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Mnistry of Municipal Affairs Report for the year ended December 31, 1981 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1983]

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 /it ft J\    Province of
l&Hs]    Brit'sri Columbia
Ministry of
Municipal Affairs
Report for the
year ended
December 31, 1981
Honourable William N. Vander Zalm, Minister
fft 1981
 British Columbia Cataloguing in Publication Data
British Columbia. Ministry of Municipal Affairs.
Report for the year ended December 31 .... — 1978-
Annual.
Cover title: Annual report.
Continues: British Columbia. Ministry of Municipal
Affairs and Housing. Report for the year ended
December 31   ISSN 0702-9810
ISSN 0227-5600 = Report - Ministry of Municipal
Affairs (Victoria)
1. British Columbia. Ministry of Municipal Affairs -
Periodicals.  2. Municipal services - British Columbia
- Periodicals.  3. Housing policy - British Columbia -
Periodicals, h.  Urban policy - British Columbia -
Periodicals. I. British Columbia.. Ministry of Municipal Affairs. Annual report.
HT127.B7Ua 351*. 71108* 3
Ministry of Municifl
 i Honourable HENRY P. BELL-IRVING, D.S.O., O.B.E., ED.
mitenant Governor of the Province of British Columbia
BPLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
Have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Ministry of
:ipal Affairs for the year ended December 31, 1981.
WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
Minister of Municipal Affairs
IsKBritish Columbia
 The Honourable WILLIAM N. VANDER ZALM
Minister of Municipal Affairs
Sir:
I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Ministry of Municipal Affairs
for the year ended December 31,1981.
J.P. TAYLOR
Deputy Minister
Ministry of Municif
 Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION 7
MINISTRY ORGANIZATION 8
MINISTRY PROGRAM REPORTS:
Municipal Administrative Services ....10
Municipal Financial Services 14
Planning Branch 19
Central Services 26
Policy and Research 29
New Legislation 29
Education and Information Services 30
Investigations 30
Building Standards Branch 31
Engineering Branch 31
ISLANDS TRUST REPORT 32
APPENDIX 34
feairt 1QR1
 Acts Administered by
Municipal Affairs
Municipal Act
Ministry of Municipal Affairs Act
Revenue Sharing Act
Municipal Finance Authority Act
Home Owner Grant Act (S.B.C. 1980)
Sewerage Assistance Act
Urban Transit Authority Act
Islands Trust Act
Metro Transit Company Act
Mobile Home Tax Act
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act
Resort Municipality of Whistler Act
Local Services Act
Transit Services Act
New Westminster Redevelopment Act 1979
Dyking Authority Act
Ministry of MUBJcj
 ii
iloduction
3 linistry continues its service to local
lament, as authorized by the Municipal
jne thousand five hundred and sixteen
as were considered and approved by
ffister in 1981. They included such
^as abandonment and vesting of
^ays and floodplain authorization, as
13 new incorporations.
V wision of roads, waterworks and
page systems is still foremost in
iteration of local government service
lies, together with social, recreational
■otection services. Most of these
os have both capital and operating
Hints, and these are reflected in
lipal budgetary requirements.
ii port of such services local
'<lments need to borrow money and
Irrowing level in 1981 was
(156,158 (Cdn.). In addition, there are
i ajor sources of revenue for
n palities: grants and shared-cost
cims through the Ministry and revenue
property tax. Grants and shared-cost
rims accounted for 98% of Ministry
Kditure in 1981; real property taxes
r981 are expected to increase by 64%
pve years ago, because of the
tuing rapid growth in urban
unities.
(ificant factor in the growth of local
eiment is the new incorporation of
3 palities. The new District of Tumbler
gis an interesting example, since it
l\s from the huge development of coal
Dees in north-eastern British Columbia,
i sw municipality looks forward to the
illation of a new and stable work force
>ih the provision of well-planned
sties and services.
j swntown Revitalization Program
fuss to generate interest among
iffiities who wish to invigorate their
nwn business cores. By the end of
tV7 municipalities had qualified for
n; 75 of these had received $5,000 in
tp grants to develop concept plans,
fsirther legislation, the Building Safety
nirds Act was enacted this year to co-
i'te all building construction regulations
) ie code. The Land-Use Act, which will
ify and clarify land use regulation, has
Iffirst reading, following contributions
tsjontent by many interested groups
P dividual.
The Ministry has also encouraged the
improvement of local government
administration through scholarships
awarded in amounts from $75-$1,300 to
senior and junior staff in local government.
In addition, shields were awarded to the
following categories of local government for
improving the participation by voters in their
municipal elections:
ANNUAL SHIELD AWARD 1980
Voter Turnout
Category Recipient      (Percentage)
Cities and Towns Kimberley 70.30
Districts Whistler 64.0
Villages Invermere 92.22
Second place recipients were Quesnel
(cities and towns) with 68.25%, Port Hardy
(districts) with 63.8%, and Clinton (villages)
with 77.39%.
In conclusion, as part of the continuing
effort to provide the best possible service to
local government in British Columbia, the
Ministry has been extensively re-organized
during the past year. It is our hope that this
re-organization, together with our many
programs for assistance, will improve
further the quality of local government.
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Minigtru nf MunJCJP
 %mmmm&
histry of
nicipal Affairs
her's Office, Parliament Buildings,
lilt, V8V 1X4, Phone 387-3602.
j Dipa! Affairs Office, 747 Fort Street,
.ria, V8W 3EI, Phone 387-5925.
he Honourable William N. Vander Zalm,
Nster of Municipal Affairs
Iroy Sage, Secretary to the Minister
re DeBiasio, Policy Co-ordinator
'.aylor, Deputy Minister
f.. Woodward, Inspector of
hnicipalities
lifarkness, Assistant Deputy Minister
.loore, Assistant Deputy Minister
E/vhelen, Senior Advisor, Legislative
Flicy
Stephens, Education and Information
Cicer
siral Services Branch
[Bedford, Executive Director, Ministry
fintral Services
l.eminiuk, Comptroller
Swallow, Director of Personnel
Erhomas, Administrator, Downtown
F totalization
ply and Research Branch
lYcLeod, Executive Director
pilisser, Research Officer
Kget, Senior Planning Coordinator
T.iubbon, Research Officer
Kbsh, Senior Planning Coordinator
fHbert, Research Officer
a inistrative Services Branch
(aJallan, Executive Director
■Clarke, Senior Administrative Officer
pvlcCrimmon, Senior Administrative
eCicer
hd.arter, Administrative Officer
KFerguson, Administrative Officer
IwOnway, Administrative Officer
poor, Administrative Officer
tlike, Administrative Officer
inncial Services Branch
•CTopham, Executive Director
hfchompson, Senior Financial Officer
pJ'amblin, Senior Financial Officer
ItlBallard, Financial Officer
i-darkson, Financial Officer
MiEurchuk, Financial Officer
k£3oldie, Financial Officer
►.CJolley, Financial Officer
■H/lacDonald, Financial Officer
M-ounds, Financial Officer
Planning Branch
E. Karlsen, Executive Director
E. Cull, Director, Urban Planning
C. Hawksworth, Director, Strategic Planning
B.S. Jawanda, Senior Planning Advisor,
Professional Services
W.J. Tassie, Senior Planning Advisor,
Program Services
R. Addison, Senior Planner, Legislation
M. Fumalle, Senior Planning Coordinator,
Lower Mainland
T. Maftechuk, Senior Policy Planner,
Resource Settlement Impacts
A.L. Quin, Senior Policy Planner, Regional
Planning
P. Walton, Senior Policy Planner, Regional
Planning
B. Heayn, Policy Planner, Regional Planning
L.V. Luchin, Regional Director, Vancouver
Island
G. Tonn, Regional Director, Northern
Regions
P. Ostergaard, Senior Planning Coordinator,
Northern Regions
E. Levesque, Regional Director, Central
Interior
B. Chambers, Regional Director, Okanagan
C. Gibson, Senior Planning Assistant
R. Lee, Senior Planning Assistant
Engineering Branch
A. MacTaggart, Director
F. Humphrey, Liaison Engineer
Building Standards Branch
J. Currie, Director
B. Emmett, Building Standards Officer
J. Moore, Building Standards Officer
J. Robertson, Building Standards Officer
W. Smith, Building Standards Officer
B. Vanderboor, Building Standards Officer
Islands Trust
848 Courtney Street, Victoria, V8W 1C4,
Phone 387-5219
John Rich, Chairman
Gordon Wallace, Vice-Chairman
Mike Humphries, Vice-Chairman
Tony Roberts, Manager/Planner
David Morris, Chief Planning Officer
Mary Lee, Administrative Officer
 m
Municipal Administrative
Services Branch
Responsibilities
The Administrative Services Branch reviews
municipal bylaws for substance and form,
and coordinates references to other
agencies where required, and prepares
recommendations for approval by the
Minister or the Inspector of Municipalities.
The Branch also evaluates information and
prepares documentation on such matters as
boundary extensions, regional district
functions and improvement district
administration. Advisory services are also
provided to local and regional governments.
New Incorporations and Other
Changes in Local Government
Structure
Letters Patent were issued on April 9,1981,
for the incorporation of the District of
Tumbler Ridge, in conjunction with the
development of the coal resources in the
Tumbler Ridge area of north-eastern British
Columbia. The municipality expects to
provide a well-planned and socially
cohesive community conducive to attracting
and retaining a stable work force.
The Minister of Municipal Affairs directed
that polls be held on the restructuring of
certain local governments. New
incorporations resulted, as follows:
WILLIAMS LAKE, where the result of
the poll was affirmed by Letters Patent
issued September 18,1981,
incorporating the City of Williams
Lake. The same Letters Patent
provided for the dissolution of the
Glendale Improvement District.
REVELSTOKE-BIG EDDY, where the
result of the poll was affirmed by
Letters Patent issued November 5,
1981, incorporating the City of
Revelstoke, effective December 14,
1981.
CLEARWATER, NORTH THOMPSON.
A negative vote on the question of
incorporation of Clearwater, in the
North Thompson area, was the result
of a poll held following a study by a
local committee.
Other Changes:
VILLAGE OF ELKFORD, was changlp
to a district municipality by Letters
Patent issued and effective on Octobe
9,1981.
Because of continuing local interest,
reviews of government structure continu®
in the Sicamous area. Studies were also
initiated in Barriere; Canal Flats; Fort St.
John; Genelle; Nakusp; Osoyoos; Parks™
and Qualicum Beach, including portions ffl\
the French Creek area; Pender HarbourH
University Endowment Lands and
Vanderhoof.
The tax burden of residential taxpayers in
the greater Trail area may be lightened as
the result of a study on the regionalizatidffij
of local government services. The benefit
could come from the use of the regionajM
hospital district assessment base for the
provision of the services as a function of
the regional district.
In November, 1981, the electorate of the
municipalities of Trail, Rossland, FruitvaliJ
Montrose and Warfield and Electoral Areas
A and B of the Regional District of
Kootenay-Boundary voted in favour of the
regional district assuming the functions of
Cemetery Services, Refuse Disposal,
Airport Services, Recreational and Cultural
Services, Fire Protection and Transit
Services on behalf of the residents of thos<
areas. (See Table 1 — Municipal Boundary
Revisions —1981.)
Bylaws Approved by the Minister
During 1981,1,516 bylaws were considerei
and approved by the Minister, as follows:
Municipalities Total
Abandonment and vesting of
highways 85
Water, sewer and electricity
rates 157
Appointment of members to
Municipal Boards of
Variance 86
Floodplain authorization
(Municipalities Enabling
and Validating Act,
Section 187) 272
Other municipal
requirements 287
Ministry of Municipa
 Vmal Districts
•odivision, zoning and
[and use 493
■Ointment of members to
Regional Boards
I if Variance 8
lilding 7
tier regional requirements     90    598
Ite Trust
lious bylaws relating to
Land Use 31        31
Total     Specified Areas
1,516
J During 1981, changes were made in
lime review and approval procedure
for certain bylaws in these categories.
: Planning Branch became responsible
for review of Floodplain authorization,
E subdivision, zoning and land use
E bylaws of Regional Districts, and
Islands Trust bylaws. While the total
r number of bylaws recorded above
I appears in the Administrative
: Services section of this report,
■subsequent Annual Reports will show
I the change in responsibility.
Hw Approval: Villages and
lavement Districts
Ins in this category were examined and
iered as follows:
fes
845
serial District
35
fiivement District
631
si Municipality of Whistler
42
II
1,553
htrs-in-Council
psieutenant-Governor-in-Council
Hred and approved 162 Minutes of
H:il. Sixty-eight of these related to
liial districts, 57 to improvement
stuts, 23 to municipal boundary
lesions, 2 to transit services and 12 for
Ellaneous purposes.
onal District Activities
prij 1981, there was a resurgence in the
Bis of all regional districts, resulting in
pfn functions being assigned to 28
Si' al districts.
aiition, 32 supplementary Letters Patent
Bssued amending existing functions,
Byample: alteration of cost
ptionment formulae and mill rate
(lions, increases in authorized
pTving for various capital projects and
pi wis to member municipalities.
Forty-two specified areas were established
in 1981. Of these areas, 16 were by petition
and 26 after property owners voted for the
proposal. In addition, amendments were
completed for boundaries to 18 specified
areas already established.
Before regional government was
introduced, community services
administered locally in non-municipal areas
were provided through the incorporation of
improvement districts. New local service
needs for non-municipal areas (with the
exception of water, irrigation and dykes) are
almost all provided and financed by regional
districts.
Many of the specified areas have been
established adjacent to municipal
boundaries. As demand for further services
develops, the trend will be towards the
incorporation of these areas within present
municipal boundaries. Isolated specified
areas will probably retain their non-
municipal status.
Functions Assigned to Regional
Districts During 1981
Alberni-Clayoquot
Noise Control (all Electoral Areas)
Bulkley-Nechako
Television Rebroadcasting (Vanderhoof
and defined area of Electoral Area F)
Capital
Pacific Centre of Human Development
Grants-in-Aid (Electoral Areas A, B, C
andE)
Noise Control (Electoral Areas A, B, C, E
and F)
Cariboo
Airport (100 Mile House and Electoral
Areas G and H)
Central Coast
Nuisances and Unsightly Premises
(Electoral Areas C, D and E)
Joint Community Use of School Facilities
(Electoral Areas C, D and E)
Central Fraser Valley
Fireworks and Firearms Regulation
(Abbotsford and Electoral Area A)
Economic Development Commission
Central Kootenay
Fire Protection Service (defined areas of
Electoral Areas A and C)
Television Rebroadcasting (Silverton, New
Denver and defined area of Electoral
 Area H)
Public Library Service (Creston, Electoral
Areas B and C and Defined Area of
Electoral Area A)
Noise Control (Electoral Areas A, B, E, G,
I and J)
Cemetery Operation (Electoral Areas D
andH)
Riding Club Grant-in-Aid (Nelson, Salmo
and Electoral Areas E, F and G)
Recycling (Nelson, Salmo and Electoral
Areas E, F and G)
Central Okanagan
Urban Transit (Electoral Area H and
defined area of Electoral Area G)
Columbia-Shuswap
Noise Control (Salmon Arm, Golden and
Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E and F)
Museum Operation Grant-in-Aid (Golden
and Electoral Areas A, B, C, D, E and F)
Comox-Strathcona
Animal Control (Electoral Areas B and C
and defined areas of Electoral Area A)
Cowichan Valley
Animal Control (all Electoral Areas)
Street Lighting (all Electoral Areas)
East Kootenay
Firearms Regulation (all Electoral Areas)
Cemeteries (all Electoral Areas)
Kootenay Boundary
Development of Subdivision (all Electoral
Areas)
Animal Control (Electoral Areas A and B)
Public Library Service (Fruitvale,
Montrose and Electoral Area A)
Noise Control (all Electoral Areas)
Fire Protection and Regulation (Fruitvale,
Montrose and defined area of Electoral
Area A)
Nanaimo
House Numbering (Electoral Areas, A, B,
C, D, E, G and H)
North Okanagan
Noise Control (all Electoral Areas)
Fire Protection (Lumby and defined area
of Electoral Area D)
Peace River-Liard
Public Library Service (Chetwynd and
defined area of Electoral Area E)
Sub-Regional Recreation and Cultural
Services (Dawson Creek, Pouce Coupe,
and defined areas of Electoral Areas D
and E)
Sunshine Coast
Economic Development Commission
(Gibsons, Sechelt and Electoral Areas B,
C, D, E and F)
House Numbering (all Electoral Areas)
Additions to Regional District
Specified Service Areas, 1981  ]
Capital
Water Supply and Distribution System
(Highland)
Cariboo
Water System (Lac La Hache)
Water System (Forest Grove)
Airstrip (Anahim Lake-Nimpo Lake) |
Airstrip (Likely)
Sewage Collectioriand Disposal (Alexis U
Central Kootenay
Community Hall Grant-in-Aid (Burton)
Television Rebroadcasting (Yahk-Kingsjj
Fire Protection (North Shore to Eight an
One-Half Mile)
Central Okanagan
Fire Equipment (Wilson Landing)
Street Lighting (Scotty Heights Subdivis
Community Hall Grant-in-Aid (Westbank)
Columbia-Shuswap
Recreation Centre (Sicamous and Distric
Street Lighting (Strata Corporation K46) |
Community Park (Sorrento and Blind Ba
Community Park (Anglemount)
Comox-Strathcona
Street Lighting (Wavecrest Road/
Mariwood Drive)
Fire Protection (Sayward Valley)
Street Lighting (Webb/Bood Road)   ]
Cowichan Valley
Street Lighting (Cowichan Bay)
Recreation Grant-in-Aid (North Oysterj
East Kootenay
Fire Protection (Windermere)
Fraser-Cheam
Electric Power (Sunshine Valley)
Television Rebroadcasting (Boston Bar-
North Bend)
Sewage Collection (Silver Creek)
Fraser-Fort George
Gymnasium (Upper Fraser-Aleza Lak|
Kitimat-Stikine
Fire Hydrants (Woodlands Utilities)
Street Lighting (Thornhill)
Urban Transit (Thornhill)
Kootenay Boundary
Fire Protection (Big White)
Refuse Disposal (Big White)
Mount Waddington
Street Lighting (Nimpkish Heights)
Nanaimo
Water System (West Bay Estates)
North Okanagan
Street Lighting (Apollo Road)
Street Lighting (Willow Park)
Okanagan-Similkameen
Electric Power (Anarchist Mountain)
aaaUinist"'"f M"nid["
 ti River
=s Protection (Northside)
Wa-Queen Charlotte
tfter System (Dodge Cove)
tine Coast
Beet Lighting (Woodcreek Park)
loson-Nicola
i.timunity Hall (Vavenby)
■Sision Rebroadcasting Grant-in-Aid
liences Bridge)
llrision Rebroadcasting Grant-in-Aid
Iffitoral Area B)
undments to Established
isified Service Areas, 1981
1
liter System (Highland) and extension
(boundaries
fink Sewer (View Royal North West) and
Iffiction of boundaries
loo
liter System (Lac La Hache) and
(tension of boundaries
I Per System (Lac La Hache) and
11tension of boundaries
liter System (Wells) and extension of
lundaries
Be Protection (Red Bluff) and extension
i boundaries
ral Kootenay
Be Protection (Creston Service Area)
id reduction of boundaries
•e Protection (Lister, Canyon, Huscroft
BRiverview) and extension of
lundaries
m-Strathcona
Her System (Back Road-Lake Trail-
liadquarters) and extension of
undaries
IBsr Services (Black Creek-Oyster Bay)
id extension of boundaries
iKoofenay
'aterworks and Street Lighting
llffiidermere) and extension of
lindanes
laterworks, Sewer System, Fire
Section, Street Lighting and Garbage
Bfection and Disposal (Radium) and
tension of boundaries
■tr-Cheam
reet Lighting (Coquihalla View Estates)
id extension of boundaries
MjFort George
re Protection (Buckhorn) and extension
boundaries
neport 1S
Nanaimo
Fire Protection (Yellow Point Waterloo)
and redefinition of boundaries
Sewer System (French Creek) and
extension of boundaries
Peace River
Fire Protection (Charlie Lake) and
extension of boundaries
Sunshine Coast
Sewer System (Sechelt) and extension of
boundaries
Improvement Districts
The Ministry currently administers 309
Improvement Districts incorporated under
the Water Act and the Municipal Act. Two
hundred and forty-six of these districts
maintain water works as their principal
function, but may also provide such
services as fire protection, street lighting,
parks and playgrounds, community halls,
sewers, garbage collection, dyking,
drainage and cemeteries. Another 31
districts provide fire protection as their main
function, with occasional responsibility for
street lighting.
Seven new improvement districts were
incorporated in 1981 for water works or
related purposes; six improvement districts
were dissolved. One of the six became a
Specified Area within a Regional District;
one was included within a city municipality;
two within a village municipality and two
were amalgamated and subsequently
incorporated as a new improvement district.
Supplementary Letters Patent were issued
during 1981 authorizing extensions or
revisions to boundaries for 32 improvement
districts. One amendment authorized an
additional object and one the deletion of an
object.
Debenture Approval
Subsequent to the approval by the
Inspector of loan authorization bylaws,
certificates of approval are issued by the
Ministry authorizing the issue of the actual
debentures. Four hundred and thirty-two
certificates of approval for loan
authorization bylaws or resolutions were
issued in 1981, compared with 437
certificates of approval issued in 1980.
Security-issuing bylaws formalize the issue
of debentures. Two hundred and six
security-issuing bylaws were approved in
1981 authorizing the issue of debentures
and other terms of indebtedness in the
amount of $171,511,716 (Cdn.)
13
 Municipal Financial
Services
Responsibilities
The Financial Services Branch is
responsible for the financial analysis and
review of local government borrowing
proposals, utility rates bylaws, annual
financial statements and preparation of
statistical data.
Developments
The Branch made 21 field visits in 1981 for
the review of financial procedures and
problems related to the budget, finance and
audit matters experienced by administrative
staff at the local government level.
Assessment
The major source of revenue for
municipalities in British Columbia continues
to be real property tax. The growth in
assessed values of real property, and
revenue from taxation of these properties
over the past 17 years, is illustrated in Table
2. It should be noted that revenue from this
source of taxation in 1980 totalled
$1,143,000,000. Of this total, $553,000,000
represented taxation for general municipal
purposes and $590,000,000 for school
purposes.
As a result of the continuing rapid growth in
the urban communities, it is anticipated that
proceeds from real property taxation for
school and general municipal purposes in
1981 will reach $1,300,000,000. This
represents an increase of approximately
64% over the revenue of five years ago. Th("
total assessed values actually taxed for I
school purposes in the Province in 1981
amounted to $16,786,000,000: an increase
m approximately $2,129,000,000 over 1980 3
Of this amount, $13,332,000,000 (or
approximately 79%), represented assessed a
values in the City, District, Town and Village |
municipalities.
School Assessment and General
Municipal Assessment
(1981 Assessments)
It should be noted that the difference
between the school assessment and the
general municipal assessment is the result
of a number of municipalities using
assessed values determined by The
Assessment Act, Section 26(19)(d) i.e.,
general municipal assessments, are based
on 100 per cent of actual market value,
while the school assessments are at the
percentage of actual market value fixed by
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
The following municipalities apply   ,
Section 26(19)(d):
Kamloops Summerland
Langley (City) Whistler
Nelson Cache Creek
North Vancouver (City)     Clinton
Penticton Cumberland
Port Coquitlam Granisle
Prince George Lytton
' NorthVancouver(District) Tahsis
Stewart
Use of Section 26(19)(d) resulted in a difference of $10,087,000,000 between School
Assessment and General Municipal Assessment as follows:
General Municipal Assessment
Less: Adjusted School Assessment
School Assessment
DEDUCT:
Commercial & Industrial Machinery
Utility values including B.C. Hydro
Difference
$13,332
(1,514)
(  952)
Milliofm
$20,953'
10,866
1110087
14
Ministry of Munici
 Collection tax collection by class of municipality for the
years shown,
iax collection picture in municipalities is It is interesting to note that, notwithstanding
litered to be the primary indicator of an the fact that property taxes are increasing,
lent administration as well as the ability the level of tax collections remains high.
Raxpayer to meet the municipal tax
promptly. In the year under review, tax
lions have shown a slight increase Revenues and Expenditures
the collections of 1979. During 1980, r
|0hS07 nl^nfof ?,L7wipalitieS ™* 1980 audited financial statements
|ed 97 per cent of the levy. indicate ,hat BritJsh Co|umbia municipalities
iugh favourable economic factors may and regional districts continued to maintain
Contributed substantially to the a favourable financial position. Gross
allent record of tax collection, municipal revenues from all sources, (including
i urers and collectors are to be collections for other governments during
aratulated for their continued effort in 1 gso) equalled $1, 857,000,000,
ataining this high rate of tax collection. representing an increase of $191,000,000
Ltis 3 and 4 show information relative to over 1979.
major revenue sources, with comparative figures for 1979, were as follows:
1980
1979+
Increase
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
enral Municipal Taxation
$   553
$   495
$ 58
liol Taxation
590
534
56
o ributions, Grants & Subsidies
258
231
27
jinue from own sources
456
406
50
$1,857
$1,666
$191
nhome-owner grant payments increased    the school tax levy of $590,000, a balance
K5,000,000 in 1980 to a total of of $380,000,000 remains of this levy to be
pi,000,000. When this is offset against        borne by the property owner.
■major expenditure items incurred during 1980 with comparative figures for 1979 were:
1980
1979+
Increase
(Millions)
(Millions)
(Millions)
lesral Government
$   123
$   111
$ 12
irProtection
93
84
9
dinistration of Justice
121
104
17
1 c Works
129
113
16
Nation and Waste Removal
66
56
10
Oal Welfare
31
28
3
ieation and Culture
142
123
19
■ation
590
535
55
1(3 Charges
164
154
10
|ial Expenditures from Revenue
113
104
9
Ir*
285
254
31
$1,857
$1,666
$191
wludes public health, utilities, and contributions to reserves and other funds.
■flbunts for 1979 have been increased over those reported in the 1980 Annual Report to
iiblude data for regional districts.
idfiiona4jaat
15
 smsm
Reserves and Surplus
The total statutory reserves, operating
reserves and surplus held in all
municipalities' accounts was $769,416,520.
This represents 61% of municipalities and
regional districts' total revenue, excluding
school taxes. Of this total, $525, 371,543 is
held in liquid form or in investments
authorized by statute. A portion of the
surplus is represented by arrears of taxes
and other receivables.
Statutory reserve funds of municipalities
and regional districts have again shown an r
increase over the previous year. At the end r
of 1980 these funds, held for a variety ofS
purposes, amounted to $220,902,523, an
increase of $54,026,576 over the previous I
year. This increase allows for approximated (
$41,000,000 being spent on capital works ' |
from reserve funds during the year 1980.
The amount held in these reserve funds hair
increased from $61,000,000 in 1973 to the >
current figure of $221,000,000, an increase a
of 262%.
The following table shows an analysis of these reserves and surplus by class of municipal
Reserves Surplus Total
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Regional Districts
Sub-total
Vancouver1
Total
117,498,833
214,114,536
4,524,762
6,725,832
3,969,130
346,833,093
286,727,300
633,560,393
31,288,395
69,169,662
3,912,216
7,504,725
9,649,652
121,524,650
14,331,477
135,856,127
148,787,228
283,284,198
8,436,978
14,230,557
13,618,782
468,357,743
301,058,777
769,416,520
The total for Vancouver includes the balance in the Property Endowment Fund which]
amounted to $251,379,560 at December 31, 1980.
Capital Programs
The value of capital projects undertaken
during 1980 by municipalities amounted to
$770,000,000. Of this total program, work to
the value of $568,000,000 was completed
during the fiscal year, leaving a balance in
progress of $202,000,000 at year-end. In
the total capital program municipalities were
able to provide $113,000,000 from current
general operating and sewer utility
operating funds, $41,000,000 from reserve
funds and approximately $51,000,000 from
grants-in-aid from the Provincial and
Federal Governments. The balance of the
amount expended was financed by
debenture loans, temporary bank loans, and
other methods of financing. The activity in
this area over the past five years is
indicated in Table 5.
Summary of Five-Year Capital
Expenditure Programs
The programs submitted by municipalities
and regional districts during 1981, and
covering the five year period ending 1985,
continued to provide useful information am
guidance, not only to the local government
bodies involved, but also to the Ministry,
other levels of government and various ■
financial institutions. Review of these   |
submissions and the constructive criticisffl|
offered by the Ministry where necessary
has led to consistency in program format
proving beneficial to all concerned.
A summary of the Capital Expenditure
Programs by year is provided in Table 6.
Included in the "General" heading under
"Classification of Expenditures" are all
capital expenditures for roads, sidewalks,
16
Ministry of Municjg
 WSW^^^^S^S^^^^SS^^^^1
lie buildings, recreational facilities, land,
I other capital projects not related to
i'.r or sewer systems. As in the past,
licipal councils are attempting to finance
[ge portion of their capital works out of
Hint operating and reserve funds,
t>ugh the availability of Federal-
Eincial loans and the infusion of capital
Is via specific purpose grants have had
lect effect on this policy.
(rowing
[jig 1981, Councils and Regional Boards
linued to meet a substantial demand for
licipal services, and 196 loan
lorization bylaws were approved by the
sector of Municipalities and
Isequently adopted by the local
liming body providing the service.
nowing of $160,356,158 (Cdn) as
Innarized in Table 7 is $34,166,579 less
I was authorized in 1980. The decrease
sie to the decline in the amount being
Iinded on water and sewer projects.
e pletion of the various projects
rorized will be phased over a number of
!is, and the demand for funds will follow
eiace of construction. Included in the
Horized borrowing is $4,252,723 in short-
r loans which, under the Municipal Act,
i-iubject to a per capita limitation.
■■Inspector of Municipalities is not
kired to approve the borrowing of the
Hof Vancouver and the Metropolitan
pr and Sewer Boards. Such borrowing
raierefore, not included in Table 7.
Hminary borrowing of an estimated
Kit of $22,249,473 was approved for
ic improvement works. A number of
it cipalities have established special
Movement funds to finance local works;
pea have not been included in the figure
for preliminary borrowing approval.
In addition to the $23,885,881 in debenture
debts guaranteed by the Province, (shown
in Table 8), $15,638,000 was guaranteed at
the end of the year under the Greater
Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District
Act.
Total debenture debt as at December 31,
1980 for all municipalities, including the City
of Vancouver, is shown in Table 9. The
debenture debt of the Greater Campbell
River Water District, the Greater Nanaimo
Water District, the Greater Vancouver Water
District, the Greater Vancouver Sewerage
and Drainage District and the Greater
Victoria Water District is not included.
Debenture sales for all municipalities
amounted to $190,796,966 (Cdn) for the
year 1980. This resulted in an increase of
$94,667,204 in the total outstanding
debenture debt of all municipalities for 1980,
after giving effect to the retirement of
debentures maturing during the year.
The percentage of current revenue
expended to service debenture debt
(excluding water and other utilities)
increased in 1980 in Cities and Towns, and
decreased in Districts, Villages and the City
of Vancouver. These figures for 1980 are
shown on the following table, with the 1979
comparative figures.
PERCENT
1980          1979
Cities
6.10           6.09
Vancouver
7.58            8.01
Districts
7.18           7.51
Towns
8.04           7.88
Villages
7.87            8.33
The debenture debt of water and other
utilities is serviced almost entirely by
revenue derived from consumer charges
and frontage taxes.
 Indices Indicating the Historical Relationships Between Population, Persona''!
Income and Local Government
Maximum
Total B.C.
Total
Building
Debenture
Values
Persona
Year
Population
Revenue1
Permits
Debt
Taxable
Income i
1961
100
100
100
100
100
100
1972
143
330
414
145
252
303
1973
153
383
602
157
286
353
1974
160
436
614
175
345
412
1975
173
525
794
217
364
497
1976
156
618
571
254
375
588
1977
163
666
843
306
396
677
1978
167
752
802
328
476
740
1979
170
827
1,060
366
512
840
1980
177
922
1,422
413
570
969
Includes general municipal revenues, collections for other governments and revenues of
regional districts and utilities. Indices for total revenue for 1972 to 1979 have been
recalculated based on the inclusion of utility revenue.
Ministry of Municip
 n^^^^a^^Mi^^^^^S^^^^^^^
anning Branch
sponsibilities
planning Branch prepares, advises on
supports programs and procedures for
Bnent land-use planning and related
Hppment controls. Branch activities
Jkss the settlement planning interests of
ai government as well as for the
jwncial government.
velopments
swing the major re-organization within
jrainistry the Planning Branch was also
flSanized. Four Sections were
jpshed: Strategic Planning; Urban
ining; Program and Professional
trices and Regional Operations.
ategic Planning
responsibilities
"This Section is responsible for broad
ft settlement analyses, major project
U impact assessment review, participation
in regional and sub-regional planning
II projects and the development of
policies and procedures for various
■forms of settlement, such as resorts.
"This Section works closely with the
n Ministry's Policy and Research Branch
hi and other service ministries such as
Education, Health, Industry and Small
Business Development, to advise
el resource ministries and developers on
the effect of major projects on
Hjiommunity development. The Section is
ee responsible for preparing and ensuring
brthat Municipal Affairs settlement
fe| planning goals and objectives are
considered in the application of other
ministries' programs.
milopments
lakeview and advice on impact
assessment submissions for coal and
lijhineral mines and energy projects was
■Apart of the Section's responsibility for
this year. The Cascade Wilderness
Study was completed; the Coquitlam
'■.rea Mountain Study is nearing
r.c completion and work continued on the
q: Slocan Valley Study, which is due for
■pompletion by the summer of 1982.
Urban Planning Section
Responsibilities
Planners in this Section are responsible
for liaison, co-ordination and advisory
services for the metropolitan areas of
the Lower Mainland and Capital
Region. They are also involved in the
preparation of draft land use planning
legislation; development of guidelines
for local government community and
settlement plans; and policies for urban
fringe development.
The Technical Services staff in this
Section prepare new composite base
maps for local government; maps and
graphics for planning projects; legal
descriptions for local government
boundary changes and large-scale base
mapping. They also respond to
requests for information on provincial
mapping and air photographs by local
government.
Developments
The updated Official Regional Plan for
the Lower Mainland was substantially
completed during 1981. Members of
staff participated in the update program
and a review of regional planning
studies preparec by the Capital
Regional District. Work was also done
on a draft urban fringe area planning
and development policy. An Official
Community Plan for Atlin was
completed, as well as work on an
Official Community Plan for Tumbler
Ridge for this new town's governing
body. Technical services staff made a
major contribution to the Slocan Valley
Planning Program as well as to
numerous smaller projects.
Program and Professional Services
Responsibilities
This section participates in the
preparation of procedures and models
for local government land use planning
and regulation. It is also responsible for
processing bylaws submitted to the
Planning Branch for approval by the
Minister or registration by the Inspector
of Municipalities. Local governments,
especially in smaller communities, are
also assisted occasionally with
(rttf L,AnQt^QD1
 technical planning. Members of this
Section are also regional co-ordinators
for two regional districts.
Developments
New procedures have been introduced
to expedite the processing of bylaws by
Ministry staff. An initial draft 'model'
land-use bylaw was also prepared for
application under the proposed Land
Use Act.
Regional Operations
Responsibilities
Our regional offices are responsible for
advising local government during the
preparation and amendment of land-use
plans and regulatory bylaws, as they
affect the province. Regional officers
advise on the acceptability of these
plans and bylaws before submission to
the Minister. They also represent the
Ministry on technical planning and
advisory committees based in the
regions. These planners also review
impact assessment submissions and
take part in provincial planning studies
and programs: as co-ordinators if there
is a primary settlement interest, or as
participants in another Ministry's
planning program.
Developments
During 1981 Regional Director positions
were established in Victoria, Prince
George, Kamloops, Penticton and
Cranbrook. The Victoria position was
filled in August, and by year-end
interviews for the other positions were
complete. Successful candidates were
found for all but the Cranbrook office.
Planning Grants Program
Genera/
The Ministry continued during 1981 with
the Annual Planning Grants program
which had been introduced in 1978.
Municipalities and regional districts
were encouraged to prepare official
plans as well as implement bylaws
following adoption of these plans. The
program, established under the
Revenue Sharing Act, provided $1
million each in grants to municipalities
and regional districts. The individual
grants were assessed on a cost-
sharing basis, with the maximum
amount available for each grant being
determined by the 1976 census
population of the area.
Municipalities
Shareable planning grants were
available to municipalities for the
preparation of official community plans <
and related programs. Shareable grants f
paid for two-thirds of the costs incurred 3
in the preparation of Ministry-approved
portions of the total planning program
for the municipality. Grants were made
on the basis of $1.00 per capita with a
minimum grant available of $15,000 and
a maximum of $75,000, depending on
the municipality's 1976 population,   j
Regional Districts
Under the Annual Planning Grants   \
program each regional district wasM
eligible for a portion of the $1 million
fund, provided there was an
undertaking to prepare Official
Settlement Plans or their implemenuB
bylaws. These grants paid for two- |
thirds of the costs incurred in the
preparation of those portions of the J
regional district's planning program,
approved by the Ministry. Regional
districts were eligible as follows:
$1.00 per capita for the first 10,000
population
$ .50 per capita for the next 20,000
population
$ .25 per capita for the next 30,000
population
$ .10 per capita for the remainder
In addition to the Annual Planning   ,
Grants Program, unconditional grants
were paid to regional districts for
general planning. These grants were
calculated on the basis of population:
$ .20 per capita, with a minimum of
$7,000 and a maximum of $10,000. i
Bylaw. Processing
The Minister of Municipal Affairs
approves all Official Settlement Plans,
as well as Regional District zoning and
subdivision bylaws where Official |
Settlement Plans are not in effect. The
Branch also advises the Inspector of
Municipalities on Village plans and
bylaws. Bylaw review and advisory  I
services take from 60%/70% of staff
time. New internal procedures andj|
additions to Regional Office staff will
greatly improve these services providec
by the Branch.
20
Ministry of MuniCM
 APPROVED MUNICIPAL PLANNING GRANTS, 1981
hfipality
p.
Aistrong
Cstlegar
tJrtenay
Embrook
Ewson Creek
Fnie
■lid Forks
E ten wood
Knloops
kowna
Etberley
-igley
iirritt
iliaimo
jlspn
■In Westminster
aj-th Vancouver
'iticton
>t Alberni
>t Moody
Mce George
Uelstoke
| i island
il
fnon
':oria
IV.
/Ston
'ksville
'iceton
iney
Hams Lake
ies:
rtBay
icarra
!;he Creek
ase
ford
1 Nelson
1 St. James
litvale
isons
Id RiVer
inisle
rrison Hot Springs
zelton
lermere
slo
Planning
Grant
'■    1,700
2,900
7,685
8,000
13,333
15,000
6,667
8,000
42,956
31,000
15,000
10,000
15,000
26,857
5,000
25,000
13,333
10,000
12,000
15,000
19,333
2,000
15,000
12,667
17,546
40,000
3,630
10,063
6,000
5,667
7,033
10,000
8,800
15,000
2,333
15,000
11,000
2,667
9,067
8,000
7,267
2,000
5,000
12,000
15,000
5,000
Municipality
Keremeos
Lake Cowichan
Lillooet
Logan Lake
Lumby
McBride
Masset
Midway
Montrose
Nakusp
Oliver
100 Mile House
Osoyoos
Port Clements
Port Edward
Sechelt
Telkwa
Districts:
Burnaby
Campbell River
Central Saanich
Chilliwack
Coldstream
Coquitlam
Delta
Houston
Langley
Maple Ridge
Matsqui
Mission
New Hazelton
North Saanich
North Vancouver
Oak Bay
Pitt Meadows
Port Hardy
Powell River
Richmond
Saanich
Salmon Arm
Spallumcheen
Sparwood
Squamish
Stewart
Summerland
Surrey
Terrace
Whistler
Planning
Grant
3,500
15,000
7,000
15,000
3,520
15,000
12,000
4,000
6,533
15,000
6,167
2,423
3;800
6,667
15,000
15,000
15,000
$ 26,667
15,000
4,733
37,055
3,300
44,667
10,000
14,887
23,667
18,480
29,333
7,400
15,000
15,000
33,667
17,658
15,000
2,000
12,867
16,827
73,383
7,990
1,467
15,000
7,867
3,483
12,500
51,647
15,000
15,000
Total number of Municipalities: 93
deport 1981
21
 APPROVED MUNICIPAL PLANNING GRANTS, 1981
Regional District
Alberni-Clayoquot
Bulkley-Nechako
Capital
Cariboo
Central Fraser Valley
Central Kootenay
Central Okanagan
Columbia-Shuswap
Comox-Strathcona
Cowichan Valley
Dewdney-Alouette
East Kootenay
Fraser-Cheam
Fraser-Fort George
Planning
PlanniitQl
Grant
Regional District
Grant
$ 20,208
Greater Vancouver
132,360
20,000
Kitimat-Stikine
20,658
46,911
Kootenay Boundary
20,341
23,853
Mount Waddington
10,636
31,553
Nanaimo
26,273"
23,204
North Okanagan
8.00C
28,149
Okanagan-Similkameen
24,1001
20,971
Peace River-Liard
22.81C
25,280
Powell River
14,500
22,998
Skeena-Queen Charlotte
15,422
24,427
Squamish-Lillooet
11,925;
23 229
Sunshine Coast
10,965
24,000
Thompson-Nicola
31,800
29,908    TOTAL
$714,4!
APPROVED REGIONAL DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMS, 1981
Regional District
Planning
Grant
Program
Alberni-Clayoquot
Bulkley-Nechako
Capital
Cariboo
Central Fraser Valley
$ 20,208 West Coast settlement plans study;
Settlement plan implement report —
Alberni Valley
Zoning bylaw update.
20,000 Official Settlement Plans for
Takla Lake
South Bank Rural
Burns Lake Rural (Revision)
Zoning bylaw for Burns Lake Rural Area;   ;
Zoning bylaw for Fraser Lake Rural Area; j
Zoning bylaw for Houston-Topley Rural Area;
Zoning bylaw for Granisle-Topley Landing Area;
Zoning bylaw for Smithers-Telkwa Area;
Zoning bylaw for South Bank Rural Area. 1
46,911 Preparation and publication of regional issues;
Preparation of general portions of the Regior
Plan;
Formulate Preliminary Growth Strategy for Offic
Regional Plan;
Preparation of draft Official Regional Plan. 1
23,853 Official Settlement Plans for
Quesnel Fringe Area
Williams Lake Fringe Area;
Regional District Zoning bylaw.
31,553 Lower Mainland Industrial Study;
Zoning bylaw for Electoral Area "A";
Subdivision bylaw for Electoral Area "A";
Official Regional Plan — Transportation Schedu!
22
Ministry of Municipal
 MliiiiiiiiiiHiiiii i 1
li!tWBlBS!Sa*a^^                                                                                                                                 a^^afSi^jga^aJ^JK^^S
APPROVED REGIONAL DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMS, 1981 Continued
Planning
jjnal District
Grant
Program
ral Kootenay
23,204
Crawford Bay soil study;
Zoning bylaw for Electoral Area "I".
,al Okanagan
28,149
Official Settlement Plans for
Electoral area "A";
Electoral area "G".
nbia-Shuswap
$ 20,971
Official Settlement Plans for
Seymour Arm — Public hearing to approval
Salmon Valley — Public hearing to approval
Blind Bay/Notch Hill/Sorrento — Public hearing
to approval
North Shuswap — Draft;
Revelstoke (Rural);
Zoning bylaw for Seymour Arm — Draft;
Zoning bylaw for Salmon. Valley — Draft;
Zoning bylaw for Blind Bay/Notch Hill/Sorrento —
Draft;
Zoning bylaw for North Shuswap — Draft.
Bjx-Strathcona
25,280
Official Settlement Plans for
Comox Valley
Black Creek-Oyster Bay;
East Coast Zoning bylaw amendment;
East Coast Subdivision bylaw amendment;
Quadra Island Zoning bylaw amendment;
Quadra Island Subdivision bylaw amendment.
|chan Valley
22,998
Official Settlement Plans for
Cowichan-Koksilah
Cowichan Lake.
tlney-Alouette
24,427
Lower    Maindland    Industrial    Implementation
Project;
Update Transportation Policies of the Official Regional Plan;
Preparation of a Monitoring Program forthe Official
Regional Plan;
Subdivision Bylaw for Electoral Areas "A", "B",
"C", "D" and "E".
■Kootenay
23,229
Official Settlement Plans for
North end of Lake Windermere
Kimberley Area (Rural).
air-Cheam
24,000
Official Settlement Plans for
Electoral Area "E"
Electoral Area "D"
Hemlock Valley;
Official Regional Plan — Text amendments;
Participation in Lower Mainland Industrial Study.
Bir-Fort George
$ 29,908
Official Settlement Plans for
Taber Lake-Stone Creek;
Zoning bylaw for Valemount-Tete Jaune;
Zoning bylaw for Taber Lake-Stone Creek.
 23_
 APPROVED REGIONAL DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMS, 1981 Continued
Regional District
Planning
Grant
Program
Greater Vancouver
Kitimat-Stikine
Kootenay- Boundary
Mount Waddington
Nanaimo
North Okanagan
Okanagan-Similkameen     $ 24,100
Peace River-Liard
Powell River
132,360 Growth Trends and Options;
Urban Structure: Concentration and Accessio§!|
Official Regional Plan — Valley wide Industrj
Study;
Extending the Data Base;
Monitoring, Research and Dissemination.
20,658 Official Settlement Plans for
Thornhill
Kitwanga
Greater Hazelton
Greater Terrace;
Thornhill Neighbourhood Plan;
Thornhill Subdivision and Zoning bylaw;
Kitwanga Subdivision and Zoning bylaws. 1
20,231 Official Settlement Plans for
Electoral Area "A"
Electoral Area "D'.'
10,638 Official Settlement Plans for
Quatsino
Malcolm Island
Hyde Creek
Holberg.
26,273 Official Settlement Plans for
Cedar
Cranberry
Bright
French Creek
Nanoose Bay.
8,000 Official Settlement Plans for
Electoral Area "A"
Electoral Area "B"
Electoral Area "C".
Official Settlement Plans for
Penticton
Oliver
Osoyoos
Okanagan Falls
Naramata
Keremeos
Princeton.
22,810 Official Settlement Plan for
Dawson Creek Area;
Dawson Creek Area Zoning bylaw.
14,500 Official Settlement Plans for
Electoral Area "A"
Electoral Area "B"
Electoral Area "C".
Zoning bylaw for Electoral Areas "B" and f
94
Ministry of Municipjja'j)
 APPROVED REGIONAL DISTRICT PLANNING GRANTS
AND PLANNING PROGRAMS, 1981
lal District
Planning
Grant
Program
na-Queen Charlotte       15,422
Himish-Lillooet
Whine Coast
11,925
10,963
tcipson-Nicola
31,800
Total:
$714,481
Official Settlement Plans for
Queen Charlotte City-Skidegate Landing
Sandspit
Dodge Cove.
Whistler-Squamish Corridor Study.
Official Settlement Plans for
Half moon Bay-West Sechelt
Pender Harbour
Elphinstone
West Howe Sound;
Consolidation of Zoning and Subdivision bylaws.
Official Settlement Plans for
Barriere — adoption
South   Thompson   Valley   and   Pinantan   —
adoption
Clearwater
Hat Creek and Environs;
Zoning bylaws Nos. 57 and 500 — review.
-25-
 ssgg&ms^m
■mm
Central Services Branch
Responsibilities
Central Services was established during
the Ministry's recent reorganization to
achieve a higher level of efficiency through
co-ordination of support services for
statutory programs. The branch comprises
the Office of the Comptroller, Financial
Administration, which provides accounting,
payroll, budget preparation and financial
reporting services for all Ministry
programs, and Personnel Services which
meets personnel requirements such as
classification review, labour relations,
recruitment and staff development. The
branch also administers grants and special
programs such as the Downtown
Revitalization Program, Revenue Sharing,
Sewerage Assistance, Home Owner Grant,
Community Services Program and Transit
Services. These grant programs are
designed to assist the capital and
operational requirements of local
governments; they represent approximately
98% of the Ministry's annual expenditure.
The branch manages the physical plant of
the Ministry, with Office Services providing
facilities, computer systems, office supplies
and equipment co-ordination and
management.
Ministty Estimated Expenditures
1981-82
($380.1 million)
Sewerage Assistance Act
The Sewerage Assistance budget for 1981-
1982 was set at $37,350,000, an increase!
of $7,850,000 over the previous year's  1
budget of $29,500,000. Grants of
$35,456,000 were provided under the Acfl
and disbursed as follows:
Category
29 Cities
33 Districts
8 Towns
40 Villages
11 Regional Districts
TOTAL:
Total Grants
$ 10,409,000
19,679,000
966,000
2,742,000
1,660,000
$ 35,456,000 I
Community Services Contribution
Program
This program was introduced in 1980. It
was administered by the Province with  I
funds provided by the federal governmerm
Funds totalling $40.4 million have been
available through the program for municicffl
sewer or water projects. During 1981,
$25,250,000 was paid out on 118 capital
projects in 54 municipalities and 11
regional districts. The program has been
completed and all committed funds claimed
and spent.
SEWERAGE ASSISTANCE GRANTS
MINISTRY PROGRAMS*   '
ADMINISTRATION 1.2%    $4.6 M
HOME OWNER GRANT
ALL OTHER GRANTS 1.8% $7 M
26
Ministry of Municipal
 ■fibourhood Improvement
pram
lleighbourhood Improvement Program
HBhtinued during 1981. An additional
pjects were completed with funds of
ISimately $875,000 being provided to
tinicipalities. This very successful joint
l|pal/provincial/federal program will
included in the coming year.
cipal Commercial Vehicle
ice Program
undred and twenty six municipalities
pated in the Municipal Commercial
IWProgram during the 1981-82
e year. Sales of vehicle plates under
■ogram, which is administered by the
Iry on behalf of the municipalities,
iated $857,051 in revenue during the
Iffter payment of incidental expenses
e funds will be distributed to
tpants on a per capita basis. The
ipalities issued 58,346 licence plates
I the year under review.
i nue Sharing
Ifons of the Revenue Sharing Act,
nve April 1,1978, replaced the
tm $34.00 per capita grant under the
nipalities Aid Act, as well as the interim
3ie sharing program. Under the
pie-sharing formula the annual
Ined dollar yield of 1 personal income
tint, and 1 corporate tax point, 6% of
sable resource, non-renewable
fcxe and sales tax revenue is
luted in the form of municipal and
lial district grants. Grants are
luted as follows:
rs basic municipal grant is $30,000 to
s:h municipality, regardless of its size
||scal capacity.
fer Facilities grants are provided by a
nula which determines the provincial
ttribution in relation to municipal debt
J'icing costs and assessment.
I Housing Growth Grant, introduced in
53, distributes $10,000,000 in
oortion to the number of housing
lis in each municipality and regional
Iffct.
J Municipal Major Road Grants
[gram provided $15 million annually.
Jiicipal Planning Grants are available
fin approved cost-sharing basis.
llWt 1QH1
6. Administration, Planning and Basic
Grants are available to regional districts.
The basic grant is $30,000 per regional
district. The administration grant is
$10,000 per regional district. Geography,
population and development needs
determine the approval of cost-shared
planning grants.
7. The Unconditional Municipal Formula
distributes assistance according to
population, expenditure and tax base.
8. Accelerated Mobile Home Development
Grants are available as approved.
The Revenue Sharing budget for 1981-82
was $213,800,000, an increase of
$37,600,000 over the previous year's
budget of $176,200,000. Of this year's
budget, $162,292,000 was provided for
unconditional grants; water facilities
contributions totalled $18,175,000, and
municipal major road grants were
approximately $11,848,000.
Municipalities received $211,074,000 as
follows:
Catetory
Cities
Districts
Towns
Villages
Regional Districts
TOTAL:
Total Grants
$ 94,416,000
94,894,000
4,971,000
11,271,000
5,522,000
$211,074,000
Financial Administration Services
Responsibilities
The Ministry Comptroller is
responsible for accounting and
fiscal control within the Ministry.
The Accounting section monitors
and processes all Ministry revenue
and expenditure and prepares
financial reports for each program
implemented by the Ministry. The
Section is also responsible for the
preparation of the Ministry
estimates of expenditure together
with consulting and co-ordinating
support for the budget.
Developments
Zero base budgeting was
introduced during 1981 to improve
financial control. The section
continues to strive to evaluate,
27
 WWsM
improve and implement the financial
policies introduced with the new
Financial Administration Act. The
new policies will be implemented by
the Ministry over the next two fiscal
years, in close liaison with the
Office of the Comptroller General,
Ministry of Finance.
In addition to the provision of
financial support services for the
Ministry's statutory programs, the
section administers extensive grant
programs such as Revenue Sharing,
Sewerage Assistance and the Home
Owner Grant.
Personnel Services
Responsibiiities
Services provided by the Personnel
Office to the staff and management
of the Ministry include employee
and labour relations, salary and
other compensation systems, union
contract interpretation and
administration, recruitment and staff
development, work performance
evaluation and organizational and
manpower planning.
Developments
Maintenance activities for 1981
Vacancies filled
21
Promotions within
11
New Positions
4
Reclassifications
14
New Employees
15
Retirements
3
Position Conversions
11
Resignations/Transfers
15
*^m^g^5smmMM
Other developments include the
successful completion of the
Ministry's reorganization, hiring of
staff for the Planning Branch's new
structure, providing a training
assessment for the Ministry and   -.
provision of staff for the Education
and Information Office and the
Downtown Revitalization Program
office. The Personnel Office also ]
contributed to the development of
the new Local Government
Investigations Section.
I
Downtown Revitalization Program   i
The Downtown Revitalization Program was'
introduced in 1980. The sum of $25 million
was committed in special funds to provide t
loans and grants to municipalities who had |
requested that their business cores be M
designated for revitalization.
Most of the year was spent introducing the I
program and assisting municipalities in the
preparation of concept plans. By the end ol
1981, 77 municipalities were designated as
qualifying for the program, with 75 of those <
receiving the $5,000 start-up grant to   ]
develop concept plans. Work on these
plans progressed to the point where by
December 31, 1981, funds totalling $3.9
million and $1.8 million were committed
respectively for streetscape loans and m
facade treatment grants.
Downtown merchants are encouraged to
participate in this program. By year-end, 20
municipalities had formed downtown
merchants' associations, being assisted
with their promotion by $136,000 from the
program.
_28_
Ministry of Municipal J
 ^^^%8&iii^^^^^^^®^^3MgBgiMMi
[icy and
[search Branch
Jiionsibilities
\ ranch provides policy support and
<rch services to the ministry. This
ton requires the development of briefs,
Ijfg papers, and reports to assist the
i :ry in adjusting its policies and
iams to suit changing needs and
instances.
slopments
| g 1981, the branch contributed to
development in a number of fields.
:inal and resource development issues
firamined and reports submitted. The
:h participated in program evaluations
laminations of local government
jures.
i ;h staff advised the Inspector of
uipalities on the development of
itrial tax base sharing arrangements
■s Elk Valley.
l^nch issued a Home Owner Grant
nistration manual and various specialist
nations were drafted.
•ultants were employed to provide
tical advice on such topics as the
ul implications of provincial grants and
idies to local areas.
its Programs
liranch continued its responsibility for
:lating the size and intermunicipal
button of the unconditional grants
mn under Revenue Sharing. A special
I'Uter program and yearly population
iates developed by the Central
itics Bureau in consultation with the
i:h are used for this purpose. Branch
lalso assisted with the design and
luction of the Accelerated Mobile
u Development Program under
He Sharing.
New Legislation
The Building Safety Standards Act was
passed at the spring sitting of the
Legislature. This major legislation will
enable all regulations governing the
construction of buildings, and the
application and administration of those
regulations, to be co-ordinated through one
code. It also provides for an appeal board to
determine appeals on the application of the
code.
Some relatively minor amendments or
additions were made to the Municipal Act,
the Municipal Finance Authority Act, the
Urban Transit Authority Act and the
Municipalities Enabling and Validating Act.
At the fall sitting of the Legislature, Bill 9,
(the Land Use Act), had its first reading,
following extensive consultation with, and
contributions from, interested groups and
individuals in response to a paper circulated
by the Minister. The Act will simplify and
clarify land use regulation.
The Committee established by the Minister
to review the Municipal Act continues its
work. The intention is to modernize the
structure and remove ambiguities, conflicts
and technical deficiences. The Committee's
report will be presented in 1982.
29
 Education and
Information Services
Responsibilities
The Ministry established an Education and
Information Office in 1981, with staff of one
Administrative Officer and a Secretary. The
Education and Information Officer is
Secretary to the Board of Examiners and
the Municipal Administration Education
Council.
The Board of Examiners, established under
the Municipal Act, Section 879, is
responsible for granting administration and
finance proficiency certificates to persons in
municipal employment. Requirements for
certification are the attainment of a
recognized level of academic qualification,
together with the appropriate amount of
experience in local government.
The Board also administers a scholarship
program, (financed by the Province), which
was established to commemorate the 75th
anniversary of the Union of British Columbia
Municipalities. This program gives financial
assistance to persons working in local
government in the province who wish to
upgrade their professional skills through
enrollment in post-secondary courses of
study and attendance at workshops or
seminars relating to local government
administration.
The Board comprises three members
appointed by the Lieutenant Governor-in-
Council as recommended by the Minister of
Municipal Affairs. The members are
nominated by the Union of British Columbia
Municipalities, the Municipal Officers'
Association of British Columbia and the
Minister. Board records are kept by the
Inspector of Municipalities.
Developments
The Board of Examiners awarded the
following certificates in 1981:
Junior Administration     9 (135 to date)
Senior Administration   11 (154 to date)
Senior Finance 5 (137 to date)
The Board also awarded scholarships from
the U.B.C.M. Commemorative Scholarship/
Fellowship Program to 33 applicants in
amounts ranging from $75.00 to $1,300.00.
The Education and Information Officer
works closely with the Municipal
Administration Education Council and the
Municipal Officers' Association. Many j
workshops and seminars on topics of
interest and concern to municipal officers
were arranged during 1981 as a result of
this co-operation.
The Education and Information Office also
produced and distributed two brochuresin
1981: one dealing with the programs of the
Ministry of Municipal Affairs and anotherS
with career and educational opportunities in
municipal administration.
Investigations
(Office of the Inspector of Municipalities)
The investigation function under the OffictS
of the Inspector of Municipalities is in its
formative stages. The Municipal Act
empowers the Inspector of Municipalities^
conduct investigations under specified  J
circumstances. Staff will be appointed, and
the section will be operational in 1982. 9
30
Ministry <
 ping
ndards Branch
©risibilities
ranch provides a complete technical
Dry and support service on the use and
Bfion of the Provincial Building Code
ilated standards. This service includes
jluation of any changes proposed to
iilding and Plumbing Codes and an
sment of new building and plumbing
ral; submitted for approval for use in
ovince. The Branch maintains close
lit with the federal government and
atandards branches in other provinces,
lical advisory service is supplied to
■ministries in the provincial
inment and to those members of the
il connected with building construction.
ilopments
■She year the Branch drafted the B.C.
laitial Conversion Guidelines in
liation with the Ministry of Lands,
lend Housing. This document, along
lie 1980 edition of the Building Code
lie B.C Plumbing Code 1980, was
Illy adopted by Minister's Order in
rmber, 1981. Work also commenced on
Reparation of a revised edition of
[Building Requirements for the
c:ally Handicapped and comprehensive
elments to the National Building Code
a: the needs of our province.
I ranch Director is Chairman of the B.C.
Ing Code Appeal Board which dealt
nore than 80 appeals during 1981. The
I In initiated a less formal approval
I tss for more than 70 other materials or
hms. In addition, the telephone
i>ry service has settled thousands of
Ibs and problems, thereby reducing
tied for more formal appeals. Staff
niers have represented the Province at
eigs and seminars across Canada
tig with code-related subjects and
tied guest speakers for specific
is. The Branch's expanding video tape
y continues to be popular and has
Ih strong demand across the province
I a3ign and inspection groups. The
Iri's word processing equipment is
fitly being converted to an information
|(al system; this should greatly
[ice our service to the public.
Engineering Branch
Responsibilities
The Branch gives engineering advice to the
Ministry, as well as limited advice directly to
municipalities and regional districts.
Developments
During 1981, 26 water and sewer projects
submitted for approval and assistance
under the Revenue Sharing Act and
Sewerage Assistance Act were evaluated
for cost-effectiveness and appropriate
design, resulting in considerable savings
and improvements achieved in co-operation
with local governments.
Twenty-two reports were prepared on
servicing and the implications of proposed
boundary amendments, municipal
restructuring and official community and
settlement plans.
The Ministry of Environment continues to
provide engineering support in the
administration of improvement districts, in
the form of advice and recommendations to
our Ministry and technical support and
guidance to improvement districts, as
requested.
The technical aspects of 99 bylaws were
examined in 1981; recommendations were
made on 23 requests for release of special
trust funds. The technical implications of ten
proposed incorporations and boundary
adjustments were examined. Sixty-two
miscellaneous investigations and reports
were made on, for example, complaints and
enquiries regarding service, subdivision,
system extension proposals, supply
agreements, system capacity appraisals
and well tests. Proposals for major projects
were appraised, or engineering studies
undertaken for eleven improvement
districts.
The section also evaluated 80 applications
by improvement districts for financial
assistance under the 1981 Improvement
District Assistance Program, and
recommended on grants totalling
$1,000,000 provided under the program.
Ilarwt 1QR1
31
 Islands Trust
Responsibilities
The Islands Trust is an Agency established
in 1974 by an Act of the British Columbia
Legislature. The Islands Trust Act gives the
Trust the responsibility of preserving and
protecting the unique amenities and
environment of the Trust Area'for the benefit
of the people of the Islands and the
Province.
Authority for such protection now resides
with the Trust, following amendment in 1977
of Islands Trust Act, which transferred
authority for all land planning matters on the
islands to the Islands Trust from the
Regional Districts.
There is a General Trust committee for the
entire Islands Trust Area which supervises
the operation of the Trust office, and
considers land planning matters which
affect more than one designated group of
islands. Three General Trustees make up
the General Trust Committee and they are
also members of each Local Trust
Committee. The General Trustees are
elected from among the Local Trustees.
There is a Local Trust Committee for each
of 13 groups of designated islands. The
main island in each of the 13 groups is
listed below with the bracketed number
indicating the number of associated islands.
Bowen (5) Hornby (2)
Denman (5) Lasqueti (24)
Activity Statistics
Local Trust Committee Meetings Held
General Trust Meetings Held
Council Meetings Held
Bylaws Passed
Bylaws in Process at Year End
Subdivision Applications Reviewed
Rezoning Applications Received
Crown Lease Applications Received
Siting Permits for Hornby and Denman
Agricultural Land Reserve Applications
Public Hearings Held
Board of Variance Applications
Development Permit Applications Received
Gabriola (22)
Galiano(10)
Gambier (24)
Saturna(12)
Thetis (15)
Mayne (2)
North Pender (26)
Salt Spring (28)
South Pender (2)
Each designated island group elects two
Local Trustees, who serve a two-year term. |
They serve as two members of a five- ■
member Local Trust Committee for that
island group. The Committee is responsible:
for all local planning, e.g., zoning,
community plans and local policy.
There are approximately 270 non-
designated islands under the jurisdiction of
the General Trust.
Sub-Agencies
Advisory Planning Commission: 13 have
been appointed, mostly after local elections.
These Commissions involve 65 residents or
owners in addition to the Local Trustees.
They advise the Local Trust Committees on
planning matters referred to them.
Boards of Variance: 13 Boards of Variance
have been sent up based on three groups ol
three persons.
Council: This is an informal quarterly
meeting of two days at which all 26 Trustees
meet to discuss a wide range of subjects of
more than local importance.
1980
1981]
66
72
24
24
3
4
36
49
32
34]
155
198
30
30
96
96
115
138
25
35
18
16
11
26
19
20
3?
Ministry of Municipal A
 mmsmxmmamammm&i
^@mm^%g&Ms^
Hccn
Public Involvement
llsity of Victoria co-op student
The Trust encourages public involvement in
Id a study on the effects of forestry
planning for the islands. In addition to the
1 jistrial wildlife in the Trust Area. More
100 Islanders directly
involved in
lapping of Trust Area conditions was
committees and commissions, the public
Ited and a report on Mobile Homes
participates at meetings held on the islands
and obtains information from newsletters,
publications, notices
on island r.otirc-
Hal Policy Formulation
boards and newspaper advertisements. The
Is developed by the General Trust
Trust's Zenith number is used extensively.
ii advice of all Local Trustees,
An example of a publication is "The
|y through Council and its
Islands", a Trust newsletter which was first
■tees. The main source of Trust Area
published in 1981.
twill be the Regional Plan which is
Six meetings were held on the islands to
hi under the Municipal Act. The
involve the public in
^egional Plan
e> of preparing the plan continued in
preparation.
Did involved a Committee of Trustees,
1 d technical liaison with other
List of Trustees
pes.
Bowen Island
Betty Black,
lowing Committees of Council
John Rich
Inn indication of the subjects which
Denman Island
Harlene Holm,
Ijeneral concern to the Trust:
Glen Snook
btion, Wildlife, Energy, and
Gabriola Island
Nelder Boulton,
asportation.
Jim Tyhurst
1 the major issues facing the 1981
Galiano Island
Jim Robertson,
as the proposal for an open pit
tenum mine on Gambier Island and a
Gambier Island
Ron Thompson
Ed Drummond,
led Vancouver Island-mainland ferry
Ann Rogers
ill for Gabriola Island. Both projects
pposed.
Hornby Island
Lasqueti Island
Boh Helliwell,
Carol Martin
Laurence Fisher,
liunity Planning
Mike Humphries
Mayne Island
Joan Sprague,
Immunity planning process is largely
Ed Williams
pn the Community Plans and the
North Pender Island
Emile LeBlanc,
lentation of subdivision and zoning
Gordon Wallace
k Official Community Plans and
Salt Spring Island
Leonard Kreissl,
e and Subdivision Bylaws are
David Lott
l|g in the 13 main islands. Most work
Saturna Island
John Gaines,
bn related to revisions and
Jim Money
hnents.
South Pender Island
Joan Noble,
pe
Bill Norton
Thetis Island
Bill Dickie,
[181-82 Budget for the Trust is
Dick Nixon
lijnately $407,000. This is partly
Bd by a 1.5 mill levy in the Trust Area
laised $155,000. The remainder is
IS directly by the Province. The Trust
j some accounting and personnel
its with other sections of the Ministry
licipal Affairs.
 APPENDIX jj
Table of Contents
TABLE 1 - Municipal Boundary Revisions
1982 jj
TABLE 2 - Growth   in   Combined
Assessed
Values  and  Taxes  in
Municipalities
of British Columbia 3|
TABLE 3 - Percentage Tax Calculations 3
TABLE 4 - Collections, 1980 (with
Comparative Figures for   \
1979)    3|
TABLE 5 - Capital Programs    3
TABLE 6 - Five Year Capital Expenditure
Programmes Summary  3
TABLE7 - Borrowing Authorization, 1981 2
TABLE 8 - Outstanding Debentures
Guaranteed, 1980   4
TABLE 9 - Total Debenture Debt,
December 31, 1980 4
34 Minr'"'nf yLmiei°^'
 TABLE 1
— MUNICIPAL BOUNDARY REVISIONS 1981
AREA (Hectares)
POPULATION
pnipality
Before
Added
After
Before
Added
After
r
Birook
1,630.41
19.14
1,649.55
13,843
Nil
13,843
won Creek
1,909.55
64.75
1,974.3
10,528
Nil
10,528
kon Creek
1,974.3
32.38
2,006.68
10,528
Nil
10,528
iv stoke
lirirporation)
iv stoke1
585.4
3,591.16
3,005.76
(—18.38)
3,591.16
3,572.76
4,644
8,182
3,538
Nil
8,182
8,182
rin
1,938.19
44.51
1,982.7
17,664
4
17,668
In
1,982.7
276.01
2,258.89
17,668
40
17,708
B ns Lake
Ifrirporation)
1,986.8
275.09
2,261.89
6,398
1,183
7,581
pts
rvbell River
13,425.86
16.43
13,442.29
12,240
Nil
12,240
nfoell River
13,442.29
26.17
13,468.48
12,240
190
12,430
htream
7,634.08
11.19
7,645.27
4,995
Nil
4,995
i Hay
1,457.82
179.36
1,637.18
17,658
4
17,662
Irlardy
4,722.99
7.80
4,730.79
3,653
49
3,702
e/ood
5,338.91
12,940.67
18,279.58
4,050
503
4,553
rer Ridge
incorporation)
	
150,407.6
	
	
5
Hi
h>x
888.14
1.34
889.48
5,359
Nil
5,359
Hville
1,037.81
15.15
1,052.96
3,416
2
3,418
Kllle
1,052.96
190.12
1,243.05
3,418
81
3,499
tees
Md
825.54
3,755.33
4,580.87
1,875
Nil
1,875
||
4,580.87
5,931.28
10,512.15
1,875
Nil
1,875
iir Lake
362.23
75.11
437.34
1,430
Nil
1,430
snere
lirirporation)
kCowichan
353.6
298.22
545.42
22.56
899.02
320.78
1,205
2,369
607
52
1,812
2,421
91 Lake
681.19
259.0
940.19
1,388
Nil
1,388
iv
224.02
21.95
245.97
1,641
15
1,656
Elements
340.99
509.7
850.69
409
2
411
|] Coupe
208.09
.47
208.56
776
Nil
776
Oidary Reduction
3
5
 TABLE 2
GROWTH IN COMBINED ASSESSED VALUES AND TAXES
IN MUNICIPALITIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Gross Assessed Values
Assessed Values
Actually Taxed
Tax   j
All
Taxable
Year
Properties
Properties
School
Municipal
Revenue
($ Millions)
($ Millions)
($ Millions)
($ Millions)
($ Thousim
1964
4,118
3,534
2,878
2,295
154,074
1977
13.3451
18.1262
11,0871
12,4742
9,030
11,895
853,847
1978
12,020i
18,2322
9,890i
14.9782
9,890
14,379
949,417
1979
13,2861
19.7232
10,8671
16,1082
10,867
15,453
1,029,000
1980
14,2871
21.7412
11.7041
17,9062
11,704
17,240
1,143,000
1981
16,2581
26,0212
13,3321
21,7682
13,332
20,953
1,300»
1 School Valui
us
2Munic
ipai Values
3Estimats
Ministn
 r
TABLE 3
PERCENTAGE TAX CALCULATIONS
1
Current Taxes
Collected as a     Total Collections
Percentage of     as a Percentage
Current Levy       of Current Levy
Outstanding
Taxes as a
Percentage of
Current Levy
t{ Except Vancouver)
             81.10                     99.10
40.16
3.39
3.95
4.68
4.49
4.89
4.65
4.36
4.22
              97.36                    100.69
              96.71                       99.38
              96.28                      99.03
              96.50                     100.04
9.;     	
              96.26                      99.99
&   	
9; 	
91   	
              96.25                    100.41
              96.66                     100.48
              96.70                    100.09
aver
3!  	
K  	
J7   	
              91.00                     103.10
              97.03                     100.82
              96.15                      98.68
30.06
3.51
4.78
5.08
5.18
5.08
4.78
4.47
3.57
9;   	
9;   	
K   	
9"i  	
9,   	
9f  	
               96.02                        98.99
              96.13                      99.26
              96.45                      99.78
              96.68                     100.04
              97.06                     100.39
               97.66                      100.88
iris
9!  	
37  	
37  	
              77.60                      95.80
              97.51                     100.82
              96.62                      98.88
34.81
3.21
4.03
4.23
4.51
4.24
4.36
3.89
3.32
9";  	
97   	
37  	
97  	
97  	
9{  	
              96.68                      99.42
               96.40                        99.53
               96.80                      100.23
              96.63                      99.65
              97.13                     100.43
              97.51                     100.56
m
9E 	
97  	
97  	
97  	
97  	
              89.55                      97.06
              96.75                     100.69
              95.44                      98.78
              95.73                      99.30
95.88                     100.03
13.62
4.48
5.65
5.14
5.19
4.42
4.31
4.18
3.44
97  	
97  	
97  	
9f  	
              96.77                     100.30
              96.64                    100.26
96.75                     101.34
97.45                     100.10
9c  	
97  ....
97 ...
              76.50                      98.30
97.02                     100.41
95.94                      98.85
38.71
3.95
4.96
4.88
5.00
5.23
5.06
4.71
5.45
9/  ..
9i  ..
96.02                      99.52
96.01                       99.36
9i  .
96.07                     100.09
9-  ..
96.19                     100.15
9:  ..
96.45                      100.65
9« ..
95.69                      9908
37
 >!
TABLE 4
COLLECTIONS, 1980 (WITH COMPARATIVE FIGURES FOR 1979|
Current Taxes Collected
as a Percentage of
Current Levy
Outstanding Taxes
as a Percentage of;
Current Levy
1980
1979
1980
1979
Cities   ..
Districts
Towns
Villages
96.70
97.51
97.45
95.69
96.66
97.13
96.75
96.45
4.22
3.32
3.44
5.45
4.36
3.89
4.18
4.71
Total  	
Vancouver   	
97.15
           97.66
96.93
97.06
3.72
3.57
4.09   I
4.47   |
Grand Total   	
           97.25
96.96
3.70
417
TABLE 5 — CAPITAL PROGRAMS
Year
Projects
Undertaken
Works
Completed
Works in
Progress
SOURCE OF FUNDS
Operating       Reserve
Funds           Funds          Grants
1976  .
$
500
$
388
488
401
451
568
$
112
115
134
162
202
$
78
81
76
100
113
$
23
27
46
30
41
$
40
42
37
40
51
1977   a
603
1978  .
535
1979  .
613
1980  .
770
Figures
shown above
are millions
38
Ministry of Municipal
 TABLE 6
St YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE PROGRAMMES SUMMARY BY YEAR
FOR ALL MUNICIPALITIES (INCLUDING VANCOUVER,
| EXCLUDING NEW HAZELTON)
CLASSIFICATION OF EXPENDITURES
Water Sewer General Total
124,262,448 114,796,220 554,929,038 793,987,706
57,998,960 53,584,343 376,902,097 488,485,400
i  41,198,535 46,532,385 343,125,672 430,856,592
48,840,135 34,228,353 291,423,486 374,491,974
49,832,985 37,904,383 282,770,138 370,507,506
w      	
    322.133.063    287.fMS Rfl4  1 fi/lQ 1RO 431   0 4R8 !-.9Q 178
I                      I                                     1                      J                      1                                      1                      IW        V,   ■         w
PROPOSED SOURCE OF FUNDS
1 Operating
. Revenue
Reserve      Prior Year's     Debenture
Grants           Funds           Surplus           Sales             Total
& 65,995,889 68,649,872 155,316,977 10,251,278 393,773,690 793,987,706
3.116,342,373 46,991,664 74,035,382 1,795,700 249,320,281 488,485,400
31110,367,341 25,609,758 64,360,213 1,536,100 228,983,180 430,856,592
|B6,456,407 15,383,416 55,990,295 1,152,000 195,509,856 374,491,974
117,451,921 16,631,013 52,684,701 766,500 192,973,371 370,507,506
06,613,931
173,265,723
402,387,568     15,501,578   1,260,560,378
2,458,329,178
TABLE 7 — BORROWING AUTHORIZATION
, 1981
irpose
Regional
District
Cities       Districts      Towns
Villages
Total
Mirks    17,299,008 14,180,628 17,382,600 608,250   2,672,778 52,143,264
H|  7,002,800 31,316,600 11,186,000 3,954,000   1,290,775 54,750,175
Hid
Ron    1,867,265   1,416,653 11,889,688 —               — 15,173,606
iEildings  1,055,000      371,500      600,000 —            356,255 2,382,755
Hint (including
Hsction)  1,432,009      383,126   1,410,000 14,342 3,239,477
pngible
ts    204,000 11,074,48121,208,400 —            180,000 32,666,881
■|. 28,860,082 58,742,988 63,676,688 4,562,250   4,514,150   160,356,158
Wmgible assets include land assembly, road improvement and sidewalks, and storm
[at.
ect msi
39
 TABLE 8
OUTSTANDING DEBENTURES GUARANTEED, 1980
Municipal
Acti
Municipalities
Aid Act2
Total
Cities (excluding Vancouver)           3,792,000 1,800,500 5,59§5G
Districts             718,800 2,850,958 3,56=W5
Towns                  9,500 134,000 143,5C
Villages               859,000 1,672,123 2,531*12
Regional Districts            875,000 — 875.0C
Sub-total  ..i       6,254,300 6,457,581 12,711,88
Vancouver                — 336,000 336.0C
Greater Victoria Water District               — 87,000 87.0C
Greater Nanaimo Sewer District            — 468,000 468.0C
Greater Vancouver Water District             — 10,283,000 10,283$)
Total           6,254,300 17,631,581 23,885,88
1Debt from improvement districts assumed by municipalities, formerly issued under the
Improvement Districts Assistance Loan Act.
2Formerly known as Municipalities Assistance Act.
TABLE 9
TOTAL DEBENTURE DEBT, DECEMBER 31, 1980
Sold
Unissued
and
Unsold
Total
$ $ $
Cities     252,669,428 63,513,534 316,182,$
Districts     391,919,476 105,103,646 497,023,1
Towns      21,881,854 10,573,250 32,455,1
Villages      56,733,663 16,938,426 73.672.C
Regional Districts     148,751,236 58,032,856 206,784,(]
Sub-totals    871,955,657 254,161,712 1,126,117,;!
Vancouver     195,034,546 — 195,034,!
Total     1,066,990,203 254,161,712
1,321,151,.
40
Ministry of Munigpaj

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