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MINISTRY OF EDUCATION of the Province of British Columbia One Hundred and Seventh Annual Report JULY… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1982]

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 E5TRY OF
:ation
of the Province of British Columbia
One Hundred and Seventh Annual Report
JULY 1, 1977, TO JUNE 30, 1978
Minister of Education
Province of British Columbia
  To the Honourable Henry Bell-Irving
Lieutenant-Governor for
the Province of British Columbia
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the One Hundred and
Seventh Report of the Ministry of Education.
Dr. Patrick L. McGeer
Minister of Education,
Science and Technology
  TABLE OF CONTENTS
PERSONNEL
7
FROM THE MINISTER
13
SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
17
DIVISION OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
17
School Programs
17
Curriculum Development
18
Learning Assessment
18
Examinations
20
Consultative Services
20
French As A Second Language
21
Educational Support Services
21
Special Programs
22
Communicatively-Impaired Programs
22
Indian Education
23
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
23
Provincial Educational Media Centre
23
Correspondence Education
24
Publication Services
25
DIVISION OF FIELD PERSONNEL
26
Field Services
26
Teacher Services
26
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
29
POST-SECONDARY DEPARTMENT
31
DIVISION OF PROGRAM SERVICES
31
DIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION
32
DIVISION OF MANAGEMENT SERVICES
33
COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES
33
Academic Council
35
Occupational Training Council
35
Management Advisory Council
35
UNIVERSITIES
37
Universities Council of B.C.
38
DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY SERVICES
39
DIVISION OF FINANCIAL SERVICES
39
Ministerial Finance
40
Schools Finance
40
Post-Secondary Finance
40
Student Services
41
DIVISION OF FACILITIES SERVICES
42
Schools Facilities
43
Post-Secondary Facilities
44
Educational Data Services
45
Publications Available
47
Information Services
47
Library
48
Metric Conversion
48
RESEARCH SECRETARIAT
49
STATISTICAL TABLES
51
Art work in this report is by public school students in School District
No. 24  - Kamloops.
  PERSONNEL
MINISTER'S OFFICE
Minister of Education
The Honourable Patrick L. McGeer
B.A., Ph. D., M.D.
DEPUTY MINISTER'S OFFICE
Deputy Minister of Education
W.G. Hardwick, B.A., M.A. Ph. D.
Assistant Deputy Minister - Schools
Department
R.J.Carter, B.A., M. Ed.
Assistant Deputy Minister - Post Secondary
Department
A.E. Soles, B.A., M. Ed.
Assistant Deputy Minister - Department of
Ministry Services
J.R. Fleming, B.A.
Educational Policy Development
J. Walsh, B. Sc, M. Ed.
SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
Division of Public Instruction
Senior Superintendent of Public Instruction
J.R. Meredith, B.A., M. Ed.
Assistant Superintendent, Educational
Programs
B.G. Webber, B.A., M.A.
Director, Curriculum Development
W.B. Naylor, B.A., M. Ed.
Assistant Director, Curriculum
Development
W.D. Oliver, B.A.
Director, Learning Assessment
J.J. Mussio, B. Sc, M.A., Ph. D.
Co-ordinator, Learning Assessment
R.N.Greer, B.A., M.A., Ed. D.
Assistant Director, Examinations
H.CD. Chalmers, CD., B. Sc, Ph. C
Co-ordinator, Industrial Education
J.Jupp
Home Economics Advisors
J. Campbell, B. Sc, M.A., Dip. Ed.
H. Krueger, B. Sc.
Co-ordinator, French Language Programs
C. Fournier, B.A.
Assistant Superintendent, Special Programs
F.L Fleming, B. Ed., M. Ed.
Director, Special Education
J.A.G. Gittins, B. Ed., M. Ed., Ph. D.
Co-ordinator, Hearing-Impaired
J.L. Anderson, B. Ed., B.A., M.A.
Co-ordinator, Visually-Impaired
D.M. Corrigan, Dip. Teaching, M. Ed.
Principal, Jericho Hill School for the Deaf
H. Minto, B. Ed., M. Ed.
Director, Indian Education
S.E. Arbess, B.A., M. Ed., M.A., Ph. D.
Division of Administrative
Services
Superintendent, Administrative Services
J.L. Canty, B.A., M. Ed.
Director, Publication Services
D.W.C. Huggins, C.G.A.
Director, Correspondence Education
J.R. Hind, B.A., B. Paed.
Director, Provincial Educational Media
Centre
B.A. Black, B. Ed.
Division of Field Personnel
Superintendent, Field Personnel
R.J. Leskiw, B. Ed., M. Ed., D. Ed.
Director, Field Services
D.L. Hartwig, B.A.
Director, Teacher Services
B.A. Andrews, B.A., M.A.
 Assistant Director, Teacher Services
E.D. Cherrington, B.A., Dip. Ed.,
Dip. Public Admin.
POST-SECONDARY
DEPARTMENT
Division of Program Services
Executive Director, Program Services
B.E.C. Fraser, B. Sc, Ph. D.
Director, Business and Industry Programs
D. MacRae, B. Sc.
Director, Program Research and
Development
E.M. Mohan, B.A., Dip. Teaching, M.A.,
Ph. D.
Division of Continuing
Education
Executive Director, Continuing Education
R.L. Faris, B.A., M. Ed., Ph. D.
Director, Continuing Education
N.A. Rubidge, B. Sc, M. Sc,
Co-ordinator, Adult Basic Education
D. Haughey, B.A., Dip. Ed., M. Ed.
Division of Management
Services
Executive Director, Management Services
J.F. Newberry, B. Ed., M. Ed., Ph. D.
Director, Trades Training and Journeyman
Upgrading
J.D. Meredith
Director, Career Programs
D. Goard, B. Ed., M.A.
DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY
SERVICES
Division of Financial Services
Superintendent, Financial Services
G.E. Wilcox, CG.A.
Director, Ministerial Finance
N. Aleksenko, R.I.A.
Director, School Finance
G. Gamble, R.I.A.
Director, Post-Secondary Finance
W.G. Stewart, F.C.I.B., CG.A.
Co-ordinator, Student Services
D.L. Clarke, B.A., M. Sc.
Division of Facilities Services
Superintendent, Facilities Services
W.L.B. Hawker, B.A., B. Ed
Senior Architect - Schools
F.B. Simpson, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A.
(to 78-06-02)
Senior Architect - Planning
W.G. Argyle, Dip Arch., R.I.B.A., A.I.B.C.,
R.A.I.C
Project Control Manager
A.Paul, B.A. Sc, Dip. Public Admin.
Executive Director, Special Projects
H. Mclntyre, B. Arch., F.R.I.B.A.
Senior Architect - Post-Secondary
D.S. McLelland, M.R.A.I.C.
Educational Data Services
Director, Educational Data Services
K. Plant, B. Com., M.B.A.
Co-ordinator, Educational Data Services
R.C May, B.A., M. Sc.
Personnel Services
Director, Personnel Services
J.A.Holmes, Dip. Public Admin.
Information Services
Director, Information Services
J.C Ewing, B. Journ.
Library
A. Armstrong, B.A.
Metric Conversion Committee
Executive Director, Metric Conversion
Committee
E. Gosh, CD., B. Sc.
8
 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
Inspector of Independent Schools
J. Phillipson, B.A., B. Ed.
Assistant Inspector of Independent Schools
C. Cuthbert, B. Ace, B. Ed., M. Ed.
DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS
OF SCHOOLS
G.S. Armstrong, B. Ed., Burns Lake
W.W. Baldry, B.A., M.Ed., Grand Forks and
Kettle Valley
O.E. Bedard, B. Ed., M.A., Vernon
L.B. Beduz, B.A., B. Ed., M. Ed., Creston-
Kaslo
R.S. Boyle, B.A., B. Ed., Qualicum
(to 77-11-28)
A.D. Campbell, B.A., B. Ed., Princeton and
Keremeos
E.M. Carlin, B. Ed., M. Ed., West
Vancouver
E.L. Coffin, B. Sc, M.A.T., Fernie
J.R. Denley, B. Ed., M. Ed., Sechelt
J.L. Doyle, B.A., M. Ed., Port Alberni
D.E.A. Eldred, B. Ed., M. Ed., Campbell
River
T.G. Ellwood, B. Ed., M. Ed., Courtenay
D.L Fiddick, B. Ed., M. Ed., Kitimat
W.F.T. Fisher, B. Ed., M. Ed., Chilliwack
D.N. Glass, B.A., B. Ed., M. Ed., Peace
River North
K.S. Granger, B. Ed., M. Ed., Windermere
and Golden
F.M. Hamilton, B. Ed., M. Ed., Terrace
N.B. Hoadley, B. Ed., M. Ed., Nanaimo
J. Holden, B.A., M. Ed., Castlegar and
Arrow Lakes
C. Holob, B.S.A., M. Ed., Richmond
C. Hopper, B. Ed., M. Ed., Hope and
Agassiz-Harrison
R.W. Huestis, B. Com., B. Ed., Lake
Cowichan and Gulf Islands
R.S. Johnstone, B.A., M. Ed., Kimberley
W.B. Johnston, B. Ed., M. Ed., Sooke
N. Keis, B.S.A., M. Ed., Queen Charlotte
Islands and Nisgha
E.A. Killough, B. Ed., M.A., Maple Ridge
J.G. Leaman, B.A., B. Ed., M. Ed.,
Vancouver Island West
E.E. Lewis, B.A., B.P.Ed., Saanich
G.C Lind, B.A., M. Ed., Trail
J.M. Lowe, B. Ed., M. Ed., Prince Rupert
R.G. Lyon, B. Ed., M. Ed., Kamloops
D.A. Lynn, B. Ed., M.A., Fort Nelson and
Stikine
N.W. McDonald, B.A., M. Ed., Shuswap
D.E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Merritt
A.P. McKay, B. Com., M. Ed., Penticton
A.V.N. MacMillen, B.A., M. Ed., Smithers
P.G. McLoughlin, B.A., Dip. Ed., B. Ed.,
Mission
E.A. Maglio, B. Com., B. Ed., Howe Sound
W.F. Marshall, B.A., M. Ed., Cowichan
W. Maslechko, B.P.E., Nelson
F.T. Middleton, B.A., B. Ed., Abbotsford
CR. Moss, B. Ed., M. Ed., Nechako
G.W. Moulds, B. Ed., M. Ed., Delta
A.J.H. Newberry, B.A., M. Ed., Ed. D.,
Peace River South
R.J. Patrick, B.A., B. Ed., Quesnel
M.G. Pendharkar, B. Sc, B.T., B. Ed.,
M. Ed., North Thompson
M. Roscoe, B.A., M.A., Vancouver Island
North
A.C Rutledge, B. Ed., M. Ed., Southern
Okanagan (Temporary Appointment)
L.P. Sampson, B.A., B. Ed., M. Ed., Ph. D.,
Langley
H. Sayers, M.A., M. Ed., Cranbrook
D.R. Smyth, B.P.E., Cariboo-Chilcotin
D.R. Sutherland, B. Ed., Dip. Ed. Admin.,
Armstrong-Spallumcheen and
Summerland
O.W. Taylor, B.A., M.A., M. Ed.,
Revelstoke
R.B. Taylor, B. Ed., M. Ed., South Cariboo
and Lillooet
M.V. Thorsell, B.A., M. Ed., Powell River
D.N. Weicker, B.A., B. Ed., M. Ed., New
Westminster
W.J. Zoellner, B.A., B. Ed., Central
Okanagan
PROMOTIONS AND
APPOINTMENTS
Headquarters
R.J. Carter, Assistant Deputy Minister-
Schools Department
J. Phillipson, Inspector, Independent
Schools
 C. Cuthbert, Assistant Inspector,
Independent Schools
J.C Ewing, Director, Information Services
D. Haughey, Co-ordinator, Adult Basic
Education
P. Northover, Assistant Director,
Publication Services
A. Paul, Project Control Manager,
Facilities Services
E. M. Mohan Director, Program Research
and Development
Field
R.I. Akune
District Superintendent
E.L. Coffin
District Superintendent
V.J. Storey
District Superintendent
LONG SERVICE
25 Year Continuous Service
Certificate
S.W. Fisk
J.H. Scarfe
Executive Development
Training Plan Graduate
L. Nevraumont
Public Administration Course
Graduate
R.L. Connolly
RETIREMENTS
F.J. Keogh, Administrative Officer,
Administrative Services, 28 years.
E.R. Cardinall, Teacher,
Jericho Hill School, 27 years.
H.C Clendenning, Clerk,
Financial Services, 26 years.
M. Lapp, Teacher,
Jericho Hill School, 23 years.
E.M. Robinson, Seamstress,
Jericho Hill School, 22 years.
CS. Mickelson, Instructor,
Correspondence Branch, 21 years.
C. Severn, Vocational Instructor,
Pacific Vocational Institute (Haney) 21 years.
V.N. Smith, Clerk-Stenographer,
Print Services, 20 years.
CS. McKenzie, District Superintendent,
20 years.
P.B. Pullinger, District Superintendent,
19 years.
J.R. Hindle, Principal, Special Projects,
Post-Secondary, 19 years.
M.M. Canova, Clerk-Stenographer,
Facilities Services, 18 years.
R. Cuthbert, Clerk,
Special Programs, 18 years.
V.G. Tocher, Vocational Instructor,
Pacific Vocational Institute (Haney), 18 years.
R.F. Lucas, District Superintendent,
17 years.
P.C Grant, District Superintendent,
14 years.
C.A. Bruce, District Superintendent,
14 years.
T.R. Ingram, Audit Accountant,
Financial Services, 13 years.
L.F. Stanbrook, Vocational Instructor,
C.F.B. Chillwack, 11 years.
H. Roe, Clerk-Stenographer,
Post-Secondary, 10 years.
A.J. Middleton, Stockman,
Post-Secondary, 10 years.
Deceased
F.B. Simpson, Senior Architect - Schools
Facilities Services
R.S. Boyle, District Superintendent
10
 W' 1
F\'    1   '
11
  FROM THE MINISTER
Honourable Patrick L. McGeer
The Ministry of Education is a challenging portfolio at any time but
perhaps never more so than during the past th ree years. A triad of factors
has been in operation at the elementary and secondary levels which has
forced a re-examination of the most fundamental approaches to
education all over the continent. The first is disturbing evidence, based
on standard achievement tests, of slipping academic achievement in
many jurisdictions of North America. The second is declining enrolment,
which has made it impossible to use growth as a means for incorporating
educational enrichment. The third is an escalation in per-pupil costs
exceeding the general growth in the economy.
It is against this background that reforms have been undertaken by the
Ministry of Education.
In 1977/78, we implemented a core curriculum throughout British
Columbia, providing assurance that every elementary and secondary
student would be offered a strong program in all fundamental subject
areas. Our learning assessment program, designed to monitor
performance in the system, is in its second full year. Three grade levels
have been assessed across the province in mathematics, reading and
social studies. Already, weaknesses in curricula have been identified and
early corrective action taken in some school districts.
In February of 1978,1 asked all schools and all school districts to report
to me on their assessment of individual students and their promotion
policies. It was readily apparent from the diversity of policies being
pursued from district to district, and from school to school within
districts, that strong direction was required and so standard practices are
now being developed by the ministry. Echoing the ministry's concern
from comparative analysis of student achievement, mathematics
teachers requested the utilization of common examinations across B.C.
to help the class teacher evaluate his or her pupils. The first test, in
algebra, was developed and will be in use in the fall of 1979, with others
to follow.
To provide fully for children speaking Canada's other official
language, a core curriculum in French was developed and a full range of
learning materials identified. Le programme-cadre de Francais will be
13
 available in the elementary schools throughout the province in
September of 1979 wherever demand warrants.
A second major departure for British Columbia—one designed to
recognize and strengthen the educational value of an alternative to the
public school system—was the approval by the legislature in September
of the province's Independent Schools Support Act. Soon thereafter an
inspector of independent schools was travelling the province, reviewing
programs, standards and facilities.
With a ministry budget of nearly $1 billion (for the 1977/78 fiscal year),
education in British Columbia is an enormous and complex undertaking.
Since per-pupil costs have been permitted tc/escalate at 11 per cent and
18.7 per cent over the past two years, modernization of the management
system is essential. This must be a co-operajive venture with close liaison
between the ministry, school districts and the teaching profession.
The Deputy Minister's Advisory Committee, which brings in both the
B.C. Teachers' Federation and the B.C. School Trustees Association, is
one vehicle. Another is the Joint Educational Management Project (JEM),
which is designed to provide information sharing and management
assistance for various combinations of users within the education system.
The ministry has also established a majorfacility in Richmond, headed by
an assistant deputy minister, which is designed to provide easier access to
the ministry for the heavily populated Lower Mainland area.
While the emphasis in the elementary and secondary system has been
directed primarily at upgrading academic standards while at the same
time controlling runaway costs, the emphasis in the post-secondary
system has been to close fundamental program gaps. Youth unemployment remains a major economic and social problem of our times and the
full power of education must be used to expand programs that are
designed to provide marketable skills.
The key piece of legislation enacted to reach this objective was the
Colleges and Provincial Institutes Act. For the first time, specific
legislation was provided for post-secondary institutions in addition to
universities.
Initial proclamation of sections of the act led to early establishment of
three councils (modelled upon the Universities Council of B.C.) to guide
the management of these institutions and advise the ministry—the
Academic Council, the Occupational Training Council and the
Management Advisory Council. Five new provincial institutes were
created to take their places beside the British Columbia Institute of
Technology in providing specialized and technical education to the
province as a whole. The first of these was the Pacific Vocational I nstitute,
with major campuses in Burnaby and Maple Ridge. Thereafter came the
Emily Carr College of Art (created from the Vancouver School of Art), the
Pacific Marine Training Institute (developed from the Marine Training
Centre based at Vancouver Community College) and the Justice Institute
of B.C.—a unique concept and a major initiative in unified courts
personnel and police training.
The fifth provincial institute is the centerpiece of a major new
educational thrust. The Open Learning Institute will deliver academic,
career and technical programs as well as adult basic education to British
Columbians no matter where they live, how long they have been out of
school or what their previous background. The OLI will make
14
 appropriate use of such delivery systems as the mails, telephone, radio,
video and audio cassettes, cable television and perhaps even satellites. It
is expected that the institute will be able to offer courses by September,
1979.
A forerunner was an eight-week satellite project in the latter part of
1977. Launched by the ministry's distance education planning group, this
systems experiment utilized Canada's Hermes communications satellite
to bounce a television signal from the Burnaby studios of the Provincial
Educational Media Centre to seminar rooms and home viewers in five
dispersed B.C. centres, including a logging camp.
The other institutions covered under the new legislation are British
Columbia's 14 regional colleges. After proclamation of required
sections, these colleges will be established as corporate entities for the
first time, with college boards and authority to hold property and assets
in their own names.
With knowledge, initiative and skill, British Columbia can prove the
richness of its economic and human resources and can anticipate a
future where all young British Columbians will have a fulfilling career
within their own province. Education will help meet this objective. That
is why we have called upon pupils and educators alike to strive toward
each individual's maximum potential and not to be held back by thefear
of failure. That is why we have insisted upon a strong foundation of basic
learning and the universal availability of programs to provide marketable
and entrepreneurial skills. That is why the Open Learning Institute has
been created—because opportunity must always be available to British
Columbians, regardless of their age, financial circumstances or previous
educational experience.
In keeping with our philosophy, the first steps were taken to expand
the Ministry of Education to include science and technology. In June, the
legislature gave approval to the Science Council Act, establishing a
Science Council in B.C. and a Science Research Secretariat. The aim of
these bodies is to advise government on opportunities for the future.
Industrial Post-Doctoral Fellowships and Graduate Research Engineering and Technology (GREAT) Awards are now being offered to young
British Columbians to prepare themselves for entry into this new
industrial realm.
In 1977/78 I was sorry to lose the services of several outstanding
officials in the Ministry of Education, but pleased to gain or re-assign
several others of similar ability. Among the losses, I might mention
Frances Fleming, who retired as assistant superintendent for special
programs; J. Ross Hind, who retired as director after making the
correspondence branch a national model, and Fred Simpson, senior
architect—schools, in facilities services, who died prematurely. Also, Joe
Phillipson, a former deputy minister, retired as associate deputy minister,
schools, but honoured my plea to become the first inspector of
independent schools. R. James Carter, the man most recently
responsible for major policy developments, stepped into Mr. Phillipson's
shoes as ADM.
15
  SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
The schools department of the Ministry of Education is reponsible for
the overall direction and administration of the public school system
under terms of the Public Schools Act. The department works closely
with the province's 75 locally-elected boards of school trustees, to which
the act and its regulations assign many specific functions and
responsibilities with respect to the delivery of educational programs to
some 523,000 pupils in more than 1,600 schools.
The schools department in 1977/78 comprised three divisions—public
instruction, administrative services and field personnel—and was
directed by a policy and planning committee. Chaired by the assistant
deputy minister—schools, the committee also included superintendents
in charge of these three divisions as well as the office of educational
policy development.
DIVISION OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
School Programs
In January, 1978, the division of public instruction replaced the former
division of educational programs—schools, and was given responsibility
for the implementation as well as the development of school programs.
Its operating branches include curriculum development, learning
assessment, examinations, special programs and consultative and
educational support services.
The change in name and function of the division stressed the need for
co-ordination of all school programs under a single senior
superintendent so that they could be managed as a coherent whole. It
also improved the administrative efficiency of the ministry.
Special features of the work of the division during the 1977/78 school
year included the initiation of an elementary school accreditation
program, the development of a French language core curriculum, and
the extension of the learning assessment program to cover the
provincially-prescribed science and social studies programs.
In addition, the consultative services' industrial education team
became involved in new vocational projects which improved
articulation between secondary school, college and employment.
Educational support services special programs branch extended the
policy of providing programs as close as possible to their homes for
children with special needs.
In the school accrediation program for 1977/78,10 secondary schools
were evaluated by ministry-appointed external evaluation teams. Six
schools received full accreditation status, and the other four received
partial accreditation. During the same period, 30 other secondary
17
 schools were examined by locally-appointed external teams which
reported their conclusions to the provincial accreditation committee. All
schools involved in the process later received detailed reports, from
both the external evaluators and the provincial accreditation teams,
which contained confirmation of good work and appropriate
recommendations for improvement.
The elementary school self-assessment program was piloted in 35
elementary schools during the year and as a consequence an
instructional booklet on the subject will be available early in the 1978/79
school year.
Curriculum Development
A major project of the curriculum development branch was the
development of a core curriculum in French (le programme-cadre de
Francais). This venture, which is in addition to the French-as-a-second-
language program, provided a complete elementary school curriculum
with French as the language of instruction. Curriculum guides were
prepared and support materials identified. The actual task of developing
the program was a joint effort by British Columbia educators and a team
from the Baldwin-Cartier school district of Point Claire, Quebec. The
program will be available from September 1979 in school districts where
a sufficient number of parents indicate that they want their children to
be educated in French. A minimum of 10 pupils who know French well
enough to receive instruction in the language is required to form a class.
The curriculum development branch was also involved in the bicentennial of Captain Cook's explorations of the B.C. coast. Under
contract to the ministry, a publisher prepared a teaching kit, Captain
James Cook and the Nootka, designed specifically for use with the
prescribed curriculum. The kit was developed as a permanent addition
to schools' instructional resources.
Revised programs in elementary school science and chemistry 11 were
introduced, as were four courses in the new business education
program. For the first time a course in drama at the grade 8 level was
implemented. Course development and revision work is a continuous
process and was carried on during the year in a number of other
secondary and elementary subject areas.
Learning Assessment
Province-wide assessments in mathematics, reading and social studies
were completed during the 1977/78 school year. Assessment reports
dealing with science and written expression will be issued in the fall of
1978 and an assessment of physical education will be completed in 1979.
In addition to publishing results of provincial assessments, the
assessment branch, through the British Columbia Research Council,
issued overall summaries of student achievement for each district in the
province. School districts were expected to involve teachers and
members of the public in reviewing the assessment results.
The assessment program is designed to survey and assess the
18
 effectiveness of major programs, and overall pupil accomplishment, in
selected areas of the curriculum. The main principle underlying the
program is that decisions on ways to improve the education system
should be based on reliable data about the effectiveness of existing
programs.
The 1977 mathematics assessment concluded that basic arithmetic
skills of students in British Columbia schools are generally satisfactory
but greater attention is required to teaching the application of those
skills to consumer-related problems.
The study found overall grade 12 problem-solving results
disappointing. Students who had taken a full 12 years of mathematics did
well on all portions of the basic skills test, but the 15 per cent who had
taken only the minimum requirements of 10 years of mathematics
generally performed poorly.
Some trends emerged from the mathematics assessment and the
report urged that they be studied further.
• On the grade 4 test, children born between January and March
outperformed those born in the latter part of the year. The
student's age when he starts school, therefore, may be one of the
factors contributing to the range of individual differences
confronting teachers at the primary level.
• In grades 8 and 12, students born outside Canada, and for whom
English is not a first language, achieved higher scores than
Canadian-born students for whom English is the first language. The
reverse was true at the grade 4 level.
• A disproportionate number of female students are not enrolling
in high level mathematics courses in secondary schools.
The reading assessment revealed that grades 8 and 12 students had
satisfactory skills in vocabulary and in understanding passages from
school textbooks. However, their ability to handle out-of-school
reading—for example, scanning newspaper items for details or
understanding misleading advertising—was in need of improvement.
The assessment report suggested that this finding could probably be
linked to a lack of emphasis on the teaching of these skills in the
secondary school program.
Although educators and the public alike agree on the importance of
developing reading skills among all students, the report said,
comprehensive and systematic reading programs were being offered in
only a minority of B.C. secondary schools.
Calls for an extensive revision of social studies programs and for
expanded professional development activities for teachers were the
chief findings of the social studies assessment report.
The report stated that the majority of educators and members of the
public who were surveyed agreed that, in addition to acquiring factual
information about the past and present, students should develop an
understanding of the complexity of major social issues.
By the end of the school year, most school districts had provided the
ministry with their interpretations of their assessment results, and their
recommendations for change. Introduction of teacher in-service
programs, development of school diagnostic testing services and
reorganization of secondary reading programs are examples of the kinds
of activities planned.
19
 On the basis of suggestions received from a variety of districts, the
assessment branch began the development of achievement tests which
are designed to measure individual pupil achievement. They are
intended as a resource for use by classroom teachers.
The first test was in mathematics. An algebra 12 test project, initiated by
the B.C. Association of Mathematics Teachers, was prepared by the
Educational Research Institute of B.C. and was to be available in
October, 1978.
Examinations
The examinations branch is responsible for the administration of the
grade 12 scholarship program, the general educational development
(GED) testing program, the issuance of transcripts of secondary school
records between 1890 and 1973, and the evaluation of secondary school
education taken elsewhere in terms of British Columbia equivalency.
Grade 12 scholarship examinations are administered in January and
June of each year. In 1978 a total of 4,178 candidates applied to write the
examinations. Of those, 3,218 completed one or more subjects and 1,079
won scholarships of $500 each. The number of winners was 20 per cent
greater than in 1977.
Of significant interest in January was the notably improved success of
students writing English composition; 82 per cent of the 3,036 students
writing the examination achieved an acceptable passing standard,
compared to 78 per cent in January, 1977.
In the general educational development program, 5,470 candidates
applied to write the battery of five standardized tests and 3,388 were
granted the British Columbia Ministry of Education grade 12 equivalency
certificate.
Consultative Services
Consultative services continued to be provided to districts and schools
and other agencies in many of the specialized fields, including industrial
education, pre-apprenticeship programs, pre-career courses, home
economics, metrication, programs for the handicapped, tests and
measurement, and school libraries. Some of these were provided
through seconded personnel, others by members of the ministry staff.
The work involved, amongst other activities, assisting in in-service
education, advising on program development and on facilities and
equipment needs. Consideration is being given to a greater use of the
plan whereby highly qualified field-based personnel are brought in to
the ministry for particular services and a specified time. Such an
approach enables the ministry to respond more effectively in meeting
the priority needs of the system, which change from time to time.
20
 French as a Second Language
As a result of the federal-provincial agreement for bilingualism in
education, support for French-as-a-second-language programs
continued to grow. Specific funding included the distribution of
$2,193,528 to school districts for French language support grants, and the
expenditure of $321,224 from the program for bursaries to second
language teachers, under which 1,021 teachers were involved in
workshops or were in receipt of bursaries.
In addition, 22 students from British Columbia were accepted for study
in other provinces, and British Columbia accepted 81 francophone
students, under provisions of the second-language monitor program;
$1,395,733 was expended on 35 projects under the special projects
program, and $110,000 was awarded for 55 projects under the provisions
for non-credit adult education French language programs.
The French program co-ordinator supervised the continuation of two
projects initiated in 1977: the summer institute for 60 elementary French
teachers held at the Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific, and the
continuation of the pilot project for two four-week French imrnersion
programs for 80 grade 10 and 11 students.
Number of
Elementary School
Students in
FRENCH
IMMERSION
PROGRAMS
Educational Support Services
Educational support services are provided by the Ministry of Education
to assist in the establishment and maintenance of services which
supplement normal services, including a variety of special programs for
disadvantaged children, programs for the communicatively-impaired,
and native Indian education.
21
 Special Programs
The special programs branch of the schools department is responsible
for developing policies and procedures on matters relating to the
education of exceptional children and the issuance of special approvals.
The special approval is a funding device by which the ministry is able to
encourage, and contribute to the shareable cost of, special programs
developed in the school districts. All told 1,136 specific approvals were
granted during the school year including 194 for the moderately and
severely retarded, 120 for hospitalized and homebound cases, 47 for
physically handicapped, 192 for jointly-funded programs, 229 for
English-as-a-second-language and 104 for other specific local needs.
In addition the branch approved 1,344 learning assistance approvals,
issued on a formula basis to all school districts to make available
additional resources for helping to meet the needs of pupils with
learning disabilities.
Wherever it was in the interest of the learning needs of the children,
moderately and severely-handicapped pupils attended the public
schools, and resources were provided to support them, sometimes
through inter-ministerial co-operation. In other cases, hospital or
itinerant teachers provided education in the hospital or home.
Work study/work experience programs, another function of the
special programs branch, continued to expand. During the year 13,397
students in 271 schools in 52 school districts were involved in this
excellent program which continued to be supported by the Ministry of
Labour and the Workers' Compensation Board.
Approximately 200 rehabilitation programs were financed jointly by
the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Human Resources. These
programs enabled young people who were experiencing great difficulty
at school, or who had dropped out of school, to acquire basic academic
and social skills.
Communicatively-Impaired Programs
The Ministry of Education also extended its services to
communicatively-impaired students, awarding 85 special approvals for
the hearing-impaired and 26 for the visually-impaired. In April, a coordinator of the education of the hearing-impaired was appointed to
assist districts in developing quality programs and to co-ordinate services
among them.
There are now more than 100 specialized teachers of the hearing-
impaired working in the province, enabling many of the students to be
served according to their needs by local itinerant programs, in district
classes for the hearing-impaired, or at Jericho Hill School for the Deaf.
Similar programs were developed for the visually-impaired.
Regular inter-ministry discussions and co-operation continued at all
levels in the area of speech therapy, the provision of auditory training
equipment, school health services and programs for pre-school
handicapped children.
22
 Indian Education
To meet the special learning needs of native Indian children, programs
were designed which strived not only to develop basic skills but also to
reflect the cultural, linguistic and social background of the children.
Programs were implemented in co-operation with the Indian
communities to provide native para-professional workers such as home-
school co-ordinators and teacher aides, to provide native Indian
language and cultural programs for the benefit of all children, and to
provide alternative education programs.
Of the total of 1,136 special approvals mentioned above under special
programs, 139 went towards Indian education.
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES
The division of administrative services is responsible for a wide range
of administrative, regulatory and logistic functions within the
educational system in the province, as well as for the Provincial
Educational Media Centre, the correspondence education branch, and
the publication services branch. The division was created in the spring of
1977 in response to a demonstrated need for an advisory and service link
between the Ministry of Education and the school districts.
The central office of the division co-ordinates the flow of information
between the ministry and school districts and issues the ministry's
circulars. It acts as the executive arm of the schools department
management committee.
Provincial Educational Media Centre
While the 1977/78 year was highlighted for the Provincial Educational
Media Centre by innovations such as the satellite tele-education project,
the centre's main efforts were on the consolidation of resources and the
integration of both acquired and original materials to support new
ministry programs. Close co-operation with curriculum development
committees resulted in the purchase or production of comprehensive
sets of learning materials directly related to course objectives. Cooperation with the Ministries of Health and Consumer Affairs led to the
creation of attractive multi-media kits representing units of study in
nutrition and money management respectively.
As part of an ad-hoc distance education planning group, PEMC served
as the control centre for the satellite tele-education project (STEP).
Technical, production and program development staff worked closely
with several institutions and agencies in a two-month experiment using
the satellite to carry educational television programming to various areas
of the province. Other PEMC contributions to distance education
23
 included a survey of existing facilities and resources and the publication
of Distance Education, a bi-monthly newsletter describing distance
learning projects and activities throughout the province.
For the second successive year PEMC captured an Ohio Award at the
international exhibition of educational radio/television programs. The
radio series Soundscape, designed to improve listening skills, was
described by the judges as "a rare excursion into the mind of the
young...warm, soft, tender learning that possesses the listener."
Originally carried by CBC, the programs were also distributed in kit form
through the audio duplicating service developed by PEMC during the
school year. This new service makes possible the packaging and
distribution of outstanding radio programs, along with appropriate print
materials, in media kits. It complements the successful video duplicating
system initiated five years ago.
Due to the increased range and variety of learning resources available
from the media centre, a computer-printed catalogue was developed.
The new system, which facilitates identification of, and access to, all
materials in a given subject area, has now been adopted by several
educational media libraries in Canada and the United States.
Correspondence Education
The 1977/78 booklet, Correspondence Education, was released in July,
1977, and contained lists of the courses offered by the correspondence
education branch. They comprised a wide range of kindergarten,
elementary and secondary school courses, together with vocational and
special courses for adults.
In the area of course-writing, at the elementary level all mathematics
courses were rewritten, and work was begun on science revision. At the
secondary level, several new courses were produced—consumer
mathematics 10, industrial and trade mathematics 10, and algebra 11 and
12. The curriculum for German studies was totally revised. The new
German 12 course, involving full use of audio-tapes, will be in use in
1978/79, and other German courses will be rewritten. A course in
beginners' Esperanto, also using audio-tapes, will be available in
September, 1978.
In the field of instruction, efforts continued to find ways to
individualize teaching to suit the capabilities and requirements of each
student. Regular reports were made to the parents of those students
taking all their education by correspondence, and to the principals of
schools in which students were enrolled in one or two courses.
Further investigations are being made as to how correspondence
courses may be used to expand the curriculum offered by small
secondary schools, to offer further opportunities for gifted students who
wish to take additional or advanced courses, and to offer assistance to
students having particular difficulties. The co-operation of school boards
in bringing additional resource material to these students is being
sought.
The enrolment for 1977/78 changed very little from that of 1976/77.
24
 General enrolment (includes adults as well as school-age
persons)
Kindergarten 83
Grades 1-7 939
Grades 1-7 (serviced from the Dawson Creek
sub-office) 120
Grades 1-12 (Canadian children living in Iran) 120
Grades 7-12 12,362
Total 13,642
Certain groups for whom free instruction was provided
Inmates of institutions 384
Adults receiving social assistance 84
Students unable to attend school through illness 260
Students needed at home 10
Students unable to attend school through distance 324
Recent immigrants 101
Total
1,163
Publication Services
The main function of the Ministry of Education's publication services
branch continues to be the purchase, inventory and distribution of
learning resource materials to approximately 1,760 public and
independent schools in the province. Over three million pounds of
material were shipped during the year and learning material invoices in
excess of $10 million were processed.
A more equitable distribution of textbooks to schools, based on
enrolment, and more efficient inventory control were made possible
through the extended use of a computer system. The book repair plan,
conducted with binderies located in the B.C. Interior, continued to prove
its merit. In 1977/78 approximately 200,000 repairs were made at a
significant saving over the cost of purchasing new replacement texts.
The branch continued to act as distributor for ministry publications and
also administered the new school library book purchase plan, which
provides for the purchase of one copy per school of appropriate titles
accepted by a panel of teacher-reviewers. The plan indirectly supports
B.C. authors and publishers and has received an enthusiastic response
from schools.
Production at the ministry's print services operation continued to
increase. During the past year print services was again able to serve every
branch of the ministry, producing more than 800 publications. Particular
emphasis was placed on core curriculum books for public school
programs. The majority of the post-secondary education publications
reflected the emphasis being placed on career-vocational areas.
25
 DIVISION OF FIELD PERSONNEL
The division of field personnel is responsible for the recruitment,
selection, assignment and supervision of provincially-appointed school
superintendents, as well as liaison with locally-appointed
superintendents. The division is also charged with teacher certification
and document evaluation, co-ordination of in-service programs,
international teacher exchange programs and liaison with the faculties of
education of the universitites. In addition to the superintendent's office,
these functions are carried out bytwobranches,fieldservicesand teacher
services.
Field Services
The field services branch provides assistance to school districts on
personnel matters and organizes various appeal processes for school
personnel as provided for under the Public Schools Act. The branch
continued during the school year to act as the co-ordinating and
sponsoring agency for a rapidly expanding province-wide in-service
training program for school administrators. Through regional and local
workshops, administrators were provided professional assistance in a
number of appropriate subject areas. Co-ordination with the curriculum
development branch enabled the ministry to help administrators and
teachers prepare for the introduction of new courses.
Professional development programs for school and district
administrators wereexpandedbythedivision in both scopeand numbers.
The division continued to seek methods of assisting administrators to
meet all the needs of the school system.
The accreditation of public schools, discussed earlier in this report,
continued to be a major responsibility of the division.
Teacher Services
Teacher certification, international and inter-provincial teacher
exchange programs, the co-ordination of professional development
activities for teachers, and administrative support for the Joint Board of
Teacher Education are the principal responsibilities of the teacher
services branch.
During the 1977/78 school year, the branch assisted with the promotion
and administration of 13 regional curriculum workshops in elementary
science and chemistry 11 and 12, an elementary French summer institute, a
special education program and a number of conferences and workshops
in industrial education, environmental education, remedial education,
metric measurement, and the teaching of the emotionally-disturbed, the
hearing-impaired and the autistic.
Twelve British Columbia teachers received exchange fellowships with
Great Britain, five with the State of Queensland, three with South
Australia, two with the State of Victoria, two with the Australian Capital
Territories, two with the Australian Northern Territories, and two with
26
 1976/77
Percentage of ELEMENTARY School Teachers
with UNIVERSITY DEGREES
78.1
82.2
83.6
79.3
Z
<*
z
O
I-:
GO
*
z
ID
O
z
>
85.4
OJ
Q.
Q
_l
LL
z
Canada
1
Percentage of SECONDARY School Teachers
with UNIVERSITY DEGREES
27
 states in the United States. In addition, the inter-provincial exchange
program involved the placement of eight teachers and one principal in
Ontario. In 1979, the branch plans to extend the overseas exchange
program to include Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany.
Discussions are currently underway to extend the inter-provincial
exchange program to include all 10 provinces and Canada's northern
territories.
The appointment of a committee was authorized by the Joint Board of
Teacher Education to conduct a thorough examination of provincial
programs for the preparation of teachers. Following 10 public hearings
and meetings with the deans of education and their faculty
representatives, the committee presented its report to the Minister of
Education in June. The director of teacher services and an administrative
assistant from the branch provided administrative and organizational
support to the committee and to the joint board.
i-jiaftSv*-* '
28
 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
In September, 1977, the Provincial Legislature passed the Independent
Schools Support Act which made provision for financial grants to
independent schools meeting certain specified requirements. For the
first time since the passage of the Public Schools Act in 1872, non-public,
fee-charging independent schools were eligible for financial assistance.
The act, which provided for the appointment of an inspector of
independent schools directly responsible to the minister, established two
levels of grants based on a percentage of the average per-pupil operating
cost in the publicschool district in whichaqualifyingindependentschool
is located.
To obtain the lower level of grant,a school mustsatisfy the inspectorthat
it has no program—in existence or proposed—that would in theory or in
practice promote or foster doctrines of racial or ethnic superiority,
religious intolerance or persecution, or social change through violent
action. The facilities of the school must be adequate, and it must have
operated as an independent school for at least five consecutive school
years, including the school year immediately prior to its application for
support.
To obtain the higher level of grant the school must, in addition to the
conditions above, meet provincial standards regarding minimal
instruction time requirements for course subject areas, have a pupil
testing program, agree to co-operate in an external evaluation program,
and employ teachers certified in accordance with guidelines set by a
teacher certification committee appointed by the Minister of Education.
During the 1977/78 school year 101 schools—with 1,300 teachers and
16,500 pupils— were qualified by the inspector.
The government provided sufficient funds so that the 1977/78 grants
(payable in the 1978/79 school year) could be set at 9 per cent and 30 per
cent of the average operating cost per pupil in the public schools. This
worked out to an approximate average grant of $150 per pupil at the lower
level and $500 per pupil at the higher level.
29
 PROVINCIAL
INSTITUTES
UNIVERSITIES
COLLEGES
Region and Name:
1. CAMOSUN
2. CAPILANO
3. CARIBOO
4. DOUGLAS
5. EAST KOOTENAY
6. FRASER VALLEY
7. MALASPINA
8. NEW CALEDONIA
9. NORTH ISLAND
10. NORTHERN LIGHTS
11. NORTHWEST
12. OKANAGAN
13. SELKIRK
14. VANCOUVER
30
Kelowna Cranbrook
Castlegar
/>&&!•Chilliwack
Nanaimo.   <^\Burnaby
^ft@ \\xNew Westminister
Victoria    \  North Vancouver
Vancouver
PROVINCIAL INSTITUTES	
Pacific Vocational Institute Burnaby
Pacific Marine Training Institute Vancouver
B.C. Institute of Technology Burnaby
Emily Carr College of Art Vancouver
Justice Institute of B.C. Vancouver
Open Learning Institute Burnaby
UNIVERSITIES	
University of British Columbia Vancouver
Simon Fraser University Burnaby
University of Victoria victoria
 POST-SECONDARY DEPARTMENT
The post-secondary department of the Ministry of Education is
responsible for the ministry's input into a comprehensive range of
academic, technical, vocational and continuing education programs
offered at some 20 colleges and provincial institutes in the province. The
department has three divisions—program services, continuingeducation
and management services—each with special responsibilities. In
addition, the department provides services to the three advisory councils
created under the Colleges and Provincial Institutes Act of 1977—the
Academic Council, the Occupational Training Council and the
Management Advisory Council.
DIVISION OF PROGRAM SERVICES
The program services division was created in 1977/78 to provide coordinated program services to the colleges and institutes. Its major thrust
during the year was in program development activities.
Extensive work was also carried out on the development of basic
policies and guidelines to assist the division in carrying out its other duties,
which include monitoring institutional program performance,
implementing program research and development projects, and
providing means of professional development for college and institute
personnel.
In keeping with the expanded scope of its activities, the former
curriculum and program development branch was renamed the program
research and development branch. It continued its former function of
curriculum development, working closely with colleges, institutes and
the Ministries of Labour, Health and Human Resources. Among its tasks
were revisions to the carpentry and heavy duty mechanic apprenticeship
programs and the development of new provincial curricula in early
childhood education and home-maker training, currently in progress.
In the research area, two important studies were completed. The
technical feasibility of the satellite tele-education program (STEP) was
evaluated and specific recommendations made regarding program
content, audience participation and technical production. A survey of
welders was undertaken and a comprehensive report written
recommending changes to the present training system to reflect better
the needs of industry.
The branch also co-ordinated several training improvement projects
funded by the Canada Employment and Immigration Commission.
31
 DIVISION OF CONTINUING
EDUCATION
The 1977/78 year was one of steady growth for adult and continuing
education in British Columbia. Following recommendations of the
1976/77 report of the special committee on continuing and community
education, several projects were undertaken. Studies on English as a
second language, women's programs in post-secondary institutions and
adult special education were commissioned. In addition, adirectory of all
provincial government and adult education programs and services was
published and distributed.
In recognition of the need for community education and basic literacy
programs, a system was introduced to encourage innovative
programming on the part of the various post-secondary institutions.
Similarly a French-language special project system was successfully
implemented to provide opportunities for adults wishing to learn the
French language or to improve their knowledge of the French-Canadian
culture.
Participation Rate in ADULT EDUCATION *
NON-CREDIT COURSES
1971/72-1976/77
jf: Rate per 1000 population (out of school and over 15 years old)
MAN.
SASK.
ALTA.
 Within the ministry the school district adult education grant-aid system
was maintained with an ever-increasing number of new programs. English
for New Canadians classes continued to be a major program area, as did
small business management.
DIVISION OF MANAGEMENT
SERVICES
In the past year the roles of the division of management services
included the monitoring of the efficiency of the system, the allocation of
college and institute budgets, the co-ordination of the development of
manpower plans, and the provision of administrative services to the
department.
One specific accomplishment during the year was the co-ordination of
significantly-expanded vocational programming to provide young
people with the type of training required to enable them to better
compete in the job market. The division also played a major role in the
continuing process of developing an overall budgeting and reporting
system for the colleges and institutes which will enable the ministry,
provincial councils and college boards to make better decisions regarding
their allocation of funds to programs.
The division assisted in the implementation of the new Colleges and
Provincial Institutes Act and with the development and activities of the
new councils it created, especially the Management Advisory Council to
which it provided the support services.
COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES
The proclamation of many sections of the Colleges and Provincial
Institutes Act occurred during the school year and as a result a number of
new governing bodies and institutions wereestablished. They include the
three councils already mentioned and five institutes—the Pacific
Vocational Institute, the Emily Carr College of Art, the Pacific Marine
Training Institute, the Justice Institute of British Columbia, and the Open
Learning Institute. The new institutes, which are designed to serve the
whole province in their specialized fields, complement the 14 colleges
located throughout the province to meet regional needs.
Enrolment in the colleges and institutes increased enough to more than
offset a slight drop in university enrolments. Detailed tables in the
statistical section of this report provide the breakdown, but generally
there was a large increase in the part-time non-vocational enrolment (15
per cent) and an even larger increase in full-timeand part-time vocational
enrolment (26 per cent). This information indicates the results of the
increased emphasis placed upon vocational education by the ministry.
33
 Vocational
Career/Tech
Vocational
Career/Tech
CAMOSUN
Vocational
Academic
SELKIRK
CAPILANO
fflSI
Vocational
^
Career/Tech
I
M
31.14 IjJJr
NORTHERN LIGHTS NORTH ISLAND
CARIBOO
NORTHWEST
DOUGLAS
Vocational
OKANAGAN
Full and Part-time
COLLEGE
ENROLMENTS
1977-78
VANCOUVER
TOTAL
34
 Academic Council
The Academic Council was established in February, 1978, under
authority of the Colleges and Provincial Institutes Act, and Dr. Ian
McTaggart Cowan was named its chairman. The council was given
responsibility for academic transfer programs, the majority of the
technological programs at the colleges and provincial institutes, and a
number of career programs. In these areas the council is responsible for
establishing advisory committees and articulation committees, and for
reviewing financial requests and allocating the funds available.
The council will maintain effective contact with the colleges and
institutes so as to understand the different circumstances within which
each operates, its teaching objectives, the limitations imposed by
geography and demography and its plans for the future. To this end the
council plans to hold many of its meetings on the college and institute
campuses.
Occupational Training Council
The Occupational Training Council was established in April, 1978, and
Mr. S.M. Rothman was named chairman. Its mandate is to advise the
minister on the allocation of funds forthe vocational and career programs
under its jurisdiction, to develop industrially-oriented advisory
committees, to relate training needs in the province to programs available
at the institutions and to develop an occupational counselling service
having current and accurate information available to individuals and
institutions alike. To date the council has established an occupational
counselling sub-committee, and has set up a schedule for participation in
the Ministry of Education's budget planning processes.
Management Advisory Council
The Management Advisory Council, also established under the
provisions of the Colleges and Provincial Institutes Act, consists of
representatives from all B.C. colleges and provincial institutes and is
chaired by the deputy minister of education.
The council's responsibilities are residual, covering programs not
assigned to other councils and including also administration, capital
building approvals, support services such as libraries and student aid, the
development of a budgeting process to serve the various institutions,
long-range planning, and personnel relations, functions common to all
the institutions.
In addition to an inaugural meeting in November, three regular
meetings were held during the year. Committees of council were formed
to act on executive matters, continuing education, budgets and bylaws.
35
 Enrolment in Colleges and Universities
28149
24418
TOTAL
17812
_
3441    .urn H.1
2047   ill   UJ
1394  I   I
1967/68
H
7159
3731
Mill
PART
Illinium
28209
9213
1977/78
1967/68
1977/78
36
 UNIVERSITIES
The three provincial universities reported a total of some 50,000
students enrolled in degree programs. Of this total some 32,000 were full-
time students and 18,000 part-time, summer and inter-session students.
Approximately 10 per cent of the total were graduate students.
The figures represent a slight decline from the 1976/77 year and
generally this decline was equally distributed among the three
universities and the various types of students. A detailed table on
enrolments can be found in the statistical tables in this report (see page
153).
UNIVERSITY
Graduate
2388 ,,
1942 Mil III  |
1967/68
I'll
II
4475
3014
1434
VII
1977/78
COLLEGE
Full and Part-t
48850
7156
20390
20161
ocational
8299
Academic
746 Career/Tech
1967/68 1977/78
37
 Universities Council of British Columbia
The Universities Council of British Columbia was formed in 1974,
subsequent to the proclamation of the Universities Act (1974). Its
purpose is to encourage the systematic development of university
education and to bring about a greater degree of public accountability
for university expenditures. The council serves as an intermediary body
between British Columbia's three universities and the provincial
government. Dr. William Gibson was named chairman of the council
during the academic year, replacing Dr. William Armstrong who
assumed the post of executive director of the newly created Science
Council of British Columbia.
The council undertook and completed several tasks during the fiscal
year. Among the most significant activities were:
• Examination of a series of program proposals to meet post-
secondary needs in the B.C. Interior.
• Completion of a policy statement on faculty responsibilities with
regard to consulting, supplementary income and related activities.
• Co-ordination and facilitation, in concert with the Ministry of
Education, of the medical teaching expansion project of the
University of British Columbia.
• Completion of an examination of student aid programs for British
Columbia residents, and the submission to the minister of a report
containing recommendations.
• Funding of a computerized cataloguing system for provincial
libraries, which is expected to be fully operational in five years.
• Participation in the organization of a space inventory and space
entitlement project.
In its third annual submission to the provincial government, the council
requested $202,487,000, a 9.7 per cent increase over the actual grant for
1977/78. Appended to this request was af urther recommendation fortwo
supplementary operating grants, one to support the expansion of the
1978/79 medical undergraduate program at the University of British
Columbia, and one to fund 1978/79 non-metropolitan university
programs recommended by the Interior University Programs Board and
approved by the council.
38
 DEPARTMENT OF MINISTRY
SERVICES
The department of ministry services is responsible for many of the
activities of the ministry which, though not strictly educational, form the
infrastructure which makes the delivery of educational programs
possible—finance, facilities services through which buildings and
equipment are provided, data services, and various ancillary services.
During the past year the department concentrated on the continuing
improvement of ministry management systems. For example, extensive
improvements were made in budgeting processes, both for internal use
and for capital approval management. lnaddition,neweffortsweremade
to develop long-range planning systems for the ministry and its field
agencies. Five-year forecasts were developed and analyzed in a number of
sectors.
This planning effort increased the intensity of co-operation between
the ministry and the central agencies of government. The department of
ministry services has become the focal point for these agencies and the
conduit through which they are involved in long-rangefiscal and physical
plans. The agencies include the Treasury Board, the Government
Employee Relations Bureau, the Public Service Commission, the B.C.
Systems Corporation, and the B.C. Buildings Corporation. This activity will
continue to increase as the ministry further develops and integrates its
planning and management systems.
DIVISION OF FINANCIAL SERVICES
The division of financial services is organized into three branches-
ministerial finance, schools finance and post-secondary finance.
Ministerial Finance
The ministerial finance branch is a service section of the division and is
responsible for internal finance, including the co-ordination of the
budget process for the ministry's annual estimates. In addition, the branch
is responsible for monitoring and maintaining records of all expenditures
and accounts payable and for assisting all other ministry branches in the
administration of financial matters. The Ministry of Education budget for
the 1977/78 fiscal year was $947,709,405—more than 24 per cent of the
entire provincial budget.
Submissions of all claims under federal-provincial cost-sharing
programs are directly prepared by the branch or audited by it before
being presented to the federal government.
39
 Schools Finance
The main function of the schools finance branch is to monitor the
expenditures of capital and operating funds in all school districts. The
branch analyzes the budgetary requirements of the districts, calculates
the value of the instructional unit (the basis on which operating grants to
districts are determined), advises the government on the effects of various
levels of funding, recommends the mill rates which should be established
for property taxes for school purposes, and calculates the grants payable
to each district.
For the 1977 calendar year, school district expenditures exceeded one
billion dollars (see table no. 3.4 for details). Prior to the 1977 budgets
being finalized, budget reviews were conducted in selected school
districts by senior staff of the division.
Between July 1,1977 and June 30,1978, 85 capital expense proposals,
amounting in total to more than $135,000,000 in borrowing authority,
were processed. This amount, an increase over 1976, was due in part to a
carry-over from the 1976/77 capital budget year. Capital expense
proposals provide borrowing authority to the school districts for the
acquisition of capital assets in the form of land, buildings and equipment.
The actual cost is met by the sale of debentures through the British
Columbia School Districts Capital Financing Authority.
During the year the branch provided assistance and information to the
joint education management (JEM) project team,which is engaged in the
investigation of processes designed to develop comprehensive reporting
and management systems for the benefit of both the school districts and
the ministry.
Post-Secondary Finance
In 1977/78 the post-secondary finance branch accomplished two
primary goals. The first was to become more effective in analyzing college
budget requests, monitoring their expenditures in relation to approved
budgets, and estimating future requirements based on actual financial
performance and future growth projections. The second goal was to
provide greater assistance to the colleges in the form of operational
audits, one of which has been performed to date, and to provide indirect
assistance in the form of documentation and procedure manuals. A
college expenditure reporting manual was developed and distributed to
the colleges, as well as a manual on budgeting procedures.
Post-secondary finance was also involved in the negotiation of a new
federal-provincial Adult Occupational Training Agreement to govern
vocational training courses conducted on behalf of the British Columbia
Ministry of Labour and the Canadian Employment and Immigration
Commission. Approximately 40 per cent of all vocational training carried
out in the province is purchased by these two agencies.
40
 SCHOOL FINANCES
School District and
Ministry Expenditures
$1,374,983,287
$332,702,367
s
.157,614,784
$ 90,483,766
1957
1962
1967
1972
1975
1976
1977
Student Services
Approximately one-third of all post-secondary students applied for
student aid under the British Columbiastudent assistance program during
the 1977/78 fiscal year. In all, 18,130 loans and 13,300 grants to students
were authorized. The average loan and grant was $1,155 and $667
respectively.
The work-study program by which on-campusjobsarefound for needy
students, started on a pilot basis by the student services branch during the
previous year, was endorsed by both students and institutions during
1977/78. Funding was increased three-fold to meet the growing demand
for supplemental jobs to assist students to meet their educational
expenses.
The student services advisory committee, in conjunction with the post-
secondary institutions, compiled a provincial model for student services
functions. It is anticipated that this model will serve as a guideline for
future planning in such areas as student housing, counselling, financial
aid, athletics and recreation, registration, student information and other
areas affecting student life.
41
 DIVISION OF FACILITIES SERVICES
The facilities services division of the ministry services department is
responsible for the co-ordination and development of physical facilities
for public schools and post-secondary institutions. During the past year it
continued to improve its capacity to respond to capital program requests
by completing the staffing of six teams, each assigned to a region of the
province. The team system has reduced the number of persons a school
district or college must contact in order to develop a capital program and
follow it through to completion.
A capital budget procedure was developed to allow for closer scrutiny
of capital projects, necessitated by declining enrolments and spending
restraints. Although the capital budget has a fixed overall total, some
individual changes were allowed to provide flexibility. Each regional team
was continually in touch with its school districts and colleges in order to
provide a proper level of service and to ensure that programs were being
carried out as planned.
PUBLIC SCHOOL
42
 Schools Facilities
To ensure proper planning the senior architect—planning
spearheaded studies on the long-term planning of facilities in a number
of school districts. Each study takes into account the future of the school
district, recognizing particular criteria such as anticipated commercial
growth, and the enrolment projection.
With the assistance of the provincial schools equipment advisory
committee, the division continued to review and adjust capital
equipment allowances. In 1978 capital funding was provided for the
additional equipment needed as a result of changes to the chemistry 11
and 12 curricula, and for the first time capital funding was made available
for the replacement of some major industrial education equipment.
Facilities services, in co-operation with the joint educational
management (JEM) projects team, began a program to computerize the
facilities inventory and analysis process, the first phase being the listing of
school facilities. This project includes a detailed quantitive analysis of
Capital Expenditure Approvals
Gymnasium
Library
Classroom and
Equivalent
43
 current space, not only for schools but also for bus garages and
administrative and maintenance offices. Each school district will
automatically be provided with its relevant data, and those wishing
information on other school districts may receive it on request.
While demand for new school facilities continued to decrease, there
was a considerable need for renovations to bring buildings up to current
standards for program needs, safety and fire protection. The division
approved 755 building projects during 1977, but only 22 were new school
buildings and five of those were fire replacements. Renovations
accounted for a great deal of the total work.
Capital expenditures for schools in the 1977 calendar year (Section 190
PSA approvals) were:
Sites $11,250,242
Buildings 69,256,538
Equipment 12,582,715
Other 7,405,406
Total $100,494,901
The staff of the ministry was saddened by the untimely death in June of
Fred Simpson, senior architect—schools, a man closely associated with
the development and processing of capital programs who is missed by
both school district officials and his associates in the division.
Post-Secondary Facilities
An executive director of projects was hired to spearhead the
development of a number of university and college projects. The $54
million medical teaching expansion project, incorporating medical
educational facilities at UBC and five Vancouver area hospitals, was a
completely new departure. Also the first phase of a university five-year
capital program was launched which included buildings at all three
universities.
The division and the JEM team compiled an inventory, which is now
computerized, of all university space. The inventory, together with an
agreed set of entitlements, allows true comparisons to be made between
institutions. The result is that future space, and therefore capital
allocations, can be made on a planned basis. A similar inventory for all
colleges and provincial institutes was initiated and will be completed as
soon as possible.
These inventories, together with enrolment projections, have been
used to prepare five-year capital plans for all post-secondary institutions.
These allow the ministry to level out its capital cash flow, and the
institutions to carry out longer-term planning than was previously
possible.
The plan for universities envisages an expenditure of $155 million for
the five years, while that for the colleges totals $125 million.
Approval was given during the year for new capital projects for the
universities totaling $50,500,000.
44
 For the colleges and institutes, capital expenditures in 1977 were:
Sites
Buildings
Equipment
Other
Total
$1,025,465
4,054,985
3,500,208
475,639
$9,056,297
Educational Data Services
During the school year the educational data services branch provided a
wide range of services at both the public-school and post-secondary
levels.
In the public schools sector, requests for information to be used for
monitoring and planning purposes continue to increase in frequency and
complexity. To meet these requests with timely and accurate data the
public schools sector continued, in co-operation with the B.C. public
schools statistics committee, to revise the forms used to collect the data.
For example, a major revision was undertaken in the format of Form J
(teachers', qualifications and teaching assignments) and the revised form
will be used during the 1978/79 school year.
Work continued within the public schools section on the catchment
area forecasting model. This is a pilot project being carried out in four
districts to develop a model to project enrolment from various areas
within districts. Initially the model is for secondary school catchment
areas, but it is possible that further refining of the model, to enable it to
make predictions for elementary schools catchment areas, will take place
in the future.
Meetings were held during the year with representatives of Statistics
Canada to consider the design of the Statistics Canada library form which
will be distributed during the coming school year to all publicschools ia
Canada. Educational data services also arranged to receive 1976 census
data, by school district, from Statistics Canada. It was to be summarized
and made available in booklet form during the early part of 1979.
In the post-secondary sector statistical coverage continued to increase
at a rapid rate. For the first time statistics on college and institute library
services (for 1976/77) were gathered and published. All college and
institute libraries weresurveyed and the resulting statistics covered almost
800,000 items of library material.
Also for the first time, continuing education statistics (for 1976/77) were
published. The project was undertaken jointly with Statistics Canada and
the resulting publication covered one-third of a million course
registrations.
However, the main area of development in the post-secondary sector
was the computerization of the college faculty workload and staff list
operations. Using a system developed by the British Columbia Systems
Corporation, the branch was able, for the first time, to carry out detailed
45
 BRITISH COLUMBIA TOTAL
School Districts
Representative of Three
Concurrent Enrolment Situations
NANAIMO
Vi
1968
PUBLIC
SCHOOL
Enrolment Trends
489187
12066
46
 analyses in this area. A wide range of information was published which
included costings by institution for instruction, services and professional
administration. Over 3,500 full-time and part-time professional and
instructional staff members were surveyed.
The branch arranged for the microfilming and indexing of material
from 1946 to 1976. With micro-filming completed, an index was made for
every reel, allowing for quick access to historical statistical data.
Publications Available from Educational Data Services
British Columbia Public Schools Systems
September Enrolment Projections
1978/79
Teacher Demand and Supply in British
Columbia 1978/79
Appendix Report
Teacher Demand by School District
1978/79
Organization of Secondary Schools
1977/78
Uses of the Teacher Demand and Supply
Model 1977/78
List of Schools in British Columbia
with Names and Addresses and Phone
Numbers of Secretary-Treasurers and
Principals or Head Teachers
September 1977
B.C. Public School Enrolment Information
September 1977
B.C. Public School Teacher Information
September 1977
B.C. Public School Statistics
1976 Census Data by School District and
College Region
B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1976/77 Library Data
B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1976/77 Continuing Education Data
B.C. Post-Secondary Statistics
1977/78 Staff and Course Data
Information Services
Emphasis of the Ministry of Education on post-secondary development,
fiscal responsibility and co-operative management of the school system
was reflected in the activities of the information services branch during
the 1977/78 academic year.
Against the background of such recurrent activities as publishing the
monthly Educaf/on Today tabloid, composing press releases (a total of 86)
and compiling the 106th annual report on education, the information
services branch completed the first stage of an extensive examination of
communications in search of ways to improve contact, co-operation and
better management at all levels of the education system. Initial results
included establishment of a ministry-wide internal communications
47
 committee and a fortnightly bulletin for managers, and approaches to the
association of education information officers with the object of
enhancing its role in the B.C. education system.
Ministry emphasis on educational finance was reflected during the year
by several special features in Education Today and widespread
distribution of a broadsheet explaining the cost-sharing formula.
The information services branch in 1977/78 was particularly involved in
such post-secondary developments as the satellite tele-education
project, launching a promotional campaign in the communities involved
and seconding an information officer to the planning group.
Information services prepared background documents on distance
education and the newly-established Open Learning Institute, and in the
latter part of the year began development work on a comprehensive
exhibit on distance education to be circulated throughout the province.
Library
The ministry's library continued to act as a source of information for staff
in the ministry and for school district superintendents as well as other
government ministries, related educational organizations and members
of the public needing material not available elsewhere. Increasing use of
major library resources in British Columbia was made possible by the
computer output microfiche (COM) catalogues of university holdings,
funded by the Ministry of Education.
On-line access to ERIC (Educational Resources Information Centre)
and other data bases has been made available through the co-operation
of the Legislative Library.
Metric Conversion
During the year the metric conversion branch organized and
conducted 22 three-hour metric training seminars for municipal and
regional district personnel, and 21 for real estate associations, fire
prevention officer associations, the B.C. Construction Association and
vocational school and community collegepersonnel.ltalsoconducted11
two-day seminars and workshops for school district directors and
supervisors of instruction.
In addition, information booths and displays were manned at various
gatherings and 22,480 training aid kits were distributed.
48
 RESEARCH SECRETARIAT
In December, 1977, an external research advisory committee was
established with 10 members appointed by the Minister of Education.
With approval by the Legislature of the Science Council of British
Columbia Act in June, 1978, this committee evolved into the B.C. Science
Council with an authorized membership of 15.
In March of 1978, the Research Secretariat was established. In addition
to providing staff support to the Science Council, the Research Secretariat
offers services to the internal research advisory committee which advises
on policy for "in-house" research in government departments.
As part of its activities last year, the Research Secretariat advised the
Minister of Education on the establishment of discovery parks—research
parks associated with the universities.
The secretariat also has set up procedures by which a scientif icadvisory
committee evaluates the applications for research funds received by the
B.C. Health Care Research Foundation.
Two research fellowship programs have been established to encourage
applied research and development in B.C. universitiesand to retain highly
qualified manpower in the province. The graduate research engineering
and technology (GREAT) awards provide financial support of $6,000 per
year to graduate students at B.C. universities who work on research
projects which are relevant to the interest of a collaborating industry or
business organization. The industrial post-doctoral fellowships provide a
subsidy of $12,000 per year to any B.C. industry employing a person
holding a Ph. D. degree. The terms and nature of the employment are
negotiated by the candidate and the employer. To date some 15 industrial
post-doctoral fellowships and 12 GREAT awards have been made.
The Science Council of B.C. has already selected several areasof applied
research which seem to have high priority for B.C. and is preparing
recommendations for the funding of these projects.
49
 50
 STATISTICAL TABLES
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
1. Pupils    53
2. Teachers Ill
3. Finance 131
4. Schools 141
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
5. General 149
POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
6. General 151
7. Universities 155
8. College and institutes 161
CONTINUING EDUCATION
9. Course registrants 177
51
 52
 1.   Pupils
TABLE
1.1 Actual enrolment by type of school -.  54
1.2 Distribution of pupils by grade and sex  55
1.3 Average daily attendance by type of school  55
1.4 B.C. public school teacher and enrolment data — September 30,1977  56
1.5 Recapitulation of actual enrolment by type of school, grade, and
sex of pupils September 30, 1977 109
1.6 Changes in enrolment during the school-year, from September to September,
and from June to June 110
53
 Table 1.1
ACTUAL ENROLMENT BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
Enrolment in public schools dropped from 536,192 in September 1976 to 527,771 in
September 1977. Elementary decreased by 7,849 and secondary decreased by 572.
Type of School
Actual Enrolment,1 September 1977
Number
of Male
Schools
Per Cent
Total of
Total
Senior secondary  23 11,182 11,366 22,548 4.3
Secondary  147 57,412 57,079 114,491 21.7
Junior secondary  124 38,217 35,993 74,210 14.0
Elementary-senior secondary  19 3,634 3,395 7,029 1.3
Elementary-junior secondary  64 6,183 5,810 11,993 2.3
Elementary  1,234 153,288 144,212 297,500 56.4
TOTALS  1,611 269,916 257,855 527,771 100
Source: September 1977 Form B.
'Actual enrolment is defined as the number of pupils actually enrolled for whom an
attendance record is required to be kept as of the reporting date.
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:
Secondary school correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 3,180
officially registered in other schools)	
In the elementary school correspondence classes, regular students	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving instruction	
2,303
1,084
24
3,411
54
 Table 1.2
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for
September 1977 and a comparison of the totals with September 1976.
Grade
Secondary
Grade XII	
Grade XI	
Totals, senior secondary grades...
Grade X	
Grade IX	
Grade VIII	
Totals, grade VIII to X	
Secondary special	
Totals, secondary grades	
Elementary
Grade VII 	
Grade VI	
Grade V	
Grade IV	
Totals, grade IV to VII	
Grade III	
Grade II	
Grade I	
Kindergarten	
Totals, kindergarten to grade III ..
Elementary special	
Total
Total
Ratio
Sept. 1977  Sept. 1976  1977:1976
18,132
20,194
18,822
20,405
36,954
40,599
35,919
41,179
1.029
0.986
38,326
39,227
77,553
77,098
1.006
22,417
23,577
23,709
22,127
22,912
22,765
44,544
46,489
46,474
44,549
46,741
47,645
1.000
0.995
0.975
69,703
67,804
137,507
138,935
0.990
3,679
2,179
5,858
5,457
1.073
111,708
109,210
220,918
221,490
0.997
20,732
19,312
18,685
19,148
19,755
18,338
17,937
18,105
40,487
37,650
36,622
37,253
44,150
40,477
37,344
36,470
77,877
74,135
152,012
158,441
19,768
20,447
19,705
17,482
18,773
19,157
18,057
16,775
38,541
39,604
37,762
34,257
37,425
38,633
40,149
35,071
77,402
72,762
150,164
151,278
2,929
1,748
4,677
4,983
0.917
0.930
0.981
1.021
0.959
1.030
1.025
0.941
0.977
0.993
0.939
Totals, elementary grades	
            158,208
148,645
306,853
314,702
0.975
GRAND TOTALS	
269,916
275,855
527,771
536,192
0.984
Source: September Form B.
Note: Occupational has not been reported separately as it is now included with secondary special.
Table 1.3    average daily attendance by type of school
FOR 1977-78 SCHOOL YEAR
Type of School
Actual as
Average Actual
Average Possible
Percent
Daily Attendance
Daily Attendance
Attendance
18,866.7
20,637.0
91.42
99,408.3
108,656.1
91.49
68,952.2
75,671.6
91.12
6,312.2
6,918.1
91.24
10,719.8
11,675.0
91.82
274,533.3
291,885.0
94.06
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary.
Elementary-junior secondary .
Elementary	
TOTAL 	
478,792.4
515,442.9
Source: June 1978 Form I.
55
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110
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
2.    Teachers
TABLE
2.1 Distribution of full and part-time professional staff by type of school 112
2.2 Teachers' certificates 113
2.3 Teachers and principals with and without university degrees 114
2.4 Highest degree by faculty and level 115
2.5 New inquiries and sources of full-time and part-time teaching force 116
2.6 British Columbia public school full-time and part-time teacher flow,
September 1976 to September 1977 117
2.7 Changes in numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers during the school
year 118
2.8 Sources of teachers beginning in British Columbia, September 1977 (those
with less than one year of British Columbia experience)     118
2.9 Numbers of trainees completing certification programs at British Columbia
universities in 1976/77 and teaching/not teaching in September 1977 119
2.10 Certificates issued during the 1977/78 school year (July 1,1977 to June 30,
1978) 120
2.11 Number of full-time and part-time teachers by type of certificate and average
years of British Columbia experience 120
2.12 Certificates and degrees of full-time and part-time teachers, principals and
supervisors, September 1976 and September 1977 121
2.13 Certification of full-time and part-time British Columbia teachers according to
location of initial teacher training, September 1976 and September 1977 122
Teachers' Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Salaries by Type of School:
2.14 Supervising principals and vice-principals 123
2.15 School attached teachers (including teaching principals and vice-principals) . . 124
2.16 District-wide supervisory and instructional staff 125
2.17 Total district-wide supervisory and school attached teachers 126
2.18 Full-time equivalent district-employed — administrative and instructional
staff (not assigned to specific schools) 127
2.19 B.C. public school pupil/teacher ratios by school district 128
Provincial Educational Media Centre
2.20 School broadcasts 129
2.21 (1) Distribution of audio-visual materials 129
(2) Distribution services circulation report.... 130
111
 Table 2.1     distribution of full and part-time
PROFESSIONAL STAFF BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
Number                                                  ,                                     Total
Type of School                                        of                      Administrative              Instructional                Professional
 Schools StafP StafF staff
Senior secondary  23 54 1,163 1,217
Secondary  147 286 6,018 6,304
Junior secondary  124 224 3,932 4,156
Elementary-senior secondary  19 25 411 436
Elementary-junior secondary  64 41 690 731
Elementary  1,234 845 14,185 15,030
District-wide instructional staff  — — 535 535
District-wide administrative staff  — 411 — 411
TOTALS  1,611 1,886 26,934 28,820
Source: September 1977 Forms B and J.
'Administrative staff includes principals and vice-principals who spend 51% or more of their time in administration,
instructional staff includes principals and vice-principals who teach at least 50% of their time.
112
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 Table 2.3 teachers and principals with and without
UNIVERSITY DEGREES
September 1977
Type of School
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary ...
Elementary-junior secondary ...
Elementary	
District-wide instructors	
Total instructional staff	
District-wide supervisory staff..
Total staff       18,650
Source: September 1977 Form J.
Note: Part-time teachers are included
Highest Degrees
No Degree
Total Teachers
Percent
Percent
Bachelors
Masters or
Doctorate     i
of teachers
n school type
Number
of teachers
in school type
Number
Percent
of all teachers
891
236
92.6
90
7.4
1,217
4.2
4,713
1,054
91.5
537
8.5
6,304
21.9
3,274
495
90.7
387
9.3
4,156
14.4
305
38
78.7
93
21.3
436
1.5
499
50
75.1
182
24.9
731
2.5
8,498
779
61.7
5,753
38.3
15,030
52.2
272
155
79.8
108
20.2
535
1.9
18,452
2,807
74.8
7,150
25.2
28,409
98.6
198
185
93.2
28
6.8
411
1.4
2,992
75.1
7,178
28,820
100
114
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115
 Table 2.5 new inquiries and source of
FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME TEACHING FORCE
Source of
Initial Teacher
Training
New Inquiries
Received in
. School-year
1977/78
First Certificate
Issued in
School-year
1977/78
to Persons
Initially
Inquiring
Teaching in
Sept. 1977 but
not Teaching
in B.C.
Public School
System in
Sept. 1976
Total
Sept. 1977
Teachers
British Columbia:
Number :	
PerCent	
Prairie Provinces:
Number	
Per Cent	
Ontario:
Number	
Per Cent	
Quebec:
Number	
PerCent	
Atlantic Provinces:
Number	
Per Cent	
Total Canada:
Number	
PerCent	
United Kingdom:
Number	
PerCent	
Other Europe:
Number	
Per Cent	
United States:
Number	
PerCent	
Australia, New Zealand:
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
Number	
Per Cent	
Total Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
1,096
41.5
379
14.3
341
12.9
169
6.4
191
7.2
2,176
82.3
102
3.9
23
.9
244
9.2
52
2.0
46
1.7
2,313
88.0
127
4.8
79
3.0
38
1.4
29
1.1
2,586
98.3
11
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1
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24
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2,574
74.0
280
8.0
139
4.0
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47
1.4
69
2.0
3,109
89.4
103
3.0
33
0.9
134
3.8
41
1.2
58
1.7
21,344
74.1
2,723
9.4
839
2.9
230
0.8
364
1.3
25,500
88.5
1,040
3.6
421
1.5
1,170
4.0
382
1.3
307
1.1
Number	
Per Cent	
                   467
                    17.7
44
1.7
369
10.6
3,320
11.5
GRAND TOTAL:
Number	
                2,643
                     100
2,630
100
3,478
100
28,820
100
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116
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 Table 2.7 changes in numbers of full-time equivalent
(FTE) TEACHERS DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR
Changes
Sept.          Feb.
1976           1977
Changes
Sept.        Feb.
1977         1978
Changes
Sept.       Sept.
1976        1977
Sept.
1976
Feb.
1977
Number
Per
Cent
Sept.
1977
Feb.
1978
Number
Per
Cent
Per
Number     Cen,
Total FTE Teachers1
27,664.9
27,847.1
182.2
0.7
27,993.3
28,182.8
189.5
0.7
328.4           1.2
Source: September 1976 Form B.
February 1977 Form B.
September 1977 Form B.
February 1978 Form B.
'Includes school-attached and district-wide public school teachers.
Table 2.8     sources of teachers1 beginning in
BRITISH COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 1977 (THOSE WITH LESS THAN
ONE YEAR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE)
Elementary Beginners
Secondary Beginners
Location of Initial
Teacher Education
Number
Per Cent
ofEle- PerCent
mentary of A"
Beginners Beginners
Per Cent
of Secondary
Beginners      Beginners
Per Cent
of All Total
British Columbia —
UBC  333 32.3 18.9
U.Vic  183 17.8 10.4
SFU  228 22.2 12.9
NDU  22 2.1 1.3
B.C. Normal School, other and not reported 17 1.7 0.9
TOTALS, PROVINCIAL  783 76.1 44.4
Alberta  45 4.4 2.5
Saskatchewan  24 2.3 1.4
Manitoba  14 1.4 0.8
Ontario  44 4.3 2.5
Quebec  16 1.5 0.9
Atlantic Provinces  18 1.7 1.0
Yukon  — — —
TOTAL, OTHER PROVINCES  161 15.6 9.1
United Kingdom and Europe  29
United States  38
Africa  2
Asia  2
Australia  4
New Zealand  1
Other North America  — — —
South America  — — —
TOTAL, NON-CANADIAN  76 7.4 4.3
Not Reported  9 0.9 0.5
TOTAL, BEGINNERS  1,029 100.0 58.3
2.8
1.6
3.7
2.2
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.1
0.1
318
104
86
43.3
14.2
11.7
1.1
1.4
71.7
32
12
12
47
11
23
4.4
1.6
1.6
6.4
1.5
3.1
137
18.6
8.1
734
100.0
18.0
5.9
4.9
0.4
0.6
1.8
0.7
0.7
2.7
0.6
1.3
3.4
41.7
651
287
314
30
27
1,309
77
36
26
91
27
41
24
3.2
1.4
53
28
3.8
1.5
66
2
3
1
0.2
0.1
4
0.5
0.2
8
1
0.2
0.1
1
1
0.2
0.1
1
135
1,763
Source: September 1977 Form J.
■Includes school-attached and district-wide full-time and part-time public school teachers.
118
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119
 Table 2.10        CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING THE
1977/78 SCHOOL YEAR
JULY 1, 1977 TO JUNE 30, 1978
hing c.    , n   r    -      i Instructor's
& Standard Professional ~. .
nee Diploma
21 134 749 1
— — — 2
— 908 2,852 56
21 1,042 2,601 59
In addition, 251 letters of permission were issued for the 1977/78 school year.
Teaching
Licence
Standard
Professional
Instructor's
Diploma
Other
Total
                21
134
908
749
2,852
1
2
56
-
905
Permanent	
2
3,816
TOTALS	
                 21
1,042
2,601
59
—
4,723
Table 2.11 number of full-time and part-time teachers
BY TYPE OF CERTIFICATE AND AVERAGE YEARS OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE
Professional       Standard
Teaching
Licence
Vocational      Instructor's        Letter of
Certificate Diploma        Permission
Total
Number of teachers	
Average years of British
Columbia experience	
22,454
8.9
4,909
7.2
1,154
15.3
23
9.2
33
8.8
246
2.0
28,819
8.8
Source: September 1977 Form J.
Note: One teacher has been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information.
Total number of teachers was 28,820.
120
 Table 2.12 CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES OF FULL-TIME AND
PART-TIME TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS
SEPTEMBER 1976 AND SEPTEMBER 1977
September 1976
September 1977
Changes in Qualifications
of Staff, Sept.-Sept.
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
Per Cent
Certificate —
Professional1	
Standard2 	
21,896
4,828
1,254
77.1
17.0
4.4
0.0
0.1
0.1
1.3
22,454
4,909
1,154
0
23
33
246
77.9
17.0
4.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.9
558
75
- 100
-4
3
8
- Ill
2.5
1.6
- 8.0
4
100.0
20
15.0
25
32.0
Letter of permission	
357
- 31.1
TOTALS	
28,384
100
28,819
100
435
1.5
Degree —
Doctorate	
Master's	
Bachelor's	
None	
65
2,649
18,129
7,426
0.2
9.4
64.1
26.3
72
2,920
18,650
7,178
0.3
10.1
64.7
24.9
7
271
521
- 248
10.8
10.2
2.9
-3.3
TOTALS	
28,269
100
28,820
100
551
1.9
Source: September 1977 Form J.
Note: Six teachers have been excluded from the September 1976 certificate figures and 121 teachers
have been excluded from the September 1976 degree figures because of missing or incorrect information. One teacher has been excluded from the September 1977 certificate figures because of missing information.
'Including professional advanced, professional basic, professional C.
including elementary A.
'Including elementary B.
121
 Table 2.13 certification of full-time and part-time British
COLUMBIA TEACHERS ACCORDING TO LOCATION OF INITIAL
TEACHER TRAINING, SEPTEMBER 1976 AND SEPTEMBER 1977
Source of Initial Teacher Training
Current
British Columbia
Certificate
British Columbia
Totals
Other
Canadian 0tner Not
Provinces Countries Reported
Sept. 1976 Sept. 1977 Sept. 1976 Sept. 1977 Sept. 1976Sept. 1977 Sept. 1976 Sept. 1977 Sept. 1976 Sept. 1977
Professional1
N  16,305
A  78.3
B  74.5
C  57.4
Standard2
N  3,311
A  15.9
B  68.6
C  11.7
Teaching Licence3
N  982
A  4.7
B  78.3
C  3.5
Elementary C
N  4
A  0.0
B  100.0
C  0.0
Instructor's Diploma
N  18
A  0.1
B  72.0
C  0.1
Letter of Permission
N  204
A  1.0
B  57.1
C  0.7
TOTALS
N  20,824
A  100.0
B  —
C  73.3
16,806
3,081
3,155
2,508
2,486
6
7
21,900
22,454
78.8
73.7
75.9
75.2
75.9
19.4
16.3
—
—
74.8
14.1
14.1
11.5
11.1
0.0
0.0
100.0
100.0
58.3
10.9
10.9
8.8
8.6
0.0
0.0
77.1
77.9
3,447
817
771
696
687
6
4
4,830
4,909
16.2
19.6
18.6
20.9
21.0
19.4
9.3
—
—
70.3
16.9
15.7
14.4
14.0
0.1
0.1
100.0
100.0
11.9
2.9
2.7
2.5
2.4
0.0
0.0
17.0
17.0
913
210
184
62
57
	
	
1,254
1,154
4.3
5.0
4.4
1.9
1.7
—
—
—
—
79.1
16.7
15.9
4.9
4.9
—
—
100.0
100.0
3.2
0.7
0.6
0.2
0.2
-
-
4.4
4
4.0
24
4
5
3
4
-
-
100.0
0.0
25
33
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1.2
—
—
—
—
72.7
16.0
15.2
12.0
12.1
—
—
100.0
100.0
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
—
—
0.1
0.1
132
67
40
67
42
19
32
357
246
0.6
1.6
1.0
2.0
1.3
61.3
74.4
—
—
53.7
18.8
16.3
18.8
17.1
5.3
13.0
100.0
100.0
0.5
0.2
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
1.3
0.9
21,322
4,179
4,155
3,336
3,276
31
43
28,390"
28,819s
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
100.0
100.0
74.0
14.7
14.4
11.8
11.4
0.1
0.1
100.0
100.0
Source: September 1977 Form J.
N = Number of teachers from that jurisdiction who hold the type of certificate shown expressed as a
percentage of:
A = Percentage of teachers from that jurisdiction holding all types of certificates.
B = Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding that type of certificate.
C = Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding all types of certificates.
'Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic and Professional C certificates,
including Elementary A certificates.
'Including Elementary B certificates,
including 20 Vocational Instructor's certificates,
including 23 Vocational Instructor's certificates.
Note: One teacher has been excluded from September 1977 figures because of missing information.
Total number of teachers was 28,820.
122
 Table 2.14 school-attached full-time equivalent
(FTE) SUPERVISING PRINCIPALS
AND VICE-PRINCIPALS
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Elem.-
Junior
Senior
Sec.
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
Percent
FTE
Salaries
$
43,250—43,749  —
42,750—43,249  —
42,250-42,749  —
41,750—42,249  —
41,250—41,749  —
40,750—41,249  —
40,250-^10,749  —
39,750-^0,249  —
39,250—39,749  —
38,750—39,249  2.0
38,250—38,749  —
37,750—38,249  1.0
37,250—37,749  —
36,750—37,249  48.0
36,250—36,749  1.0
35,750—36,249  8.0
35,250—35,749  1.0
34,750—35,249  14.0
34,250—34,749  1.0
33,750—34,249  25.0
33,250—33,749  39.0
32,750—33,249  40.0
32,250—32,749  16.0
31,750—32,249  35.0
31,250—31,749  49.0
30,750—31,249  67.0
30,250—30,749  49.0
29,750—30,249  45.0
29,250—29,749  48.0
28,750—29,249  41.0
28,250—28,749  52.0
27,750—28,249  34.0
27,250—27,749  43.0
26,750—27,249  29.0
26,250—26,749  23.0
25,750—26,249  19.0
25,250—25,749  21.0
24,750—25,249  21.0
24,250—24,749.'  16.0
23,750—24,249  10.0
23,250—23,749  9.0
22,750—23,249  10.0
22,250—22,749  5.0
21,750—22,249  8.0
21,250—21,749  1.0
20,750—21,249  3.0
20,250—20,749  3.0
19,750—20,249  2.0
19,250—19,749  —
18,750—19,249  2.0
18,250—18,749  2.0
17,750—18,249  —
17,250—17,749  1.0
16,750—17,249  1.0
Not Reported  —
1.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
10.0
3.0
8.0
10.0
9.0
9.0
13.0
12.0
9.0
8.0
10.0
14.0
9.0
6.0
16.0
10.0
6.0
7.0
8.0
12.0
7.0
2.0
6.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
5.0
5.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
10.0
6.0
14.0
4.0
15.0
8.0
11.0
12.0
10.0
12.0
13.0
6.0
16.0
13.0
8.0
13.0
11.0
5.0
11.0
5.0
4.0
8.0
11.0
7.0
4.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
2.0
5.0
—
2.0
	
1.0
2.0
7.0
1.0
7.0
2.0
10.0
1.0
4.0
3.0
8.0
—
8.0
1.0
22.0
3.0
61.0
1.0
24.0
—
23.0
4.0
30.0
2.0
34.0
5.0
33.0
2.0
55.0
1.0
61.0
1.0
62.0
2.0
44.0
4.0
61.0
2.0
81.0
—
88.0
2.0
77.0
4.0
75.0
1.0
67.0
1.0
55.0
3.0
76.0
1.0
59.0
1.0
58.0
—
39.0
—
42.0
2.0
32.0
—
29.0
2.0
31.0
	
19.0
—
13.0
	
15.0
—
16.0
	
8.0
—
9.0
—
3.0
	
3.0
—
4.0
—
3.0
	
2.0
	
2.0
—
2.0
—
1.0
—
1.0
_
1.0
100.0
99.7
99.5
99.4
99.3
98.8
98.4
97.7
97.4
96.9
96.3
94.8
90.7
89.1
87.5
85.5
83.2
80.9
77.2
73.1
58.9
65.9
61.8
56.3
50.3
45.1
40.0
35.5
31.7
26.6
22.6
18.6
16.0
13.2
11.0
9.0
6.9
5.6
4.7
3.7
2.6
2.1
1.5
1.3
1.1
0.8
0.6
0.5
0.3
0.2
0.1
o.i
TOTALS	
MEDIANS	
845.0
  $29,955
41.0
$28,187
25.0
$31,625
224.0
$32,035
286.0
$32,519
54.0
$33,750
1,475.0
$30,720
—
Median salary = $30,720; mean salary
Source: September 1977 Form J.
$30,754.
123
 Table 2.15 school-attached full-time equivalent (fte)
TEACHERS (INCLUDING TEACHING PRINCIPALS AND
VICE-PRINCIPALS)
Salary
Elem-
tary
Elem.-       Elem.-
Junior        Senior
Sec. Sec.
Junior
Sec.
dary
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
Percent
FTE
Salaries
$
35,750—36,249  — — — — 1.0 — 1.0 100.0
35,250—35,749  — — — 1.0 1.0 — 2.0 100.0
34,750—35,249  — — — — 1.0 — 1.0 100.0
34,250—34,749  — ___ _ _ _ _
33,750—34,249  — ___ _ ___
33,250—33,749  1.0 — — — 1.0 — 2.0 100.0
32,750—33,249  2.0 — 1.0 — — — 3.0 100.0
32,250—32,749  — ___ _ ___
31,750—32,249  1.0 — — — 1.0 — 2.0 100.0
31,250—31,749  14.0 1.0 — — 1.0 2.0 18.0 100.0
30,750—31,249  4.0 — — — — 2.0 6.0 99.9
30,250—30,749  18.0 1.0 — 1.0 1.0 1.0 22.0 99.9
29,750—30,249  13.0 — — — 1.0 1.0 15.0 99.8
29,250—29,749  10.0 — — — 1.0 — 11.0 99.7
28,750—29,249  24.0 — — 2.0 3.0 — 29.0 99.7
28,250—28,749  13.0 1.0 — 2.0 6.0 — 22.0 99.6
27,750—28,249  39.0 0.1 — 1.0 5.0 1.0 46.1 99.5
27,250—27,749  43.5 4.0 5.0 11.0 79.5 6.0 149.0 99.3
26,750—27,249  38.0 1.0 2.0 6.0 56.0 7.0 110.0 98.7
26,250—26,749  30.0 — — 27.0 66.0 16.0 139.0 98.3
25,750—26,249  78.0 3.0 3.0 36.0 186.0 34.0 340.0 97.7
25,250—25,749  144.2 7.0 8.0 84.8 347.0 78.0 669.0 96.4
24,750—25,249..  101.3 9.0 8.0 113.0 207.5 69.0 507.8 93.8
24,250—24,749  50.6 4.0 7.0 53.8 107.0 34.0 256.4 91.8
23,750—24,249  71.5 12.1 2.0 63.5 144.0 30.0 323.1 90.8
23,250—23,749  290.1 19.5 15.0 119.5 459.5 43.0 946.6 89.6
22,750—23,249  479.5 30.1 10.0 474.4 530.5 231.5 1,756.1 85.9
22,250—22,749  220.8 31.0 13.0 165.4 256.7 48.0 734.8 79.0
21,750—22,249  110.1 13.0 5.0 99.0 141.9 20.0 389.0 76.1
21,250—21,749  166.7 11.0 15.0 83.2 130.0 23.0 428.9 74.6
20,750—21,249  198.0 16.1 16.5 95.5 172.0 27.5 525.6 73.0
20,250—20,749  760.4 18.6 10.0 164.3 266.4 51.5 1,271.3 70.9
19,750—20,249  731.7 33.0 15.5 199.0 228.6 54.0 1,261.9 65.9
19,250—19,749  277.0 17.0 21.0 99.0 176.5 20.0 610.5 61.0
18,750—19,249  365.4 20.9 10.0 149.4 183.4 40.0 769.1 58.6
18,250—18,749  369.7 28.3 19.5 149.1 184.5 29.0 780.2 55.6
17,750—18,249  572.1 21.4 14.0 171.0 215.8 34.5 1,028.8 52.6
17,250—17,749  1,166.9 37.0 24.0 241.5 219.5 54.0 1,742.8 48.6
16,750—17,249  875.8 36.0 32.3 178.1 277.1 26.0 1,425.4 41.8
16,250—16,749  742.5 37.5 18.5 181.5 284.8 33.0 1,297.8 36.2
15,750—16,249  874.0 42.0 20.5 217.5 168.6 34.0 1,356.6 31.1
15,250—15,749  1,211.2 61.4 25.0 195.2 272.0 33.0 1,797.9 25.9
14,750—15,249  812.4 24.0 13.5 154.5 210.1 29.0 1,243.4 18.8
14,250—14,749  566.5 27.5 14.2 149.0 111.1 14.0 882.3 14.0
13,750—14,249  579.6 26.5 18.0 95.3 142.8 18.0 880.3 10.5
13,250—13,749  489.2 20.7 8.1 46.7 46.0 6.0 616.7 7.1
12,750—13,249  419.5 26.0 6.0 44.2 52.6 3.0 551.4 4.7
12,250—12,749  226.8 11.8 13.0 16.0 6.0 5.0 278.6 2.5
11,750—12,249  213.6 3.0 3.0 4.5 5.3 — 229.3 1.5
11,250—11,749  55.7 4.5 4.0 — 3.0 — 67.2 0.6
10,750—11,249  40.5 5.5 3.0 5.8 2.0 — 56.8 0.3
10,250—10,749  9.5 0.4 — 2.0 4.0 2.0 17.9 0.1
9,750—10,249  — 1.0 — — — — 1.0 —
9,250— 9,749  — — — — — — — —
8,750— 9,249  — — — — — — — —
8,250—8,749  — — — — 1.0 — 1.0 —
Not Reported  — — — — — — — —
TOTALS	
MEDIANS	
    13,521.6
    $17,046
667.9
$17,333
403.6
$17,722
3,902.9
$19,082
5,967.8
$20,604
1,160.0
$22,494
25,623.7
$17,927
-
Median salary = $17,927; mean salary = $18,687.
Source: September 1977 Form J.
124
 Table 2.16 district-wide full-time equivalent(fte)
SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
(NOT ATTACHED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Percent
Mid-Point
FTE Persons
FTE
Salaries
41,000
3.0
100.0
40,500
2.0
99.7
40,000
4.0
99.5
39.500
1.0
99.0
39,000
3.0
98.9
38,500
5.0
98.6
38,000
7.0
98.0
37,500
4.0
97.3
37,000
12.0
96.3
36,500
8.0
95.5
36,000
8.0
94.6
35,500
1.0
93.7
35,000
10.0
93.6
34,500
14.0
92.5
34,000
11.0
91.0
33,500
2.0
89.8
33,000
9.0
89.6
32,500
28.0
88.6
32,000
12.0
85.5
31,500
13.0
84.2
31,000
10.0
82.7
30,500
20.0
81.6
30,000
12.0
79.4
29,500
14.0
78.1
29,000
10.0
76.6
28,500
14.0
75.5
28,000
19.0
73.9
27,500
27.0
71.8
27,000
10.0
68.9
26,500
17.0
67.8
26,000
19.5
65.9
25,500
32.3
63.8
25,000
28.0
60.2
24,500
18.0
57.1
24,000
18.0
55.2
23,500
25.0
53.2
23,000
38.9
50.4
22,500
24.0
46.1
22,000
22.0
43.5
21,500
19.0
41.1
21,000
18.6
39.0
20,500
31.7
37.0
20,000
34.9
33.5
19,500
20.0
29.6
19,000
20.3
27.4
18,500
15.6
25.2
18,000
25.4
23.5
17,500
28.4
20.7
17,000
25.7
17.6
16,500
18.5
14.7
16,000
25.6
12.7
15,500
21.4
9.9
15,000
16.7
7.5
14,500
17.9
5.7
14,000
10.3
3.7
13,500
3.7
2.6
13,000
10.4
2.2
12,500
1.6
1.0
12,000
2.0
0.9
11,500
2.6
0.6
11,000
3.1
0.4
10,500
0.2
—
40,750—41,249..
40,250-^10,749. .
39,750—40,249..
39,250—39,749. .
38,750—39,249..
38,250—38,749..
37,750—38,249..
37,250—37,749..
36,750—37,249..
36,250—36,749..
35,750—36,249..
35,250—35,749.
34,750—35,249..
34,250—34,749..
33,750—34,249..
33,250—33,749..
32,750—33,249..
32,250—32,749..
31,750—32,249..
31,250—31,749..
30,750—31,249..
30,250—30,749..
29,750—30,249..
29,250—29,749..
28,750—29,249..
28,250—28,749..
27,750—28,249.
27,250—27,749..
26,750—27,249.
26,250—26,749.
25,750—26,249..
25,250—25,749..
24,750—25,249..
24,250—24,749. .
23,750—24,249..
23,250—23,749..
22,750—23,249.
22,250—22,749.
21,750—22,249.
21,250—21,749.
20,750—21,249.
20,250—20,749.
19,750—20,249.
19,250—19,749.
18,750—19,249.
18,250—18,749.
17,750—18,249.
17,250—17,749..
16,750—17,249..
16,250—16,749.
15,750—16,249.
15,250—15,749.
14,750—15,249.
14,250—14,749.
13,750—14,249.
13,250—13,749.
12,750—13,249.
12,250—12,749.
11,750—12,249.
11,250—11,749.
10,750—11,249.
10,250—10,749.
Not Reported .
TOTAL 	
MEDIAN	
909.3
23,200
Median salary = $23,200; mean salary = $24,022.
Source: September 1977 Form J.
125
 Table 2.17     total full-time equivalent(fte)
DISTRICT-WIDE AND SCHOOL-ATTACHED TEACHERS
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Percent
Mid-Point
FTE Persons
FTE
Salaries
$
43,500
5.0
100.0
43,000
—
—
42,500
2.0
100.0
42,000
—
—
41,500
2.0
100.0
41,000
4.0
100.0
40,500
9.0
100.0
40,000
11.0
99.9
39,500
11.0
99.9
39,000
7.0
99.8
38,500
13.0
99.8
38,000
15.0
99.8
37,500
26.0
99.7
37,000
73.0
99.6
36,500
32.0
99.4
36,000
32.0
99.3
35,500
33.0
99.1
35,000
45.0
99.0
34,500
47.0
98.9
34,000
66.0
98.7
33,500
65.0
98.5
33,000
74.0
98.2
32,500
72.0
98.0
32,000
75.0
97.7
31,500
112.0
97.4
31,000
104.0
97.0
30,500
119.0
96.7
30,000
102.0
96.2
29,500
92.0
95.9
29,000
94.0
95.5
28,500
112.0
95.2
28,000
124.1
94.8
27,500
234.0
94.4
27,000
159.0
93.5
26,500
198.0
93.0
26,000
391.5
92.3
25,500
730.3
90.9
25,000
566.8
88.3
24,500
293.4
86.2
24,000
354.1
85.2
23,500
986.6
83.9
23,000
1,811.0
80.4
22,500
766.8
73.9
22,000
420.0
71.2
21,500
450.9
69.7
21,000
547.2
68.1
20,500
1,307.0
66.1
20,000
1,299.8
61.5
19,500
632.5
56.8
19,000
791.4
54.5
18,500
797.8
51.7
18,000
1,055.2
48.9
17,500
1,772.2
45.1
17,000
1,452.0
38.8
16,500
1,316.3
33.6
16,000
1,382.2
28.9
15,500
1,819.3
24.0
15,000
1,260.1
17.5
14,500
900.2
13.0
14,000
890.6
9.8
13,500
620.4
6.6
13,000
561.8
4.4
12,500
280.2
2.4
12,000
231.3
1.4
11,500
69.8
0.5
11,000
59.9
0.3
10,500
18.1
0.1
10,000
1.0
—
9,500
—
—
9,000
—
—
8,500
1.0
—
$
43,250—43,749..
42,750-^13,249.
42,250—42,749..
41,750—42,249..
41,250—41,749..
40,750^—41,249..
40,250-^10,749..
39,750-^10,249..
39,250—39,749..
38,750—39,249.
38,250—38,749.
37,750—38,249..
37,250—37,749..
36,750—37,249..
36,250—36,749..
35,750—36,249..
35,250—35,749..
34,750—35,249..
34,250—34,749..
33,750—34,249..
33,250—33,749..
32,750—33,249..
32,250—32,749..
31,750—32,249..
31,250—31,749..
30,750—31,249..
30,250—30,749..
29,750—30,249..
29,250—29,749..
28,750—29,249..
28,250—28,749..
27,750—28,249..
27,250—27,749..
26,750—27,249..
26,250—26,749..
25,750—26,249..
25,250—25,749..
24,750—25,249..
24,250—24,749..
23,750—24,249. .
23,250—23,749..
22,750—23,249..
22,250—22,749..
21,750—22,249. .
21,250—21,749..
20,750—21,249..
20,250—20,749..
19,750—20,249.
19,250—19,749..
18,750—19,249..
18,250—18,749.
17,750—18,249..
17,250—17,749..
16,750—17,249..
16,250—16,749..
15,750—16,249.
15,250—15,749..
14,750—15,249..
14,250—14,749..
13,750—14,249.
13,250—13,749.
12,750—13,249..
12,250—12,749..
11,750—12,249.
11,250—11,749.
10,750—11,249.
10,250—10,749..
9,750—10,249.
9,250— 9,749.
8,750— 9,249..
8,250— 8,749..
Not Reported .
TOTAL	
MEDIAN	
28,008.0
18,445
126
Median salary = $18,445; mean salary = $19,482.
 Table 2.18 full-time equivalent district-employed
ADMINISTRATIVE AND INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
(NOT ASSIGNED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
School District Number and Name
District-Wide
Administrative Staff
District-Wide
Instructional Staff
Total
District-Wide Staff
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford v .
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West ..
85. Vancouver Island North .
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
4.0
1.0
5.0
3.0
0.5
3.5
2.7
5.5
8.2
2.0
—
2.0
3.0
2.5
5.5
1.0
2.5
3.5
1.0
—
1.0
4.0
1.0
5.0
—
1.0
1.0
	
1.5
1.5
2.0
1.0
3.0
—
1.0
1.0
1.0
—
1.0
—
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
—
0.5
0.5
8.0
6.6
14.6
11.0
4.0
15.0
15.0
11.0
26.0
3.0
—
3.0
8.0
7.5
15.5
7.6
7.0
14.6
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
14.7
21.1
35.8
9.9
10.5
20.4
16.0
12.0
28.0
39.7
48.2
87.9
9.6
7.0
16.6
14.0
10.0
24.0
53.5
21.0
74.5
6.0
8.3
14.3
19.0
15.0
34.0
7.0
10.0
17.0
14.0
4.0
18.0
19.0
21.0
40.0
4.8
8.0
12.8
2.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
5.7
7.7
4.6
1.0
5.6
1.0
—
1.0
1.0
—
1.0
2.6
5.8
8.4
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
4.5
6.0
10.5
22.0
16.5
38.5
9.0
9.5
18.5
4.0
—
4.0
13.0
23.2
36.2
10.0
10.6
20.6
5.0
2.0
7.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
8.0
3.0
11.0
1.5
2.6
4.1
30.2
31.7
61.9
1.0
—
1.0
10.5
5.5
16.0
7.0
9.0
16.0
6.0
2.4
8.4
3.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
3.6
5.6
1.0
2.5
3.5
1.0
—
1.0
4.0
—
4.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
1.8
2.8
6.0
2.0
8.0
8.0
11.8
19.8
1.0
—
1.0
489.4
Source: September 1977 Form J.
127
 Table 2.19      B.C. PUBLIC SCHOOL PUPIL/TEACHER RATIOS BY
SCHOOL DISTRICT OCTOBER 31, 1976 TO OCTOBER 31, 1977
School District
FTE
Pupils
October 31, 1976
FTE
Teachers
Pupil/
Teacher
Ratio
FTE
Pupils
October 31, 1977
FTE
Teachers
Pupil/
Teacher
Ratio
Fernie  3,460 184.50 18.75 3,551 193.00 18.40
Cranbrook  4,630 233.00 19.87 4,663 242.10 19.26
Kimberley  2,058 114.80 17.93 2,027 116.52 17.40
Windermere  1,403 80.12 17.51 1,404 82.60 17.00
Nelson  4,261 228.60 18.64 4,149 231.60 17.91
Castlegar  2,933 156.20 18.78 2,902 155.80 18.63
Arrow Lakes  1,056 61.85 17.07 1,042 64.10 16.26
Trail  4,760 246.53 19.31 4,674 251.32 18.60
Grand Forks  1,496 81.25 18.41 1,461 81.30 17.97
Kettle Valley  772 43.00 17.95 740 43.50 17.01
Southern Okanagan  2,517 126.60 19.88 2,399 134.25 17.87
Penticton  5,037 260.10 19.37 4,984 256.10 19.46
Keremeos  665 39.00 17.05 640 39.00 16.41
Princeton  1,020 58.50 17.44 1,003 58.50 17.15
Golden  1,587 89.60 17.71 1,559 89.20 17.48
Revelstoke  2,198 128.50 17.11 2,148 127.50 16.85
Armstrong-Spallumcheen ... 1,406 76.00 18.50 1,385 78.50 17.64
Vernon  8,653 442.64 19.55 8,591 464.00 18.52
Central Okanagan  16,140 860.30 18.76 16.040 868.00 18.48
Kamloops  18,098 957.04 18.91 17.919 1,011.91 17.71
North Thompson  1,313 76.70 17.12 1,333 85.40 15.61
Cariboo-Chilcotin  8,192 453.10 18.08 8,329 466.80 17.84
Quesnel  5,631 310.32 18.15 5,571 315.66 17.65
Lillooet     979 58.00 16.88 1,029 59.40 17.32
South Cariboo  2,080 120.20 17.30 2,041 120.40 16.95
Merritt  2,552 134.00 19.04 2,592 138.00 18.78
Hope  1,800 96.00 18.75 1,659 94.00 17.65
Chilliwack  8,635 445.90 19.37 8,545 455.76 18.75
Abbotsford  8,815 464.60 18.97 8,861 476.30 18.60
Langley  11,122 601.10 18.50 11,701 644.55 18.15
Surrey  27,975 1,510.60 18.52 27,754 1,522.60 18.23
Delta  17,205 913.30 18.84 17,504 956.40 18.30
Richmond  18,092 953.33 18.98 18,110 975.62 18.56
Vancouver  62,207 3,215.00 19.35 59,949 3,189.50 18.80
New Westminster  4,841 271.50 17.83 4,645 263.50 17.63
Burnaby  23,080 1,276.25 18.08 22,252 1,238.55 17.97
Maple Ridge  7,598 398.40 19.07 7,535 406.50 18.54
Coquitlam  23,277 1,223.40 19.03 22,912 1,215.20 18.85
North Vancouver  19,779 1,122.36 17.62 18,918 1,089.10 17.37
West Vancouver  6,991 368.78 18.96 6,612 357.15 18.51
Sechelt  2,471 144.35 17.12 2,472 146.30 16.90
Powell River  4,610 262.00 17.60 4,380 258.10 16.97
Howe Sound,  2,835 146.43 19.36 2,837 158.33 17.92
Ocean Falls  857 54.70 15.67 824 56.70 14.53
Queen Charlotte  1,353 84.00 16.11 1,291 85.00 15.19
Prince Rupert  4,227 226.50 18.66 4,096 236.00 17.36
Smithers  2,748 144.64 19.00 2,765 153.34 18.03
Burns Lake  1,958 116.90 16.75 1,938 122.20 15.86
Nechako  3,345 183.50 18.23 3,334 194.00 17.19
Prince George  20,628 1,132.11 18.22 20,655 1,139.20 18.13
Peace River South  5,540 305.13 18.16 5,396 309.25 17.45
Peace River North  5,506 288.50 19.08 5,594 300.40 18.62
Greater Victoria  26,129 1,378.76 18.95 24,876 1,338.64 18.58
Sooke  7,715 419.80 18.38 7,677 431.80 17.78
Saanich  5,920 334.80 17.68 5,916 336.24 17.59
Gulf Islands  1,014 58.20 17.42 1,003 63.30 15.85
Cowichan  7,870 420.50 18.72 7,771 435.00 17.86
Lake Cowichan  1,441 86.45 16.67 1,370 88.48 15.48
Nanaimo  12,172 670.00 18.17 11,971 691.65 17.31
Qualicum  2,362 134.30 17.59 2,410 134.00 17.99
Alberni  8,216 438.80 18.72 7,868 439.75 17.89
Courtenay  7,377 376.06 19.62 7,334 380.39 19.28
Campbell River  5,785 299.10 19.34 5,763 309.70 18.61
Mission  4,271 225.20 18.97 4,403 235.60 18.69
Agassiz-Harrison  845 48.00 17.60 838 49.00 17.10
Summerland  1,472 75.00 19.63 1,421 76.60 18.55
Kitimat  3,155 179.50 17.58 3,183 177.80 17.90
Fort Nelson  1,118 63.17 17.70 1,090 66.00 16.52
Vancouver Island West  1,024 56.50 18.12 1,010 63.50 15.91
Vancouver Island North.... 3,057 187.85 16.27 2,947 191.60 15.38
Creston-Kaslo  2,633 145.10 18.15 2,530 147.80 17.12
Stikine  485 31.95 15.18 516 39.72 12.99
Skeena-Cassiar  5,764 317.25 18.17 5,665 308.60 18.36
Shuswap  5,685 305.40 18.61 5,599 319.55 17.52
Nisgha  523 37.00 14.14 543 38.50 14.10
GRAND TOTAL  518,425 27,858.42 18.61 510,419 28,181.24
18.11
Source: Form AD — 77-10-31, Division of Financial Services.
Note: Calculation of F.T.E. pupils— each Grade I through XII pupil is counted as 1.0; each Kin-
. rt dergarten pupil is counted as 0.5.
\ 28 Calculation of F.T.E. teachers — part-time as well as full-time teachers are counted. Each part-time
teacher is counted according to the appropriate decimal fraction of full-time (i.e., a half-time teacher is
counted as 0.5). All district-wide (i.e., directors of instruction, supervisors, teacher consultants, coordinator-,   district  lihrarians   district counsellors,  relieving  teachers   etc 1   as  well  as schnnl-arracheri
 PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
Table 2.20 school broadcasts
Television
Programs broadcast 148
Schools reporting use 738
Radio
Programs broadcast 148
Schools reporting use ' 556
Table 2.21(1) distribution of audio-visual materials
Total films supplied 35,133
Media catalogues 10,000
School broadcast tabloids 72,000
Sing-out booklets 75,000
Let's Sing Together booklets 76,000
French booklets — Chantez, First French, A Propos, Cocorico 42,000
Videotape programs 13,000
Audiotape programs 4,233
129
 Table 2.21(2) distribution services circulation report
District No.
and Name
Motion Pictures
No.
Supplied
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14,
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
-22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
■41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
92.
130
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake 	
Nechako.	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Gulf Island's	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Agassiz-Harrison	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island, West ..
Vancouver Island, North .
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine	
Skeena-Cassiar	
Shuswap	
Nisgha	
Provincial Colleges	
Independent Schools	
Miscellaneous	
TOTAL 	
657
594
252
476
448
78
252
209
448
I8l
50
535
237
289
561
617
109
656
488
450
288
1,942
714
112
188
428
312
1,975
134
95
1,905
425
107
202
113
406
298
144
174
228
361
393
439
628
621
443
371
407
486
93
635
469
83
411
501
307
416
119
1,027
485
820
424
300
402
168
60
668
351
301
896
429
194
1,142
1,070
43
437
891
65
35,133
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
3.    Finance
TABLE
3.1 Comparison of enrolment and expenditure for public education
at June 30 132
3.2 Expenditure for education, calendar year 1977 133
3.3 Cost per pupil, calendar year 1977 134
3.4 Expenditure by school district for the calendar year 1977 135
3.5 Revenue by school district for the calendar year 1977 137
3.6 Transportation costs 139
3.7 Summary of school dormitory data, 1977/78 139
131
 Table 3.1
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION AT JUNE 30
Number
Number
June
Average          Percentage
Total
Operating
Total
School-year
of
or
Net
Daily                   of
Expenditures
Expenditure
Teachers
School
Enrol
Atten-               Atten
for
for
Employed
Districts
ment
dance               dance1
Education
Education
1882/83	
69
59
2,693
1,383                51.36
$
60.758.752
$
1887/88	
128
104
6,372
3,093                48.54
113,689.36;
1892/93	
267
169
11,496
7,111                61.85
174,775.43
21S.056.223
1897/98	
429
213
17,648
11,055                62.64
290,255.26
425,555.10
1902/03	
607
268
24,499
16,357                66.76
473,802.29
604,357.86
1907/08	
816
189
33,314
23,195                69.62
544,671.60
1,220,509.85
1912/13	
1,597
359
57,608
43,274                75.12
1,663,003.34
4,658,894.97
1913/14	
1,859
374
62,263
49,377                79.30
1,885,654.11
4,634,877.56
1917/18	
2,246
575
67,516
54,746                81.09
1,653,796.60
3,519,014.61
1922/23	
3,118
744
94,888
77,752                81.94
3,176,686.284
7,630,009.54*
1927/28	
3,668
788
108,179
91,760                84.82
3,532,518.95
9,261,094.98
1928/29	
3,784
792
109,588
94,410                86.17
3,765,920.69
11,149,996.27
1929/30	
3,854
803
111,017
96,196               86.65
3,743,317.08
10,008,255.66
1930/31	
3,948
811
113,914
99,375                87.23
3,834,727.19
10,061,387.99
1931/32	
3,959
830
115,919
103,510                89.29
4,015,074.37
9,719,333.81
1932/33 ;.
3,912
821
116,816
104,978                89.86
2,849,972.02
8,941,497.34
1933/34	
3,873
827
115,792
103,389                89.30
2,611,937.80
8,213,369.04
1934/35	
3,942
762
117,233
101,893                86.91
2,835,040.74
8,458,156.00
1935/36	
3,956
773
116,722
101,873               87.27
2,972,385.04
8,775,353.78
1936/37	
4,025
763
118,431
104,044                87.85
3,277,660.23
9,593,562.64
1937/38	
4,092
741
120,360
106,515                88.49
3,524,962.69
10,193,367.08
1938/39	
4,194
721
120,934
107,660                89.02
3,630,670.78
10,640,740.47
1939/40	
4,220
720
120,459
108,826                90.34
3,585,769.00
10,521,684.92
1940/41	
4,248
730
119,634
103,192                86.26
3,963,848.24
10,982,364.49
1941/42	
4,224
696
118,405
102,085               86.22
4,028,397.88
11,120,801.94
1942/43	
4,055
661
115,447
93,473                80.96
3,924,243.53
11,502,291.35
1943/44	
4,162
654
119,043
102,999                86.52
4,244,898.82
12,231,029.35
1944/45	
4,354
650
125,135
107,599                86.08
5,022,534.59
13,683,538.18
1945/46	
4,512
86
130,605
114,590                87.91
5,765,205.50
14,818,625.81
1946/47	
4,833
89
137,827
121,334                88.36
9,398,473.46
20,176,930.53
1947/48	
5,116
93
146,708
129,859                88.81
12,468,653.18
25,768,392.09
1948/49	
5,496
97
155,515
138,941                89.67
17,363,430.94
35,538,079.88
1949/50	
5,873
97
164,212
147,583                90.26
22,809,631.23
47,726,750.37
1950/51	
6,272
98
173,354
154,077                89.19
25,830,076.88
54,195,133.95
1951/52	
6,598
101
183,112
163,364                89.58
26,885,980.43
57,881,559.48
1952/53	
7,105
100
195,290
176,138                90.62
26,555,080.24
58,401,121.15
1953/54	
7,574
104
210,174
191,061                91.25
24,060,233.15
70,791,844.25
1954/55	
8,185
104
223,840
204,239                91.63
34,279,302.27
80,823,263.714
1955/56	
8,690
102
240,674
218,303                91.12
41,067,740.34
69,314,181.24'
1956/57	
9,474
103
260,069
235,396                 90.98
43,989,524.32
77,653,192.32
1957/58	
10,171
102
277,070
252,490                91.71
50,861,473.63
90,483,765.63
1958/59	
10,839
101
291,223
267,052                92.32
53,288,028.94
101,351,107.94
1959/60	
11,513
98
305,837
281,513                92.61
59,472,055.06
115,941,018.06
1960/61	
12,137
97
321,760
298,175                 93.23
70,174,999.84
133,401,622.84
1961/62	
12,772
99
340,290
312,173                92.69
77,632,903.48
145,535,715.48
1962/63	
13,571
100
358,905
332,585                93.76
83,782,121.79
157,614,783.79
1963/64	
14,415
100
378,641
348,472                 93.23
95,497,375.16
177,539,584.16
1964/65	
15,327
93
400,080
367,718                93.25
105,017,594.75
199,114,313.75
1965/66	
16,173
93
420,790
379,045                91.50
119,871,278.31
227,937,392.31
1966/67	
17,742*
87
445,228
408,452               93.28
144,702,607.40
269,217,969.40
1967/68	
19,191
85
467,486
425,514                92.64
181,854,578.21
332,702,367.21
1968/69	
20,481
85
489,596
447,643                93.87
251,827,287.92
384,336,617.68
1969/70	
21,828
85
513,079
466,264               93.74
292,556,398.29
437,743,656.54
1970/71	
22,678
80
527,106
476,643               93.41
354,470,298.48
516,309,118.90
1971/72	
23,224
75
534,523
481,353                93.38
382,221,877.00
557,875,205.00
1972/73	
23,365
74
537,106
481,686               93.20
425,505,748.00
612,808,108.00
1973/74	
24,585'
74
548,999
489,303               92.86
481,823,740.00
694,357,161.00
1974/75	
26,877
75
553,991
494,877               93.13
551,647,880.00
832,876,042.00s
1975/76	
27,870
75
555,238
495,715                92.95
704,839,307.00
1,068,408,139.00
1976/77	
28,390
75
547,994
484,226               93.13
822,600,150.00
1,223,758,028.00
1977/78	
28,181
75
539,198
478,792                92.89
923,735,364.00
1,374,983,287.00
■Average daily attendance as a
percentage of FTE net enrolment. Since 1968/69 percentage of atten-
dance is total actual attendance as a percentage of total possible attendance.
2The total expendit
ure for public schools
was borne by the Government.
Excluding unknown expenditu
re made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
4Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the provincial univer
sities and since 1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
5Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital e
xpenditures from by-law funds.
4 OO     6The numbers of teachers reported from 1966/67 on
* ^^      administrative duties. These district-wide teachers
include district-wide teachers with supervisory and
were excluded from this table prior
to 1966/67.
'Since 1973/74 the number of teachers is
reported i
is of September 30 rather than June 30.
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x)
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138
 Table 3.6
TRANSPORTATION COSTS
Calendar Year
Total District
Conveyance
Costs as a
Expenditures
Costs
Percentage of
District Expenditures
$
118,269,99.1
$
2,477,202
2.1
127,616,486
2,611,370
2.0
136,432,687
2,721,510
2.0
150,790,702
2,886,696
1.9
165,814,555
3,125,447
1.9
185,566,119
3,475,895
1.9
214,156,353
4,009,393
1.9
248,031,667
4,610,089
1.9
285,686,761
5,355,378
1.87
323,153,465
5,891,894
1.82
361,429,563
6,556,422
1.81
401,033,384
7,216,520
1.89
438,901,005
8,072,883
1.84
502,596,294
9,688,206
1.93
599,460,473
12,548,230
2.09
748,419,484
16,363,823
2.19
863,163,406
19,298,273
2.24
972,529,889
21,930,833
2.25
1960..
1961..
1962..
1963..
1064..
1965..
1966..
1967..
1968..
1969'.
1970'.
1971'.
1972'.
1973'.
1974'.
19751.
1976'.
1977'.
'Excluding college expenditures.
Table 3.7
SUMMARY OF SCHOOL DORMITORY DATA, 1977-78
Capacity
Occupancy
Staff
Grade Lirtiits
School District
No. Name
Female        Male        Female
Full Part
Time Time
From
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
29. Lillooet	
60. Peace River North	
85. Vancouver Island North
92. Nisgha..	
TOTALS 	
70
70
48
49
7
4
29
29
29
29
4
1
68
58
20
18
7
1
25
25
11
16
3
1
35
35
35
35
10
2
12
12
12
12
12
227
217
143
147
139
 .'"fp*?'?** sWiiK'
140
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
4.    Schools
„
TABLE
4.1 Number of public schools in operation by type, September 1972 to 1977 .. .142
4.2 Senior secondary schools 142
4.3 Secondary schools 143
4.4 Junior secondary schools 144
4.5 Elementary-senior secondary schools 144
4.6 Elementary-junior secondary schools 145
4.7 Elementary schools 146
4.8 Summary of all schools 147
141
 Table 4.1  number of public schools in operation by type,
SEPTEMBER 1972-77
Numbers Open in September
^        1972       1973       1974       1975       1976 1977        ^".V
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary.
Elementary-junior secondary.
6 23
5 118
4 115
3 10
2 46
24
115
126
14
44
23
123
122
17
55
21
135
122
16
56
23
141
126
16
67
23
147
124
19
64
+ 29
+ 9
+ 9
+ 18
Elementary	
1          1,209
1,221
1,234
1,232
1,229
1,234
+ 25
TOTAL SCHOOLS	
— 1,521
— 526
1,544
536
1,574
542
1,582
543
1,602
536
1,611
527
+ 90
TOTAL ENROLMENT IN THOUSANDS	
+   1
Source: September Form B.
Table 4.2
senior secondary schools
District Number and Name
Number of
FTE'
September 30
Schools
Teachers
Enrolment
1
61.00
1,142
2
111.50
2,108
1
34.40
699
1
35.00
662
1
54.50
949
1
51.00
880
4
156.20
2,855
1
64.00
1,165
2
90.20
1,820
1
61.60
1,141
3
191.00
3,626
1
86.50
1,527
1
57.60
1,063
1
83.00
1,602
1
37.00
714
1
36.00
595
22.   Vernon	
24.   Kamloops	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin.
28. Quesnel	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41.   Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver.
61. Greater Victoria . .
68.  Nanaimo	
72. Campbell River...
89.   Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
1,210.50
22,548
•In tables 4.2 through 4.8 data on teachers are expressed in full-time equivalents and apply to school-attached personnel only, i.e., the totals do not include district-wide professional staff.
Source: September 1977 Form B.
142
 Table 4.3
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
77.
80.
81.
84.
85.
86.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Central Coast	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake 	
Nechako	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich 	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West...
Vancouver Island North ..
Creston-Kaslo	
Terrace 	
19
1
4
3
5
3
2
2
2
2
66.00
49.00
28.00
28.90
48.50
46.00
19.00
75.50
38.00
20.00
47.85
67.00
18.25
35.00
46.00
20.30
30.00
299.00
115.10
29.00
25.00
1.00
19.50
44.00
55.00
28.50
107.00
34.00
82.00
176.00
105.00
67.10
1,400.87
125.50
248.75
151.50
274.60
180.57
43.10
45.85
50.80
22.40
21.00
35.75
44.00
30.00
37.00
265.55
44.50
42.00
271.76
135.00
110.50
20.80
89.95
30.47
29.90
34.00
88.50
75.30
38.00
39.50
38.60
69.50
20.02
15.00
52.00
53.00
69.50
1,180
912
507
507
855
882
311
1,425
651
321
873
1,232
278
656
829
359
559
5,488
1,815
486
466
8
366
713
1,034
520
2,059
631
1,401
3,115
1,841
1,283
27,681
2,351
4,691
2,650
4,965
3,356
735
751
888
275
307
662
701
480
666
4,717
758
783
5,060
2,372
1,955
360
1,708
461
537
554
1,551
1,454
671
753
706
1,289
253
212
738
938
1,211
89.  Shuswap	
                 2
44.70
728
TOTAL 	
             147
6,260.24
114,491
Source: September 1977 Form B.
143
 Table 4.4
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
2.
7.
9.
11.
15.
21.
22.
23.
24.
27.
28.
30.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
41.
42.
43.
44.
46.
47.
48.
52.
54.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
65.
68.
70.
71.
72.
75.
Cranbrook	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Trail	
Penticton	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Centra! Okanagan	
Kamloops	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
South Cariboo	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Kitimat	
Terrace	
60.00
36.00
22.00
29.00
58.00
16.70
119.70
103.00
228.75
107.10
90.10
9.00
104.60
101.50
128.50
305.35
166.50
247.90
225.00
24.00
334.50
134.20
17.30
69.69
13.20
49.00
25.54
142.55
60.00
67.00
291.48
37.80
101.75
160.45
104.00
104.80
54.00
57.60
2.00
57.00
1,060
692
403
525
994
272
2,176
1,816
3,908
1,919
1,502
113
1,930
1,844
2,187
5,684
2,859
4,923
3,875
420
6,363
2,202
288
1,169
247
869
452
2,688
1,079
1,173
5,394
732
1,752
2,945
1,741
1,954
884
960
19
1,072
89.  Shuswap	
               2
62.00
1,125
TOTAL 	
             124
4,128.56
74,210
Source: September 1977 Form B.
Table 4.5   elementary-senior secondary schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
144
7.   Nelson	
10.   Arrow Lakes	
17.   Princeton	
28.  Quesnel	
37.   Delta	
39.   Vancouver	
50.  Queen Charlotte	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
76.   Agassiz-Harrison	
84. Vancouver Island West.
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
92.   Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
1                      17.00
236
1                      14.70
218
1                     33.00
531
1                      5.60
71
2                     77.72
1,315
1                     2.00
34
1                    21.82
345
1                      28.00
435
2                     71.50
1,244
1                      24.50
460
1                      14.50
239
1                      26.50
461
1                    16.50
316
2                     26.20
440
1                      18.50
279
1                     25.50
405
423.54
7,029
Source: September 1977 Form B.
 Table 4.6   elementary-junior secondary schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1,  Fernie	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.  Nelson	
11.  Trail	
14.   Southern Okanagan	
19.   Revelstoke	
24.   Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
32.   Hope	
41.   Burnaby	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
50.  Queen Charlotte	
52.   Prince Rupert	
55.   Burns Lake	
57.   Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
66.   Lake Cowichan	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
72.  Campbell River	
81.   Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West..
85. Vancouver Island North .
87.  Stikine	
89.   Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
1
17.40
301
1
29.00
467
1
9.25
134
1
8.00
70
1
17.50
322
1
27.35
491
1
7.00
129
2
18.00
341
1
6.50
101
9
41.20
759
1
3.56
37
1
5.50
104
2
24.10
429
1
51.50
974
1
2.00
6
3
11.64
151
2
11.50
175
3
31.50
453
1
13.00
181
2
30.10
504
1
7.00
140
3
27.50
492
2
39.60
636
4
87.90
1,589
i
11.30
139
16.50
266
40.00
743
3.50
58
21.00
378
7.10
105
4.20
60
65.79
1,037
4.94
62
8.30
159
64
710.23
Source: September 1977 Form B.
145
 Table 4.7
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
80.
81.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
92.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Central Coast	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake 	
Nechako	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Agassiz-Harrison	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West...
Vancouver Island North ..
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine	
Terrace 	
Shuswap	
Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
9
9
8
7
16
12
5
11
3
6
5
12
3
5
7
8
2
15
40
39
7
29
17
4
4
24
31
31
63
27
35
95
9
41
20
47
35
19
11
12
10
5
5
7
11
54
17
17
40
20
13
3
27
6
35
7
21
17
13
16
3
3
5
2
5
10
9
4
16
21
2
104.60
129.00
58.52
42.70
115.10
83.05
28.70
119.30
42.30
23.50
55.55
125.80
19.50
26.50
52.55
66.75
40.00
235.64
453.40
513.16
42.00
243.50
173.40
31.80
66.40
78.00
39.20
226.66
269.50
357.94
839.05
522.00
538.70
1,691.96
131.00
608.15
212.55
643.95
563.84
161.50
77.50
125.35
88.72
33.30
28.50
106.60
79.80
44.70
74.30
640.57
151.20
145.40
638.78
235.73
127.30
27.60
227.15
37.36
373.22
59.00
230.01
184.85
150.05
132.10
21.00
38.00
100.20
37.00
25.50
68.20
62.90
11.00
171.10
146.15
11.50
2,217
2,904
1,102
806
2,443
1,701
556
2,534
842
444
1,109
2,836
375
506
937
1,279
796
4,958
9,349
10,405
794
4,730
3,418
60S
1,297
1,644
789
4,840
5,772
7,650
17.197
11,019
10,745
34,205
2,466
12,213
4,748
13,625
10,834
3,394
1,553
2,463
1,832
563
533
2,301
1,713
871
1,508
13,656
3,103
3,104
13,526
4,839
2,552
519
4,549
674
7,295
1,199
4,788
4,089
3,271
2,858
412
752
2,008
764
477
1,262
1,257
188
3,599
3,176
162
1,234
14,488.36
297,500
146
Source: September 1977 Form B.
 Table 4.8
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
80.
81.
84.
85.
Fernie	
Cranbrook 	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Central Coast	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake 	
Nechako	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich 	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Agassiz-Harrison	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West...
Vancouver Island North ..
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine	
Terrace	
Shuswap	
Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
12
12
10
9
21
14
7
15
4
7
7
15
10
4
20
50
52
9
43
24
6
11
9
7
30
36
38
79
36
44
115
10
54
24
59
44
17
15
19
13
7
9
13
11
10
14
67
22
24
58
27
20
6
32
8
42
10
27
23
19
19
4
4
7
4
9
17
12
6
21
27
3
188.00
238.00
115.52
80.85
224.60
151.05
62.40
241.30
80.30
43.50
130.75
250.80
37.75
59.50
87.55
119.75
77.00
446.34
855.40
986.51
77.50
451.20
308.66
56.80
119.40
133.00
91.80
438.26
459.50
619.44
1,476.60
935.22
943.90
3,094.83
256.50
1,195.00
388.05
1,169.45
1,059.14
342.07
139.90
252.53
152.72
55.70
82.82
222.85
149.34
115.70
182.80
1,078.77
287.20
296.40
1,299.22
408.53
325.70
59.70
418.85
84.33
646.57
133.00
426.01
364.95
300.05
229.20
47.50
76.60
171.70
64.12
61.20
185.99
142.10
34.44
297.60
297.15
37.00
3,698
4,876
2,076
1,447
4,296
2,986
1,085
4,806
1,493
765
2,473
5,062
653
1,037
1,593
2,237
1,427
8,835
16,653
18,577
1,381
8,573
5,698
1,075
2,123
2,678
1,738
8,829
9,196
12,118
28,851
18,199
18,771
61,920
4,817
22,894
7,818
23,614
19,528
6,750
2,582
4,534
2,967
838
1,360
4,285
2,866
1,967
3,418
21,565
5,540
5,791
25,679
7,943
6,096
1,018
8,009
1,401
12,379
2,496
8,138
7,497
5,918
4,571
873
1,458
3,316
1,122
1,065
3,037
2,635
529
5,882
5,783
567
1,611
27,221.43
527,771
147
Source: September 1977 Form B.
  INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
Table 5.1   GENERAL INFORMATION, 1977/78
1. PUPILS
Number of qualifying pupils (group 1 and 2 schools)  16,817
2. TEACHERS
Number of teachers (group 1 and 2 schools)  1,307
3. FINANCE
Grants for 1977/78 school year       $8,183,796
Percentage of average operating costs in the public schools of the
school district in which the independent school is located
applicable to grant.
Group 1 schools 9 Percent
Group 2 schools 30 Percent
4. SCHOOLS
Number of schools applying for grants  109
Number of schools receiving grants  101
Classification of group 1 and 2 schools
Elementary (K-VII)  67
Elementary-junior secondary (K-X)   9
Elementary-senior secondary (K-XII)  11
Junior secondary (VIII-X)  2
Secondary (VIII-XII)  _12
101
149
 150
 POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
6.    General
TABLE
6.1 Summary of credit enrolments at B.C. post-secondary institutions, by
institution type, major program area, and enrolment status, 1967/1968 to the
present 152
6.2 Total (full-time plus part-time) Academic and Career/Technical enrolment at
British Columbia universities, public community colleges and BCIT,
1967/1968 to the present 153
6.3 Number of faculty at B.C. post-secondary institutions, by institution type,
major program area, and employment status, 1972/1973 to the present 154
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154
 POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
7.    Universities Data
TABLE
7.1 Degree enrolment in British Columbia universities, 1977/78 156
7.2 Undergraduate students, (full-time plus part-time) enrolled for credit at
British Columbia universities, by faculty for fall 1977 157
7.3 Graduate students, (full-time plus part-time) enrolled for credit at British
Columbia universities, by faculty for fall 1977 158
7.4 University regular teaching faculty by rank, fall 1977 159
7.5 University regular teaching faculty by faculty, fall 1977 160
155
 Table 7.1 degree enrolment in
BRITISH COLUMBIA UNIVERSITIES, 1977/78
British
Columbia
University
Victoria
Simon
Fraser
Total
FULL-TIME
Undergraduate  17,988
Graduate  2,120
Subtotal  20,108
PART-TIME'
Undergraduate  8,849
Graduate  1,389
Subtotal  10,238
TOTAL  30,346
4,937
261
5,198
3,530
294
3,824
6,130
583
6,713
3,637
360
3,997
29,055
2,964
32,019
16,016
2,043
18,059
9,022
10,710
50,078
Source: Universities Council of B.C. Data are for fiscal year 1977-78.
Note:    ' Academic year equivalent enrolments are computed as follows:
— UBC and U.Vic.: the sum of the enrolments of the summer session and inter-session added
to the part-time enrolments of December 1.
— SFU: for undergraduates, it is the sum of the enrolments of summer, fall and spring enrolments and of the summer session and inter-session, divided by two (summer and inter-session enrolments are part-time only). For graduates, it is the sum of the enrolments of the
summer, fall and spring semesters, divided by three.
2 Part-time enrolments include on and off-campus part-time enrolments as well as the enrolments of summer and inter-session. In addition, it includes correspondence enrolments at
UBC.
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 Table 7.4 university regular teaching faculty by rank,
FALL 1977
Institution
Professors
Number of Regular, Full-time Teaching Faculty
Associate        Assistant       Instructors
Professors       Professors     and Lecturers
Total
Number of
Regular Part-
time Teaching
Faculty
Grand Total
UBC	
U.Vic	
560
89
105
541
205
169
584
123
121
133
9
30
1,818
426
425
340
2
10
2,158
428
SFU	
435
TOTAL 	
754
915
828
172
2,669
352
3,021
Source: Universities Council of B.C.
159
 160
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 POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
8.   Colleges and Institutes
TABLE
8.1 Enrolment in public community colleges and provincial institutes, October 31,
1977 162
8.2 Full-time Career/Technical enrolment in B.C. community colleges and BCIT,
by institution, by program, October 31,1977 163
8.3 Part-time Career/Technical enrolment in B.C. community colleges and BCIT,
by institution, by program, October 31,1977 164
8.4 Full-time enrolments by program in vocational institutes and vocational
divisions of public community colleges, 1977/78 165
8.5 Number of course registrations in all University Transfer courses at B.C.
community colleges, by institution and by subject area, October 31,1977 169
8.6 Number of course registrations in all Career/Technical courses at B.C.
community colleges and BCIT, by institution and by subject area, October 31,
1977 170
8.7 Professional and instructional staff at B.C. community colleges and provincial
institutes, by program, by employment status and by institution, October 31,
1977 171
8.8 Total (Academic, Career/Technical and Vocational) faculty at B.C.
community colleges and provincial institutes, by institution and by subject
area, October 31,1977 172
8.9 Academic faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes, by
institution and by subject area, October 31,1977 173
8.10 Career/Technical faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes,
by institution and by subject area, October 31,1977 174
8.11 Vocational faculty at B.C. community colleges and provincial institutes, by
institution and by subject area, October 31,1977 175
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 176
■
 CONTINUING EDUCATION
9. Course Registrants
TABLE
9.1 University Continuing Education non-credit course registrations, 1975/76,
1976/77 178
9.2 Continuing Education course registrations in British Columbia colleges,
1976/77,1977/78 179
9.3 Continuing Education course registrations for British Columbia school
districts, 1976/77,1977/78 180
177
 Table 9.1      university continuing education
NON-CREDIT COURSE REGISTRATIONS,
1975/76, 1976/77
Institution
Year1
UBC
SFU
U.Vic.
Total
1975/76
1976/77
52,813
53,011
6,098
8,822
3,242
4,080
62,153
65,913
Source: Continuing Education Annual Reports, 1975/76, 1976/77.
Note:    ' Reporting year September 1 to August 31 for UBC and SFU, and April 1 to March 31 for
U.Vic.
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 Table 9.3 CONTINUING education COURSE registrations
FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOL DISTRICTS,
1976/77, 1977/78
Program
Institution
Academic
Upgrading
Vocational
Part-Time
General &
Community
Education
Professional
Development
1976/77 1977/78 1976/77 1977/78 1976/77 1977/78      1976/77      1977/78 1976/77 1977/78
7 Nelson  0 0 0 254 1,262 1,502 0 0 1,262 1,756
11 Trail  214 151 129 112 1,638 1,461 13 0 1,994 1,724
13 Kettle Valley  0 0 28 23 87 69 0 0 115 92
17 Princeton  0 15 0 74 360 150 0 0 360 239
28 Quesnel  75 863 597 1,209 5,384 5,084 311 51 6,367 7,207
35 Langley  365 52 689 792 4,261 2,924 269 0 5,584 3,768
36Surrey  1,102 1,655 1,158 1,127 4,162 4,737 151 0 6,573 7,519
37 Delta  127 419 688 855 4,676 4,328 234 285 5,725 5,887
38 Richmond  563 1,059 2,023 3,126 5,031 5,190 945 383 8,562 9,758
39 Vancouver  460 4,472 0 0 29,190 32,340 0 77 29,650 36,889
40 New Westminster . 542 708 855 730 4,881 5,513 487 384 6,765 7,335
41 Burnaby  893 1,784 1,580 1,964 12,134 11,462 919 1,213 15,526 16,423
42 Maple Ridge  427 383 797 1,211 2,536 1,802 480 71 4,240 3,467
43 Coquitlam  1,934 2,728 279 494 9,868 10,498 42 35 12,123 13,755
44/45 North & West
Vancouver  853 1283 1,236 1,212 8,408 8,381 923 866 11,420 11,742
46 Sechelt  28 31 72 593 2,047 1,574 21 42 2,168 2,240
48 Howe Sound  0 33 92 255 2,388 1,183 75 0 2,555 1,471
49 Central Coast  0 0 0 0 121 142 0 0 121 142
50 Queen Charlottes.. 0 0 15 31 422 450 19 0 456 481
52 Prince Rupert  0 20 0 71 778 557 34 0 812 648
54Smithers  51 70 89 221 1,132 862 102 11 1,374 1,140
57 Prince George  467 1,262 395 1,404 12,722 7,443 709 0 14,293 10,109
60 Peace River North* 29 — 269 — 1,131 — 230 — 1,659 —
61 Greater Victoria... 8 40 16 12 865 1,236 0 0 889 1,288
62Sooke  61 147 109 91 1,568 876 87 0 1,825 1,114
63 Saanich  383 75 70 152 1,926 1,513 105 0 2,484 1,740
64GulfIslands  0 54 0 55 721 865 0 0 721 974
66 Lake Cowichan.... 145 376 192 589 1,669 1,964 60 0 2,066 2,929
70 Port Alberni*  64 — 327 — 3,093 — 183 — 3,667 —
89
129
168
281
166
50
230
1,637
1,353
679
892
84
41
0
0
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1,640
858
88 Terrace	
80
1,290
TOTALS	
8,960
17,977
12,152
16,937
127,451
115,677
6,524
3,418
155,087
153,985
Source: Continuing education annual reports, 1976/77, (final) and 1977/78 (preliminary).
* Adult education programs in these districts were turned over to community colleges following the
1976/77 school year.
180

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