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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA One Hundred and Fifth Annual Report JULY… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1976

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 D€PfiRTmanTOP
axjamon
OF THE PROVINCE
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
One Hundred and Fifth
Annual Report
JULY 1, 1975 TO JUNE 30, 1976
MINISTER OF EDUCATION
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Printed by K. M. MacDonald.
Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent
Majesty in right of the Province of
British Columbia
1976
  ^orzou,
A      PROVINCE OF
VICTORIA
To Colonel the Honourable
Walter S. Owen, Q.C, LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the One Hundred
and Fifth Report of the Department of Education.
?r\
ZksJ
Dr. Patrick L. McGeer
Minister of Education
 table of conraro
Personnel     5
From the Minister  10
Schools
Educational Programs—Schools  14
Integrated and Supportive Services  18
Field Personnel  21
Post-secondary Education
Educational Programs—Post-secondary__ 24
Finance and Administration
Financial Services  28
Administrative Services  29
Communications  31
Statistical Tables  3 3
Alfr^ Minni
 >
€R/onna
INISTER'S OFFICE
'inister of Education
fie Honourable Patrick L. McGeer,
A., Ph.D., M.D.
EPUTY MINISTER'S OFFICE
eputy Minister of Education
. G. Hardwick, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
ssociate Deputy Minister, Finance and
A dministration
R. Fleming, B.A.
ssociate Deputy Minister, Educational
Programs—Schools
Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
ssociate Deputy Minister, Educational
Programs—Post-secondary
. E. Soles, B.A., M.Ed.
irector, Personnel Services
A. Holmes, Dip.PublicAdmin.
UPERINTENDENTS OF
DUCATIONAL SERVICES
lucational Programs—Schools
R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
tegrated and Supportive Services
Walsh, B.Sc, M.Ed.
eld Personnel
J. Leskiw, B.Ed., M.Ed., D.Ed.
iucational Programs—Post-secondary
E. Justesen
nancial Services (until April)
Valen, C.G.A.
iministrative Services
L. Canty, B.A, M.Ed.
■ymmunications
L. Faris, B.A, M.Ed, Ph.D.
3-ucational programs—
:hools
ssistant Superintendent
T. McBurney, B.Com, M.Ed.
rector, Curriculum Development
. B. Naylor, B.A.
ssistant Director, Curriculum Development
D. Oliver, B.A.
ome Economics Consultants
iss J. Campbell, B.Sc, M.A, Dip.Ed.
rs. H. Krueger, B.Sc.
Fiona Ellis
 French Program Co-ordinator
C. Fournier, B.A.
Director, Vocational and Industrial
Education
J. Jupp
Assistant Director, Learning Assessment
J. J. Mussio, MA, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Examinations
H. C. D. Chalmers, B.Sc, Ph.C.
INTEGRATED AND SUPPORTIVE
SERVICES
Assistant Superintendent
Mrs. F. L. Fleming, B.Ed, M.Ed.
Director, Correspondence Education
J. R. Hind, B.A, B.Pasd.
Director, Special Education
J. A. G. Gittins, B.Ed, M.Ed, Ph.D.
FIELD PERSONNEL
Director, Field Services (Acting)
D. L. Hartwig, B.A.
Director, Teacher Services
B. A. Andrews, B.A, MA.
Assistant Director, Teacher Certification
E. D. Cherrington, B.A, Dip.PublicAdmin.
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS—
POST-SECONDARY
Assistant Superintendent
J. F. Newberry, B.Ed, M.Ed, Ph.D.
Director, Trades Training and Journeyman
Upgrading
P. C. MacGregor
Director, Business and Industry Programs
D. MacRae, B.Sc.
Director, Career Programs
D. S. Goard, B.Ed, M.A.
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Assistant Superintendent (Acting)
R. A. Munro, B.Com, CA.
Director, Departmental Finance
J. F. Currie, Dip.PublicAdmin.
Director, Schools Finance
G. Gamble, R.I.A.
ADMINISTRATIVE  SERVICES
Assistant Superintendent (Acting)
W. L. Hawker, B.A, B.Ed.
Director, A dministration
F. J. Keogh, Dip.Schl.Admin.
Director, Facilities Development—Schools
F. B. Simpson, M.R.A.I.C, A.R.I.B.A.
Director, Facilities Development—
Post-secondary
D. S. McLelland, M.R.A.I.C.
COMMUNICATIONS
Director, Publication Services
D. W. C. Huggins, C.G.A.
Director, Information Services (until April)
J. L. Arnett
Director, Provincial Educational Media
Centre
B. A. Black, B.Ed.
Director, Educational Data Services
K. Plant, B.Com, M.B.A.
Co-ordinator, Educational Data Services
R. C. May, B.A, M.Sc.
Librarian
Mrs. A. Armstrong, B.A.
DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS  OF
SCHOOLS
G. S. Armstrong, B.Ed, Burns Lake
W. W. Baldry, B.A, M.Ed, South Cariboo
O. Bedard, B.Ed, M.A, Peace River South
L. B. Beduz, B.A, B.Ed, M.Ed, Creston
R. S. Boyle, B.A, B.Ed, Qualicum
C. A. Bruce, B.A, B.Ed, Kamloops
A. D. Campbell, B.A, B.Ed, Chilliwack
E. M. Carlin, B.Ed, M.Ed, West Vancouver
C. Cuthbert, B.Acc, B.Ed, M.Ed, Langley
J. R. Denley, B.Ed, M.Ed, Sechelt
J. L. Doyle, B.A, M.Ed, Smithers
D. E. A. Eldred, B.Ed, M.Ed, Campbell
River
T. G. Ellwood, B.Ed, M.Ed, Courtenay
W. F. T. Fisher, B.Ed, M.Ed, Revelstoke
R. E. Flower, B.A, B.Ed, Nelson
 . Grant, B.A, B.Ed, Vernon
!. Hoadley, B.Ed, M.Ed, Cariboo-
lilcotin
lden, B.A, M.Ed, Castlegar
tolob, B.S.A, M.Ed, Richmond
lopper, B.Ed, M.Ed, Hope
V. Huestis, B.Com, B.Ed, Lake
owichan
3. Johnston, B.Ed, M.Ed, Trail
. Killough, B.Ed, M.A, Maple Ridge
. Lewis, B.A, B.P/Ed, Saanich
1. Lind, B.A, M.Ed, Peace River North
[. Lowe, B.Ed, M.Ed, Kimberley
Lucas, B.A, B.Ed, M.Ed, Prince
upert
j. Lyon, B.Ed, M.Ed, Alberni
V. McDonald, B.A, M.Ed, Shuswap
. McFee, B.A, M.A, Merritt
. McKay, B.Com, M.Ed, Penticton
McKenzie, B.A, Delta
1. MacKirdy, B.A, B.Ed, M.Ed,
owichan
/. MacMillen, B.A, M.Ed, Queen
•harlotte Islands
McLoughlin, B.A, Dip.Ed, B.Ed,
lission
V. Maglio, B.Com, B.Ed, Howe Sound
F. Marshall, B.A, M.Ed, Fernie
Maslechko, B.P.E, Nechako
!\ Middleton, B.A, B.Ed, Abbotsford
N. Moulds, B.Ed, M.Ed, Grand Forks
. H. Newberry, B.A, M.Ed, Ed.D,
ort Nelson
R. J. Patrick, B.A, B.Ed, Quesnel
M. G. Pendharkar, B.Sc, B.T, B.Ed,
M.Ed, North Thompson
P. B. Pullinger, B.A, B.Ed, Sooke
M. Roscoe, B.A, M.A, Vancouver Island
North
L. P. Sampson, B.A, B.Ed, M.Ed, Ph.D.,
Armstrong
H. Sayers, M.A, M.Ed, Cranbrook
D. R. Smyth, B.P.E, M.Ed, Terrace
D. R. Sutherland, B.Ed, Kitimat
M. V. Thorsell, B.A, M.Ed, Central Coast
R. E. J. Watson, B.Ed, M.A, Powell River
B. G. Webber, B.A, M.A, Southern
Okanagan
D. N. Weicker, B.A, B.Ed, M.Ed,
Nanaimo
W. J. Zoellner, B.A, B.Ed, Central
Okanagan
STAFF APPOINTMENTS AND
PROMOTIONS
Headquarters
Dr. R. J. Leskiw
Appointed Superintendent, Division of Field
Personnel.
D. R. MacRae
Appointed Director, Business and
Industry Programs, Division of Educational
Programs—Post-secondary.
D. S. Goard
Appointed Director, Career Programs,
Division of Educational Programs—
Post-secondary.
Joanne Rosten
Bernie Kuppers
 Dr. J. A. G. Gittins
Appointed Director, Special Education,
Division of Integrated and Supportive
Services.
K. Plant
Appointed Director, Educational Data
Services, Division of Communications.
B. A. Andrews
Appointed Director, Teacher Services,
Division of Field Personnel.
E. Gosh
Executive Director, Metric Conversion
Committee, Transferred to Department of
Education.
Field
G. S. Armstrong
Appointed District Superintendent of
Schools, Burns Lake.
A. V. MacMillen
Appointed District Superintendent of
Schools, Queen Charlotte Islands.
Dr. A. J. H. Newberry
Appointed District Superintendent of
Schools, Fort Nelson.
M. Roscoe
Appointed District Superintendent of
Schools, Vancouver Island North.
Dr. L. P. Sampson
Appointed District Superintendent of
Schools, Armstrong.
D. R. Sutherland
Appointed District Superintendent of
Schools, Kitimat.
25-YEAR CONTINUOUS  SERVICE
CERTIFICATE
Miss M. J. Rhodes
EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT
TRAINING PLAN GRADUATES
G. Gamble
R. B. Vickery
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
COURSE GRADUATE
Mrs. J. O. Pollard
RETIREMENTS
Miss N. W. Snape, Secretary to Minister of
Education, after 46 years of service.
W. R. D. Hill, Clerk, Publications Services,
after 35 years of service.
Miss D. E. Thompson, Instructor,
Correspondence, after 33 years of service.
S. J. Graham, District Superintendent of
Schools, School District No. 40 (New
Westminster), after 29 years of service.
G. A. Batterbury, Registrar, Correspondence
Education, after 25 years of service.
W. D. Robertson, Senior Cook, Jericho Hill
Schools, after 24 years of service.
Miss I. A. Bowen, Teacher, Jericho Hill
Schools, after 23 years of service.
Miss J. R. Irvine, Co-ordinator, Home
Economics, after 20 years of service.
K. F. Alexander, District Superintendent of
Schools, School District No. 75
(Mission), after 20 years of service.
Mrs. A. F. McCallion, Clerk, Correspondence Education, after 19 years of service.
R. S. Price, Assistant, School Board Affairs,
after 18 years of service.
Mrs. A. Cooper, Secretary, Minister's Office,
after 15 years of service.
Mrs. D. Robinson, Clerk, Correspondence
Education, after 13 years of service.
I. Valen, Superintendent, Financial Services,
after 13 years of service.
F. S. Aikens, Clerk, British Columbia
Vocational School, Nelson, after 12 years of
service.
D. G. Anstey, Co-ordinator, Adult
Education, after 11 years of service.
C. G. Alexander, Instructor, British
Columbia Vocational School, Burnaby,
after 11 years of service.
R. B. Cox, District Superintendent of
Schools, School District No. 71
(Courtenay), after 10 years of service.
A. C. Rutledge, District Superintendent of
Schools, School District No. 14 (Southern
Okanagan), after eight years of service.
E. C. Stewart, District Superintendent of
Schools, School District No. 66 (Lake
Cowichan), after eight years of service.
F. J. Brent, Stockman, British Columbia
Vocational School, Burnaby, after
eight years of service.
  PROm THE miniSTCR
I wish to begin my first Annual Report by
paying tribute to and thanking all members
of the Department of Education who
facilitated my assumption of responsibility
for the Department following the change of
Government in December 1975.
One of the first steps resulting from the
change in Governments was my appointment
of Dr. Walter Hardwick, from the University of British Columbia, and a former
Vancouver alderman, as Deputy Minister.
Coincidental with Dr. Hardwick's appointment was the reassignment of duties
to the Associate Deputy Ministers.
J. R. Fleming, whom Dr. Hardwick replaced, became Associate Deputy Minister,
Finance and Administration; A. E. Soles
became Associate Deputy Minister, Post-
secondary, and J. Phillipson became
Associate Deputy Minister, Schools.
Officials of the Department directed much
of their time and effort during the school-
year to improving educational, financial,
and administrative accountability both in the
schools and in the post-secondary areas.
The Kindergarten-to-Grade XII program
received particular attention.  A long-
range learning assessment program was
initiated early in the year so that the
Department could assess the standards of
education.   Results of these assessments—
the first of which is an examination into the
English language arts—will be made available to school districts and the public, so
that everyone will be able to contribute to
the betterment of the education system
if weaknesses are found.
In this respect I announced that a core
curriculum for the K-XII program was
being developed and that it will be in place
by September 1977. The core curriculum
will contain the specific learning objectives
that should be attained at each level of
schooling.
Despite financial restraint, educational
spending during the school-year (and during
the calendar and fiscal years that overlapped it) was higher than ever.  Substantial
grants were made to school districts and
post-secondary institutions, and extra
moneys were provided for the upgrading
of school libraries and for the enrichment of
Provincial Government scholarships. To
ensure that funds would be appropriately
allocated, planning was initiated on methods
of improving the information systems
needed to upgrade financial management.
The education of children with sight and
hearing difficulties took place to an increasing extent in the school districts in which
they live.  This enabled them to live with
their parents and to experience life in a
community rather than in an institution.   It
also permitted the Jericho Hill Schools to
better fulfil their function as a Provincial
resource.
While the number of students in the
K-XII system stabilized, education and
training needs in the post-secondary system
continued to grow. The Universities Council
of B.C. reported directly to the Legislature
on progress of the universities.  On the
important topic of the delivery of university
programs to the non-metropolitan areas of
British Columbia, I asked Dr. William Wine-
gard, former president of the University of
Guelph, to report on the need for such
programs.   Dr. Winegard's commission was
asked to produce its report in the late
summer of 1976.
Orej? Rennett
 uring the year, greater emphasis was
ed on vocational training.  One of the
malies that exists in this Province is that
ligh unemployment among youth when
ie same time there is a shortage of
led labour to fill certain important
itions. To assist with this problem, the
ley Correctional Centre was transferred
n the Department of the Attorney-
leral to become a vocational training
tre.
Vs the year ended, plans for commissions
vocational, technical, and trades train-
and continuing and community
cation were being contemplated.  A
rine Training Advisory Council was
ointed to manage and make recom-
ldations regarding the Marine Training
ltre in Vancouver and the over-all future
narine training in the Province.
Tiese are only a few of many responsi-
ties that have occupied the Department
ing the year, and me for half of it.  I
e found it interesting and rewarding.   The
t annual report will more closely reflect
priorities and plans that have emerged
:e I became Minister.
Z> all, and particularly our dedicated
:hers who have helped to make public
cation better—in the schools, in the
eges, in the vocational and technical
itutions and in the universities—I express
sincerest appreciation.
■isuJ
DR. PATRICK L. McGEER
Minister of Education
Christine Paterson
11
 ■H
 fCHOOLI
The functions and responsibilities of the
Department of Education fall into three
categories broadly defined as schools, post-
econdary education, and finance and
administration. Although each is the re-
ponsibility of one of the three Associate
Deputy Ministers, there are many areas of
mitual concern and a high degree of col-
egiality in the operation of the Department.
Of the Department's seven operational
divisions, three—Educational Programs—
Schools, Integrated and Supportive Services,
and Field Personnel—are the responsibility
3f the Associate Deputy Minister, Schools.
These divisions administer programs of
curriculum development, learning assess-
nent, industrial education, special education
ncluding the Jericho Hill Schools for the
Deaf and the Blind, and correspondence
jducation. They also supervise Provincially
appointed personnel in the school districts
and the certification of teachers.   The work
Df the various branches, which deal mostly
Dut not entirely with the Kindergarten-to-
Grade XII program, is recorded in the
'ollowing pages.
 CHVMOnOFEDUCATIOnAL
PROGRAfTU-XCHOOLJ
During the 1975/76 school-year the work
of the Division of Educational Programs—
Schools centred primarily on core curriculum and learning assessment.   Core
curriculum activities involved a considerable
amount of preliminary developmental work
by the staff of the Curriculum Development
Branch.   Specific aspects of the branch's
activities are elaborated in the following
sections of this report. The Provincial
learning assessment program continued.
Assessment of both educational goals and
selected areas of pupil performance was
completed during the year and the analysis
and interpretation stages were well under
way for preparation of the final reporting
phase of the program.
A new Grade XII scholarship program
was implemented during the year.  An
increase in the amount of the scholarship
award and provisions for local school
district as well as Provincial scholarships
were the major changes.
Service to the field continued to be a high
priority for the division. The work of the
consultative staff in home economics
and industrial education is outlined in the
reports of the Home Economics Branch and
the Industrial Education Branch.  Members
of the Curriculum Development Branch
prepared a Program Development Model
which was utilized extensively in in-service
programs directed toward local curriculum
development.   Further assistance in the area
of local programming also resulted from
the branch's draft publication A Checklist
for Locally Developed Courses. The French
programs co-ordinator also provided
extensive consultative assistance to school
districts, particularly with respect to the
initiation and administration of programs
under the current Federal-Provincial
Agreement.
Specific funding for French language
programs included the distribution of
$1,048,700 to 62 school districts for French
language support grants; the expenditure
and commitment of $180,966 from the
program for bursaries to second language
and minority language teachers (718
teachers were involved in workshops and in
receipt of bursaries as a result of these
provisions); 157 Grade XII students received bursaries from the summer language
bursary program; 17 students from British
Columbia were accepted in other provinces
and British Columbia accepted 43 francophone students under provisions of the
inter-provincial second language monitor
program; the amount of $1,761,264 was
awarded under the special projects program.
An active Provincial accreditation program operated through the co-operative
efforts of the Division of Field Personnel
and the Division of Educational Programs—
Schools. The Provincial Accreditation
Committee had a relatively light agenda in
respect to the review of individual school
reports, but it did initiate steps toward the
review and revision of the present accreditation booklet and process.   External
evaluation teams were very busy with four
such teams visiting secondary schools in
Clearwater, Fort St. John, Kamloops,
Kitimat, Masset, Prince Rupert, Rutland,
and Trail.
CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
BRANCH
The term, core curriculum, took on a
special meaning for the staff of the Curriculum Development Branch this year. The
staff undertook to develop an initial working
paper outlining what could be considered
to be essential learning for all pupils in the
public school system.   The paper, redrafted
several times, will be the vehicle used to
obtain public and professional reaction and
input toward the eventual goal of preparing
a clearly stated set of learnings goals to be
prescribed for all pupils.
In addition to its involvement in core
curriculum the branch has carried on with
its regular work of curriculum development
and identification of resource materials to
support Provincially developed programs.
During the year under review new programs
were prepared in Elementary School
French, Secondary School English,
Secondary School German, Secondary
School Latin, and Secondary School
Industrial Education.   New or revised
courses were also developed in Mathematics,
 Geology, and Western Civilisation 12.
Eighty-two new textbooks were added to
the list prescribed for schools.
In the work of curriculum development,
the professional staff of the branch was
assisted by a number of advisory committees
of teachers and other experts.
The practice was continued whereby outstanding teachers in the Province were
released by boards of school trustees to
work with the Curriculum Development
Branch as curriculum consultants.   This
year's appointees were Mrs. S. M. Hoenson
(Saanich); W. G. Dunlop (North Vancouver), who completed his third year in
this capacity; and Mrs. H. D. Cruchley
(Abbotsford), who completed a second year.
LEARNING ASSESSMENT BRANCH
Following extensive consultation with a
number of organizations over the past two
years, the Minister of Education, in the
spring of 1976, announced a five-year
assessment time-table (see below).
The learning assessment program is
designed to provide credible information on
the extent to which the performance of
groups of students meets the desired goals
and objectives of the public school system.
The fundamental purpose of the program is
to facilitate educational decision-making
in areas such as curriculum development,
fiscal management, teacher education, and
research.
The pilot study in the language arts,
which was started in the fall of 1974, neared
completion and reports were being prepared
on goals of the language arts, instructional
practices, test results for reading at the
Grade IV level, and writing at the Grade
VIII and XII levels.   In addition, each
district received a report dealing with the
over-all district results for the Grade IV
reading test which was administered in
January 1976.
Assessment Time-table1
Content Area
Grade
Smallest
Reporting Unit
Publication
of Report
1975/76
(pilot study)
Reading
Writing
4
8, 12
district
Province
summer 1976
1976/77
Functional Skills 1
(Reading, Math.)
Social Studies/
Citizenship
4,8,12
4,8,12
school2
Province
summer 1977
1977/78
Functional Skills 2
(Writing)
Physical Sciences
4, 8, 12
4, 8, 12
Province
school2
summer 1978
1978/79
Functional Skills 1
(Reading, Math.)
Career and Occupational
Development
4,8, 12
8, 12
school2
Province
summer 1979
1979/80
Functional Skills 2
(Writing)
Recreational and
Health Education
4,8,12
4,8,12
Province
Province
summer 1980
1 Note that functional skills (reading, mathematics, writing) are assessed over a two-year cycle;
if possible, other related skills such as speaking and listening will be assessed under the heading
of functional skills.   Content areas such as social studies, physical sciences, or even the fine arts
will be assessed over a five or six-year cycle and may not be assessed in conventional
fashion (instruments other than paper and pencil tests may be used).
2 Optional reporting unit; results provided at district request.    Provincial and district results will
automatically be made available to the board.
15
 The branch continued to provide
consultative services to schools and districts
by way of periodic in-service workshops.   It
also continued to supply schools and
districts with tests prepared in British
Columbia.   For the first time in its
operations the branch was able to utilize the
services of a consultant seconded from a
school district in the person of J. Alex
Holm. The co-operation of School District
No. 80 (Kitimat) was genuinely appreciated.
EXAMINATIONS BRANCH
The Examinations Branch has four areas
of responsibility—the Grade XII scholarship
program, the general educational
development testing program, the issuance
of transcripts, and secondary school
education evaluation.
A new Grade XII scholarship program
was introduced for the school-year 1975/76.
The major changes were the introduction
of a second competition to supplement the
Province-wide scholarship examinations
administered through the Department.   It
was a district-wide competition administered
by each district.
In both competitions it was necessary
for a candidate to show evidence of an
acceptable standard of English.
A total of 4,049 candidates entered the
scholarship competitions and 1,877
completed the requirements. A total of 938
$500 awards were made.
John Cameron Stout, of New Westminster
Secondary School, ranked first in the
1975/76 Provincial competition and won
the Governor General's silver medal with
an average of 94.67 per cent. The Governor
General's bronze medal was awarded to
Timothy Michael Hegedus, a student at
Mount Douglas Secondary School in
Victoria, who ranked second with an
average of 86.67 per cent.
The general educational testing program
has now completed its third year and
remains extremely popular as an adult
program by which British Columbia
residents 19 years of age and over may
obtain Grade XII equivalency.   During the
school-year, 4,591 candidates applied to
write the battery of five standardized tests.
Of these, 3,324 qualified.   Since the
1*
inception of the program, 15,110 candidates
have applied, and of these 10,868 have been
granted the British Columbia Department
of Education Grade XII equivalency
certificate.
During the school-year, copies of 6,870
secondary school transcripts were issued and
259 official evaluations of secondary school
education from all parts of the world
were made.
Cheryl Baxter
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION BRANCH
Industrial education courses taken by
students in secondary schools in 1975/76
continued to expand. The total enrolment
for the year was 156,245, an increase of
3.5 per cent over the previous year.
There has been a renewed interest in
programs for particular occupations, and
many districts are planning to include
in-depth programs as soon as practical. The
main objective of programs for particular
occupations is to prepare students to enter
further training in an apprenticeship or
obtain immediate employment in automotive
work, carpentry, or cooking.   Students take
a minimum of six courses of the required 12
at the Grade XI and XII levels in the
particular program.   Six courses (650
hours) are equal to the pre-apprenticeship
time stipulated by the Department of
Labour.   Graduates may receive up to six
months' credit toward an apprenticeship in
the particular trade area.   Such credit is
negotiable between the student, the
Apprenticeship Branch of the Department
of Labour, and the employer. The three
 eas—automotive, carpentry, and cooking
are emphasized because of the many
rrployment opportunities in the mechanical,
nstruction, and service industries.
The extension of industrial education
cilities to small schools, mentioned in the
st annual report, is proceeding well, and
any students in the smaller school districts
e now benefiting from courses in industrial
lucation and home economics.
Some districts are now experimenting
th a multi-craft type of program at the
rades V, VI, and VII levels. A Vancouver
ogram with a mobile classroom is
ntinuing to be most successful. With the
ailability of space in some elementary
hools, a more practical craft program
obably will emerge.   Practical courses
ve played a major role in providing some
adents with success in secondary schools,
d it is hoped this approach can be
ccessful at an earlier age.
A new organization for industrial
ucation was issued to all schools and may
implemented in September 1976 on a
rmissive basis. All programs become
andatory in September 1977. The
ghlight of the new programs is expected
be the technology courses in Grades XI
id XII. These courses are designed to
able teachers to develop a technology
ost suited to the particular school district.
:chnologies envisaged are forestry,
riculture, marine, mechanical, and
iation.
A total of 1,244 teachers were employed
industrial education in the 1975/76
riool-year, an increase of 5.7 per cent over
74/75.   Surveys indicate a need for an
ditional 85 teachers per year for the
xt three years.
The branch's long and successful
volvement with the British Columbia wood
oducts overseas program continued, and
11 culminate when Japanese carpenters
ce a five-week training program at the
itish Columbia Vocational School,
arnaby, in the summer.
These carpenters are familiar with the
aditional Japanese post-and-beam
nstruction methods, and they will return
Japan qualified to instruct other
rpentersin Canadian platform-frame
nstruction.
HOME ECONOMICS BRANCH
During the 1975/76 school-year the total
course enrolment in home economics
(excluding Community Recreation 12) was
109,701, an increase of 3,908. The greatest
numerical increases in home economics
courses were in Foods and Nutrition 9,
Home Economics 8, Foods 11, and Textiles
11.   Statistics on home economics course
enrolment indicated a trend toward
increased student preference for food
courses.
Home economics departments were
operated in 312 schools, an increase of nine
over the previous year. The number of
teachers of home economics courses
increased by 28, making a total of 898.
In keeping with the national changeover
to metric measurement, home economics
classes are being equipped with metric
measures for use in conjunction with the
new metric textbook in home economics,
Management and Foods, produced by the
Department of Education.
In addition to regular field work, the
consultants of the Home Economics Branch
co-operated with the Faculty of Education
of The University of British Columbia by
visiting and advising the home economics
graduates on the integrated teacher training
program, who were employed, on letters of
permission, in many schools throughout the
Province.
Field work also included visits to teaching
cafeteria kitchens, a visit to a home
economics department in the native village
of Port Simpson, and in-service home
economics workshops in some school
districts.
In a few schools, some locally developed
courses in home economics were
implemented.
The home economics consultants gave
technical and practical advice to ensure that
adequate and efficient facilities would be
provided for home economics programs in
new or renovated school buildings.
17
 DIVi;iOnOFIAT£6RAT6D
AnDAJPPORTIVEJERVKH
Under the authority of section 180 of the
Public Schools Act, the Division of
Integrated and Supportive Services
continued to approve and support large
numbers of local programs developed by
boards of school trustees in their endeavours
to meet the educational needs of every
child in their school districts.
Educators throughout the Province are
developing public and professional
awareness of the potential for academic
and social growth of handicapped children
through these learning assistance programs,
for which there were 1,136 special
approvals, each worth approximately
$17,000, during the school-year.
In addition to the learning assistance
approvals, 936 approvals were arranged for
groups of children with specific problems
such as deafness, blindness, speech
impairment, physical handicap, or severe
retardation.   Programs were supported for
Indian children and children who came
into the public school system without
adequate English.
During the year, rehabilitation programs,
jointly sponsored by the Department of
Human Resources, the Department of the
Attorney-General, and the Department of
Education served more than 1,500 students.
The work of the division was enhanced
by the addition of two directors to the
existing staff.   Mrs. Jacqueline Leo, former
Chief Counsellor of the Kyoquot Indian
band, was appointed Director of Indian
Education for the Department.   During her
brief stay in office she travelled extensively
throughout the Province, noting and
encouraging such progressive steps as the
hiring of remedial teachers, the use of
home-school co-ordinators and special
counsellors, and utilization of local Indian
materials in local curricula.
The second appointment was that of
Dr. J. A. G. Gittins as Director of Special
Education.   At the time of his appointment
he was visiting lecturer in special education
at the University of British Columbia.
K"nrinn  Vr\itfVirws/clrw
 )RK STUDY—
)RK EXPERIENCE
Vork study—work experience programs
e introduced in 1974, and continued to
elop through the 1975/76 school-year,
grams were offered in 64 school districts
ti 259 schools and 11,481 students taking
t.
t became quite clear during the year that
vernment and community agencies are
oming much more aware of the
jstment problems of those seeking
)loyment after leaving school.   Numerous
ncies and committees are seeking to
e the problems, and a major need for
ordination of activities is evident,
nvolvement in the invitational First
ional Consultation on Vocational
inselling, sponsored by the Department
Manpower and Immigration in Ottawa in
/ember 1975, provided familiarization
l CHOICES, a computer-assisted career
nselling program developed by the
)artment of Manpower and Immigration,
eral meetings with Government and
rict personnel were held with the result
ta pilot project should be ready in early
' for two urban centres in British
mbia.
tICHO '75 SUMMER PROGRAM
he Jericho Hill Schools campus in
icouver was the location for the
lartment-sponsored Jericho '75
essional development summer program,
six weeks during the summer of 1975,
nine non-credit and four University of
ish Columbia credit courses, designed
rovide leadership skills for teachers
;d upon to work with exceptional
dren, were attended by 170 participants,
l addition to the leadership training
rses, housing, cafeteria, gymnasium, and
ing-field facilities were made available
;he youth development camp of the B.C.
eration of Athletic Associations. The
one-week camps (for rugby, soccer,
' volleyball, boys' volleyball) were
nded by 295 students between the ages
4 and 16, from all parts of the Province,
lassroom and playground facilities were
provided for 30 learning-disabled
children and five deaf-blind children
attending a special summer program.
Facilities were provided for workshops
conducted by the Vancouver Association
for Children with Learning Disabilities and
the Pacific Association for Autistic Children.
JERICHO HILL SCHOOLS
The pupil population of Jericho Hill
Schools for the Deaf and the Blind
continued to decrease. This trend is a
result of several factors.   Increased medical
knowledge and vastly improved facilities at
local levels are reducing the number of
handicapped children requesting admittance
to Provincial institutions. A lack of
enthusiasm on the part of many parents
to relinquish their handicapped child and a
willingness on the part of enlightened school
districts to devise educational programs for
the child has, over the years, reduced the
need for a single, centralized, Provincial
institution.   In June 1976 the Provincial
School for the Blind was serving only 21
day students and 29 resident students. The
Provincial School for the Deaf was serving
81 day students and 64 residential students.
Students attending Jericho Hill off-campus
classes numbered 51.   One hundred and
sixty-five regularly employed staff served
them.
Parents and interested persons formed a
board for the School for the Blind to act in
an advisory capacity to the Minister. This
group produced a useful handbook for blind
pupils, their teachers, and parents, which
was published by the Department of
Education for wide distribution.
Mrs. Doris Corrigan, Principal of the
School for the Blind, made a Province-wide
survey of the education of blind children
which is expected to have tangible results
in an increase in resource centre service to
these pupils.
The principal of the School for the Deaf
resigned to join the public school system.
John Anderson was appointed Acting
Co-ordinator of the Education of the
Hearing-impaired for the entire Province,
charged with overseeing the off-campus and
school district programs with a view to
recommending improvement.
19
 CORRESPONDENCE EDUCATION
BRANCH
This division is responsible for the
Department of Education's Correspondence
Education Branch, which has served
students in remote areas for nearly 40
years and has developed an international
reputation for excellence.   Its methods
have been copied by correspondence
schools as far away as New Zealand and
Rhodesia, and have been examined
by the Open University in England.
During 1975 a number of Canadian sources
requested permission to incorporate
British Columbia course material into
training manuals.
During 1975 the branch had a total of 190
courses available.   Of these, 40 were
undergoing revision and two new courses,
Biology 11 and Brain and Behaviour,
were being developed.
One hundred and eight students in
isolated areas were gathered together in
what are called "Section 20" schools
throughout the Province under the
supervision of 20 teacher assistants.
Principals of regular schools were urged to
appoint some member of staff to supervise
correspondence students in attendance
at school and to conduct seminar and
question periods as required.
An interesting experiment this year was
the formation of a Section 20 school for
British Columbia students living in Iran.
The Canadian company operating Ihere
was prepared to provide study quarters,
a library, and qualified teachers at the
site of the giant pulp-mill under construction.   The number of students in the
Iranian school using correspondence
material is 30 now and will rise to
150 next year.
The enrolment figures for the year were
as follows:
General enrolment:
Grades VIII-XII and
1974-75
1975-76
special    vocational
courses
13,879
15,084
Kindergarten
93
85
Grades  I-VII   (Vic
toria)
1,137
1,019
Grades I-VII (Daw
son Creek)
105
126
Total students
15,214
16,314
Certain groups for whom free instruction
was provided:
Inmates 269 380
Social Assistance cases 109 106
Special illness 288 363
Recent immigrants 113 104
Needed at home 9 5
Distance cases 484 399
1,272
1,357
The free instruction above represented a
waiving of enrolment fees in the amout
of $54,836.50.
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES
Modifications in the student assistance
program from July 1, 1975, to June 30,
1976, enabled students to receive up to
$3,300 for each educational year. This
represented a $400 increase over the
previous year.
The total number of students authorized
to receive funds increased by 16 per cent
over 1974/75.   During the most recent
year, 19,509 loans were authorized,
amounting to $17.4 million.   In addition,
16,294 grants-in-aid, valued at
approximately $9.1 million, were awarded.
The total student aid authorization for the
full-time program of assistance totalled
$26.5 million.
A special committee was established by
the B.C. Student Loan Committee to
adjudicate appeals.   Membership included
representatives of financial awards officers at
the educational institutions, students, and
Department officials.
The special assistance program continued
to benefit individuals pursuing a post-
secondary program of study on a part-time
basis.   It also served to help low-income
families and individuals receiving partial
educational funding from the Department
of Human Resources.
The Student Services Branch administered
the distribution of about 970 second-
language bursaries in co-operation with the
Council of Ministers of Education of
Canada, and with the Federal-Provincial
bilingual training program.
 wrnon of field P£R/onna
The Division of Field Personnel was re-
ganized during the past year and new
sponsibilities were incorporated into its
ructure.   Previously the division was
sponsible for the supervision of
rovincially appointed school district
Iministrative personnel, teacher certifica-
on, international teacher exchange
■ograms, the evaluation of instructional
•ograms at the secondary level, and inter-
•ovincial liaison on matters related to the
vision's responsibility. The reorganization
Ided responsibility for administering the
epartmental involvement in teacher
aining at both the pre-service and in-
-rvice levels and co-ordinating in-service
■ograms developed by other divisions of the
epartment.
Early in the year, Dr. R. J. Leskiw
isumed the position of Superintendent of
ield Personnel.  At the same time,
A. Andrews was appointed Director of
eacher Services. These two appointments
artially completed the proposed
^organization of the division.
Since the reorganization a concerted
Tort has been made to develop a profes-
onal development program that will
iclude activities suitable for all persons
:rving the educational enterprise,
udgetary provisions were made to initiate
rograms on both a district-wide and
rovince-wide basis.   Initial work included
entifying existing programs and supple-
enting these as needed. To this end a
eek-long conference was scheduled for
irly fall for all district superintendents of
hools and superintendents of schools.  It is
aped that programs of this type can
/entually be arranged for other adminis-
ative groups within the public school
'stem.  Conferences and workshops are
lanned to deal with supervision and other
tatters specific to administrative operation,
lans are now being formulated that will
oth permit and encourage superintendents
> become involved in intensive professional
svelopment programs.
The Teacher Services Branch has
>sumed the responsibility for assessing
acher supply and demand on a district-by-
istrict basis.  As pupil enrolment continues
to decline the necessity of accurately predicting specific requirements at both the
district and Provincial level will increase.
Efforts, under district sponsorship, to upgrade teachers presently working have been
under way for some time, and the division is
assisting these activities where possible,
as well as initiating direct sponsorship of
other activities.  A program of in-service
workshops, conducted on a regional basis,
has already begun.    It is hoped to expand
within the next few years the subject areas
covered by this program so as to include
all subject disciplines.   In conjunction with
this program an examination was begun of
methods of serving teachers in subject fields
in which staffing has been difficult.
The division also began exploration of
means to resolve some of the many concerns
about teacher education which are
continually expressed.   Discussions will
be conducted to ascertain approaches to be
followed in dealing with these concerns.
District superintendents continued to be
actively involved in many Provincial
committees. The school accreditation program has been expanded in order to provide
more external committees to examine
programs offered in secondary schools. The
division has continued its study of the
small secondary school.  On the basis of a
recently submitted report containing
significant statistical data, further study
was considered desirable in order to identify
more clearly the unique needs of these
small rural schools. As a result the division
has requested that the ERIBC examine two
specific areas of small school activity. The
purpose of the first study, a developmental
planning project, is to identify a set of
practical, cost-effective means of
overcoming, modifying, or offsetting the
disparities in educational opportunity which
exist for students in the most disadvantaged
of those schools enrolling Grades XI and
XII. The second study will provide
information with respect to the identification
of students' educational and occupational
aspirations, and parental expectations
regarding their children's educational and
occupational plans.
21
 Debbie Dugdale
 POCT.£conDflRY axjomon
In British Columbia the term "post-
secondary education" refers not only to
academic and professional education at the
universities and colleges but to a wide range
of vocational and technological education
available at 14 colleges, three vocational
training centres, and the British Columbia
Institute of Technology.
The Associate Deputy Minister, Post-
secondary, bears much of the responsibility
in these areas.   He maintains liaison with
the universities through the Universities
Council, and with the colleges, and supervises the activities of the Division of
Post-secondary Programs. The Division
administers the Provincially operated vocational training centres, develops training
programs as required, provides for
co-operation with other Provincial departments and the Government of Canada in
matters relating to manpower training, and
has considerable involvement in adult and
community education.
An account of post-secondary activities
follows.
23
 DIVMOn OFEDUCADOnAL
PROGRAm/-PQfr.tfCOnDARY
Restructuring of the Division of
Educational Programs—Post-secondary, the
assigning of personnel to new duties, and
the secondment to the Department of
Education of leading education figures from
the field highlighted the activities of post-
secondary education during 1975/76.
A. E. Soles, Associate Deputy Minister,
Educational Programs, was appointed
Associate Deputy Minister, Post-secondary
Programs, in January 1976 and assumed
over-all responsibility for the division
in its diversified fields of activity.
H. E. Justesen, Superintendent, Educational Programs—Post-secondary, was
assigned the task of developing programs
and physical and administrative plans for
vocational, career technical trades, and
occupational training for the Lower
Mainland of British Columbia.
Dr. J. F. Newberry, Assistant Superintendent, Educational Programs—
Post-secondary, was assigned to lead the
Management Services Section of the
reorganized division.
Dr. R. L. Faris, Superintendent of
Communications, was assigned
responsibility for continuing and community
education, and academic programs at
community colleges.   In addition, he served
as the Department's representative on the
Post-secondary Co-ordinating Committee
chaired by Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan,
and the Commission on the Delivery of
University Programs to Non-metropolitan
Areas, headed by Dr. William Winegard.
D. R. MacRae, former principal of the
B.C. Vocational School, Dawson Creek, was
appointed Director of Business and
Industry Programs and D. S. Goard, former
Division Head at Cariboo College,
was appointed Director of Career Programs.
J. E. Cooper, formerly with the Vancouver School Board, was appointed
principal of the B.C. Vocational School,
Burnaby.   The multi-discipline building
at the school was placed in operation
providing much needed additional training
space.   In addition, work was begun on the
transfer of the aircraft maintenance program from the Willingdon campus to
the Vancouver International Airport, where
the Department purchased a hangar to
accommodate the program.
R. A. Dawson, formerly with Vancouver
Community College, was appointed
principal of the Haney Educational Centre.
The centre, which was formerly the Haney
Correctional Centre, was acquired by
the Department of Education from the
Attorney-General's Department in October.
Programs began at the site almost
immediately and work was begun on a
three-year plan which will result in Haney
becoming a major vocational training
centre.
Increased support in the form of
student recruitment and job referral for
graduates was offered to the B.C.
Mining School in Rossland.   Several
advisory committee meetings were held
during the year, bringing together Government, industry, and union representatives
who assist in the general direction of
the programs offered at the school. Virtually
100 per cent of the students completing
training at the Mining School have
obtained employment in the mining industry,
a positive reflection on principal S. J.
Hunter and the staff.
Efforts were made by the division
during the year to improve accessibility
to training opportunities for students
seeking career-technical-vocational trades
and occupational training.    Additional
short-term courses were mounted in
an effort to reduce student waiting-lists
and improved career counselling was
developed.
A Marine Training Advisory Council
was established to make recommendations
on the future of marine training in British
Columbia and to oversee the operation
of the Marine Training Centre in
Vancouver.
Agreement was reached with the
Department of Health for the transfer of
the education centre at Riverview to the
Department of Education for use by
Douglas College.   The centre will form the
Coquitlam campus of Douglas College,
 ereby greatly improving the delivery of
>ost-secondary education to residents on the
lorth side of the Fraser River.
One of the most exciting developments
>f the school-year was the opening of
he four new community colleges in
Campbell River, Dawson Creek, Cranbrook,
nd Terrace.   The four colleges—North
sland, Northern Lights, East Kootenay,
tnd Northwest—proved very valuable
o the areas they served.
Enrolments in post-secondary education
ontinued to increase in the last 12-month
>eriod.   University enrolments have
ncreased by 7 per cent for full-time students
nd 17 per cent for part-time students.
College enrolments are up 3 per cent for
ull-time students and 18 per cent for
>art-time students.   Enrolment at the B.C.
/ocational School, Burnaby, was up 19
>er cent.
JNIVERSITIES COUNCIL OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Liaison between the Department of Edu-
ation and the universities is the
esponsibility of the Universities Council
)f British Columbia, which completed its
irst year of operation during the 1975/76
chool-year.
Established under the Universities Act
1974), the Council acts as an independent
iown body to provide public accountability
or the affairs of the public universities.
Membership of the Council is made up of
1 individuals, who are appointed for
arying terms by Order in Council. Chair-
nan of the Council is Dr. W. M. Armstrong,
ormerly of The University of British
Columbia.
One of the major responsibilities of the
Jniversities Council is to receive, review,
md co-ordinate the operating and capital
mdget requests of the public universities.
The Council, after examining the uni-
ersities' requests, submits a consolidated
mdget to the Minister of Education.  The
Minister then approves a lump-sum payment
o the Council, which allocates money to
lie universities.
The Council undertakes various studies
nd research projects related to matters
vithin its jurisdiction.   During its first year
the Council produced a report on student
housing. The Council is also actively
involved in the planning and development
of universities' academic offerings and
facilities.
23^   I     -z_   "'%
' z*z<.-   >
Dan Dobson
25
 HJ
*►♦< I
HJ
w
HJ
V>
 Finance nnD ADminuTRATion
The Department of Education employs
more than 800 people; administers a budget
which, including grants to school districts
and universities, is more than three-quarters
of a billion dollars, and maintains liaison
with 75 school districts and 22 post-
secondary institutions having more than
600,000 students.  To do this the Department has three support divisions—Financial
Services, Administrative Services, and Communications—which are responsible to
the Associate Deputy Minister, Finance and
Administration.
The Division of Financial Services is
concerned not only with the allocation of
grants and financial controls, both internally
and externally, but for liaison with the
Federal Government and the administration
of financial agreements with the senior
government. The Division of Administrative
Services is responsible for liaison with
school districts in administrative areas,
including the provision of public school and
post-secondary facilities and the conveyance
of pupils. The Division of Communications
is in charge of the Provincial Education
Media Centre which supplies audio-visual
materials to schools and colleges, the
Publication Services Branch, which supplies
textbooks and other materials, and the
Data Services Branch.
Accounts of these divisional activities
follow.
27
 Division op
financial services
The Division of Financial Services, under
the superintendency of Inge Valen until
he retired late in the school-year, was reorganized into a number of directorates.
John F. Currie became Director of Departmental Finance, George Gamble Director of
School Finance, and R. A. Munro Director
of Post-secondary Finance.    Larry Ting, a
consultant to the Department, was in charge
of financial planning.
The Director of Departmental Finance is
responsible for all internal financial matters,
including budgetary control and the administration of the payroll office.   He also
prepares the Department's estimates,
including internal and external expenditures,
which, for the 1975/76 fiscal year,
amounted to $777,350,709—more than 22
per cent of the entire Provincial
Government budget.
The main function of the Directorate of
School Finance is to monitor the expenditure
of capital and operating funds within each
school district.  It analyses the budgetary
requirements of school districts, calculates
the value of the instructional unit (the basis
on which operating grants to districts are
determined), advises the Government on the
effects of various funding levels and the
mill rates which result in property taxes for
school purposes, and calculates the grants
payable to each district, once funds are
approved.
In the area of operating budgets, members
of the staff visit school districts to review
budget proposals and analyse them.
During the 1975/76 period, 63 Capital
Expense Proposals, amounting in total to
more than $162 million, were processed.
Capital Expense Proposals provide borrowing authority for the school districts for the
acquisition of capital assets in the form of
buildings and equipment. The actual cost is
met by means of debentures sold to the
School Districts Capital Financing
Authority.
The Director of Post-secondary Finance
has similar responsibilities in the post-
secondary area.
During fiscal year 1975/76 the community college system increased by 40 pet-
cent with the inception of two totally new
colleges and two others which had previously
been Provincial vocational schools. With
this development came additional responsibilities in college budget administration and
the accompanying monitoring of college
financial matters.   In addition to the
increased number of colleges, there was
considerable growth in other colleges, with
the result that budgetary provisions for
Government grants increased by 41 per cent
over 1974/75 to a total of $95 million for
operating and capital expenditures.
In addition the directorate calculates and
administers the cost of vocational training
courses for the purpose of providing training
to the B.C. Department of Labour and
Canada Manpower, the latter governed by
the provisions of the Adult Occupational
Training Act and 1974 Agreement.   It is to
be noted that the Federal Government
purchases approximately 40 per cent of all
vocational training carried on in the
Province.
Another area of Federal/Provincial financial participation is through the Federal-
Provincial Fiscal Arrangements Act,
whereby the Federal Government contributes to post-secondary education by way
of return of personal, corporate, and nonresident income taxes paid by British
Columbia residents and collected by the
Federal Government. It is a direct responsibility of the directorate to prepare the
claim under the Act and analyse the effects
of changes on the financial framework of
the post-secondary system.   It is to be noted
that total post-secondary expenditures have
increased more than 70 per cent in the past
four years.
 tivision op
iDfnifflSTRATIVE
ERVICES
During the 1975/76 school-year the
ivision of Administrative Services con-
nued to maintain contact with school
stricts to plan for the provision of capital
cilities and equipment. A guide book was
epared by the division to help school
jards and their officials in the preparation
: submissions for capital programs,
egional meetings with school board chair-
en, district superintendents, and secretary-
easurers were held following the
stribution of the guide books. These
eetings were useful forums for the indenti-
;ation of concerns and their clarification.
The Advisory Committee to the division,
>mposed of district superintendents and
cretary-treasurers representing all zones of
e Province, met several times during the
ar. This committee acted as a valuable
lk between the division and the
hool districts and provided a most useful
urce of expert advice to the division.
The division continued to assist districts
' providing consultative services in respect
all aspects of capital development,
eluding site acquisition and other aspects
land matters, school buildings and
her capital facilities, the furnishing and
uipping of facilities, the problems inherent
the provision of safe, efficient, and
onomical transportation services, and on
any other matters of general administrative
ncern.
^cilities development—
:hools
The division's Facilities Development—
hools Branch continued its normal task
reviewing submissions from the school
stricts for capital construction projects.  In
dition, members of the staff assisted
stricts in the review of capital needs survey
bmissions. Visits were made to various
;as in the Province to assist districts and to
rry out research on the effectiveness of
ecific areas in existing schools.
Capital expenditures for the 1975
calendar year (section 190 approvals) were:
Sites
13,705,567
Buildings
112,578,437
Equipment
12,217,118
Other
7,549,368
Total
146,050,490
IPf          I
fflrSH
EHbi
■
'            ■.'■:■■        .       ■
BKM"*»S'Y
llll    1
llll   1
Shiurai Panua
FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT—
POST-SECONDARY
The 1975/76 school-year saw major
campus expansion nearing completion at
Malaspina College and under way at the
College of New Caledonia.  Cariboo College
library and gymnasium buildings were
completed, while Capilano College had
major expansion in portable buildings and a
four-storey facility.   Douglas College proceeded with leasehold renovations to its
Richmond campus, while Fraser Valley
College completed leasehold developments
at its Abbotsford and Chilliwack locations.
The four new colleges—North Island, Northwest, Northern Lights, and East Kootenay
—commenced operations in September,
utilizing leased space and portable buildings.
Capital expenditures for the 1975
calendar year were:
Sites
Buildings
Equipment
Other
Total
2,290,658
16,098,052
6,289,221
794,585
25,472,516
29
 SCHOOL BOARD ORGANIZATION
During the school-year which ended June
30, 1976, the number of school districts in
the Province remained at 75. There were 69
municipal school districts and six rural
districts.
In regard to the size of school boards,
two had three trustees, 18 had five, 36 had
seven, 17 had nine, and two districts had
Official Trustees.
TRANSPORTATION—CONVEYANCE
OF PUPILS
The following statistics give details of the
conveyance of school-children during the
1975/76 school-year:
(1) Number of school districts
providing transportation 72
(2) Total number of vehicles 942
(a) District-owned 672
(b) Contract 266
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.) 4
(3) Total daily approved mileage 79,422.1
(4) Total number of "shareable"
pupils carried daily 98,998
(5) Total number of "non-
shareable" pupils
carried daily 16,468
(6) Total number of all pupils
carried daily 115,466
Transportation assistance payments are
made available by boards to the parents of
pupils who reside in isolated areas of the
Province where there are insufficient pupils
to establish a bus route or a school with the
appropriate grade.  In the 1975/76 school-
year, the Province provided grants of
$1,737,656 for 3,922 pupils in 63 school
districts to assist boards with these payments.
Effective January 1973, school districts
became eligible for special grants for cold-
weather transportation to increase local
flexibility in setting walk limits and to
provide additional transportation services
during the cold months.  Grants in the
amount of $2,020,056 were made available
for this purpose in 1975/76.
BOARDING ALLOWANCES AND
DORMITORIES
A school board may provide boarding
allowances for pupils who are not able to
utilize transportation or dormitory facilities.
Although a board may pay an allowance
it considers appropriate, the amount which
the Department will accept as a shareable
cost is $100 per month.  In the 1975/76
school-year, the Province shared in boarding
allowances for 369 pupils at a cost of
$369,000.
The need for dormitory accommodation
is continuing to decline.  A summary of
dormitory data for the year will be found
among the statistical tables in this report
(see Table 3.7).
ADULT SCHOOL-CROSSING
GUARDS
In 1976 a total of 44 school districts
received Department sharing in the employment of adult school-crossing guards for
236 crossing points.  In addition the
Department continued to supply standard
equipment kits for each guard.
Changes made to the Motor-vehicle Act
now provide adult school-crossing guards
with legal authority to control traffic, thus
enabling them to better carry out their
function.
•-:.
Wr^>%« **»         '■■:■■■ ■-^s..'z,,- ■■-i-z"
• rmt, V*£
-j
IS
Mike Correia
 won of oommunKATion;
e 1975/76 school-year was a prove one for all branches of the Division
mmunications.
rhaps the most noticeable project, from
ublic's point of view, was the tele-
1 series Interface: Science and Society
iced by the Provincial Educational
e Publication Services Branch took
al steps to improve its operation,
ling the rental of warehousing
ies in Vancouver and the introduction
mputer services to its management
ns.
was a busy year also for the Data
es Branch, which began work on a
nanagement information system to
the Department in the management of
hole education enterprise.  The branch
:xpended great effort toward improv-
Le flow of data to other divisions,
tments, and governments, in both the
>ls and post-secondary areas.   Much of
/ork was made easier with the co-
tion of the B.C. Public Schools
tics Committee and the B.C. Post-
dary Statistics Committee.
e Information Services Branch con-
d to publish the paper Education Today
hly during the school-year.  It
ded informative and interesting articles
e Department's activities and policies
Sessional educators and others.
e division also contributed on behalf of
epartment, to the B.C. School
rians' Association, enabling it to
ict workshops throughout the Province
ist librarians with the selection of
ials.
VINCIAL EDUCATIONAL
[A CENTRE
ijor changes were introduced in the
Dution services of the Provincial
ational Media Centre in 1975/76. The
f these was the use of a computer for
:servation of films which also provides
ils and colleges with immediate con-
tion about the availability of films they
1st. The second innovation offered
3tion of a courier service in place of
ostal service for the delivery of films
ther media materials.
More than 250 new titles were added to
the videotape catalogue and 75 to the film
catalogue, following the previewing of
1,500 film and television programs. The
catalogues, as well as teachers' guide-books
for school broadcasts, and other supplementary print materials, were distributed to
all schools and colleges.
Production of the 15-part television series
Interface: Science and Society was completed during the year, and the series was
made available to cable systems as well as to
individual schools and colleges. The
weekly cablecasts were supplemented by a
full page of related news articles carried
once a week by The Vancouver Province
newspaper. This unique project resulted in
the formation of community discussion
groups using the newspaper and television
programs as a basis for directed study.
The production unit produced several
films for use in school broadcasts carried by
the CBC.  One of these, Fish Farming, from
the four-part series Marine Biology, was
awarded second prize at the international
exhibition of aquaculture films in Kyoto,
Japan.   Radio production was also undertaken by the Provincial Educational Media
Centre during the past year, with completion of the series Kids' Radio, written and
performed by elementary school-children
and carried by CBC in school broadcasts
time periods.
Videotape duplication continued as a
major function of PEMC, which provided
nearly 10,000 videotape programs to
schools and colleges.
Another service provided by the media
centre was the negotiation of bulk film and
videotape purchases on behalf of school
districts and colleges.   Savings of nearly 50
per cent were realized on purchases of
more than 4,000 videotapes and 1,000 films.
EDUCATIONAL DATA SERVICES
During the 1975/76 school-year this
branch, established in 1975, made considerable progress in improving the supply of
educational data to the Department, to other
departments of the Provincial Government,
and to Federal and Provincial agencies and
organizations in the education field.
31
 The use of joint committees such as
the B.C. Public Schools Statistics
Committee and the B.C. Post-secondary
Statistics Committee was an important factor
in the development of responsive programs
in data analysis.   By means of these
committees the branch was able to consult
widely with representatives of organizations
such as the B.C. School Trustees Association, the B.C. Teachers' Federation, and
the B.C. Principals' and Vice-Principals'
Association.
Working closely with the B.C. Research
Council, the Educational Data Services
Branch designed and developed a number of
new and innovative data processing programs. These programs will enable the
Department to utilize more fully existing
data and further upgrade its services,
particularly in the post-secondary area
where much work has been done on improving data availability on vocational courses
and career technical education.
The main concern of the post-secondary
side of the branch was community college
data, as the Universities Council of B.C. is
already collecting university data. The
main task of the year was the wholesale
revision of Form TV-27, used to collect
enrolment and training-days data for
vocational programs.
In the public schools area, the B.C. Public
Schools Statistics Committee continued to
play a major role in the consolidation of
forms and the elimination of duplication.
Several statistical reports were expanded,
including the basic enrolment data booklet
and the public school teacher information
booklet. As well, a special report was
prepared for the Division of Communications conference on the collections of library
print and non-print materials in the public
schools as well as the expenditures on
collections and staff. This is the first time
such detailed information has been available
for public school libraries on a school
district by school district basis.
Also in the 1975/76 school-year a five-
digit school coding system was adopted
which gives a unique code for every public
school in the Province. Fifteen districts took
advantage of the opportunities to integrate
their coding systems with the Departmental
system so that both would have the same
code numbers for the schools.
A workshop was held in October 1975, at
which time the Enrolment Forecasting
Model and the Teacher Demand and Supply
Model, both developed by the B.C.
Research Council for the Department of
Education, were presented to members of
the educational community.
PUBLICATION SERVICES BRANCH
In the continuing struggle to maintain
efficient outflows of learning resources to the
schools of the Province, warehousing
facilities were utilized in the Greater Vancouver area during the 1975/76 school-year.
Selected materials were sent to the new
Vancouver warehouse for redistribution in
carton lots to the schools of Greater
Vancouver, which have approximately 40
per cent of the student population of British
Columbia.
Computer services were introduced into
the operation and a data base is presently
being established to permit more efficient inventory control and improvements in the
ordering and supply service of the branch.
Purchases of learning materials during the
1975/76 school-year resulted in the payment of invoices in excess of $8 million.
During the year the Department's printing
operation was placed under the control of
the Publication Services Branch.  Originally,
print services evolved to meet specific and
limited publication requirements of the
Post-secondary Curriculum Development
Branch. The shift to the Publication
Services Branch allowed print services to
serve the wider range of publication needs of
the Department.
Doue Alton
 E 33
STATISTICAL TABLES
PAGE
1. Pupils  35
2. Teachers  98
3. Financial   115
4. Schools  127
5. Post-Secondary Education    137
PUPILS
TABLE
1.1 Actual Enrolment by Type of School  35
1.2 Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  36
1.3 Average Daily Attendance by Type of School   36
1.4 Summary of Actual Enrolment  37
1.5 Recapitulation of Actual Enrolment by Type of School,
Grade, and Sex of Pupils    93
1.6 Changes in Enrolment During the School-year,
From September to September, and From June to June   94
  E35
TABLE 1.1 Actual Enrolment by Type of School
Enrolment in public schools rose from 542,061 in September 1974 to 542,688 in September,
1975. A 6,604 secondary increase outweighed an elementary decrease of 5,977.
Actual1 Enrolment. September, 1975
Type of School
Number
Per Cent
of
Male
Female
Total
of
Schools
Total
21
10.304
10,413
20,717
3.8
135
57.149
56,332
113.481
20.9
122
39.372
37.112
76,484
14.1
16
3.023
2,808
5,831
1.1
56
6.244
5,708
11,952
2.2
1.232
161.931
152,292
314,223
57.9
Senior Secondary	
Secondary	
Junior Secondary	
Elementary-Senior Secondary	
Elementary-Junior Secondary	
Elementary	
Totals        1,582
Source: September, 1975 Form B
'Actual enrolment is defined as the number of pupils actually enrolled for w
reporting dale.
278.023
264,665
542,6
100.0
horn an attendance record is required lo be kept as of the
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:
Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 2,461 officially registered in other schools)
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes,
regular students	
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act,
pupils receiving instruction	
3,689
1,009
226
4,924
Adult Education
Canadian Vocational Training Program —
Day   38,897
Night  14,574
Public School Adult Education  140,9722
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)   8,875
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  36
Public colleges and British Columbia Institute of Technology —
Full-time  14,632
Part-time  18,193
236,179
'Includes 115,253 nonvocational.
 E36
TABLE 1.2 Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for September, 1975
and a comparison of the totals with September, 1974.
Total Tolal Ratio
Grade Male Female       Scp,  ,975     &pl ,974     „„. ,974
Secondary
Grade XII  .'  17,180 17,683 34,863 32,915 1.059
Grade XI  20,044 19,905 39,949 38,555 1.036
Totals, Senior Secondary Grades	
Grade X	
Grade IX	
Grade VIII	
Totals, Grades VIM lo X	
Occupational 3	
Occupational 2	
Occupational 1  	
Totals, Occupational Classes	
Secondary Special	
Totals, Secondary Grades	
Elementary
Grade VII   23.284 22,334 45,618 45,383 1.005
Grade VI  22,639 21,681 44,320 45,574 0.973
Grade V  20,737 19,594 40,331 44,102 0.915
Grade IV  19,142 18,156 37,298 40,022 0,932
Totals. Grades IV to VII  85.802 81.765 167,567 175,081 0.957
Intermediate Special  — — — 4,311 —
Primary Special  — — — 2,259 —
Elementary Special  3,126 1,892 5,018 — —
Grade 111  18,741 17.798 36,539 37,310 0.979
Grade 11  19,478 18.244 37,722 36,555 1.032
Grade 1  20.498 19,047 39,545 38,424 1.029
Kindergarten	
Totals. Kindergarten to Grade 111 (excl. Special) ...
Totals, Elementary Grades	
Grand Totals  278,023 264,665 542,688 542,061 1.001
Source: September Form B.
Note: Occupational has not been reported separately for September 1975. as il is now included with Secondary Special.
37,224
37,588
74,812
71,470
1,047
22,619
23,497
24.399
22,058
23,055
23.304
44,677
46,552
47,703
43,196
46,909
47,271
1.034
0.992
1.009
70.515
68,417
138,932
137,376
1.011
-
-
-
1,139
1,283
1,353
-
3.519
1,962
5,481
3,775
-
111,258
107,967
219,225
212,621
1.031
19,120
17,952
37,072
35.500
1.044
77,837
73,041
150,878
147,789
1.021
166.765
156,698
323,463
329,440
0.982
TABLE 1.3 Average Daily Attendance by Type of School
For 1975-76 School Year
Type of School
Average Ac-
ual
Average Possible
Daily Attend
ance
Daily Attendance
Attendance
16,467
18,082
91.07
98,788
108,293
91.22
68.933
75,023
91.88
4,533
5,012
90.46
10,563
11,541
91.53
291.604
311,660
93.57
Senior Secondary	
Secondary	
Junior Secondary	
Elemeniary-Senior Secondary.
Elemeniary-Junior Secondary.
Elemeniary	
Total	
Source: June 1976 Form 1
490,888
529,61
 E37
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 E95
TEACHERS
TABLE
PAGE
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.18
2.19
2.20
2.21
Distribution of Full and Part-Time Professional Staff by Type of School        97
Teachers' Certificates        98
Teachers and Principals With and Without University Degrees        99
Highest Degree by Faculty and Level      100
New Inquiries and Sources of Full-Time and
Part-Time Teaching Force      10]
British Columbia Public School Full-Time Teacher Flow,
September 1974 to September 1975      102
Changes in Numbers of Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Teachers
During the School Year      103
Sources of Teachers Beginning in British Columbia, September 1975
(Those With Less Than One Year of British Columbia Experience)      103
Numbers of Trainees Completing Certification Programs at British Columbia
Universities in 1974-75 and Teaching/Not Teaching in
September 1975      104
Certificates Issued During the 1975-76 School Year (July 1, 1975 to June 30, 1976).     105
Number of Full-Time Teachers by Type of Certificate and
Average Years of British Columbia Experience      105
Certificates and Degrees of Full-Time Teachers, Principals and Supervisors,
September 1974 and September 1975       105
Certification of Full-Time and Part-Time British Columbia Teachers
According to Location of Initial Teacher Training,
September 1974 and September 1975       106
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School:
2.14 Supervising Principals and Vice-Principals 107
2.15 School Attached Teachers (Including Teaching Principals and Vice-Principals) 108
2.16 District-Wide Supervisory and Instructional Staff 109
2.17 Total District-Wide and School Attached Teachers 110
Full-Time Equivalent District-Employed — Administrative and
Instructional Staff (Not assigned to Specific Schools)       Ill
B.C. Public School Pupil/Teacher Ratios by School District       112
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
School Broadcasts      113
(1) Distribution of Audio-Visual Materials      113
(2) Distribution Services Circulation Report      114
  TABLE 2.1 Distribution of Full and Part-Time
Professional Staff by Type of School
E97
Type of School
Total
of
Administrative
Instructional
Professional
Schools
Staff ,,.
Staff (2)
Staff
21
53
1,120
1,173
135
234
5,465
5,699
122
216
4,026
4,242
16
21
377
398
56
32
635
667
1,232
643
13,958
14,601
—
—
534
534
—
376
—
376
Senior Secondary	
Secondary	
Junior Secondary	
Elementary-Senior Secondary	
Elementary-Junior Secondary	
Elementary	
District-Wide Instructional Staff ...
District-Wide Administrative Staff.
Totals	
1,575
26,115
Source: September 1975 Forms B and J
(1) Administrative staff includes principals and vice-principals who spend 51% or more of their time in administration.
(2) Instructional staff includes principals and vice-principals who teach at least 50% of their time.
NOTE: 180 teachers have been excluded because of missing or incorrect information. Total number of teachers = 27,870.
 E98
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 E99
TABLE 2.3 Teachers and Principals With and Without University Degrees
(September, 1975)
Type of School
Highest Degrees
No Degrees
Total Teachers
Masters or    % of teachers
Doctorate     in school type
Number
% of teachers
in school type
Number
Percent
of all teachers
Senior secondary  839
Secondary  4,255
Junior Secondary  3,324
Elementary-senior secondary — 287
Elementary-junior secondary.... 447
Elementary  7,666
District-wide instructors  265
Total instructional staff  17,083
District-wide supervisory staff
Total staff  17,289
212
89.6
861
89.8
443
88.8
33
80.4
36
72.4
581
56.5
130
74.0
122
583
475
78
184
6,354
139
10.4
10.2
11.2
19.6
27.6
43.5
26.0
1,173
5,699
4,242
398
667
14,601
534
4.2
20.6
15.3
1.4
2.4
52.7
1.9
17,083
2,296
70.9
7,935
29.1
27,314
98.6
206
138
91.5
32
8.5
376
1.4
2,434
71.2
27,690
Source: September, 1975 Form J
Note: 180 teachers have been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information. Total number of teachers in September
1975 = 27,870. Part-time teachers are included.
TABLE 2.4 Highest Degree by Faculty and Level — September, 1975
Faculty
Bachelors
Masters
Totals
Total      Elem.
Total     Elem.
Total     Elem.
Education  5,564 3,616 9,180
Arts  2,159 2,705 4,864
Science  241 1,093 1,334
Physical Education  174 452 626
Home Economics  18 413 431
Commerce and  Business
Administration  45 177 222
Agriculture  22 89 111
Music  Ill 117 228
Library Science  27 25 52
Forestry  4 17 21
Fine and Applied Arts ... 33 81 114
Social Work  13 6 19
Engineering  and   Applied
Science  10 74 84
Journalism  3 4 7
Environmental Studies ... 2 2 4
Architecture  3 9 12
Unclassified  30 65 95
Totals  8,459 8,945 17,404
629
865
1,494
135
376
511
18
117
135
16
43
59
—
13
13
14
32
46
1
9
10
21
25
46
8
22
30
—
4
4
5
14
19
3
4
7
1
10
11
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
5
— 6,193 4,481 10,674
— 2,294 3,081 5,375
— 259 1,210 1,469
— 190 495 685
— 18 426 444
59
209
268
23
98
121
132
142
274
35
47
82
4
21
25
38
95
133
16
10
26
11
84
95
3
4
7
2
3
5
4
10
14
54
108
162
854     1,539
9,335     10,524    19,859
Source: September, 1975 Form J
Note: This table includes full-time and part-time teachers and principals as well as district-wide administrative and instructional staff.
  TABLE 2.5 New Inquiries and Source of
Full-Time and Part-Time Teaching Force
E101
Source of
Initial Teacher
Training
New Inquiries
Received in
School-year
1975/76
First Certificate
Issued in
School-year
1975/76
to Persons
Initially
Inquiring
Teaching in
Sept 1975 but
Not Teaching
in B.C.
Public School
System in
Sept. 1974
1,515
39.9
2,232
81.2
2,716
66.9
476
12.6
230
8'.4
408
10.0
338
8.9
108
0.9
200
4.9
184
4.9
24
0.9
46
1.1
163
4.3
42
1.5
86
2.1
2,676
70.6
2,636
95.9
3,456
85.0
213
5.6
14
0.5
145
3.6
Total
Sept. 1975
Teachers
British Columbia:
Number	
PerCent	
Prairie Provinces:
Number	
PerCent	
Ontario:
Number	
Per Cent	
Quebec:
Number	
PerCent	
Atlantic Provinces:
Number	
Per Cent	
Total Canada:
Number	
Per Cent	
United Kingdom:
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Europe:
Number	
Per Cent	
United States:
Number	
PerCent	
Australia, New Zealand:
Number	
Per Cent	
Other Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
Number	
PerCent	
Total Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
167
4.4
605
15.9
132
3.5
0.3
82
3.0
9
0.3
68
1.7
262
6.5
45
1.1
87
2.2
20,158
72.7
10.4
768
2.8
186
0.7
336
1.2
24,333'
87.8
1,066
3.8
443
1.6
1,179
4.2
382
1.4
324
1.2
Number	
                 1,117
29 4
113
4.1
607
15.0
3,394
122
Grand Totals:
Number	
                  3,793
                100.0
2,749
100.0
4,063
100.0
27,727=
100 0
(1) Includes one teacher who received initial teacher training in the Yukon Territory.
(2) 143 teachers have been excluded because of missing or incorrect information. Total number of teachers =
27,870.
 E102
3 E !
8    I   if:
r    3i 1 I?  p.
I 1 !
|5S||   n I      I  n  n
Jilll   u LU  u   U
S.. p
 E 103
TABLE 2.7 Changes in Numbers of Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Teachers
During The School Year
Changes
Sept.-         June
1974           1975
Changes
Sept.-        Feb.
1975         1976
Changes
Sept.-       Sept.
1974        1975
Sept.
1974
June
1975
Number
Per
Cent
Sept.
1975
February
1976
Number
Per
Cent
Per
Number     Cent
Total FTE Teachers'
26,230.6
26,504.4
273.8
1.0
27,185.1
27,420.3
235.2
0.9
954.5          3.6
Source: September 1974 — 1975 Form J,
June 1975 Forms F and G,
February 1976 Form B.
'Includes school-attached and district-wide public school teachers.
TABLE 2.8 Sources of Teachers '
Beginning in British Columbia September 1975
(those with less than one year of British Columbia Experience)
Elementary Beginners
Secondary Beginners
Per Cent
Per Cent
of Ele
Per Cent
of Secon
Per Cent
Teacher Education
Number
mentary
of All
Number
dary
of All
Total
Beginners
Beginners
Beginners
Beginners
British Columbia —
UBC	
465
28.7
17.1
413
37.4
15.2
878
UVIC	
190
11.7
7.0
99
9.0
3.6
289
SFU	
364
22.5
13.4
147
13.3
5.4
511
NDU	
31
1.9
1.1
7
0.6
0.3
38
B.C. Normal School, other and
not reported	
25
1.5
0.9
25
2.3
0.9
50
Totals, Provincial	
1,075
66.4
39.5
691
62.6
25.4
1,766
Alberta	
74
4.6
2.7
65
5.9
2.4
139
Saskatchewan	
47
2.9
1.7
36
3.3
1.3
83
Manitoba	
36
2.2
1.3
25
2.3
0.9
61
86
5.3
3.2
77
7.0
2.8
163
Quebec	
26
1.6
1.0
12
1.1
0.4
38
42
2.6
1.5
31
2.8
1.1
73
Yukon	
_
_
—
_
_
311
19.2
11.4
246
22.3
9.0
557
United Kingdom and Europe	
70
4.3
2.6
55
5.0
2.0
125
121
1
7.5
0.1
4.4
0.0
80
6
7.3
0.5
2.9
0.2
201
Africa	
7
Asia	
4
0.3
0.2
3
0.3
0.1
7
Australia	
8
0.5
0.3
4
0.4
0.2
12
2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1
1
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.0
3
Other North America	
2
3
South America	
—
—
—
1
0.1
0.0
1
208
12.8
7.6
151
13.7
5.5
359
Not Reported	
26
1.6
1.0
16
1.5
0.6
42
1,620
100.0
59.5
1,104
100.0
40.5
2,724
Source: September 30th, 1975 Form J
'Includes school-attached and district-wide full-lime and part-time public school teachers.
16 teachers have been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information. The total number of beginning teachers :
2,740.
 E104
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2
 TABLE 2.10 Certificates Issued During the 1975/76 School-Year
(July 1, 1975, to June 30, 1976)
E105
Teaching
Licence
Professional
Instructor's
Diploma
Interim	
Permanent...
Non expiring.
Totals...
231
1,079
26
—
7
14
1,196
4,008'
24
1,360
29
5,228
6,617
'Composed of 8 Permanent Vocational Instructor's certificates. In addition, 479 Letters of Permission were
issued for the 1975/76 school-year.
TABLE 2.11 Number of Full-Time Teachers by Type of Certificate
and Average Years of British Columbia Experience
Certificate
Professional
Standard
Teaching
Licence
Elemen-      Vocational
tary C        Certificate
Instructor's
Diploma
Letter of
Permission
Total
Number of Teachers
Average years of British
Columbia experience
20,370
8.4
4,431
6.7
1,150
14.4
7                  19
16.7                 9.1
25
9.7
325
2.0
26,327
8.3
Source: September 30, 1975 Form J
Note: 140 teachers have been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information.
Total number of full-lime teachers = 26,467.
TABLE 2.12 Certificates and Degrees of Full-Time Teachers, Principals
and Supervisors September, 1974 and September, 1975
September 1974
Seplembe
1975
Changes in
of Staff
Qualifications
Sept.-Sept.
Number
Percentage
of Total
Full-time
Teachers
Number
Percentage
of Total
Full-time
Teachers
Number
Per Cent
Certificate —
Professional1	
Standard2	
19,049
4,608
1,517
74.5
18.0
6.0
0.0
0.1
0.0
1.4
20,370
4,431
1,150
7
19
25
325
77.4
16.8
4.4
0.0
0.1
0.1
1.2
1,321
- 177
-367
-4
- 4
7
-24
6.9
- 3.8
-24.2
11
- 36.4
23
- 17.4
Instructor's Diploma	
18
349
38.9
- 6.9
Totals	
25,575
100.0
26,327
100.0
752
2.9
Degree —
Doctorate	
Master's	
Bachelor's	
None	
52
2,177
15,883
7,463
0.2
8.5
62.1
29.2
62
2,334
16,695
7,200
0.2
8.9
63.5
27.4
10
157
812
- 263
19.2
7.2
5.1
-3.5
Totals	
25,575
100.0
26,291
100.0
716
2.8
Source: September, 1975 Form J.
Note: 140 teachers have been excluded from the September, 1975 certificate figures and 176 teachers have been excluded from the degree
figures because of missing or incorrect information.
Total number of full-time teachers in September, 1975 = 26,467.
'Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, Professional C
including Elementary A
'Including Elementary B
 E106
TABLE 2.13 Certification of Full-Time and Part-Time
British Columbia Teachers According
to Location of Initial Teacher Training,
September, 1974 and September, 1975
Source of Initial Teacher Training
Current
British Columbia
Certificate
Professional'
N	
A	
B	
C	
Standard'
N	
A	
B	
C	
Teaching Licence1
N	
A	
B	
C	
Elementary C
N	
A	
B	
C	
Instructor's Diploma
N	
A	
B	
C	
Letter of Permission
N	
A	
B	
C	
Totals
N	
A	
B	
C	
British Columbia
Totals
Other
Canadian 0ther Not
Provinces Countries Reported
Sept. '74  Sept. '75    Sept. '74    Sept. '75 Sept. '74  Sept. '75 Sept. '74    Sept. '75    Sept. '74   Sept. 75
14,203
76.5
74.6
55.5
3,134
16.9
68.0
12.3
992
5.3
65.4
3.9
9
0.1
81.8
0.4
18
0.1
100.0
0.1
216
1.2
61.9
0.9
18,554
100.0
72.5
15,635
76.3
74.3
56.4
3,282
16.3
67.4
11.8
4.9
73.5
3.6
5
0.0
71.4
0.0
18
0.1
69.2
0.1
213
1.1
52.9
0.8
20,141
100.0
72.6
2,679
68.0
14.0
10.5
790
20.1
17.2
3.1
386
9.8
25.4
1.5
2
0.1
18.2
79
2.0
22.6
0.3
3,936
100.0
15.4
2,977
71.3
14.1
10.7
847
20.3
17.4
3.1
266
6.4
19.8
1.0
2
0.1
28.6
0.0
5
0.1
19.2
0.0
78
1.9
19.4
0.3
4,175
100.0
15.1
2,167 2,416
71.2 72.9
11.4 11.5
8.5 8.7
684
22.4
14.8
2.6
139
4.6
9.2
0.5
3,044
100.0
11.9
733
22.1
15.0
2.6
2.7
6.6
0.3
— 3
— 0.1
— 11.5
— 0.0
54 74
1.8 2.2
15.5 18.4
0.2 0.3
3,315
100.0
12.0
26
19,049
21,054
33.8
—
—
0.1
100.0
100.0
0.1
74.5
75.9
11
4,608
4,873
14.3
—
—
0.2
100.0
100.0
0.0
18.0
17.6
2
1,517
1,345
2.6
—
—
0.2
100.0
100.0
0.0
5.9
4.9
-
11
7
	
100.0
100.0
—
0.4
0.0
-
18
26
	
100.0
100.0
—
0.1
0.1
38
349
403
49.4
1.4
1.5
9.4
100.0
100.0
0.1
1.4
1.5
77
25,575*
27,727s
100.0
100.0
100.0
—
100.0
100.0
0.3
100.0
100.0
Source: September, 1975 Form J
N= Number of full-time teachers from that jurisdiction who hold the type of certificate shown expressed as a percentage of:
A— Percentage of teachers from that jurisdiction holding all types of certificates.
B— Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding that type of certificate.
C— Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding all types of certificates.
'Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic, and Professional C Certificates,
including Elementary A Certificates.
^Including Elementary B Certificates.
including 23 Vocational Instructor's Certificates. The September 1974 figures are for full-time teachers only.
'Inducing 19 Vocational Instructor's Certificates. The September 1975 figures are for full-time and part-time teachers.
Note: 143 teachers have been excluded from this table because of missing or incorrect information. Total number of teachers in September
1975 = 27,870.
 TABLE 2.14 School-Attached Full-Time Supervising Principals
and Vice-Principals
E107
Salary
Cumula
emen-
Junior
Secon
Senior
Total
tive
tary
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
dary
Sec.
Per Cent
$
36,750—37,249  —
36,250—36,749  —
35,750—36,249  —
35,250—35,749  —
34,750—35,249  —
34,250—34,749  —
33,750—34,249  —
33,250—33,749  —
32,750—33,249  —
32,250—32,749  —
31,750—32,249  3
31,250—31,749  1
30,750—31,249  1
30,250—30,749  4
29,750—30,249  54
29,250—29,749  25
28,750—29,249  29
28,250—28,749  45
27,750—28,249  28
27,250—27,749  58
26,750—27,249  37
26,250—26,749  55
25,750—26,249  61
25,250—25,749  49
24,750—25,249  28
24,250—24,749  40
23,750—24,249  60
23,250—23,749  27
22,750—23,249  31
22,250—22,749  19
21,750—22,249  22
21,250—21,749  18
20,750—21,249  15
20,250—20,749  14
19,750—20,249  10
19,250—19,749  7
18,750—19,249  6
18,250—18,749  7
17,750—18,249  4
17,250—17,749  3
16,750—17,249  4
16,250—16,749  2
15,750—16,249  1
15,250—15,749  1
14,750—15,249  1
14,250—14,749  1
Not Reported  —
Totals  771
Medians  $25,877
100.0
—
1
—
5
_
6
99.7
—
—
1
—
2
3
99.1
—
—
—
7
2
9
98.8
1
	
—
6
1
8
97.9
—
—
—
6
—
6
97.1
—
—
3
8
—
11
96.5
—
	
8
2
3
13
95.5
—
—
7
8
3
18
94.3
—
—
4
6
2
15
92.7
—
8
5
—
15
91.3
1
—
7
10
4
23
90.0
—
23
14
2
45
88.0
2
—
11
8
3
78
84.1
2
7
13
1
50
77.5
2
6
13
1
52
73.3
1
—
8
6
4
64
69.1
—
18
11
3
61
64.0
3
9
11
4
86
59.1
2
7
10
1
58
52.5
5
10
14
4
89
48.1
3
21
14
2
102
41.5
1
13
8
1
74
34.0
—
—
4
6
2
40
28.7
2
3
12
2
60
25.9
1
—
13
3
2
79
21.7
1
2
3
1
35
16.4
1
3
4
1
41
14.1
3
—
5
5
—
32
11.4
—
7
3
—
33
9.4
2
3
3
1
28
7.3
—
3
2
—
22
5.6
1
—
2
1
1
19
4.3
1
—
2
—
—
13
3.2
—
—
1
—
9
2.5
1
1
4
—
13
2.0
1
—
—
—
—
8
1.3
—
—
—
—
—
4
0.9
1
—
—
—
—
4
0.7
1
-
-
-
-
5
2
1
1
0.5
0.3
0.2
0.1
39
23
219
235
53
1
1
1,340
0.1
$26,166
$26,000
$27,791
$28,458
$28,437
$26,491
—
Median Salary = 26,491; Mean Salary = $26,513
Source: September 30, 1975 Form J.
 E108
TABLE 2.15 ■
School-attached full-time teachers (including Teaching Principals and Vice-Principals)
Salary
Elemen
Junior
Senior
Junior
Secon
Senior
Total
tary
Sec.
Sec.
Sec.
dary
Sec.
Per Cent
$
32,250—32,749  —
31,750—32,249  —
31,250—31,749  —
30,750—31,249  —
30,250—30,749  —
29,750—30,249  —
29,250—29,749  —
28,750—29,249  —
28,250—28,749  1
27,750—28,249  2
27,250—27,749  1
26,750—27,249  4
26,250—26,749  5
25,750—26,249  21
25,250—25,749  15
24,750—25,249  8
24,250—24,749  11
23,750—24,249  17
23,250—23,749  46
22,750—23,249  31
22,250—22,749  45
21,750—22,249  99
21,250—21,749  86
20,750—21,249  85
20.250—20,749  52
19,750—20,249  172
19,250—19,749  393
18,750—19,249  192
18,250—18,749  117
17,750—18,249  118
17,250—17,749  520
16,750—17,249  650
16,250—16,749  328
15,750—16,249  305
15,250—15,749  483
14,750—15,249  820
14,250—14,749  1,094
13,750—14,249  684
13,250—13,749  1,185
12,750—13,249  1,098
12,250—12,749  1,020
11,750—12,249  989
11,250—11,749  731
10,750—11,249  575
10,250—10,749  319
9,750—10,249  263
9,250— 9,749  36
8,750— 9,249  26
8,250— 8,749  —
7,750— 8,249      1
Not Reported  51
Totals  12,699
Medians $ 13,809
100.0
2
2
2
7
11
7
3
16
35
10
6
13
24
36
13
32
38
35
43
25
50
47
44
33
17
24
7
9
2
—
4
4
9
2
7
—
21
13
50
10
87
4
102
1
64
29
78
7
440
5
198
8
66
12
113
16
161
14
184
12
155
4
120
19
187
20
203
25
261
26
240
26
211
37
294
19
289
13
207
12
82
16
69
2
9
5
8
1
6
1
3
4
3
7
101
37
39
313
261
151
102
344
499
285
132
131
219
207
208
207
233
173
286
232
240
220
304
245
69
54
12
8
3
5
1
1
100.0
1
1
100.0
—
1
100.0
—
3
100.0
1
3
99.9
—
5
99.9
—
7
99.9
—
24
99.8
2
21
99.7
2
17
99.5
—
18
99.4
1
27
99.3
8
170
99.1
7
86
98.0
18
125
97.5
44
526
96.8
75
530
93.6
53
402
90.6
31
253
88.3
29
669
86.9
176
1,550
83.3
50
740
75.1
29
358
71.3
30
417
69.6
36
976
67.5
46
1,139
62.9
47
763
57.7
30
699
54.3
47
1,007
51.3
58
1,309
47.1
57
1,766
41.8
44
1,251
34.9
26
1,738
30.2
41
1,737
23.9
50
1,728
17.8
38
1,525
12.0
6
917
7.0
6
747
4.2
1
351
2.0
1
296
1.0
—
48
0.2
2
37
0.1
9
1
108
—
24,098
$ 14,715    $ 14,775     $ 15,479       $ 17,161       $ 17,933     $ 14,708
Median Salary = $14,708; Mean Salary = $15,472
Note: 176 teachers have been excluded because of missing or incorrect information. Total number of full-lime school attached teachers in
September, 1975 = 24,274.
Source: September 30, 1975 Form J.
 TABLE 2.16 District-Wide Full-Time Supervisory
and Instructional Staff
(Not Attached to Specific Schools)
E 109
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Per Cent
Mid-Point
Persons
Full Time
Salaries
36,500
6
100.0
36,000
2
98.6
35,500
—
—
35,000
3
98.1
34,500
1
97.5
34,000
3
97.3
33,500
6
96.6
33,000
3
95.3
32,500
12
94.7
32,000
4
92.2
31,500
6
91.4
31,000
2
90.2
30,500
8
89.8
30,000
10
88.2
29,500
7
86.3
29,000
4
85.0
28,500
7
84.3
28,000
24
83.0
27,500
12
78.7
27,000
9
76.6
26,500
16
75.0
26,000
20
72.3
25,500
8
69.0
25,000
8
67.7
24,500
15
66.4
24,000
21
64.1
23,500
26
60.9
23,000
18
57.0
22,500
15
54.3
22,000
28
52.2
21,500
25
48.2
21,000
18
44.8
20,500
10
42.4
20,000
16
41.1
19,500
36
39.1
19,000
25
34.6
18,500
26
31.5
18,000
12
28.5
17,500
24
27.1
17,000
28
24.4
16,500
23
21.4
16,000
10
18.9
15,500
27
17.9
15,000
29
15.2
14,500
21
12.5
14,000
22
10.5
13,500
24
8.5
13,000
19
6.5
12,500
17
4.9
12,000
16
3.5
11,500
17
2.3
11,000
9
1.1
10,500
3
0.5
10,000
2
0.3
9,500
2
0.1
$
36,250—36,749..
35,750—36,249..
35,250—35,749..
34,750—35,249.
34,250—34,749. .
33,750—34,249.
33,250—33,749. .
32,750—33,249.
32,250—32,749.
31,750—32,249.
31,250—31,749.
30,750—31,249.
30,250—30,749.
29,750—30,249.
29,250—29,749.
28,750—29,249.
28,250—28,749.
27,750—28,249.
27,250—27,749.
26,750—27,249.
26,250—26,749.
25,750—26,249.
25,250—25,749.
24,750—25,249.
24,250—24,749.
23,750—24,249.
23,250—23,749.
22,750—23,249.
22,250—22,749.
21,750—22,249..
21,250—21,749..
20,750—21,249..
20,250—20,749..
19,759—20,249..
19,250—19,749. .
18,750—19,249..
18,250—18,749..
17,750—18,249..
17,250—17,749. .
16,750—17,249..
16,250—16,749..
15,750—16,249..
15,250—15,749..
14,750—15,249. .
14,250—14,749.
13,750—14,249. .
13,250—13,749. .
12,750—13,249. .
12,250—12,749. .
11,750—12,249.
11,250—11,749. .
10,750—11,249..
10,250—10,749..
9,750—10,249..
9,250— 9,749..
Not Reported ..
Total	
Median
19,618
Median Salary = $19,618; Mean Salary = $20,467
Source: September 30, 1975 Form J.
 E 110
TABLE 2.17 Total Full-Time District-Wide and
School-Attached Teachers
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
Per Cent
Mid-Point
Persons
Full Time
Salaries
$
37,000
3
100.0
36,500
6
100.0
36,000
8
99.9
35,500
3
99.9
35,000
12
99.8
34,500
9
99.7
34,000
9
99.7
33,500
17
99.6
33,000
16
99.5
32,500
31
99.3
32,000
19
99.1
31,500
21
98.9
31,000
25
98.8
30,500
53
98.6
30,000
88
98.2
29,500
58
97.6
29,000
57
97.2
28,500
72
96.8
28,000
88
96.3
27,500
101
95.7
27,000
72
95.1
26,500
112
94.6
26,000
146
93.9
25,500
103
93.0
25,000
65
92.4
24,500
93
92.0
24,000
127
91.5
23,500
232
90.8
23.000
145
89.5
22,500
172
88.7
22,000
590
87.8
21,500
583
84.7
21,000
442
81.8
20,500
283
79.6
20,000
698
78.2
19,500
1,604
74.9
19,000
785
67.5
18,500
394
64.0
18,000
436
62.3
17,500
1,011
60.4
17,000
1,173
56.2
16,500
792
51.5
16,000
711
48.4
15,500
1,040
45.8
15,000
1,342
42.0
14,500
1,795
37.2
14,000
1,280
31.1
13,500
1,766
26.8
13,000
1,762
21.2
12,500
1,749
15.8
12,000
1,544
10.6
11,500
938
6.3
11,000
757
3.7
10,500
356
1.8
10,000
298
0.9
9,500
51
0.2
9,000
35
0.1
8,500
—
—
8,000
1
112
—
$
36,750—37,249.
36,250—36,749.
35,750—36,249.
35,250—35,749..
34,750—35,249.
34,250—34,749. .
33,750—34,249..
33,250—33,749..
32,750—33,249..
32,250—32,749..
31,750—32,249.
31,250—31,749.
30,750—31,249.
30,250—30,749.
29,750—30,249..
29,250—29,749..
28,750—29,249..
28,250—28,749..
27,750—28,249. .
27,250—27,749.
26,750—27,249.
26,250—26,749.
25,750—26,249.
25,250—25,749.
24,750—25,249.
24,250—24,749.
23,750—24,249.
23,250—23,749..
22,750—23,249. .
22,250—22,749..
21,750—22,249. .
21,250—21,749..
20,750—21,249..
20,250—20,749..
19,750—20,249. .
19,250—19,749..
18,750—19,249..
18,250—18,749..
17,750—18,249..
17,250—17,749..
16,750—17,249..
16,250—16,749. .
15,750—16,249..
15,250—15,749..
14,750—15,249. .
14,250—14,749. .
13,750—14,249. .
13,250—13,749..
12,750—13,249. .
12,250—12,749..
11,750—12,249..
11,250—11,749..
10,750—11,249..
10,250—10,749..
9,750—10,249..
9,250— 9,749..
8,750— 9,249..
8,250— 8,749..
7,750— 8,249..
Not Reported ..
Total	
Median
26,291
15,032
Median Salary = $15,032; Mean Salary = $16,184
Note: 176 teachers have been excluded because of missing or incorrect information. Total number of full-time teachers in September, 1975
= 26.467.
Source: September 30, 1975 Form J.
 E 111
TABLE 2.18 Full-Time Equivalent District-Employed Administrative
and Instructional Staff
(Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
School District Number and Name
District-Wide
Administrative Staff
District-Wide
Instructional Staff
Total
District-Wide Staff
92.
Fernie ,	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley.	
Windermere	
Nelson...'	
Castlegar-!	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Central Coast	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Nechako	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni 	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Agassiz-Harrison	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West ..
Vancouver Island North .
Creston-Kaslo	
Strikine	
Terrace	
Shuswap 	
Nisgha	
Total	
2.0
—
2.0
3.0
	
3.0
1.0
5.7
6.7
2.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
5.0
1.0
2.5
3.5
5.0
	
5.0
—
2.0
2.0
	
LO
1.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
-
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
—
1.0
1.0
6.0
5.0
11.0
10.0
5.0
15.0
12.0
9.0
21.0
2.0
—
2.0
3.0
4.0
7.0
6.0
9.7
15.7
1.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
LO
2.0
3.0
—
3.0
—
2.0
2.0
7.0
17.9
24.9
7.0
8.0
15.0
13.0
3.0
16.0
17.0
49.1
66.1
5.0
6.0
11.0
15.0
9.0
24.0
39.0
26.5
65.5
7.0
—
7.0
15.0
18.0
33.0
6.0
3.0
9.0
12.0
16.0
28.0
16.0
26.5
42.5
8.0
4.0
12.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
5.0
3.0
2.6
5.6
0.7
	
0.7
3.0
5.0
8.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
24.0
9.5
33.5
7.0
5.5
12.5
4.0
1.0
5.0
16.0
42.2
58.2
7.0
6.6
13.6
4.0
1.0
5.0
—
1.0
1.0
7.(1
12.0
19.0
2.5
3.4
5.9
10.0
23.5
33.5
10.0
6.0
16.0
7.0
11.0
18.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
1.0
7.5
8.5
—
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
5.0
1.0
—
1.0
6.0
	
6.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
8.5
2.0
10.5
4.0
8.0
12.0
409.7
782.4
Source: September 1975 Form J
 E112
TABLE 2.19 B.C. Public School Public/Teacher Ratios By School District
October 31, 1974 to October 31, 1975
School District
FTE
Pupils
October 31, 1974
FTE
Teachers
October 31, 1975
Pupil/
FTE
FTE
Pupil/
Ratio
Pupils
Teachers
Ratio
20.41
3,478
177.0
19.65
19.95
4,470
228.9
19.53
19.42
2,130
111.6
19.09
18.74
1,416
79.6
17.79
20.16
4,371
223.7
19.54
20.91
2,966
146.1
20.30
20.85
1,052
53.2
19.76
20.37
4,870
247.3
19.69
20.53
1,511
76.6
19.71
19.08
762
40.0
19.05
21.45
2,516
117.5
21.41
19.99
5,114
250.5
20.42
20.71
709
36.4
19.48
19.91
1,018
59.0
17.25
18.09
1,686
86.0
19.60
18.87
2,253
123.0
18.32
19.50
1,408
71.5
19.69
20.62
8,571
425.6
20.14
20.66
15,757
821.5
19.18
19.33
18,082
962.8
18.78
18.28
1,230
74.7
16.47
20.24
8,161
412.1
19.80
20.02
5,673
305.2
18.59
17.75
987
56.0
17.63
19.28
2,132
117.5
18.14
20.78
2,619
134.0
19.54
20.54
1,818
93.5
19.44
20.33
8,821
451.5
19.54
19.61
8,647
437.4
19.77
19.01
10,725
551.4
19.45
19.05
28,557
1,531.5
18.65
19.69
17,068
884.3
19.30
19.82
17,910
918.2
19.51
21.12
64,240
3,244.5
19.80
20.32
5,297
277.0
19.12
19.60
24,669
1,313.5
18.78
20.41
7,611
387.4
19.65
19.60
23,759
1,232.8
19.27
18.78
20,737
1,148.3
18.06
20.59
7,357
370.7
19.85
19.85
2,485
133.5
18.61
19.16
4,766
261.0
18.26
20.47
2,713
139.4
19.46
17.96
843
53.0
15.91
16.81
1,293
79.2
16.32
20.28
4,397
224.8
19.56
20.16
2,730
144.1
18.94
18.39
1,987
113.5
17.51
20.19
3,349
173.0
19.36
19.08
20,355
1,086.3
18.74
19.16
5,711
308.2
18.53
20.15
5,361
278.6
19.24
19.27
27,227
1,419.1
19.19
19.35
7,793
406.5
19.17
19.22
6,031
320.7
18.80
17.91
948
50.2
18.88
19.85
7,832
410.7
19.07
18.31
1,482
87.5
16.95
20.88
12,211
633.6
19.27
20.21
2,336
121.5
19.23
19.42
8,166
436.8
18.69
20.67
7,387
365.2
20.23
20.43
5,715
285.6
20.01
20.38
4,114
213.5
19.27
18.77
890
49.0
18.16
21.51
1,437
73.5
19.55
19.48
3,259
178.0
18.31
18.82
1,071
62.5
17.14
16.57
930
57.8
16.09
17.82
3,043
177.5
17.14
19.14
2,754
143.0
19.26
16.22
438
33.0
13.27
19.71
6,050
331.3
18.26
19.95
5,721
301.9
18.95
—
361
22.2
16.29
19.82
525,344
27,454.5
19.14
Fernie  3,409 167.0
Cranbrook  4,428 221.9
Kimberley  2,136 110.0
Windermere  1,415 75.5
Nelson  4,436 220.0
Castlegar  2,942 140.7
Arrow Lakes  1,032 49.5
Trail  4,960 243.5
Grand Forks  1,468 71.5
Kettle Valley  725 38.0
Southern Okanagan  2,359 110.0
Penticton  5,047 252.5
Keremeos  704 34.0
Princeton  1,055 53.0
Golden  1,674 92.6
Revelstoke  2,240 118.7
Armstrong-Spallumcheen ... 1,316 67.5
Vernon  8,304 402.7
Central Okanagan  15,413 745.9
Kamloops  18,079 935.1
North Thompson  1,272 69.6
Cariboo-Chilcotin  7,839 387.3
Quesnel  5,684 283.9
Lillooet  985 55.5
South Cariboo  2,227 115.5
Merritt  2,627 126.4
Hope  1,869 91.0
Chilliwack  8,966 441.1
Abbotsford  8,423 429.5
Langley  9,902 520.8
Surrey  28,601 1,501.2
Delta  16,654 846.0
Richmond  17,519 884.0
Vancouver  65,669 3,110.0
New Westminster  5,546 273.0
Burnaby  25,545 1,303.4
Maple Ridge  7,404 362.7
Coquitlam  23,966 1,223.0
North Vancouver  21,085 1,122.5
West Vancouver  7,637 371.0
Sechelt  2,434 122.6
Powell River  4,721 246.5
Howe Sound  2,767 135.2
Ocean Falls  826 46.0
Queen Charlotte  1,254 74.6
Prince Rupert  3,963 195.4
Smithers  2,708 134.3
Burns Lake  1,959 106.5
Nechako  3,216 159.3
Prince George  20,016 1,049.0
Peace River South  5,745 299.8
Peace River North  5,376 266.8
Greater Victoria  28,246 1,465.9
Sooke  7,508 388.0
Saanich  5,940 309.1
Gulf Islands  858 47.9
Cowichan  7,586 382.1
Lake Cowichan  1,510 82.4
Nanaimo  11,987 574.1
Qualicum  2,142 106.0
Alberni  8,254 425.0
Courtenay  7,378 357.0
Campbell River  5,564 272.4
Mission  3,981 195.3
Agassiz-Harrison  901 48.0
Summerland  1,441 67.0
Kitimat  3,334 171.1
Fort Nelson  1,038 55.1
Vancouver Island West  895 54.0
Vancouver Island North.... 2,887 162.0
Creston-Kaslo  2,700 141.1
Stikine  415 25.6
Skeena-Cassiar  6,114 310.2
Shuswap  5,756 288.5
Nisgha  — —
Grand Total  523,982 26,430.8
Source: Form AD — Division of Financial Services.
Note: Calculation of F.T.E. pupils — each Grade I through XII pupil is counted as 1.0; each Kindergarten pupil is counted as 0.5.
Calculation of F.T.E. teachers — part-time as well as full-time teachers are counted. Each part-time teacher is counted according to the appropriate decimal fraction of full time (i.e. a half-time teacher is counted as 0.5). All district-wide (i.e. directors of instruction, supervisors,
teacher consultants, coordinators, district librarians, district counsellors, relieving teachers, etc.) as well as school-attached teachers (i.e.
principals, vice-principals, department heads, librarians, counsellors, regular classroom teachers, etc.) are counted.
 E 113
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
Table 2.20       School Broadcasts
Television
Programs Broadcast       163
Schools Reporting Use    609
Radio
Programs Broadcast      162
Schools Reporting Use   -  522
Table 2.21 (1)       Distribution of Audio-Visual Materials
Total Films Supplied     30,887
Filmstrip Catalogues    300
Film Catalogues     3,500
School Broadcast Guidebooks      14,000
School Broadcast Calendars     14,000
Sing Out Booklets    63,600
Let's Sing Together Booklets     70,000
Chantez, First French, A Propos (French) booklets    12,000
Videotape Catalogues       3,500
 E114
TABLE 2.21 (2)
Distribution Services Circulation Report
Motion Pictures,
District No. No.
and Name Supplied
1. Fernie 440
2. Cranbrook  699
3. Kimberley  662
4. Windermere 273
7. Nelson  398
9. Castlegar   63
10. Arrow Lakes 76
11. Trail    313
12. Grand Forks  267
13. Kettle Valley 310
14. Southern Okanagan   135
15. Penticton  666
16. Keremeos 80
17. Princeton  117
18. Golden  603
19. Revelstoke 732
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen  114
22. Vernon 585
23. Central Okanagan 500
24. Kamloops 680
26. North Thompson  244
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin    1,732
28. Quesnel   573
29. Lillooet 95
30. South Cariboo 295
31. Merritt  398
32. Hope 153
33. Chilliwack 1,255
34. Abbotsford 60
35. Langley 65
36. Surrey  2,114
37. Delta 253
38. Richmond  396
39. Vancouver 211
40. New Westminster 54
41. Burnaby  147
42. Maple Ridge  408
43. Coquitlam  320
44. North Vancouver 952
45. West Vancouver 272
46. Sechelt  396
47. Powell River  517
48. Howe Sound   323
49. Ocean Falls  394
50. Queen Charlotte 432
52. Prince Rupert  320
54. Smithers 389
55. Burns Lake      272
56. Nechako 616
57. Prince George  188
59. Peace River South  496
60. Peace River North 278
61. Greater Victoria  88
62. Sooke   156
63. Saanich 475
64. Gulf Islands 71
65. Cowichan 443
66. Lake Cowichan 57
68. Nanaimo   652
69. Qualicum  405
70. Alberni 689
71. Courtenay  400
72. Campbell River 321
75. Mission 369
76. Agassiz-Harrison 189
77. Summerland   21
80. Kitimat 353
81. Fort Nelson 271
84. Vancouver Island, West  460
85. Vancouver Island, North  932
86. Creston-Kaslo  245
87. Stikine 80
88. Skeena-Cassiar   615
89. Shuswap 923
92. Nisgha    13
Miscellaneous  328
30,887
 E 115
FINANCIAL DATA
Table
Page
3.1 Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education at June 30 ... 117
3.2 Expenditure for Education, Calendar Year 1975  118
3.3 Cost per Pupil, Calendar Year 1975  119
3.4 Expenditure by School District for the Calendar Year 1975  120
3.5 Revenue by School District for the Calendar Year 1975  122
3.6 Transportation Costs   124
3.7 Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1975/76  125
  TABLE 3.1 Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure
for Public Education at June 30
E 117
School-year
Number
Number
June
Average
Percent
Government
Total
of
of
Net
Daily
age of
Expenditure
Expenditure
Teachers
School
Enrol
Atten
Atten
for
for
Employed
Districts
ment
dance
dance
Education
Education
69
59
2,693
1.383
51.36
$
60,758.75'
$
128
104
6,372
3,093
48.54
113.689.362
267
169
11,496
7,111
61.85
174,775.43
215,056.22'
429
213
17,648
11,055
62.64
290,255.26
425,555.10
607
268
24,499
16,357
66.76
473,802.29
604,357.86
816
189
33,314
23,195
69.62
544,671.60
1,220,509.85
1,597
359
57,608
43,274
75.12
1,663.003.34
4,658,894.97
1,859
374
62,263
49,377
79.30
1,885,654.11
4,634,877.56
2,246
575
67,516
54,746
81.09
1,653,796.60
3,519,014.61
3,118
744
94,888
77,752
81.94
3.176.686.284
7,630,009.54'
3,668
788
108,179
91,760
84.82
3,532,518.95
9,261,094.98
3,784
792
109,588
94,410
86.17
3,765.920.69
11,149.996.27
3,854
803
111,017
96,196
86.65
3.743,317.08
10,008,255.66
3,948
811
113,914
99,375
87.23
3,834,727.19
10,061,387.99
3,959
830
115,919
103,510
89.29
4,015,074.37
9,719,333.81
3,912
821
116,816
104,978
89.86
2,849,972.02
8,941,497.34
3,873
827
115,792
103,389
89.30
2.611,937.80
8,213,369 04
3,942
762
117,233
101.893
86.91
2,835,040.74
8,458,156.00
3,956
773
116,722
101,873
87.27
2.972,385.04
8,775,353.78
4,025
763
118,431
104,044
87.85
3,277,660.23
9,593,562.64
4,092
741
120,360
106,515
88.49
3,524,962.69
10,193,367.08
4,194
721
120,934
107,660
89.02
3,630,670.78
10,640,740.47
4,220
720
120,459
108,826
90.34
3,585.769.00
10,521,684.92
4,248
730
119,634
103.192
86.26
3,963,848.24
10,982,364.49
4,224
696
118.405
102,085
86.22
4,028,397.88
11,120,801.94
4,055
661
115,447
93,473
80.96
3,924,243.53
11,502.291.35
4,162
654
119,043
102,999
86.52
4.244.898.82
12,231,029.35
4,354
650
125,135
107,599
86.08
5,022,534.59
13,683,538.18
4.512
86
130.605
114,590
87.91
5,765,205.50
14,818,625.81
4,833
89
137,827
121,334
88.36
9,398,473.46
20,176.930.53
5,116
93
146.708
129,859
88.81
12,468,653.18
25,768,392.09
5,496
97
155,515
138,941
89.67
17,363.430.94
35,538,079.88
5,873
97
164,212
147,583
90.26
22,809,631.23
47,726,750.37
6,272
98
173,354
154,077
89.19
25,830,076.88
54,195,133.95
6,598
101
183,112
163,364
89.58
26,885,980.43
57,881,559.48
7,105
100
195,290
176,138
90.62
26,555,080.24
58.401,121.15
7,574
104
210,174
191,061
91.25
24,060,233.15
70,791,844.25
8,185
104
223,840
204.239
91.63
34,279,302.27
80,823,263.71'
8,690
102
240,674
218.303
91.12
41,067,740.34
69,314,181.24'
9,474
103
260,069
235,396
90.98
43,989,524.32
77,653,192.32
10,171
102
277,070
252,490
91.71
50,861.473.63
90,483,765.63
10,839
101
291,223
267,052
92.32
53,288,028.94
101,351,107.94
11,513
98
305,837
281,513
92.61
59,472.055.06
115,941,018.06
12,137
97
321,760
298,175
93.23
70,174,999.84
133,401,622.84
12,772
99
340.290
312,173
92.69
77,632,903.48
145,535,715.48
13,571
100
358,905
332,585
93.76
83,782,121.79
157,614,783.79
14,415
100
378.641
348,472
93.23
95.497,375.16
177,539,584.16
15,327
93
400.080
367,718
93.25
105,017.594.75
199,114,313.75
16,173
93
420,790
379,045
91.50
119,871,278.31
227,937,392.31
17,742"
87
445,228
408,452
93.28
144,702,607.40
269,217,969.40
19.191
85
467,486
425.514
92.64
181.854,578.21
332,702.367.21
20.481
85
489.596
447.643
93.87
251,827,287.92
384,336,617.68
21,828
85
513.079
466,264
93.74
292,556.398.29
437,743,656.54
22,678
80
527,106
476,643
93.41
354.470.298.48
516,309,118.90
23,224
75
534,523
481,353
93.38
382.221.877.00
557,875,205.00
23,365
74
537,106
481,686
93.20
425,505,748.00
612,808.108.00
24,585'
74
548,999
489,303
92.86
481,823.740.00
694.357,161.00
26,877
75
553,991
494,877
93.13
551,647,880.00
832,876,042.00'
27,870
75
555,238
495,715
92.95
704,839,307
1,068.408.139.00
1882/83.
1887/88.
1892/93.
1897/98.
1902/03.
1907/08.
1912/13.
1913/14.
1917/18.
1922/23.
1927/28.
1928/29.
1929/30.
1930/31.
1931/32.
1932/33.
1933/34.
1934/35.
1935/36.
1936/37.
1937/38.
1938/39.
1939/40.
1940/41.
1941/42.
1942/43.
1943/44.
1944/45.
1945/46.
1946/47.
1947/48.
1948/49.
1949/50.
1950/51.
1951/52.
1952/53.
1953/54.
1954/55.
1955/56.
1956/57.
1957/58.
1958/59.
1959/60.
1960/61.
1961/62.
1962/63.
1963/64.
1964/65.
1965/66.
1966/67.
1967/68.
1968/69.
1969/70.
1970/71.
1971/72.
1972/73.
1973/74.
1974/75.
1975/76.
1. Average daily attendance as a percentage of FTE net enrolment. Since 1968/69 percentage of attendance is total actual attendance as a
percentage of total possible attendance.
2. The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
3. Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
4. Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the provincial universities and since 1963/64 lo school district and regional colleges.
5. Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
6. The numbers of teachers reported from 1966/67 on include district-wide teachers with supervisory and administrative duties. These district-wide teachers were excluded from this table prior lo 1966/67.
7. Since 1973/74 the number of teachers is reported as of September 30th rather than June 30th.
  E 119
TABLE 3.2 Expenditure for Education — Calendar Year 1975
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditure for By-Law Funds)
Total Expenditure by School Districts (including Colleges) $   795,058,251
Add:
Less:
Department of Education expenditure for administration, Correspondence Schools, Teachers'
Pension Fund, free textbooks and maps, insurance,
adult education, vocational and technical schools,
grants to colleges, universities and
School Districts, etc      $710,534,271
Government grants to School Districts included in
School District expenditure:
Direct grants  $345,170,465
Grants to reduce local taxation  92,013,918
Total Government grants to
School Districts	
437,184,383
Gross total other Department of Education expenditures  273.349,888
Grand total expenditure $1,068,408,139
TABLE 3.3 Cost Per Pupil — Calendar Year 1975
Grand Total Cost of Education  $1,068,408,139
Deduct: School District expenditure not affecting pupil cost:
Colleges and other non-operating
expenditures   $ 62,758,893
Debt charges  67,602,162
Current non-shareable capital    8,683,161
Total School District reduction... $139,044,216
Department of Education expenditures for post-secondary and adult education, correspondence
schools, technical and vocational schools, grants to
colleges not included in School District deduction,
universities, etc   224,524,616 363,568,832
Total Operating Costs   $   704,839,307
Operating cost per pupil based on average daily attendance of 495,715  $1,421.86
 E120
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'     -S    T>     >        -     ~     C^     ■
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= c5S
, £-
Et
ai
•a -a
a)  <u iC
3   3   c
ooo
3^0U^^0uu3Lc3"'-U«uoSJ0^',3-0«T:a)5'-0^i.Up-||Jr'-
m2uZ^^a.xoaa.^mZa-a-D-O^^OU~JZ:a<OOS<^^UT>>u^r-^z:
  TABLE 3.6 Transportation Costs
E 125
Calendar Year
Conveyance
Total District
Conveyance
Cosls as a
Expenditures
Costs
Percentage ol"
District Expenditures
S
118,269,991
$
2,477,202
2.1
127,616,486
2,611,370
2.0
136,432,687
2,721,510
2.0
150,790,702
2.886,696
1.9
165,814.555
3,125,447
1.9
185.566,119
3,475,895
1.9
214,156,353
4,009,393
1.9
248,031,667
4.610,089
1.9
285,686,761
5,355,378
1.87
323,153,465
5,891,894
1.82
361,429.563
6,556,422
1.81
401.033,384
7,216,520
1.89
438.901,005
8,072,883
1.84
502,596,294
9,688,206
1.93
599,460,473
12,548.230
2.09
748,419,484
16,363,823
2.19
1960. .
1961..
1962.
1963.
1064..
1965..
1966..
1967..
1968..
19691.
1970'.
1971'.
1972'.
1973'.
19741.
1975'.
'Excluding college expenditures
TABLE 3.7 Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1975-76
School District or School
Capacity
Occup
ancy
Starr
Grade Limits
Male
Female
Male
Female
Full
Time
Part
Time
From           To
40
40
29
30
2
1
8                12
30
30
13
16
3
1
8                12
20
20
20
18
4
1
8              12
16
21
14
16
4
1
8              12
68
58
30
40
7
2
8              12
25
25
13
13
3
1
8              12
27. Columneetza	
27. 100 Mile House	
29. Lillooet	
57. Prince George	
60. Peace River North	
85. Vancouver Island North
Totals	
119
  E 127
SCHOOLS
TABLE PAGE
4.1 Number of Public Schools in Operation by Type, September 1970-75  129
4.2 Senior Secondary Schools  130
4.3 Secondary Schools  131
4.4 Junior Secondary Schools  132
4.5 Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools   133
4.6 Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools  134
4.7 Elementary Schools  135
4.8 Summary of All Schools  136
  TABLE 4.1 Number of Public Schools in Operation
by Type, September, 1970-75
E 129
Numbers Open in September
Senior Secondary	
Secondary	
Junior Secondary	
Elementary-Senior Secondary	
Elementary-Junior Secondary	
Elementary	
Total Schools	
Total enrolment in thousands
Type
No.
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
Change
1975-70
6
16
20
23
24
23
21
+ 5
5
119
117
118
115
123
135
+ 16
4
99
103
115
126
122
122
+23
3
13
12
10
14
17
16
+ 3
2
58
51
46
44
55
56
-  2
1
1,201
1,210
1,209
1,221
1,234
1,232
+31
1,506
518
1,513
524
1,521
526
1,544
536
1,574
542
1,582
543
+ 76
+ 25
Source: September 30th, Form B
TABLE 4.2 Senior Secondary Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE1
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan.
24. Kamloops	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41.   Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver.
61. Greater Victoria ,.
65.  Cowichan	
68.   Nanaimo	
72. Campbell River...
89.  Shuswap	
Total	
1                       59.0
1,134
1                        30.0
527
1                        52.0
948
1                        55.5
1,072
1                        55.0
1,019
4                       153.1
2,855
1                         58.0
1,128
2                        81.3
1,592
1                         63.0
1,166
2                       136.0
2,670
1                         75.0
1,281
1                         61.2
1,154
1                         52.0
931
1                         80.2
1,564
1                         44.0
917
1                         41.0
759
21
1,096.3
20,717
'In tables 4.2 through 4.8 data on teachers are expressed in full-lime equivalents and apply lo school-attached personnel only, i.e., the totals
do not include district-wide professional staff.
Source: September, 1975 Form B
  TABLE 4.3 Secondary Schools
E 131
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number ol'
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1.
2.
3.
4.
7.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
68.
69.
70.
71.
75.
77.
Fernie	
Cranbrook 	
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vernon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsrord	
Langley	
Surrey 	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake 	
Nechako	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Guir Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Mission	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West...
Creston-Kaslo	
Skeena-Cassiar	
Total	
62.3
48.5
28.0
27.0
48.0
45.0
17.3
74.9
33.5
17.0
41.5
66.0
16.0
33.0
42.0
19.1
30.0
188.0
151.0
28.9
57.5
36.0
20.0
41.0
51.5
27.3
108.0
32.0
43.0
128.0
87.0
60.5
1,417.5
129.0
255.0
144.5
47.0
319.5
184.5
52.9
50.4
58.5
19.5
17.0
30.2
22.0
29.2
36.0
269.5
41.5
37.0
252.2
156.4
80.6
20.1
33.6
37.0
26.3
36.0
84.6
66.5
35.2
36.3
72.0
20.5
11.6
51.2
69.1
1,086
890
514
475
877
891.
322
1,353
665
310
847
1,241
288
625
763
353
569
3,423
2,754
444
1,190
650
370
697
999
518
2,136
606
779
2,329
1,639
1,243
28,970
2,432
4,851
2,736
972
5,859
3,583
1,004
969
1,086
262
294
635
379
478
646
4,855
817
708
4,738
2,938
1,618
321
621
623
496
586
1,528
1,324
629
663
1,318
308
159
1,017
1,212
5,958.7
113,481
Source: September, 1975 Form B
 E 132
TABLE 4.4 Junior Secondary Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
2.  Cranbrook	
7,   Nelson	
9.   Castlegar	
11.   Trail	
15.   Penticton	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
30.  South Cariboo	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delia	
38. Richmond	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
47.   Powell River	
52.   Prince Rupert	
54.  Smithers	
57.   Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Saanich	
65.   Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75.   Mission	
85. Vancouver Island North ..
88. Skeena-Cassiar	
89. Shuswap	
Total	
1
29.0
542
1
34.0
671
1
18.0
349
2
42.5
803
2
54.0
1.018
1
16.1
284
3
112.5
2,054
5
152.0
2,701
5
208.2
3,770
2
66.0
1,225
2
81.3
1,440
1
9.0
121
4
98.0
1,852
3
91.9
1,628
4
127.2
2,238
9
350.9
6,461
5
195.5
3,604
6
251.5
4,859
5
234.0
4,103
1
18.5
339
8
322.0
6,202
3
125.0
2,233
1
52.0
926
1
43.8
879
1
25.3
442
4
131.6
2,461
2
63.0
1,076
2
62.0
1,126
10
371.2
6,906
1
25.5
480
3
98.5
1,754
5
151.3
2,924
1
23.0
385
3
102.0
1,722
5
106.8
1,959
2
76.1
1,396
2
58.2
977
1
16.5
255
2
69.0
1,222
2
60.3
1,097
76,484
Source: September, 1975 Form 1
 TABLE 4.5 Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools
E 133
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
7.   Nelson	
10.   Arrow Lakes	
17.   Princeton	
39.   Vancouver	
50.   Queen Charlotte	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako	
59.   Peace River South	
76.   Aggassiz-Harrison	
84. Vancouver Island West..
85. Vancouver Island North .
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
Total	
1          16.0
299
1          11.4
247
1          31.0
553
1          5.5
125
1          17.4
290
1          22.0
369
1          23.0
457
2          57.0
1,229
1          26.0
534
1          27.0
476
1          8.0
1(19
1         22.0
450
2          27.3
468
1           1.0
225
Source: September, 1975 Form B
TABLE 4.6 Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.   Nelson	
14.   Southern Okanagan	
19.   Revelstoke	
24.   Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
32.   Hope	
41.   Burnaby 	
47.   Powell River	
50.  Queen Charlotte	
55.   Burns Lake	
57.  Prince George	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
84. Vancouver Island West..
85. Vancouver Island North .
87.  Stikine	
89.   Shuswap	
92.   Nisgha	
Total	
1         16.5
310
1         28.0
571
1         26.0
491
2         18.9
338
1          7.0
98
1         27.0
528
1         16.0
305
2         26.0
403
1          5.5
87
8         64.0
1,247
2         10.5
130
1          3.5
65
2         24.3
488
1         58.7
1,145
2         11.1
166
2          10.1
193
1          12.6
198
1           3.0
22
3          26.6
529
1          5.5
57
2         31.5
735
2           61.4
1,163
2          7.5
136
1          3.5
57
1          2.0
31
2         16.5
333
1          4.0
65
5          52.2
1,008
1           4.5
75
3          44.5
87(1
1          6.5
108
634.9
11,952
Source: September, 1975 Form B
  E135
TABLE 4.7 Elementary Schools
District Number and Name
Number or
Schools
Number of
FTE
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1.   Fernie	
                  8
96.3
2,260
2.  Cranbrook	
                  8
117.9
2,639
8
55.6
1,183
6
30.5
115.0
630
7.   Nelson	
                 19
2,566
                 12
77.1
1,807
                  5
21.4
121.4
552
11.  Trail	
                 11
2,833
3
41.1
22.3
888
13.   Kettle Valley	
6
478
                    4
48.9
1,195
15.  Penticton	
                  11
128.1
2,932
                    4
20.4
427
17.   Princeton	
                    5
26.5
504
18.  Golden	
                  7
52.9
1,095
19.  Revelstoke	
                  7
62.0
1,259
                  2
35.1
808
22.  Vernon	
                 14
212.0
5,015
40
438.1
9,602
24.  Kamloops	
                 38
504.1
10,874
                  7
36.5
743
27.  Cariboo-Chilcotin	
                 31
211.5
4,819
28.  Quesnel	
                 18
164.4
3,664
29.  Lillooet	
                 5
29.5
581
30.  South Cariboo	
                  8
66.5
1,384
8
79.0
40.0
1,711
32.   Hope    	
                    4
874
33.  Chilliwack	
                 26
216.2
5,142
34.   Abbotsford	
                 33
243.6
5,678
35.   Langley	
                 30
308.3
7,137
36.  Surrey	
                62
812.3
17,897
37.   Delta	
                 28
517.9
11,494
38.   Richmond	
                 35
497.8
10,911
39.  Vancouver	
                95
1,706.9
37,431
40.   New Westminster	
                  9
140.0
2,934
41.   Burnaby	
                41
654.5
13,906
20
205.7
4,807
43.  Coquitlam	
                43
678.9
14,818
44.   North Vancouver	
                 36
592.7
12,119
                 13
172.8
3,909
46.  Sechelt	
                 10
75.0
1,572
47.  Powell River	
                 15
140.5
2,844
7
72.7
32.2
30.8
1,704
                  5
619
50.  Queen Charlotte	
                  5
576
8
114.2
2,610
                  6
71.8
1,653
55.   Burns Lake	
                  6
41.7
887
56.   Nechako	
                 12
72.0
1,548
51
624.6
13,890
59.   Peace River South	
                 17
158.8
3,458
60.   Peace River North	
                 17
142.9
3,187
61.  Greater Victoria	
                  41
693.7
15,287
62.  Sooke 	
                 17
197.1
4,379
63.  Saanich	
                  14
139.4
2,963
64.  Gulf Islands	
                  3
22.9
204.8
517
65.  Cowichan	
                 27
4,725
                 6
45.4
333.4
913
68.   Nanaimo	
                  35
7,571
                 9
62.5
1,394
70.   Alberni	
                  21
234.9
5,174
71. Courtenay	
                16
177.8
4,272
72.  Campbell River	
                13
140.5
3,256
75.  Mission	
                15
114.0
2,656
76.   Aggassiz-Harrison	
                 3
22.2
458
77.  Summerland	
                 3
36.4
811
80.   Kitimat	
                 5
101.1
2,039
81.  Fort Nelson	
3
37.0
33.0
70.3
61.6
805
5
618
14
1,447
                 8
1,358
87.  Stikine	
                 4
10.0
163
88.  Skeena-Cassiar	
                  17
179.2
3,876
89. Shuswap	
                  21
141.3
3,206
92.  Nisgha	
                  3
14.5
281
Total	
             1,232
14,251.9
314,223
Source: September, 1975 Form B
 E136
TABLE 4.8 Summary of All Schools
District Number and Name
Number ot
FTE
September 30
Schools
Teachers
Enrolment
11
175.1
3,656
11
223.4
4,642
10
109.6
2,188
9
76.4
1,443
25
220.0
4,511
14
140.1
3,047
7
50.1
1,121
15
238.8
4,989
4
74.6
1,553
7
39.3
788
6
117.4
2,570
14
248.1
5,191
5
36.4
715
6
57.5
1,057
8
85.9
1,720
9
120.0
2,327
4
70.3
1,445
19
413.5
8,772
50
808.1
16,253
50
941.3
18,749
9
70.9
1,274
43
399.0
8,481
23
292.2
5,884
7
53.0
1,016
11
116.5
2,202
9
130.5
2,710
7
91.6
1,880
32
422.2
9,130
38
423.0
8,984
36
533.5
11,173
78
1,444.3
29,542
36
858.4
17,865
44
891.1
18,605
116
3,129.9
66,526
10
269.0
5,366
52
1,265.2
25,171
24
368.7
7,882
54
1,183.9
24,662
45
1,112.2
21,492
16
357.3
7,492
12
127.9
2,576
19
254.0
4,905
9
131.2
2,790
7
51.7
881
9
75.3
1,353
10
188.2
4,124
9
141.1
2,843
9
106.5
2,020
15
165.0
3,423
63
1,028.7
21,228
21
289.3
5,885
23
268.5
5,550
58
1,383.8
28,142
23
385.0
8,052
19
306.9
6,224
6
50.5
974
32
388.9
8,031
7
82.4
1,536
42
591.2
12,555
11
121.5
2,365
27
425.0
8,481
23
353.1
7,586
18
277.1
5,902
18
207.4
4,262
4
49.2
934
4
72.7
1,474
7
173.1
3,357
4
57.5
1,113
8
56.6
951
21
161.0
3,160
11
140.1
2,843
6
15.5
463
22
317.3
6,310
27
287.1
5,932
4
21.0
389
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.   Nelson	
9.  Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby 	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52.   Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake 	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Aggassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
84. Vancouver Island West...
85. Vancouver Island North ..
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Skeena-Cassiar	
89. Shuswap	
92.   Nisgha	
Total	
26,409.6
Source: September, 1975 Form B
 E 137
POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
TABLE
PAGE
5.1 Degree Enrolment in -British Columbia Universities, 1975-76  139
5.2 Enrolment in Community Colleges and British Columbia Institute of Technology, 1975-76         140
5.3 Enrolment in Vocational Schools and Vocational Divisions of Community
Colleges, 1975-76         141
5.4 Full-Time Enrolments By Program in Vocational Schools and Vocational
Divisions of Colleges, 1975-76  142
5.5 British Columbia Institute of Technology Day Enrolments, 1975-76  146
5.6 British Columbia Institute of Technology Extension  (Career Programs)
Enrolment, 1975-76  147
5.7 Classification of Adult Education Courses, and Enrolment for School Districts, 1975-76 •  148
  E 139
TABLE 5.1 Degree Enrolment' in British Columbia Universities, 1975-76
University
British Simon Notre
Columbia Victoria Fraser! Dame Total
FULL-TIME
Undergraduate          17,990                  5,222 6,068                      399                  29,679
Graduate             1,990                       289 644                         —                     2,923
Totals          19,980                  5,511 6,712                      399                  32,602
PART-TIME
Graduate              769                     209 264                       —                    1,242
On Campus            3,240                   1,664 2,966                      102                    7,972
Off Campus               (3)                     327 —                       36                       363
Correspondence               721                         — —                         —                        721
Summer Session, 1975           4,051                   1,741 (4)                      116                    5,908
Interim Session            1,891                       — —                       42                    1,933
Totals          10,672                   3,941 3,230                     296                   18,139
Grand Totals              30,652                  9,452 9,942                     695                  50,741
Source:    Departmental Annual Report Forms. Data reported as at December 31st, except for SFU; SFU data reported as at October 15th,
February 15th, and June 15th.
Notes: 'Excludes those enrolled in noncredit and other courses not leading toward a university degree
Pinion Fraser Undergraduate enrolments are based on the sum ol the enrolments for all 3 terms divided by 2; Graduate enrolments
are based on the sum of the enrolments for all 3 terms divided by 3.
3U.B.C. Off Campus enrolment is included with On Campus enrolment.
*Simon Fraser Summer Session included in "full-time" and "part-time".
 E 140
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 E 141
TABLE 5.3 Enrolment in Vocational Schools and Vocational Divisions
of Community Colleges, 1975-76
B.C. Mining...,
Burnaby 	
Camosun	
Capilano	
Cariboo	
Douglas	
East Kootenay..
Fraser Valley...
Haney1	
Malaspina	
New Caledonia,
Northern Lights
North Island ...
Northwest	
Okanagan	
Selkirk 	
Special Projects.
Vancouver	
Total	
July 1, 1975 to
As at October 31, 1975
June 30, 1976
Full-Time
Part-Time
Total
Full-Time
63
63
192
1.761
1,265
3,026
10,498
712
1.176
1,888
3,136
141
—
141
585
430
364
794
2,180
170
53
223
517
22
297
319
216
160
499
659
543
—
—
—
279
570
706
1,276
2,729
457
566
1,023
1,993
248
16
264
699
34
—
34
315
341
130
471
1.206
499
967
1,466
2,464
363
165
528
1,036
282
—
282
1,227
2,691
8,370
11,061
9,082
14,574
23,518
38,897
Source: Form TV-27, collected by Division of Financial Services.
Notes: 'Haney Educational Centre did not open until after October 31, 1975.
 E 142
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 E146
TABLE 5.5 British Columbia Institute of Technology
Day Enrolments, 1975/76
Course
Female
Male
Business Management
Administrative Management	
Broadcast Communications	
Computer Programming and Systems	
Financial Management	
Hotel, Motel, and Food Service	
Marketing Management	
Operations Management	
Engineering
Building	
Chemical and Metallurgy	
Civil and Structural	
Electrical and Electronics	
Biological Sciences	
Forestry	
Forest Products	
Natural Gas and Petroleum	
Instrumentation and Systems	
Mechanical	
Mining	
Surveying	
Health
Medical Laboratory	
Medical Radiography	
Nuclear Medicine	
Nursing	
Biomedical Electronics	
Health Data	
Environmental Health Services	
Totals	
1st
28
72
100
2nd
12
52
64
1st
23
43
66
2nd
10
34
44
1st
33
41
74
2nd
16
25
41
1st
41
66
107
2nd
19
24
43
1st
35
76
111
2nd
21
28
49
1st
26
78
104
2nd
18
51
69
1st
4
25
29
2nd
0
17
17
1st
12
61
73
2nd
9
55
64
1st
6
33
39
2nd
7
34
41
1st
0
68
68
2nd
0
58
58
1st
2
168
170
2nd
1
134
135
1st
34
53
87
2nd
25
9
34
1st
20
114
134
2nd
8
128
136
1st
0
22
22
2nd
1
23
24
1st
1
12
13
2nd
0
6
6
1st
0
41
41
2nd
1
23
24
1st
0
71
71
2nd
1
51
52
1st
0
13
13
2nd
0
12
12
1st
2
76
78
2nd
5
49
54
1st
68
5
73
2nd
69
10
79
1st
47
5
52
2nd
41
3
44
1st
13
4
17
2nd
11
4
15
1st
207
12
219
2nd
96
15
111
1st
5
18
23
2nd
4
15
19
1st
17
0
17
2nd
15
0
15
1st
6
29
35
2nd
4
24
28
1st
2nd
1,2
630
394
1,024
1,206
2,090
1,836
1,278
3,114
Source: B.C.l.T. Registrar's Office (July, 1976)
 E 147
TABLE 5.6 British Columbia Institute of Technology
Extension (Career Programs) Enrolment, 1975/76
Technology
Student
Enrolment
Administrative Management  3,557
Financial Management  1,496
Marketing Management  1,260
Operation Management (Technical Management)  321
Broadcast Communications  475
Computer Programming  1,119
Hospitality Industry (Hotel, Motel, and
Food Services Management)  777
Executive Housekeepers Program  97
English    419
Health Care Management  221
Biological Sciences Technology  53
Building Technology  711
Chemical and Metallurgical Technology  152
Chemical Technology  51
Civil and Structural Technology  340
Electrical and Electronics Technology  1,431
Forest Resources Technology  344
Instrumentation and Systems Technology  56
Mechanical Technology  394
Mining Technology  71
Natural Gas and Petroleum Technology  32
Surveying Technology    424
Landscape Technology  149
Mathematics Department   792
Physics Department  46
Total  14,788
Source: B.C.I.T. Registrar's Office (July, 1976)
 E 148
TABLE 5.7 Classification of Adult Education Courses,
and Enrolment for School Districts, 1975-761
Number of Classes
Instructors
Vocational Programs
Business Management	
Commercial	
Automotive	
Machine Shop	
Construction Trades	
Electricity and Electronics .,
Lumbering and Forestry....
Engineering	
Service Trades	
Health Services	
Agriculture	
Vocational Preparatory	
Miscellaneous	
Totals	
Non-Vocational Programs
Academic Upgrading	
English and Citizenship
Liberal Studies	
Fine Arts	
Domestic Arts	
Hobbies and Crafts	
Social Awareness Education.
Recreation and Fitness	
Driver Training	
Metric Courses	
Safety and First Aid	
Miscellaneous	
Totals	
Grand Totals	
164
120
2,553
381
251
6,918
154
100
2,770
40
26
544
118
83
2,113
78
62
1,181
48
18
1,105
7
7
115
102
73
1,842
80
45
1,455
37
36
735
144
120
2,504
109
85
1,884
1,462
498
374
9,330
273
172
4,323
605
418
10,788
423
326
6,299
746
497
12,239
1,458
832
24,384
283
277
5,601
1,017
580
20,602
168
122
3,074
43
27
783
185
142
3,603
745
536
14,227
4,303
115.253
7,906
5,329
Source: Continuing Education Annual Report. 1975-76. collected by Division of Educational Programs (Post-Secondary).
Note: 'Data are for the 31 School Districts which offered Adult Education courses.

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