCO
HO>
-*o
cq
oocq 0^<
•H-l rH OOt-la
o eo on
cor-T eocq
cqeo
eqN
cq oo
ooo
rHCq
rHCO
c<feq""
cq
rH
CO
CO
eo
N
CO
cqo
coo
oeo
cqeo
OrH
OO
-HH©
MN
OrH
o
o
rHCO
ON>,
oooo eo
CO-*
O0 rH
CO
eo
eo
eo
i©
i©
-*l©
rHN
HHO
rHN
tH-HH
ocq
CO
-jf. rH
ooo
cqeo
eqi©
eocq
t~-*
t^N.
eoeo
coco
eoeo
rH O
■*o
ON
•*r-4
CON.
Ncq"
■* rH
oeo
COrH
■«*• 00
rHCN
eoeo
O-*
O0 rH.
ON
eocq"
rQ
rt
CQ
coioNoeqeo
OWOOft CO
ocqcq oeorH
cq 00 crNrHTlT
OOtQ^iOO
cq io ta •* io >o
CO rH CO rH »C) rH
rH
cq
eo
o
CO
UO
N
N
CO
o
o
N
rH
eo
■*
CO
CO
eo
o
CO
-HH
N
eq
o
eo
o
O
rH
rH
eo
eo
rH
eo
N
CO
rH
N
ta
o
cq
IO
o
—
«.
«.
«h
..
*■>
rH
rH        fig
T"1    IPS
rH
rH
i-H
R
O
at
03
©
CQ
rHrH cq cq co eo
rH rH rH rH rH rH
Oi OiOi Oi OiQi
cq^cqE^cqE^
rH rH Cq Cq
rH rH rH rH
OOOO
co eo
rH rH
OiOi
CQr^CQr^        CQ^
rn rn cq cq eoeo
rH rH i—1 -i—I rH rH
OS O O O OS OS
COr^CQr^CQr^
rHCq
rHrH
OO
CO
rH
o
CQCQ     CQ
OiOi
cq cq
rHrH
OO
COCO
rH rH
OO
CQfc^     CQ^     CQ^
>t
Ti
•rH
03
rQ
rt
CQ
cq     n     eo
UO       CO       rH
o     eo
rH,     N
O       00
00
o
ta    cq    n
eo    io    ■*
N       N       00
o
o
o
o
o o
o o
o    o
o
o
o
o
o
IO      iO
IO
ooo
ooo
o O IO
io o cq
cq    o    eo
co    o
©
fl
Ol
©
a>
at
©
tH
a
H
o
is
©
rfl
Hr>
bfl
B.
•o
9
*©
fl
B
03
©
cd
.rH
©
c3
P-<
rt
.*
'O
s
<3
o
fl
Q
©
B
O
o
cq
o
IO
eo
go
oo.
oo
oo
oo
o-*
oo
ocq
oo
oo
oo
oo
oo
tata
co-*
io co
CO"*
lO-*
CO'*
fl
o
• I-i
§
• iH
a
o
Q
tH
o3
H>»
GQ
H>5
• rH
. xi
9
fl
rd
Hj*
g
3 GEORGIAN BAT CANAL COMMISSION
53
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 142'
■^-Noooeq eq
Cl •* T-H CNI r-H o
-* co eo •* cq co
io-*cq oo io ■*
Ncocq —h ©so
OOrHOHINN
■*-*Neoeo
00 O N CO O
CO OOO o
eONioicio
rH CO O O O
N-*COrHO
-*       IO
co
coco
T—i T-H
T-i  O0
CO rH
T-H rH
CO o
oo
ocq
rH OS
NO
'COCO
T-*tM
OOO
cq cq
N©
co -*
N CO
rHCq
cqeo
eq
00 N
eq
co o
eo
eq
■*
»o
N
00
oo
rH
CO
eq
eq
CO
cq
rH
eq
to
o
N
•*•* f- coco
00 O N CO O
CO oooo
MNieiO©
t-h eo o o o
N idOOHO
l©       CO
coco     oo
CON        rHCO
CON       O ■*
eq i-h
coco
n cp     oo eo
" r*     cq o
hh     eqeo
S:
oeo
ta co
IOO
CO
eq
NrH
eq
N
-*
•00
:-*
■00
• 1-1
o
eq
-*
oo"
rH
-*
cq
O
CO
-*
os
N
UO O ON CO-*
CO-* OO NO
eq o eoeo eoeo
oeo OrH eooO
t-h cq oeo ih©
eoeo ta rn eocq
I©-* NO* ON
N
-*
00
oo
o
eq
-*
CO
eq
o
CO
-*
o
N
00
o
eo
co
eq"
n-*     ON
NrH       -*CO
con     con
co co
rHCO
-*rH
NrH
-*cq
ON
Cq rH        CO rH
H*eooo
•*OOrH
O O CO
eftoeo
•*t^.eo
lO       o
cq
eo
OiOi cqeo
eqeo coo
t-h htjh eo cq
IO CO cnTthh"
rneo eq eo
N O rH CO
O Cq"rH
t-h rH cq cq eo eo
l-H T-H T—I   T—I T-H  T—I
OS o O O OS OS
CQr^CQ^GQr^
rn r-i cq cq eo
rH t—I rH T—I rH
OO O O O
CQr^GQJ^.CQ
OiOi
eq eq
rH rH
OO
o
o
o
o
o
o
ooo
o   ,o    o
O      O      •©
CO
co
eo
§
e3
©
ti~
$
at
m
fl
o
©
I
r-H
©
©
c3
-»3
O
E-*
Ti
fl
63
U
o
-*
cq
-*
CO
rH
CO
CN      •
rH      •
O-* eooi©
COOOONN
00 O O 00 eo
•*■*
OO
NCO
coo
"*•*
coeq
oeo
-*N
eqeo
uo
N
CO
eq
eq
eo
iO    •
os   •
N    •
CNNCOO-*
co eo eocq co
co-*eqrHO
eqeo
eo io
oo-*
coo
oeo
ocq
rH CO
o-*
OOrH
T-i
•rH     •
eq     eo.   t»i
iO   •
CO
CO
rH
■*eo
rH eO
eocq
o-*
coco
OlO
COCO
coco
coco
ioco
ooo"
IO rH
N00
COrH
COCO N O OrH
o cq ioeo uo-*
oeo cq o in eo
eq"o cq"oT eq^jH
oeo uo co co o
eqeo i© •* con
coco eo-* eoeo
eoeo
T-H T-H
oo
CQr^ CQ^ CQr^
NO
IOO
N •*
COO
CO O
COO
OO
TH uo
ocq
CO-*
N-*
00 cq
tHIO
coeq
T-H  T-H
OrH
INN.
N
NCO
CON
N
ON
ON
O
(2
xi
CQ
a
03
CQ     

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.chungpub.1-0056475/manifest

Comment

Related Items