BC Sessional Papers

Ministry of Environment Annual Report 1980/81 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1982

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Full Text

 Ministry of Environment
Annual Report
■1980/81
Province of
! British Columbia
' Ministry of
Environment
Honourable Stephen Rogers,
^minister
IB.E. Marr,
JMeputy Minister
VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA
I Activities of all branches are covered for the period
I January 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981.
 British Columbia Cataloguing in Publication Data
British Columbia. Ministry of Environment.
Annual report. — 1978-1979 ; 1980/81-
Continues: British Columbia. Ministry of Environment. Report of the Ministry of the Environment.
ISSN 070U-3201
Report year 1980/81 Jan. 1980-Mar. 1981.
ISSN 0227-7506 = Annual report - Ministry of Environment (Victoria. 1978)
1. British Columbia.
Environmental policy -
Ministry of Environment. 2.
British Columbia - Periodicals.
HC117.B7B757
35U.7110682'32
 To the Honourable Henry P. Bell-Irving,
D.S.O.,O.B.E.,E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of
the Province of British Columbia
MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit
[ the /Annual Report of the British
'. Columbia Ministry of Environment for
j the period January 1, 1980 to December
[31,1981.
The Honourable Stephen Rogers,
Minister of Environment
SIR:
I have the honour to submit the
Annual Report of the British Columbia
Ministry of Environment for the fifteen
months ended March 31, 1981.
Stephen Rogers,
I Minister of Environment
B. E. Marr,
Deputy Minister
  Contents
Page
FOREWORD  7
ORGANIZATION CHART  9
OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER  11
Information Services Branch  13
ADMINISTRATION DIVISION  17
Financial Services Branch  18
Personnel Services Branch  18
Computing Services Branch  18
Central Services Unit  19
ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING DIVISION  21
Planning Branch  22
Assessment Branch  24
Terrestrial Studies Branch  25
Aquatic Studies Branch  26
Air Studies Branch  28
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION  29
Fish and Wildlife Branch  30
Marine Resources Branch  36
Water Management Branch  40
Pesticide Control Branch  43
Waste Management Branch  44
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES DIVISION  47
Inventory and Engineering Branch  48
Surveys and Mapping Branch  52
Provincial Emergency Program  54
Environmental Laboratory  55
REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION  57
Conservation Officer Service  58
Regions—
1. Vancouver Island  58
2. Lower Mainland  59
3. Thompson-Nicola  61
4. Cariboo  63
5. Kootenay  64
6. Skeena  68
7. Omineca-Peace  71
8. Okanagan  71
BOARDS  75
Pesticide Control Appeal Board  76
Pollution Control Board  76
STATISTICS  79
IB.IST OF TABLES  80
5
  Foreword
This report differs from past annual
reports, since it reports from the start of
a calendar year rather than the traditional
fiscal year. For most branches of the
Ministry this means that this edition
covers the 15 months period between
January 1, 1980 and March 31, 1981.
The organizational structure of the
Ministry changed during 1980 with the
realignment of programs and
responsibilities. Some of these changes
are reflected in the contents of this
report, with emphasis being placed on
the regional structure of the Ministry.
This is the first report that gives
extensive coverage to regional activities.
  nistry of Environment
MINISTER
C.S. Rogers
REGIONAL
OPERATIONS OIV.
Assistant Deputy Minister:
E.D. Anthony
CONSERVATION
OFFICER SERVICE
Chief Conservation Off:
R.L AWrich
ADMINISTRATION
DIVISION
Executive Director:
J.R. Marshall
PERSONNEL
SERVICES BR.
Dir: R.C. Webber
  Office of the Deputy Minister
At the beginning of each reporting
period, the Ministry sets a number of
goals and objectives we hope to achieve
during the year. While many programs
are continuing, we made significant
progress in the past fifteen months in
managing and protecting the Province's
natural environment.
As you can see in the text of this
report, the work in which the Ministry is
engaged is as varied and diversified as
the Province. Our programs reflect the
increasing demands being placed on the
environment from the social and
economic communities.
During this reporting period, the
Ministry identified 12 major programs to
which present and future energies and
resources will be directed. We
established a new Assessment and
Planning Division to ensure that proper
planning is an integral part of our
management strategy. Major changes
were made to legislation under which the
Ministry operates, and a new Ministry of
Environment Act was introduced.
Successful negotiations were completed
with management plans for the
Cowichan, Squamish, Nanaimo and
Fraser River Estuaries.
A water management strategy was
developed to deal with water quality and
quantity in the Nicola watershed. During
the year there was an urgent need for
staff to assess the impact of the Northeast
Coal Development and the Site C hydro
electric project. In 1980, we launched a
major investigation of pollution violators
in the Fraser River estuary that resulted
in a number of successful prosecutions.
The Ministry established the new
Habitat Conservation Fund for acquiring,
protecting and enhancing key fish and
wildlife habitat areas, and 16 new
wildlife species plans were issued. We
introduced a new commercial fisheries
aquaculture policy and established
assistance for British Columbia's oyster
growing industry.
A special hazardous waste
management committee was established
to solve the growing problem of
dangerous material disposal. We placed
greater emphasis on the recovery of
resources in our waste management
program. Oil recycling incentives were
introduced on Vancouver Island and the
Lower Mainland and a quarantine
program was initiated to check the spread
of Eurasian water milfoil.
Decentralization of services to eight
regions was well advanced and staff were
consolidated in headquarters, Prince
George and Nanaimo. Construction
started on new regional headquarters in
Smithers, Penticton and Kamloops.
When you consider that these and
many other difficult programs were
completed in the midst of a major
Ministry reorganization, we can truly
appreciate the dedication of managers,
professionals, technicians and support
staff of the Ministry of Environment.
  Information Services Branch
Introduction
1980 saw the consolidation of
information and education staff of the
Ministry into a single Information
Services Branch, and the organization of
the staff in a way most suitable for
meeting the demands of a new and
broader Ministry information program.
The new structure created a service unit
to provide basic communication skills
across all programs, and a program
development unit consisting of
information officers, assigned to various
Ministry management programs. Staffing
for these divisions was still being
completed at year end.
The major activities of this period
were split between the development of
overall Ministry information programs
and procedures, with numerous trial
projects, and the maintenance of
continuing communications services
including media relations, educational
program publications, audio-visual and
displays. By the end of the year a
Ministry theme was established and
several projects were begun to introduce
the concept of "Environment — it's your
home". These included a poster series,
Ministry directory, office entry and decor
items and television spots. This theme
will be developed further, and used as a
vehicle for other Ministry program
messages in the activities of the next
year.
Continuing information services
activities including the following:
Media Relations
A total of 153 news releases,
information bulletins, press advisories
and other public notifications were
issued, with an average distribution of
700 to 800 per item. This included
several joint Federal-Provincial news
releases.
The Ministry's "Oil Save" program
was the subject of a special series of
releases backed up by advertising with
selected media where the program was
being initiated — on Vancouver Island
from Victoria to Nanaimo, and in
Vancouver City, North and West
Vancouver, and Burnaby.
The Branch initiated the use of
"Information Bulletins" rather than
"News Releases", to distinguish genuine
"news" items from more general
information such as the release of reports
and the updating of hunting and fishing
regulations. In addition, the Ministry's
mailing list was maintained and updated.
The Ministry's clipping service was
produced regularly and distributed to the
heads of Ministry divisions and
branches, and to regional offices. Many
clippings from the Province's weekly and
community papers, which were not
included in the primary clipping service,
were sorted and distributed to the
appropriate parties within the Ministry.
Publications
In addition to a considerable amount
of publication preparation and production
work undertaken on behalf of other
Ministry programs, several projects were
begun to improve public understanding
of overall Ministry concerns following
reorganization. These included a review
of Ministry programs in the form of a
colour booklet, a series of colour posters
dealing with environment which is
representative of different parts of the
Province, and a series of inexpensive fact
sheets with environmental problems as
their focus. The quarterly Wildlife Review
and the staff newspaper Environment
News continued to be issued regularly.
Wildlife Review and the Ministry's
wildlife poster series were honoured with
awards from the Association for
Conservation Information ih the
categories of magazine editing and
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
special publications respectively. Other
highlights of the year included:
(1) publication of a full-colour booklet,
The Fraser River, dealing with the
Ministry's approach to environmental
problems affecting the river,
(2) a major document describing new
Provincial policy for commercial
fisheries and mariculture,
(3) assistance to the Fish and Wildlife
Branch in developing literature
dealing with new management
policies for moose in the Omineca
Region, as well as public
information material intended to alert
the public to the problem of coarse
fish introductions to interior lakes,
and
(4) planning for a major illustrated book
on the British Columbia
environment, to be co-published
with the private sector in 1982.
Audio-Visual
Photographic assignments included
major coverage in the Omenica-Peace,
Skeena and Kootenay Regions in
response to demands for illustrated
material required for publications, slide
shows and the new environment poster
series. The photographer was seconded
for a number of special assignments
including the cabinet tour of Vancouver
Island and B.C. Place features.
Special photographic coverage was
completed for the Fraser River brochure,
the Provincial Emergency program's
mock airport disaster, and the
introduction of the Conservation Officer
Service uniforms.
Displays
More than 300,000 visitors viewed the
Ministry's shopping mall display which
included live animals, fish, movies and
features on waste, water and fish and
wildlife. The display was exhibited in
most major malls in the Lower Mainland
and on Vancouver Island. It was
alternated with a second display on the
Salmonid Enhancement Program carried
out in conjunction with the Federal
Ministry of Fisheries and Oceans. In
addition, a display was entered in the
Sportsman Show in Vancouver and a
special "milfoil" exhibit was constructed
and displayed in major malls throughout
the Province.
The Kootenay Hatchery display was
refurbished and a feature photographic
display was distributed to all regional
headquarters.
More than 1,000 signs were
constructed. New exterior signs were
introduced for most Victoria offices.
Education
The Ministry's ENCORE
environmental educational program was
recommended as prescribed material for
use in British Columbia schools. Also,
the Ministry of Education officially
endorsed the use of the environmental
education handbook as supplementary
material for ecology units in the
elementary science program.
This is the first time that an
environmental-oriented education
program, developed by a resource
Ministry, has been proposed as
prescribed material for use in British
Columbia schools. This means that the
material must be used in the school
science program.
A number of workshops were held for
school personnel to encourage
integration of environmental studies into
the school curriculum.
There has been a very positive
response from the school system for
more environmentally-oriented material.
As a result there is greater emphasis
being placed on introducing new
materials and lesson plans for such
resources as water, waste, and other
resource management objectives.
Library
Library holdings in Victoria of the
Fish and Wildlife Branch, the Marine
Resources Branch, and the Information
 INFORMATION SERVICES BRANCH
and Education Branch, formerly housed
with the Ministry of Recreation and
Conservation, were amalgamated with
holdings of the Waste Management
Branch and Water Resources Services
libraries of the Ministry of Environment.
A central library to house the
amalgamated holdings of these agencies
was created in Victoria in the fall of
1980. This library will continue to
monitor the uncentralized holdings of the
Assessment and Planning Division and
Environmental Services Division. The
library will also monitor the holdings of
the regional offices of all the agencies of
the Ministry.
Demands for the library services of the
Ministry have increased substantially;
queries from all areas of the world are
multiplying, and so are the numbers of
students and the public who use the
ministerial library. In the coming year
the library will endeavour to expand its
service to these patrons, as well as to the
Ministry's staff throughout British
Columbia. Expanded service includes
proposals for central administration,
periodic publication of a computer-based
catalogue, and the introduction of a
service to generate current bibliographies
in a wide range of special fields, using
commercial sources of information stored
on computers.
Conservation Outdoor Recreation
Education Program (CORE)
The responsibility for the
administration of the CORE program was
transferred from the Fish and Wildlife
Branch to the Information Services
Branch. The transfer initiated a general
review of the program, and results
indicated a need for new lesson plans, a
new instructors manual, improved visual
aids and a streamlining of administrative
procedures. The Ministry of Education
agreed to provide professional assistance
in the development of new lesson plans,
and a new instructors manual, including
a review of all present teaching aids.
New comprehensive liability insurance
coverage was instituted for all instructors
in the Province.
There was an increased interest in the
CORE program with a total of 9,892
students enrolled between January 1,
1980 and December 31, 1980. There
were 7,928 graduates with 1,450 failures
and 629 who failed to complete the
course.
Registered volunteer instructors
totalled 879 but only 362 were classified
as active.
See Table 10.1, Page 138, for further
details.
  ADMINISTRATION DIVISION
Financial Services Branch
Personnel Services Branch
Computing Services Branch
Central Services Unit
The Division is responsible for regional offices, and consolidation of
personnel, finance, space, operations involving 700 staff in
communications, computing services, Victoria; a Ministry Personnel
mail, courier services, and general Classification Committee and a new
administrative support for the Ministry. Safety and Training Unit; approval of a
new autocartographic system; a Central
Major developments in the reporting Services Unit responsible for space,
[   period include: approval of seven new communications, vehicles and insurance.
17
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Financial Services Branch
The Financial Services Branch is
responsible for the development and
implementation of Ministry programs for
control of assets, budgetary planning and
expenditure. Programs also include
accounting for revenue and operating
costs in accordance with Ministry and
Government policies, and advice to
Ministry officials on budgetary and
financial matters.
A major development during this
reporting period was the decentralization
of some accounting responsibilities to
branches and regions. This process will
continue through the 1982 fiscal year.
New financial reporting systems were
introduced, as well as a proposed
property control system.
A new Distributed Finanacial
Management system will result in the
introduction of bi-weekly pay, and the
integration of the Personnel Management
System and Leave Management System.
Personnel Services Branch
This Branch is responsible for
personnel administrative services and
systems provided to managers and
employees of the Ministry. Services
include recruitment, selection, salary
administration, classification,
organizational analysis, contract
administration, collective bargaining,
employee relations, staff development,
safety and manpower planning.
The Branch opened an office in
Kamloops this year, and established a
Staff Development and Safety Section.
Our first regional office was opened in
Kamloops in February, 1980.
Other new projects include
preliminary studies for the delegation of
recruitment and selection from the Public
Service Commission and a new
payroll/personnel records system.
Recruitment, selection, classification
and organizational analysis continue at a
high level. There was also increased
union action relating to staff transfers.
The Ministry Classification Committee,
initiated last year, has been well accepted
within the Ministry and by the central
agencies.
Computing Services Branch
The Computing Services Branch is a
liaison between Ministry staff and B.C.
Systems Corporation. The Branch is
responsible for Ministry systems,
changes to systems and co-ordination of
data processing.
The Branch is coordinating a project
to provide the technology and procedures
necessary for Surveys and Mapping
Branch to distribute digital and paper
maps on request. The Assessment and
Planning Division is supported with
thematic map production and
preparations for the new Land Use
Planning Act.
 Central Services Unit
Central Services meets the Ministry's
requirements for office, storage and
equipment space by negotiation with the
British Columbia Buildings Corporation.
Associated services such as building
security, janitorial service, parking,
furniture systems, office moves,
telephone systems, photo-copying and
mail delivery, vehicles and insurance, are
also administered by this office.
The largest single project undertaken
was the consolidation of almost 700 of
the Ministry's Victoria staff into one
area.
  ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING
DIVISION
Planning Branch
Assessment Branch
Terrestrial Studies Branch
Aquatic Studies Branch
Air Studies Branch
The Assessment and Planning
Division was created to provide a focus
for a new range of Ministry-wide
assessment and planning objectives. In
April 1980, five branches were
established: Assessment, Planning, Air
Studies, Aquatic Studies, and Terrestrial
Studies, supported by an Administrative
unit.
After dissolution of the Environment
and Land Use Committee Secretariat, the
Division became responsible for
coordinating projects under the E.L.U.C.
Development Guidelines, specifically for
Linear Developments.
At the year end, the Divison has
continued to implement its objectives
and to play its role in the Ministry
through the Air, Terrestrial
Environmental, and Coastal and Estuary
Management Programs.
21
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Planning Branch
The Branch prepared plans for all
environmental resources (air, water, water
quality, fisheries, wildlife and marine
resources) at the sub-regional level. The
first plans were for the Nicola and
Williston basins, and for the south-east
Kootenays.
Operational fisheries plans were
produced for the .Arrow Reservoir,
Kootenay Lake and the Peace River, a
wildlife plan for the Arrow basin and a
water management plan for Nicola Lake
and the Coquitlam River.
The Economics Section advised the
Water Comptroller and the Director of
the Fish and Wildlife Branch on
compensation for fish and wildife losses
associated with the Revelstoke hydro
project, the Arrow Reservoir and the
proposed Site C project.
Branch Responsibilities and
Accomplishments
Plans developed by this Branch will
examine the supply-demand relationships
for all environmental resources now, and
over the next 20 years, for approximately
40 planning areas in the Province. The
aim is to develope consistent policies
involving water-related resources (water
quality, water quantity and fisheries) and
the terrestrial resources Ministry
programs can be avoided and the
Ministry's concerns can be better
understood.
Specific resource management
measures (e.g. water storage for
irrigation, wildlife management areas,
fishery enhancement works) are
developed by operation planners, but are
prescribed in the strategic plan.
Strategic Planning
Strategic environmental management
plans were initiated in the Nicola basin,
the Elk/Flathead Planning Unit, the
Williston basin, the Peace basin and the
Upper Columbia Planning Unit.
(i) Nicola Planning Unit
Water and related resource
management in the Nicola basin were
subjects of an initial study in 1979/80 to
develop a hydrologic model to assist
water management. The Planning
Branch, in conjunction with the Regional
Office of the Ministry in Kamloops,
assumed direction of the study in
August, 1980. The Branch completed an
initial analysis of current supply and
demands for water quantity, sport
fisheries and wildlife. Because there is a
shortage of water in the basin, work has
begun to improve the regulation of
Nicola Lake to increase water supplies
for fisheries (salmon and steelhead) and
irrigation. A Nicola Valley Working
Committee was established, with
representatives from various public
interests in water management and
Government agency staff, to advise the
Ministry.
(ii) Elk/Flathead Planning Unit (S.E.
Coal Block)
This program arose from the Coal
Guidelines Process as a plan for fish,
wildlife and outdoor recreation
resources. The objective is to measure
impact assessment and develop impact
management programs associated with
the five coal projects currently planned
for the region. After the dissolution of
the E.L.U.C. Secretariat, this project
was transferred to the Planning Branch,
and expanded into a comprehensive
environmental management plan. Terms
of reference are currently being prepared
to add water allocation, water quality,
and air quality to the plan.
Data collection and analysis of the
fish, wildlife and outdoor recreation
sections are nearly complete. A major
component of the study has been a
survey of public attitudes towards all
aspects of outdoor recreation. The results
of the survey will help resource managers
to set environmental management
 ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING DIVISION
objectives which have public support.
The management plan should be
complete by mid-1981.
(Hi) Upper Columbia Planning Unit
An environmental resource
management plan for the Columbia-
Windermere Land Use Study has
recently been introduced. Background
data relating to fish, wildlife and water
resources are currently being collected.
(iv) Peace River Planning Unit
The urgent need to assess the impact
of Northeast Coal Development and the
Site C Hydro-electric project, and to
develop comprehensive impact
management programs, makes the Peace
River Planning Unit one of major
importance in the Province.
A strategic plan for fisheries
management on the Peace River, with
and without the proposed Site C dam,
has been completed by the Fish and
Wildlife Branch and work has
commenced on a plan for wildlife
resources. Initial discussions have taken
place to prepare terms of reference for
the north-east Coal Block section of the
Peace Planning Unit.
(v) Williston Basin
An analysis of the resource
management opportunities in and around
Williston Reservoir was originally
initiated in 1974/75 by B.C. Hydro and a
number of Government agencies. The
Planning Branch has developed this into
a strategic plan for water, fisheries,
Iwildlife, recreation and forestry
management in the area.
Operational Planning
(i) Nicola Lake
Storage on Nicola Lake was the first
project to be undertaken based on the
Nicola strategic plan. There is sufficient
hydrological information available on
Nicola Lake inflow to be reasonably
certain of filling the amount of storage to
be developed. It is probable that more
storage control on the mainstem will
simplify tributary storage development
and management in the future.
During 1980, work on the project
included field surveys of the lake outlet.
Aerial colour photographs were taken of
the area from Nicola Lake to Spence's
Bridge to determine how much land is
currently irrigated by the Nicola river.
Field investigations continued under the
Salmonid Enhancement Program to
estimate fisheries resource maintenance
flow desired for the Nicola River for this
particular storage project, and elsewhere
in the Nicola Basin. A preliminary
engineering feasibility report was
completed on rebuilding the outlet of
Nicola Lake.
(ii) Coquitlam River
During 1980, the Ministry of
Environment chaired an Implementation
Committee to act as a forum for
information sharing, encouragement and
assistance in the implementation of the
1978 Coquitlam River study
recommendations.
Staff of the Planning Branch
participated in the Coquitlam Area
Mountain Study, undertaken to ensure
integrated planning and management of
these public lands.
(Hi) Arrow Reservoir Fisheries and
Wildlife Management Plans
In 1967, the Keenleyside dam raised
the level of the Arrow Lakes
approximately 13 m. (40 feet) flooding
over 110 sq. km of Class 1 winter range
for mule and white-tail deer, and around
30 per cent of accessible spawning areas
for kokanee, Dolly Varden and rainbow
trout. The Water Licence for the project
stipulated that management measures
should be undertaken at B.C. Hydro's
expense. Because a program to resettle
former waterfront owners along the
reservoir was not approved by
Environment and Land Use Committee
until 1980, the Planning Branch, in
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
1
conjunction with the Fish and Wildlife
Branch, did not complete management
plans for fish and wildlife until spring of
1981. Several measures have been
proposed, including the Inonoaklin
Fishway, to increase current levels of
production.
(iv) Kootenay Lake Fishery Plan
The closure of the West Arm of
Kootenay Lake for kokanee fishing in
1980 reduced sport catches by one-third
of the 1975 total. Angling for trophy-
sized rainbow trout in the North Arm of
the lake is also on the decline. A fishery
management plan for the entire lake has
been drafted which would re-establish
the kokanee fishery in the West Arm by
the construction of a spawning channel at
Redfish Creek, which could also be used
to enhance rainbow trout stocks.
Kokanee and rainbow trout production
would also be helped in the North Arm
by improvements to the Meadow Creek
spawning channel and by increasing
spawning habitat for trophy-sized
rainbow trout on the Lardeau River. The
plan has been approved in principle by
the Kootenay Region Fish and Wildlife
Branch and will shortly be implemented
under the Conservation Trust Fund.
Economic Studies
The Economics Section of the
Planning Branch provides economic
policies for analysing the Ministry's
Assessment Branch
The Assessment Branch directs the
management and protection of
environmental resources by developing
appropriate surveillance activities and
guidelines.
Evaluation Section
The Evaluation Section is responsible
for evaluating developments affecting the
major programs and negotiates claims for
compensation.
(i) Compensation
During 1980/81, the Planning Branch
assisted with claims for compensation
such as the Revelstoke hydro-electric
project, the Keenleyside dam on the
a\rrow Lakes and the proposed Peace
Site C hydro dam.
By the end of the year, a draft
agreement had been negotiated with B.C.
Hydro to provide almost $6 million for
compensation programs on the
Revelstoke project.
(ii) Economic Policy Analyses
The Planning Branch assisted the Marine
Resources Branch with preparation of a
paper on Provincial Commercial
FisherieslAquaculture Policy, which was
subsequently adopted by Cabinet. A
report was also commissioned on the
Economic and Resource Management
Aspects for the Commercial Use of Fish
and Wildlife Resources in British
Columbia for the Fish and Wildlife
Branch.
During the year, the Branch undertook
a number of site surveys to estimate
recreational values of steelhead in
conjunction with the Federal-Provincial
Salmonid Enhancement Program, and
also completed an overall assessment of
the economic effects of salmon
enhancement on steelhead stocks.
environment. This work includes
environmental problem analysis,
representation on Provincial, Federal/
Provincial and other steering committees
associated with major developments.
Guidelines and Review Section
Work completed includes coordinating
reviews of environmental impact
J
 ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING DIVISION
statements submitted by developers
under the E.L.U.C. Guidelines for Coal,
Metal and Linear developments,
representing the Ministry on the Steering
Committees for Coal and Metal Mines.
Accomplishments
Preliminary assessments were
conducted of natural gas pipeline routes
from the Mainland to Vancouver Island;
coal liquification plant at Hat Creek;
fixed transportation link from the
Mainland to Vancouver Island; coal
shipping terminal at Boat Harbour,
Vancouver Island.
Regulated projects considered were:
alternative LNG Terminal proposals;
petrochemical plant proposals; offshore
oil exploration proposals; foothills
(North B.C.) Gas Pipeline; foothills
(South B.C.) Gas Pipeline Surveillance;
Site C Hydro-electric development; oil
tanker traffic and related terminal
proposals; CNR Twin Tracking proposal.
The Section became responsible for
supervising restricted development in the
Garibaldi slide hazard area.
Other activities included: O/C 908-77
Fraser Delta Environmental Assessment
Dredgate Deposition/Marsh Transplant
i Experiment at Steveston North Jetty;
Geotechnical (Pit Test) Studies, Roberts
Bank; Vancouver Island Natural Gas
Pipeline Proposal; O/C 3339-78
Cowichan Estuary Environmental
I Assessment Dolphin replacement and
I landfill in Doman Industries mill pond;
maintenance dredging of MacMillan
Bloedel's log sort facility; replacement of
B.C. Forest Products log dump retaining
crib; dyke repairs to Blackley's Farm.
Environmental regulation of major
Federal projects included: Fraser River
Training Works: panel awaiting
Environment Impact Assessment of
revised proposal; Vancouver
International Airport: Roberts Bank Coal
Port Expansion.
Ministry planning studies included:
Thompson River Basin Pre-planning
Study, Squamish Estuary Management
Planning Study, Fraser River Estuary
Study. The Branch became responsible
for future direction and coordination of
the Ministry's Coastal and Estuary
Management program in early 1981.
The Field Coordinator on the Alaska
Gas Pipeline Southeastern Pre-Build was
to be responsible for surveillance during
construction and clean-up.
Procedures and policies were
developed for environmental control of
construction of the Pacific Northern Gas
Kitimat to Terrace natural gas pipeline.
Ministry review of numerous Coal and
Metal mine developments was
coordinated including the Quintette
(Dennison Mines) property in the
Northeast Coal area and the Quinsam
(Weldwood) mine near Campbell River.
The risk to the killer whale population
of Robson Bight was evaluated as a result
of proposed logging activities in the
Tsitka watershed.
t Terrestrial Studies Branch
The Terrestrial Studies Branch is
responsible for Terrestrial Environmental
management program and the Coastal
and Estuary management program. The
Branch provides information on the soils,
surficial geology, vegetation and wildlife
j biophysical habitats; serves as a central
repository for Province-wide information
on soils, vegetation and terrain; and
provides drafting, graphics, distribution
and autocartographic services for the
Assessment and Planning Division.
Two major programs were initiated:
the Terrestrial Environmental
management program, and the Coastal
and Estuary Environmental management
program.
 26
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Accomplishments
(i) resource analyses of the
Graystokes area east of Kelowna
Maj
or accomplishments include:
for use by the Graystokes Public
Terrestrial Environmental Management
Advisory Task Group;
Program:
(j) inventory and analyses of the
(a)
soils, terrain, agriculture
Cascade Wilderness Study area's
capability and forest capability
soil resources;
maps of the upper Coldwater
(k) soil and laboratory computer data
River for a watershed planning
file;
study for the Water Investigations
(1) wildlife ecological mapping for
Branch;
the East Kootenay area, the Pine-
(b)
soils, terrain, geologic and
Moberly area and the Burns Lake
erosion hazard maps of the
area.
watersheds of the Stein and
(m) completed 40,595 chemical and
Cummins rivers, for the Ministry
physical analyses of soil, surficial    j
of Forests.
material and vegetation samples.
(c)
assessing the suitability of soil
(See Tables 1 and 2 on pages 118
and terrain for urban development
& 120 for summary of laboratory
(Brandywine Creek) (for
services provided in 1980/81.)
Assessment Branch, Ministry of
(n) Publications during 1980/81
Environment).
included:
(d)
detailed terrain maps and
Describing Ecosystems in the
assessment of the River Delta's
Field.
suitability as a port facility;
Terrain Capability for
(e)
broad scale soils, terrain,
Residential Settlements.
vegetation and wildlife habitat
Soil Resources of the Lardeau
information in the Cry Lake area
Map Area.
Soils of the Pemberton Valley.
in northern British Columbia for
wildlife management and linear
Soils of the Langley-Vancouver
development;
Map Area, Volume 1.
1
mapping of soils, terrain, erosion
Illustrated Keys to the
potential and stream
Gymnosperms.
characteristics for the Coldstream
Illustrated Keys to Some
and Vaseaux watersheds for the
Common Grass Genera.
Okanagan Basin Implementation
Board;
Coastal and Estuary Environmental
(g) evaluating the soils in the vicinity
Management Program:
of Vernon for their suitability for
(a) continuation of the coastal
spray irrigation of waste water;
(h)
providing soil capability for
agriculture and soil moisture
waterfowl inventory, and the
estuarine waterfowl habitat
information to the Ministry of
assessment in cooperation with
Agriculture and Food for their
Ducks Unlimited;
Agricultural Land Reserve
(b) participation in the Fraser River
Program.
Estuary Task Force.
Aquatic Studies Branch
The
. Aquatic Studies Branch is a
in the fields of aquatic biology,
techni
cal support agency. It is the
limnology, oceanography, water quality
Ministry's central source of information
engineering and other aquatic sciences.
 ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING DIVISION
Environmental Services
(a) Saltspring Island Small Lake
Study — A report on the water
quality and domestic suitability of
Ford Lake, Bullocks Lake,
Blackburn Lake, and Lake
Stowell was completed in 1980.
(b) Dutch Lake — A study of water
quality was initiated at the request
of Thompson-Nicola Regional
District. Sampling was completed
in 1980, and the report will be
finished in 1981.
(c) Shawnigan Lake Study — The
quality of water in Shawnigan
Lake will be studied, as well as
its nutrient loading, in order to
assist the Cowichan Valley
Regional District with lake-shore
planning.
(d) Waste Management Branch —
Reviews were carried out on
sludge disposal to land, and land
disposal of sewage as an option
for Saltspring Island (Ganges).
Assistance was given in preparing
guidelines to design settling
ponds for sediment control in
mining. Pollution control facilities
and the water equality monitoring
program for the Line Creek Coal
Project were assessed.
(e) Consulting for Regional Districts
— Use of soils information and
investigations in lakeshore
management was reviewed for the
Fraser-Fort George Regional
District.
(f) Consulting for the Petroleum
Resources Branch — Disposal of
wastes from the petroleum
industry in the Peace River-Fort
St. John area.
Environmental Management
A storm water outfall in the Vancouver
region will be monitored to discover the
amount of contaminants originating in
storm water from a residential area. The
monitoring will last until October, 1981,
and may be expanded to other outfalls.
Heavy metals and toxic organics will be
measured which may be accumulating in
fish from the Fraser River. During 1980,
fish of several species were obtained
from all parts of the river, between the
source and the estuary. Results of the
analyses should be available in 1981.
Watershed Management
Activities for the year are summarized
in Table 9.1 page 134.
Aquatic Plant Management
This program concentrated on control
of the nuisance aquatic weed, Eurasian
water milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum
L.). Cost-shared cosmetic control of this
plant in four Okanagan Valley mainstem
lakes was implemented in cooperation
with the Okanagan Basin Water Board.
Diver-operated dredges worked under a
similar arrangement with local agencies
in Cultus Lake in the Lower Mainland
Region. Intensive integrated control was
implemented by the Province in
Kalamalka and Wood Lakes.
Quarantine and surveillance activities
were combined in 1980 to improve
technical knowledge about the spread of
Eurasian water milfoil by boaters and to
secure public cooperation. Research
continued on control technologies,
including potential biological control of
Eurasian water milfoil. Table 2 contains
detailed information.
Stream and Lake Inventory and
Aquatic Data Base
During 1980/81, work continued on
stream inventory programs in the Queen
Charlotte Islands (South Moresby
Island), the Saanich Peninsula, Saltspring
Island, the Lillooet River, the Sooke
River, the Columbia mainstem, the East
Kootenays (Windy and Cummings
Creeks) and the upper Dean River.
Fifteen stream systems of varying
sizes were surveyed for fish species
distribution, delineation of areas
sensitive to habitat manipulations and
basic interpretations of habitat quality.
 a
A data base was formed of aquatic
Environmental Impact and
resources of the East Kootenay's and
Miscellaneous Work
upper Dean River system.
A paper entitled, Agricultural Runoff
There was consultation with the
and Water Pollution was prepared and
Province of Quebec and the Yukon in
presented at the annual meeting of the
ecological survey design and with the
Canadian Water Resources Association,
U.S. Forest Service on the impact of
Kelowna, British Columbia, June 1980.
forest harvesting on fish habitats in
The paper has been submitted for
western North America.
publication in the Journal of that
Association.
Research
Manuals were published describing
aquatic system inventory procedures,
A study was carried out on the impact
data entry procedures, the hierarchical
on water quality of explosives
watershed coding system for British
(ammonium nitrate) used in coal mining.
Columbia, together with a glossary of
Aquatic plants were documented
aquatic survey terminology. Work began
throughout the Province. A 600-page
on lake inventory procedures and various
illustrated manual was published
mapping methods.
describing most aspects of aquatic plants
The Alcan Pipeline Project, continued
in British Columbia, including their
with a detailed study of proposed stream
distribution and ecology. An aquatic
crossing sites along the length of the
plant herbarium was maintained and
pipeline from the Yukon to the Alberta
specimens identified for other agencies.
borders.
Air Studies Branch
An acid rain program was initiated for
Six hundred and seventy Provincial
the coastal area. Nine sampling stations
climate stations were operated in British
have been established to monitor
Columbia, reducing to 208 during the
precipitation chemistry from individual
year; half are operated by cooperating
storms; Environment Canada is
agencies.
cooperating in analysis of the data. All
Publications during 1980/81 included:
acid rain programs in the four western
(a) Climate of British Columbia — 1977,
provinces are now being coordinated
(b) Saanich Peninsula Spring-Time
FreezeRiskby R. R. H. Chilton, (c) An
through a joint committee.
Analysis of Solar Radiation Data for
British Columbia by Dr. J. E. Hay.
A lichen monitoring project was
The Branch has four components: Air
established near Chetwynd to correlate
Engineering Unit, Meteorology Unit.
sulpher dioxide concentrations with
Climatology unit, and Data Processing
lichen growth.
Unit.
 E1WIR0NMENTAL MANAGEMENT
DIVISION
Fish and Wildlife Branch
Marine Resources Branch
Water Management Branch
Pesticide Control Branch
Waste Management Branch
29
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Fish and Wildlife Branch
The Wildlife Program
Wildlife management programs cover
inventory and management of wildlife
populations, maintaining or enhancing
habitat, and setting seasonal regulations
to control hunter and trapper harvests.
Administration
Gross revenue from the sale of hunting
and angling licences and all other
services totalled $6,830,845; an increase
of $188,892 or 3 per cent from fiscal
year 1979/80, mostly as a consequence
of greater activity by hunters and
anglers, both resident and non-resident.
Expenditures, exclusive of
accommodation costs, utilities, and
statistical services, are expected to total
$11,814,117 for fish and wildlife
programs; $130,971 by Creston Wildlife
Management Authority; $348,482 in
mitigation funds for fish and wildlife
habitat affected by B.C. Hydro
development; and $2,000,000 in the
Salmonid Enhancement Program.
Guided hunting generated
approximately $1.7 million in direct
revenue to the Province. Guide Outfitters
provided big game guiding services to
4,150 hunters, of whom 3,916 were nonresidents from 16 foreign countries.
Guided hunters harvested 3,648 game
animals (the number of each species
harvested in each Region is shown in
Table 6.5).
Active Guide Outfitters numbered 274
(out of 308 licences held), and there were
855 active Assistant Guides (1,108
licences).
Bird Management
Peale's peregrine falcons were
surveyed on the f^ueen Charlotte Islands
in 1980 as part of the five year North
American Peregrine Falcon Survey.
Territorial pairs increased more than 30
per cent from the survey in 1975. The
breeding population is estimated to be at
least 76 pairs.
For the first time a systematic survey
was made of breeding bald eagles on the
coast of British Columbia. The survey
was made in conjunction with the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service and was based
on 61 plots, of 64 square miles each. The
estimated breeding bald eagle population
on the British Columbia coast is
9,080 ±22 per cent birds.
Endangered Species
The Ministry continued to work with
Federal and Provincial counterparts to
implement the Convention on
International Trade in Endangered
Species of Wild Flora and Fauna.
With the Federation of B.C.
Naturalists and Douglas College, the
Ministry co-sponsored a successful
symposium on threatened species and
habitats in British Columbia and the
Yukon.
Wildlife Research and Technical
Services
A five year, $1.3 million co-operative
research program was begun to study the
effects of intensive forest management
practices on wildlife in second growth
forests on Vancouver Island.
Roosevelt elk and black-tailed deer are
the key species in the study, but the
implications for other wildlife will also
be examined. Costs are being shared
equally between the Ministry of
Environment and the Ministry of Forests.
The forest industry and public
conservation groups are also
participating.
The impact of wolves on caribou calf
survival was studied for a fourth year. In
the first three years of the experiment
wolves were removed from an area and
response of the caribou was compared
with caribou response in a comparable
area where wolves had been left
J
 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION
undisturbed. In the fourth year no wolves
were removed, and the emphasis was
turned toward monitoring the wolves and
caribou in both areas. It appears that
removal of wolves may have led to a
i   small increase in the survival of calves.
I   Another year of monitoring is planned.
Caribou habitat in both study areas has
been mapped in cooperation with the
Terrestrial Studies Branch, to identify
[   key features associated with specific
kinds of habitat used by caribou.
The Branch completed a fourth year of
a bighorn sheep productivity project to
examine behaviour, nutrition, range and
[   genetics and their influence on
reproduction and growth in bighorns. A
I   band of 20 to 30 sheep in a 100 acre
[   enclosure near Penticton is being studied,
I  in a cooperative venture between the
[   Ministry, the University of British
I   Columbia, and the Okanagan Game
I  Farm.
Information on the growth, horn
I   development, condition and reproduction
I   of the sheep, and changes in vegetation,
I   are being recorded in the first phase of
I   the study. Results so far show that the
sheep feed on herbs and shrubs much
I   more than previously believed, and that
■   the diversity and nutritive content of their
I   forage is more important than the
|   amount.
A one-year survey of public attitudes
I toward wildlife and wildlife issues was
I  undertaken.
The Ministry assisted with funds for
I   other studies, as follows: response of elk
and vegetation in north-eastern British
I   Columbia to 'prescribed fire' (controlled
[  burning of the range); status of the white
pelican, an endangered species in British
I Columbia; assessment of public attitudes
j   toward wolf control (in cooperation with
Simon Fraser University).
The Wildlife Research Section
I   examined specimens of wildlife for
I  parasites and disease, 'aging' teeth were
collected for compulsory inspection as
I   part of their Regional service.
Game Checks, Compulsory Inspection
and Hunter Questionnaires
Game checks at the Cache Creek
checking station (in its 35th consecutive
year of operation), were made by 15,000
hunters, who reported a harvest of over
28,500 animals.
The Fish and Wildlife Branch
instituted a Province-wide compulsory
inspection system for grizzly bear,
cougar and mountain sheep in 1975.
These animals which are killed during a
regular hunting season, or under
circumstances provided by authority of
the Wildlife Act, must be taken to an
official of the Branch for inspection and
measurement. Mountain goat and
caribou were added to the list of
designated species in 1976 and 1978.
The number of compulsory inspections
completed by Branch staff has grown
from 700 in 1975 to some 2,100 in 1980.
More than 100,000 questionnaires
were mailed to residents who purchased
hunting licences in 1980. According to
responses, approximately 40 to 50
thousand big game animals were
harvested during 1.25 million
recreational hunting days.
Big Game (Ungulates)
Elk populations appear to be
increasing in most areas of the Province.
A trial intensive management program
was initiated in heavily hunted moose
areas to preserve a greater proportion of
mature breeders and increase the
percentage of the non-breeders harvest.
There is some evidence that because of
heavy hunter take of bull moose in past
years, there are too few mature bulls to
breed all the cows during the main
breeding period.
The number of "limited entry" hunts
was increased from 28 to 37, and the
number of licences made available, from
1,807 to 2,981.
During the year a small group of
woodland bison moved up the Liard
River to Fort Nelson from Nahanni Butte
 32
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
in the Northwest Territories, where they
had been released by the Canadian
Wildlife Service. The 'rare and
endangered' animals were subsequently
transferred away from the community to
a more remote area southwest of Fort
Nelson.
Wild Fur Management
Wild caught fur taken in the 1979/80
trapping season brought $4.1 million into
the rural economy of British Columbia.
(See Table 6.6).
In 1980 Trapper Education courses,
mandatory for new trappers in British
Columbia, were offered throughout the
Province. The Ministry established an
annual grant of $8,000 to help defray
costs incurred by the British Columbia
Trappers' Association. A total of 480
students completed the course in 1980
(Table 6.7).
The Ministry assisted several trap
inventors through the $100,000 Humane
Trapping Fund.
Problem Wildlife Management
There were more complaints in 1980
of deer, elk and waterfowl damage to
pastures, orchards, crops and stored
products.
Attacks by bears, including one fatal
incident and nine maulings, caused
concern for public safety. As most bear
problems are related to garbage disposal,
steps are being taken to improve waste
management in chronic problem areas.
Livestock losses to wolves declined in
1980, although the problem remains
serious. During the winter, shooting from
helicopters was an effective means of
removing some problem wolves. But the
primary method of control is site-baiting,
particularly in the summer period. A
permit to use the poison 1080 for this
purpose was issued to the Fish and
Wildlife Branch in 1980, with a
maximum of 250 individual baits to be
placed per year within the Province.
Public Conservation Assistance Fund
The $50,000 Public Conservation
Assistance Fund supported fifteen
conservation projects which may not
have been possible without assistance.
One half the total cost of a project may
be covered out of the Fund, with the
project volunteers supplying materials,
equipment, labour or additional
financing.
Some projects undertaken in 1980/81
involved: a re-introduction of sandhill
cranes; wildlife range improvement;
steelhead and rainbow trout stream
enhancements; construction of a nature
park; winter feeding of wild sheep, deer,
and birds; construction of holding
facilities for injured wildlife;
preservation of the Vancouver Island
marmot; protection of ecological
reserves; collecting steelhead
broodstock; stream cleanup; tagging
rainbow trout; fry feeding in the San
Juan River.
Land Management
Habitat Conservation Fund
The Habitat Conservation Fund was
created to acquire and develop key fish
and wildlife habitat in the Province.
Revenue for the fund will be generated
from surcharges in primary hunting,
fishing, trapping and guiding licences,
and from grants, gifts, donations and
bequests.
A sum of $1.26 million was granted
from the Crown Land Fund.
Use of Prescribed Fire
A draft protocol agreement with the
Ministry of Forests was developed to
facilitate the use of prescribed fire in
wildlife management.
Site Management
The Fish and Wildlife Branch manages
land consigned to the Ministry from the
National Second Century Fund of British
 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION
Columbia The following sites were
consigned in 1980/81:
(a) Willow Creek (Campbell River)
— 80 acres acquired to protect
and enhance a highly productive
cutthroat and coho stream;
(b) Stellako River — 59 acres at the
mouth of the Stellako River on
Francois Lake, important to a
continuing fisheries and
conservation project;
(c) Walter Clough (near Slocan City)
— 150 acres of waterfowl habitat
donated by Mr. Innes Lome
Cooper of Victoria, now named
the Walter Clough Wildlife .Area,
in memory of an early pioneer in
the area;
(d) RCMP Hats (north of Radium
Hot Springs) — 584 acres,
including valley bottom habitat
important for waterfowl nesting
and staging, and an upland winter
range for ungulates, principally
elk;
(e) Owen Lake (south of Houston) —
128 acres adjacent to Owen Lake,
part of an intensive moose
management program planned for
the Nadina Valley.
i The Fisheries Program
The number of participants in non-
| tidal sport fishing continued to increase
[in 1980/81. Approximately 340,000
■licensed resident anglers spent 4.6
■million days fishing. There were
I approximately 110,000 non-resident
anglers who spent an estimated 570,000
days sport fishing. The total annual catch
Iwas approximately 8 million fish, or
■close to 1.5 fish per angler day, with
■rainbow trout and kokanee the most
■commonly caught species. The total
Icatch has remained at approximately 8
mnillion fish for the last 20 years, despite
■the increasing number of anglers.
|   During the 1980/81 season residents
and non-residents together spent
■approximately 140 million dollars on
t freshwater angling.
In order to maintain and enhance
freshwater fishing in British Columbia
the Fisheries Management Section
carries out fish habitat assessment and
improvement, research, and fish culture
activities throughout the Province with
the cooperation of regional fisheries
biologists. Additional responsibilities
include the Fisheries Program,
development of freshwater sport fishing
regulations, regulation of commercial
fish farms, and coordination of the
Federal-Provincial Salmonid
Enhancement Program.
Steelhead Harvest Analysis
The 1979/80 analysis is based on
returns from 7,565 steelhead anglers or
30 per cent of the 25,095 licensees.
From these returns it is noted that an
estimated 14,755 licensees spent
135,000 days fishing for steelhead in
British Columbia. An estimated 6,384
anglers were successful, catching a total
of 39,500 steelhead. Approximately
12,663 were kept, while the remainder
were caught and released. Comparison of
these results with the five previous years
is found in Table 6.8.
Fish Habitat Improvement
Major programs such as the Salmonid
Enhancement Program, Okanagan Basin
Implementation and the Public
Conservation Assistance Fund, have
improved debris clearance, obstruction
removal, stream diversion, lake aeration,
chemical lake rehabilitation, spawning
and rearing habitat renovation and
creation, fish passage construction and
fish food transplants.
In 1980/81 the Fish Habitat
Improvement Section was involved in ten
inland fisheries projects throughout the
Province, as follows: Small lake
tributary enhancement investigations
(Carp, Hicks, Alta, Weaver, Kawkawa,
Buntzen Lakes); Spawning channel
maintenance (Ruby Lake); Flood control
impact assessment (Mission Creek);
Wild Rainbow trout recruitment
monitoring (Mission Creek); B.C. Hydro
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Mitigation/Compensation Surveys
(Jordan River).
Weaver and Hicks Lakes, outlet
spawning gravel will be renovated and
increased and fish passage (i.e., access
to lakes) improved through fishway
construction in 1981/82. At Carp Lake
regional managers were concerned that
rainbow trout were being harvested in
excess of their natural recruitment or
replacement. Angling regulations have
been introduced which are designed to
protect and maintain spawning stock. At
Ruby Lake the annual scarification
(cleaning) of an outlet-spawning channel
resulted in increased production of
coastal cutthroat trout and improved
catch of these fish in the lake fishery.
In 1980/81 the Section was involved in
16 projects with funds provided by the
Salmonid Enhancement Program, as
follows: Enhancement assessment
(Nicola, Little Chilcotin/Elkin, Camera,
Salloomt, Kispiox, Morice and Kloiya
Rivers); Enhancement assessment/
implementation (Lower Mainland Sea-
Run Cutthroat); Fry stocking evaluation
(Bonaparte, Silverhope Rivers);
Highway/industrial impact assessment
(Coquihalla, Coldwater Rivers); Pre- and
post-flood evaluation (Salmon River —
Langley); Instream improvement
(Springer Creek); Applied enhancement
research (Colquitz Creek); Evaluation of
steelhead survival over winter (Deadman
River).
A number of these projects will
continue in 1981/82. For example, in the
Lower Mainland, boulders will be placed
in two streams to improve rearing habitat
for juvenile sea-run cutthroat trout. In
Silverhope Creek and the Coquihalla,
Bonaparte and Salloomt Rivers,
steelhead fry stocking programs
recommended by the Section will
continue. In Colquitz Creek, the
Provincial Capital Commission has
provided funds for a combined linear
park and stream restoration project which
will include stream enhancement
structures for increasing coho salmon
and sea-run cutthroat production.
In 1980/81 the Fish and Wildlife
Branch, in cooperation with Federal
Fisheries and Oceans, produced a Stream
Enhancement Guide with support from
the Federal-Provincial Salmonid
Enhancement Program. This guide can
be used by fisheries agency field staff as
well as the public.
Fisheries Research
Research indicates that by genetic
manipulation or by sterilization,
(diverting energy to growth rather than
production of sexual products), growth of
trophy rainbow trout of 2-4 kg should be
achieved easily and inexpensively.
In the Okanagan-Kamloops area most
small lakes are extremely rich in
nutrients. In some cases this
characteristic results in low dissolved
oxygen levels and consequent winterkill
of fish. Experimental aeration of Yellow
Lake near Penticton has resulted in a
trout population per unit of area five
times greater than in comparable lakes
nearby.
In the Lower Mainland the first
experimental sea-run cutthroat rearing
program has resulted in a catch of 2,000
fish in the Chilliwack area.
Fish Culture
During the year 6.4 million hatchery
fish were liberated in 607 lakes and
seven streams; approximately 5.1 millions
rainbow trout were planted in 483 lakes;
82 lakes received brook trout, and
250,000 kokanee eggs went into the
Arrow Lakes area. Steelhead fry totalling j
119,500 were released to four rivers;
52,633 steelhead smolts were planted in
five rivers; and 61,691 sea-run cutthroat
were also released. (See Tables 6.9 and
6.10.)
For the second year, 17,000 brown
trout fry were released into tributaries of
the Cowichan and Adam-Eve Rivers.
Other projects included: cooperation
with B.C. Hydro and Power Authority in |
the construction of a small hatchery at
Peace Canyon to compensate for the Site 1
 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION                                         35
[   1 Dam; significant returns of
Smolts released from Provincial
I anadromous cutthroat to sport fisheries
hatchery facilities number 32,000
I and spawning grounds on Vancouver
cutthroat and 73,000 steelhead.
I Island resulting from the first year's
Fingerling releases in the fall provided
release of hatchery fish; approximately
an additional 15,000 cutthroat and
one-half of the summer run steelhead
120,000 steelhead. Also, in 1980 the
I returning to the Coquihalla River were of
first production scale rearing facility was
■ hatchery origin; Loon Creek Hatchery
constructed and operated on Cowichan
1   expansion was completed, enabling the
Lake. High summer temperatures
■ first steelhead smolts and chinook fry to
resulted in substantial losses (65 per
be released in April and May of 1981;
cent), but fall and winter survival and
2,206 juvenile and adult fish were
growth was excellent. Alterations to the
1 examined clinically for the detection,
Loon Creek hatchery near Clinton were
B diagnosis and prevention of disease.
completed, and the facility went into
production.
■ Salmonid Enhancement Program — 1980
Regional staff intensified the
The Federal-Provincial Salmonid
collecting of wild stock steelhead for
■Enhancement Program is designed to
Federal hatchery facilities. Approximate
double the catch of salmon, steelhead
production of smolts was 220,000,
B and sea-run cutthroat in the next twenty
though many fish were undersize.
if years. This development program is to be
Programs for colonizing unused
■ completed in two phases. Phase I will
habitat should be given high priority,
continue until 1983/84 followed by the
because pilot plants of fry have shown
■final Phase II.
such programs to be economical and to
The Province agreed to support Phase
encourage survival.
fl II with funds at the proportionate level
The first returns of adult steelhead
agreed to for Phase I.
were observed in some rivers.
Careful and restrictive management of
The development of a sea-run cutthroat
II salmonid stocks in the Province
program continued, and good fisheries
continues, since they have declined to
for sea-run cutthroat have developed on
II historic low levels.
the Hope-Camp Slough, the Gorge
i    Opportunities for enhancement of
Waterway, Fulford Harbour and the
II natural systems were evaluated on the
Oyster River.
■Jsjicola, Chilcotin, Bella Coola, Kispiox,
llMorice, Kloiya, Lillooet, Nahatlatch,
■Stein, Texas, Seton and Bridge Rivers.
Inland Fisheries Enhancement Projects
Log and debris barriers were removed
Wfrom four high-quality tributaries of the
[■Salmon River on Vancouver Island. In
Hatheume Lake rehabilitation project
(Region 3); Hatheume Lake was
11 addition, several large boulders were
chemically treated to remove the
1   added to Springer Creek, providing
increasing population of sculpins which
[■habitat for several hundreds of steelhead
was causing the decline of rainbow trout
1   and coho smolt. In the Lower Mainland,
and threatening to colonize nearby lakes.
IKutthroat rearing areas were improved in
Gardom Lake (Region 3) aeration
IBributaries of the Serpentine, Nicomekl,
project; air pumps were installed to
and de Boville Slough. On the
circulate air to the bottom of the lake and
■■Thompson, removal of an obstruction on
increase oxygen levels during the winter.
1   Criss Creek gave steelhead access to an
This will prevent winterkill of fish due to
IBtdditional 17 km of spawning and
low oxygen levels caused by the cover of
IBearing habitat. Spawning areas were also
ice and algae decomposition, and will
IBonstructed in Criss Creek and Shaken
increase the level of sport fish
1   Creek, a tributary of the Nicola system.
production.
 36                                                      MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Nechako River sturgeon study (Region
when the plankton crop is at its
7); sturgeon have been tagged with radio
maximum, thus reducing the cost of
transmitters and their movements have
rearing, and increasing the survival of
been followed. This study has been made
the released kokanee.
in collaboration with New Caledonia
College.
Habitat Protection
Yellow Lake aeration project (Region
A compensation package for losses
8); aeration of Yellow Lake to prevent
stemming from Revelstoke Dam was
winterkill of trout has created a fishery of
completed during the year, and a position
11,000 angler days per year, where
paper on the effects of the proposed
previously there was no fishery.
Peace River Site C dam was developed.
Arctic grayling transplants (Region 7);
Emphasis is placed on the low flow
arctic grayling have been stocked
problems in the Nechako and the
upstream of impassable barriers in rivers
Kemano completion proposal by Alcan,
in the area of the northeast coal block.
the Coquihalla highway projects, coal
British Petroleum collaborated in this
projects in the northeast and southeast,
project.
the Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline, and
Okanagan Lake enhancement (Region
the proposal for a wilderness area on
8); 20,000 one year old rainbow trout
South Moresby Island.
were released into Okanagan Lake. The
Work has been started on a special
hatchery fish made up 25 per cent of the
study to assess the effects of soil erosion
catch of one year rainbow trout. 100,000
on forest and stream productivity in the
kokanee were also released into
Queen Charlotte Islands. The $800,000
Okanagan Lake.
study is a joint project of the Federal
Skaha Lake Hatchery (Region 8);
Department of Fisheries and Oceans and
construction of this hatchery is complete.
the Provincial Ministries of Environment
It will be used to rear kokanee for release
and Forests.
Marine Resources Branch
This Branch is responsible for the
operation. In spite of the economic
management of oyster and marine plant
situation, the number of processing and
resources and the economic development
buyers' licences issued remained at
of associated industries. It licences and
record high levels.
regulates the fish processing sector and
fish buyers in the commercial fishing
Prices for shellfish — principally
industry of British Columbia. These
services are provided under the British
oysters and clams — continued to rise;
demand exceeds supply and the industry
Columbia Fisheries Act and Fish
continues to expand at record rates.
Inspection Act.
New Provincial policies for
The commercial fishing industry was
commercial fisheries and mariculture
affected by a sharp drop in prices and
were announced in April of 1980. Exceptl
volume of landings in 1980. The Marine
for a Canadian citizenship requirement, 1
Resources Branch approved transfers of
fish buyers' licences will not be
processing and buyers' licences to
restricted, nor will processing licences, 1
accommodate the sale and acquisition of
except for floating processing plants. Tha
assets between the two major fish
new policies include the monitoring of
processors in the Province; an
the structure and source of investment
intermediate-sized company ceased
capital.
 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION
Marine plant harvesting will not take
place where it may have a negative
impact on salmon, or herring or
shellfish, et al. Seaweed harvesting
licences for large volumes will be issued
on a competitive bid system.
Cooperative, exploratory fishing
programs with the Nanaimo Biological
Station have produced an additional 69
t/year of prawns and shrimp, having a
landed value of $460,000/year and
providing 1,200 person days of
employment/year; similarly, 19,000 t of
groundfish were located, having a landed
value of $3,000,000.
Identification of individual herring
stocks in the Strait of Georgia increase
quotas by about 10 per cent or (at last
year's prices), a landed value of
$480,000/yr.
Development of a marine plant
industry started in 1980 with the
i establishment of a kombu harvesting and
j processing operation at Port McNeill.
Mariculturists have started trial
operations of kombu culture in Masset,
\ Pender Harbour area and Barkley Sound.
A second Oyster Seed Development
; Loan Fund was negotiated with the B.C.
Development Corporation.
The number of registered oyster
growers increased from 90 to 100 and
leased foreshore increased from 2,274
(79/80) to 2,685 by the end of 1980.
In cooperation with the B.C. Oyster
{Growers' Association, a commercial
[ scale trial of longline cultured oysters
twill be used to compete with a five
■million dollar per year market served by
■imported product.
A contract was placed for a
■commercial scale mussell culture project,
■jointly funded by Fisheries and Oceans.
The company has extensive experience in
Kultured oyster production.
Inspection, Licencing and
Enforcement Section
The number of licenced processing
facilities increased by six per cent from
■351 to 371 (an eight per cent increase
recorded in 1979). In 1980, more small
facilities such as retail markets were
licenced to operate. Two small "sport
fish canneries" ceased operations, which
resulted in a decrease of licenced salmon
canneries from 22 to 18.
The number of fish buyers' licences
increased by three per cent from 651 to
672 (a one per cent decrease was
recorded in 1979).
Salmon Canneries
Of 18 licenced salmon canneries, one
is located in the Central Coast area; six
in the Skeena River-Prince Rupert area;
three on Vancouver Island; and eight in
Fraser River-Lower Mainland area. The
canned pack was made up of the
following number of 48 lb. (21.8 kg)
cases by species: sockeye 388,206;
chinook, 6,768; steelhead, 440; coho,
82,651; pink, 456,363; and chum,
170,346; for a total of 1,104,774 cases.
This is an increase of 19 per cent over
the 928.076 cases produced in 1979.
However, the 1980 production included
217,148 cases of salmon imported from
the USA and also 27,411 cases canned
from the previous year's frozen stock,
which together makes up 22 per cent of
the current year pack. (See Table 7.5,
Salmon Canning — Commercial for
comparative figures for two preceding
periods.)
Sport-Caught Fish Canneries
Sport-caught fish canneries recorded a
decrease in production of one-half pound
(225 g) cans. From 345,817 cans in
1979, a drop of 34 per cent to 229,117
cans has occurred. The number of
resident fishermen using these facilities
dropped from 2,082 to 1,780. The
number of individual fish canned by the
four licenced canneries was 27,784,
which is a decline of 31 per cent from
the 40,468 reported in 1979. Chinook
salmon comprised 31 per cent of the
catch in 1980 and 26 per cent in 1979.
Coho salmon made up 60 per cent in
1980 and 57 per cent of the catch in
1979.
 38                                                      MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Inspection Survey
Salmon Fishery
An inspection of sport fish resorts,
51,576 t of salmon worth $117 million
charter vessels, and freshwater fish farms
(landed value) were landed in 1980.
which was undertaken in late 1979 was
Landings declined 11 per cent from 1979  !
completed in 1980. The purpose of this
and value dropped 27 per cent due to
survey was to determine if any of these
softening world export markets. Salmon
establishments were engaged in fish
represented 65 per cent of landed value
processing. About 85 charter boats and
of British Columbia fishing landings
marinas, 65 freshwater fishing resorts
during 1980.
and 65 fish farms were included in the
survey.
Halibut Fishery
Fin Fish Policy and Resource
Development Section
Canadian fishermen landed 3,305 t of
halibut having a landed value of $9
million. This quantity is 370 t more than
The exploratory fisheries programs to
the previous year, however, landed prices
date have provided an additional 4,052
declined 140 per cent resulting in a
person days/yr. of fishing to harvest a
reduction in total landed value of $7.4
233 t/yr. increase in shrimp and prawn
million from 1979/80. The protocol
catch worth one million dollars landed
between Canada and the United States,
value. They have provided a 19,000 t
which allows Canadian fishermen to fish
increase in the groundfish quota worth an
halibut in U.S. waters in exchange for
estimated $3.2 million landed value/yr.
the right of U.S. fishermen to catch
The herring tagging program
continued; 27.027 tagged herring were
groundfish in British Columbia waters,
expired in 1980. Halibut landings are
released from four vessels.
therefore expected to decline in the
Approximately one half of the releases
future.
were made in the vicinity of La Perouse
and Swiftsure Banks during September,
the remainder during November in the
Herring Fishery
Gulf of Georgia, Johnstone Strait and
The total herring landed in the
near Browning Entrance. One hundred
1980/89 herring fishery is estimated at
seventy-three tags were recovered out of
38,5761, with an estimated landed value 1
a total of 78,482 herring tagged during
of $34 million. The 1980 food and bait
the first two years of the program. This
fishery landed 87811 worth an estimated ]
data will allow the continuation of the
$4 million. Landed value of roe herring   ]
lucrative herring roe fishery and 10 per
continued at a value approximately
cent increase in the catch quota per year.
25-35 per cent of that achieved in 1979   j
due to a softening Japanese market.
Fishing Industry Production
The primary source of commercial
International Fisheries Negotiations
sales is salmon, followed by the
Salmon Interception Negotiations
lucrative, but somewhat unstable, herring
between Canada and the United States in M
fishery. Total landings declined due
Lynnwood, Washington, reached a
primarily to poor salmon returns. Landed
satisfactory conclusion. The Marine
values dropped significantly as a result of
Resources Branch recommended support
softening markets in the major importing
of the "Lynnwood Agreement", which   j
countries. Increasing production from
should entitle fishermen in both countries™
ground-fisheries and shellfish stocks
to a catch of salmon commensurate in
provided some relief from dependence
value with that produced in their
on traditional markets.
respective rivers.
 Shellfish Management and
Development
Environmental Protection and
Monitoring
/After closure of shellfish harvesting in
I Saanich Inlet, an assessment of fecal
[ coliform pollution was made and point
[sources were identified. An effective
"clean-up" of the inlet should result in
j the re-opening of this previously heavily-
used shellfish recreational area.
Habitat Protection
The MacMillan Bloedel proposal for a
log handling facility at Buckley Bay has
[ been a recurring and contentious issue
[ throughout the year. We have provided
information on design, construction and
; operation phases to provide the best
! possible habitat protection. Baseline
•inventory is underway, and sample
I stations and bioassay sites have been
[established to monitor growth and
[mortality of oysters. Intertidal plots will
[be set up to monitor build up of debris.
[Water quality monitoring programs have
[been agreed with the company.
Referrals from Lands Branch
[accounted for 41 per cent and Waste
[Management Branch comprised 46 per
[cent of other protection referrals.
Shellfish staff were members of the
planning task forces initiated by the
■Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing to
Ivrite management plans for small
[harbours. The "Sooke Harbour and
Basin Crown Foreshore Plan" was
published this year, and the first drafts of
the "Ladysmith Harbour Crown
Etoreshore Plan" were completed.
Extension and Liaison Services
j   A cooperative study with the
|Bechnology Services Branch of the
I   Department of Fisheries and Oceans
I(assessed the shelf life, food value and
IKondition indices of bottom and off-
IBiottom cultured oysters. Results indicate
I    that for the same storage temperatures
|B>ff-bottom oysters have a longer shelf
life than bottom oysters. There were
insignificant differences in food value
between bottom and off-bottom oysters.
Off-bottom oysters were found to have a
lighter colour, and fresher odour and
flavour. The study also compared several
methods for obtaining condition indices.
This study is the first of its kind in
British Columbia.
Oyster Seed Development Loan Fund
An oyster seed development loan of
$160,000 was made by the British
Columbia Development Corporation to
the British Columbia Oyster Marketing
Board. Seven growers have taken out
loans totalling $131,000.
Oyster Culture Development
At the end of 1980, there were 100
registered oyster growers in British
Columbia, using 2,685 acres of Crown
foreshore. This is the first time that the
number of growers has reached 100.
These figures represent an increase of
475 acres of growing area and an
additional 12 registered growers over the
previous year.
There is continuing strong market for
fresh oysters; the industry is diversifying
into new oyster products and starting to
culture different species of shellfish.
Although the number of permits issued
to harvest wild oyster increased from 66
in 1979 to 86 in 1980, there was a
reduction of tonnage harvested from 709
tons in 1979 to 337 tons in 1980. All
permits come under close scrutiny and
only conservative quotas are allowed.
Trials of oyster culture-on-stakes at
Baynes Sound, Nanoose Harbour and
Kuper Island are complete. This work
showed that marginal growing areas can
be used; growth rates of approximately
double that of bottom cultured oysters
were obtained in all areas. Additional
plots have been set up in Ladysmith.
A pilot project was introduced to test
the commercial feasibility of culturing
oysters, using the Japanese Iongline
system. Oysters from this project will be
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
1
smoked and canned and will compete
with an imported product which now
services a 5 million/year market.
Automated shucking and cooking
techniques will be used for this project,
to be developed jointly between British
Columbia Research, the industry and this
Branch.
A site for the Shellfish Demonstration
Facility has been located at Fanny Bay;
construction should be completed by
about mid 1982.
Spatfall Prediction Service
There was a successful commercial set
in Pendrell Sound this year.
Approximately 200,000 strings of cultch
were installed, and the value of seed
collected was about $1,160,000. This is
an increase of almost $200,000 over
1979.
The Marine Resources Branch will
provide the prediction service as of 1982.
Mussel Culture
An oyster grower is under contract to
set up a pilot commercial mussel culture
operation. The Branch invested $15,000
for the first year.
Marine Plant Management and
Development Section
The Province's first kombu (edible
kelp) harvesting and processing operation
got underway in June 1980 based on
using Laminaria and Cymathere off
Malcolm Island; a processing facility
was licensed at Port McNeill. Pre-harvest
inventory identified in excess of 2,6001
of kombu in the area.
Kelp harvesting and processing
licences have been conditionally awarded
to a company in Vancouver. The annual
harvest quota is 5,0001 for a minimum 5
year period. A monitoring team will
assess the impact of harvesting on
regrowth of kelp and on associated fish
and invertebrate species.
For the first time harvesting licences
were issued to regulate kelp harvesting
by the herring spawn-on-kelp industry.
Seventy-two t of Macrocystis blades were
used on spawning substrate in the herring
ponds. This industry produced wholesale
sales of approximately $3 million in
1980. A kelp harvesting licence was also
issued to provide feed for brood stock in
an abalone culture operation.
The single commercial nori or purple
laver (Porphyra) operation on the British
Columbia coast has led to Native Indian
concern over their continued access to
this traditional sea vegetable. The
Ministry will catalogue traditional
picking sites and preserve them for the
special interests of Indian people.
Culture technology for red seaweeds
will be discontinued, following sweeping
changes occurring in the international
algal colloid (gel) industry.
Kombu culture technology
development continues to progress
rapidly. Young wildlife plants
transplanted to culture lines have
produced larger, higher quality blades
than naturally grown plants. Seeding
techniques are well established and seed [
produced in the laboratory has shown
that shorter growing seasons may be
possible.
Water Management Branch
The Comptroller of Water Rights
administers the Water Act, under which
the water resources of the Province are
managed. With few exceptions, licences
are required before any person,
company, community or government
agency uses water from surface-water
sources. Licences are issued for
 r
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION
domestic, waterworks, conservation,
irrigation, mining, industrial, power,
storage and other purposes.
The Comptroller of Water Rights also
administers the Water Utilities Act under
which he regulates water utility
companies.
The Water Management Branch is
organized into three sections;
I .Administrative, Power and Special
Projects and Community Water Supply.
The number of licences issued
continues to grow at 1,000 per year; the
total number of licences has now reached
34,100. For the period January 1, 1980
to March 31. 1981, 2,245 new
applications were received; the number
of pending applications reached 3,132 at
March 31, 1981.
Approvals granted under section 7 of
the Water Act for a short term use of
water, or for changes in and around a
stream, increased to 387.
Applications for amendments of
licences by apportionment, transfer of
< appurtenancy or changes of works
! totalled 926.
Draughting and Mapping Office
During the reporting period 2,419
: plans were draughted for each water
licence issued.
A total of 848 new reference maps
were completed; 212 new mylar maps
were also completed.
The staff has produced a record
[ number of maps: a total of 547, showing
water licencing data.
Power and Special Projects Section
Considerable emphasis was placed on
two major responsibilities, dam safety in
general, and the Revelstoke hydroelectric
project in particular.
Contracts for construction of
cofferdams, unwatering of the riverbed
and excavation for the foundations of the
proposed concrete gravity dam and
powerhouse were completed by March
I 1980, on the 2,700 mw Revelstoke
Project despite difficult bedrock
conditions. The Columbia River had
been diverted earlier in 1978.
A $283,000,000 contract for the
concrete gravity dam at the Revelstoke
hydro-electric project was awarded in
June, 1979. This is the largest single
contract ever awarded by British
Columbia Hydro and provides for the
construction of the concrete dam,
powerhouse and spillway.
While engineering aspects of the dam
are assessed by the Section's technical
staff and three consultants, the
environmental and social effects of the
construction activities are reviewed
continually by the Revelstoke Project
Coordinating Committee.
Two other major hydroelectric
projects, the 700 mw project at Peace
Canyon and the 525 mw Seven Mile
project on the Pend d'Oreille River near
Trail, were substantially completed in
1980. Official opening ceremonies, with
the Premier attending, were held on June
13 at Seven Mile and on September 23 at
Peace Canyon. Installation of a fourth
175 mw unit at Seven Mile is being
deferred until additional units at Seattle
City Light's Boundary Project, located
some 16 km upstream, are in place.
Although much of the responsibility
for the review and approval by
Government of new major hydroelectric
projects has been transferred from the
Ministry of Environment to the Ministry
of Energy, Mines and Petroleum
Resources (under the Utilities
Commission Act, August, 1980), the
Water Management Branch, (in
particular, the Power and Special Projects
Section) will continue to review technical
aspects of projects proposed for
approval.
In 1980, British Columbia Hydro
applied for a certificate to proceed with
the 900 mw Site C Project, located on
the Peace River near Fort St. John. A
review of the preliminary designs of the
proposed 200-foot high earthfill dam was
initiated by the Section.
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Other hydroelectric projects are under
active consideration for development in
the next decade, including the Liard
River (4,000 mw total at two sites), the
Stikine-Iskut (2,800 mw total at four
sites) and the smaller Murphy Creek
Project on the Columbia River near Trail
(400 mw).
During 1980, water management and
licencing requirements for 17 metal mine
proposals were reviewed in addition to
coal development in the Southeast
Kootenay area, the Northeast Coal
Block, Vancouver Island and the
Southern Interior.
A proposed new rental structure will
increase Government revenues from $16
million to $41 million annually. The
Section also completed a report on
mitigation/compensation opportunities on
the Arrow Lakes; a review of irrigation
depletions in the Columbia Basin, and
the interrelated effects on downstream
power benefits; coordination of studies
and negotiations with the City of Seattle
as they affect the long-standing Skagit
Valley flooding issue; the review of
approximately 40 water licence
applications for power purposes.
Dam Safety Program
A new inspection program covers
more than 1,500 storage structures in the
Province. An additional 140 dams,
classified as major structures, are
inspected by the Power and Special
Projects Section.
During 1980, seventy-nine major
structures were examined for their
structural integrity and operating
capability. Infra-red photography was
used to detect areas of seepage of
embankment dams; inundation studies
checked potential flood areas below high
hazard structures, and liaison continued
with the Provincial Emergency Program
Director to discuss early warning systems
and evaluation procedures in the event of
mishap. Twenty-four dams throughout
the Province are now being monitored
two or more times per year. Future plans
include the addition of acoustic emission
equipment to allow measurement of
internal stresses by placing probes into
embankment dams. This is a relatively
new technique which is receiving worldwide interest.
Approval applications for major dams
now require incorporation of an
instrumentation proposal.
Community Water Supply Section
Water Utility Sub-program
Under the new Utilities Commission
Act, 1980, privately-owned water
utilities, and some water supplies owned
by municipalities are regulated by the
Comptroller of Water Rights. There were
262 private water utilities and 34
municipal utilities under regulation at
March 31. 1981; a net decrease of nine
during the year. The incorporation of
some service areas outside municipal
boundaries has led to a decrease in
regulated municipal utilities.
During the 15 month period ended
March 31, 1981, 97 applications for
; crtificates of Public Convenience and
Necessity were received, an increase of
40 over the preceding year.
There were 105 orders of various
kinds, among which were those for the
establishment of maintenance trust funds,
construction trust funds, replacement
reserve trust funds, and approval for the
transfer of waterworks to new owners.
These trust funds are deposited with a
financial institution of the utility's choice
and held to the order of the Comptroller.
At the year end the total balance on
deposit amounted to $4,487,050.
The Community Water Supply Section
continued to represent the Branch on the
Pacific Rim Infrastructure! Technical
Committee of the Ministry of Industry
and Small Business Development. The
Committee plans and implements the
installation of water and sewer systems to
enhance the tourism and fishing
industries on the west coast of Vancouver
Island. These systems are being financed
under the Canada-British Columbia
Tourist Industry Development Subsidiary
Agreement and the Agriculture and Rural
Development Subsidiary Agreement.
 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION
Pesticide Control Branch
The Pesticide Control Branch is
responsible for ensuring that useful,
Federally registered pesticides are used
safely in the Province, in a manner that
will not produce an unreasonably adverse
effect on people or the environment.
Administration
The Pesticide Regulations were
amended to include a provision that
permits be required for use of pesticides
on private land for forestry, public utility,
and transportation purposes. The
Pesticide Regulations were also revised
to de-regulate the sale of pesticides used
on domestic pets, by transferring these
pesticides from Schedule IV to Schedule
V under which they may be sold in
unlicenced premises by uncertified
dispensers.
Permits are required for pesticides
applied to publicly owned land or to any
body of water. Restricted permits are
granted for highly toxic or highly
persistent compounds listed in Schedule I
of the Regulations. Special use permits
are also granted for research projects
involving unregistered pesticides.
The Program supported two contracts
last year: one to dispose of unwanted
2,4,5-T herbicides and the other for an
integrated program for the control of
insects on potatoes.
The Branch continued to work closely
with the members of the Pesticide
Control Committee on the permit referral
system.
From the former Headquarters (Lower
Mainland), a total of 60 Restricted Use
Permits, 350 Public Land and Aquatic
Permits, and 35 Special Use permits
were issued.
During 1980, regulations were
successfully completed with CPR for
spraying the E & N line between Victoria
and Courtenay with the herbicide
Roundup (glyphosate). Projects such as
this were exempt during 1980 from the
permit requirements of the Pesticide
Control Regulations.
One of the most notable, among 48,
appeals last year was the lengthy appeal
against the use of 1080 in controlling
wolves and coyotes throughout British
Columbia.
Certificates
The Branch is heavily involved in
training, examining, and certifying
pesticide applicators and pesticide
dispensers.
Branch staff conducted a total of 107
adult education courses in 39 centres and
issued 285 1-year certificates and 2,709
5-year certificates.
The Branch Handbook is in demand
all across Canada, having been
distributed to our students and to others
outside the Province.
Licences
The four regional offices (Lower
Mainland, Vancouver Island, Okanagan,
and Omineca-Peace) issued a total of
1,509 licences, 1,027 to pesticide
vendors and 482 to pesticide services.
Enforcement/Compliance
From the 2,735 inspections of
pesticide service and pesticide vendor
premises, there were 56 investigations,
30 suspensions or revocations of licences
and certificates, and a total of four
charges were laid. There were 52 permits
sites inspected to determine compliance
to the permit conditions.
The Branch is occasionally involved in
the investigation of fatal poisonings of
domestic dogs, sick cattle, and
contaminated drinking water. In at least
half the cases pesticides are not the
cause.
Last year several instances of highly
toxic compounds being stored or shipped
 44                                                      MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
in leaky containers were investigated by
As a continuing public service in the
the Branch. There have also been several
disposal of unwanted pesticides, 95
reported incidents of pentachlorophenol
sources were removed in 1980. A
spills around sawmills.
bibliography of important pesticide
Several cases of bee kills were
references is being accumulated as part
received throughout the season.
of a central library of pesticides.
Waste Management Branch
1
Pollution Control Section
An influx of people and business to
to a marsh which was recently acquired
British Columbia has resulted in
by Ducks Unlimited. The supply of
continuing pressure for new housing
nutrients from the town will be used by
units, requiring the servicing of difficult
the aquatic plant life in the marsh and
lots on bedrock outcroppings and the
thus improve sanctuary and food supply
infilling of previously derelict tracts of
for the many thousands of birds using the
land adjoining transportation rights-of-
mountain flyway.
way and utility corridors in the south
Applications for Permit and Permit
west urban centres of the Province.
/Amendments involving disposal effluent,   I
Elsewhere, new treatment centres are
either by spray irrigation or direct
being built to serve previously
infiltration into the ground, continue to
undeveloped properties; existing works
be important options selected by large
are being expanded years ahead of
municipal effluent dischargers in the
schedule.
interior. This option is being considered
The City of Prince Rupert is due for
more and more because rivers and
expansion as a major bulk commodity
streams are under increasing stress from
port in the 1980's. The city had inherited
the expanding volume of wastes from
a network of pipeworks and short outfalls
municipal sources. Guidelines covering
installed under emergency conditions in
"Municipal Effluent Application to the
the early years of the second World War.
Ground" have been published to assist
The replacement and provision of new
municipalities with developing spray or
services is being carried out concurrently
ground disposal schemes. The
with a network of new shoreline
recommendation is that entire sections be   1
interceptors and outfalls into deeper
devoted to spray irrigation of treated
waters further offshore. The project is
municipal sewage effluent. The cities of
scheduled for completion in mid-decade
Vernon and Cranbrook continue to be the   1
and the results will be closely monitored.
largest dischargers of municipal effluent
The Clover Point outfall in the City of
via spray irrigation, while the Village of
Victoria was completed to 1,000 metres,
Osoyoos. by spraying their municipal
and permission given for extending the
golf course, is the first to use treated
McMicking Point outfall into Enterprise
effluent for recreational use.
Channel.
The instinctive scavenging habits of
One innovative scheme for re-use of
bears at municipal refuse disposal sites
waste products is the nourishment of a
continues to be a problem. The Regional   j
marsh area for the enhancement of
District of Central Kootenay is
migratory bird habitat. The Town of
embarking on a refuse container haul
Valemount in the Rocky Mountain
system with disposal in remote areas.
Trench area proposes to locate their new
Three British Columbia kraft pulp
treatment plant and disposal basins next
mills, Crown Zellerbach (Elk Falls
 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DIVISION
Division), Canadian Forest Products
(Port Mellon Division) and Tahsis (Gold
River Division) propose to attach Teller
Scrubbers to their existing recovery
boilers for control of total particulate and
malodorous gases, to meet permit
conditions.
Canadian Cellulose Company
(Castlegar Division) carried out a pilot
plant project using a new technology
involving the use of waste gases to strip
kraft foul condensates. With this
technology, kraft pulp mills could reduce
the amount of B.O.D. and toxicity in the
raw mill effluent by approximately one
third. The concept of stripping foul
condensates with waste gases would be
of particular benefit to kraft mills in
British Columbia which do not have
biological treatment of effluent. At
MacMillan Bloedel (Port Alberni
Division) a pilot plant Lamb wet cell
burner uses hog wastes to generate hot
combustion gases for the calcining of
lime in a kiln.
Crestbrook Forest Industries is
constructing a series of infiltration basins
for the treatment of pulp mill effluent to
reduce colour to the level specified in
their Permit. The Weyerhaeuser Pulp
Mill at Kamloops proposes to conduct a
pilot plant study of infiltration for colour
removal of their pulp mill effluent.
Northwest Panelboard Incorporated is
building a 126 ton/day particle board
plant at Smithers, which will use
shavings from two neighboring planer
mills.
Reichhold Limited is building a bark
conversion plant of 16,000 tons/year
capacity of dried, ground and bagged
bark product at Squamish. This product
is to be used as a glue extender in
plywood manufacturing.
Western Forest Products Limited, (a
Partnership of B.C. Forest Products,
Doman Lumber and Whonnock Lumber)
purchased all the holdings, timber rights,
etc., of Rayonier Canada B.C. The
Woodflbre kraft mill will be rebuilt
incorporating a low odour recovery
boiler system and the most recent
technologies for pollution control.
Quesnel River Pulp (a partnership of
West Fraser Lumber and Daishawa of
Japan) are constructing a 450 metric
tonne/day thermomechanical pulp mill at
Quesnel. Before discharge to the Fraser
River, the effluent will receive primary
and secondary treatment.
B.C.F.P. at Crofton is currently
installing a 300 ton/day
thermomechanical pulp mill and a third
newsprint machine. MacMillan Bloedel
(Powell River Divison) is expanding with
the installation of a 390 ton/day
thermomechanical pulp mill and a new
paper machine. Finaly Forest Products at
Mackenzie (40 per cent owned by
B.C.F.P.) is expanding their refiner
groundwood production from 360 tons/
day to 540 tons/day.
MacMillan Bloedel (Harmac Pulp
Division) propose to install a new large
low odour recovery boiler. This will
enable them to shut down two of their
existing recovery boilers, thereby greatly
improving their emissions.
On December 2, 1980, a section of the
fibre glass cooler and a portion of the
main line to the Weyerhaeuser
(Kamloops Pulp Mill) high level stack
collapsed due to a build up of ice-
plugged drain lines. It is anticipated that
repairs will take at least three months.
The Director has amended an earlier
Letter of Approval Amendment which
covered a similar circumstance in
November of 1977. This will permit the
company to divert the emissions from the
main stack to the low-level auxiliary
stack for a period of approximately three
months.
Increased activity in the mining
industry has resulted in a significant
increase in the number of applications for
permits and permit amendments.
One major development is in the
Highland Valley where two existing
copper mining operations are doubling
production. Two new operations are
proposed which will result in a total ore
L
 46                                                      MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
processing capacity of approximately
appears to be the most acceptable
230.000 tons per day.
environmentally. A comprehensive
Activity has also been high in gold
monitoring program will be carried out
mining and recovery. Most of the
to detect any adverse effects.
operations which employ the cyanidation
Ocelot Industries Ltd. has submitted
process are being required to install
permit applications for the discharges
alkaline chlorination treatment to destroy
from a proposed 1,200 ton per day
the cyanide before discharge of tailings.
methanol plant to be located in Kitimat.
Although not new, this process has not
This will be the first such world-scale
been used extensively to date.
plant in British Columbia. Natural gas is
Developments in northeast coal were
the main raw material used in the process   1
suspended in 1980 while sales contracts
and the resulting discharges should have
were being developed. Two major coal
little impact on the environment.
developments in the East Kootenays were
A lack of natural gas sales and some
in construction or pre-construction in
start-up problems have delayed full
1980. They were Crows Nest Resources
operation of the Westcoast Transmission
(Line Creek) and B.C. Coal (Greenhills).
Company Ltd., Pine River gas plant with   ]
Considerable adverse publicity has
its associated sulphur recovery facilities.
been given to the proposed reopening of
It has therefore not been possible to
the molybdenum mine at Kitsault by
assess the operation of the sulphur plant,
Amax of Canada Ltd; however, the
which has a design capacity of 1,000
proposed method of discharge of tailings
tons per day.
Resource Recovery Section
The "Oil Save" program to recover
ramps at Swartz Bay. The extension of
lubricating oil for re-refining has been
such projects could solve the serious
extended to 150 gas stations and now
environmental problems caused by the
covers most of Southern Vancouver
annual discard of 2,500,000 used
Island and the Lower Mainland.
automobile tires.
The City of Victoria is cooperating
The Province sells 500,000,000 beer
with the Ministry on a demonstration
bottles annually, and 95 per cent are
project to use an asphalt incorporating
returned for reuse. Reusing beverage
rubber for road surfacing. The B.C.
containers saves a substantial amount of
Ferries Corporation is also proposing to
energy, reduces litter and lowers garbage
use this material on one of its loading
disposal costs.
Environmental Safety Program
The Environmental Safety Program,
under secton 29 of the Pollution Control
Waste Management Branch, is
Act were necessary. An electrical room
responsible for spill response and
fire resulted in contamination by PCB's
prevention (shared responsibility with
of a smelter building in Trail and sludge
Provincial Emergency Program) and for
contaminated with mercury was
disposal of hazardous wastes. During
discharged into the Columbia River, were   1
1980 and the first three months of 1981,
approximately 610 spill reports were
among spills reported.
received. There were 68 major spills;
Shipments of hazardous wastes
eight were of lesser significance. During
continued to licenced disposal facilities
this period, no emergency declarations
in the United States.
 f
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES
DIVISION I
Inventory and Engineering Branch
Surveys and Mapping Branch
Provincial Emergency Program
Environmental Laboratory
47
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Inventory and Engineering Branch
Flood Damage Prevention Program
For the fourth consecutive year the
snowpack in the Fraser and Thompson
River basins was below average and, as a
result, there was little chance that
damaging flooding would occur in the
Fraser Valley during the spring freshet. A
flood-warning system for the Squamish
River Valley was further developed and
applied during the fall period when
expectations of flooding are at their
highest.
Floodplain Development Control
Some 10,670 man hours were spent on
topographic, bathymetric and control
surveys in 14 river valleys and seven
creeks. Surveys were completed for
approximately 57 square miles of
floodplain containing approximately 118
miles of river and 102 miles of
lakeshore.
The Modelling Unit of the Hydrology
Section analysed data sets to obtain the
magnitude and frequency of flood flows
for floodplain mapping and bridge
design.
Where sufficient data were available
for frequency analysis, the Surface Water
Subsection estimated extreme flood
flows and levels by using techniques
which included development of regional
methods. The most important studies are
listed in Table 4.10.
Map production during 1980 included
the production of base floodplain map
sheets for six rivers and lakes. The
Planning and Surveys Section produced
the final floodplain maps showing flood
lines; these are for use by other agencies
and planning authorities. The status of
floodplain mapping is indicated in Table
4.1.
A brochure entitled Floodproofing
New Residential Buildings in British
Columbia was published by Planning and
Surveys section to inform municipal
officials and the public of buildings
design which may reduce future flood
damage.
(See Table 4.2 for a summary of the
1980/81 workload.)
Channel Clearing and River Protection
The second year of a five-year
$3,200,000 Federal-Provincial
Agriculture and Rural Development S.A.
program to rehabilitate and extend the
Pemberton Valley Dyking District's flood
and erosion protection works and
drainage systems was concluded, with
total expenditure to March 31, 1981 of
$1,231,000.
A report covering erosion and flooding
problems along the Similkameen River
was prepared for the Lower Similkameen
Indian aAdministration in support of their
ARDSA application. Work was also
continued on the following studies:
Nicola River Corridor; Nusatsum River
Fan; Salmo River; Slocan River; Kitimat
Dykes; Bellevue Creek; and the Port
Moody, Port Coquitlam and Haney
Slides.
Assistance under the Channel Clearing
Program was provided for eight projects
costing $27,000, of which some $16,000
was spent on Mission Creek ice jam
removal.
Work continued on drainage studies
and related projects which affect the
development of agriculture. (See tables
4.4 and 4.5)
Fraser River Flood Control
This Program is principally for the
construction of flood control works in the
Lower Fraser Valley. It has been carried
out under a Federal-Provincial agreement
signed in 1968 which has been amended
to allow for an expenditure of $120
million. Expenditures to March 31,
1980, totalled $73.6 million; expenditure
for the fiscal year 1980/81 was $9.2
 ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES DIVISION
million. A breakdown of expenditures for
previous years is given in Table 4.6, and
by project in Table 4.7.
Projects under construction during
1980/81 include Richmond, Delta, Pitt
Meadows, Abbotsford and Vedder River;
the Surrey South Westminster project is
almost complete. ■
Further details are given in the annual
reports of the Fraser River Joint Advisory
Board.
Dyke Inspection
The purpose of the dyke inspection
program is to ensure the safety, proper
maintenance and operation of all dykes
in the Province. During 1980/81, spot
inspections were made of all dyking
districts in the Lower Fraser Valley.
During December 1980, the dykes
which protected against winter flooding
were under severe strain throughout
southwest British Columba. In addition
to severe flooding mentioned elsewhere
in this report, a minor failure occurred
on the Nicomekl dyke, McEIroy Road,
in the Surrey Dyking District.
A close watch was kept on several
problem areas on the Fraser River,
notably: Carey Point erosion at
[   Chilliwack; the groyne area at Harrison
Mills; Newton Road at Dewdney;
Niconmen Island; Barnston Island; and
'   Matsqui near Sumas Mountain.
r   Water Supply Utilization Program
I   Snowpack And Runoff
For the fourth consecutive year,
[   snowpacks measured in many southern
and coastal drainages of British
I  Columbia, (the Fraser, Thompson,
[  Okanagan, Smilkameen, and north into
the Peace and Skeena drainages), were
I found to be well below average; as a
I result, snowmelt runoff was below to
I  well below, average. Snow surveys
totalling 1,265 were made at 273
I   established snow courses. Early warning
I enables reservoir operators in low
■ snowpack areas to conserve water for
later use. All historical snow survey data
were prepared for publication in
"Summary, Snow Survey Measurements,
1935 to 1980", including for the first
time, snow line flight data.
As a result of conservation and the
above-normal spring precipitation,
Okanagan Lake filled to within 5 cm of
full pool level, assuring adequate water
supply throughout the summer.
Agreements were reached with
Washington State regarding a referral to
the International Joint Commission and a
cooperative plan for Osoyoos Lake levels
and trans-border flow, once the new
control structure is built.
Surface Water Inventory
The Branch coordinates the operation
and expansion of the Province-wide
network of water-level and streamflow
gauges with the Water Survey of Canada
through the Federal-Provincial
Hydrometric Cost Sharing Agreement.
During the reporting period (1980/81)
622 gauges were in operation under this
Agreement.
In addition, the Branch operated
network of 70 stations installed for short-
term or special Branch projects. During
1979, the Surveys Subsection undertook
326 hydrometric measurements at
stations within this network.
Groundwater Inventory
Groundwater inventory is used to
define the location of future well sites,
their potential production and drilling
logistics. The Groundwater Subsection
has records of about 50,000 wells in the
Province. Assemble of well data is nearly
complete and has been successfully
tested within limits of water well data for
the Saanich Peninsula. A
hydrogeological mapping program is
continuing for the Saanich Peninsula
Pilot Project. The Subsection compiles
and analyses long-term water level data
from 146 observation wells in the
Province. Information is received
monthly from several key observation
wells and a summary is published in the
!U
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Snow Survey Bulletin. Work is in
progress on preparation of a publication
on historic observation well data, (See
Table 4.8). More time is now being used
for reviewing environmental impact
assessment Stage 1 and 2 studies, mainly
for proposed coal and metal mining
projects and their possible effects on
groundwater resources. (See Table 4.19).
Water Supply Studies, Groundwater
The Groundwater Subsection
undertook groundwater supply studies,
assessment review of aquifer and well
performance, resource evaluation,
inventory studies, and provided
assistance for groundwater use conflicts,
well interference and waste disposal
problems. (See Table 4.9).
Water Supply Studies, Surface Water
The Surface Water Subsection
estimated the water supply in various
creeks and lakes to accommodate new or
expanding water supply systems. Studies
of the potential impact on surface water
by proposed watershed development,
such as logging, were carried out. (See
Table 4.10).
Water supply and irrigation studies
which were active during 1980 and the
first quarter of 1981 are described in
Table 4.11.
Water Supply Project Implementation
The status of active projects during the
period January 1, 1980 to March 31,
1981, is described in Table 4.12.
Other assignments included assisting
with design of facilities for the Loon
Creek Hatchery, water supplies for the
Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery.
Environmental Preservation Program
Watershed Management Studies
Mackenzie River Basin Study
A four-year $1.6 million study of
water and related resources in the
Mackenzie River Basin commenced in
April 1978, financed jointly by the
Government of Canada, British
Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan,
continued through 1980. The study
includes the effect of ice conditions,
break-up and the spring flood on the
Mackenzie River and its major
tributaries, especially the Liard River.
Areas sensitive to changes in the
hydrologic system were also included,
with special attention to the three major
deltas in the system (the Mackenzie,
Slave and Peace-Athabasca deltas) and
alluvial habitats within this drainage
area. British Columbia contributes
275,000 square kilometres of the
drainage area and about 25 per cent of
the annual streamflow of the Mackenzie
River by way of the Peace and Liard
Rivers in the northeastern part of the
Province. Present and future
development of British Columbia's water
resources in the region is significant to
downstream neighbours in the Mackenzie
River Basin.
Yukon River Basin Study
As a result of an agreement signed late
in 1980, the water resources of the
Yukon River Basin will be studied
jointly by the Federal Government and
the Governments of British Columbia
and Yukon. The main purpose of the
program is to study current and possible
future use of the water and water-related
resources; to specify areas where further
investigation or resolution of
jurisdictional difference is required; and
to provide a framework for future   *
resource management. The Yukon River
is the fifth largest in North America in
drainage area and average annual water
discharge. The river rises in British
Columbia and, with its tributaries, drains
most of southern Yukon before it crosses
the Canada-United States border into
 ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES DIVISION
Alaska. The study is expected to start
during 1981.
The program is directed toward
ensuring that community water supplies
are protected during land clearing, land
use and forestry.
A report entitled "Guidelines for
Watershed Management of Crown Lands
Used as Community Water Supplies" has
been completed and is to be distributed
to Regional Districts, Government
Agencies and Improvement Districts
across the Province.
Public Health Engineering Program
The primary purpose of the Public
Health Engineering Section is to ensure
that all new waterworks construction in
the Province meets the minimum
standards of design outlined in the
Section's publication, Waterworks
Systems Guidelines, particularly in
relation to the protection of public health.
The section processed 1,039 certificates
of approval over the 15-month period for
more than 1,000 known water systems.
This compares to 739 certificates for 12
months in 1979.
One of the section's major projects
was a search for groundwater
contaminants affecting several private
shallow water wells in the Langley area,
i A small research project was initiated in
the Boundary Health District to
determine the effectiveness of a built-up
sewage disposal field.
The Section reviews plans and
specifications for all swimming pools
except private backyard pools. During
the 1980/81 reporting period, the section
processed 169 swimming pool approvals,
which compares with 106 for 1979.
I Okanagan Basin Implementation
Program
The Inventory and Engineering Branch
; is responsible for implementing the
[Sections of the 1976 Federal-Provincial
Okanagan Basin Implementation
Agreement pertaining to flood control
and water supply. These sections involve
principally construction work, costing
some $2.5 million.
The progress made in the 1980/81
reporting period on projects financed
directly under the Agreement, is shown
in Table 4.17.
Support Services Program
Administrative services in support of
Branch operations were provided by the
Records and Compilation Section
through its two units: the General Office
and the Reports Library.
During this period the Reports Library
prepared over 500 copies of older reports
for use by other branches and agencies.
The addition of more than 100 new
engineering reports brought the total
number of technical reports in the
Library to over 2,900.
For the 1980/81 reporting period, the
Drafting Section provided: 1,080
completed drawings; nine issues of the
Snow Survey Bulletin; and five maps for
the five-year Snow Summary
Publication. Of the 1,080 completed
drawings, 25 per cent were revisions,
additions, or both. Table4.18 provides
details of drawing assignments directed
to the Drafting Section from the Branch
Sections.
Fraser River Estuary Study
Phase II of the Fraser River Estuary
Study was established in October, 1979,
under a Federal/Provincial Agreement
between Canada and British Columbia,
for management of estuary resources.
During 1981, proposals for a multi-
agency system to manage the estuary
will be further developed and presented
to the two senior governments.
 52
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Surveys and Mapping Branch
Survey Section
The Survey Section is responsible for
air photography and field control. Air
photography is also supplied to other
ministries for resource inventory and
monitoring.
The Air Survey Group received 349
requests from 26 agencies for air
photography during 1980; of these, 282
were flown in part or to completion.
Weather conditions, while worse than
average throughout the Province, were
particularly unsuitable north of 52° North
Latitude. As a result, surveys of several
large blocks remain incomplete or have
not been started; however, 47,175 air
photographs of various scales covering
68,665 line kilometres were obtained this
season and two photo aircraft logged a
total of 662 flying hours.
In January, the Air Survey Group
collaborated with B.C. Hydro in its
thermal scan of urban areas. Colour
photographs of townsites were obtained
by infra-red sonar-equipped aircraft
owned by B.C. Hydro.
Mapping control was established in
five areas this summer for the Base
Mapping Program covering 102 1:5,000
mapsheets and 57 1:20,000 mapsheets.
Integrated control was established in five
areas and 387 monuments were
coordinated. Approximately 1,800 new
monuments were located in seven
corporate areas before the survey. During
the off season two cadastral survey
projects were undertaken for the
Agricultural Land Commission.
Analysis of the Provincial Control
System computation and records group
continued in preparation for the
transformation from the 1927 Datum to
the 1983 Geocentric Datum.
Drafting and Mapping Services
Nineteen new and revised lithographic
maps were published at scales of
1:50,000, 1:100,000, 1:250,000,
1:400,000 and 1:2,000,000. These
included a new Park Series Map PS-MI
Manning Park at 1:50,000.
A new Special Geographic Series Map
SGS-2 Vancouver-Kamloops at
1:400,000 shows relief in multiple
colours, the main transportation routes,
historical notes and trails. The West
Coast Trail Map, WCT2 at 1:50,000, was
revised along with the Air facilities Map
of British Columbia at 1:2,000,000.
Twelve new maps: 82E/NE Upper Kettle
River, 82E/SE Grand Forks, 82K/NE
Invermere, 82K/NW Beaton, 82L/NE
Revelstoke, 82L/NW Shuswap Lake,
82L/SE Sugar Lake, 92H/SE Princeton,
92I/SE Merritt, 92I/SW Lytton, 93A/SW
Horsefly River and 93G/SE Cottonwood
River were published at 1:100,000. Two
maps, 93E Whitesail Lake and 103P
Nass River were lithographed at
1:250,000. A new Relief Map of British
Columbia UR was published at
1:2,000,000.
Fourteen orthophoto mapping projects
were completed. There were 47 requests
from government and private industry for
466 individual lithographic map bases.
The compilation unit produced 29 new
bases.
Cadastral Compilation
In addition to its 1:5,000 and 1:2,500
cadastral mapping program, the
Cadastral Compilation unit, produced
1:10.000 maps for the B.C. Agricultural
Land Commission, cadastral overlays at
various scales for both orthophoto and
topographic bases and district lot status
for the Federal 1:50,000 National
Topographic Series program.
Planimetric Compilation
The planimetric compilation and
plotting unit compiled 54 new
planimetric mapsheets of the Quadra
Public Sustained Yield Unit for the
Ministry of Forests. This concluded the
interim mapping program initiated 30
 years ago by which government and
private industry were supplied with base
maps. This program produced up to 500
planimetric bases yearly, with air
photographs obtained during one flying
season and the planimetric bases
available for use during the next field
season.
In addition, 167 mapsheets were
revised to the new 1:20,000 format for
the Water Management Branch, mostly
in the Peace River area. Sixty-five
mosaics were also compiled and made
available for public distribution. (See
Table 3.14).
For the Ministry of Forests, 69
mapsheets of the Merritt T.S.A., 72
sheets of the Dean P.S.Y.U. and 44
sheets of the Peace P.S.Y.U., had new
1:20,000 photo centres superimposed
onto existing bases.
The compilation section also drafted
87 contour overlays for the Fort Fraser-
Vanderhoof Orthophoto project.
Photogrammetric
The aerial triangulation procedure was
converted from semi-analytical to fully
analytical, so that any aerial camera may
be used. The main component of the
procedure is program OBSERVE
(Observations of Bundles or Strips with
ERror VErification), an on-line
interactive program which collects data
and uses advanced statistical methods to
test the operator's observations as they
are made.
Reprographics
The calendar year of 1980 showed an
increase in production of $227,855.91
over the previous year. A record monthly
production in August of 63,014 (23 cm x
23 cm) prints.
Among many other services, the
Diazo printing unit produced prints for
64 contracts for the Ministry of
Transportation and Highways, quarterly
! revisions of the Agricultural Land
Reserve maps and printing from
transparent originals for other
Government ministries and the public.
Map and Air Photo Sales and
Toponymy
The map and air photo office
distributed 252,621 Federal and
Provincial mapsheets valued at $543,483
between January, 1980 and March, 1981.
A master set of air photos is retained
for viewing in the MAPS — British
Columbia office.
A particularly notable decision was the
change of name of the reservoir behind
the Mica dam from McNaughton Lake to
Kinbasket Lake. There was strong
support for this change in the East
Kootenay region which has a long
historical connection with Kinbasket
Lake. The British Columbia Gazetteer is
now out of print, but was issued in
microfiche format by the Federal Surveys
and Mapping Branch. A new
consolidated paper edition is scheduled
for production in 1983.
Program Section
Pacific Survey Corporation of
Vancouver was awarded the flying
contract for 15,000 line kilometres of
black and white aerial photography at
scale 1:50,000. A late start and poor
weather conditions resulted in the
acquisition of only 3,000 line kilometres,
all in the South Central Columbia block
centered about Princeton.
In the Parksville-Qualicum area of
Vancouver Island 96 integrated survey
monuments and 166 cadastral ties were
surveyed. Three integrated survey
monuments were tied to the Geodetic
network; 71 horizontal and vertical photo
control points were established
approximately 150 cadastral points were
tied. This work will be used in the
compilation of three layers of Base Map
information of 51 maps at the scale
1:2,000, in the Parksville-Qualicum area
during fiscal year 1981/82.
 n
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
The largest surveying contract of the
year was awarded to Underhill and
Underhill. It involved the acquisition of
photo control for the South Central
British Columbia block that was part of
the year's contract aerial photography
program. Photography and control were
to be used for the mapping of 138 sheets
at the scale 1:20,000 in fiscal year
1981/82.
Work has begun on the compilation of
a base mapping inventory and of an
index of projects scheduled for fiscal
year 1981/82
Almost $900,000 was spent in contract
services for base mapping.
Provincial Emergency Program
The Provincial Emergency Program
Plan was revised in 1980 and much
progress was made in municipal
planning. During the year the Program
sponsored an exercise to update the
Province's Tsunami Warning System; a
new signal for radio and television
broadcasts has been developed.
The training section is responsible for
developing and conducting a Provincial
Course Program of emergency planning.
The Provincial College, Victoria,
offers courses in community emergency
planning, transportation of dangerous
goods, marine rescue, management of
land searches, casualty simulation, oil
spill control, techniques of instruction,
cliff rescue and tracking.
A new course, "Orientation for
Dangerous Goods Trainers", was offered
this year. It was developed following
passage of Federal Bill C-18, which is an
Act to promote the safe transportation of
dangerous goods. The purpose of the
course is to prepare training officers in
organizations such as Fire Services,
Police, Ambulance, and Municipal
Engineering. During 1980/81. 6,787
persons received Provincial Emergency
Program instruction.
A Search Management Course was
developed during the past year for
presentation in early 1981/82.
Techniques for cliff rescue have been
revised, and tracking courses have been
given in a number of regions in 1980/81.
Search and Rescue Operations
Over 2,000 volunteer pilots and
spotters are registered in the Air Service;
they fly more than 300 aircraft in
locations throughout the Province.
During the reporting period, the Air
Service was involved in 32 operations,
and volunteers donated 4,500 man-hours.
Training exercises are held in each
region of the Province in conjunction
with the armed forces.
The Marine Service is used by the
Rescue Coordination Centre, local police
and Municipal Area Coordinators for
rescuing boaters in distress; they assist
with land and air searches where
required. There were 581 marine
incidents reported during this period.
The service has 300 vessels registered
and manned by over 400 volunteers.
Volunteers donated 6,500 hours for
operations and many more hours in
training.
Volunteer search and rescue teams are
involved in bush searches, highway
rescues.
Tens of thousands of hours are spent
annually on volunteer search and rescue
tasks and many hours on training and
preparations. During 1980, 364 tasks
were completed.
The Provincial Emergency Program,
with the cooperation of most other
ministries, has been working toward
establishing a Province-wide emergency
communications network.
The Provincial Emergency Program
gives high priority to equipping
volunteers with new communications
equipment over the next two years. A
feature of 1980 was the establishment of
 ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES DIVISION
Base Station at Provincial Emergency
Program Headquarters: Call Letters
V37 PEP.
Auxiliary and Reserve Police are
trained by the Provincial Emergency
Program. Regular police departments are
becoming more dependent on auxiliaries
to assist in emergency situations such as
search and rescue. It is interesting to
note that we are one of the few provinces
with such a system; however, other
provinces are following our lead. There
are 1,455 volunteers enrolled in this
program.
The Provincial Emergency Program
recorded 532 incidents involving oil and
other dangerous goods in 1980: an
increase of 23.5 per cent over 1979. Of
the reported incidents, 57 per cent were
land-based and 43 per cent of marine
origin. Equipment failure was the cause
of 18 per cent, human error 12 per cent
and motor vehicle accidents 12 per cent.
Petroleum products, particularly diesel
oil, continued to be the most frequently
spilled substances, while chemicals
reflected 13 per cent of the incidents.
"Slicks" (marine incidents — source
unknown) accounted for 34 per cent of
the total.
Courses for dangerous goods trainers
started in the latter part of 1980. The
seminars are designed to acquaint
emergency personnel and others with
dangerous goods and the unusual hazards
they may present.
We are also greatly indebted to the 130
Area Coordinators who are the
background of the system and all others
who make the continuation of the service
possible. Their recorded efforts in
1980/81 show 1,716 lives removed from
jeopardy and the saving of $3.5 million
in property damage.
Environmental Laboratory
During the period January 1, 1980 to
March 31, 1981, the Environmental
Laboratory performed 251,059 routine
tests. During the 1980 calendar year,
214,119 routines tests were performed,
i representing an increase of 17 per cent
over 182,300 tests performed in 1979.
The distribution of the Environmental
Laboratory routine workload is shown in
Table 1.
On February 15, 1980, a fire occurred
at the Environmental Laboratory in the
area used for the analysis of organic
contaminants and pesticides. No injuries
occurred; however, there was a
substantial loss of equipment, supplies
and production time. The Fire
I Department was unable to ascertain the
cause of the fire. Following the purchase
I of new instruments, full service for
\ organics and pesticide analyses resumed
' at the beginning of June 1980.
The Water Quality Check Program
[analysed private water supplies of 1,135
residents of British Columbia.
Chemical Services
The Chemical Services Division
continued to analyse water, wastewater,
sediments and biological materials for
inorganic and organic constituents, as a
service to Provincial ministries. During
the period January 1, 1980 to March 31,
1981, the Chemical Services performed
201,327 routine tests; 174,950 of these
tests were conducted during the 1980
calendar year.
Analysis of samples having legal
implications was a continuing service of
the Environmental Laboratory. The
workload of the laboratory increased by
230 per cent, due mostly to the large
number of samples of discharges
submitted by the Fraser River Task
Force.
Considerable time was spent on
developing procedures for determining
the level of polychlorinated biphenyls
and organochloride pesticides in human
milk. This project was initiated and
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
1
financed by the Ministry of Health. Work
on this project has resulted in improved
methods for numerous other tests such as
determination of polychlorinated
biphenyls. organochlorides and
organophosphates in cow's milk and
liver.
Projects completed during fiscal year
1980/81 include the following:
Determination of Radium-226 and Gross
Alpha Activity in Water; Development of
Field Filtration Kit — prototype design;
Development of an Automated Berthelot
Method for Ammonia Determination;
Chemical Leaching of Radioactive Waste
Ore; Analysis of Plictran in Cucumbers;
Stability of Butoxy Ethyl Ester of 2,4-D.
Reports Published During 1980181
Reproducibility in Automated
Determination of Mercury in Mining
Industry Discharges, Analytical
Chemistry, Vol. 52, pp. 996-998 (1980).
Special Services Division
The Special Services Division
continued to analyse air quality and the
biological content of water, for
Government ministries. During the
period January 1, 1980 to March 31,
1981, the Biology Section reported
3,673 chlorophyll and biomass
measurements and identified 22,109
instances relating to the taxonomy of
fresh water plankton and invertebrates.
Total test results reported in 1980 were
20,553, representing a 144 per cent
increase over 1979. During the period
January 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981, the
Air Quality Sections produced 23,950
test results for ambient air, source
emission, soil, vegetation and
precipitation from samples returned to
the Environmental Laboratory for
analysis. In addition, 497,000 data
points (hourly averages), were reported.
These points were associated with
continuous gas and wind analyzers
located at various air quality monitoring
stations. The total laboratory test results
reported during 1980 are 18,616,
representing a two per cent decrease over
1979. Monitor test results for the same
period remained unchanged at
approximately 400,000. During the
period January 1, 1980 to March 31,
1981, the Instrumentation Section
completed 388 Work Orders for repair
and maintenance to monitoring
equipment; the Calibration Section
carried out 368 performance audits on air
monitoring equipment.
Methods were developed for the
following: acid precipitation monitoring;
monitoring for inhalable particulates;
automated (real time) data acquisition for
continuous air monitors; continuous
monitoring of airborne particulates;
updating sampling, calibration and data
handling; procedures for source testing;
evaluation of ambient chlorine monitors;
bioassay procedures using microtoxicity
analysis.
Reports published during fiscal
1980/81 included the following:
Collection and Analysis of Acid
Precipitation (P0006); Measurement of
Aerosol Size Distribution (P0011);
Measurement of Aerosol Scattering
Coefficient (POO 10); 1CP/AES Analysis
and the Composition of Airborne and
Soil Materials in the Vicinity of a Lead/
Zinc Smelter; Complex (P8001), J. Air
Pollut. Contr. Assoc, 30, 257 (1980);
Standards Used in the Trace Analysis of
Selected Gases — (P9027); Inter. Lab,
70,61 (1981).
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION
Conservation Officer Service
Regions—
Vancouver Island
Lower Mainland
Thompson-Nicola/Cariboo
Kootenay
Skeena
Omineca-Peace
Okanagan
57
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Conservation Officer Service
Headquarters
During 1980, the 94 District
Conservation Officers were responsible
for 1,931 successful prosecutions
through enforcement of Provincial Acts
and three Federal Acts.
A team of four officers conducted a
major investigation of pollution violators
in the Fraser River Estuary. Charges
were laid against 24 offenders resulting
in fines as high as $7,500.
On March 31, 1981, the green
uniform was retired and replaced by navy
blue jackets, blue shirts, grey slacks,
grey stetsons and blue forage caps.
Public acceptance of the new uniform has
been favourable.
Training
A variety of training courses was
available to Conservation Officers this
year, including small boat training,
regional range officer's firearms,
enforcement training course, and wildlife
control. An effective presentation course,
police supervisor's and junior constable's
course were provided by the R.C.M.
Police.
Vancouver Island Region
Water Management
Heavy December rains and melting
snow resulted in serious and large-scale
flooding in some areas. Numerous
requests were received for financial and
technical assistance with developing
flood and erosion protection.
Fisheries
Guidelines were completed for
recreation and development of lakes in
the Sayward Forest.
Conservation Enforcement
Eleven Conservation Officers and four
auxiliaries made 291 charges under
various Acts.
Complaints of wolf and cougar
depredations increased by 300 per cent
over 1979.
1,258 problem wildlife complaints
were investigated in the period
January-December, 1980.
Wildlife Management
Deer populations are crashing in areas
of high wolf densities; e.g., M.U. 11
had the lowest carry-over count ever
recorded, despite a succession of mild
winters.
Inventory surveys were completed of
eagle, falcon, Trumpeter swans, and
waterfowl.
Wolf/deer interaction research,
initiated in 1977, was continued with
emphasis on fawn mortality.
A preliminary five-year management
plan has been developed for the
Vancouver Island marmot. Colonies
appear to be expanding. A captive pair of
marmots were placed in the Okanagan
Game Farm and have survived the
interior winter.
An "Integrated Wildlife-Intensive
Forestry Research" program, financed
by the Ministry of Environment and
Ministry of Forests, has been created to
effect integration of intensive forest and
wildlife management. One of the first
projects was the initiation of an
investigation into the response of elk
populations to various silvicultural
treatments in second-growth forests.
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION
Lower Mainland Region
The Fraser River Task Force laid 23
charges under the Pollution Control Act.
In July, 1980, a Public Involvement
Officer was hired by the Fraser River
Estuary Study to develop a Public
Involvement Program.
A Cabinet Submission was prepared
based on the findings of the Fraser River
Task Force arid the recommendations of
the Fraser River Estuary Study Planning
Committee, Phase 1 of the Fraser River
Estuary Study.
Two other committees were formed in
1980: the Coquitlam River Water
Management Study Committee and the
Pipeline Road Mining Review
Committee. The Coquitlam River Water
Management Study Committee is
coordinated by the Regional Water
Manager. Its first meeting was held in
March 1981. The Pipeline Road Mining
Review Committee reviewed gravel
operations on the Pipeline Road,
Coquitlam, and siltation problems
resulting from the operations.
Conservation Officer Service
A lengthy investigation of pollution on
the Coquitlam River, carried out in
conjunction with the Habitat Protection
Section, resulted in a successful
prosecution of the Jack Cewe Ltd. gravel
operation. Fines totalling $190,000 were
imposed as a result.
Conservation Officer Service Statistics —
1980 Calendar Year
Number of violations reported or
discovered: 382.
Total charges: 159.
Total fines —$9,375.
Summary of Problem Wildlife
By activity and control: Black bear,
854; cougar, 57; coyote, 222; raccoon,
i 359; beaver, 102; skunk, 93; deer, 81;
I Canada geese, 62.
Summary of Conservation Officer Service
Time Spent in District
Office time: Approximately 50 per
cent.
Enforcement, Management and
Animal Control: approximately 50 per
cent.
Fisheries
Enhancement of fisheries habitat was
undertaken in five stream systems within
the Region. Rock weighing 223 tons
(pieces 1-foot to 2-foot in diameter) were
placed within four streams to create
rearing areas for cutthroat trout.
Spawning gravel platforms were installed
in the Chilliwack River to enhance
winter steelhead spawning areas.
The catchable-size rainbow trout
program continued to be the mainstay of
the lake management program.
Catchables numbering 84,000 were
introduced to lakes that are subjected to
intensive fishing and cannot support the
fishing by natural production.
Much field time was devoted to the
collection of biological and physical
habitat information for immediate use in
management and environmental
protection; almost 30 stream systems
were surveyed.
The Fish and Wildlife Branch acquired
223 acres of land adjoining the
Silverhope Creek near Hope. The
property was leased from the National
Second Century Fund and contains
extremely valuable steelhead trout and
kokanee salmon spawning areas.
WildUfe
Land management projects continued
in the Serpentine Wildlife Management
Area with the removal of several small
islands which were replaced by larger
peninsulas. Pasture will be developed to
provide grazing for Canada geese and
additional nesting habitats for other
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
species. Dykes and islands were
constructed in the southern portion of the
Pitt Wildlife Management Area to
provide additional nesting habitat and
water impoundment.
Protection of mountain goat habitat
was emphasized by management,
because these habitats come under fairly
severe pressure from the rapid increase in
helicopter logging operations.
More than 2,000 Canada geese were
harvested by more than 2,200 hunters
within the 1980/81 hunting season.
Agricultural complaints of food
depredations reached a peak during May
and June when affected crops were in
their seedlings stages. Staff relocated the
offending goslings and moulting sub-
adult geese.
Periodic census of Brant populations
within Mud and Boundary Bays and
Roberts Bank were made throughout the
winter. Preliminary results indicate that
Brant rarely show within the area until
the annual northward migration begins.
The shortened season was continued and
the hunting was the most successful of
any in recent years.
Habitat Protection
Referrals from Government agencies
and other sources increased by 16 per
cent.
Regional staff participated in two
major Provincial/Federal studies of fish
and wildlife: Fraser River Estuary Study
and the Squamish River Estuary Study.
Other studies included Crown Land
Master Plans, Municipal and Regional
District Plans, and major forestry plans.
Staff also cooperated with the
Conservation Officer Service, in
investigating and prosecuting of
environmental violations, especially
those affecting fish stocks or their
habitats.
Information and Education
A total of 1,788 students graduated
from 95 courses in the CORE program.
More than 250 teacher's information
kits were distributed to school teachers,
outdoor educators, and youth leaders.
Audio-visual aids, including 984 films
and 469 slide packages, were lent to
schools during the year, to a total of
1,600. Several "Career Days"
presentations were made in local
secondary schools.
Waste Management
The Regional Office has been involved
in a comprehensive program of spill
control and hazardous waste
management. As a result, many tons of
toxic materials have been permanently
stored or destroyed.
The Fraser River Task Force has
continued to concentrate on enforcement
of the Pollution Control Act in the lower
Fraser River area.
Statistics — Region 2
Number of Permits as of January 1,
1980    618
New Permits Received—
January 1980-December 1980      73
January 1981-March 1981      11
Permits Amended—
January 1980-December 1980      32
January 1981-March 1981       7
Permits Cancelled—
January 1980-December 1980      21
January 1981-March 1981        3
Permits administered by Region 2 as
of March 31, 1981    678
Permits applications processed by
Region, January 1, 1980-March
31, 1981      11
Approval applications processed by
Region, January 1980-March
1981      30
Orders issued by Region, January
1980-March 1981      24
Charges by Region, January
1980-March 1981 (Does not include Task Force charges)       7
Water Management
Water Licence Applications Approvals
increased by 48 per cent.
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION                                                 61
Stream flooding/erosion problems and
pipeline, dam intake and related works
[   flood plain management increased
were constructed.
[   dramatically (200-250 per cent).
Enclosure of approximately 500 feet of
a major tributary to the Coquihalla River
Licencing and approval matters
in 10 foot diameter pipe has been given
!    included:
to Carotin Mines. This will create
Approval of an application by the
working room for the mine mill, which
Dewdney-Alouette Regional District for
is part of a multi-million dollar gold-
a Water Licence on Norrish Creek. As a
mining operation expected to begin in
result, approximately $15-20 million in
August 1981.
[ Thompson-Nicola/Cariboo Regions
Thompson-Nicola Region
time basis to reduce colour in effluent
There have been major industrial
discharge by about 25 per cent; and
developments, including a large copper
higher priority given to maintenance by
,   mine in the Highland Valley, a thermal
mill staff.
[   (coal) plant near Hat Creek and the
[   proposed expansion of a major
Projects undertaken by the
Environmental Management Section
[   transportation corridor along the
included a comprehensive study of the
Coquihalla Highway, and twin tracking
Merritt STP on the Coldwater and Nicola
[   of the CNR mainline. Long term strategy
Rivers with background watershed data;
for environmental management in the
continuation of the Afton Mines
[   Nicola Valley was begun, with a special
vegetation monitoring study; a study of
program to identify impact on the
mercury accumulation in small
management of water and related
mammals; collection of background data
|   resources.
on McGillvray Creek as it is affected by
Tod Mountain development; data
Cariboo Region
collection on the Guichan Creek
Watershed study; and preliminary data
The Conservation Officer Service was
collection on White Lake.
realigned as a separate Ministry wide
Staff worked with the Town of Merritt
1  enforcement unit under the Regional
1  Conservation Officer.
to solve problems arising from
phosphorous removal, alum addition
|   Waste Management
works and the starting of a
dechlorination works.
An air quality report was completed
In conjunction with the Habitat
1 on the source and severity of the air
Biologist in Williams Lake, a draft
I  pollution problem with respect to smoke,
policy on landfill sites in the Cariboo
1  suspended particulate and flyash at
was developed. The policy concentrates
Williams Lake.
on the natural conflict between bears and
Improved procedures were
humans, and stresses the use of
implemented for the control of fine
incinerators by small industrial and
I  copper ore dust within the loading site at
commercial operators in isolated areas
1  Gibraltar Mines Ltd.
inhabited by grizzly bears.
Particulate emissions from
At the request of Regional Waste
Weyerhauser Canada Ltd., Kamloops
Management staff the Village of Cache
t  Pulp Mill, were reduced following
Creek has made permanent arrangements
installation of a scrubber on bleach plant
to dechlorinate STP discharge for the
I discharge to remove chlorine;
protection of fish released from Loon
1   substitution of hydrogen peroxide and
Creek Hatchery and the upgraded fishery
1 oxygen for CIO in bleach plant on a part-
in the Bonaparte River.
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Conservation Officer Service
Thompson-Nicola Region
Angling pressure, and the need for
effective enforcement, continued to
increase.
Reports of steelhead fishery angling
violations on the Thompson River have
accelerated the development of an
enforcement program for 1981.
Summonses issued by plain-clothes
Conservation Officers in the Clinton
District have resulted in a number of ice
fishermen being prosecuted. Other
fisheries' enforcement operations
involved protection of spawning
populations and special fishery closures.
An attempt was made to measure the
rate of compliance by the public who are
required to report at the Cache Creek
Game Check. All vehicles were stopped
on the highway immediately downstream
from the regular Game Check to
determine the number of vehicles that
were avoiding the Game Check. During a
five hour period, 101 people stopped
voluntarily, while 160 people avoided the
check. More than 50 people were
charged with failing to stop at a game
check, carrying loaded firearms in motor
vehicles, and other infractions; 25
warnings were issued. Results were the
same as those recorded for similar
circumstances in 1979.
Cariboo Region
Fifty-three charges were laid for
fisheries offences, the most prevalent
being angling without a licence. Charges
increased from six to ten over the
previous year for exceeding the daily
fishing possession limits. This was due,
in part, to a plain clothes operation on
Tzenzaicut Lake near Quesnel. Seven
charges were laid and fines of $100 to
$200 were assessed for over limits.
Charges for hunting during the closed
season increased over the previous year
from five to eleven. Offences against
wildlife resulted in 104 charges being
laid.
Five charges were laid and four
convictions obtained under section 4 of
the Litter Act. There were three
investigations for pollution offences
under section 33 of the Fisheries Act,
and one for dumping septic tank waste
from a "tank truck".
Conservation Officers received 296
animal nuisance complaints, of which
they investigated 215. Black bear and
wolf were the main problem species.
In the Cariboo Region, the
Conservation Officer Service laid 162
charges for fisheries, wildlife and habitat
offences and obtained convictions of
140. A summary of these offences is
attached.
Water Management
Thompson-Nicola Region
The Thompson-Nicola Region (Region
3) includes the major drainages of the
Thompson River and the middle reach of
the Fraser River. The Eagle River
watershed has been added to the region.
The dam inspection program was
expanded following flooding in February,
1980.
Work continues on the Valley Copper
Project, the Dimac Tungsten Project, the
Canadian National Twin Tracking
Project, multiple Lands Branch Planning
Projects, the Coquihalla Highway,
Strategic Planning, Forest Management
Experimental Projects, and the Hat Creek
Coal Project.
Fisheries Management
A series of winter limnology samples
were taken on seven winter kill lakes,
followed by the preparation of a program
to bring some of these lakes into
production by circulation and/or aeration.
Twenty-five adult steelhead were
captured from the Deadman River for an
egg take. As a result, 100,000 eggs at
the Loon Lake Hatchery were incubated
for release as fry into the Upper
Bonaparte and Deadman Rivers.
 1
REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION                                                 63
Criss Creek was identified for the first
Much attention has been given to the
B time as a major steelhead spawning
caribou/logging conflict in the North
1 creek.
Thompson via the newspapers and
S.E.P. staff marked 20,000 steelhead
magazines.
1 fry in the Shakan Creek tributary to the
A brochure was produced on the
Nicola River, to assist in assessment of
problems of coarse fish transport.
K the Nicola River as a steelhead rearing
Several instructors' courses were given
site.
for the CORE Program. Forty-four
student courses were given to 900
A comprehensive paper was produced
students — graduating 728.
■ for management of all seven anadromous
salmonids in the Fraser River system.
Wildlife Management
A range improvement proposal for
B Habitat Protection
restoration of prime ranges by prescribed
burning was submitted to the Forest
Seymour River and Valley copper
Service.
developments were among major
A study of caribou winter range
■referrals handled by habitat protection
confirmed that there is a double
staff.
altitudinal migration for caribou in the
The development of forest access
North Thompson area each year. A
1  roads, and relocation of Highway 24 in
census was taken of the North Thompson
B the lake-rich Nehalliston Plateau
herd.
■northwest of Little Fort, has created
Among other studies and inventories,
r^ problems for fishing camp operators and
inventory was taken of California
j!  fishermen in the area. Ministry staff met
bighorn on their spring ranges west of
■ with Balco, Forest Industries, Ministry
the Fraser.
B of Forests, and camp operators to discuss
A controlled hunt of geese at
■methods of protecting the wilderness in
Tranquille has helped to disperse birds
■the area and the quality of the fishing.
and lessen crop damage near the airport.
An aerial reconnaissance of the
Information and Education
highway corridor between Kamloops and
Merritt was made to assess the impact of
\   Fifty-four articles were written and
the highway on Moose range within
B published in regional newspapers.
M.U. 19.
Cariboo Region
Water Management
provided by Thompson-Nicola and
[   Environmental use increased
substantially during the reporting period,
resulting in a major increase in
applications for water use and approval
Omineca-Peace Regions.
Input was provided to Technical
Planning and Coordinated Resource
Planning Committees.
Flood restoration work in the Bella
X applications for placer mining
Coola area was undertaken in
■ operations.
conjunction with Inventory and
The Cottonwood and Natzko Precincts
Engineering staff in Victoria following
were added to the Cariboo Region on
flooding in December.
■March 31, 1980.
Coordination of field effort between
Fish and Wildlife, Conservation Officer
r    Dam inspection capacity was supplied
Service, and Waste Management staff
■by the Thompson-Nicola Region, while
progressed favourably and improved the
■ community water supply support was
efficiency of each operation. Much
 64                                                      MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
improvement was also observed in the
Several wildlife inventory projects
referral process involving the Ministries
were undertaken, including radio-
of Lands, Parks and Housing;
collaring of grizzly bears at Owikena
Transportation and Highways; Forestry;
Lake (in cooperation with B.C. Forest
and Federal Fisheries.
Products Limited) to monitor movement    !
Reporting
of the bears. In the Itcha Ilgachuz Range   i
1979        1980       Period
mountain, a census was taken of caribou   1
Water Licence Ap
on their calving grounds to detect a
plications  Re
possible imbalance in cow-calf ratios,
ceived    152     230     257
related to predatim.
Approval Applica
A set of high elevation guidelines has
tions Received       48     158      198
been prepared for use by the Forest
Water Licence Ap
Service. The guidelines provide rules for  '<
plications Pro
logging practices at elevations where
cessed     47       50       98
there are relatively rare species of big
Approval Applica
game animals such as grizzly bears,
tions Processed..    42      145     156
mountain goats and mountain caribou.
The guidelines have particular
Fish and Wildlife
application in the vicinity of Quesnel
Fish and Wildlife staff assumed
Lake where logging is to take place in
responsibility for the management of
1981.
Chilanko Marsh, a productive, partially-
There was a limited inventory of sport  1
wetted area, important for production,
fisheries management and protection.
feeding and resting of waterfowl. The
Portions of the Taseko Lake watershed
marsh was acquired in 1980 with
were surveyed in response to impending
National Second Century Funds and
mining developments and the need to
management responsibility is shared with
develop protective guidelines.
Ducks Unlimited.
A joint project by Ministry of
In Horsefly, Big Creek, and 100 Mile
Transportation and Highways and
House areas, browse areas for moose and
Ministry of Environment resulted in
furbearers have been modified by cutting
placement of spawning gravel in Horsefly |
and ripping to encourage growth of
River for an expanded capability for
newer, more accessible vegetation. At the
spawning of kokanee from Horsefly
Junction Wildlife Management Unit, a
Lake. Deposits of silt in these spawning   j
2,000 acre burn of grasses and
areas had reduced the success of
encroaching woody species was
spawning in previous years.
undertaken as part of a continuing
A modest creel census and winter
management and research project. The
limnology program was carried out on
objective is to increase forage for
several lakes in the Region; these
California bighorn sheep and to improve
included Dugan, Raven, and Lac La
range condition on the unit.
Hache.
Kootenay Region
Corrective action has been undertaken
New regional division of the Ministry  I
by Foothills Pipeline Ltd. to comply with
resulted in the separation of the
Conservation Officer Service and
Ministry requirements on pipeline
Information Officer staff from the Fish
crossings across rivers and streams.
and Wildlife Branch.
j
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION
Waste Management
Increased attention was given to major
discharges having the greatest
environmental significance.
Regional studies have shown that
[clear, shallow reaches of the Elk River
land its tributaries will experience serious
algae growth problems if treated sewage
[effluent is discharged directly into the
[river. The need for a municipal
[wastewater disposal policy for the Elk
River drainage was recognized.
An engineering study was begun of the
[hydraulic overloading of the Regional
■District of Kootenay Boundary common
Isewage collection system, and to
examine intermittent raw sewage by-pass
■discharges to Trail Creek.
i    Crestbrook Forest Industries are
[proceeding with construction of a rapid
■infiltration system at the Skookumchuck
pulp mill.
[   Investigation into numerous
complaints about the water quality of Tie
■Lake revealed elevated phosphorus
Bevels. A blue-green algae bloom
Resulted in odours, foaming and lack of
Ivvater clarity.
[   Because of a mercury contaminated
Bcid and sludge discharge from the
Kominco operations in Trail, which led
to a prosecution, a joint Provincial-
pederal study was undertaken to
determine mercury content in Columbia
River fish.
I  Discharge from the Village of
Krivermere secondary treatment plant into
Toby Creek resulted in massive algae
growth downstream. The municipality
constructed an exfiltration system and
diverted the direct discharge to ground
disposal.
Statistics
Pollution Control Permits on record  366
■^Number of Permit Applications
processed in 1980  32
Approved in 1980  31
Rejected in 1980  1
Applications being processed
end of 1980        23
Number of Approval Applications
processed in 1980         13
Applications being processed end
of 1980  3
Waste Discharge Surveillance—
Inspections of works    1,332
Number      of     discharges
sampled—Effluent      202
—Emmissions  6
Environment Surveillance—
Number of Background Water
Samples collected      551
Number of Ambient Air Samples collected      577
Enforcement—
Orders issued  7
Prosecutions  2
Emergency Spill Program —
Number of hazardous spills investigated         14
January 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981 —
Annual Report Statistics
Applications for Water Licences:
Applications on hand Junuary 1,
1980  440
Applications Received  473
Applications inspected and reported. 448
Applications cancelled or abandoned     66 514
Applications on hand March 31,
1981  399
New Water Licences Received:
Conditional Water Licences  495
Final Water Licences     25
Approvals:
Approvals Received   120
Approvals Reported     87
Final Licences:
Reports Submitted     53
Licence Amendments:
Apportionment   153
Transfer of Appurtenancy     91
 1
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Change of Works  133
Extension of Time  11
Change of Purpose  8
Abandonment  9
Subdivision Referrals Reported   105
Water Management
Conservation Officer Service
Charges totalling 226 were laid,
resulting in 198 convictions, 14
dismissals, 7 stays, 6 charges withdrawn
and one aquitted.
Enforcement checks were carried out
on Kootenay Lake, Arrow Lake and
border crossings. Helicopter and
horseback patrols were carried out in the
East Kootenay area during the hunting
season.
The influx of workers due to
construction projects such as the Seven
Mile Dam on the Pend d'Oreille River,
the Revelstoke Dam on the Columbia
River and the construction of power lines
and pipe lines across the southern portion
of the region have added to the
enforcement problems. In November
1980 an injunction was obtained to help
ensure that protective clauses were
observed, after information had been
received that some construction
companies may intend to ignore these
limitations at certain stream crossings.
Information and Education
Ministry displays dealing with
garbage, bears and man were exhibited
in Castlegar and Trail.
Two major articles were produced.
One outlined the Ministry's teamwork
approach with the Federal Government in
collecting and sampling fish from the
Columbia River for heavy metal tests;
the other dealt with newspaper
photographic coverage of Ministry
properties. An article on Redfish Creek
fishery habitat improvement was also
prepared for regional distribution.
Education programs on trapping and
fur management, sport fishing and fish
identification, animal identification, use
of fire in wildlife management and other
methods of wildlife management, were
given in many schools and two colleges.
The public was informed of the Fish
and Wildlife Branch's antlerless deer
endorsement program, through media
outlets during August.
A total of 1,122 students took the
CORE examination in Region 4 between
April 1, 1980 and March 31, 1981.
Statistics — Region 4
Students  1,122
Courses  48
Students per class  17.7
Passes  848
Failures  148
Correspondence exams given  31
Percentage pass  75
Fish and Wildlife
B.C. Hydro Compensation Projects
Recent developments on major
compensation projects are as follows:
High Revelstoke Dam
The Fish and Wildlife Branch and
B.C. Hydro developed a draft agreement \
on final compensation which was
forwarded to the Ministry of
Environment Executive in April 1981.
Ratification of the agreement is expected
early in 1981/82.
Major components of the proposed
agreement include a three year study of
grizzly bear and mountain caribou in the
area to be inundated to give a better
information for managing the remaining
populations and habitats.
A major spawning channel at Hill
Creek, north of Nakusp, was completed
late in 1980 for startup in the summer of
1981. This channel is designed for
500,000 adult kokanee salmon and 1,000
rainbow trout.
High Arrow Dam
A compensation package will be
presented to the Ministry of Environment j
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION
Executive for approval and forwarded to
B.C. Hydro for the start of negotiations
early in 1981/82. The package includes
construction of a major fishway on the
Inonoaklin River to open up a sizeable
length of river, above currently
impassable falls to spawning kokanee,
rainbow trout and Dolly Varden char.
Focus of wildlife compensation is on a
major habitat acquisition and
enhancement program for white-tailed
■ and mule deer on one of the two
remaining Class IW ungulate winter
ranges in the West Kootenay.
Seven Mile Dam
This dam, on the Pend d'Oreille River
south of Trail, inundated a large part of
the second remaining Class IW ungulate
winter ranges in West Kootenay. A
sizeable fund was established in 1978 to
secure the remaining habitat, and white-
[ tailed deer habitat. A deer management
plan was completed in 1980.
Libby Dam
In 1972 the Libby Dam in Montana
backed water up some 50 miles into the
Canadian portion of the Southern Rocky
I Mountain Trench, displacing some of this
country's most significant wildlife
populations and having a considerable
limpact upon the river fishery. For some
•years, funds have been provided by B.C.
•Hydro for wildlife and fisheries studies.
Proposals for conservation and
•restoration of fish and wildlife lost to this
[project will be ready for presentation to
I Ministry of Environment Executive in
the summer of 1981.
[ South East Coal Block
f   Southeastern British Columbia has
[three active coal mining operations,
| producing 13 million tons per year.
rThere are proposals to expand or start
[five additional mines to bring annual
production up as high as 30 million tons.
The impact of coal mining on fishery and
wildlife resources in this area is
•considerable.
The new Forest Act has provided new
opportunities as well as new problems
for Fish and Wildlife staff. For the first
time, fish, wildlife and recreation are
acknowledged as legitimate resources.
Kootenay Lake Fishery
Kootenay Lake clearly is seriously
affected by the reduction in nutrients due
to the Libby Dam. The west arm
kokanee fishery was closed due to poor
stream production and overfishing. The
west arm will remain closed for at least
three years. A new kokanee spawning
channel at Redfish Creek, provided
under the Habitat Conservation Fund,
will be completed in 1981 and will
substantially enhance this fishery.
East Kootenay Cutthroat Trout
Overfishing of East Kootenay cutthroat
streams has resulted in development of a
management plan which will see closures
imposed in rotation over the next three
years. The initial closures for 1980
included the Upper St. Mary River and
Upper White River. In 1981 Wigwam
and Skookumchuck Rivers will be closed
to cutthroat fishing.
Meadow Creek Spawning Channel
Kokanee returns from Meadow Creek
spawning channel were very low in
1980. It is believed that the low returns
are due to poor channel performance.
Whiteswan Lake Spawning Channel
The Whiteswan Lake rainbow
spawning channel was completed in early
1980 and was operational for the 1980
spawning season. Nearly 1,000 spawning
trout used the channel.
Whitetail Lake
Whitetail Lake, which was chemically
rehabilitated in 1979, was opened in May
1980, but had to be closed six weeks
after opening because of concern for
over-fishing. It will be reopened in 1981
with more restrictions imposed on
method of catch.
 68                                                      MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Nuisance Bear Management
Flathead Grizzly Bear Studies
Nuisance bear management has
The radio telemetry study conducted
presented severe problems to
in cooperation with the Border Grizzly
Conservation Officers and Fish and
Project began to produce important
Wildlife staff in recent years. In attempts
population and ecological information,
to alleviate problems of bears being
with continued support from a variety of
attracted to inadequately managed
sources, including the local forest
garbage, (at the source and disposal
industry, guide outfitters, coal mining
sites), some 200 black bears were
companies and sportsmen.
destroyed in the Kootenays in 1980. This
is a substantial decrease from the 300
dispatched in 1979, but still represents a
Voluntary Tooth and Harvest Data
System
serious problem.
Close control of bear populations will
The long established Kimberley and
continue, and efforts will increase to
Cranbrook Game Checks were cancelled. 1
ensure that garbage is handled and
A voluntary mail-in harvest data card,
disposed of in an acceptable manner.
requesting a tooth from each animal
killed, proved to be a monumental
Bighorn Sheep — Contagious Ecthyma
success. It is expected that this procedure
Outbreak
will become standard practice throughout !
The discovery of contagious ecthyma
the Province.
in the Wigwam herd of Rocky Mountain
bighorn in the late fall resulted in
concern for the welfare of the Province's
Wildlife-Agricultural Conflicts
largest Rocky Mountain bighorn herd. A
Coordination of reported agricultural-   ]
transplant of bighorn from the Wigwam
ungulate conflicts in the East Kootenay
area to enhance recovery of the Bull
and at Creston continued. Purchase and
River herd was postponed, pending an
retirement of chronic problem ranches
assessment of the epidemic. A detailed
situated on heavily used elk ranges has
monitoring program was established
been suggested, and adequate fencing by j
through the East Kootenay Hunters
landowners of vulnerable orchards and
Association.
hay stacks.
Skeena Region
During this reporting period,
Logging practice guidelines are
components of the Ministry were
presently being developed to ensure
consolidated into a regional office. The
watershed protection within special
region is approximately 110,000 square
biogeoclimatic zones.
miles in area and is subject to increasing
Numerous minor complaints of
development in mining, hydro-electric
flooding were received.
plants, forestry, and the surrounding
community.
Routine Applications for Water Licences   !
and Approvals Statistic January 1 to
Water Management
March 31, 1981
There was an increase in water
Licences
licensing during 1980; 137 new
Backlog January 1, 1981  55
applications were received during this
New applications received  21 1
reporting period.
Reports submitted to Victoria  7  1
1
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION
69
I Applications cancelled or abandoned 5
[Backlog March 31, 1981  64
Applications for Approval (Changes)
[Received  10
Reported  12
[Applications for Approval (Short
Term Use)
[Received  31
Reported  0
Waste Management
Early in 1980, it was confirmed that
[an unknown quantity of P.C.B.'s had
•been spilled into the environment at
IKitsault from 1967-72, from a
•concentrate dryer operated by B.C.
[Molybdenum. Regional staff were
involved in a "clean-up" operation.
I^lore than 100 yd.3 of contaminated soil
■Was removed from the site and shipped
[to a facility in Oregon. In addition,
■Terrace staff discussed the attendant
[health hazards with groups in the area.
ISVaste management staff were also
Bnvolved in re-opening of Granduc Mine
at Stewart by Esso Resources; opening of
[Equity Silver operation near Houston;
water and sewer system for Queen
[Charlotte City; pilot plant for
Consolidated Cinola on Queen Charlotte
Islands.
vf/orkload Statistics
permits on Record—
June 1, 1980  232
March 31, 1981  262
BDutstanding Site Inspections—
Junel, 1980     29
March 31, 1981     33
Site Inspection Reports Completed—
June 1, 1980      0
I March 31, 1981     47
Kermits Processed in Region      0
■Approvals Processed in Region      3
Botal Number of Pollution Control
Facilities Inspected  311
Total Number of Pollution Control
I Facilities Sampled  121
Enforcement Activities—
Orders Issued      0
Charges Laid      0
Court Hearings Attended      4
Receiving Water Environmental
Background      0
Monitoring Stations Sampled     57
Air Monitoring Stations Operating-
June 1, 1980     13
March 31, 1981      7
Environmental Safety Program
Responses    34
Information and Education
Thirty courses were conducted in
major communities throughout Skeena
Region resulting in approximately 550
graduates.
Articles were written and interviews
given to the news media on a variety of
topics including bear/people problems;
pollution problems; fisheries and wildlife
projects; Ministry reorganization and
consolidation into regions; current
hunting and fishing regulations and the
CORE program.
Brochures were prepared on steelhead
of British Columbia, burbot, information
for guides and non-resident hunters, and
angling data sheets.
Information and Education assisted
conservation officers on patrol and
conducted annual qualifying shoots
before the Conservation Officer Service
obtained their own range master.
Wildlife Management
A new wildlife management plan has
been introduced with emphasis on big
game species, (particularly moose
management).
Limited Entry moose hunting was
prepared for 1981/82 hunting season, to
restructure moose populations so they
will respond to future habitat
enhancement programs. Two mapping
programs were initiated in the northern
portion of the region and in the south to
assess the best winter range for moose.
In addition, a moose radio tagging
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
project was started to assess the
distribution of critical winter ranges in
the Nadina bottomlands.
A 1980 Peak's Peregrine falcon survey
shows possible 35 per cent recovery (in
numbers of breeding pairs) from the
decline seen in 1970/75 period.
As part of a management plan for the
Delkatla Wildlife Sanctuary near Masset,
the slough was flooded as a first step in
returning the marsh to its former salt
water condition. The marsh was altered
in 1964 by construction of a causeway
which cut off tidal wash to the slough,
thereby altering the ecology of the area
to the detriment of waterfowl.
Fisheries Management
Steelhead management associated with
the Salmonid Enhancement Program
represents a major part of fisheries
management in the Skeena Region.
Skeena River steelhead radio tagging
was continued during this reporting
period, and has provided valuable
information on migration patterns and
timing of runs. It has also revealed the
importance to steelhead of small streams
in the Skeena River system. The data
acquired will assist in solving the
problem of steelhead interception by
commercial gill netting at the mouth of
the Skeena River.
Barrier removal and colonization of
the upper Harold Price Creek enhanced
Suskwa River steelhead stocks by
opening up approximately 35 miles of
formerly inaccessible water.
A special char sampling project was
initiated on Atlin Lake to evaluate sport
fishing management as they affect Yukon
Commercial Fishery.
An inventory was taken of two
watersheds (Morrison and Gosnell) so as
to develop logging plans which will
reduce the detrimental effect on fish.
Habitat Protection
The Minister and senior staff toured
the Rennet Sound area of Moresby Island
to view stream damage caused by
November 1979 landslide on Riley
Creek. Subsequently, the South Moresby
Planning Team developed slope-stability
mapping for most of the planning area.
Their interim report will be available
early in 1981.
Habitat Protection is now receiving
management working plans for TFL's
from B.C. Forest Services for
examinations, from which they assess the
Annual Allowable Cut.
There has been a considerable increase
in mining within the region. Major
developments include the Stikine-Iskut -I
Hydroelectric proposal; P.N.G. gas line   j
from Terrace to Kitimat; Placer
Committee formation; Khutzeymateen
Eco-reserve; Highway 16 reconstruction
between Terrace and Prince George;
Ridley Island pipeline; Windy Bay Eco-
reserve proposal; several large mining
developments including ADANAC and
Consolidated Cinola; Amax issues,
particularly pollution control permits;
and the Alcans Kemano II completion   <
proposal.
Conservation Officer Service
During this reporting period a new
Regional Conservation Officer was
appointed.
Existence of elk in the region was
confirmed in 1980 when a hunter
mistakenly shot a 700 pound bull elk
near Smithers.
More than 1,450 "nuisance" animal  J
complaints were received in 1980:
conservation officers responded to 1,238.
Wolf control was carried out in
response to complaints from ranchers.
Statistical information showing results j
of C/O's activities are contained in
attached appendix.
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION
Omineca-Peace Region
\ Fish and Wildlife
The new moose management strategy
[ for the Omineca portion of the Region
j was put into operation.
Land use alienation and pressures by
[ the agriculture and forest industries have
I affected game habitat significantly. This
has been compounded by extensive bark
[ beetle attack on thrifty mature timber
I stands. The result has been increased
[pressure on the Branch to permit very
large clear cut openings.
Bison continue to be a problem in the
[ Peace sub-region. Eight wood bison have
I escaped from the Northwest Territories
[ and moved to British Columbia.
There is a growing awareness of the
[impact of rapidly increasing populations
[ on the fish resource of the Region.
[Waste Management
tAmbient Air Monitoring Program —
tPrince George
\   Prince George has been identified as
[having some of the highest H2S and
dustfall levels anywhere in the Province.
■The main sources of these pollutants are
•the pulp mills, sawmills and the oil
•refinery. As a result a joint industry-
[ government ambient monitoring program
Bias recently been initiated.
I Gas Processing Plants
There are three large natural gas
[processing plants in this Region, all of
■Which can result in excessive sulphur
pollution. There has been excessive
Eulphur pollution, and emphasis is on
[Okanagan Region
The new region for the Okanagan
comprises the drainage areas for the
' Okanagan Lakes system, the upper
I Shuswap River, the Tulameen-
Kimilkameen River systems, and the
Kettle-Granby River systems.
A continuing drought strained the
Bvater and the fisheries resource, but
bringing these discharges into line with
the Permit requirements.
Water Management
Rainfall above normal during the
summer offset what could have been a
drought year. Continued rainfall through
March brought levels back to normal.
There was a major increase in the
number of applications for short-term
approval of increased placer mining in
the Germansen Landing area. There was
very little flooding during the spring
freshet, but a sudden thaw and rainstorm
in mid December 1980 created a large
ice jam on the Fraser River which caused
extensive flooding at Penny. Some
people were evacuated but only one
house suffered minor flood damage. The
return of more normal winter weather
gradually reduced the water level and the
ice dissipated.
Statistics for the Water Management
Branch for the Period January 1, 1980 to
March 31, 1981
Total Applications Received  97
Total Applications Reported and
Abandoned  81
Outstanding Applications as of March
31, 1981  82
Total Approval Applications Received
for Changes  19
Total Approval Applications Reported
—Changes  16
Total Approval Applications Received
—Short Term Use  56
Total Approval Applications Reported
—Short Term Use  33
Total Licence Amendments  21
there was a high carry over of deer
populations. A relatively wet summer
tended to offset the negative influences.
There is a continuing growth in
population throughout the Region.
Corresponding demand for urban
settlement produced increased activity
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
for all programs. This is particularly
reflected in the increasing number of
referrals for subdivisons, and the
applications for water licences.
The City of Kelowna began a major
construction program, which will use the
Barden process and crop irrigation.
An inventory has been taken of the
large mobile equipment items such as
vehicles and main equipment. This
inventory is part of a new property
control system which will be expanded
as time permits.
The Region will be consolidating into
new quarters in Penticton.
Waste Management
Five of the major municipalities are
constructing, or planning to construct,
new works to improve the quality of
discharge. A secondary activity involved
industrial waste disposal and during the
year two new burners were constructed to
help solve wood waste burner problems.
Some statistics for the period are
shown below:
Permits —January 1, 1980  333
New Permits processed      33
Permits —March 31, 1981  336
Applications processed in Victoria    64*
Applications processed in Region     41
Hazardous spills response    70
Pollution complaint response  242
* Included applications for permits, amendment of permits approvals and certificates.
Water Management
Some statistics for the period are
shown below:
Water Licence Applications on
hand—January 1, 1980  335
Water licence Applications received 352
Water Licence Applications reported 319
Water Licence Applications on
hand—March 31, 1981  368
Approval Applications received     88
Approval Applications reported    82
Water Licence Ammendment Reports
prepared  184
Flood Plain Subdivision Referrals
reported  367
Forestry Referrals reported  423
All other Referrals reported  222
Fisheries Program
The enhancement of the fishery in
Skaha and Okanagan Lakes was the
major activity in this program. There
were 50,000 rainbow trout produced in
the Mission Creek rearing pond, and
240,000 kokanee produced in the small
Regional Hatchery in Penticton. The new
mobile hatchery for the Skaha Lake
Kokanee fishery was completed, and a
study of the interaction between kokanee
and mysis shrimp on Skaha Lake was
undertaken in cooperation with the
Fisheries Research staff.
The aeration of Yellow Lake continued
with very successful results.
In the Headwater Lake Inventory
Program aerial surveys were completed
on 200 lakes, while 150 lakes were
subject to a creel census.
Wildlife Program
Range improvement and habitat
enhancement were priorities during this
period. The water-fowl oxbow
enhancement was completed near Grand
Forks; a controlled burning project was
completed in Bighorn sheep range in the
Ashnola, and the Osoyoos Wildlife
Management area was established. There
are plans for similar programs near
Summerland and Naramata, to limit the
destruction of orchards by deer.
The deer inventory showed a high
percentage of fawns, due in part to the
mild winter. A telemetric study of deer
was completed to measure the effect that
logging may have on fawning.
The feeding program for bighorn
sheep was evaluated.
A Habitat mitigation study associated
with mining activity was also completed.
Waste Management staff are
collaborating on two wild fowl habitat
enhancement projects where disposing of
 REGIONAL OPERATIONS DIVISION
sewage effluent through spray irrigation
is affecting wildfowl in the City of
Vernon and at Whilte Lake, City of
Penticton.
There were approximately 1,800
referrals from fisheries and wildlife
programs.
The Conservation, Outdoor Recreation
and Education Program graduated 1,250
students in the period.
Conservation Officer Service
There were over 9,000 public contacts
made during this period, which resulted
in 230 prosecutions.
The involvement of staff in Fish and
Wildlife Management activities has been
reduced, but still occupies a substantial
part of the Conservation Officers' time.
There were 493 nuisance animal
complaints received during the period.
  Boards
Pesticide Control Appeal Board
Pollution Control Board
75
 76                                                      MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Pesticide Control Appeal
Board
A new Pesticide Control Appeal Board
permits were strengthened by adding
was established in January of this year. It
requirements to ensure the safety of the
will act as an appeal tribunal against
program.
Orders of the Administrator of the
Several appeals filed in 1980 are
Pesticide Control Act. The new Board
pending and are expected to be heard
has a broad background of academic,
early this coming spring.
business and land-use experience, as well
Dr. F. E. Murray was appointed
as extensive knowledge of British
Chairman; the members are Dale
Columbia's regions.
Alsager, Dr. Wm. Godolphin, J. E.
During the reporting period, the Board
Harris, R. G. Holtby, E. E. Jeffreys, V.
held 20 public hearings for 72 appeals
Raudsepp, Dr. A. J. Renney and Dr. N.
against 62 permits and two suspension
Schmitt. The Chairman, Dr. Murray, and   |
orders of the Administrator. The Board
R. G. Holtby resigned during 1980, and
cancelled two permits and upheld the
were replaced by E. E. Jeffreys as
remainder, although in many cases, the
Chairman, and C. H. Gairns.
Pollution Control Board
The Pollution Control Board,
1980. Groups appearing before the
established under the Pollution Control
Board represented the Greater Vancouver  1
Act, section 2, hears appeals against
Sewerage and Drainage District, three
orders of the Director of Pollution
municipal governments within the
Control, Province of British Columbia,
GVSDD, two Federal agencies, one
and against orders of the Director of
Provincial agency, two environmental
Pollution Control, Greater Vancouver
groups and one from a native
Regional District. In addition, the Board
organization. The Board's Technical
sets standards for Pollution Control for
Advisory Panel prepared a draft report
the Province of British Columbia, holds
and recommendations, which were later
public inquiries on environmental
ratified by the Board and released as
problems, and defines which elements of
"policy advice".
water, land or air constitute pollution.
The Board received an evaluation from 1
The Board held seven public appeal
the Director of the Pollution Control
hearings for 16 appeals against Orders of
Branch on the practical and economic
the Director of Pollution Control. Nine
potential of incineration for solid waste
appeals were allowed; five appeals were
management in small rural areas. The
denied; two were allowed in part. One
recommendations contained in the report  1
was resolved before reaching a formal
have been used by the Board for the
appeal hearing. Four decisions were
successful resolution of appeals
made on 1979 appeals: two were allowed
involving landfill operation requirements  1
and two were denied. Three decisions
in rural communities.
were subsequently appealed to the
The term of the Board expired on
Lieutenant Governor in Council and to
December 31, 1980, but has been
the Supreme Court.
extended by Order in Council to June 30, 1
The Public Inquiry into Water
1981.
Standards for the Lower Fraser River
The Board is in the second year of its
dominated the Board's activities during
two-year term. It consists of the
 BOARDS
Chairman, Dr. C. J. G. Mackenzie, and
11 members, as follows: from the private
sector are, Mrs. E. J. Armstrong, active
in environmental affairs; H. W. Buckley
and Ian A. Hayward, Consulting
Engineers; H. D. C. Hunter, Barrister
and Solicitor; Dr. J. E. Mclnerney,
Biology Department, University of
Victoria, and Dr. F. M. Murdoch,
Physician: from Government are E.
Knight, Forests: R. J. Miller,
Agriculture: W C. Robinson, Mines: Dr.
J. H. Smith, Public Health: and E. H.
Vemon, Environment.
  STATISTICS
An Appendix to the
Annual Report of the
Ministry of Environment
79
 80 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
List of Tables
Accounting
Table 1.1—Summary of Revenue and Recoveries Sx. .'.> - a..}...'.    82
Water Rights Branch
Table 2.1—A Summary of Water Licence Activities Since 1969  84
Table 2.2—Total Number of Licences  85
Table 2.3—Water Licences Applications Outstanding  86
Table 2.4—Applications, Reports Received and Licences Issued  87
Table 2.5—Licences Prepared and Issued and Staff  88
Surveys and Mapping Branch
Table 3.1—Air Survey 1980 Photographic Accomplishments  89
Table 3.2—Summary of 1980 Photographic Breakdown  89
Table 3.3—Field Survey Accomplishments  89
Table 3.4—Integrated Survey Systems 1980 Monuments  90
Table 3.5—Reconnaissance Integrated Surveys  90
Table 3.6—Cadastral Surveys  90
Table 3.7—Photogrammetric Section Projects Completed in 1980  91
Table 3.8—Photogrammetric Section Projects in Progress at End of 1980  92
Table 3.9—Map and Air Photo Sales  93
Table 3.10—Air Photo, Photographic, and Printing Services—1980  94
Table 3.11—Lithographic Maps Printed in 1980  96
Table 3.12—Cadastral Map Production in 1980  97
Table 3.13—Summary of Planimetric Mapping Completed  97
Table 3.14—Summary of Photomosaics Completed  98
Inventory and Engineering Branch
Table 4.1—Floodplain Mapping Status          100
Table 4.2—Floodplain Development Control  104
Table 4.3—Minor Flooding and Erosion Projects  104
Table 4.4—Drainage Studies—Engineering  105
Table 4.5—Status of Drainage Projects  106
Table 4.6—Fraser River Program Fiscal Expenditures  106
Table 4.7—Fraser River Program Project Status  107
Table 4.8—Groundwater Section Activities, 1980  107
Table 4.9—Water Supply Studies—Groundwater  108
Table 4.10—Water Supply Studies—Surface Water  Ill
Table 4.11—Water Supply Studies—Engineering  112
Table 4.12—Status of Water Supply Projects  115
Table 4.17—Okanagan Basin Implementation Agreement Water Quantity Programs  116
Table 4.18—Support Services—Drafting Production for 1979  118
Table 4.19—Environmental Assessment Report Review  119
Terrestrial Studies Branch
Table 5.1—Soil Laboratory Report, Jan. 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981  120
Table 5.2—Soil Laboratory Report in Progress  122
 Fish and Wildlife Branch
Table 6.1—Harvested Animals Checked  123
Table 6.2—Estimates of Resident Hunter Harvest 1974-1979  123
Table 6.3—Compulsory Inspection Results from Harvest Reports by Resident and
Non-Resident Hunters  124
Table 6.4—General Results of the 1980/1981 Limited Entry Hunting Season  124
Table 6.5—Summary of Guided Hunter Activity in the 1980/81 Hunting Season  125
Table 6.6—Composition of the 1979/80 British Columbia Wild Fur Harvest  126
Table 6.7—Numbers of Annual Graduates from the Trapper Education Program from Inception 126
Table 6.8—Number of Steelhead Licences Issued and Estimates of Total Anglers,
Successful Anglers, Total Steelhead Catch and Number of Angler Days 1974/75
to 1979/80  127
Table 6.9—Number of Eggs Collected and Incubated at Each Hatchery  127
Table 6.10—Number and Weight of Fish Liberated from Each Hatchery  128
Table 6.11—Gross Revenue by Major Activity  128
Table 6.12—Gross Revenue from Resident and Non-Resident Hunting and Angling Licence
Sales  129
Table 6.13—Resident Hunting Licence Sales  129
Table 6.14—Non-Resident Hunting Licence Sales  130
Table 6.15—Special Hunting and Firearms Licence Sales  130
Table 6.16—Resident Angling Licence Sales  130
Table 6.17—Non-Resident Angling Licence Sales  131
Table 6.18—Other Revenue (Sources Other than Hunting or Angling)  131
Marine Resources Branch
Table 7.1—Number of Licences and Permits—Revenue 1975-1980  132
Table 7.2—Total Production and Value from British Columbia Fisheries 1970-1980  133
Table 7.3—Salmon Landings by Species 1975-1980 in Metric Tons  133
Table 7.4—Salmon Landed Values (000's dollars) by Species 1975-1980  133
Table 7.5—Salmon Canning  134
Table 7.6—Increased Total Allowable Catch of Groundfish  134
Table 7.7—Number of Registered Oyster Lease Holders/Acreage  134
Table 7.8—Oyster Industry Production  134
Environmental Laboratory
Table 8.1—Distribution of Environmental Laboratory Workload by Submitting Agency  135
£ Aquatic Studies Branch
Table 9.1—Water Management Studies  136
Table 9.2—Aquatic Plant Management Program  139
i Public Information
■ Table 10.1—Conservation Outdoor Recreation Education (CORE)  140
I Conservation Officer Service
Table 11.1—Preliminary Data from the Offence Data System  141
 82
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
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 Survey and Mapping Branch
Table 3.1
,Air Survey 1980 Photographic Accomplishment
British Columbia Assessment Authority	
British Columbia Building Corporation	
British Columbia Hydro	
Environment Canada	
Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources I
Ministry of Environment	
Ministry of Forests	
Ministry of Lands, Parks and Housing	
Ministry of Municipal Affairs	
Ministry of Transportation and Highways	
Totals	
Flying lime
Number of
Line
Hours
Photos
Kilometres
100.2
8,220
13,550
0.2
10
5
16.1
1,535
845
1.3
20
30
6.3
155
305
207.9
13,905
16,640
233.4
17,355
28,265
62.0
4,525
6,380
1.5
245
265
33.2
1,205
2,380
662.1
47,175
68,665
Table 3.2
Summary of 1980 Photographic Breakdown
I.R. False Color..
Color Negative....
.Panchromatic	
Totals...
Flying Time
Hours
21.8
98.8
541.5
662.1
Number of
Photos
1,949
8,920
36,306
47,175
Line
Kilometres
1,536
58,261
68,665
Table 3.3
Field Survey Accomplishments
Horizontal
Control
Project Name—Requesting Agency Monuments
, Creston—Surveys and Mapping  6
j Cranbrook—Surveys and Mapping  45
Hazelton-Kitwanga—Surveys and Mapping  35
Fort St. James—Inventory and Engineering  52
Prince George—Surveys and Mapping  19
ench
Mapping
Cadastral
larks
Control
Ties
X
X
30
X
22
X
X
29
89
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 3.4
Integrated Survey Systems 1980 Monuments
Sidney  27 Completed
Saanich  40 In progress
Matsqui  51 Area extended
Surrey  86 Replacements
Coquitlam  83 Replacements
387
Table 3.5
Reconnaissance Integrated Surveys
Monument
Locations
West Vancouver  343
Saanich  538
Burnaby  65
Port Moody  163
Port,Albemi  260
Oak Bay  391
Rossland  38
1,798
Table 3.6
Cadastral Surveys
Coquitlam—Minnekhada Ranch Agricultural Land Reserve	
Central Saanich—Property No. 47 Agricultural Land Reserve..
In progress
Completed
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table 3.7
Photogrammetric Projects Completed in 1980
Project
No. Project Name Originator
78-165P/C Lytton I & E.*
78-194T Addition to Monte Lk I. & E.
78-230T/O Kitimat I. & E.
79-09T/O Burns Lk I. & E.
79-65C Fraser R.-Agassiz S. & Mapping
79-74T Mt. Seymour Parks Br.
79-87T Western Community Reg. Dist.
79-89T/C McConnell Cr. Reg. Dist.
79-90P/C Pitt Polder Reg. Dist.
79-101TO Kelowna Foreshore I. & E.
79-117T/0 Radium-Windermere I. & E.
\ 79-126T/0 Okanagan Valley I. & E.
' 79-130T Hudson Bay Ski Develop Environ.
79-140T Nadina R.-Colleymont Highways
79-156T/C Gambierls E.L.U.C.
79-157T Lot 12217, Cariboo Dist Environ.
79-158T Section 25, Township 47 L.P. & Housing
79-159T Lot 9970 L.P. & Housing
79-161T/C Fraser R. Debris Site Forests
80-05T Wilkinson R.-Helmcken Rd Highways
80-06T Monais-Bodreau Highways
i 80-07T Smithers Bypass Highways
j80-14T McKenzie (Add to 79-127T) Highways
[80-16S/P Hosmer Spotheights Environ.
80-19T/O Cheakamus I. &E.
I80-23T Esplanade-Succour L.P. & Housing
I80-25T Add. to 80-25T Highways
I80-26T /\dd. to Hope Merritt Highways
180-29T Topley-Broman Lks Highways
80-30T/O Ware Mines
^80-32T Rose Valley Lk I. & E.
80-33T Shannon Lk. Reservoir I. & E.
80-34T Brent Lk. Profiles I. & E.
80-35T Slocan R.-Passmore I. & E.
80-37T Fox Mtn L.P. & Housing
80-39T Chimney Lk I. & E.
[ 80-40T Branson Lk I. & E.
180-44T Pemberton Land Assembly
80-46T Valemont L.P. & Housing
i 80-47T McBride L.P. & Housing
80-55T/O Fraser R.-Debris Site Forests
I80-63T Cypress Bowl L.P. & Housing
I80-66T Hope-Merritt Add Highways
* Inventory and Engineering (Environment).
Vertical
Scale
Interval
Overlaps
1:5 000
	
15
1:1 200
2 ft.
1
1:5 000
1 &2m
Ortho 58
215
1:5 000
1 &2m
Ortho 32
89
1:5 000
—
138
1
1 000
2m
1
2 500
5 m
11
Bridging Only
89
1
2 500
2m
13
1
5 000
—
16
1:5 000
142m
Ortho 21
81
1:5 000
1 &2m
Ortho 35
101
1:5 000
1 &2m
Ortho 68
291
1
6 000
10 ft.
1
1
5 000
5 m
37
1
10 000
10 m
4
1
5 000
5m
1
1
6 000
5m
1
1
5 000
2m
2
1
2 000
1 m
1
1
500
1 m
5
1
5 000
5 m
4
1
5 000
5m
22
1
500
2ra
1
1
5 000
—
3
1
5 000
1 &2m
Ortho 20
38
1:2 000
2 m
2
1:500
1 m
1
1:1 200
5 m
3
1:5 000
5m
16
1:50 000
20 m
63
1:2 000
1 m&
0.5 m
16
1:2 000
5 m
4
Profiles
1
1:5 000
2m
14
1:5 000
5m
6
1:2 000
2m
43
1:2 000
lm
9
1:2 400
10 ft.
2
1:4 000
5 m
2
1:4 000
5m
2
1:2 000
1 &5m
6
1:1 000
2m
14
1:2 500
5m
1
4 800
10 ft.
3
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 3.7—Continued
Project
No. Project Name Originator
80-81T DL 3959 L.P. & Housing
80-85T Yale Bluffs Highways
80-90T Salle L I. & E.
80-91T Pass Cr. Highways
80-92T Felker Lk I. & E.
80-99T Hope-Merritt Add Highways
80-122T/O Brandywine Environ.
80-125T Ext. toM92 Forests
80-129T Summerland I. & E.
8O-130T Fintry I. & E.
80-131T Westbank-Gellantly I. & E.
80-142T Inklin R. Landslide Environ.
80-146P Quatsino S. & Mapping
80-147T StoddartCr. Highways
80-152T Bella Coola I. & E.
80-162T Add. to Hope Merritt Highways
79-61T/0 Vanderhoof I. &E.
80-163T Big Meadow Lk I. &E.
80-135T Trepanier I. & E.
80-136T Naramata I. &E.
77-108T/O Cowichan Lk I. &E.
80-153T Cordova Bay Reg. Dist.
80-144P/C Delta, Surrey, Langley S. & Mapping
80-160T Prince George F/P I. &E.
Completed Projects, 67
Scale
1:2 000
1:500
1:2 000
1:1 000
1:2 000
1:4 800
1:5 000
1:5 000
1:2 500
1:2 500
1:2 500
1:2 500
1:20 000
1:5 000
1:6 000
1" = 400'
1:5 000
1" = 200'
2 500
2 500
5 000
2 000
5 000
2 000
Vertical
Number of m
Interval
Overlaps    1
5 m
3
1 m
1
1 m
6
2m
16
1 m
24
10 ft.
2
1 &2m
2
2m
2
1 m
9
1 m
3
lm
12    !
2m
4
—
70
5m
11
1 m
6
5 ft.
1
m & spot
146
(ortho 146J
2 ft.
4
1 m
6
1 m
9    <
l&2m
62
(ortho 19)1
lm
3
—
164    |
lm
20
1,973
399 Orthi
2,372
Table 3.8
Photogrammetric Projects in Progress March 31, 1981
Project
No.                            Project Name                   Originator Scale
77-166T/0   Squamish I. &E. 1:5 000
79-118T/0   Fairmont-Canal Flats I. &E. 1:5 000
80-145T      Penticton Indian Band I. &E. 1:2 000
80-151T/O   KelownaWoodlake I. &E. 1:5 000
Vertical
Interval
Number of!
Overlaps
Ortho 40
&2m
102
l&2m
1 m&
0.5 m
l&2m
Ortho 391
29
Ortho 54|
54
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table 3.9
Map and Air Photo Sales
Environment—
E   Surveys and Mapping	
■ Resource Analysis	
[   Water Investigations	
t  Provincial Emergency	
I  Pollution Control	
Fish and Wildlife	
I Marine Resources	
[   Water Management	
ELUC Secretariat	
Agriculture	
Attorney General .....
Consumer and Corporate Affairs	
Education	
Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources	
Finance	
Forests	
Health	
Human Resources	
Industry and Small Business Development	
Labour	
Lands, Parks and Housing—
■ Lands	
I Parks	
■ Housing	
Municipal Affairs	
Provincial Secretary and Government Services.
Tourism	
Transportation and Highways	
Universities, Science and Communications	
Government Total ,-	
Public	
Lithographed Maps
Itek
Number of
Requisitions
321
177
322
74
85
220
10
120
20
46
22
5
41
402
20
571
45
13
22
12
201
215
50
43
181
23
524
12
3,797
8,986
Number of
Maps
10,743
2,655
2,204
2,692
1,113
2,576
40
1,667
201
492
169
9
264
1,875
586
29,056
251
75
97
115
2,407
2,994
397
714
2,340
104
4,081
92
70,009
182,612
Value
$
23,447.50
5,755.70
4,420.50
5,495.50
2,321.25
5,003.25
87.25
3,312.25
398.25
854.50
560.00
16.50
552.00
3,736.25
1,111.50
65,875.25
544.75
175.25
251.00
289.50
4,263.25
6,002.20
873.25
1,256.25
5,529.50
233.25
8,915.25
229.50
151,510.40
391,973.25
Number
199
167
607
35
175
4
119
85
3
7
67
1,077
25
793
581
59
54
140
1,370
22
5,591
10,154
Value
$
279.00
270.25
882.50
45.25
251.00
8.00
173.50
119.75
4.50
8.75
96.00
1,530.75
37.50
2.50
1,096.75
810.00
75.25
84.75
202.25
1,949.00
33.00
7,964.25
14,425.00
Total..
12,783    252,621      543,483.65        15,745      22,389.25
ill Mail Count	
:eCash Customers..
13,266
.. 9,716
Federal Maps Distributed  89,674
Provincial Maps Distributed  163,659
Cash Collected  $93,703.98
(through cash register)
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 3.10
Map Production—Reprographics
Reqs.
Agriculture         134
Attorney General  5
Consumer and Corporate
Affairs  11
Education  3
Energy, Mines and
Petroleum Resources  62
Environment      1,153
Finance  2
Forests        622
Health  7
Human Resources        —
Industry and Small Business
Development        —
Labour        —
Lands, Parks and Housing—
Lands Management/
Legal Surveys         177
Parks         162
Housing  26
Legislative Assembly  2
Municipal Affairs  53
Provincial Secretary and
Government Services  41
Tourism  3
Transportation and Highways        741
Universities, Science and
Communications        —
British Columbia Assessment
Authority         151
Public     5,862
Total     9,218
* Kamloops total included.
Air Photo Section
10x10
9,848
7
21
21
2,047
141,645
1
117,145
1
Diaps.
Enlgs.    Mosaics
127 8
3       —
Color
667
Cost
$19,419.7S
62.50
3
2,342
187
33
164
648
1
460
72
5 —
646.7:
32.1
5
8
127
3
84
606
13,064
6,105
6,087.5(1
290,069.25
76.25
208,180.oJ
526.25
22,589
41
31
19
804
68,205.0™
12,313
16
69
12
26
19,046.0M
1,565
7
21
1
—
2,343.25
16
—
1
—
—
35.00
1,348
—
52
13
381
4,181.50
575
	
12
8
19
1,181.50
4
—
—
2
—
46.001
31,203
200
254
36
705
54,459.2a
20,460
160,629
11,286
1,707
3,758
7
494
63
7,481
49.248.25
35U9HM
521,438  14,082  7,413   827  29,921
1,075,037.31
 lble 3.10—Continued
lp Production—Continued
Reproduction Section
Reqs. Whprts. Offset               Photo                             Cost Total Cost
[.culture  179 1,703 244              $5,383.20 $24,802.95
limey General  89 981 210               55                1,951.19 2,013.69
f isumer and Corporate
[affairs  1 2 5.82 652.57
[cation  5 113 139.00 171.25
Irgy, Mines and Petro-
lium Resources  1,520 26,471 27,801           1,398             49,478.67 55,566.17
lironment  8,277 91,872        5,497,123 38,282            522,774.67 812,843.92
lince  30 527 603               12                  532.44 608.69
\m  1,396 7,577 31,136            236,644.30 444,824.30
m.  220 290 1,200         28,306              26,860.04 27,386.29
ittan Resources  238 46 1,523               5,243.65 5,243.65
i istry and Small Busi-
;ss Development  1 — —                   1                    41.60 41.60
SH..  1 35 245.00 .   245.00
ds, Parks and
ffimsing—
ands Management/
Legal Surveys  4,082 27,911 2,615           2,210              42,916.67 111,121.67
irks...  399 3,813 7,442               18,074.22 37,120.22
JWhg  113 2,358 73               3,359.40 5,702.65
sislative Assembly  1 7 —                                         14.00 49.00
fciicipal Affairs  1,378 13,446 3,089             42,895.63 47,077.13
Mncial Secretary and
overnment Services  279 697 5,500          2,159               7,564.96 8,746.46
Rism  20 31 41                  440.40 486.40
fisportation and
ighways  2,684 137,840 19,501             137,267.43 191,726.68
J'ersities, Science and
i ommunications  24 164 37                  508.60 508.60
J sh Columbia Assess-
ent Authority  103 1,733 174               5,389.75 54,638.00
|ilj.  2,769 21,865 —            11,661 58,473.31 409,664.56
■Total  23,809 339,447       5,535,052       147,379 1,166,203.95 2,241,241.45
 96
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 3.11
Lithographic Maps Printed January 1980 to March 1981
Contour
Map No.
Name
Edition
Scale
Interval
Remarks
82E/NE
Upper Kettle River	
Third
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
82E/SE
Third
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
New Map
82K/NE
Invermere	
Second
1:100 000
50 m
82K/NW
Beaton	
Second
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
82L/NE
Revelstoke	
Second
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
82L/NW
Shuswap Lake        	
Third
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
82L/SE
Sugar Lake	
Third
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
92H/SE
Princeton	
Fourth
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
92I/SE
Merritt	
Fourth
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
92I/SW
Lytton	
Third
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
93A/SW
Horsefly River	
First
1:100 000
50 m
New Map
93G/SE
Cottonwood River	
First
1:100 000
50 m
93E
Whitesail Lake	
Third
1:250 000
150 m
New Map
New Map
New Map
103P
Fourth
1:250 000
150 m
PS-MI
Manning Park	
First
1:50 000
50 m
UR
British Columbia Relief	
Second
1:2000 000
—
New Map
SGS-2
Vancouver-Kamloops	
First
1:400 000
150 m
300 m
New Map
WCT2
West Coast Trail	
Second
1:50 000
100 ft.
Revised
British Columbia Air Facilities	
1980
1:2000 000
—
Revised
Lithographic Maps Reprinted January
1980 to March 1981
82F/SE
Creston	
Second
1:125 000
200 ft.
82F/SW
Trail	
Second
1:125 000
100 ft.
92G/NW
Squamish	
First
1:125 000
100 ft.
92H/SW
92K-J
Third
First
1:125 000
1:250 000
200 ft.
500 ft.
Bute Inlet	
92M
Rivers Inlet	
Second
1:250 000
500 ft.
92N
Mount Waddington	
First
1:250 000
500 ft.
93A
93B
Second
First
1:250 000
1:250 000
500 ft.
500 ft.
Quesnel	
93C
931
93M
Second
First
Fourth
1:250 000
1:250 000
1:250 000
500 ft.
500 ft.
500 ft.
Hazelton	
93N
930
First
First
1:250 000
1:250 000
500 ft.
500 ft.
MacKenzie	
93P
Dawson Creek	
First
1:250 000
500 ft.
1BL
Northwestern British Columbia	
1:600 000
1DL
Northeastern British Columbia	
1:600 000
—
IE
Southeastern British Columbia	
1:600 000
—
1FL
West Central British Columbia 	
1:600 000
—
1GL
East Central British Columbia	
1:600 000
—
IK
Southwestern British Columbia
Fifth
1:600 000
—
Large Scale                     52 projects
657 sheets
Special
15 projects
41 sheets
Orthophoto                      14 projects
300 sheets
Ottawa (N.T.S.)               Admin. Boundaries
85 sheets
i
 SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
97
liable 3.12
| Cadastral Map Production 1980
Scale                                                     Item Completed In Hand
1:2 500     Cadastral  6 32
1:5 000     Cadastral  119 99
1:10000    A. L. R. ConstituentBdy. Maps  33 10
1:20 000    Cadastral  23 —
1:50 000    Cadastral (Federal Maps)  120 34
Integrated Survey Indices  2 4
1:5 000     Map Indices  12
Special Projects  31 —
Grids and Title Blks. (Calcomp Plotter)  829 —
Total-Less Grids and Title Blks  346 180
Kamloops Office
Completed
In Hand
5
4
j30Man/Hours-
: 50 Man/Hours-
-Mechanical drafting for machine shop (Field Operations.)
-Mapping assistance and checking for private and government agencies.
Kamloops Office Map Distribution*
I Government Map Distribution—
Topographic Maps  2,512
I       Composite Maps  2,926
White Printing  365
: B.C. Assessment Authority Map Distribution—Composite Maps  459
I. Public Map Distribution—
Composite Maps  2,943
Topographic Maps  4,600
Misc. Public  1,428
Xerox Copies  40
Total Maps Distributed, All Types  15,273
* Kamloops Office closed August 5,1980.
[ liable 3.13
■Summary of Planimetric Mapping Completed
Number of
Sheets
Originator
Quadra P.S.Y.U.      54     Ministry of Forests..
Scale
1:20 000
Revision Mapping
93P, 104A 167    Water Management Branch  1:20 000
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 3.14
Summary of Photo Mosaics Completed
Photo/Mosaic Number of
Number Name Sheets
402-76 Guichon Creek  4
403-79 Portion Gilford Island  3
404-77 Pitoney Lake-Jerry Creek  1
405-72 Penticton Creek  1
406-74 Whiteman Creek-Beau Park  8
407-79 Scot Unit  1
408-79 Herrick Creek, Bks. 1 and 2  3
409-75 Sunset Prairie Community Pasture  1
410-79 Fort St. James  1
411-75 Albemi Valley  2
412-79 Fife-Deep Creek Range Units  1
413-79 South Pass-Brown Creek Range Unit. 1
414-77 Hardwicke Island .v.  1
415-77 Revelstoke Area  1
416-78 Charlie Lake Area  2
418-77 Victoria Lake Planning Project  1
419-76 Bridge Lake Stock Range  2
420-79 Valemount-Tete Jaune Cache  2
421-74 LacLeJeune  1
422-79 Gable Mountain  1
423-79 Burrell Creek  1
424-79 Jones Creek  1
425-79 Mt. Faith-Morrell  1
426-79 XeniaLake  1
427-79 Duncan-Cowichan Lake  3
428-75 Chase-Tod Mountain  2
429-77 S.T.L.'s Doe Lake-Stony Lake  2
430-79 Powell River-Westview  2
431-80 Smithers  2
432-80 Port Hardy Area  3
433-80 North Saanich District Municipality... 1
434-80 Central Saanich District Municipality 1
435-80 Saanich District Municipality  2
436-79 Bowen Island  1
437-80 Comox-Oyster River  6
438-76 Fawnie Creek  1
439-79 Falls Lake Area  1
440-77 Thursday-George  1
441-77 Wansa-Pitoney ,^^.....1.-^1.  2
442-74 Dear Creek Range Unit  1
443-80 Cranbrook  2
444-79 Yahk River  2
445-80 Lantzville-Qualicum  3
446-77 Salmon Valley  1
447-79 Pike Mountain  4
448-77 Port Edward and Vicinity  2
449-79 Ladysmith Harbour—Departure Bay.... 1
450-79 Teapot Mountain-Siwash Creek  1
451-79 Bowron River-Ames Creek  1
452-76 Homathko River  1
453-78 Texada Island  2
454-80 Deep Bay to Bowser  1
455-67 Tuchodi River Valley  1
Originator Scale    I
Forests......,..- 1:40 000
Forests 1:10 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:15 840
Transportation and Highways.... 1:4   000
Forests 1:40 000
Forests 1:31 680
Forests 1:31 680
Environment 1:63 360
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Environment 1:20 000
Environment 1:18 000
Transportation and Highways.... 1:20 000
Lands, Parks and Housing 1:20 000
Forests 1:50 000
Lands, Parks and Housing 1:30 000
Lands, Parks and Housing 1:10 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Transportation and Highways.... 1:25 000
Transportation and Highways.... 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Transportation and Highways... 1:20 000
Municipal Affairs 1:10 000
Lands, Parks and Housing 1:10 000
Transportation and Highways.... 1:10 000
Transportation and Highways.... 1:10 000
Transportation and Highways.... 1:10 000
Environment 1:20 000
Municipal Affairs 1:10 000
■Forests 1:10 000
Lands, Parks and Housing  1:25 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Transportation and Highways... 1:10 000
Forests 1:15 840
Transportation and Highways.... 1:20 000
Environment 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Municipal Affairs..: 1:20 000
Transportation and Highways... 1:22 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:20 000
Forests 1:10 000
Environment 1:30 000
Transportation and Highways... 1:20 000
Environment 1:50 000
 r
SURVEYS AND MAPPING BRANCH
Table 3.14—Continued
Summary of Photo Mosaics Completed
i Photo/Mosaic
Number
456-78
457-77
458-79
459-79
460-74
461-80
462-80
463-80
464-80
465-77
466-79
Number of
Name Sheets
Pend d'Oreille Valley      2
Grove Burn      2
Mark Creek      2
Cascade Wilderness Study	
Clear Lake	
Buttle Lake-Upper Campbell Lake..
Salmo-Erie	
Vernon Area-Swan Lake	
Sumas-Chilliwack Lake	
Davie Lake-Bear Lake	
Summit Lake	
Originator
Municipal Affairs	
Forests	
Forests	
2     Forests	
1 Forests	
4     Lands, Parks and Housing	
2 Transportation and Highways..
2     Transportation and Highways..
2     Environment	
2     Forests	
2     Forests	
Scale
20 000
20 000
.20 000
20 000
20 000
.20 000
10 000
20 000
31 680
15 840
15 840
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 104
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 4.2
Floodplain Development Control
Items Dealt With 1979
1. Zoning By-laws  272
2. Official Community and Settlement Plans  84
3. By-law Appeals  64
4. Subdivisions  706
5. Crown Land Lease and Fee Simple Applications  227
6. Flooding Reserve and Ecological Reserve Clearance  90
! For 15 month period January 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981.
284
116
195
824
505
123
Table 4.3
Minor Flooding and Erosion Projects
River Improvement Assistance Program
Projects Implemented
Requests Total
for             Site         Reports Construction
Year                                   Assistance Inspections Completed          No. Cost $
1974   115    62    84     54 520,000
1975   93    104    87     24 1,170,000
1976   114    143    112     37 1,043,000
1977   57    86    86     44 499,000
1978 ..,,,   91    95*   68*    48 463,000
1979   95   105    98    40* 490,000
1980 1;   Ill    90t   84     17 580,000
* Excludes Terrace area flooding investigations and reconstruction, Mission Creek and Granite Creek projects and Houston
dyking for an additional construction value of $1.800,000.
t Excludes inspections under Provincial Emergency Program following Christmas 1980 storm.
 INVENTORY AND ENGINEERING BRANCH
105
Table 4.4
Drainage Studies—Engineeiing
Area Description
A. Undertaken by Inventory and Engineering Branch
Surrey Report on drainage improvements in the Burrows Ditch area on the
Nicomekl River floodplain.
Delta Study on proposed drainage improvements in the East Delta area.
Mud Bay Data gathering continued in 1980 for proposed drainage improve
ments for Mud Bay Dyking District.
% complete
to Mar. 31/81
30
75
10
B. Undertaken by Consultants
Delta Study on proposed drainage improvements and new pumping sta
tion in the Crescent Slough area. 100
i Chilliwack Report on proposed drainage scheme in Elk Creek-Big Ditch area of
East Chilliwack. 100
' North Cowichan    Report on proposed drainage improvements in Quamichan Lake
area. 100
Keremeos Economic analysis of proposed dyking and erosion control project
for Similkameen Indian Band. 100
C. Requests for Studies Under Investigation or Awaiting
Assignment to Consultants
Pitt Meadows Proposals were received for a study on drainage improvements and
replacement of pumping facilities for the District of Pitt Meadows.
Colebrook ARDSA assistance has been requested by the Colebrook Dyking
District for a study on proposed drainage improvements.
Richmond Preliminary data gathering continued in 1980 and 1981 for proposed
drainage improvements and irrigation for the Township of
Richmond.
Port Coquitlam      ARDSA assistance was requested for drainage improvements at
Port Coquitlam.
Chilliwack A request was received for a study on drainage improvements in the
Dunville Creek area, District of Chilliwack.
Hope ARDSA assistance was requested by the Chawathil Farm Co
operative for a feasibility study on drainage improvements.
 106                                                    MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 4.5
Status of Drainage Construction Projects
Design
Construction
ARDSA         % Complete     During Period
Project               as of             Ian. 1/80-
Project Description                          No.             Mar. 31/81         Mar. 31/81
Pemberton Dyking District Flood
Protection and Drainage Scheme.    271105             75         1,202,394
District of Surrey—Old Logging
Ditch Drainage Scheme.                 271107             95               0
Nicomen Island Improvement
District—Drainage Scheme.           271110           100            260,000
Glen Valley Dyking District
Drainage Scheme.                          271114           100               0
Township of Chilliwack—East
Chilliwack Drainage.                       271120              0                 0
Table 4.6
Fraser River Flood Control Program
Expenditures by Fiscal Year
Expenditures
To
Mar. 31/81
1,231,520
0
260,000
0
0
% Complete
as of
Mar. 31/81
30
50
80
0
0
Fiscal Year                                    Design
1968-1969         $5,165
1969-1970                                              658,871
Construction
$120,396
105,464
1,164,383
1,214,645
1,456,465
4,370,870
8,849,305
10,368,685
9,020,330
8,606,174
11,053,066
6,618,397
8,945,047
Upstream
Storage
$ —
3,410
492,531
295,618
64,994
92,062
75,732
32,066
600
Total
$125,561   I
764,335
1970-1971        769,659
1971-1972        592,110
1972-1973        650,875
1973-1974                                  867,542
1,937,452    |
2,299,286    \
2,402,958
5,303,406
1974-1975     1,173,697
1975-1976     1,280,582
1976-1977                                              919,987
10,115,064    )
11,724,999   I
9,972,383   1
1977-1978                                  1,101,902
9,708,676 1
1978-1979                               882,251
11,935,317 1
1979-1980                                        734,857
7,353,254 1
1980-1981 (Estimated)        217,054
9,162,101.1
Total Expenditures to March 31/81     9,854,552
71,893,227
1,057,013
82,804,792
 Table 4.7
Fraser River Program Project Status
Est. Cost of
Design Construction
Per Cent During
Date of             Completed 1979-80
Project                           Application         at Year-end Fiscal Year $
Kent Mar. 5, 1969          100 —
Pitt Meadows Mar. 3, 1969           95 1,831,992
Richmond Mar. 3, 1969            99 513,714
Matsqui May 15, 1969        100 —
Chilliwack Aug. 1, 1969           90 —
Delta Aug. 1, 1969           95 264,645
Mission Aug. 4, 1969 98
Abbotsford Feb. 1969                95 3,933,955
Surrey-Dams May 6, 1969          100 —
S.Westminster May 6, 1969          100 403,021
New Westminster Dec. 10. 1970         100 14,863
Coquitlam Apr. 30, 1970         100 120,381
Nicomen Island Sept. 30, 1974        — 915,458
Seabird Island Oct. 8, 1971 —
VedderRiver July25, 1979           90 727,018
Oak Hills Oct. 28, 1973 100
Dewdney Apr. 30, 1973 —
Pre-Program Construction      —
administration    220,000
Totals 8,945,047
Total Contiuction
To End of Fiscal Year
Amount
Per Cent
$
Completed
2,666,455
100
5,751,659
85
15,638,572
92
2,547,337
100
6,402,817
90
18,446,952
90
5,857,963
20
1,175,254
100
1,821,945
40
3,181,299
100
3,873,352
100
1,374,417
9SH
138,844
—
5,009,285
80
1,051,444
100
9,116
—
211,000
1,848,048
72,005,757
Table 4.8
Groundwater Inventory, 1980
Statistics
Well logs collected  3,001 Water samples collected  61
Well logs located  2,579 Enquiries answered  734
Well logs plotted   1,880
Activities
Area Description
Internal Completion of Second Draft Report on Suggested Guidelines for Mini
mum Standards in Water Well Construction for British Columbia for the
Water Management Branch.
Province-wide Completion of observation wells at Midway, Galiano Island (Contract
67), Whonnock (Contract 68), Quesnel (Contract 69), Williams Lake
(Contract 70) and Denman Island (Contract 72).
Salmon River, Program plans for abandonment of observation wells near Glenemma.
Shuswap Lake Basin
Saanich A contribution to a report on the effects of irrigation withdrawals on
neighbouring residential areas in the Ardmore area for the Inventory and
Engineering Branch.
Saanich Hydrogeological mapping program for the Saanich Peninsula Pilot
Project.
 108
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 4.9
Water Supply Studies
—Groundwater
j\rea
Description
Abbotsford
Completion of production well for Fish and Wildlife Branch and BCBC.
Aldergrove
Assist Public Health Engineering on Construction of monitor wells.
Anmore
Assess groundwater potential for water supply for Water Management
Branch.
Armstrong
Review application for proposed waste disposal impact on groundwater
for Water Management Branch.
Assess potential for groundwater development for irrigation for Engineering Section.
Big Eddy
Review consultant's report on test well construction for Water Management Branch.
Cherry Creek
Review data on water withdrawals for Water Management Branch.
Cobble Hill
Assessment in progress on groundwater conditions for Water Management Branch.
Cowichan Bay
Assess salt water intrusion problem in local wells for Cowichan Valley
Regional District.
Elko
Review well test for proposed community supply for Water Management
Branch.
Ewing Landing
Assess groundwater-surface water relationship for Water Management m
Branch.
Farleigh Lake
Review groundwater prospects for irrigation potential for Engineering    I
Section.
Fernie
Review potential for well contamination for Public Health Engineering.
Review data on groundwater level fluctuations for Planning and Surveys
Section.
Galiano Island
Preliminary review in progress of groundwater potential for Islands Trust.
Garibaldi
Review prospects for groundwater development for proposed subdivision
relocation for Assessment Branch.
Hornby Island
Preliminary review in progress of groundwater potential for Islands Trust.
Invermere
Report on groundwater availability for Water Management Branch.
Kamloops
Assessment of impact of proposed sewage disposal on groundwater for
Waste Management Branch.
Kersley-Alexandria
Completion of preliminary report on groundwater availability for Engineering Section.
.Kininey Beach
Assess groundwater-surface water relationship for Water Management
Branch.
Mission Creek
Assess potential for aquifer recharge for Okanagan Implementation   1
Program.
Myer's Flat
Review groundwater conditions for proposed water level monitoring for
Water Management Branch.
Myrtle Point
Review groundwater potential for water supply for Water Management
Branch.
Nanoose
Review water quality in subdivision wells for Public Health Engineering.
 INVENTORY AND ENGINEERING BRANCH                                         109
j  Table 4.9—Continued
Water Supply Studies—Groundwater
Area
Description
1   Nelson
Provide groundwater advisory assistance on proposed landfill for Waste
Management Branch.
[   Nicola Basin
Internal review of consultant's hydrologic report.
I  Norbury Lake
Review groundwater potential for irrigation for Engineering Section.
I  Oliver
Completion of test production wells at B.C. Fruit Growers Test Orchard
for Engineering Section.
Review well tests completed for town wells for Okanagan Implementation Program.
Assess results of well redevelopment at SOLID No. 2 pump station for
Okanagan Implementation Program.
i   Okanagan-Mission
Review groundwater prospects for irrigation for Engineering Section.
f   Okanagan River Basin
Review of proposed groundwater program to study sources of nutrient
input into Okanagan Valley Lakes for Okanagan Basin Water Board.
1' Oyama
Report completed on probable relationship between groundwater and
lake water for Aquatic Plant Management Program.
K Penticton
Provide groundwater advisory assistance for proposed waste disposal for
Waste Management Branch.
■ Prince George
Review water quality from monitor wells at waste disposal site for Waste
Management Branch.
1   Province-wide
Review of 16 well tests submitted in application for "Certificate of Public
Convenience and Necessity" for Water Management Branch.
Radium
Report completed on groundwater prospects for Water Management
Branch.
B Ribbleworth Creek
Internal report completed on result of natural isotope analyses of
groundwater.
■ Ruskin
Assess groundwater availability for water supply for Water Management
Branch.
■ Saanich
Review groundwater potential for irrigation for Engineering Section.
Report completed on effects of irrigation well pumping for Water Management Branch.
Internal report on results of isotopic age dating of groundwaters.
B Saanich-Elk Lake
Prepare proposal for investigating groundwater components for Engineering Section.
B Salmon River
Review groundwater conditions relative to proposed sewage disposal for
Waste Management Branch.
Saturna Island
Preliminary review in progress on groundwater conditions for Islands
Trust.
I  Scott Point
Review consultant's report on groundwater prospects for Water Management Branch.
■Shelter Cove
.Assess groundwater potential for water supply for Water Management
Branch.
Shannon Lake
Assess groundwater-surface water relationship for Water Management
Branch.
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 4.9—Continued
Water Supply Studies—Groundwater
Area
Skookumchuck
Sumas Prairie
Thompson River Basin
Tofino-Ucluelet
Tumbler Ridge
West Penticton
Wood Lake
Yale
Yarrow
Description
Advisory assistance on groundwater regarding rapid infiltration project
for Waste Management Branch.
Preparation of program for drilling of observation wells for Engineering
Section.
Completion of report on groundwater component for Thompson River
Basin Pre-PIanning Committee.
Review of groundwater proposals and investigations for water supply for
Water Management Branch.
Provide comments on future aquifer development for Ministry of Municipal .Affairs.
Review in progress on groundwater prospects for irrigation for Engineering Section.
Review of alternative water supply following use of herbicide treatment
of lake water for Aquatic Plant Management Program.
Complete assessment of groundwater potential for Water Management
Branch.
Completion of report (Contract No. 66) on Well drilling for Rivers
Section.
 INVENTORY AND ENGINEERING BRANCH                                         111
Table 4.10
Water Supply Studies-
—Surface Water
1. Water Supply
Kelowna Creek
Estimates of dependable water supply for Glenmore and Ellison Irrigation Districts were completed. Final report in preparation.
Tofino
Further work on determining minimum expected streamflow on Meares
Island were completed in connection with water supply feasibility
studies for Tofino and area.
Trout Creek
Estimated water yields were used to assess the feasibility of increasing
reservoir storage based on a simulated 1,000 years of operation under
various water use demand work.
Elk-Beaver Lake
Inflow and runoff estimates were made and water availability determined for various drought conditions and water use demands.
Shingle Creek
Estimates of required storage capacity were determined for alternate
drought conditions for a proposed irrigation project. Alternative irrigation capacity proposals were assessed.
Bowen Island
Streamflow monitoring continued for making estimates of annual and
monthly runoff at a number of potential reservoir sites in connection
with water supply design.
Danish Lake
Potential water yield was estimated for a proposed irrigation scheme.
East Vancouver Island
Streamflow characteristics were estimated for a number of watersheds
in connection with a coastal planning project.
1   2. Flood Flows
Peak Flow
Regionlization
Flood flow frequency analyses are being updated to 1979 in metric
units. Further information was added by analysis, instantaneous flows
and timing of annual peak flows. Peak flow for 30 ungauged streams
was estimated for the design of stream crossing structures and bank
protection works.
Dec. 1980 Storm
Runoff
A study of the magnitude and extent of flood flows occurring on
December 26-27, 1980 was commenced.
White Lake
Extreme lake level and outflow was estimated to resolve conflicts
between water use and lakeshore activities.
Horse Lake
A detailed analysis of Extreme inflow and lake level conditions were
analysed to assess the impact of a proposed outlet control structure.
Lower Fraser Valley
Return period peak flows for 37 streams were estimated for assessment
of proposed fishery enhancement projects'.
Oberlander Slide
Storm rainfall and runoff was analysed to determine design flows for
bank stabilization works in a small urban watershed.
Colquitz River
This cooperative study with the District of Saanich continues. Peak
flood flows will be estimated and used for floodplain mapping and
storm drainage management studies.
Lugrin Creek
Streamflow monitoring continued to provide data on flood flows for
floodplain mapping and storm drainage management.
3. Environmental Impact
Foothills
(North B.C.) Pipeline
Studies of regional runoff, peak flow, low flow and snowpack continue
along the proposed northern pipeline corridor, in addition to monitoring
of streamflow and snowpack.
 112
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 4.10—Continued
Water Supply
Studies—Surface Water
Trout Creek
Quantitative assessments were made of the potential impact
logging on water supply due to mountain pine beetle attack
of salvage
Community Water         Timber harvesting proposals were assessed for a number of watersheds
Supply Watersheds        (Vernon Creek, Sutherland Creek, Creston area, Bridge River,
Milkranch Creek). These watersheds are used for water supply and
recommendations were made in order to reduce the detrimental impact
on water quantity and quality.
T^ble 4.11
Water Supply
Studies—Engineering
Area
% Complete
Description                                                         to Mar. 31/81
A. Undertaken by Inventory and Engineering Branch
Glenmore
Report on feasibility of providing additional water supplies for
100
Passmore
Study on alternative irrigation scheme for group of landowners in
Passmore	
100
Penticton
Report on proposed irrigation scheme for Penticton Indian Band.
100
Kelowna
Report on irrigation scheme for Benvoulin Water Users Community.	
100
Saanich
Study on providing irrigation supplies for .ALR lands in Saanich
"Peninsula .,._    p^.^	
65
Kersley-Marguerite   Studies of proposed irrigation schemes for groups of farmers.
90
Lillooet
Report on development of irrigation water supply for group of
landowners on Laluwissin and McGillivray Creeks	
90
Quesnel
Report on proposed irrigation scheme for group of farmers near
Gravelle Ferry. U.:.\	
100
Fort Steele
Report on development of irrigation supplies for group of farmers.
100
Cranbrook
Report on irrigation storage development for group of farmers on
HaHa Creek	
5
Penticton
Report on increased storage development on Farleigh Lake	
100
Okanagan Falls
Naramata
Report on water supply rehabilitation for Skaha Estates Improve-
100
Report on development of additional storage supply for Naramata
90
Tahsis
B. Undertaken b
Preliminary report on upgrading water supply system for the
100
y Consultants
Monte Lake
Westbank
Report on irrigation storage feasibility for group of farmers at
100
Irrigation feasibility study for group of landowners at McDougall
100
1
 INVENTORY AND ENGINEERING BRANCH
T^ble 4.11—Continued
Water Supply Studies—Engineering
% Complete
to Mar. 31/81
Area Description
Bierritt Report on irrigation storage feasibility on Lauder Creek for group
of farmers        100
lEnderby Irrigation feasibility study for group of farmers at Trinity Valley.        100
Krand Forks Irrigation feasibility study for group of farmers at Granby River.        100
BKamloops Report on irrigation storage feasibility for group of ranchers at
Logan Lake        100
Report on feasibility of irrigation scheme for group of farmers at
Darfield        100
Eilliams Lake Irrigation storage feasibility study for group of ranchers at Spokin
Lake        100
Kieston Irrigation feasibility study for group of farmers near Rykerts        100
Barriere Irrigation storage feasibility study for group of ranchers on Dixon
Creek        100
Salmon Arm Irrigation feasibility study for group of farmers at Tappen Valley.        100
Grasmere Irrigation feasibility study for group of farmers at Grasmere        100
Kamloops Report on feasibility of irrigation scheme for group of farmers
south of Darfield        100
Armstrong Report on feasibility of irrigation study for group of landowners at
Grandview Flats        100
Vernon Report on feasibility of additional irrigation supplies for Vernon
Irrigation District and adjacent areas        100
*Cranbrook Report on feasibility of irrigation scheme for group of ranchers at
Mayook, including investigation into possible supply from City of
Cranbrook effluent irrigation project         90
Kelowna Inventory of lands within the South East Kelowna Irrigation District which could obtain irrigation supply from City of Kelowna
effluent irrigation project        100
Kamloops Report on proposed irrigation development for North Thompson
Indian Reserve No. 1        100
jEitt Meadows Report on feasibility of water supply project for Pitt Meadows and
Pitt Polder.         95
Kamloops Report on feasibility of irrigation scheme for group of farmers at
Cherry Creek, including investigation into possible supply from
City of Kamloops effluent disposal project        100
C. Requests for Studies under Investigation or Awaiting
Assignment to Consultants
\    Ashcroft Proposals were received for engineering and economic studies of a
proposed irrigation scheme on Oregon Jack Creek.
;    Kelowna Proposals were received for engineering and economic analysis of
a proposed irrigation scheme to supply effluent from City of
Kelowna to S.E. Kelowna LD.
Williams Lake A proposal was received for a study on a proposed Moffat Creek-
San Jose-Chimney Creek diversion for the Cariboo Regional
District.
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 4.11—Continued
Water Supply Studies—Engineering
Area Description
Armstrong A request from the Township of Spallumcheen for an irrigation
study was reviewed.
Vernon A request was received from a group of farmers north of Swan
Lake for a study of an irrigation system.
Nelson Preliminary data was gathered on a request for ARDSA assistance
from Whitehead Waterworks District.
Kamloops A request was received from a group of farmers at Knutsford for a
study of a proposed irrigation scheme.
A request was received from the Upper .Louis Creek Stock Association for a study of proposed storage development on Eileen
Lake.
Merritt ARDSA assistance for drainage and irrigation improvements for
five Indian Bands in the Nicola area was requested.
Summerland The Meadow Valley Irrigation District requested assistance for a
proposed irrigation storage development.
Kamloops A request was received for assistance in constructing an irrigation
system for a group of farmers east of Kamloops.
 INVENTORY AND ENGINEERING BRANCH
liable 4.12
Status of Water Supply Construction Projects
Design Construction
ARDSA % Complete     During Period % Complete
Project as of Jan. 1/80- to as of
Project Description No. Mar. 31/81 Mar. 31/81 Mar. 31/81 Mar. 31/81
BilcKinney Road W.U.C.
I   Irrigation System     271106 90 218,376       172,824 65
Farleigh Lake Irrigation System
271003 100 — — 100
Sub. 2
Big Bar Ranches Irrigation
Scheme........... ....,':.......     271009 100 158,535       158,535 90
St. Mary's Prairie LD. Irrigation
Scheme     271108 100 425,654       425,654 100
I Basque Irrigation District
Irrigation Scheme      271113 100 147,892        147,892 100
O'Connor Lake Dam Irrigation
f   Storage Works     271112 100 133,868       133,868 90
Chase Irrigation District
I  Irrigation Storage Works     27U16 100 39,277 39,277 75
IHeffley Irrigation District—
j   Irrigation Storage Works     271117 100 40,058 40,058 80
j^Rixton Lake Dam Irrigation
Storage Works     271115 100 15,994 15,994 90
district of Abbotsford Water
I- Supply System     271297 25 — — 10
B.C. Fruit Growers Ass'n—
Oliver Test Orchard     271301 100 86,000 86,000 75
	
 116
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 4.17
Okanagan Basin Implementation Agreement Water Quantity Programs
1980 Work Summary
Federal-aProvincial Cost-Shared Programs
Program
Program Objectives
Work Completed
I   Okanagan, Skaha and
To bring dams up to a satisfac
• Contract No. 7 for electrical repairs ■
Vaseux Lake Control
tory standard, to reduce oper
to Skaha and Vaseux Dams.
Dams
ational costs and to alleviate
* Contract for painting Skaha Lake ■
winter icing problems.
Dam metal work and replacing rub- 1
ber gate seals.
* Painting and installation of security ■
fence on Vaseux Lake Dam.
| Contract No. 9 for installation of 1
security fence and painting Okana- 1
gan Lake Dam.
II Okanagan River
To bring the Okanagan Flood
• Contracts 6, 8 and 10 for the con-1
Channel
Control Works up to a satisfac
struction of head walls, trash racks ■
tory standard and to improve
and gates on 17 outlet culverts.
flood control operations by in
• Construction of Operations Centre <■
creasing drainage capacity.
in Oliver.
• Awarded Contract 11 for the re- I
placement of a further 7 vertical ■
drop structure walkways.
• Installed new inlet culvert and con- ■
structed ditch system at lower ele- ■
vation on an oxbow system.
| Constructed 1,000' of drainage
ditch.
• Assessment of right-of-way fe,nc- 1
ing and began repair of fencing at
selected areas.
HI Okanagan River
To modify water intakes on
* Phases 11 and III of intake modi
Intake
Okanagan River to permit op
fication program which included
eration at flows of 100 cfs plus
modification to 7 pumphouse in
consumption and evaporation
stallations and dredging of 11
losses. This measure is neces
oxbows.
sary to conserve water and re
• Drilling of test wells, drilled 2 pro-M
duce operational costs.
duction wells and commenced construction of pumphouses for Village of Oliver.
• Redevelopment of SOLED wells
which was not completed successfully; conducted pump test on
well system.
IV Okanagan Lake
To prepare contingency plans
Tksk completed in September 1979.
Floating Bridge
and costs for adjustments to
the Kelowna floating bridge to
permit operation within the
extreme range of lake levels
forecast in the Okanagan
Basin Study reports of 1974
(1.116.8 to 1,125.5).
Ji
 INVENTORY AND ENGINEERING BRANCH
Table 4.17—Continued
I Okanagan Basin Implementation Agreement Water Quantity Programs
11980 Work Summary
JFederal-Provincial Cost-Shared .Programs
V Tributary Water Management Studies
Program Objectives
To prepare water management
plans so that major conflicts
in water use between irrigation and fishery requirements
can be avoided in Mission,
Equesis and Trepanier Creeks.
wflS, Review of Framework
Plan
Work Completed
Runoff estimates and water supply
calculations for mainstem Mission
Creek basin and Powers Creek; reports in preparation.
Two groundwater test-production
wells in the Kelowna area; both
were successful and will be put into
production.
A new stream gauge was installed
on Mission Creek below the BMID
intake to assess operational efficiency and monitor releases for
downstream users.
Field work and office calculations
on survey of Okanagan River
channel.
1 Field work, office calculations and
drafting on survey of Mission and
Powers Creeks.
■ Conducted low flow test on Okanagan River.
	
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT'
r-i^^ocsovoo^-iri^st
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WI/ahClVOfN^^h
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 INVENTORY AND ENGINEERING BRANCH
[ Table 4.19
I Environmental Assessment Repoit Review
1. Coal Projects
Northeast B.C.:
Quintette (Denison) Stage II
Burnt River (Teck) Stage I
Cinnibar Peak (Cinnabar) Prospectus
Monkman (Petro-Can) Stage II
Sukunka (British Petroleum) :. Stage II
Regional Hydrology of the Northeast Coal Study Area.
Northeast B.C. Resource Management Framework Report.
Southeast B.C.:
Greenhills (Kaiser) ...v. Stage I, II
Sage Creek (Rio Algom) Stage II
Line Creek (Crowsnest Industries)
Vancouver Island:
Quinsam (Quinsam) Stage II
Cedar (Westland) Exploration
Other:
Bowron River (Norco) Stage I
Amendments to Guidelines for Coal Development.
j 2. Metal Mines
Consolidated-Cinola Stage I
I  Valley Copper (Valley Copper) Stage I, n
Kutcho Creek (Esso Minerals) Stage I
Baker (Du Pont) Stage I
Scottie (Scottie Gold) Stage I
Ladner Creek (Carolin) Stage I
I   Adanac (Placer Development) Stage I
Taurus (United Hearne) Stage I
Brussilof (Baymag) Stage I
3. Linear Development
I Chetwynd South Railway Stage II
Anzac-Quintette Railway Stage II
Kelly Lake-Nicola Transmission Line Stage II
;    Cheekeye-Dunsmuir Transmission Line Stage II
Shrum G.S.-Monkman Transmission Line Stage It
4. Major Development
Information was provided to ELUCS on surface water and groundwater quantity and quality to assist
I in preparing the Guidelines for Major Development.
5. Power Development
Murphy Creek
6. Coastal Development
[   Tsehum Harbour-Canoe Bay (North Saanich, Van Isle and Canoe Cove Marina).
	
 Terrestrial Studies Branch
Soil Laboratory Report
The soils laboratory made 50,595 chemical and physical analyses during the period
January 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981. Tables 5.1 and 5.2 attached provide a breakdown,
by project, of the laboratory services provided this year, and give a comparative overall
summary of laboratory performance.
Table 5.1—(Complete)
Laboratory Report, January 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981
Forestry Research
Gold River Klinka  1980/1-581
Lake Cowichan Nuszdorfer  1929-1981
Red Rock Nursery McCleod  582-1129
Cariboo           Art Yee  1130-1198
1741-1655
Smithers Trowbridge  199-1502
Awmack  1503-1640
Cariboo B. Coupe  1656-1741
S. Smith  1742-1823
R. Coupe  1824-1879
D. Monchak  1880-1928
4094-4105
Kamloops W. Erickson  1982-2175
Nelson Priority 1 Utzig/Still  2176-2652
2 ,. .„. a  2653-3070
3 ...:".:  3071-3680
4  3681-3809
5  3810-3963
Red Rock Nursery .'.';.: McCleod  3964-4093
T.S.B. General Program
Hesquiat Harbour Maxwell  4200-4221
Okanagan Wittneben  4222-4271
Cascade Void  4272-4300
Cranbrook City Ted Tatem  4301-4312
Cascade <&m»W&>mj>-?* Void „  4313-4355
B.C. Agricultural Land Commission Brian French  4356-4374
Cummins River Hignett  4375-4419
Delkatla Void  4420-4473
Vancouver Island Jungen  4474-4655
Saltspring Island Thompson  4656-4704
Okanagan Wittneben  4705-4825
NadinaR Maxwell/Hinkley. 4826-4846
Vancouver Island Christie  4847-4990
120
rhemical
Physical
6,355
368
7,400
288
550
64
133
16
4,815
192
753
26
829
68
465
18
388
14
132
—
603
34
1,844
216
1,601
120
2,822
126
616
73
939
80
1,573
—
31,818
1,703
506
48
568
90
331
87
216
—
430
176
266
38
540
126
332
—
2,107
923
241
931
1,194
274
336
—
1,206
277
40,091
4,673
 TERRESTRIAL STUDIES BRANCH
Table 5.1—(Complete)—Continued
Laboratory Report, January 1, 1980 to March 31, 1981
Surface Samples
Davis, Nagpal, Hinkley, Ovanin, Jungen, Void, Fenger, Epp,
KOWall Vitaa,	
Horse Ranch, Okanagan, Vaseaux	
Vancouver Island	
Graystokes, Vancouver Island	
Inventory & Engineering Blaine Simpson	
80G/1-245
246-275
276-282
287-314
315-325
1,405
403
2
13
44
437
54
10
93
22
41,958      5,289
Stein R. Project June Ryder        Carried forward to 1981
1980/4106-4185
Request for 1980     47,247
Analyses brought forward from 1979       3,385
50,632
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 5.2 (In Progress)
Laboratory Report, January
1980 to March 31, 1981
Ministry of Forests
Sayward Forest R. Liard	
Port Hardy	
Woss Lake	
Knight Inlet Nuszdorfer	
Toba Inlet	
Red Rock Nursery Wayne Blashill.
A. J. McLeod...
Valemont Graeme Hope...
McGregor..
Cariboo Chris Easthope..
Prince Rupert Ken Awmack	
Nelson 1 Sfill/Quesnel	
2	
3	
4	
T.S.B. General Inventory Program
Stein R June Ryder.
1981/1- 281
279- 281
282- 468
469- 618
619- 779
780- 919
920-1129
1130-1278
1279-1407
1408-1490
1491-1620
1621-1736
2759-2784
2785-3079
1737-2347
2348-2526
2527-2717
2718-2745
Chemical
3,534
39
2,409
1,915
1,972
495
2,571
2,028
1,515
1,105
1,151
1,475
404
2,741
2,527
915
1,009
111
1980/4106-4185
Physical
284
2
138
116
110
104
106
18
24
182
38
44
28,286      1,262
1,200
Total requests for 1980 (calendar year)     48,447
Analyses brought forward from 1979 (calendar year)       3,385    51,832
Analyses carried forward to 1981 (calendar year)       1,200
Completion
Percentages
84
85
85
100
87
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
95
Analyses completed in calendar year 1980     50,632
Summary of Laboratory Performance
1977
Technician months       88
Analyses completed per technician month     341
1978
91
423
1979
101
522
1980
114.5
442
 Fish and Wildlife Branch
Table 6.1
Harvested .Animals Checked
Days of
Number of
Stations
Checked
Other
Year
Operation
Hunters
Moose
Deer
Big Game
Grouse
Ducks
Geese
1980	
        60
13,731
2,893
1,138
336
8,890
2,025
210
1979	
      62
15,230
3,114
1,165
317
21,173
2,156
207
1978	
       58
12,625
2,922
603
432
22,701
2,798
262
1977	
       73
13,243
3,287
662
419
16,429
2,491
205
1976	
       72
11,888
3,305
393
364
9,992
1,733
159
1975	
       75
13,848
4,546
405
486
11,769
2,623
228
1974	
       78
15,519
4,435
482
481
5,553
2,938
236
Table 6.2
\ Estimates of Resident Hunter Harvest 1974—1979
Hunting
Licence
Year                                    Sales* Deer Moose
1974  135,515 36,700 11,739
1975  143,652 28,977 13,383
1976  139,510 22,018 10,898
11977..  144,447 23,771 12,826
1978  155,605 28,550 12,688
1979  163,088 29,965 13,045
Grizzly Black
[ Year                                      Bear Bear Caribou
1974    144 2,182 531
1975    149 2,443 501
1976    158 3,203 405
1977 !    165 3,453 386
1978    124 3,076 143
1979    148 2,731 148
* Resident hunting licence sales.
t Data not available.
Elk
Goat
Sheep
603
487
137
1,041
623
193
760
498
162
1,278
579
251
1,273
461
235
1,471
366
188
Cougar
Grouse
Ducks
294
420,166
261,479
196
t
t
148
385,000
244,000
116
278,203
149,540
174
485,781
181,205
129
478,579
160,307
123
_
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 6.3
Compulsory Inspection Results from Harvest Reports
by Resident and Non-resident Hunters
Species
Caribou	
Cougar	
Grizzly Bear	
Mountain Goat	
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep..
California Bighorn Sheep	
Dall Sheep	
Stone Sheep	
Total	
* Caribou was not designated for compulsory inspectio
1977/78
Hunting Season
1978/79             1979/80
1980/81
*
334
348
340
142
212
150
106
282
314
337
390
789
861
799
794
32
44
37
41
51
55
49
49
14
15
10
14
422
369
370
335
1,732
2,204
2,100
2,069
==
==
__
z
prior to 1978/79
season.
Table 6.4
General Results of the Limited Entry Hunting Season 1980/81
Applications
Species for Licence
Caribou  169
Elk  6,941
Grizzly Bear  131
Moose .-.  2,582
Goat  2,294
Sheep  917
Deer  867
licences
Issued
Reported
Harvest
65
14
381
149
33
1
1,470
227
399
85
60
10
550
84
 FISH AND WILDLIFE BRANCH
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 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 6.6
Composition of the 1979/80 British Columbia Wild Fur Harvest
Per Cent
Number or Total Average Total
Rir Type of Pelts Rir Harvest Value Value
$ $
Beaver  24,309 8.0 39.17 952.184
Muskrat  35,540 11.7 6.30 223,902
Mink  7,686 2.5 34.49 265,090
Otter  939 0.3 61.33 57,589
Coyote  4,691 1.5 60.83 285,354
Fox  634 0.2 63.29 40,126
Wolf.  268 0.1 107.35 28,770
Weasel  9,139 3.0 1.98 18,095
Wolverine  283 0.1 166.33 47,071
Skunk  38 tr 5.61 213
Fisher  570 0.2 148.31 84,537
Marten  32,732 10.8 31.96 1,046,115
Lynx  2,848 0.9 214.29 610,298
Bobcat  140 0.1 207.01 28,981
Squirrel  183,110 60.2 1.47 269.172
Raccoon  1,179 0.4 29.72 35,040
Subtotals  304,106 100.0 — 3,992,537
Other Products and Pelts:
Black Bear  480 12.9 62.88 30,182
Grizzly Bear  21 0.6 475.00 9,975
Cougar  16 0.4 180.00 2,880
Castoreum and Miscellaneous  3,196 86.1 — 61,551
Subtotals  3,713 100.0 — 104,588
Totals  307,819 — — 4,097,125
Table 6.7
Number of i\nnual Graduates from the Trapper
Education Program from Inception
Number of
Year Students
1976/77     564
1977/78 ;.      756
1978/79      397
1979/80      398
1980/81      480
Total  2,595
_:
 FISH AND WILDLIFE BRANCH
[Table 6.8
Number of Steelhead Licences Issued and Estimates of Total Anglers-,
[Successful Anglers, Total Steelhead Catch and Number of Angler Days
1974/75 to 1979/80
Year Licencees
1974/75  24,399
1975/76  29,594
1976/77  25,539
1977/78  25,406
1978/79  24,600
1979/80  29,095
Estimated
Estimated
Estimated
Successful
Estimated
Total
Anglers
Kept
Released
Angler Days
16,469
7,296
27,807
23,845
196,751
20,265
8,770
31,490
26,546
219,797
18,356
6,998
20,168
20,450
186,381
17,143
7,038
18,154
27,047
174,721
15,788
6,746
14,725
24,748
159,363
14,755
6,384
12,663
26,906
134,569
Table 6.9
Number of Eggs Collected by Each Hatchery
. Species Kootenay
Rainbow (wild)  2,918,900
Rainbow (domestic)  229,000'
[Cutthroat (yellowstone)  176,000
ICutthroat (coastal lake)  —
Cutthroat (anadromous)  —
Brook  —
Brown  —
Kokanee  880,495
I Chinook salmon  —
Dolly Varden  84,000
I Steelhead    —
Summerland
3,360,000
1,331,500
Fraser
Valley
312,000
115,000
78,600
9,960
Loon
955,365
Vancouver
Island
119,396
—    457,000
50,100
85,000  237,695
4,288,395  4,691,500  972,560  1,090,465  357,091
* Duncan brood stock
 128
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 6.10
Number and Weight of Fish Liberated from Each Hatchery
(Total kg in Brackets)
Species
Rainbow (native)	
Rainbow (domestic)	
Brook	
Cutthroat (yellowstone)
Cutthroat (coastal)	
Brown	
Kokanee	
Steelhead	
Cutthroat (anadromous).
Kootenay
875,000
(4,514)
12,600
(2.740)
95,500
(406)
113,500
(13)
250,000
(eggs)
1,346,600
(7,673)
113 lakes,
2 rivers
Summerland
1,470,000
(9,317)
215,500
(1,163)
1,685,500
(10,480)
230 lakes,
1 river
Fraser
Valley
81,000
(1,163)
199,435
(20,165)
2,000
(10)
75,198
(3,225)
17,115
(6)
172,133
(4,494)
61,691t
(3,743)
608,572
(32,806)
79 lakes,
27 streams
Loon
Creek*
2,484,000
(9,800)
747,240
(2,294)
3,231,240
(12,094)
185 lakes
* Fish reared at Kootenay and Summerland.
t Of this total, 41,566 (2,211) reared on Vancouver Island.
Table 6.11
Gross Revenue by Major Activity
1978/79
Hunting        $3,639,694 (59%)
Angling         2,279,620 (37%)
Other*  228,827   (4%)
Totals        $6,148,141
* See Taible 6.15.
1979/80
$3,953,330 (60%)
2,451,112(37%)
237,511   (3%)
$6,641,953
1980/81
$4,055,784 (59%)
2,514,011 (37%)
261,050   (4%)
$6,830,845
 FISH AND WILDLIFE BRANCH 129
Table 6.12
Gross Revenue from Resident and Non-resident Hunting and -Angling Licence Sales
1978/79 1979/80 1980/81
IBJsident Hunting  $2,365,518 (61%) $2,529,029 (61%) $2,684,534 (62%)
Resident Angling  1,523,204(39%) 1,625,753 (39%, 1,656.221 (38%,
I  Totals  3,888,722 4,154,782 4,340,755
gbn-resident Hunting.'.  1,209,712 (61%) 1,362,969 (62%) 1,306,708 (60%)
Non-resident Angling  754,739 (39%) 823,587 (38%) 856,002 (40%)
■ Totals  1,964,451 2,186,556 2,162,710
Special/Firearms and Duplicate Hunting  64,464(97%) 61,332(97%) 64,542(97%)
■Silicate Angling  1,677   (3%) 1,772   (3%) 1,788   (3%t
Totals  66,141 63,104 66,330
Grand Totals  $5,919,314 $6,404,442 $6,569,795
,Table 6.13
Resident Hunting Licence Sales
B.C. Resident	
■Senior Citizen	
Black Bear	
Caribou	
JCougar	
fcDeer	
■EJk	
Grizzly Bear	
atMoose	
Mountain Goat	
Mountain Sheep	
Limited Entry Cards.
Limited Entry Cards.
I    Total Licences...
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
147,294
$1,031,058
153,327
$1,073,289
158,033
$1,106,231
8,311
8,311
9,150
9,150
9,844
9,844
15,231
60,924
18,234
72,936
21,818
87,272
1,692
16,920
1.551
15,510
1,385
13,850
579
5,790
580
5,800
478
4,780
117,586
470,344
126,641
506,564
132,974
531,896
10,499
104,990
11,563
115,630
13,925
139,250
1,263
44,205
1,469
51,415
1,809
63,315
54.681
546,810
59,357
593,570
62,448
624,480
2,096
31,440
1,988
29,820
2,048
30,720
1,469
36,725
1,611
40,275
1,703
42,575
5,373
8,001
1,343
6,715
5
5
—
_
8,355
8,355
15,158
30,316
366,074
$2,365,518
395,169
$2,529,029
421,628
$2,684,534
 130
MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 6.14
Non-resident Hunting Licence Sales
Non-resident	
Canadian Resident (non-B.C)..
Non-resident game bird	
Black Bear	
Caribou	
Cougar....	
Deer	
Elk	
Grizzly Bear	
Moose	
Mountain Goat	
Mountain Sheep	
Wolf	
Totals	
Number
3,878
591
328
1,258
602
55
623
528
617
2,872
802
486
433
Value
290,850
4,137
8,200
50,320
60,200
5,500
31,150
52,800
185,100
287,200
80,200
121,500
32,475
Number
4,405
752
411
1,597
655
76
771
616
728
3,270
844
437
545
Value
$ 330,375
5,264
10,275
63,880
65,500
7,600
38,550
61,600
218,400
327,000
84,400
109,250
40,875
Number
4,122
774
462
1,891
498
62
835
664
778
2,924
682
418
564
Value
309,1501
5,4181
11,5501
75,640 J
49,800
6,2001
41,7501
66,400
233,400 j
292,4001
68,2001
104,5001
42,3001
13.073     $1.209.632
15,107     $1,362,969
14,674    $1,306,7
Table 6.15
Special Hunting and Firearms Licence Sales
Firearms	
Bow Hunting	
Fraser (Valley)	
Creston (Pheasant)
Duplicates	
Totals	
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
22,040
$22,040
18,902
$18,902
18,348
$18,348;
1,633
4,989
2,022
6,066
2,483
7,449;
6,623
33,115
6,398
31,990
6,723
33,615;
115
1,150
99
990
107
1,070
—
	
1,692
3,384
2,030
4,060
30,411
$61,294
29,113
$61,332
29,691
$64,542
Table 6.16
Resident Angling Licence Sales
B.C. Resident.
Senior Citizen.
Steelhead	
Totals	
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
286,220
$1,431,100
306,014
$1,530,070
313,687
$1,568,433
23,827
23,827
26,293
26,293
27,423
27,423
22,759
68,277
23,130
69,390
20,121
60,363
332,806
$1,523,204
355,437
$1,625,753
361,231
$1,656,221!
 FISH AND WILDLIFE BRANCH
Table 6.18
Other Revenue (Sources Other Than Hunting or Angling)
Resident	
Guides	
Bir Traders Licence	
Royalty on Furs ,.	
Fines Imposed Under Wildlife Act
:and Firearms Act	
'Duplicates	
Miscellaneous _
I    Totals	
Number
2,976
1,419
64
Value
$14,880
22,405
2,200
45,462
124,698
24
19,158
3,200
1,591
Value
$ 16,000
23,605
2,450
55,337
121,884
19
Number
Value
$228,827
3,178 $ 15,890
1,616 23,220
75 2,325
— 81,092.50
— 121,000*
16 32
HH 17,490.50
4,810   $261,050
* Estimate only.
Table 6.17
^On-resident .Angling Licence Sales
Canadian Resident (non-B.C.)
Non-resident (annual)	
^on-resident (three-day)	
Steelhead	
Special Lakes	
Special Rivers	
t   Totals .......m.
Number
Value
Number
Value
Number
Value
44,387
$221,935
51,177
$255,885
56,507
$282,535
19,646
294,690
21,464
321,960
21,964
329,460
28,669
172,014
30,037
180,222
30,692
184,152
!?!     2,010
20,100
2,129
21,290
2,180
21,800
1,175
17,625
957
14,355
587
8,805
1,135
28,375
1,195
29,875
1,170
29,250
97,022
$754,739
106,959
$823,587
113,100
$856,002
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132
 M/UUNE RESOURCES BRANCH
Table 7.2
Total Production and Value from British Columbia Fisheries 1970-1980
Landings
Year Tonnes
1970  132,884
1971  103,978
1972  153,412
1973  176,715
1974  135,343
1975  135,110
1976  174,492
1977  198,391
1978  193,269
1979  149,204
1980  124,455
Landed
Wholesale
Value
Value
($'000)
($'000)
60,255
123,280
58,588
120,089
75,128
159,132
130,409
284,997
100,976
220,452
79,681
167.018
141,851
297,621
167,905
362,556
250,565
517,501
332,473
698,789
182,281
257,000
(estimated)
Note: Prior to 1979 these figures are based on a January 1 to December 31 period for each year.
Table 7.3
Salmon Landings by Species 1975-1980 in tonnes
ESpecies                                                                   1975           1976 1977           1978 1979 1980
Spring     7,289 7,776 7,522      7,887 6,088 5,750
Sockeye     5,681 12,339 17,388 22,321 14,347 7,707
! Coho     7,737 9,322 9,857      9,152 9,140 7.989
: Pink  10,239 17,056 24,723 15,331 23,414 13,365
Chum     5,389 10,922 6,032 15,855 4,725 16,765
■ Totals  36,335    57,415    65,522    70,546    57,714    51,576'
Table 7.4
I Salmon Landed Values (000's dollars) by Species 1975-1980
Species 1975
Spring  12,172
Sockeye  8,184
Coho  12,401
Pink  6,900
Chum  7,206
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
22,919
23,589
29,461
31,159
24,307
20,656
32,218
55,181
43,307
18,222
21,331
22,671
27,269
44,063
23,078
12,124
22,262
12,835
29,685
15,118
14,835
7,905
33,336
12,243
36,197
Totals  46,863    91,865    108,645   158,082  160,457   116,922
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
1979
1980
285,229
388,206
557,082
456,363
34,326
170,346
41,804
82,651
9,316
6,768
319
440
928,076
1,104,774
Table 7.5
Salmon-(Canned Production in 21.8 kg Cases)
1978
Sockeye         485,748
Pinks        456,058
Chums         121,487
Coho  53,960
Chinooks  8,916
Steelhead  707
1,126,876
Table 7.6
Increased Total ./Allowable Catch of Groundfish Resulting from
Provincial/Federal Cost-shared Program in 1980.
Thrbot	
Hake	
Pollock	
Rockfish	
Dover Sole..
Table 7.7
Number of Registered Oyster Lease Holders and Leased Acreage for the Years
1974/75 to Year Ending December 31, 1980.
Estimated
Tonnes
Landed Value
3,000
$   280,000
14,000
2,100,000
1,500
300,000
1,000
300.000
500
250,000
19,000
$3,230,000
1974/75...
Number of
Lease
Holders
65
Acres
1902.0
1975/76	
                          68
1790.2
1976/77	
                            65
1722.9
1977/78	
66
1712.8
1978/79	
                          78
1900.5
1979/80	
90
2273.9
1980	
100
2685.0
Table 7.8
.Annual Oyster Production in British Columbia (in U.S. gallons) for the Years
1975/76 to the Year Ending December 31, 1980.
Year
1975..
1976..
1977..
1978..
1979..
1980..
Shucked Meat
U.S. Gallons
Landed Value
89,255
883,000
89,249
887,000
82,448
981,000
76,815
1,021,000
61,373
893,000
52,862
1,134,000
 Environmental Laboratory
Table 8.1
Distribution of Environmental Laboratory Routine Workload by Submitting
Agency
Submitting Agency Percentage of Workload
' Ministry of Environment         81
Assessment and Planning Division  18
Environmental Management Division  14
Environmental Services Division  5
Regional Operations Division         63
100
[Ministry of Agriculture  11
Ministry of Health  2
Water Quality Check Program  3
Other Government Ministries and Crown Corporations  3
100
135
 Aquatic Studies Branch
Table 9.1
Watershed Management Studies
Coldstream Creek Settling
Basin Cleanout
An engineering feasibility report was completed for cleaning out
a silted-in reservoir on Coldstream Creek, the main tributary to
Kalamalka Lake. The cleanout would improve the silt-trapping
efficiency of the reservoir and thus contribute to maintaining the
quality of Kalamalka Lake, an extremely important water-based
recreational attraction in the Okanagan Valley. The cleanout was
estimated to cost $63,000.
Coquitlam Area Mountain
Study
The Water Investigations Branch was represented on an ELUC
Secretariat coordinated study which undertook to ensure that
planning for and management of public lands in the Indian
Arm-Pitt Lake area are undertaken in an integrated fashion; and
contributed information gained through the Coquitlam River
Water Management Study on the present and potential use of
Coquitlam Lake water, the proposed diversions of Or Creek and
Widgeon Lake by the Greater Vancouver Water District, possible
cancellation of the Port Moody Conservation Reserve and
reclamation and conservation efforts on the gravel mining
operations along the Coquitlam River.
Coquitlam River Study
Implementation
This study, completed in 1978, made 21 recommendations to
reduce conflicts and improve water resource utilization on the
Coquitlam River. These recommendations encompassed dam
safety, flood damage prevention, dyke construction guidelines,
floodplain zoning, flow measurement, fisheries release flows,
gravel mining reclamation and conservation, logging practices,
urban development, future additional water supply for the Greater
Vancouver Water District and outdoor recreational amenities.' I
Progress continued in 1980 on implementation of the study
recommendations with the full cooperation of the Watershed
Management Studies Section.
Kathlyn Lake
An engineering feasibility report was completed on drawing
down Kathlyn Lake near Smithers to frost-kill the lake weeds.
The lake would be drawn down in the fall by pumping. Winter
frosts would kill the exposed weed beds. Snowmelt runoff would
refill the lake the spring following drawdown. The drawdown was
estimated to cost at least $80,000 and because of weather
variability might have to be repeated to achieve the degree of
success desired.
Lakeshore Management
Guidelines
Some progress was made toward the ultimate objective of
providing methods for assessing the impacts of lake watershed
development on water quality. In cooperation with an SFU
graduate student on a G.R.E.A.T. grant (B.C. Science Council),
Brannen and St. Mary Lakes were studied as examples.
Techniques were evaluated for assessing nutrient budgets and lake
water quality impacts. Data used were those being collected by
the Watershed Management Studies Section.
136
 AQUATIC STUDIES BRANCH
Table 9.1—Continued
Watershed Management Studies
Nechako Diversion
Nicola Study
Quarantine Lake Study
I Saltspring Island Study
Serpentine-Nicomekl Study
The Nechako diversion scheme, proposed Alcan expansion and
desired fisheries resource maintenance flow releases into the
Nechako system were reviewed, with some suggestions on using
a strategic planning approach to resolve this fisheries versus
hydroelectric power generation conflict.
The objective of this study is to improve water resource
management in the Nicola River drainage basin, mainly through
the development of headwater storage and subsequent release
during the summer low flow period. Improved stream flow would
reduce conflicts among fisheries, licenced water users (mainly for
irrigation) and the Town of Merritt (dilution of effluent
discharge). Work in 1980 consisted primarily of a consultant
completing a contract on data collection, developing an
approximate hydrologic model and making a case for further
studies and financing. The consultant proposed to use this
modelling technique to estimate runoff and provide a framework
for reservoir regulation and water use. Some field survey work
was carried out on potential storage sites. A review was
conducted on the best legislative vehicle to use to form the local
entity which would operate and maintain these water supply
improvement works.
A report was completed on Quarantine Lake near Metchosin for
the Water Management Branch. The report assesses the amount
of water which may be available from this source for licencing
purposes, as well as the effect excessive drawdown may have on
the lake water quality.
A report was completed for Islands Trust on the water quality and
quantity of five small lakes on Saltspring Island, for
consideration as a future domestic water supply.
This is a two part study. The first part involves incremental
drainage improvements to the floodplain, designed so as to
minimize conflicts between utilizers of the land and water
resource. This part of the study is being undertaken by the Water
Supply Sub-section, Engineering Section, Inventory and
Engineering Branch.
The second part of the study involves a basin-wide management
approach to the water problems in the watershed. In 1980 a report
found that:
considerable background information, necessary to develop an
overall watershed management plan, has been gathered, but little
progress has been made on actual plan development;
incremental improvements are taking place over the floodplain on
internal drainage, irrigation water supply and flood protection.
Construction of improvements was underway for the Old Logging
Ditch area under an ARDSA funded project, which was
economically and environmentally sound.
 MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT
Table 9.1—Continued
Watershed Management Studies
Shawnigan Lake Study
Strategic Planning
Thompson River Preplanning Study
Local cost-sharing arrangements, between the District of Surrey
and the farmers Old Logging Ditch area, on capital, operation
and maintenance costs, have been made. These are significant
because they set a precedent for those improvement projects to
follow.
Field investigations have established that an irrigation depth of
eight inches appears to be a sufficient amount of supplemental
water to nourish crops in the Serpentine-Nicomekl floodplain.
This water demand (reduced from 1V2 feet) means it is no longer
necessary to import water to reach maximum agricultural
productivity of the floodplain.
Both the District of Surrey and the Township of Langley have
adopted runoff detention/retention requirements in urban
development in an effort to hold runoff to pre-development
levels.
The Surrey Dyking District has initiated a dyke upgrading
program financed by both the District of Surrey and the
Provincial Government.
The objective of this study was to develop a better understanding
of the quality of water in Shawnigan Lake and the nutrient
loading to it, in order to assist the Cowichan Valley Regional
District on lake-shore development guidelines. The results have
been presented to the Regional District for use in its land
settlement planning, but the final report has not yet been written.
The Water Investigations Branch was represented on a Strategic
Planning team under the chairmanship of Dr. J. O'Riordan,
formed to develop a process for integrating the best use of those
resources under the ministry's mandate. Information was
provided on Banch objectives and flood damage prevention
program criteria. Regions were divided into management areas
and work began on a strategic planning document.
This joint Federal-Provincial investigation was undertaken to
identify and document problems with the water resources of the
Thompson river drainage basin; further, to recommend additional
desired information studies and costs, to resolve these problems.
The Watershed Management Studies Section contributed
information on water quality (point discharges, general water
quality of rivers and lakes in system, non-point source water
quality concerns and aquatic plants) to the planning Task Force;
and on hydro-electric power generation benefits and ecological
costs of storage reservoir development in the Clearwater River
drainage basin (System E). In 1980, a report was drafted.
 AQUATIC STUDIES BRANCH
Table 9.2
Aquatic Plant Management Program
PROJECT
Quarantine and Surveillance
Public Information
Documentation and Mapping
Biological Studies
[Mechanical Treatments and
Evaluation
Herbicide Treatments and
'Evaluation
DESCRIPTION
The main aim in 1980 was to minimize the spread of Eurasian
water milfoil by reducing lake to lake transport of the plant and
by providing early warning of new infestations. Roadside
quarantine stations were operated at six locations and over 20,000
boaters were contacted leaving infested areas; plant fragments
were removed from over 180 boats, motors and trailers. Forty-
eight lakes were surveyed and a resource folio of environmental
resource features of 20 high-use lakes was prepared to help
control strategies in the event of Eurasian water milfoil
infestation. Local agencies were encouraged to send in suspected
specimens of Eurasian water milfoil which could be new lake
records. One new infestion was located in Champion Lakes in the
Kootenays.
In an effort to increase public awareness, pamphlets were placed
at tourist centres and two mobile displays were manned by staff at
shopping malls in major British Columbia population centres on
the coast and southern interior. Signs encouraging boaters to
remove aquatic plants from their equipment were placed at
approximately 130 launching ramps.
Field survey information, together with aerial photographs, were
obtained in Okanagan Valley mainstem lakes and Cultus and
Hatzic Lakes in the Lower Mainland to determine changes in the
extent and density of Eurasian water milfoil. Intensive control
procedures were used on Kalamalka and Wood Lakes. Increases
in area or density of Eurasian water milfoil populations were
noted in areas of Osoyoos, Vaseux, Okanagan and Cultus Lakes.
Several studies were continued and new ones initiated in 1980 to
provide biological information to control Eurasian water milfoil,
especially concerning the most effective harvesting strategy.
Investigations of the growth dynamics of the plant revealed
several organisms which feed on its stems and leaves and a study
was initiated on their possible application as biological control
agents. The effectiveness of several mechanical control systems
including an underwater plow, several cultivation implements and
Aqua-screen were assessed, with emphasis on root mortality.
The majority of mechanical control activities in 1980 were
implemented under cost-shared agreements with local agencies.
In cooperation with the Okanagan Basin Water Board,
approximately 120 ha of Eurasian water milfoil were harvested in
Okanagan, Skaha, Vaseux and Osoyoos Lakes and shallow water
tillage was performed in several localized areas. Under an
agreement with the Fraser-Cheam Regional District a small area
was treated with diver dredges in Cultus Lake. In addition, the
Ministry used diver dredges on over 35 ha in Kalamalka and
Wood Lakes in an effort to prevent populations in these lakes
from reaching nuisance levels.
Herbicide use was continued in 1980 as part of the intensive
control project in Kalamalka and Wood Lakes. Herbicide was
applied in spot treatments to 3.2 ha in Kalamalka and to two
blocks totalling 18.2 ha in Wood Lake in areas not previously
treated. While the slow growth in Kalamalka Lake may permit
successful control here, unexpectedly rapid growth in Wood Lake
in 1980 may prove too extensive to justify intensive management.
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