BC Sessional Papers

Ministry of Human Resources Annual Report 1980-81 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1982]

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 n
listry of        I
man Resources
nnual Report
)80-81
Province of
British Columbia
 W\
Office of the Minister of Human Resources,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, BC
March, 1982
The Honourable Henry Bell-Irving, D.S.O., O.B.E., E.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia
MAY IT PLEASE YOUR HONOUR:
The Annual Report of the Ministry of Human Resources for
fiscal year 1980-81 is herewith respectfully submitted.
grace McCarthy
Minister of Human Resources
 ms of Human Resources,
xia, BC
ih, 1982
Honourable Grace McCarthy,
liter of Human Resources,
,'ria, BC
urn:
aiffrie honour to submit the Annual Report of the Ministry
Ijman Resources for fiscal year 1980-81.
1 NOBLE,
|ity Minister of Human Resources
 HIGHLIGHTS OF 1980-81
Report of the Deputy Minister, John
Noble
This year the Ministry of Human Resources
has taken a new approach to its annual report.
We have developed a new format and included
additional information to provide for greater
public accountability. The changes also respond
to recommendations made by the provincial
Auditor General in 1980.
The Human Resources Ministry volunteered
to be the first provincial ministry to participate in
such a comprehensive audit, which differs from
a traditional audit in that it assesses other factors
besides financial management. The 1980 comprehensive audit examined all of the ministry's
activities including its management and information controls and systems. The findings and
recommendations of this audit were presented
to the Legislative Assembly in the Auditor General's 1980 report.
Recommendations were made in several
areas, including the reporting of information on
performance and other factors, financial management and control, electronic data processing
and internal audit procedures. The ministry has
taken steps to address the recommendations in
each of these areas. Developments initiated during 1980-81 are included in the appropriate sections of this annual report.
To improve information on the ministry's activities we are now using a fiscal year reporting
format, rather than reporting on the calendar
year as we have done since 1973. This report
provides information for the period April 1,
1980 to March 31, 1981. A fiscal year reporting
format provides for more relevant and accurate
statistics since our estimates, accounting procedures, contracts and community grants are all
based on a fiscal year system.
To ease the transition to a fiscal year format
and to provide complete information for the fiscal year 1980-81, this report repeats some information that was included in the ministry's 1980
annual report.
To further improve the ministry's accountability, this annual report includes additional statistics to present a more complete picture of the
ministry's activities. Information (on statutory
authorities and objectives) is included for each
program area. In some areas, additional program measures are included to report on program operations, activities and performance to
indicate the extent to which programs have succeeded in meeting their objectives.
Program descriptions have also been expand.
ed to include historical information illuaratin!
the progress and changes in ministry programs
This information will be periodically included ir
future annual reports to summarize furthei
developments.
For the first time in several years, this annual
report includes information on regional developments and highlights. This will give a per
spective on the various ways that regions respond to the needs of their communitieammin
the statutory responsibilities of the minisfjfas
whole.
This revision of the annual report is a significant step for the ministry but it is just a first step
in what will be a major focus of the ministry in
years to come: to develop and implement expanded performance measurement systems to
allow for analysis of program delivery and cost
effectiveness. We continue to work for improved accountability both to the legislature and
to the people of British Columbia. For example,
in February 1981, field testing of a revised comprehensive audit process was carried out in two
ministry district offices. The results will be analyzed to determine whether present audit systems should be revised.
September 1980 marked the introduction of
the Individual Opportunity Plan — an individualized approach that helps employable income
assistance recipients to find independence. The
plan is based on a recognition of the temporary
nature of most of the i ncome assistance caseload
and on an awareness of the individual needs and
abilities of our clients. Ministry staff work with
selected clients to develop a personalized approach to job finding and educational upgrading
that supports the individual's goals. The personalized approach might include counselling,
community college courses, on-the-job training
and experience, or intensive seminars such as
the two-week Job Action program that shows clients how to get and keep the job they want. Already th is approach is showing results in each of
the regions around the province.
Another major achievement of the ministry reflects the new directions of our work with families and children in recent years. In August,
1980, the new Family and Child Service Act was
passed by the provincial Legislature. This act, to
be proclaimed in 1981, takes into account more
than 1,200 submissions on a white paper on
children's legislation. It reflects the emphasis on
family support services in recent years.
In 1980-81, the ministry focussed a greatdeal
of attention on the areas of planning for the de
velopment of new community resources
for the
 Lly handicapped. This was a priority for
Lthe International Year of Disabled Per-
s'he ministry is placing special emphasis
far on developing systems to evaluate and
Lrthe resources and services available for
didicapped. We will be working together
tie Ministries of Education, Health, Attor-
Lneral and Labour to develop an integrat-
3i to develop an awareness of the abilities
fabled people in British Columbia.
k;hout the 80s, attention will be focussed
fionding to the needs of the handicapped
i it of our population and supporting their
bation in society.
illy, on the subject of the 1980s, I would
f mention that working in the social ser-
L;eld during this period of accelerated so-
td economic changes is a challenge for all
Ministry staff deserve full recognition for
Indication to the principle of helping peo-
r/elop their own independence.
  able of Contents
SoN I FINANCIAL REPORT
Ifflptry Financial Data   10
IFeaeral and Municipal Program Cost-Sharing      12
CTION II ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION
Regional Map     14
I Ministry Administration and Organization     15
Service Delivery System     16
I Organizational Chart     17
ivynistry Comptroller's Office     17
Management Information Services   18
[Audit Team     18
I Office Supply and Services    18
Personnel and Staff Training    19
I nformation Services      20
I tesearch and Statistics   20
I ederal-Provincial Agreements    21
Community Human Resources and Health Centres     22
| 'rogram Evaluation and Planning Support     22
TON III FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES
nttpduction to Programs and Services     24
jarnily Support Services   24
Ipfant Development     24
Child Day-care Subsidy    25
CHANCE     27
Special Services to Children    27
I Children's Rehabilitation Resources   28
i Emily Support Homemakers     28
'hild Protection Services     29
ervices for Children in Care     35
c Foster Homes     36
I Specialized Resources for Children     36
doption Services      38
c Post-Adoption Services      41
PjfON IV INCOME ASSISTANCE
iitroduction to Programs and Services     44
■financial Assistance    44
I CAIN Basic Income Assistance     44
! CAIN for Handicapped     45
- GAIN Seniors Supplement     47
I Other Services and Benefits     47
School Start-Up Allowance    47
Christmas Supplementary Allowance      47
Camp Fees    48
Crisis Grants     48
Diet Allowance    48
Natal Allowance    48
Comforts Allowance   48
Guide Dog Allowance    48
Burial of Indigents      48
Repatriation    49
Transition Houses and Hostels     49
 Ministry Inspectors     50
Rental Assistance     51
RentAid      51
SAFER   51
Adult Rehabilitation     52
Incentive Allowance      53
Earnings Exemption     53
Community Involvement    53
Assistance to Employment   54
Educational, Vocational and Rehabilitative Services    54
Work Activity      54
Job Action     55
SECTION V HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Health Care Services     58
Pharmacare     59
SECTION VI COMMUNITY SERVICES
Community Grants     62
Achievement Centres    69
Lower Mainland Special Services      73
Emergency Services     74
Emergency Shelters      78
Child Abuse Team      78
Medical Clinic and Clinical Services   81
In-Home Services    81
Senior Citizens' Counsellors     81
Seniors' Day Centres     82
Bus Passes     83
British Columbia Council for the Family   83
SECTION VII RESIDENTIAL SERVICES FOR THE
MENTALLY HANDICAPPED
Introduction to Residential Services   86
Community Residential Care      86
Residential Centres   88
Woodlands      88
Tranquille      89
Glendale     90
SECTION VIII LEGISLATION    93
 SECTION I
Financial Report
 10        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
MINISTRY FINANCIAL DATA
Figure 1  Expenditures of the Ministry*, 1980-81
(Total $754.8 million)                                 	
/                       Income Assistance                        a
/                and GAIN for Handicapped
/                         $378.9           50.2%
j          Adult
I Rehabilitation
—j          $9.9       1.3%
-J       Administration
Family and       \                        /       I     \   \    n.
7        $16.9        2.2%
Children's ^^-\                   /          /       \       \  ^\    ^^*
J ^"^ Community
Services             \         /             j         \       \      \^
'        Programs
$82.5        10.8%   \./                  /            \          \      ^Y
^\  $21.9       2.9%
GAIN
Direct       \^            /               \            ^/\
Seniors
Community   /-^^     /                    \        .^—        \
Supplement
Services       '      ^"^C  1~-"    \             ^
a     $25.1       3.3%
$74.3       10%      Health       [  "       Programs
Rental
Services     '           for Retarded
Aid
* Expenditure figures in millions of dollars.               $66.9     8.8%    $49.2      6.5%
$29.2       4%
Table 1 Gross Expenditures, Comparison
of Fiscal Years 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year                               Amount
1980-81                         $754,877,153
1979-80                          648,800,000
1978-79                            558,500,000
1977-78                          544,500,000
1976-77                          481,000,000
Table 2 Summary of Expenditures Related to Estimates, Fiscal Year 1980-81 (000s)
Main       Additional
Percentage
Ove
Estimate      Authori-         Total
Actual        of Total
(Undl
VOTE DESCRIPTION                              Voted          zation        Estimate
Expenditure Expenditure
Expajl
Direct Community Services
and Administrative Support                $ 73,635                       $ 73,635
$ 69,402               9.2
$(43
Services for Families and
Children                                                     87,159                             87,159
82,484             10.9
(47
Health Services                                             71,279                             71,279
66,914               8.9
(46
Community Projects                                     22,012              400         22,412
21,940               2.9
7
GAIN Programs                                          433,603           7,200      440,803
443,124            58.7
22
Special Programs for the
Retarded                                                    52,111                              52,111
49,182               6.5
(22
Building Occupancy Charges and
Computer and Consulting
Charges                                                      22,933                             22,933
21,655               2.9
(17
TOTALS          762,732           7,600       770,332
754,701           100
(153
 FINANCIAL REPORT       11
ile 3 Summary Showing Geographic
Distribution of Expenditures, 1980-81
(000s)
Percentage
of Total
Regionalized
ion
Expenditure
Costs
IWcouver East
$  19,591
4.2
Vancouver Burrard
35,426
7.6
■ Okanagan
30,241
6.5
Kootenays
17,598
3.8
i Prince George-Cariboo
27,643
5.9
mser Valley
29,949
6.4
I Prince Rupert-Bulkley Valley
10,554
2.3
North and South Peace River
8,974
1.9
Kamloops Mainline
23,143
5.0
Vancouver Island North of Malahat
38,716
8.3
Victoria*
40,879
8.8
I Fraser South
18,403
3.9
[Rraaser North
28,361
6.1
[North Shore-Sunshine Coast
18,370
3.9
(.Downtown Strathcona
22,798
4.9
Vancouver South
26,358
5.7
Vancouver West
19,199
4.1
limey
22,045
4.7
ICoquitlam-Maple Ridge
21,434
4.6
l/er Mainland Special Services
6,752
1.4
111 of Regionalized Expenditures
466,434
100
[itrally administered programs,
[long Pharmacare, Dental Program,
Mfor Seniors, SAFER and RentAid
203,956
[idential Centres (Woodlands,
liquille and Glendale)
49,182
Irffistration (including building
fugancy and computer charges)
34,600
hparate financial coding systems for Regions 11 and 20
re not established for the 1980-81 fiscal year.
Region
ngures report on both regions.
1   aa
 12        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1.
■-81
FEDERAL AND MUNICIPAL
PROGRAM COST-SHARING
The Ministry of Human Resources provides a
range of services to families, children, and persons disadvantaged because of age, handicap,
or unemployment. The federal government contributes a significant share of the ministry's operating and program costs under an agreement
with the provinces in the Canada Assistance
Plan (CAP) Act of April 1, 1966.
The Canada Assistance Plan accounts section
of the Ministry of Human Resources is responsible for filing all claims for cost-sharing under the
Canada Assistance Plan. According to the terms
of the Canada Assitance Plan, the province may
claim up to 50 per cent of provincial expenditures on income assistance and social services
from the federal government.
Under the British North America Act, the
province is responsible for providing social programs. The federal government restricts the
types of programs it will support. For example,
the ministry provides certain programs, such as
RentAid, SAFER and Pharmacare, to persons 65
years of age and over, but the federal government does not share in the cost.
During fiscal year 1980-81, ministry expenditures totalled $754.9 million, of which $641.2
million (84.94 per cent) was eligible for cost-
sharing. The ministry received $320.6 million
(42.47 per cent) from the federal government
under the Canada Assistance Plan.
In 1979, the ministry supported the provincial
Auditor-General's comprehensive audit program, part of which was to ensure that full advantage was being taken of the cost-sharing provisions of the act. As a result of this audit, the
ministry is conducting a full review of all ministry programs, and has provided cost-sharing
guidelines to other ministries in the province. Efforts are also underway to obtain maximum
cost-sharing by improving administrative procedures within the provincial government.
The Department of Indian and Northern Affairs reimbursed the province for $11 million
spent on services to status Indians on reserves,
including children in care, in 1980-81.
Historically, local authorities have been responsible for providing social assistance programs. Between 1974 and 1977, the administration of social services was integrated in the
Ministry of Human Resources. The Municipal
Act (section 697), however, requires municipalities with more than 2,500 residents to contribute to the costs of providing income assistance.
In the years 1974-75 through 1978-79, mii
palities were required to contribute 10 pe:
of the costs of shareable programs. This Ml
duced in 1979 to seven per cent, and h
mained at this level.
Table 4 Monthly Per Capita Rates
Total Pay
Monthly
ment to
Muntl
Per
General
Sil
Capita
Revenue
of 11
Charge
Fund
Col
Fiscal Year
($ million)
($ million)
(per 'tj
1980-81
1.20
28.5
1979-80
1.06
25.2
1978-79
1.01
24.4
1
1977-78
1.38
21.6
1
1976-77
1.51
31.2
1
 SECTION II
Administration
and Organization
 14        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
]
Ministry of Human Resources Regional Map
Region 1: Vancouver East
Region 2: Vancouver Burrard
Region 3: Okanagan
Region 4: Kootenays
Region 5: Prince George-Cariboo
Region 6: Fraser Valley
Region 7: Prince Rupert-Bulkley Valley
Region 8: North and South Peace River
Region 9: Kamloops Mainline
Region 10: Vancouver Island North of Malahat
Region 11: Victoria West
Region 12: Fraser South
Region 13: Fraser North
Region 14: North Shore-Sunshine Coast
Region 15: Downtown Strathcona
Region 16: Vancouver South
Region 17: Vancouver West
Region 18: Surrey
Region 19: Coquitlam-Maple Ridge
Region 20: Victoria East
 ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION
15
MINISTRY ADMINISTRATION
ND ORGANIZATION
ie Ministry of Human Resources delivers a
load range of social services and income secu-
y programs, including income assistance, as-
'stance to the handicapped and the elderly,
I if Id welfare services, services to the handi-
ipped, subsidies for day-care, homemakers,
id a variety of other programs. Policy, priorities
id program content for these services and pro-
ams are determined by government through
Inflation,    and    cabinet    and    ministerial
Irection.
The nature of ministry programs and functions
Iquires a regionalized structure, assisted by a
lirjaalized core of tightly integrated programs
lid support services. The regional, institutional,
id headquarter levels are inter-related in a
IKix-type" organizational structure. Togeth-
, they work to decentralize all practical deci-
hMmaking. Direction and control of theorga-
zation is provided by the office of the deputy
inister and executive staff.
entral Administration
ie deputy minister and assistant deputy minis-
f are responsible for ensuring that the minis-
''s policies, priorities, and program content,
ilJIpnined by the government, are properly ad-
inistered. Eleven senior and middle manage-
ent staff members report directly to the office
the deputy. The assistant deputy minister is
legated organizational responsibilities as-
;ned to the deputy minister, and any of these
management staff members may report to the
sistant deputy minister. In addition to the dep-
y and assistant deputy, the office of the deputy
iniker consists of a co-ordinator, executive
iff, and six administrative support staff.
Executive committee members advise the
puty minister on policy and administration,
d assume overall responsibility for assigned
ograms and the delivery of all services in des-
lated geographic areas of the province. The
-rribers include the deputy and assistant depu-
minister, five executive directors, and the
n]|try comptroller. Program and regional as-
ingients to executive committee members
ay change occasionally in response to shifting
)rk-load demands and priorities. Assignments
executive committee members in 1980-81
depicted on the organizational chart.
11
Residential Centres
There are three residential centres which provide care for the mentally handicapped: Glen-
dale Lodge in Victoria, Tranquille near Kamloops, and Woodlands in New Westminster.
Through these residential centres, the ministry
provides comprehensive assessment, planning,
training, and residential services for mentally
handicapped adults and children.
Headquarters Support Services
Four program divisions provide support to regional and district staff. These are Family and
Children's Services, Income Assistance, Community Services, and Health Care Services. The
major responsibilities of these divisions are program planning co-ordination and monitoring,
policy development and documentation, and
consultative services for regional and district
staff on policy, practice and procedural
questions.
Lower Mainland Special Services provides
specific service to regions in the Vancouver and
Lower Mainland areas. These services include
after-hours emergency services, emergency
homemakers, medical and orthopsychiatric
clinical services, a child abuse team, and the
Helpline for Children.
The office of the comptrol ler is responsible for
providing support services to the organization,
in accounting and office administration. Responsibilities include paying accounts and preparing the payroll, assisting in budget preparation, providing financial management reports,
distributing office supplies and equipment, providing property services, and preparing statistical and other record material.
Personnel and Staff Training provides support
services in organization and classification studies, labour relations, safety, and in the recruitment, orientation, work performance evaluation, and training of staff. This division is also
responsible for delivering library services to
ministry staff.
Other central support divisions include: Management Information Services, which is responsible for co-ordinating the development, design,
implementation and maintenance of management information and operating systems; Information Services, which provides public relations and communication services; the Audit
Team, which is responsible for internal auditing
to ensure that payments and practices correspond to policy; Federal-Provincial Agreements,
 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
which provides consultation and evaluation relating to cost-sharing in ministry programs; and
Pharmacare, which provides full or partial assistance with the cost of designated prescription
drugs and medical supplies.
SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEM
The ministry's basic delivery unit for its numerous social welfare programs is the local district
office, under the direction of a district supervisor. District offices are located in all larger communities and within relatively easy commuting
distance of smaller communities, except along
the British Columbia coast and in the extreme
northwest of the province. Offices are located
and staffed to serve a particular neighbourhood
or area.
The province has been divided into management regions, each under the direction of a regional manager. The regional manager, who reports to an executive director, is accountable for
delivery of social services and income assistance programs within his region. His responsibility is to ensure that delivery takes place according to established policy, and to the level of
quality defined by the ministry. The regional
manager has significant autonomy in managing
staff, deploying resources, reviewing and approving contractual services, recommending
grants to community agencies, and approving
services in exceptional situations. His responsibilities also include monitoring services and expenditures, co-ordinating regional personnel
and staff training activities, formulating budgets,
and handling public enquiries and client
appeals.
The ministry's 20 regions are:
Region
Region
Region
Vancouver East (6 offices).
Vancouver Burrard (9 offices).
Okanagan  (headquarters  at  Vernon), offices at Grand Forks, Kelowna (2 offices), Oliver, Penticton
(2 offices) and Vernon (2 offices).
Region 4: Kootenays (headquarters at Nelson), offices at Castlegar, Cran-
brook, Creston, Fernie, Invermere,
Kimberley, Nelson, New Denver,
and Trail.
Region 5: Prince George-Cariboo (headquarters at Prince George), offices at
Prince George (5 offices), Fort St.
James, Mackenzie, 100 Mile
House, Quesnel, Vanderhoof and
Williams Lake.
Region   6:
Region   7:
Region   8:
Region   9:
Region 10:
Region 11:
Region 12:
Region 13:
Region 14
Region15:
Region 16
Region 17
Region 18
Region 19:
Region 20:
Fraser Valley (headquarters fil
botsford), offices at Langley,SI
grove, Abbotsford, ClearHH
Chilliwack (2 offices), Hope I
Mission.
Prince Rupert-Bulkley Vl
(headquarters at Terrace), ofrfll
Burns Lake, Hazelton, HoSI
Kitimat, Massett, Prince Rul
Queen Charlotte City, Srnrol
Terrace and Granisle.
North and South Peace Riverffll
quarters at Dawson Creek), oh
at Fort St. John, Dawson Crees!
Nelson, Chetwynd and CasSI
Kamloops Mainline (headqiBl
at Kamloops), offices at Atffll
Golden, Kamloops (2 officii
looet, Merritt, Revelstoke, Sals
Arm, Clearwater and PrinceSI
Vancouver Island North of Mai]
(headquarters at Duncan), of™!
Campbell River, CourtenayHI
can (2 offices), Nanaimo (2 oral
Wellington, Parksville, Portffl|
and Port Hardy.
Victoria West (6 offices).
Fraser South (headquarters at a
ta), offices at Delta (2 office||B
mond (2 offices) and White^l
Fraser North (headquarters at 2
Westminster), offices at Burnal
offices) and New Westmiffl
offices).
North Shore-Sunshine Coast.a
fices at Sechelt, North Vancoiel
West Vancouver, SquamisMI
Coola and Powell River. '
Downtown Strathcona (7 offjsffl
Vancouver South (9 officesMI
Vancouver West (6 offices)JH
Surrey, offices at Newton,E|
ford, Whalley, CloverdaCTj
Bridgeview.
Coquitlam-Maple Ridge (headia
ters at Coquitiam), offices at'd
Moody, Port Coquitlam (3 ofe
and Maple Ridge (2 officesWI
Victoria East (6 offices).
 ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION        17
jiistry of Human Resources
Ilffizational Chart March, 1981
MBJaUTIVE COMMITTEE
executive
Erector
D. Bingham
OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER
John Noble, Deputy Minister
E.L. Northup, Assistant Deputy Ministet
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
S. Travers
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
R.K. Butler
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
R.F. Cronin
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
H.E. Saville
MINISTRY
COMPTROLLER
REGIONS 1, 2,
15, 16, and 17
Personnel and
Staff Training
Lower Mainlanc
Special
Services
Federal-
Agreemenl
Audit Tean
REGIONS 10,
11. and 20
Community
Services
Glendale
REGIONS 3,
4, and 9
Family and
Children's
Services
Tranquility
Services
Accounting
Services
Research
Office Supply
and Services
Property
■ rggONWITH:
LIAISON WITH:
Labour
Housing
Employment and
Immigration
LIAISON WITH:
Universities
and Colleges
LIAISON WITH:
Education
LIAISON WITH:
Health
Inter-ministry
Children's
Committee
KTRY COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE
e comptroller is responsible for all financial
iSnting and fiscal control within the min-
y. This responsibility includes providing
afeial services, office services such as print-
; and telecommunications, and property
■nagement.
3efore 1976, the Ministry of Human Re-
trces shared accounting services with the
ntjstry of Health and the Ministry of Provincial
:retary and Government Services. In 1976,
>e to the growth of the ministry's budget and
Ii need for constant financial input, the minis-
1 created its own comptroller's office and ac-
unting division. Since 1976, the comptroller's
'ice has responded to the decentralization of
S.ial services, and emphasized sound financial
i.nagement.
The accounting division consists of 122 staff
limbers in two locations: the ministry's main
Spting office in Victoria, and a branch of-
h serving the Vancouver area. The division
i three functional areas: budgets and analysis,
iancial operations and procedures, and finan-
M ipformation systems. The division processes
Itnpistry expenditures and revenue, and disputes current monthly financial statements to
[areas of the ministry. The division also pro-
es consultation to senior management
SKiout the budget process, and prepares fi-
■Cjal reports.
Because the ministry has decentralized responsibility for delivery of some 35 social programs, accounting procedures have been structured to assign responsibilities and provide
reports to managers.
Each year, 3.5 million cheques are issued to
clients.
The annual financial transactions processed
by the Ministry of Human Resources constitute
approximately 33 per cent of the provincial
volume.
The comptroller's office is responsible for six
major computerized payment systems. These
are:
• the Income Assistance payment system;
• the GAIN Seniors Supplement system;
• the Victoria Child-in-Care system;
• the Vancouver Child-in-Care system;
• the Pharmacare system; and
• the MSA accounting system in Vancouver.
Also reporting to the comptroller are the support divisions of Research and Statistics, Office
Supply and Services, and the Audit Team. The
activities of these divisions are reported
separately.
The 1981-82 objectives of the comptroller's
office are to:
• complete a ministry budgeting manual;
• acquire   additional   qualified   accounting
staff in order to better address the observa-
 18        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
tions contained in the report of the Auditor-
General;
• complete an internal accounting procedures manual;
• update and improve existing accounting
manuals;
• develop time-monitoring reports on financial processing to improve decentralized
processing;
• develop criteria for automating appropriate
accounting functions; and
• implement specific financial control policies initiated by the Comptroller-General
and Treasury Board.
MANAGEMENT
INFORMATION SERVICES
Management Information Services co-ordinates
all data processing systems and services in the
ministry. The division supports line management and staff in identifying and formulating
their needs, and co-ordinates activities with the
British Columbia Systems Corporation, which
provides equipment and specialized technical
expertise.
During 1980-81, Management Information
Services was involved in several major activities. Early in 1980, the ministry completed and
installed new computerized systems for Universal Pharmacare and for Emergency Services.
Throughout the year, considerable progress was
made in the Family and Children's Services MIS
computer system. Designs for general and detailed requirement specifications were completed, and implementation is expected to commence in the fall of 1981. All other development
work was deferred, to give the ministry an opportunity to rationalize and consolidate its long-
term system requirements, and related developmental and operational plans. The division
obtained a better understanding of the information resources required by staff members, and
reorganized and strengthened the system to simplify its use and make staff training easier.
During the year, the Zenith Helpline for Children computer system was upgraded to enable
staff to record and respond to calls more efficiently. Work also continued on the GAIN On-
Line Inquiry and Data Entry System. The continued development of this system, as well as the
Family and Children's Service Management Information System, will be a priority of Management Information Services during 1981-82.
Management Information Services computer
and consulting charges for 1980-81 were
$3,613,632.
AUDIT TEAM
The Audit Team was established in 1976B
the statutory authority of the GuaranteedB
able Income for Need Act (section 23). The:
sion assists management to examine and@
ate administration of ministry programs
During 1980-81, the Audit Team conrffl
ed on two areas. First, it conducted interne
dits of programs authorized under the GAIf
and some child welfare programs. TheseH
evaluated operational efficiency, com™
with policies, and accuracy of informatiqj
ond, the Audit Team performed finanW
views and operational audits of institution;
society-operated organizations receivings
try funds to administer social services.
The Audit Team makes recommendaOT
improve office procedures and correct clan
client cases. Based on information prov™
the Audit Team, ministry program polic^
be changed and clarified.
In 1981-82, specialized staff will be recn
to reorganize audit procedures. The scopm
dit procedures will be expanded to pre
greater program coverage and manag]
control.
Table 5 Audits Completed, 1980-81
Ministry Regional Offices
Ministry District Offices
Ministry Rehabilitation Project
Outside Organizations Funded
by the Ministry
OFFICE SUPPLY AND SERVICES '•
Office Supply and Services provides a ran;
support services to the ministry, includg
lysing and consulting on administrativjm
for various programs, co-ordinating uW
chase of supplies and equipment, plannfflg
co-ordinating communications and.
space, administering mail services, and prii
and distributing policy program procedures
administrative information.
The Victoria print shop and stockroom u:5
variety of up-to-date graphic machinery to j
duce extensive paperwork including legish
documents, operational directives and adml
trative circulars, policy manuals and amn
ments, forms, and other printed materia"!
quired by divisions. Most of this mated
stockpiled and distributed to field of*
throughout the province, excluding Vancofl
and the Lower Mainland.
 ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION        19
A separate print shop and stockroom in Van-
Iroer serves the district offices of Vancouver
d the Lower Mainland. The Vancouver print
dd and stockroom is similar to the Victoria
nt shop operation in size and purpose, but
ices more emphasis on divisional require-
.nts such as training manuals, pamphlets and
jchures, and printed material for family and
liraren's programs. In addition, a number of
reen's Printer catalogue items are stocked for
.tribution by the print shop's own courier series to ministry offices. In 1980-81, the Van-
itver print shop produced 7.4 million items,
rj the Victoria print shop produced 10.1 mil-
| items.
ministry mail service works in co-operation
ththe Postal Branch of the Ministry of Provin-
I Secretary and Government Services, to prole daily deliveries to headquarters staff and lo-
I Victoria offices.
Ml ministry needs relating to office equipment
a supplies are provided by Office Supply and
vices. Requests for equipment and supplies
i approved according to Queen's Printer and
rrfiasing  Commission   guidelines.   Contact
pputside suppliers for furnishings and equip-
mf is an ongoing procedure.
To simplify work and increase efficiency, all
i/v and changed forms are controlled in de-
:n, usage, storage and distribution.
I The Bus Pass program has been administered
■ Office Supply and Services since 1967. The
|iv3ties of this program are reported separately
ISfflion Five: Community Services.
Property Management Services is responsible
t negotiating  ministry  space  requirements
tough consulation with ministry managers and
Htish Columbia Building Corporation.
3RSONNEL AND STAFF TRAINING
Rlsgnnel and Staff Training provides assistance
BrMiistry's management in staff organization
IlijBlassification, salary administration and la-
10Jr relations, occupational health and safety
Bvijes, and in the recruitment, orientation and
I ning of staff.
Irsonnel Services
'ersonnel Services was established in 1943
(en standards of staff services were defined. It
>s not until 1962 that the ministry's first per-
jin|>l officer was appointed to oversee staff hir-
i1 and personnel services. The responsibilities
i(Personnel Services now include technical
advice and consultation for recruitment and selection of staff, contract negotiation and administration, application and maintenance of classification systems and staff organization, and
occupational health services and safety
programs.
These services are provided to the Vancouver
regions by an office in Vancouver, to Woodlands
and Tranquille by personnel staff assigned to
those facilities, and to the rest of the province by
the headquarters office in Victoria.
In providing support to ministry executive and
management staff, Personnel Services confers
with the Public Service Commission and the
Government Employee Relations Bureau, which
are the primary authorities for administration of
the Public Service Act and the Public Service Labour Relations Act. The ministry has employees
in three separate bargaining units, each with a
Master Collective Agreement, and a total of six
Component Agreements. As of March 31, 1980,
there were 4,830 established ministry positions.
By March 31,1981, that number had increased
to 5,033.
Table 6 Personnel Activities,
1979-80 and 1980- 81
1979-80
1980-81
Vacancies Filled
452
445
Promotions
142
133
Reclassifications
309
415
Resignations
733
784
Transfers (non-
promotional
movement of staff)
231
221
Staff Training
Training for Human Resources staff is authorized under the Public Service Act and the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act.
Staff Training is responsible for ensuring that
individuals and staff receive the training needed
to deliver professional service to clients. Training programs are kept up-to-date by revisions
made to incorporate new training techniques
and any changes in ministry program policies
mandated by new legislation.
In-service staff training began in 1942 when a
six-week training course was offered to ministry
regional managers. The next year, astaff training
supervisor was hired, and a series of in-service
training courses were developed. In 1963, an
assistant training supervisor was appointed.
Since 1963, both the division's staff and its training programs have increased to meet the spe-
 20       REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
cialized training needs of ministry staff throughout the province.
The Staff Training program has gone through a
number of phases. At one time, staff training was
administered by a central office in Victoria, and
staff members were given a standard orientation
course when they joined the ministry. In recent
years, the division has designed programs to
meet the needs of different groups in the ministry. To support this type of programming,the
ministry has field co-ordinators who assist in
training-needs analysis, program selection, and
program design. Field staff are supported by a
central staff training division that has a full library service, audio-visual component, program consultants, and designers who help to design and implement major ministry training
programs.
The ministry library service provides books
and audio-visual materials to augment ministry
training programs. In 1980-81, emphasis was
placed on obtaining audio-visual equipment for
rural regions to allow staff in these areas to develop skills in family therapy, job training and
employee orientation. To complement these
projects, the library has nine video units
throughout the province.
During the year, Staff Training compiled bibliographies to assist staff working in areas such
as sexual abuse, management, wife-battering
and financial assistance worker training. Managers began using computer data bases to request current research, articles, and reports by
other governments. In addition, a range of training programs was developed, in regions and
residential centres, to meet the special needs of
staff members working with mentally handicapped people.
The ministry ran four successful half-day
workshops using the Anik B satellite. The program was beamed to centres around the province where staff members viewed the program.
A telephone hook-up allowed questions and
comments to be called in and broadcast to all
centres. This "interactive" process, using the
satellite, has the potential to provide training at
considerable savings in time and travel costs.
Staff Training placed special emphasis on two
areas during 1980-81:
INFORMATION SERVICES
Information Services is responsible for provi I
information about the ministry's programs I
services to the public, special interest grol
and the media. The division also offers supl
services to the minister, the executive and ml
try staff.
Information Services was created in mid-1|
to co-ordinate the ministry's public informs!
endeavours. The Victoria office consistsll
manager, four public information officers, i
two administrative support staff. The Vanco j
community relations office, which works 1)1
pendently to provide support to ministry stay
the Lower Mainland, consists of two publid!
formation officers.
Public information officers are responsffll
preparing press releases, articles, and copiJ
pamphlets and publications, and fordeveloi
exhibits, displays, posters and other printed A
terial required by the ministry. They alsca
spond to inquiries from the public and the m 1
by providing information on ministry progrrl
and activities.
In 1980-81, the division developed new na
ing lists to streamline distribution of pres.'d
leases and other information materials, acqua
a portable display on ministry services for us J
district offices at open houses and other com J
nity functions, and helped to develop thea
vised format of the 1980-81 annual repowl
The division also increased its audio-via
capacities by acquiring recording and playtd
equipment.
Communications initiatives undertaktMJ
ing the year included information campaigns
the Individual Opportunity Plan, the Helpi
for Children and Universal Pharmacare. M
pamphlets were produced on the Family i
Child Services Act, GAIN for Seniors, and Sea
Citizen Counsellors, as well as information a
terial on GAIN benefits, SAFER benefits tj
RentAid.
In 1980-81, the cost of advertising and pili|
cations was $475,000.
RESEARCH AND STATISTICS
• child abuse training; and
• training new district supervisors, for which a
series of standards was developed.
Research and Statistics is responsible for de-JI
oping and maintaining income assistance st a
tics, for providing consultation to senior sftj
and for researching special projects. The m
sion was started in 1944 with the appointme oj
a research consultant, and now consists of
staff members.
—
J
 ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION        21
I
The division continued to develop the use of
. jmputer-produced statistics for income assis-
nce. The compilation of income assistance
jmkics produced for senior staff and support
jBions was redesigned to incorporate full and
upplemental reports on research findings. As
ell, a compilation of statistics for Family and
hildren's Services programs was developed
id turned over to the Program Evaluation and
, anning Support unit of Family and Children's
,>rvices for ongoing production.
The division continued its efforts to replace
i anual field statistical systems with a computer-
ed system. The first phase in automating field
'come assistance statistics was completed this
;ar. In 1981-82, manual field income assis-
nce statistics will be replaced with automated
stems.
■ The division's computer data systems were
•tpanded to include additional income assis-
nce program information, and its time-series
ita bases were restructured and expanded to
.elude additional non-ministerial data. A new
:stem for maintaining and structuring the data
■ises was developed to make more efficient use
the data. Training in the use of computer data
stems continues to be provided to other minis-
\t support divisions.
A major research project to monitor and ana-
se the Victoria Earnings Exemption Pilot Pro-
'Ctwas completed. During the term of the pro-
ct, the division produced three reports to
(pport senior-level planning.
In 1980-81, the division was assigned respon-
bjlity to support and monitor the Region 16
-'ancouver South) Rehabilitation Pilot Project.
ie project began in the fall of 1980 and will
|H|ue in 1981-82.
Iffie division continued its work in developing
i predictive model for GAIN case-loads and
cists. New data sources were developed to inte-
.ate the Basic Income Assistance predictive
i odel with the model for GAIN for Seniors and
landicapped. Full integration of these systems
ould be completed in 1981-82.
'.DERAL-PROV1NCIAL AGREEMENTS
lie Federal-Provincial Agreements section enures that maximum  revenues  are obtained
rough federal cost-sharing agreements; that
leffiiinistry's position is presented in federal-
Ijffijricial, interprovincial, and inter-ministerial
• eetings; and that the impact of federal cost-
i aring agreements is taken into account in the
ieparation of ministry program policy.
The section was created in 1978 to provide
analysis of the impact of federal initiatives on
provincial programs. Unemployment insurance, pensions, and services to native people
are examples of federal programs which directly
affect the ministry and require ongoing study.
The Federal-Provincial Agreements section is
also responsible for preparing ministry proposals for federal-provincial and interprovincial
meetings of ministers and officials of social services. It also consults with ministry divisions and
other ministries regarding program proposals
developed by the Ministry of Human Resources.
Negotiations with the federal government
during 1980 produced federal agreement to
share costs of civil legal aid; clarification of the
relationship between the Canada Assistance
Plan and the Established Program Financing Act;
and examination of the Canada Pension Plan regarding benefits for handicapped persons. Work
was also begun on cost-sharing for the Youth
Containment Program under the Ministry of Attorney General. Also as a result of negotiations,
the administration of three income maintenance
programs for seniors and handicapped persons
living on reserves was transferred to the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs. Previously,
Indian Affairs reimbursed the province for providing benefits under these programs on reserves. Negotiations with the Spallumcheen
Band for the administration of child welfare on
that reserve have also been monitored by Federal-Provincial Agreements.
ln December 1980, the section participated in
a Federal-Provincial Conference of Ministers of
Social Services, in Ottawa, where provincial
concerns were discussed with the federal minister. As a result of the conference, a task force
was established to review the Canada Assistance
Plan and the Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons Acts, Regulations and procedures. The Federal-Provincial Agreements section is participating in this review process,
particularly with regard to the Canada Assistance Plan.
In 1980, the section participated in the Interprovincial Conference of Ministers of Social Services through committee work with other provinces on problems of native Indians, and on the
enforcement of court-ordered maintenance payments for income assistance recipients.
The work of the Ministers' Interprovincial
Task Force on the Administration of Social Security resulted in the publication, in September
1980, of a booklet entitled The Income Security
System in Canada: Report for the Interprovincial
Conference of Ministers Responsible for Social
Services.
 22        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
1
The inter-ministerial liaison functions of the
section included discussions with the Ministry of
Health on cost-sharing implications of the Den-
ticare program and cost-sharing for the Long-
Term Care Program.
Cost-sharing was also reviewed, with the
Ministry of Attorney General, regarding the upcoming federal Young Offenders legislation.
Consultation also occurred with the newly established Inter-governmental Relations Ministry.
COMMUNITY HUMAN RESOURCES
AND HEALTH CENTRES
The Community Human Resources and Health
Centres program is jointly funded by the Ministry of Human Resources and the Ministry of
Health. There are four centres in the province,
located at Houston, Granisle, Queen Charlotte
Islands, and Victoria (James Bay). These centres
deliver social services, primary medical care,
public health nursing and mental health programs. Elected citizen boards are responsible for
administering programs and providing services
in co-ordination with both ministries.
In 1980-81, Ministry of Human Resources expenditures for the centres were:
• Granisle, $59,152;
• Houston, $70,433;
• Queen Charlotte Islands, $101,947; and
• Victoria (James Bay), $163,512.
PROGRAM EVALUATION
AND PLANNING SUPPORT
Program Evaluation and Planning Support provides a consultative, training and operational
service in data collection and use to Family and
Children's Services. These services are available
to local, regional and provincial office
personnel
In October 1979, Computer Research and Inter-ministry Research were combined with the
Program and Evaluation Section. The major
functions of the Program Evaluation and Planning Support section are to:
• provide consultation and training to ministry staff in data evaluation, systems analysis
and information systems, as well as on the
implementation of evaluation projects;
• develop a system of monitoring Family and
Children's Services objectives;
• co-ordinate and review Family and Children's Services annual reports;
• review and recommend improvemem
the present Family and Children's SefflT
computer system, respond to field and I
sional personnel's requests for conS
data outputs, and analyse protectiorlH
plaints registry information;
• co-ordinate research activities for the I
ministry Children's Committee; and I
• provide quarterly statistical informaticl|
Family and Children's Services prograni
the manager, and the office of the del
minister.
In 1981, major evaluations were comffl
on Zenith Helpline for Children, Systems Arj
sis of Central Records, Central Planning Cl
mittee demonstration project and Regio
(North and South Peace River) Special Senfll
In addition, staff provided consultation ancl
sistance to the Task Force on Handicapped (i
dren, the federal-provincial discussions or;
proposed Young Offenders Act, Commit
Grants Policy, Special Care Home Policy, Ir]
ance and Liability Committee, Reside
Guidelines Committee, University of Vial
School of Child Care Professional Advi
Committee, both steering committees of SI
agement Information Services Systems, VS|
Downtown Youth Project and OR. Pearkes
sure Time Project.
In addition to producing monthly, quarij
and annual report statistics, the computeu
search co-ordinator prepared and circulaBr
procedural manual for the provincial ChiRj
Care computer system, a reference manuat
the use of this system, and a report on the u:c
planned life placements. A total of 149 spjf
requests for information or consultation wens
ceived and answered.
The Program Evaluation activities comS|
by the section included 51 individual coffl
tions, 15 group consultations, and 11 w
shops/training sessions. In addition, 86 reqt
for statistics or other planning support sej
were satisfied.
 SECTION III
Family and
Children's Services
 24        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMS
AND SERVICES
The Ministry of Human Resources, under the
statutory authority of the Family and Child Service Act, provides a range of services to assist
families and children who are experiencing
difficulties.
New legislation governing the provision of
these services under the Family and Child Service Act, formerly the Protection of Children
Act, will be proclaimed in 1981. The new legislation shifts the emphasis from the state to the
family in providing care and protection to children. It also defines the state's role in developing
and providing services to children who need
special care, and to parents who need help in
carrying out their parental responsibilities. The
Ministry of Human Resources maintains its legal
right to intervene through the courts when a
child's safety and well-being are at risk.
Family and Children's Services is divided into
four areas: Family Support Services, Child Protection Services, Services for Children in Care,
and Adoption Services.
FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES
Family Support Services helps families to maintain or restore the independent functioning of
the family unit. With ministry staff and families
working together, unnecessary crises can be
avoided.
Other forms of intervention, such as removal
of a child from the family, are only considered
when family support services are insufficient to
protect the child. This requires a full hearing in
family court.
In 1980, the ministry strengthened several of
its family support programs. For example, the
parental share of day-care and homemaker costs
was reduced for those receiving subsidies. In addition, to meet the growing demand for day-care
services for children under three years of age,
the ministry introduced a further subsidy increase for parents of these children using family
day-care.
The ministry continues to place greater emphasis on preventive aspects of family support
services, and on its partnership with families in
helping them overcome their difficulties and become self-reliant.
Family support programs include Infant Development, Child Day-care Subsidy, CHANCE,
Special Services to Children, Children's Rehabilitation Resources and Family Support
Homemakers.
Infant Development
The Infant Development program nurtifflH
skills of infants with developmental delays, n
assists families to cope with and respond to a
children's special needs. The Infant DeveJ
ment program operates under the Guarara
Available Income for Need Act (section 2, i3
sections 1 and 2; and section 5).
In 1973, the Ministry of Human Resourced
sumed financial responsibility for the lm
Development program, which was begun i
pilot project in Vancouver in 1972. The projnl
has since been expanded to 17 communa
Non-profit societies negotiate an agreetsJ
with the ministry for an operating grant tcfl
minister the program. The society is respond
for the hiring of professional staff, and deliS
of the service.
The Infant Development program helps di el
opmentally delayed children up to the aj d
three who because of retardation, birth pi
lems, or other difficulties, are not keeping
with their age group in one or more majordj
areas. Referrals may come from physraH
public health nurses, social workers, or the m
ily. After an initial assessment, professio ll
trained infant development workers prcd
learning activities and materials for infants i n
home to help them reach such developm tl
milestones as sitting up unsupported, wallll
talking, and playing with toys. In additic j
these services, workers send regular repord
each child's progress to the family physi'iJ
provide access to a wide range of toys, tol
and resources, and arrange for parents of h;d]
capped children to meet other parents to taJ
concerns and successes.
Additional program support is provided bti
Provincial Steering Committee, which acts ta
advisor to the ministry and makes recommedJ
tions on new development and proai
guidelines.
Plans were made to offer the progra I
Smithers, Terrace and Prince Rupert in 198 31
Communities served by the Infant Devaij
ment program were:
• in 1980-81, 17 communities; Vanco'ej
North Vancouver, Burnaby, Surrey, e?l
Westminster, Duncan, Kamloops, Keloid
Victoria, Castlegar, Port Alberni, Upper Isa
Valley, Courtenay-Comox, Prince Gegrj
Vernon, Cranbrook, Eastside Vancouver
• in 1979-80,  17 communities; the sans
1980-81;
san aj
 J
 FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES       25
Ml978-79, 16 communities; Vancouver,
North Vancouver, Burnaby, Surrey, New
Westminster, Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna,
Victoria, Castlegar, Port Alberni, Upper Fraser
galley,   Courtenay-Comox,   Prince   George,
Won, Cranbrook;
n 1977-78, 12 communities; Vancouver,
vlorth Vancouver, Burnaby, Surrey, New
/Vestminster, Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna,
/ictoria, Castlegar, Port Alberni, Upper Fraser
fflley; and
n 1976-77, nine communities; Vancouver,
\lorth   Vancouver,   Burnaby,   Surrey,   New
■/Vestminster, Duncan, Kamloops, Kelowna,
I /ictoria.
ile 7 Numbers of Children Serviced and Infant
relopment Workers, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Number
Approximate of Infant
Number of        Development
' r Children Served*       Workers
BJO-81 1,200 28.5
"9-80 1,100 26.5
"8-79 900 21.5
"7-78 600 17.5
T6-77 350 11.0
'hese statistics reflect the approximate num-
I ;r of children visited during a given year,
ase loads fluctuate as children are admitted
Mmischarged.
ile 8   Infant Development, Expenditures,
R'7-78 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$693,176
1979-80
569,191
1978-79
433,395
1977-78
331,103
lild Day-care Subsidy
he Child Day-care Subsidy program helps
silies to meet the costs of day-care for chil-
cn up to and including 12 years of age. Child
C'-care Subsidy is a support service enabling
|;nts who would otherwise be unable to work
i'repare for and maintain employment and fi-
Icjal independence. It also provides relief to
lips during prolonged illness or other crisis,
i specialized day-care for handicapped chil-
P ■■ The program operates under the statutory
Ilority of the Guaranteed Available Income
Need Act (sections 2 and 5) and Regulations
f-'tion 28, schedules D and E).
I|8pnistry of Human Resources provides
I&s to assist parents with the cost of day
care services if they are eligible on the basis of
an income test and social needs criteria. The
types of day-care which the ministry may subsidize are:
• licenced family day-care in a private home for
a maximum of five pre-school children and
two school age children;
• unlicenced family day-care in a private home
for one or two children;
• day-care for children in their own homes under the supervision and care of a person selected by the parent;
• nursery school up to three hours per day for
children from 32 months to school age;
• out-of-school-hours day-care for school aged
children up to and including 12 years of age.
This service may be offered through family
day-care homes or in day-care centres licenced to provide out-of-school group care;
• and day-care for children with special needs
in specialized or integrated day-care centres.
The ministry is responsible for approving and
monitoring family day-care homes caring for
one or two children, and in-own-home day-care
subsidized by the ministry. Standards for licenced day-care facilities are set by the Community Care Facilities Licencing Act and the Provincial Child Care Facilities Licencing Regulations.
These regulations are administered by the Provincial Child Care Facilities Board at the provincial level, and medical health officers at the local level. Day-care support projects in Nelson,
Prince George, Kelowna, Abbotsford, Mission,
Burnaby (Simon Fraser University) and Vancouver (University of British Columbia) are funded
by the ministry as pilot projects. Ministry staff
contract with non-profit societies to provide specialized day-care, and play an active role in
monitoring the admission, care and discharge of
children in these programs.
On July 1, 1978, special needs children enrolled in integrated centres on a half-day basis
and those enrolled in specialized centres became eligible for a full subsidy. The ministry also
began to pay for additional costs incurred as a
result of special needs children being enrolled in
integrated centres.
Amended and improved day-care policy was
released during June 1980. The introduction of
contracting for specialized day-care services enabled the ministry to purchase these services on
behalf ofall special needs children, regardless of
the family's income, enrolled in both specialized and integrated non-profit society-operated
day-care centres. Children enrolled in these
 26
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
1
specialized programs are fully subsidized.
Maximum subsidies for all categories of daycare were increased by eight per cent on May 1,
1980. The ministry also introduced two new
subsidy categories on May 1,1980 for care provided in family day homes for children from
birth to age three, and in group day-care centres
for children from 18 to 36 months. These new
subsidy groups were recognized to offset the additional cost of caring for children in this age
group and to attract more care-givers.
Table 9
Day-care Categories and Subsidies,
Effective May 1,1980
Previous
Rate Effective
Type of Care
Rate
May 1, 1980
Family Day-care
$125
Under 3 years
$160*
3 to 5 years
$135
Group Day-care
18 months to
3 years
$249*
3 to 5 years
$160
$173
In-Own-Home Day-care
First child
$105
$114
Second child
$ 52.50
$  57
Family total
$200
$216
Nursery School
Day-care
$ 50
$ 54
Out-of-School
Day-care
Up to 4 hours
$  60
$ 65
Over 4 hours
$ 80
$ 87
* new category
Note: As of May 1, 1980, allowable exemptions for parents applying for subsidies on
the basis of income were increased by an
average of 17 per cent. Increases are detailed in the following table.
Table 10
Financial Eligibility Test, Effective May 1, 1980
Previous Basic
Basic
Allowable Net
Allowable Net
Family Size
Mo.
Income
Mo. Income
(incl. children)
Level*
Level, as of
May 1, 1980
2
$
550
$   608
3
$
615
$   722
4
$
680
$   809
5
$
745
$   874
6
$
810
$   939
7
$
875
$1,014
8
$
940
$1,069
9
$1,005
$1,134
10
$1,070
$1,199
* A family unit's allowable monthly nem
income level is increased by $90 (chM
from $64) per month for each disablewi
person in the family unit or for each pej
in the family unit aged 65 years or o/ml
and by $100 per month where an adm
the family is employed and earns a wS
from such employment.
In December 1980, Port Alberni opmi
new integrated day-care centre which prod
care for 16 special needs children. Them
serves as a natural progression for childrml
have received infant development servirMl
helps prepare them for entering infill
school programs.
Table 11
Average Number of Children
subsidized,  1
1977-78 to 1980-81
Type of Day-care
1980-
1979-  1978r
81
80        79
Family Day-care
3,871
3,736   3,683
Croup Day-care
3,259
3,382  3,22|
In-Own-Home
Day-care
632
730      741
Out-of-School
Hours Day-care
1,691
1,691   1,6.1
Nursery School
517
485      42|
Special Needs
Day-care
1,058
874     821
TOTALS
11,02810,89810,511
The following day-care issues were revi./e
in 1980-81, with changes planned for 198 3:
• the creation of additional day-care sffll
providing start-up grants, emergence!
expansion and relocation grants to non-o
societies;
• the establishment of policy and proceaBl
the investigation of any complaints 1m|
abuse in licenced day-care facilities;^
• the increasing of the allowable income n
in the income test;
• the increasing of the maximum allovb
subsidies;
• the creation of local licencing comnrra
expedite the licencing process;
• the provision of additional social woM
day-care services;
• the introduction of a new category of |tiii(
for children who attend licenced o-c
school hours day-care programs in additT
attending kindergarten;
• the extension of subsidies for in-owffljj
day-care to other than shift-working pa it
• the subsidizing of relatives as day-care IE
ers; and
• the posting of lists of licenced and appv,
day-care facilities.
 ——	
 |lle 12
lid Day-care Subsidy,
fflitures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$16,903,220
1  1979-80
14,884,153
1978-79
12,612,677
1977-78
11,011,945
■1976-77
10,308,265
Table 14
CHANCE, Expenditures, 1979-80 and 1980-81*
HANCE
IHANCE provides services that enable multi-
i handicapped children to acquire basic aca-
piic and social skills in the classroom. The
f \NCE program operates under the statutory
liority of the Guaranteed Available Income
peed Act (section 2, subsections 1 and 2).
[ HANCE began in 1979 as a joint program of
[Ministries of Human Resources, Education,
li Health. The program ensures that children
Li severe mental or physical handicaps are
kin a chance to benefit from a classroom ex-
pence. Services provided by personal atten-
l.:s are purchased from school districts by the
listry of Human Resources. Policy regarding
■education of handicapped children was es-
bshed by the Ministry of Education in 1978.
I ie ability of a referred child to benefit from
pprogram is assessed by a local screening
Bmittee composed of members from the
£»l district, Ministry of Human Resources
and, if appropriate, from community
leSjonals. An educational program to meet
[Mi's needs is then developed with the co-
Bfjjpn of the parents.
11980-81, the CHANCE program expanded
J)n 10 (Vancouver Island North of Mala-
!>and Region 4 (Kootenays). CHANCE served
BKnately 70 children from six school distil in Region 10, and 42 children from seven
jMistricts in Region 4.
Dp
BSCE Activities, 1979-80 and 1980-81
1980-81    1979-80
l->er of Contracts with
l®J Districts
pioer of Personal
■endants
'''Mr of Children Served
S||vincial School
Julation
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$2,650,405
1979-80
397,915
* The CHANCE program was started during
1979.
Special Services to Children
Special Services to Children provides services
to enable children with special needs to remain
in their homes or communities. It operates under
the statutory authority of the Family and Child
Service Act (section 23, sub-section 1) and the
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Regulations (section 26).
The Special Services to Children program was
started in November 1973 to provide short-term
support for families with children with exceptional physical, mental or behavioural needs, to
assist them to grow up in their own homes.
Special services are provided by child-care
workers hired by non-profit societies. The ministry assesses the family's need and contracts with
the society, outlining the terms of service. Services may include support to assist a child in
making the transition from a foster home back to
his own home, or help a child resolve difficulties
he is experiencing in his relationship with his
family. These services are offered in a variety of
^settings.
As of May 1980, the ministry discontinued the
use of income testing for families who require
these services. In June 1980, a new method of
negotiating special services contracts was implemented to provide more flexibility. In 1980-
81, the Special Services to Children program
was extended to serve the communities of Fort
Nelson, Cassiar, Lower Post and Dease Lake.
Table 15
Special Services to Children,
Activities, 1979-80 and 1980-81
1980-81    1979-80
Number of Societies
52
45
Contracted
Average Number of Families
68
65
293
N/A
Served Monthly
952
900
989
148
Average Monthly Cost
Per Family
$467
$356
509,805
659
,505
Average Hourly Rate
$9.01
$7.53
 28
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Table 16
Special Services to Children,
Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
980-81
$5,388,689
979-80
3,843,618
978-79
4,007,900
977-78
3,591,137
976-77
1,836,477
Table 18
Children's Rehabilitation Resources,
Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$3,203,301
1979-80
2,638,914
1978-79
2,367,920
1977-78
1,955,827
1976-77
1,562,686
Children's Rehabilitation Resources
Children's Rehabilitation Resources helps
children or youths who are experiencing difficulty at school for emotional or social reasons,
or who have dropped out of school, to acquire
the basic skills needed to re-enterthe school system or go on to further training or employment.
It operates under the statutory authority of the
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section 2, subsections 1 and 2).
The program was developed in 1974 as a project shared by the Ministry of Human Resources,
the Ministry of Education and local school
districts.
Human Resources staff work together with local schools to plan and develop special programs for disturbed children. The ministry pays
for appropriate program expenses, and purchases the services of child-care counsellors to
assist with behavioural management and provide counselling and life-skills training.
Children are admitted to the program after an
assessment by a local advisory committee consisting of representatives from the school district, the Ministry of Human Resources, the nonprofit society from which child-care services are
purchased and, if appropriate, health and probation personnel. The child's progress is evaluated periodically by ministry and school staff together with the child and his family.
Table 17
Children's Rehabilitation Resources,
Activities, 1979-80 and 1980-81
Number of Government-
Operated Programs
Number of Contracted-
Sponsored Programs
Total Number of Programs
1980-81     1979-80
24 24
Family Support Homemakers
The Family Support Homemakers pre,
provides temporary support and relief toffll
uals and families under stress. The progffll
erates under the statutory authority of the j
anteed Available Income for Need Act SI
27)-
The services of trained homemakers aro
vided to families faced with temporary^!
ties. Homemakers provide a range of seSI
child-care and household managemenBI
gust 1979, this service was expanded to a
retarded adults to live independently ami
vide relief to parents of handicapped cffll
Homemakers are hired and supervisj]
non-profit or proprietary agencies frofall
the ministry purchases services. DependiJ
their income, families receiving service™!
required to contribute to the cost.
The Ministry of Human Resourcesffll
sponsible for both long-term care anal]
support homemakers services until ffll
1978. Since that time, all financial respcHI
for long-term care homemaker services™]
transferred to the Ministry of Health Loot j
Care Program.
Table 19
Family Support Homemakers,   I
Activities, 1979-80 and 1980-81
1980-81    1'9|
Number of Agencies Paid
to Provide Services 91 J
Number of Families Served 1,376 ■
Average Cost Per House* $7.72 ■
* Rates established by Ministry of Hea/ffi jl
Term Care.
95
119
88
112
 FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES
29
Ne 20
liily Support Homemakers,
l||ditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$3,966,125
1979-80
3,563,588
1978-79
3,715,111
1977-78
7,710,403
1976-77
7,428,522
lie 21
'tiber of Family Service Cases Not in
ieipt of Financial Assistance from the
liistry of Human Resources, by Regions,
19 to 1981
legion
Mar. 31,
Mar. 31,
Mar. 31
1979
1980
1981
1
1,393
854
838
2
1,776
1,524
1,196
3
401
431
626
4
426
506
570
5
404
515
626
6
300
311
465
7
386
529
515
8
138
123
202
9
327
516
508
10
423
523
688
11*
767
877
1,006
12
713
982
512
13
592
651
713
14
1,093
1,053
579
15**
—
473
422
16
1,162
1,165
1,100
17
1,043
1,023
971
18"
—
—
585
19**
—
—
588
ower
linland
fecial
races
238
256
271
TTALS
11,582
12,312
12,981
Wtfigures for region 20 (formed in 1979-
Wwe included with those for region 11.
s regions 15, 18 and 19 were formerly
itt of other regions, separate statistics
'ere not available until the years indicated.
ILD PROTECTION SERVICES
jEotection Services provides a range of
SjTO children and families under stress,
e services are provided under the statutory
l|^ of the Family and Child Service Act,
family Relations Act (Chapter 120, RSBC
l^prt 2, Child Custody, Access and Cuar-
'•■hip) and the Guaranteed Available Income
pleed Act. Under the terms of these acts,
Child Protection Services has the power to take
legal action to ensure a child's safety and well-
being.
Child Protection Services helps families to resolve problems which have led or may lead to a
child being in need of protection, in order to
maintain the integrity of the family. Through the
provisions of the Family and Child Service Act,
the superintendent of child welfare may enter
into an agreement with parents to provide for the
temporary care and custody of a child during a
period of crisis in the family. The superintendent
may also enter into an agreement with parents to
provide for the special needs of a child that cannot be met within the home. Under both agreements, the parents remain the guardians of the
child.
The Family and Child Service Act requires a
person who believes a child is in need of protection to report to the superintendent or his delegate. The superintendent is required by law to
investigate all reports, and is empowered to
keep a record of all reports and investigations.
Reports are often received through the 24-hour
toll-free Helpline for Children, many of them
from children. The ministry responds immediately to all calls to the helpline and to any report
received indicating that a child is in danger, so
that ministry staff can offer help before a family
situation becomes critical, or provide immediate protection to a child who is in danger.
Parents who have harmed or believe they may
harm their child may be referred to Project Parent, a ministry program operating in Vancouver
to help parents improve their parenting skills.
The intent of the program is to achieve and
maintain a stable home life for parents and their
children, keeping the family intact wherever
possible. Through counselling and recreational
activities, Project Parent works to enhance the
self-worth of parents and children.
The ministry operates two Project Parent programs in Vancouver: Project Parent West serving
regions 2 and 17, and Project Parent East serving
regions 1,16 and 15. These programs each offer
a preventive group for parents considered to be
at risk, and a more structured group for parents
who are working towards the return of their children from a foster home placement.
Parents are referred to the program and attend
with their children two or three days per week,
five hours per day. Families participate in the
program for a length of time determined through
individual meetings between the worker and the
family. The average length of participation in the
Project Parent West program is eight months,
and in the East program, 11 months.
 30        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
A voluntary organization known as Parents in
Crisis provides a self-help service to abusive or
potentially abusive parents. Through this organization, parents are able to meet with others
who face similar problems, to talk about their
difficulties and to learn more acceptable methods of child care and discipline. Parents in Crisis
has groups in many communities throughout
British Columbia.
Children may also come into the care of the
superintendent through the Family Relations
Act, which provides that the superintendent of
child welfare is the guardian of any child whose
parents have died and for whom no other guardian has been appointed. Guardianship of many
of these children is subsequently transferred by
an order of the Supreme Court to an interested
relative. The superintendent investigates the relative's circumstances and gives a report to the
court.
Children may also be placed in the care of the
superintendent when ordered by the provisions
of the Juvenile Delinquents Act (when a court
determines that such an order will satisfy the circumstances of a case where a ch i Id has committed a delinquency). The Family and Child Service Act states that an order made under the
Juvenile Delinquents Act will be for a maximum
period of 12 months, and that the child shall be
dealt with as though the order had been made
under the provisions of the Family and Child Service Act for temporary guardianship.
In August 1980, the Family and Child Service
Act was introduced in the provincial legislature.
The new act represents a significant change in
approach from the former Protection of Chi Idren
Act.
The old Protection of Children Act, based on
legislation which was proclaimed in 1901, treated state and family as adversaries in the protection of children. The new legislation recognizes
the family's role as central in child protection
and makes provision for state and parents to
work in partnership in maintaining the family
unit and meeting the special needs of children.
Public input contributed significantly to the
development of the act. It is a major initiative
which reflects the new directions the ministry
has taken in its work in recent years. After comprehensive staff training, the new Family and
Child Service Act will be proclaimed in 1981.
The Ministry of Human Resources provides
reports to the court on custody issues under the
Divorce Act. Reports on matters of custody are
provided by Corrections Branch of the Ministry
of Attorney General, under the Family Relations
Act. To allow for a more consistent service to the
Supreme Court, plans to co-ordinate ™
ports under the Ministry of Attorney <M
have been initiated and are expected to^l
plemented during 1981-82.
During 1980-81, the ministry receivSI
requests from the Supreme Court in BrirS|
lumbia and other provinces for the prera
of reports on custody and access.
Table 22
Reported Cases of Probable Child Abuse,   ]
Calendar Years 1976 to 1980
Age and Sex
1976
1977
1978*
1979?
Male
Under 3 Years
58
63
48
87 i
3 to 10 Years
92
99
141
1551
11 Years and
Older
41
46
75
811
No Age Reported
0
2
0
0
Female
Under 3 Years
52
43
45
71 i
3 to 10 Years
90
93
130
1641
11 Years and
Older
TOTALS
84    104    166      23BI
417    450    605      791!
* Forms for reporting were changed janu./i
1978, resulting in more reports. Thesmi
differ also from those in the 1978 repou
later follow-up reports have come inWT
figures report cases where the problem
shown as "maltreatment" and the folWA
has not definitely shown the complaim
"unfounded". In late 1979, the Zenitm
Helpline started to operate, causing ant
increase in reporting.
Table 23
Admissions and Discharges of Children
to Care of Superintendent of Child Welfare,
Fiscal Year 1980-81*
Admissions
By Agreement
By Apprehension
By Committal**
TOTAL
Discharges
By Adoption
By Age or Similar Terminations
Returned to Parents
(i.e., Legal Guardian)
TOTAL
* The detail formerly reported regarding
legal acts involved and the methods c |
discharge is available on Tables 28 to jl
 FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES        31
Iffi/ross/on for Family and Child Service
Iffif cases occurs as soon as the child is
apprehended. For other acts Quvenile
| Delinquents Act, Family Relations Act,
lOther Province Wards, etc.) committal is
lahtomatic, or admission does not occur
lffi/7 court procedure is completed.
ile 24
mber of Children in Care and Legal Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare,
Hal Status by Regions, as at March 31, 1981
PCA WARDS
4
EGIA6
FRA and
Other
Perma
Before
JDA5
Similar
Province
Non-
nent1
Other
Court
Wards
Wards
Wards
Wards
TOTALS
;ion 1
107
79
63
2
7
•f'ffi'
17
282
lion 2
133
58
55
3
12
2
40
303
lion 3
268
57
28
9
25
37
93
517
;ion 4
170
51
32
6
29
14
64
366
lion 5
318
69
35
33
107
15
93
670
:JM1 62
348
64
44
15
30
20
78
599
,ion 7
183
29
24
13
108
11
49
417
,ion 8
131
29
24
17
37
14
14
266
l.ion 9
334
39
34
15
71
9
84
586
ion 10
425
110
46
16
116
18
121
852
B 113
413
86
43
25
50
18
93
728
Hi 122
229
52
24
4
23
15
49
396
|HJ13
161
62
85
12
22
1
73
416
Hi 142
176
61
8
8
45
3
82
383
jlffll 15
33
14
24
0
3
0
12
86
iion 16
210
89
61
0
22
4
47
433
ijSl 17
113
37
35
3
15
9
59
271
Hon 18
204
76
70
7
19
13
55
444
iion 19
181
52
46
11
17
9
93
409
■ er Supervising
Iffices
0
7
0
0
1
5
13
ids Supervised by Another
rovince
155
19
iJaW
2
42
0
0
220
IfALS
4,292
1,133
790
201
800
220
1,221
8,657
l'e-7966 wards are now being included with the "permanent" wards; 824 of these wards were
I volved on March 31, 1981.
hese three regions were altered by the formation of Regions 18 and 19 on April 1, 1980.
I:parafe coding systems for Regions 11 and 20 were not established for the 1980-81 fiscal year.
t-Mon '' figures report on both regions.
IZA: The Protection of Children Act, was replaced by the new Family and Child Service Act
Itrpduced in 1980. Children who have been admitted to the care of the superintendent of child
lepre are neglected, abused, abandoned, or without proper supervision or guardianship.
VA: Children who have been admitted to the care of the superintendent of child welfare under
I e Juvenile Delinquents Act after committing an act of delinquency.
WjIA, FRA: Children who have been admitted to the care of the superintendent of child welfare
there, at the death of their guardian, no other person has been named in the will. The Equal
I uardianship of Infants Act was repealed in 1979 and children have since been admitted under
e Family Relations Act. The EGIA is used only to distinguish the children admitted under the two
fferent acts.
 32        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-f
Table 25
Cases* Related to Protection of Children by Type of Service,
Fiscal Years 1979-80 and 1980-81
Opened During
Carri
ed D
uring
Incomplete 1
Yea
r
Year
at En
d of Year
Type of Service
1979-80
1980-81
1979-80
1980-81
1979-80
1980-8
Custody
194
206
358
331
125
124
Repatriation**
646
703
857
794
91
111
Immigration
11
13
17
21
8
7
TOTALS
851
922
1,232
1,146
224
242
Cases are the number of family units receiving services on behalf of their children.
Figures for 1979-80 have been adjusted to include, and figures for 1980-81 include, the
Vancouver Emergency Services office cases.
Table 26
Children in Care and Legal Responsibility
of Superintendent of Child Welfare,
by Age Group, as at March 31, 1981
Age Group
Under 3 years
3 to 5 years inclusive
6 to 11 years inclusive
12 to 15 years inclusive
16 to 17 years inclusive
18 years
TOTAL
Number of Children
651
1,888
2,755
1,962
812
8,657
Table 27
Number of Children in Care and Legal
Responsibility of Superintendent of Child Welfare,
by Type of Care, as at March 31, 1981
Type of Care
Number of Children
Paid foster-home care
5,390
Independent, own or
relative's home:
1,178
Boarding home, child
maintains self
134
Free home and free
relatives' (or parents')
home
800
Runaways
244
Adoption Home
351
Special Care Home
297
Resources*
1,441
TOTAL
8,657
* This covers a wide variety of placements
ranging from subsidized receiving homes to
federal institutions.
Table 28
Number of Children Admitted to Care of
Superintendent of Child Welfare, by Legal Stat
During Fiscal Year 1980-81
Legal Status
Number of Gffl
Apprehended Under Protection
of Children Act*
Committed Under Juvenile
Delinquents Act
Family Relations Act
Non-Wards
Other Province's Wards
TOTAL NEW ADMISSIONS
2,4
2,6
1
5,41
* The Protection of Children Act was r§
named the Family and Child Servicers
during 1980. A completely new act OT
now been passed by the Legislature em
will become effective in 1981.
** Children in care seven days or less aa
transients are no longer counted. Of the
children, 617 were paid through shoM\
billings in 1980-81.
Variation between legal status and that
logically linked reason for admission^
shown on Table 29 is caused by dela/e
establishment of the legal status or use!-c
unexpected status.
 FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES       33
lie 29
** Pre-168 PCA wards are now shown in
(sons for New Admissions of Children to Care
this table among the permanent wards
r uperintendent of Child Welfare During
discharged. Of these wards,
239 were
al Year 1980-81
discharged in 1979-80.
(son                                     Number of Children
hysical abuse
205
Bital failure
3,110
Bertion or abandonment
343
notional disturbances,
needing treatment
144
H parent deceased
39
uffitparent deceased
irental illness, mental
109
Table 31
163
Reasons for Discharge of Children in Care of
: irental illness, physical
224
Superintendent of Child Welfare,
for
availing adoption placement
224
Fiscal Year 1980-81
»moved from adoption placement
1
{raiting permanent plan
81
Reason for Discharge                N
Wards
jmber of Children
aabilitation plan for parents
222
ffiical handicap
51
19 Years of Age
643
lental retardation
156
Married
18
ielinquent behaviour (Juvenile
Deceased
21
IWnquents Act only)
72
Committal order terminated
731
ansient*
91
Returned to parents (JDA)
97
nmarried mother
57
Returned to own province
96
irental failure to provide needed
Adoption Order granted
425
nedical treatment or prevention
11
Subtotal
2,031
irent or parents imprisoned
43
.■quested by other province
114
Before the Court
DTAL NEW ADMISSIONS
5,460
Withdrawn from Court
Order under section 8(9)(a)(i)
494
iffldren in care seven days or less as
returning to parents
589
InB/enfs are no longer counted. Of these
Deceased
6
IBren, 677 were paid through short-stay
Adoption Order granted
Married
3
0
lUmgs in 1980-81.
Apprehended but not presented
52*
Le 30
Subtotal   -
1,144
hber of Children Discharged From Care
of
Non Wards
«!rintendent of Child Welfare, by Legal Status,
ling Fiscal Year 1980-81
18 or 19 years of age
Married
156
1
Deceased
5
IJBtatus                              Number of Children
To parents or relations
2,082
j!lpre the Court, PCA
liffiction of Children Act Wards
1,146*
Placed for adoption
Other
116
1
'ermanent           928**
Subtotal
2,361
jfiers                  679
1,607
1,607
TOTAL DIRECT DISCHARGE
5,536
|ual Guardianship of Infants
1W Wards and Other
144
* Children in care seven days or less as
venile Delinquents Act
134
transients are no longer cour
ted. Of these
nn-Wards
2,361
children, 617 were paid thro
ugh short-stay
Ether Province's Wards
144
billings in 1980-81.
PJM. DIRECT
DISCHARGES FROM CARE
5,536
iffldren in care seven days or less a;
li§'ents are no l°n8er counted. Of these
hildren, 617 were paid through short-stay
iilhngs in 1980-81.
 34
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Table 32
Numbers of Children in Care, by Age and Legal Status, as of March 31, 1981
Non-Wards
BC and PCA Wards
(before court and temporary)
PCA Wards
(permanent and pre-68)
All Other Court Wards
(JDA, FRA, other provinces)
TOTALS
Age Groups in Years
Under 3
3 to 5
6 to 11        12 to 15
16 to 18
Tol
73
61
249             460
378
1,1
271
267
489              594
301
1,9
180
254
904          1,353
1,601
4,2
65
69
246              348
494
1,2
589
651
1,888          2,755
2,774
8,6
Table 33
Children Who Are Legal Responsibility of
Superintendent of Child Welfare Receiving Care
in Resources as of March 31, 1981
Care Provided
Shelter
YWCA and YMCA hostels, etc.
Educational
Indian residential
Private boarding schools
Other
Physical Care
Maternity homes
Jericho Hill School
Special children's hospitals
Private hospitals
Other
Mental Retardation
Group homes for the retarded and
retarded association homes
Chrisholme
Dr. Endicott's Home, Northern
Training Centre, Haven
Woodlands, Tranquille, Glendale
Other
Behavioural Difficulties
Receiving homes
Assessment and planning centres
Probation or remand centres
Special camps
Group homes
Riverview and other mental health
Special treatment outside province
Browndale
Children's Foundation
Specialized Resources
Cedar Lodge
The Maples
House of Concord
Provincial and federal camps
City and provincial goals
Detention centres
Federal penitentiary
Other
TOTAL
Number of Children
12
13
2
2
13
3
14
19
110
13
17
262
42
87
113
24
20
310
5
1
26
21
158
36
20
5
21
12
37
4
14
,441
ln the last 11 years, the number of chiHB
care has dropped by 19 per cent, ln 197(al
were 10,567 children in care, while in ;
there were 8,657. Each year more childre
admitted to care, yet fewer children rerfll
care.
Table 34 illustrates the decrease in eveil
category of children in care during 1980-81
cept for those children aged 16 and oven
often remain in care until they reach the n
majority.
Table 34
Children in Care, by Age, for Fiscal Year 1981
Age
Group
Under 3
3 to 5
6 to 11
12 to 15
16 to 17
18 years
TOTALS
No. of
Children
589
651
1,888
2,755
1,962
812
8,657
Increase/Decreajl
from Apr. 1, 19(1
to Mar. 31, 19!
-72
-21
-14
-86
+ 56   J
+ 59
-78  1
Table 35
Number of Children in Care of Superintended
Child Welfare During and at End of Fiscal Ye s,
1978-79 to 1980-81
Year
No. of Children
No. of CJjffl
During Year*
at March .
1980-81
14,193
8,657
1979-80
13,841
8,73|I
1978-79
13,733
8,831  |
* Children in care seven days or less ami
transients are no longer counted. Numl3
of children paid through short-stay biWm
were:
• 617 in 1980-81
• 511 in 1979-80; and
• 484 in 1978-79.
 FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES       35
je36
rtof Children's Programs for
tjl Year 1980-81
IBcost of maintenance of children in Family
[Children's Services division:
L homes $16,977,625
">r residential
[sources $31,563,043
f.iving special
Iffices $11,204,456
[TOTAL $59,745,124
I&cost of transportation
Igiildren in care
superintendent
IBeost of hospitalization
f new-born infants being
rmanently planned for
L superintendent
Is Expenditures
b Collections
BCost to provincial government
per public accounts
$  983,076
$ 75,655
$60,803,855
$11,726,852
$49,077,003
IIlCES FOR CHILDREN IN CARE
pices for Children in Care provides help to
:Hren in the care of the ministry to develop
Hible and productive life-styles. The goals of
program include the return of the child to the
■Wtfamily, adoption placement, substitute
■Hiving, specialized care, or an indepen-
ii living arrangement. Services under this
B;ram are provided under the statutory au-
■Hofthe Family and Child Service Act (SBC
I.)), Adoption Act, Guaranteed Available In-
II for Need Act (section 2), Family Relations
HS&tion 29), and Juvenile Delinquents Act.
Iffitionally, communities have voluntarily
:;d for dependent children deprived of their
Hjffiiilies. When the Protection of Children
Was enacted in British Columbia in 1901,
Bmdren's aid societies (Victoria, Cowichan,
I aimo, and two in Vancouver) were given the
[fetory authority to protect and care for chil-
B.ffhese societies provided group child care
Kphanages, homes and missions, and family
Bwith voluntary foster families.
Mild in care services underwent several sig-
pant changes in the 1930s. Regular mainte-
hf e payments were extended to families car-
|iaall foster children, rather than to those
Sigonly for infants; the position of the super-
■ffint of neglected children became a full-
|lr position instead of voluntary one; in 1934,
Mifants Act was proclaimed, permitting child
welfare agencies to deliver preventive services
for families and children.
Over the years, the ministry has made numerous policy and program changes to respond to
the changing needs and goals of children in care
services. The continuous development of family
support services enables more children to receive support services within their own homes.
Today, the ministry administers and delivers
all services to children in care, including those
services formerly provided by children's aid societies. The variety of resources available to
children in the care of the superintendent of
child welfare ranges from the volunteer foster
home providing care for the average youngster,
to the very special ized resource able to care for a
severely disturbed or handicapped child.
Services for children in care includes foster
homes, and specialized resources for children.
Several new child in care programs were developed during 1980-81. Region 15 (Downtown
Strathcona), in co-operation with Region 1 (Vancouver East), appointed a Native Indian Child
Welfare Advisory Committee made up of native
Indian members. In 1981-82, this committee
will begin working with ministry staff to plan
programs for native children who come into
care, and assist in the development of native Indian resources.
Plans to begin a crisis nursery in 1981-82
were also developed this year by Region 15. The
nursery will be operated by downtown Vancouver native Indian parents. It will provide care for
children of native parents moving into the area
while they secure accommodation and employment. The nursery will also serve as a temporary
emergency care home for native children, to
prevent them from coming into care.
In 1980-81, a new program was developed in
Region 13 (Fraser North), providing an opportunity for youths in care to meet with ministry staff
and child-care workers to share their ideas and
feelings about the child in care system. Information from these meetings is used to promote discussion at staff workshops on how the system
can be improved. A video tape of a play, written
and acted by children in care, about the child in
care system, is being used to provide basic information about the system to other ministries.
 36
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
ll
Foster Homes
This program provides substitute care to meet
physical, social, emotional and developmental
needs of chiIdren admitted to care. It is operated
under statutory authority granted by the Family
and Child Service Act (SBC 1980) and the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section
2).
In 1905, 44 of the 94 children in the care of
Vancouver's Children's Aid Societies were in
foster homes. By the early 1930s, regular payments were provided for the maintenance of all
foster children, and no longer for the maintenance of infants only. Since the 1960s, the foster
care program has provided long-term and short-
term care for children who are unable to be returned home or placed for adoption. Although
foster homes are just one of the choices available, they continue to serve the placement
needs of the majority of children in care.
Fostering a child is a personal and demanding
task, requiring patience, understanding, sharing
and commitment. Foster parents play a vital role
by working with the social worker to return the
child to his natural family as soon as possible. In
some cases, the child is not able to return home
and is committed permanently to the superintendent's care. The foster parents then assist in preparing the child for placement in an adoption
home, or may themselves give the child a permanent home by adoption or a "planned life
placement".
Monthly maintenance payments are provided
to the foster parents according to the age of the
child. The payments provide for the child's basic
needs and include family allowance. Where
there are extra child-care related costs, a supplementary rate may be paid.
Table 37
Basic Foster Care Maintenance Rates,
Effective January 1981
Age of
Mainte
Child
nance
Clothing
TOTALS
0-5 years
$122.49
$24.20
$146.69
6-9 years
148.61
28.98
177.59
0-11 years
167.68
34.29
201.97
2-13 years
192.52
34.29
226.81
4-19 years
211.42
41.04
252.46
The Ministry of Human Resources is responsible for the recruitment, orientation, support and
training of foster parents. Since 1966, the ministry has contracted with the British Columbia
Federation of Foster Parent Associations to provide support and education programs to foster
parents. In 1980-81, the ministry gran3
federation $136,747 to pay for developiffll
implementing training programs, prov:i
newsletters, annual conferences, regionajH
shops, local foster parent associations and h
special projects. The number of local fosnM
ent associations has grown from one in 19
58 in 1980-81.
Throughout 1980-81, an average of lit
paid foster homes in British Columbia cal
children in care.
In 1980-81, the ministry increased its gr.t
the federation to provide more educatraffl
support programs to foster parents at the .c
level. In the Lower Mainland, plans for a uj
foster parent recruitment campaign weEM
pleted. The campaign will be launchecMI
spring of 1981. A Foster Parent Recragl
Night was held in Region 18 (Surrey) toml
and present awards to hundreds of s
parents.
The 1980-81 budget included an incrSI
foster home rates, provisions for supplejBI
rates for special needs children, and addiirl
funds-for foster parent training and sua
programs.
Table 38
Foster Home and Child in Care Expenditures,
Fiscal Years 1976-77 to 1980-81
1980-81
$17,882,262
1979-80
16,062,2ffl
1978-79
14,936,5.1
1977-78
15,072,0ffl
1976-77
11,989,428
Specialized Resources for Childrei
The Specialized Resources for Childraffl
gram provides residential and non-residil
services to children with special needSj
able them to return to as normal a life-stn
possible or to a less intensive communi i
source. These services are provided und'lj
statutory authority of the Family and Chil'M
vice Act (section 3, subsection 2, a and ba
tion 16, subsection 1), and the Guaraej
Available Income for Need Act (section 2ui
section 1).
The Specialized Resources for ChildSM
gram was developed in 1973 to providespuj
ized residential and non-residential cai-il
children with emotional disturbances or hi
caps. These resources are preferred alterniM|
to institutional care, as they tend to be snli
and offer more opportunities for eachoJMa
 FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES        37
Resources are developed regionally to re-
>nd to local needs, and are generally operated
ough non-profit societies on contract with the
ffitry. Services under this program include:
Hmite Homes
Respite homes offer intermittent temporary
Rare for a child when family breakdown is a
Bisk due to the stresses of caring for a handicapped or emotionally disturbed child.
Helving and Assessment Resources
Receiving centres offer temporary care for a
Khild until a suitable placement, either in
the child's home with support services or in
a specialized care facility, is arranged. This
program also provides emergency care and
lEhelter in bed subsidy homes.
:>oup Homes
Croup homes provide care and treatment
\mpr children in a family setting. Group home
Blacement is generally chosen as an alternative to foster care for children who cannot be planned for in foster homes, or for
Ehildren who require specialized services.
| Group home programs are often designed
for a particular group; for example, a home
may have training resources or autistic children or life-skills programs for older adoles-
Knts. Time limits for children placed in
group homes are flexible and determined
by the child's plan.
pecial Care Homes
jgpecial care homes provide special child
care and treatment for one or two severely
^turbed or handicapped children. Fam-
I^ks of these children are often given respite
and intermittent services to enable them to
cope. Special care homes provide individ-
BJlized family care tailored specifically to a
child for whom the alternative is often insti-
tutional care.
Socialized Residential Resources
mecialized residential resources provide
^H-hour care and treatment to severely
Emotionally disturbed or disabled children.
I^Bere is usually a placement time limit of
six to eight weeks. This placement option is
Wgierally used only until more permanent
Mjans have been prepared.
Jecialized Non-residential Resources
The ministry contracts with non-profit soci-
eties to provide goal-oriented services and
IMjnselling to families and children. Pro-
IKms often include training in parenting
skills, particularly those skills necessary to
IBaintain a child with special needs in his
own home or a foster home. Centre-based
i programs also offer day respite care.
The special care home model came into use in
June 1980. This model of service combines the
provisions of the former therapeutic home program with aspects of special-rate foster homes,
and some additional features. It allows for maximum flexibility in planning services for hard-to-
place children.
The program offers family-based care for children with a wide range of mental and physical
handicaps, as well as for severely emotionally
disturbed children.
Since its introduction, the special care home
model has been widely used throughout the
province. Region 4 (Kootenays), for example,
developed 28 special care homes during 1980-
81, enabling 28 special needs children to receive individual attention in a small home setting. This new resource model has allowed a
number of children in institutions to be relocated in the community.
In addition to special care homes, other specialized resources were developed throughout
the province during 1980-81.
The McDonald Lodge Wilderness Program, a
resource program serving Region 8 (North and
South Peace River), became fully operational
during 1980-81. The program has the capacity
to serve 10 adolescents, and is jointly funded
with the Ministry of Attorney General.
A new emergency home which has the capacity to serve 18 children was developed in Region
18 (Surrey) during 1980-81. The home, operated by the Surrey Community Resource Centre
Society, has proven to be a valuable resource to
the ministry's Emergency Service's Child Abuse
Team. Region 18 also developed a long-term
group home; three children from Woodlands
were moved into this resource during the year.
In addition to developing new resources, Region 19 (Coquitlam), also established a resource
bank to recruit and study new foster homes and
special contract homes.
In 1980-81, ministry staff from Vancouver Island came to an agreement with the Ministries of
Health, Attorney General and Education on a
co-ordinated approach to providing the services
and resources to children requiring intensive
help. (It is expected that this approach will be
implemented during 1981-82.)
 38
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
3
Table 39
Number of Specialized Resources,
Fiscal Years 1979-80 and 1980-81
Specialized Resource
by Type 1980-81    1979-80
Respite Homes 8 7
Receiving, Assessment
and Bed Subsidy 68 60
Group Homes
Mentally Disabled 12 7
Behaviourally or
Emotionally Disturbed 115 118
Special Care Homes*
Mentally Disabled 49 2
Behaviourally or
Emotionally Disturbed 190 99
Specialized Residential
Resources
Mentally Disabled 24 16
Behaviourally or
Emotionally Disturbed 54 38
Specialized Non-residential
Resources
Mentally Disabled 5 1
Behaviourally or
Emotionally Disturbed 16 14
TOTAL NUMBER OF
SPECIALIZED RESOURCES 541 362
Capacity for Specialized
Placements of Children 1,700        1,547
* Since the special care home model replaces
therapeutic homes in June 1980, the 1979-
80 figures refer to therapeutic homes.
Table 40
Specialized Resources for Children,
Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$31,563,043
1979-80
24,924,504
1978-79
22,040,000
1977-78
21,080,000
1976-77
19,750,000
ADOPTION SERVICES
Adoption Services plans, provides and legally
establishes, permanent life plans for children
whose natural parents are unable to do so. It operates under the statutory authority of the Adoption Act.
A central registry of approved adoption
homes is maintained in Victoria by the ministry.
Children who require placements are referred to
the registry by local ministry offices. Based on
the needs of the child referred, registry staff forward a selection of approved homes for consid
eration by local staff and, where possible, rjj
natural parents. Before an adoption placS!
the superintendent of child welfare proviol
report and makes a recommendation to trail
ish Columbia Supreme Court. After thisa
Adoption Order may be granted.
Non-ministry adoptions are those in v\c
children are placed privately or are adoptel
stepparents or relatives. The superintend™!
comes involved in these adoptions only \e
ordered by the British Columbia SupremeMl
or, in the case of private adoptions, wnml
adopting parents submit their notice of inten
adopt. During fiscal year 1980-81, the Bl
Columbia Supreme Court ordered the supii
tendent to conduct inquiries into 24 cases a
An amendment to the Adoption AcnM
claimed in September 1980, provided foi
voluntary transfer of guardianship for a chi
the superintendent upon the signing of a SI
to adoption. The intent of the amendmejBI
prevent a child from being in a "legal line
during the waiting period before the grant! .
an adoption order by the court.
A further amendment makes it an offeffll
anyone to offer money in connection witlt
adoption of a child, and prohibits advertml
child for adoption without the approvaMI
superintendent.
Throughout the fiscal year, a large nuffll
unstudied applications accumulated as a,ta
of the February 1980 moratorium on the|B|
those persons applying to adopt healthy^!
sian infants. This moratorium was neceSB
by the lengthy waiting list of approved adoh.
homes. These applications will be revieJl
er, as the waiting list to adopt decreaseSB
The placement of children with speciaJM
will continue to be emphasized by the mint
during 1981-82.
Table 41
Children Placed for Adoption by the Ministry
of Human Resources, 1979-80 and 1980-81
Category
1980-81
197.0
Total
717
66
Special Needs
367
29
From Other Provinces
21
1
From Other Countries
20
1
 1
'
FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES       39
L
Table 44
iroved Adoption Homes, 1979-80 and 1980-81
Number of Adoptior
Placements Made
rjy Ministry
of Human Resources
, by Type
of Placement,
As of               As of
by Regions, for Fisca
1 Year 1980-81
egory                    Mar.31,1981    Mar.31,1980
h demand
Foster
Home
) to 2 years)                   401                   629
to Adoption
h demand special
Hospital
Within
In
eeds child                      262                   257
To
Same
Anothe
cial needs
Region
Adoption
Home '
Home
TOTALS
jjgld only                        313                   220
1
0
1
8
9
2
4
2
3
9
lie 43
3
15
8
27
50
iption Reports Submitted to the Supreme Court,
4
13
1
26
40
'9-80 and 1980-81
5
18
8
23
49
6
17
13
19
49
e                           1980-81                1979-80
7
10
5
13
28
Ifflarent                       42                       422
8
3
5
11
19
alive                         13
9
19
8
28
55
[ate                            46                         57
10
29
16
30
75
11*
27
5
28
60
12
30
3
25
58
13
10
6
14
30
14
21
4
37
62
15
1
1
0
2
16
6
1
4
11
17
10
0
6
16
18
18
7
18
43
19
19
5
28
52
SUB
TOTAL
270
99
348
717
hparafe coding systems for Regions 11 and
Placement
b were not established for the 1980-81
Made
Iml year. Region 11 figures report on both
Outside BC     0
0
0
0
■gions.
TOTALS      270
99
348
717
|H>fe refers to table 44)
le 45
nber of Children Placed for Adoption by the Ministry
of Human Resources
in BC and Outside
BC,
\fe, During Fiscal Year 1980-81
Age
n BC
Outside BC
rOTALS
h                    (up to but not including 15 days)
236
0
236
days                 (i"'   "'    "    "                     1 month)
147
0
147
1 lonth               ("   "    "    "                    3 months)
62
0
62
1 Kths             ("   "    "                          6 months)
17
0
27
1 OTths              ("   "    "    "         "          1 year)
26
0
26
bar
43
0
43
hars
31
0
31
bars
32
0
32
bars
26
0
26
[is
24
0
24
hars
14
0
14
pars
9
0
9
l:ars
14
0
14
:;ars
6
0
6
1/ears
9
0
9
l/ears
4
0
4
'/ears
2
0
2
1 /ears and over
5
0
5
TOTALS
717
0
■      j
 40        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Table 46
Number of Legally Completed Adoptions, by Type of Placement, by Region, During Fiscal Year 1980-81 I
Region Ministry i Relative , Private                TOT
Stepparent Other Any*
Region 1 110 0 0 1
Region 2 8 0 0 0 0
Region 3 65 8 0 43 6
Region 4 45 4 0 35 1
Region 5 64 6 7 63 6
Region 6 37 0 0 31 9
Region 7 34 12 4 36 3
Region 8 20 5 0 12 0
Region 9 45 1 0 32 6
Region 10 93 6 3 70 1
Region 11*** 76 13 2 59 1
Region 12 78 0 0 94
Region 13 22 3 1 123 1
Region 14 43 2 0 8 5
Region 15 0 0 0 0 0
Region 16 12 1 0 0 0
Region 17 22 0 0 0 4
Region 18 32 6 0 3 3
Region 19 53 5 2 0 5
Vancouver Court 0 0 0 130 0
Registry TOTALS                  760 72 19 654 56                        1,
* Since August 24, 1979, adoption by a blood relative does not require direct involvement oS
superintendent. The ministry is aware of how many of these orders are issued, but is unable t
show the relationship of the child and adopting parents.
** In addition, nine adoptions started in BC were completed elsewhere.
*** Separate coding systems for Regions 11 and 20 were not established for the 1980-81 fiscal $
Region 11 figures report both regions.
 >st-Adoption Services
The Post-Adoption Services division was
med in September 1978 in response to a
ranting number of requests for services relat-
j to records of completed adoptions. These
ffices are provided under the statutory author-
of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need
:t (section 1 (e), section 6) and Regulations
Sion 7), and the Adoption Act (section 15).
Requests have increased from approximately
: per month in the mid-1960s to 30 per month
me mid-1970s, and continue to increase each
ar.
The overriding principle in providing these
'vices is that no identifying information
lich, either singly or in combination, might
fflto identification of persons, may be pro-
Jed. This applies to adoptees requesting infor-
ittion about their natural parents, as well as
raral parents inquiring about their child's pro-
bss and selected adoption home up until the
ie an adoption order is granted. Medical and
ffitic information is frequently provided in
ffltion to explanations of legislation and pol-
/ regarding confidentiality of identifying
ormation.
Gpmpleted adoption records are kept on file
Kpctoria. Post-adoption inquiries may be
ide through the Ministry of Human Resources
.trict offices or directly to Post-Adoption
rvices.
HMay 1980, the first application in British
ranbia was made to the Supreme Court un-
reection 15 of the Adoption Act, by an adop-
,'who wanted his file opened in order to learn
I identify of his biological parents. The judge
iised the application because the adoptee
i led to show sufficient "good cause" why he
ould receive identifying information.
980-81
1979-80
321
278
131
122
20
18
33
27
12
8
Table 47
Inquirers and Their Relationship to Adoptees,
Fiscal Years 1979-80 and 1980-81
Inquirer
Adoptee him/herself
Adoptee's biological mother
Adoptee's biological father
Adoptee's siblings or
half-siblings
Other relatives of adoptee
Other than adoptee or
member of his biological
family (includes adopting
parents, Ministry of Human
Resources district offices,
other provinces' child
welfare departments,
doctors, lawyers, Indian
Affairs) 426 337
Table 48
Number and Types of Requests,
Fiscal Years 1979-80 and 1980-81
Type of Request
1980-81
1979-80
Social background
515
477
Medical background
235
158
Services related to genetics
19
10
Natural parents wanting
news of child relinquished
for adoption
119
117
Help with post-
adoption reunion
77
96
Parents wanting it on record
that they would be willing
to meet child if he/she asks
to meet them
37
45
Confirmation of adoption
63
60
Other
215
164
  SECTION IV
Income Assistance
 44        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMS
AND SERVICES
Income Assistance programs and services are
authorized under the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act. Formerly, these programs
and services operated under the Social Assistance Act of 1945, which provided for child welfare services, social assistance and old age pension plan services. In the early 1960s, the
ministry began new assistance programs to help
clients attend vocational programs and obtain
work experience, as well as vocational programs for handicapped persons, funded jointly
with the Ministry of Health.
In 1976, the Social Assistance Act and Regulations were rewritten, and the name of the act
was changed to the Guaranteed Available Income for Need (GAIN) Act. This legislation provides a variety of financial and social services,
including programs to relieve poverty and provide a basic standard of living, and programs to
help persons in need become independent and
self-supporting.
Income Assistance programs and services "are
administered by 20 regional offices through 147
district offices, and can be divided into two sections: Financial Assistance and Adult Rehabilitation.
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
In recent years, the Financial Assistance section
has undergone changes to make it more accountable for program costs and to ensure that
clients are receiving the benefits to which they
are entitled. The administration process has
been improved to provide benefits quickly and
efficiently to eligible recipients. Policies to determine eligibility for benefits have been simplified. Eligibility for benefits is based on an objective measurement of needs and financial
circumstances. Personal issues such as race,
colour, or creed may not enter into determination of eligibility.
To protect the rights of persons applying for
assistance, the ministry has an appeal process.
Applicants who feel that a wrong decision has
been made in their case can appeal through an
administrative review and tribunal. A standardized appeal kit is readily available to all applicants. During 1980, the appeal kit was tested in
three ministry regions and found to be very helpful by applicants requesting reviews of their
eligibility.
Financial  Support programs  include three
types of GAIN programs: GAIN Basic Ino]
Assistance; GAIN For Handicapped; and g|
Seniors Supplement. In addition to GAIN 1
grams, the ministry offers a range of support!
vices to GAIN recipients, to meet indivll
needs and assist in maintaining or improi
personal levels of independence.
GAIN Basic Income Assistance
GAIN Basic Income Assistance provides ]
sons in need with financial assistance with:l|
living costs. It is administered under the GuaJ
teed Available Income for Need Act (sectiol
subsections 1 and 2).
GAIN Basic Income Assistance provj
monthly benefits to persons aged 19 to 64, rl
of whom req u i re assistance for on ly a short til
Persons considered employable are expected
look for work to support themselves; those]
able to find work because they lack skills on]
perience may participate in one of the minis!
programs to prepare for employment andi
crease their chances of finding a job. Those 'i
work part-time or full-time at low wages]
have large families to support, may qualify fcj
income supplement from the ministry to bj
their income up to the income assistance rati!
their family size.
Persons who are temporarily unable to vi
because of poor health or disability, and rj
financial eligibility requirements, may qu.j
for financial support during convalescenj
They usually return to full- or part-time A
ployment.
GAIN Basic Income Assistance is also i|
vided for children living with relatives. Althca
the ministry's goal is to keep parents and <i|
dren together, children must sometimes;]
placed in other homes in case of parental illi
or desertion. Placing a child with a relative i
vides a continuity of surroundings and resl I i
less upset for the child. Financial assistance d
vided to relatives is paid at the same rate esrJ
lished by the ministry for foster childrerHI
In 1980-81, income assistance benefit ii
for single persons and family units werel
creased by nine per cent, based on the cos)j
living index. This accounted for an incre.al
cost of $23 million to the program.
To ensure consistency in administering |l|
cy, the Financial Assistance Worker Comma
was developed in Region 18 (Surrey). Theca
mittee works with the Income Assistance "i|
sion to solve problems associated with admit!
tering financial assistance.
 ——^^-^—
 INCOME ASSISTANCE       45
•lie 49
trage Monthly Number of Recipients, GAIN
lie Income Assistance, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
1980-81*
B 979-80
1978-79
1977-78
1976-77
Number of Recipients
124,280
115,914
114,622
113,939
112,937
iAIN for Seniors (60-64) was incorporated
ito CAIN Basic Income Assistance as of July
, 1980. The 1980-81 figure includes the averse monthly number, from July 1, 1980 to
torch 31, 1981, of approximately 6,000
fAlN for Seniors (60-64) recipients. As a per-
entage of the provincial population, the case
tad has remained fairly static at approximate-
('4.5 per cent over the same time period.
lie 50
/ rage Number of Income Assistance
lipients Per Month, by Category, 1980-81
pgory
lids of Family
|>le Persons
111 Case load (Average)
Ciendents
\ verage Monthly Total
1980-81*
32,221
30,975
63,196
61,084
124,280
VgCain for Seniors (60-64) program was in-
morated into CAIN Basic Income Assis-
■nce effective July 1, 1980.
He 51
lume Assistance Rates (applicable during first
(V months of eligibility), Effective May 1980
It
Maximum
Support       Shelter        TOTAL
F.9-59)*
$136
$130           $266
2
218
260             478
3
287
325              612
4
334
365              699
Snd more)
4-45
+ 20
(each
unit)
(each unit)
*'raged 60-64, see Table 52.
Table 52
Basic Income Assistance Rates (applicable after
four consecutive months), effective May 1980
Maximum
Unit
Support       Shelter       TOTAL
1 (aged 19-30)
$136          $130          $266
1 (aged 31-64)
191             130            321
2 (aged 19-30)
218            260            478
2 (aged 31-64*,
or
parent and child)      273            260            533
3
322            325             647
4
369            365             734
5 (and more)
+45         +20
(each unit) (each unit)
TOTAL
* For a couple,
both aged 60-64, add $47 to the
basic rate.
Table 53
GAIN Basic Income Assistance, Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
1980-81
1979-80
1978-79
1977-78
1976-77
Expenditure
$270,380,951
227,145,681
158,074,606
157,479,474
138,259,881
GAIN for Handicapped
GAIN for Handicapped ensures that handicapped persons and their families receive financial support to maintain the health and unity of
the family. These services are provided under
the statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section 2, subsections 1 and 2; section 12, subsections 1 and 2).
GAIN for Handicapped provides monthly
benefits to persons aged 18 to 64 who qualify as
handicapped under the GAIN Act and Regulations. Eligibility is determined, first, by the financial assets, income, shelter costs and size of the
applicant's family; and second, on the basis of
an evaluation, by a medical committee, of the
applicant's handicap as defined by a physician.
The maximum monthly benefit for a single
handicapped person, as of January 1,1981, was
$408.96. Benefits vary, depending on the recipient's shelter costs. Since April 1979, GAIN
for Handicapped benefits have been increased
each quarter.
The ministry continues to provide medical
benefits for handicapped recipients who obtain
employment. Handicapped clients who obtain
employment but cannot remain in the work
force because of their handicap may resume receiving GAIN for Handicapped benefits.
 Table 54
Number of Cases of Income Assistance, by
Category and Regions, as of March 31, 1981
Region 1
Region 2
Region 3
Region 4
Region 5
Region 6
Region 7
RegioS
(Vancouver
(Vancouver
(Okanagan) (Kootenays)
(Prince
(Fraser
(Prince
(North ii
East)
Burrard)
George-
Cariboo)
Valley)
Rupert-
Bulkley
Soffll
Peac j
Category
Valley)
Rive.
Single Person
1,694
4,669
1,498
1,017
1,489
1,331
502
5
Couple
180
336
395
191
269
290
62
Two-Parent Fam
ly         202
221
500
304
511
493
145
1
One-Parent
Family
830
1,064
1,793
943
1,781
1,772
532
4
Child with
Relative
47
34
102
90
219
90
176
TOTALS
2,953
6,324
4,288
2,545
4,269
3,976
1,417
1,3
CAIN (60-64)*
230
398
456
271
295
385
86
1
Region 9
Region 10
Regions 11
and 20
Region 12
Region 13
Region 14
Region 15
Regior
(Kamloops (Vancouver
(Capital
(Fraser
(Fraser
(North
(Vancouver
(Vanco
Mainline)
Island
North of
Regional
District)**
South)
North)
Shore-
Sunshine
Downtown
Stratchcona)
Sout
Category
Malahat)
Coast)
Single Person
1,169
2,370
2,220
778
2,075
1,008
4,841
1,6!
Couple
261
358
289
129
267
139
230
2.
Two-Parent Fam
ly      443
708
418
155
246
185
86
2.
One-Parent Fam
ly   1,457
2,360
2,074
922
1,418
914
175
1,2;
Child With Relative    132
181
118
33
74
56
8
(
TOTALS
3,462
5,977
5,119
2,017
4,080
2,302
5,340
3,5f
CAIN (60-64)*
279
375
380
225
427
209
316
31
Region 17
Region 18
Region 19
(Vancouver West)
(Surrey)
(Coquitlam-
PROVINCIAL
GAIN (60-64)
Category
Maple Ridge)
TOTALS
TOTALS
Single Person
1,082
943
895
31,776
3,937
Couple
87
169
139
4,118
1,167
Two-Parent Family
91
265
226
5,671
162
One-Parent Family
446
1,536
1,254
22,998
106
Child with Relative
48
88
69
1,714
—
TOTALS
1,754
3,001
2,583
66,277
—
CAIN (60-64)*
177
204
163
—
5,372
* As of July 1, 1980, CAIN Basic Income Assistance case load includes CAIN (60-64). Separm
load figures for GAIN (60-64) have been listed to illustrate resulting case load increases. These
have been included in GAIN Basic Income Assistance total figures.
** Separate financial coding systems for regions 11 and 20 had not been established for the 19t
fiscal year. Regions 11 and 20 statistics will be reported separately for 1981-82.
 INCOME ASSISTANCE       47
le 55
Jmber of Handicapped Persons
ileceipt of GAIN for Handicapped,
III March 31, 1977 to 1981*
so possible future mail strikes will create fewer
problems.
Year
Number of Persons
1981
13,726
1980
13,469
1979
12,526
1978
11,568
1977
10,794
Vmtatistics do not include the number ofde-
t endents of handicapped persons.
lie 56
(IN for Handicapped, Expenditures,
16-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81*
$56,487,316
1979-80
47,661,148
1978-79
38,797,108
1977-78
34,143,830
1976-77
30,998,947
s of July 1980, the statistics include the
mwits paid to dependents of handicapped
(.IN Seniors Supplement
SIN Seniors Supplement provides benefits
jt( jpplement the federal government's Old Age
purity, Guaranteed Income Supplement and
puses' Allowance programs. It operates under
^Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act
Bi2).
/hen the Federal Spouses' Allowance pro-
;nwasbegun in October 1975, GAIN Seniors
implement benefits were made available to eli-
>e spouses of pensioners. Over the years,
jtdy increases in Canada Pension Plan bene-
land interest rates on savings have reduced
tnumber of pensioners eligible for the GAIN
>(ors Supplement, and have caused a demise in program expenditures. At March 31,
[T, 67,569 persons were receiving the GAIN
i ors Supplement.
lose eligible for the GAIN Seniors Supple-
fe'tare paid automatically, based on informa-
l;supplied by the federal Old Age Security di-
i| of Health and Welfare Canada.
postal strike in the summer disrupted the is-
'tof cheques. However, cheques were sorted
f g postal code information, and routed to the
it'est district office. Plans are underway to connate postal codes with district office codes
Table 57
GAIN Seniors Supplement, Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$25,101,262
1979-80
28,104,256
1978-79
31,047,412
1977-78
34,991,773
1976-77
37,100,805
Other Services and Benefits
Income Assistance administers a range of support services for GAIN recipients. These services, which provide financial benefits for extraordinary expenses and programs to help
recipients become independent, operate under
the statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act.
School Start-Up Allowance
This allowance is paid to income assistance
families with school aged children, to help meet
extra costs at the start of the school year. The
allowance for children up to age 12 is $20, and
for children 12 and older, $30.
Table 58
School Start-Up Allowance,
Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$723,977
1979-80
358,115
1978-79
711,224
1977-78
544,987
1976-77
444,138
Christmas Supplementary Allowance
The ministry provides this allowance to income assistance recipients in December, as an
additional source of funds for Christmas. Single
persons receive $20 and families $50.
Table 59
Christmas Supplementary Allowance, Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$2,049,268
1979-80
1,969,693
1978-79
1,009,867
1977-78
553,123
1976-77
862,359
 48        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Camp Fees
Each ministry region has funds available to
enable handicapped persons and children of income assistance recipients to attend summer
camps.
Table 60
Camp Fees, Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$179,766
1979-80
104,653
1978-79
112,548
1977-78
104,956
1976-77
53,146
Crisis Grants
When a recipient does not have assets, income or other resources to meet an emergency,
a crisis grant may be provided to prevent danger
to the person's health or removal of children
from the home.
Table 61
Crisis Grants, Expenditures, 1979-80 and 1980-81*
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$1,577,243
1979-80
1,529,187
* Prior to 1979-80, crisis grants were budgeted
under special needs allowances.
Diet Allowance
To provide a recipient with funds to meet extraordinary dietary costs recommended by a
physician, dietitian or nutritionist, a maximum
allowance of up to $20 per month may be
granted.
Table 62
Diet Allowance, Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$989,856
1979-80
976,502
1978-79
934,622
1977-78
841,829
1976-77
598,023
Natal Allowance
An allowance of up to $25 a month, for 12
months, may be grated to a recipient who is
pregnant and who requires a special diet recommended by her doctor. An income assistance recipient who has recently given birth and needs a
special diet for herself or her infant may also be
eligible for this allowance for up to six months.
Table 63
Natal Allowance, Expenditures, 1976-77 to]
1980-81
Year
Expenditura
1980-81
$562,582
1979-80
509,377
1978-79
464,1201
1977-78
463,4921
1976-77
499,0261
Comforts Allowance
This allowance is provided to meet ffl
sonal and recreational needs of an indiv^
ceiving subsidized care in a residential
ment centre or personal care facility. Urffl
per month may be grated to each persrffl
Table 64
Comforts Allowance Recipients, 1979-80 and
1980-81*
Year
Average Month
Case load
1980-81
3,086
1979-80
3,013   1
* Provincial case load figures were not
reported prior to 1979-80.
Table 65
Comforts Allowance, Expenditures, 1976-77 I
1980-81
Year
1980-81
1979-80
1978-79
1977-78
1976-77
Expenditure
$2,218,088
1,865,5J3
1,841,5ffl
2,470,033
1,496,338
Guide Dog Allowance
An amount of $35 per month is avaijtij
aid in the maintenance of a registered guica
used by a blind person receiving incofflj
tance. This allowance is included in thejffij
assistance budget.
Burial of Indigents
The ministry provides payment of boil
cremation costs, under an agreement wi i
Funeral Directors' Association of BritisEEI
bia, for all areas of the province except Va*
ver, where the city assumes this cost. Thehf
is provided when the deceased has noSBJ
relatives or other persons able or willinMJ
this responsibility.
 INCOME ASSISTANCE       49
Je 66
llBndigent Burials, 1979-80 and 1980-81*
Year
1980-81
1979-80
Number
552
542
rov/nc/a/ numbers of indigent burials were
\Wrecorded prior to 1979-80.
[lie 67
I ial of Indigents, Expenditures, 1976-77 to
1181
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$327,392
1979-80
290,548
1978-79
235,229
1977-78
191,922
1976-77
332,573
datriation
jnder certain conditions, income assistance
pients can be assisted to return to their prov-
b or country of origin. Such moves are made
Irrarily to reunite with families or improve em-
p/ment opportunities. Planning is carried out
prainistry staff in co-operation with the au-
Bmes in the other province, who verify the
jffijlity of the repatriation.
r;e*68
Mation. Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
980-81
$110,261
979-80
82,526
978-79
93,342
977-78
75,511
976-77
57,105
iiisition Houses and Hostels
^Bition houses (also known as emergency
Iters), hostels, and residential treatment fa-
-ies provide temporary room and board to
lie who may require income assistance and
IV' are in a period of transition. This includes
a lies in crisis, women undergoing marital
i£ ration, and persons recently released from
loitals, prisons or treatment centres for drug
Italcohol dependency. Transition houses and
Kels operate under the Guaranteed Available
Pme for Need Act (section 2).
tere are 58 facilities in the province which
|uhded by the ministry to provide accommo-
jHfor a limited time to eligible persons.
Iffits who require financial assistance may
IKirough the nearest ministry office serving
and the contract with the facility, the ministry
may provide assistance directly to the individual
or pay the operator directly on a daily basis at a
pre-determined rate.
The ministry expects facilities providing this
type of care to be licenced under the Community Care Facilities Licencing Act where applicable. Hotels which are sometimes used as hostel
resources are approved by district offices of the
ministry. Budgeting for these facilities is part of
the GAIN Income Assistance vote and is administered through that division, although payment
and eligibility are determined locally.
Some facilities are funded jointly with the provincial Alcohol and Drug Commission of the
Ministry of Health. In these facilities, the Alcohol and Drug Commission funds the treatment
program, and the Ministry of Human Resources
pays accommodation costs of persons eligible
for income assistance benefits.
Eight new transition houses were established
during 1980-81: two in Region 4, one in Region
5, two in Region 7, one in Region 8, one in Region 9, and one in Region 13.
Development of seven additional transition
houses is planned for 1981-82: two in Region 4,
one in Region 6, one in Region 8, one in Region
10, one in Region 12, and one in Region 14.
Also, one additional hostel is planned in Region
4 (Cranbrook) for 1981-82.
Table 69
Transition Houses (Emergency Shelters),
1979-80 and 1980-81
1980-81
1979-80
Number of Facilities
21
13
Total Capacity*
216
159
Average Capacity
per Shelter*
10
12
Average per Diem Rate*
$19.81
$15.26
Actual Occupancy
Days Used
59,160
46,542
* Figures refer to adult capacity and per diem
rates only.
Table 70
Single Persons' Hostels, 1979-80 and 1980-81
Mlity. Depending upon the circumstances
Number of Facilities
Total Capacity*
Average Capacity
per Hostel*
Average per Diem Rate*
Actual Occupancy
Days Used
* Figures refer to adult
rates only.	
1980-81       1979-80
27 26
785 765
29 29
$16.58 $14.13
229,410      212,489
capacity and per diem
 50        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Table 71
Facilities Shared with Alcohol and Drug
Commission, 1979-80 and 1980-81
Number of Shared
Facilities
Total Capacity
Average Capacity
per Facility
Average per Diem Rate
Actual Occupancy
Days Used
1980-81
10
186
1979-80
10
184
19 18
$13.66        $11.46
36,494
33,921
Expenditure
$1,708,910
481,785
343,988
Table 72
Transition Houses, Expenditures,
1978-79 to 1980-81
Year
1980-81
1979-80
1978-79
Ministry Inspectors
The Ministry Inspectors program is responsible for investigating alleged or suspected abuse
by clients of income assistance programs administered by the ministry. Inspectors try to curtail
abuses by recommending policy changes and
procedures to prevent fraud, and recover, where
possible, overpayments fraudulently obtained.
The Ministry Inspectors program operates under
the statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section 2, subsections 1 and 2).
The Ministry Inspectors program was established in late 1976 to assist line workers to investigate suspected or alleged fraud and abuse of
financial assistance benefits. Initially, one inspector was assigned to each of the ministry's
regions. There are now two inspectors in some
of the larger regions. A provincial co-ordinator
works with 28 inspectors located throughout the
province at regional offices, while one inspector
Table 73
Single Persons' Hostels, Expenditures,
1978-79 to 1980-81
Year Expenl
1980-81 $1,829
1979-80 2,1(S
1978-79 17JI
Table 74
Alcohol and Drug Shared Facilities,
1978-79 to 1980-81
Year ExpejB
1980-81 $1,19f
1979-80 984
1978-79 625
works full-time on the Pharmacare plan. Tffl
spectors work under thedirect supervision
regional managers.
The Ministry Inspectors program placem
ity on preventing fraud by identifying anym
nesses in application procedures. Inspector
tend workshops, study groups andBj
meetings, to advise ministry staff on methffli
detecting and preventing fraud.
Several sizeable frauds were uncoverS
ing the year. The largest of these resulted ii
conviction of five persons who were invoffl
a fraud extending over five years, amountii
more than $250,000. The value of other re!
eries made, ordered or agreed to during^|
cal year was approximately $775,000.
Ministry field staff are now the largest cori
utors of information and the team approiM
tween the inspectors and field staff is welB
lished. All cases of suspected fraud are ch;
examined.
Table 75
Monthly Report of Cases Referred to Inspectors for Investigation, 1979-80 and 1980-81
Month
1980-81
1979-80
Month
1980-81
1979-f
April
379
306
October
405
338
May
358
320
November
466
351
June
399
394
December
295
274
July
383
275
January
453
416J
August
400
321
February
381
409
September
433
386
March
310
370
 aC
INCOME ASSISTANCE
51
Br76
Ifistry Inspectors Program, Statistical Data Covering All Regions, 1977-78 to 1980-81
1980-81
1979-80
1978-79
1977-78
Riumber of cases reported
>r investigation
4,662
4,160
4,013
3,650
Res laid
209
212
235
354
es still before court,
mf March 31, 1981
179
N/A
N/A
N/A
Kigations completed
4,331
4,568
3,447
2,213
Bunded complaints, or insufficient
Hence to proceed
913
1,242
950
994
il value of recoveries made,
raered, or agreed to
$775,831.17
$510,770.05
$446,729.79
$379,689.33
Bents, other than through
(675
cases)
(579 cases)
(436 cases)
Durt action
$583,818.28
$475,078.05
$355,209.46
N/A
il amount of monthly assistance
Hjnated due to inspector's
(687
cases)
(684 cases)
(714 cases)
N/A
ivolvement
$311,
47.02
$255,404.47
$253,975.48
$164,679.54
I The above represents only the amount of monthly assistance being granted at the time of
^termination. No attempt has been made to estimate the amount which may have been
Ireceived in the months ahead, had assistance not been terminated.
le 77
istry Inspectors,
Expenditures,
6-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
I    1980-81
$733,836
1979-80
653,243
1978-79
618,100
1977-78
601,208
1    1976-77
176,652
lital Assistance
he objective of Rental Assistance is to help
ble with low incomes cope with housing
Is. This program is operated under the statu-
f authority of the British Columbia Income
■ Act (section 4[a]).
litAid
No benefit may exceed 10 per cent of the total
rent paid by the applicant during the year.
Eligibility for receiving RentAid, and the
amount provided, is determined by the applicant's age, income, amount of rent paid, and
other factors. To meet the basic requirements,
an applicant must be 16 years of age or older,
pay rent for his principal residence in British Columbia, and reside in British Columbia as of the
last day of the taxation year.
Table 78
RentAid, Expenditures, 1979-80 and 1980-81*
Year
Expenditure
980-81
$21,688,624
979-80
15,479,415
' Prior to 1979-80, RentAid was administered
by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and
Housing.
hntAid is a tax credit program to help offset
Nal costs, especially for people with low in-
fces. The Ministry of Human Resources as-
led responsibility for RentAid from the Minis-
|)f Municipal Affairs and Housing in 1979.
lough it is funded by the provincial govern-
ft, RentAid is administered through the fed-
■ government's income tax system. Applies complete a RentAid claim form included
[tieir federal income tax return.
I ie maximum benefit is $150 less one-and-a-
Iper cent of the applicant's taxable income.
SAFER
Under the Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters Act,
the SAFER program provides direct cash assistance to Canadian Old Age Pensioners living in
British Columbia so that renters 65 and over do
not have to spend an unreasonable portion of
their income on rent. Eligibility is based on income, rent and residency requirements.
The SAFER program was initiated ir July 1977
under the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and
Housing. In December 1978, responsibility for
 52        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
:
SAFER was transferred to the Ministry of Human
Resources.
SAFER provides a monthly supplement to senior citizen renters to offset the cost of rental accommodation in British Columbia. Benefits
equal 75 per cent of the amount by which rent
exceeds 30 per cent of the applicant's total income. Effective March 1, 1980, the maximum
monthly rent that could be claimed for SAFER
benefits was $225 for a single person and $245
for a couple. Applicants whose rent is higher
may still qualify for SAFER, but no more than
these amounts may be claimed.
To be eligible for SAFER benefits, applicants
must be 65 years of age or older, renting a principal residence, and paying more than 30 per cent
of their income towards rent. They must also be
receiving Canadian Old Age Security, and either
the applicant or the spouse must have resided in
British Columbia for two years immediately prior to application, or for five continuous years at
any time. Persons already receiving a provincial
rental subsidy (BC Housing Management Commission or Long-Term Care Programs) are not
eligible for SAFER.
Benefits begin July 1 of each year and continue tojune 30 of the following year. Eligibility for
SAFER Must be reestablished in May or June every year by submitting a reapplication updating
the applicant's income. This income includes
Old Age Security, Guaranteed Income Supplement, GAIN Basic Income Assistance, DVA and
Workers' Compensation Board pensions, plus
all other sources of income (interest, dividends,
private and Canada Pensions) from the previous
year.
The steady increase in Old Age Security,
Guaranteed Income Supplement, Canada Pension Plan benefits, and other private incomes
has reduced the number of recipients and the
amounts paid in benefits.
Table 79
SAFER, Increases
1977 to 1980
in Claimable Rents,
Couples
March 1980
September 1978
July 1977
Singles
$225.00
205.00
175.00
or Sharers
$245.00
225.00
200.00
Table 80
Total SAFER Recipients, 1978-79 to 1980-81 j
Year
1980-81
1979-80
1978-79
Number
12,500
13,500
15,000
Table 81
SAFER, Expenditures, 1979-80 and 1980-81*
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$7,522,486
1979-80
7,399,336
* Prior to 1979-80, SAFER was administM
by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs ana
Housing.
ADULT REHABILITATION
The Ministry of Human Resources provides]
eral programs to help income assistanceg
ents increase their levels of independejw
September 1980, the ministry introduced^
plan for employable income assistance (B
ents called the Individual Opportunity Plan.
goal of the Individual Opportunity Plan \sw
vide individuals who have been receiving
come assistance for over four months win
quate planning and resources to support ll
efforts to become independent. Under theM,
clients'skills are assessed, and an individual
realistic plan for employment is formulate^!
plan may involve job retraining or educM
upgrading, preparation for employment
take as long as a year or more.
Each region has a service delivery plarH
meet the needs of its communities. In add™
social workers and financial assistance wojji
employment rehabilitation officers are assijf
throughout the province to work with client
the Individual Opportunity Plan. Regions:
increased access to the resources of other rr i
tries and to local employers.
New regional programs were develops f
well. For example, Region 16 (VancouveMJJI
worked with the Women's Employment]
and Canada Employment and Immigrara
initiate a pilot project called Women's Pre"
ployment Group, in September 1980. WSgj
Pre-employment Group is designed to helftl
gle mothers receiving income assistance ten
pare for the work force. The program consi
a 10- to 12-week preemployment course o
ing a range of topics. The objective of there
gram is to help single mothers develop a"
crete   plan   for   employment   leading t(
 INCOME ASSISTANCE
53
mediate job search or specific plans for job
lining.
In 1980-81, a pilot project called Job Action
ffiitroduced in five regions: regions 2, 8, 11,
, and 20. As part of the Individual Opportu-
yfplan, Job Action teaches individuals who
ne been on income assistance for at least three
Iffis how to obtain and prepare for an inter-
|'W for a job. As a result of the program's suc-
ijplans to develop additional Job Action pro-
Kduring 1981-82 have been initiated,
'rograms provided under Adult Rehabilita-
n are: Earnings Exemption; Incentive
owance; Community Involvement; Assis-
ce to Employment; Educational, Vocational
J Rehabilitative Services; Work Activity; and
'Action.
:entive Allowance
i^B|ncentive Allowance program provides
ame assistance recipients with an opportu-
:• to obtain work experience in preparation for
y or re-entry into the work force. The pro-
pi operates under the statutory authority of
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act
:tion 10, subsection 10) and Regulations
:tion 14, subsections 1, 2 and 3).
hg incentive allowance is available to recipi-
|i&/ho have never worked or who have not
iked for a long period of time. It offers oppor-
lties for individuals to participate in local
limunity services, and gain experience and
tfidence in working with others,
n individual can participate in the program
sup to six months. The ministry pays an
Iwance in addition to regular income assists payments of up to $50 per month for a sin-
Is recipient or $100 per month for a person
ir dependents. This allowance helps with
s of clothing and transportation.
fce 82
Itntive Allowance, Expenditures,
'5-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$   616,326
1979-80
864,060
1978-79
1,846,559
1977-78
2,080,417
1976-77
3,221,436
Earnings Exemption
The Earnings Exemption program allows income assistance recipients to keep a certain
amount of their earnings from a job to assist with
work-related expenses. The program is administered under the statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section
3, subsection 2; section 10; section 9, subsection 1).
The ministry believes it is important that clients have the opportunity and incentive to take
employment. This is recognized in the earnings
exemption policy, which is designed to encourage clients in their transition from income assistance to a self-sustaining position in the workforce. A client may move directly into a full-time
job, or into part-time work where new skills acquired may lead to full-time employment.
Policy allows earnings exemptions of $50 per
month for a single person, and $100 per month
for a single handicapped person or a person with
dependents.
Community Involvement
The Community Involvement program enables people who are considered unemployable
to participate in community service projects operated by nonprofit agencies. Program emphasis
is on voluntary involvement in a local service
group which contributes to some aspect of community life. The program operates under the
statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available
Income for Need Regulations (section 15).
The ministry provides a grant, in addition to
regular income assistance payments, of $50 per
month to participants for extra expenses such as
transportation.
Table 83
Community Involvement, Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
980-81
$1,433,654
979-80
1,119,461
978-79
730,718
977-78
528,320
976-77
50,669
 54        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
D
Assistance to Employment
The Assistance to Employment program helps
employable income assistance recipients or applicants to become self-supporting through
community resources, counselling and financial
assistance. The program operates under the
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section 2), and Regulations (section 12).
To help income assistance receipients find
employment, the ministry may grant additional
financial assistance to meet the costs of essential
work tools and clothing for a confirmed job. The
ministry also assists with the cost of moving the
recipient to the community where the job is located, if financial aid from other agencies is not
available. Additional assistance is available for
essential clothing for job interviews and transportation expenses for interviews which seem
likely to result in a job.
Educational, Vocational
and Rehabilitative Services
The Educational, Vocational and Rehabilitative Services program helps income assistance
recipients become independent through assistance from other government programs and
community sources. It operates under the statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section 10).
This program is designed to help income assistance recipients acquire the skills and self-
confidence necessary to seek employment. The
financial, educational and training services offered by Canada Employment and Immigration,
the provincial Ministries of Education and
Health, Community Vocational Rehabilitation
Services, and other community resources, are
used to develop a training plan suited to the client. Ministry personnel work together with these
departments and agencies, in an effort to ensure
fulfilment of training programs. Where no other
financial assistance is available, the ministry
may pay for all or part of the training itself. Payments may include grants to assist with costs of
transportation, school supplies and miscellaneous needs.
In February 1981, the ministry introduced a
new policy to meet the additional costs of transportation and school supplies, incurred by recipients in training programs, which could not
be met through other sources.
Table 84
Training and Education Allowances,
Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
980-81
$505,574
979-80
353,024
978-79
317,321
977-78
253,987
976-77
274,309
Work Activity
Work Activity provides an opportunity ffl
sons receiving income assistance to dS
adequate work skills, experience and a
dence, to improve employment oppoituniB
is administered under the Guaranteed AvS
Income for Need Act (section 16, subsectS
Work Activity is an employment prepjffl
program for GAIN recipients who are ha\H
usual difficulty in obtaining or retaininan
The program has proven valuable to people]
have been unable to benefit from other ffl
programs.
Groups of trainees are carefully seledSj
participate in a three- to six-month program
program includes actual work experienSI
supervised setting, education upgradinj»|
search preparation, counselling and lifjT
education in such areas as money managent
These skills are taught within work placet
such as forestry projects or workshops for;
industrial manufacturing.
This program is provided to specialism
such as the handicapped, persons receiM
come assistance, or other people in need
During 1980-81, seven projects operaffl|
der the program throughout the provinrH
• Fraser Valley Work Activity ProjectS
• Vancouver Island Work Activity Prffl
• Surrey Rehabilitation Workshop;
• Vancouver Youth Project;
• Arbutus Work Incentive Society;
• Capital Mental Health Association™
• Boys' and Girls' Club of Victoria.
During 1980-81, the Vancouver IslarifflS
Activity project in Duncan and Nanaiffl!
expanded to the communities of CourterjS|
Port Alberni. Participants receive two #|
weeks work experience in forestry project'!
one week of learning job appljp
techniques.
Region 6 (Fraser Valley) worked towaEf
ordinating the Fraser Valley Work Actijfflj
ject into its regional Individual Opportune If
program.        	
 INCOME ASSISTANCE       55
le 85
irk Activity Projects, 1980-81
|:icipants
723
,: of Participants
5 to 21
360
2 to 35
301
6 to 51 +
62
lults
1 tjjployed
235
Iffier Training or tducation
87
llnemployed
37
Iffl Not Finish Program*
212
ItDTon Program as of March 31
152
f ime of these persons moved out of the
IB/nce, found employment before
impletion of the course, were transferred to
liner rehabilitation programs, or left the
lea.
le 86
Mfctivity, Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$1,188,058
1979-80
1,092,947
1978-79
939,872
1977-78
683,593
1976-77
340,288
Ii Action
)b Action teaches individuals who have been
fincome assistance for at least three months
ivto prepare for and obtain an interview and a
job. It also helps build confidence in people
who have not worked for a long time. The program is administered under the Guaranteed
Available Income for Need Act (section 10) and
Regulations (section 16). Job Action was introduced as a pilot project in regions 11, 20, 18, 8
and 2 during 1980-81 as part of the ministry's
Individual Opportunity Plan.
The program works on the assumption that if a
person has been trying to obtain a job for at least
three months without success, then the problem
•may not be with the job market, but with the job
hunt. Through classroom instruction, class and
individual participation, peer support, and use
of audio visual feedback, Job Action addresses
the following:
• clients' own job skills;
• what employers  are  looking for  in  an
employee;
• how to obtain job leads;
• how to make appointments for interviews
by telephone;
• how to fill out application forms;
• facts on pleasant grooming habits;
• practicing employer interviews;
• financial assistance available to employers;
• practicing role-playing to obtain jobs;
• how to keep a job;
• increasing   self-confidence   by   constant
practice; and
• a   realistic  view  of  their  value  to   an
employer.
;e87
I Action, 1980-81
Region 8
Re
gions 11,
Capital
20*
Region 2
Region 18
North and South
Regional
Vancouver
Surrey
Peace River
District
Burrard
Feb81-Mar81
Jan 81-Mar 81
M
)y 80-Ma
81
Jan 81-Mar 81
liber of clients
ho participated
10
13
286
28
biber who
und work
5
11
236
21
piber placed in
her phases
Individual
pportunity Plan
4
2
50
7
mnajority of Job Action participants in Regions 11 and 20 had been on income assistance for a
Wonum of six months. As of March 1981, follow-up showed only 21 had come back on income
sEtance.
 56
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
The Ministry of Labour provides Job Action
participants with an allowance of $3.00 per
hour while attending the program, to help cover
the cost of transportation and clothing for job
interviews.
Job Action is evaluated and monitored:
• by statistical records to determine length of
time clients spend on the training program
before finding a job;
• by client appraisal of the course;
• through follow-up at one and three rrS
intervals to determine clients' presents
through use of letter or by telephone*
• by checking clients' names against theg
rent month's Ministry of Human Resomj
case load.
During 1980-81, plans to develop additio
Job Action programs in other regions of the p|
ince in 1981-82 were initiated.
—I
 SECTION V
Health Care Services
 r
58
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
HEALTH CARE SERVICES
Health Care Services provides quality health
care at a reasonable cost for eligible income assistance recipients, through basic coverage under the Medical Services Plan of British Columbia and, in some cases, additional coverage.
The services of this division are provided under
the statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section 29).
Health Care Services include medical and
dental services, optical and ancillary services,
and transportation and special health need services. The following groups of persons are eligible for health care coverage through the
ministry:
• "unemployable" persons under 60 years of
age who receive GAIN benefits;
• children in the care of the superintendent of
child welfare, or living in the home of a relative who receives GAIN benefits on their
behalf; and
• GAIN recipients over 60 years of age.
Coverage has been expanded in short- or
long-term health care needs for low income
families, particularly those with a child who
needs ongoing treatment or materials.
Health Care Services consults with ministry
district office staff to make sure they are aware of
available health care services. To provide the
best possible service, the division may retain
medical specialists in any field for consultation.
Accounts from medical practitioners (doctors,
chiropractors, physiotherapists, etc.) are paid by
the Medical Services Plan of British Columbia.
Accounts for hospital services are paid by the
Hospital Programs Branch of the Ministry of
Health.
Most costs of Health Care Services programs
are shared equally with the federal government,
under Canada Assistance Plan funding.
The Health Care Services division processes
accounts for the following additional services:
Medical Services
Payment is made for medical examinations
that are required by the ministry for the administration of the GAIN program. As well,
the division pays on behalf of eligible persons
who require medical clearance for activities
such as camp attendance, sports, or post-
stroke programs.
In some cases, when the yearly Medical
Services Plan limit for physiotherapy has been
exhausted, the division may pay for up to 10
additional treatments, after the physOT
pist has obtained approval. This is helpffl
ticularly in cases where the patient is tS|
abled to leave home.
The division recently added services®
tritional needs, such as food supplemera
extra allowances for enriched diets for tl
riously ill, when approval has been ret^
and on medical advice.
Dental Services
Persons formerly receiving basicB
benefits through Ministry of HumS
sources dental services, became eligffl
dental care under the Min istry of Healtffl
dental care plan introduced in Januanjj
Applications from people who are not at
under the plan or who require speciaM
work beyond the plan's coverage, maw
viewed and approved by Healtfj
Services.
The Health Care Services division m
ues to provide orthodontia for chilffi
care, and eligible children of income
tance clients. With the expansion of c
dontia services, approximately 180 case
be served each year.
Optical Services
Standard single-vision or bifocal glassi:
provided when prescribed by an ophtffl
ogist or optometrist. Unusual needs,™
plastic lenses, trifocals, contact lenseaa
traocular lenses, may also be provide
the approval of the division.
Optical suppliers are paid wholesale
of materials, plus a fee for service, whig
increased in 1980-81.
There had been an increase in all,@[
services in early diagnosis and remedial
done on older people.
*?r '• '-
Ancillary Services
The division provides non-transfer,
medical needs, such as braces and suit
supports, when a client's income and ii
do not permit private purchase.
Prescribed wheelchairs may also ber
vided. In such cases, the Canadian Paracg
Association or other specialized agencies
be requested, at the division's expense, 'S
sess a client's physical needs and envJ
mental circumstances, and recommend*
able equipment. To obtain the best potb
prices, purchases are made through the
ish Columbia Purchasing Commission
In 1980-81, there was greater demarf
equipment and devices to provide moi(|
 HEALTH CARE SERVICES
59
[Inty to persons of all ages in home care and
I^Jg-term care.
]§Esportation
Transportation to and from clinics, nursing
^res, rehabilitation centres, and hospitals
Hlbe provided for clients who cannot use
ublic transportation. In cases of life-saving
Bgencies, transportation costs may be
Hfor people on low incomes. Local transition can be authorized by the local
We.
jecial Health Needs Program
'The division may, at its discretion, provide
iffof the services listed above to persons on
Brginal incomes, following a budget review
OTocal ministry staff.
This program was greatly expanded in
IB-81, enabling more people to remain in
IB! own homes through the aid of special
Moment such as beds, lifts, and ramps. As
ell, the provision of self-diagnostic devices,
■was ducometers and dextrometers for ac-
[Kjely measuring blood sugar in diabetics
lilted in fewer hospitalizations.
HBiding continues to be available for cli-
IWrequiring sensory motor development
rvices in Surrey, and Blissymbolics training
Victoria.
Implications for GAIN
IflHandicapped Benefits
With the assistance of medical specialist
■Kiltants, the division decides whether ap-
Iffints are medically eligible for GAIN for
IWicapped benefits. The division also pro-
IB^s handicapped applications on behalf of
IMlepartment of Indian Affairs, and "handi-
ipped status" applications for the Min istry of
I ealth's Long-Term Care services.
Table 89
Application for GAIN for Handicapped Benefits,
1979-80 and 1980-81
Applications
Applications
Year
Received
Approved
1980-81
4,296
2,198
1979-80
4,378
2,496
Table 90
Health Care Services, Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$12,776,079
1979-80
13,006,051
1978-79
11,594,140
1977-78
9,668,828
1976-77
8,729,144
PHARMACARE
Pharmacare provides assistance with the costs of
designated prescription drugs, ostomy supplies
and prosthetic appliances. It is administered under the statutory authority of the Guaranteed
Available Income for Need Regulations (section
30).
Pharmacare administers four programs, each
benefiting a different group of people. While
benefits are identical within the four plans, eligibility and degree of assistance vary.
Pharmacare is provided where the expense of
medical supplies to the individual or family is
considered prohibitive. The intent of the program is to provide assistance with the major
share of expense. However, responsibility for
purchase of some items, or a share of some
items, rests with the individual. The prescribed
items eligible for payment assistance cover a
wide range of therapy.
The Ministry of Human Resources maintains
its authority to establish benefit status and the
level of payment assistance for any item.
Before the establishment of Pharmacare in
1974, the expense of proper medication was a
lie 91
pis Costs of Health Care Services, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Trans
1
Medical
Drugs*
Dental
Optical
portation
Other
TOTALS
l')-81
$1,629,753
$54,137,943
$7,532,995
$1,465,439
$1,252,736
$895,156
$66,914,022
l')-80
1,480,852
46,257,728
8,784,379
1,230,356
807,215
722,358
59,282,888
1.1-79
1,204,134
37,321,647
7,905,683
1,096,989
767,564
619,769
48,915,786
H'-78
1,378,781
30,129,270
6,033,887
790,638
588,942
784,326
39,705,844
l'i-77
1,008,073
26,716,886
5,487,320
644,315
438,963
524,832
34,820,389
:luded under Drugs are drug costs incurred under Pharmacare, which commenced January 1,
,74.
 60        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
heavy burden for elderly persons on low incomes. The elderly constitute approximately 10
per cent of our population, receive 22 per cent
of all prescriptions, and account for over 28 per
cent of all drug expenditures in the province. A
higher number of prescriptions are being filled
for elderly citizens than were f il led prior to Phar-
macare's free drug program.
In June 1977, Universal Pharmacare was introduced to provide partial protection against
major drug and other medical expenses for all
citizens not receiving benefits on a fully paid basis. Universal Pharmacare provided 80 percent
reimbursement for all eligible expenses exceeding $100 in 1980.
The ministry's Pharmacare services can be divided into three categories: eligible recipients,
benefits, and levels of payment.
Eligible Recipients
Group 1. Payment is provided on behalf of:
• individuals holding a valid Pharmacare card issued on the basis of
age (65 years of age or over) and
residency;
• individuals resident in a licenced
long-term care facility; and
• individuals and dependents eligible for the Ministry of Human
Resources Medical Benefits
Program.
Group 2. Universal Pharmacare. Partial
government assistance is provided on behalf of every British
Columbian not eligible for Group
1 who is registered with Medical
Services Plan of British Columbia.
Those receiving fully-paid benefits from union or employer-sponsored plans, or from DVA, DIA,
or Workers' Compensation, will
continue to be covered by those
programs.
Benefits
Pharmacare provides payment or reimbursement for therapeutic medications which
are reasonably prescribed by a physician,
dentist or podiatrist. Those medications must
be included in Schedule A, Part 1, and Schedule A, Part 3, Division 2, of the British Columbia Pharmacy Act. In addition, Pharmacare
pays for syringes for diabetics.
Even where medications appear in the designated schedules of the British Columbia
Pharmacy Act, Pharmacare does not provide
direct payment or reimbursement for ex
narcotic preparations such as 222s, vit
combinations or vitamin-mineral com
tions with iron, and antacids.
Good medical and pharmacy practica
pected to be followed in determiniaa
scribing dispensing quantities. For fuffl
benefits, Pharmacare will accept claJJ
100 days' supply as a maximum.
Ostomy supplies and designated pe
nent prosthetic appliances are paraijg
benefits of Pharmacare.
Fees and Payments
For people in Group 1, payment fffl
scription services is made directly to uW
macy by Pharmacare. Charges are theffl
those made to any customer for the saffl
scribed item. People in Group 2 are exra
to pay the pharmacist directly and ba
bursed after submitting a completer
form along with official Pharmacare rw
Individuals in Group 1 are eligible for
medical items as fully paid governme™
fits. Payment for such items is made dir®,
the suppliers by government. All offl
tients receiving ostomy supplies and desi
ed prosthetic appliances are expecteffl
their pharmacist or other supplier dire J
imbursement is made to the patient upm
mission of a completed claim form.
In recent years, the ministry has assi^gj
health professions in the development dm
Use Review project (DUR), an educatiom
gram on the prescribing of drugs, based on
surement of Pharmacare payment dataW
Table 92
Pharmacare Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-8
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$54,137,9^
1979-80
46,257,M
1978-79
37,321,69
1977-78
30,037,0||
1976-77
26,091,2^
—
 SECTION VI
Community Services
 62        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
COMMUNITY GRANTS
The Community Grants program purchases nonstatutory social services from community-based
nonprofit societies to complement and support
ministry programs. It is administered under the
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (sections 2 and 5).
Community grants are provided to nonprofit,
societies offering services such as rehabilitation,
social integration, referral, prevention, crisis intervention services, or volunteer services to families, groups or individuals who are in need or
likely to be in need. To be eligible for funding,
proposed services must:
• be supportive of ministry services;
• not be directly provided by the ministry;
• not be the sole responsibility of any other
federal or provincial ministry or municipal
government;
• be delivered on behalf of present or potential ministry clients;
• be measurable in terms of stated objectives;
• be subject to a written agreement; and
• be within the ministry's planning, program,
and budget priorities.
In addition, project proposals must include:
• documentation that there is community
need of and support for the proposed
project;
• documentation that the society has pursued
all potential sources of funding including
the municipal and federal levels of government; and
• a statement of how volunteer services will
be or are involved.
In 1976, the Community Grants program was
decentralized, giving ministry regional managers more responsibility for processing and authorizing grants. During 1978, the provision of
funds through grants was replaced by a contract-
for-service arrangement.
Over the years, as new programs and services
have developed province-wide (such as rehabilitation resources, family support workers and
handicapped transit), projects which had been
funded by grants have become absorbed into
other programs. There are other provincial ministries also providing grants, and responsibility
for funding community projects may shift from
one ministry to the other as the programs
develop.
Services currently funded by the Comffl
Grants program include family supports
grams, crisis lines, drop-in centres, and sel
for youth, the elderly and the handicap]
Some societies operate province-wide
grams, while others gear their services to I
needs. Many programs have a large volur
component.
The projects funded during 1980-81 fall I
eight categories:
• Family Service Projects
Through family service projectsBJ]
eties offer emotional support to farm
within their communities. Individual
group counselling, group discull
and workshops for parents and cM
are some of the services offered.B
• Crisis Centres
Societies operate crisis centres to
vide information and counselling^
as crisis intervention services to van
communities throughout the provi
Many crisis centres make use of ffl
volunteers.
• Youth Projects
Youth projects offer activities for yc
people, counselling services or sW
velopment programs through corf™
ty service organizations.
• Low Income Groups
Local associations offer help to lov
come families and individuals in :
communities. Services include couis
ling, information exchanges and drc-l
centres. The aim of these groups
help with problems such as finding
commodation or moving.
• Services to the Handicapped
Associations serving handicappel.8
sons provide opportunities andjffl
the   mentally   or   physically   disat
through a variety of programs.
• Transportation Projects
Societies offer transportation with
help of volunteers who drive sen^BI
handicapped people to doctors' aw|
ments, therapy or achievement cers.
• Volunteer Services
Funding is made available to voffls
bureaus to assist them in co-ordE*
the efforts of local volunteersBJi
grants help to direct the immense \>'-'
tial for community services Ml
volunteering.
 COMMUNITY SERVICE
S       63
stalling
Blulti-Service Agencies
Nonprofit  agencies   received
fund;
t
I Some  societies  operate   multi-service
$6,614,862 during 1980-81.
programs which offer a range of services
to meet different community needs. Ser
vices may include some or all of the pro-
■   grams listed above.
Bjon and Agency
Type of Service
1980-81
Grant
30TSFORD
Kqui-Abbotsford Community Services
Volunteer Services
Family Service Project
Youth Project
$
85,160
Etsqui-Abbotsford Transportation Services
Transportation Project
$
37,620
Isiz
.gassiz Community Services
Volunteer Services
$
18,883
vtSTRONG
Bstrong-Spallumcheen Community Services Centre
Family Centre
$
33,120
ffisociation
Youth Project
Volunteer Services
KNABY
lig Brothers of Burnaby
Youth Project
$
13,446
urnaby Family Life Institute
Family Life Education
$
13,365
mens' Development Fund; Project Backdoor
Youth Project
$
77,555
Iffiily Services of Greater Vancouver
Family Service Project
$
10,000
aser Correctional Resources Society; Purpose
Youth Project
$
45,965
xhdale Area Community School Association
Youth Project
$
13,990
Ife Line Society
Family Service Project
$
48,610
ISs LAKE
urns Lake Bridge the Gap Society
Youth Project
$
12,718
Bell river
lampbell River Counselling and Crisis Line
Family Service Project
$
30,426
liBvices Society
Crisis Centre
lampbell River Youth Centre
Youth Project
$
28,180
IMEGAR
notenay Columbia Child Care Society
Volunteer Services
$
10,625
ILLIWACK
.illiwack Community Services
Volunteer Services
Family Service Project
Crisis Centres
$
74,275
IffilTLAM
Ipuitlam Share Society
Crisis Centre
$173,674
Outreach Project
Low Income Groups
'eater Coquitlam Volunteer Bureau
Volunteer Services
$
10,296
pJRTENAY
[Kroads Crisis Family Services Society
Crisis Centre
Family Service Project
$
32,138
>mox Strathcona Youth Chance Society
Youth Project
$
27,224
llSr Island Low Income Society
Low Income Croup
$
11,043
JNBROOK
anbrook Homemaker Services
Transportation Project
$
9,485
st Kootenay Mental Health Society
Volunteer Services
Family Service Project
Crisis Centre
$
45,863
  —                                                        1
64        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
CRESCENT BEACH
Crescent Beach Community Services
Family Service Project
$  13
DAWSON CREEK
Nawican Friendship Centre
Youth Project
$ 29
South Peace Senior. Citizens' Association;
Seniors Project
$ 45
Community Effort for Senior Citizens
DELTA
Deltassist
Family Service Project
Volunteer Services
Transportation Project
$186
DUNCAN
Cowichan Family Life Association
Family Service Project
$ 18
Cowichan Valley Volunteer Society
Volunteer Services
$ 16
Cowichan Valley Regional District Activity Centre
Youth Project
$    7
FALKLAND
Falkland and District Community Association
PPPMIP
Youth Project
$ 15
Elk Valley Crisis and Information Line Society
FORT NELSON
Fort Nelson-Liard Native Friendship Society
FORT ST. JOHN
North Peace Community Resources Society
Fort St. John Friendship Society
FRASER LAKE
Nechako Valley Community Services Society
GOLDEN
Golden Community Resources Society
GRANISLE
Granisle Daybreak Association
HAZELTON
Hazelton's Will Luu Sa'yd Goot Society;
Hazelton Drop-In Centre
HOUSTON
Houston Outreach Project
KAMLOOPS
Kamloops Family Life Association
Kamloops Citizen Advocacy
Boys' and Girls' Club of Kamloops
Kamloops Community YM-YWCA
KASLO
Kaslo and District Homemakers Society
KELOWNA
Central Okanagan Social Planning Society;
Advice Service Kelowna,
Kelowna Crisis Line,
SHARE
Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, Kelowna
KIMBERLEY
Kimberley and District Homemakers Service Society
KITIMAT
Kitimat Community Services
LAKE COWICHAN
Cowichan Lake District Activity and Resources Centre
Crisis Centre
Youth Project
Volunteer Services
Youth Project
Crisis Centre
Volunteer Services
Service to the Handicapped
Family Service
Youth Project
Family Service Project
Family Service Project
Service to the Handicapped
Youth Project
Youth Project
Family Service Project
Volunteer Service
Crisis Centre
Low Income Groups
Transportation Project
Transportation Project
Volunteer Services
Youth Project
$ 48
$  17
$ 29
$ 22
$ 20
$ 14
$ 11
$ 251
$  14£
$ 1
$ 6C
$ 276
$ 308
$    27
$ 69?
$ 61
$ 124
$ 124
 COMM U NITY SERVICES       65
pLEY
.angley Community Services
Volunteer Services
$
20,300
■ .angley Family Services Association
Family Services Project
$
32,888
ISkenzie
■ Mackenzie Community Rehabilitation Society;
Crisis Centre
$
13,469
Project Serenity
IJfflE RIDGE
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Community Services Council
Family Service Project
Youth Project
$
91,734
LiSION
InFssion Community Services Association
Family Service Project
Volunteer Services
$
44,770
HJSP
mkusp District Homemakers Society
Volunteer and Information Centre
$
3,610
JNAIMO
BRiaimo Family Life Association
Family Service Project
$
20,287
I lanaimo Volunteer Centre Society
Volunteer Service
$
16,200
Janaimo Citizen Advocacy Association
Service to the Handicapped
$
20,115
I lanaimo Community Employment Advisory Board;
Low Income Groups
$
19,550
r Employment Liaison Project
oys' and Girls' Club of Nanaimo
Youth Project
$
31,765
BBtaimo Association for Intervention
Youth Project
$
46,090
rand Development
Crisis Centre
p.SON
lielson Community Services Centre
Family Service Project
Crisis Centre
Volunteer Services
$
69,933
lelson Youth Activities Society
Youth Project
$
10,800
illelson and District Homemaker Service
Transportation Project
$
14,806
r ootenay Society for the Handicapped
Service to the Handicapped
$
42,700
IW WESTMINSTER
IfifYWCA of New Westminster and District
Youth Project
$
37,540
IM-Aid Never Ends Society; SANE Community Centre
Service to the Handicapped
$
37,143
gffiH VANCOUVER
ISth Shore Projects Society for the Low Income
Service to the Handicapped
$
14,763
ind Handicapped
apilano Community Services
Multi-Service Agency
$
8,796
Innily Services Association of Greater Vancouver
Family Service Project
$
26,648
1 North Shore);
llrorth Vancouver and District Community
yfaiiily Workers
orth Shore Neighbourhood House
Family Service Project
$
23,827
orth Shore Living and Learning Centre
Volunteer Services
$
17,420
irjited North Shore Transportation Society
Transportation Project
$118,413
PKSVILLE
IjSrict 69 Society of Organized Services
Family Service Project
$
11,340
fTICTON
ilMticton and District Social Planning Society
Family Service Project
$
17,010
Low Income Groups
$
28,350
Transportation Project
$
12,813
Volunteer Services
$
28,616
[PT ALBERNI
1  irt Alberni Family Guidance Association
Youth Project
$
23,382
1   irt Alberni Volunteer Centre
Volunteer Service
$
26,554
Mfels for the Handicapped Society
Transportation Project
$
12,884
berni Valley Citizen Advocacy Society
Service to the Handicapped
$
21,068
 66       REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
PORT COQUITLAM
Port Coquitlam Area Women's Centre
Family Service Project
$    3 5
POWELL RIVER
Powell River Community Services Association;
Youth Project
$ 121
Streetworkers Project
PRINCE GEORGE
Prince George Crisis Intervention Society
Crisis Centre
$ 41*
Carefree Society
Transportation Project
$1031
PRINCE RUPERT
Prince Rupert Friendship House Association
Youth Project
$ 1511
PRINCETON
Princeton and District Services Society
Transportation Project
$ 3025
PROVINCE-WIDE
BC Association of Volunteer Centres (Volunteer
Volunteer Services
$   3D
Recognition Week)
BC Association for the Mentally Retarded;
Service to the Handicapped
$ 481
Training and Administrative Support
Canadian Paraplegic Association
Service to the Handicapped
$2101
Canadian Wheelchair Sports
Service to the Handicapped
$ 123
Catholic Community Services
Family Service Project
$ 628
Coalition of BC Rape Centres Society
Crisis Centre
$ 273
John Howard Society of BC
Family Service Project
$ 503
Lower Mainland Parents in Crisis
Family Service Project
$ 312
Pacific Association for Autistic Citizens
Service to the Handicapped
$ 469
Vancouver Volunteer Society
Volunteer Services (VARC)
$ 366
Western Institute for the Deaf
Service to the Handicapped
$ 217
QUEEN CHARLOTTE ISLANDS
Queen Charlotte Islands Health and Human
Youth Projects
$ 160
Resources Society
QUESNEL
Quesnel Contact Line and Centre
Crisis Centre
$ 301
Quesnel and District Community Aid Society
Transportation Project
$ 514
Quesnel Tillicum Society
Low Income Groups
$ 100
RICHMOND
Richmond Volunteer Transportation Society
Transportation Project
$ 214
Richmond Family Place Society
Family Service Project
i   15
Family Services of Greater Vancouver (Richmond Branch)
Family Service Project
$ 130
Richmond Volunteer Centre Society
Volunteer Services
$    33
Richmond Youth Service Society
Youth Project
$ 3C7
Chimo Personal Distress Services
Crisis Centre
$ 632
REVELSTOKE
Revelstoke Receiving Home Society
Miscellaneous
$      8
SALMON ARM
Shuswap Youth Centre Association
Youth Project
$ If
SALTSPRING ISLAND
Saltspring Island Community Society
Family Service Project
$ 2(8
SECHELT
Sunshine Coast Community Resource Society
Volunteer Services
Transportation Project
Service to the Handicapped
$ 6; 5
SMITHERS
Smithers Community Services Association
Family Service Project
$ If!
Youth Project
$ 4:'8i
SUMMERLAND
Volunteer Services
$    81
Parkdale Place Housing Society;
Lions Easter Seal Bus
Transportation Project
$ 1
 COMMUNITY SERVICES       67
[RREY
lurrey Co-ordinating Centre;
[urrey-White Rock Family Development Program,
Hmldford Family Program,
Uayfair Family Program,
Crisis Intervention Program,
Klunteer Bureau
Emily Services Association of Greater Vancouver
KSurrey Branch)
lurrey Community Resource Society
[race
terrace and District Community Service Society;
iMothers' Time Off
Family Service Project
Family Service Project
Family Service Project
Crisis Centre
Volunteer Service
Family Service Project
Transportation Project
Family Service Project
$ 39,015
$ 32,148
$ 31,737
$ 27,468
$ 20,019
$    5,952
$ 90,383
$ 24,020
ETOUVER
HBrothers of Greater Vancouver
HjlSisters of Greater Vancouver
rittania Community Service Society
Bast Foundation Society Resocialization Team
UPAC Services
Irisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre for
Greater Vancouver
tivorce Lifeline of Greater Vancouver
Hglas Park Community Centre Association
lowntown Eastside Women's Centre Association
wibar Community Association
Ride Family Place Society
ilse Creek Community Association
I^HUnited Church;
Downtown Eastside Handicapped Program,
Prenatal Project
fanklin Community School Association
randview Community Centre Association
reater Vancouver Information and Referral Services;
Directory of Services and Referral Program
imdicrafts by Homebound Handicapped Society
ffigrant Services Society of BC;
i/Valter Moberly Elementary School Child Care Worker
jllarney Community Centre Society; Carleton Elementary
ffiool Child-Care Worker
itsilano Inter-Neighbourhood Development Society
iwassa Neighbourhood Services Association;
{Ear Hear Project,
rKlonald School Project
arpole Oakridge Area Council Society
ount Pleasant Family Centre Society
ulti-Lingual Orientation Service Association for
Emigrant Communities;
HfflSAIC
fflve Women's Honor Society;
Bnderbird Drop-In and Outreach Project
fffihbourhood Services Association of
Greater Vancouver;
^ttiew Child-Care Worker,
jbrdon House - Davie Street,
Rdon House - People Place,
[flglano Neighbourhood Family Focus,
gount Pleasant Family and Children's Worker Program,
Hint Pleasant Teen Centre,
fflth Vancouver Housing Development Project,
!Mh Vancouver Transportation
Wjist Club of Vancouver
Youth Project
Youth Project
Youth Project
Service to the Handicapped
Miscellaneous
Crisis Centre
$  31,600
$  24,700
$    4,184
$128,842
$ 48,876
$  26,940
Family Service Project
Service to the Handicapped
Family Service Project
Youth Project
Family Service Project
Youth Project
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,857
12,000
16,200
8,640
35,000
4,644
Service to the Handicapped
Family Service Project
Youth Project
Youth Project
$
$
$
$
12,198
2,860
18,958
12,379
Miscellaneous
Service to the Handicapped
Youth Project
$
$
$
34,344
10,000
2,184
Youth Project
Transportation Project
Service to the Handicapped
Youth Project
Family Service Project
Family Service Project
Miscellaneous
Family Service Project
Youth Project
$    4,394
$ 48,762
$ 30,240
$ 8,100
$ 19,894
$ 40,208
$115,483
$  90,147
Youth Project
$    4,644
Youth Project
$ 35,664
Miscellaneous
$ 21,600
Family Service Project
$    7,248
Youth Project
$  20,157
Youth Project
$  18,764
Family Service Project
$  38,046
Transportation Project
$ 31,786
Service to the Handica
aped
$        750
 68        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Raycam Co-operative Association
Youth Project
$ 13,1
Red Door Rental Aid Society
Low Income Group
$ 551
Riley Park Community Association; Branching Out
Family Service Project
$  11!
St. James Social Service Society
Multi-Service Agency
$103,
St. James Social Services
Low Income Group
$    7)
Skeena Terrace Tenants' Association
Family Service Project
$  141
Strathcona Property Owners' and Tenants' Association
Family Service Project
$ 20'
Vancouver Boards of Parks and Recreation;
Strathcona Youth Project (McLean),
Youth Project
$    7\
Thunderbird Youth Project
Youth Project
$    7
Vancouver Community Workshop Society
Low Income Group
$ 47!
Vancouver Indian Centre Society;
Native Family Counsellor
Family Service Project
$  15!
Vancouver Life Skills Society; South Vancouver
Family Service Project
$ 271
Family Place
Vancouver Mental Patients' Association
Service to the Handicapped
$ 89!
Vancouver Resource Society for the Physically Disabled
Service to the Handicapped
$ 64)
Volunteer Grandparents' Association
Family Service Project
$ 45:
West End Community Centre Association;
Family Service Project
$    31
West End Single Parents' Group
West Side Family Place Society
Family Service Project
$ 33!
VERNON
People in Need Crisis Intervention Society of Vernon
Crisis Centre
$ 275
and District
Multiple Sclerosis Society (Vernon Branch)
Transportation Project
$ 18?
VICTORIA AND SURROUNDING AREA
Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Victoria
Youth Project
$    7[
Crisis Intervention and Public Information Society
Crisis Centre
$ 39E
of Greater Victoria
Downtown Blanshard Advisory Committee
Family Service Project
$ 18f
Esquimalt, Vic West, View Royal Community
Family Service Project
$ 253
Advisory Society
Garth Homer Society for the Handicapped
Service to the Handicapped
Transportation Project
Volunteer Services
$1015
Greater Victoria Citizen Advocacy Society
Service to the Handicapped
$ 277
Greater Victoria Citizens Counselling Centre
Family Service Project
$ 313
Greater Victoria Volunteer Society
Volunteer Service
$ 358
James Bay Community Resources Board
Family Service Project
$ 153
Youth Project
$ 168
Oak Bay Volunteer Services Society
Volunteer Services
$ 1CC
Peninsula Community Association;
Youth Project
$ 458
Sidney Teen Activity Group, Volunteer Services
Volunteer Services
Saanich Peninsula Guidance
Family Service Project
$ 176
Victoria and Vancouver Island Multiple Sclerosis Society
Transportation Project
$ If
Victoria West Community Development Association
Youth Project
$ 200
Victoria Single Parents' Resource Centre Society
Family Project
$ 3(i0
Victoria YM-YWCA of Greater Victoria
Youth Project
$ 8!1
WHITE ROCK
White Rock Co-ordinating Centre Society
Volunteer Services
$ 1(10
White Rock Community Aid Society
Transportation Project
$ 6C2
WILLIAMS LAKE
Canadian Mental Health Association
Crisis Centre
$ 3"5
 COMMUNITY SERVICES       69
\ new manual of policies and procedures was
sloped during 1980-81, and will streamline
Ifflpxpedite the Community Grants funding
ffiss.
grading of transportation projects in Rich-
Sl, White Rock, Surrey, Delta, Vancouver,
m Vancouver, Kelowna and Prince George
is assumed by the Urban Transportation Au-
fity during 1980-81. Planning is well under-
^y for the Urban Transit Authority to assume
f ding of transportation projects in Cranbrook,
hberley, Vernon, Princeton, and Sechelt dur-
i 1981-82 and transportation projects in Nel-
si, Penticton, Summerland, Port Alberni,
(esnel, Victoria and Abbotsford during 1982-
E .
lie 93
[nmunity Grants, Expenditures,
16-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$6,614,862
1979-80
6,335,730
1978-79
5,919,600
1977-78
6,129,519
1976-77
5,856,612
MHIEVEMENT CENTRES
fl Achievement Centres program provides fi-
ecial support to community-based nonprofit
iceties operating achievement centres for
idicapped persons. Authority for this pro-
ph is provided by the Guaranteed Available
rune for Need Act (section 2, subsections 1
ir2; and section 5), and the Guaranteed Avail-
it Income for Need Regulations (sections 5,
land 19).
:hievement centres provide organized day
1t;rams for handicapped and disabled persons
). school-leaving age. The programs help
Blicapped and disabled persons to improve
f'sjpcial and work skills, and encourage them
o ihance the quality of their lives by becoming
ni pendent.
9-ifrie centres provide a workshop program
?ii:d at developing basic work skills, while
tf rs provide an activity program, or a combi-
ia>n of both. Societies are responsible for the
iLtion, priorities, and financial management
tfieir centres. The ministry began funding
Movement centre programs in 1971. Today,
(fsntres throughout the province are funded
Wie ministry.
ntres are paid monthly by the ministry,
"ad upon  the  number  of user-hours  per
month. These funds are not an allowance or
wage to the participating clients. They are to assist, first, with staff salary costs; and second,
with other operating expenses. Centres which
have a small group of handicapped participants
and are unable to accrue many user-hours may
receive a basic grant of $1,000 per month. Assistance with a capital expenditure can sometimes
be authorized, particularly if it relates to client
safety and the work environment.
To ensure access to these centres by the
handicapped, a transportation allowance of up
to $20 per month may be provided. The
allowance is administered through local Ministry of Human Resources offices, and is not part
of the ministry's operating subsidy.
Achievement centres receive only part of their
operating costs from the Ministry of Human Resources. The balance of funding, and other supports, is provided by societies and agencies.
Staff is both volunteer and paid.
In April 1980, the rate per user-hour paid by
the ministry to achievement centres was increased from 73 cents to one dollar per hour.
During 1980-81, a system was devised to
evaluate the achievement centres program at
Dawson Creek, and assess the needs of the mentally handicapped in Region 8 (North and South
Peace River).
Table 94
Number of Achievement Centres and Clients,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Approximate
Number of
Number of
Year
Centres
Clients
1980-81
75
5,000
1979-80
75
5,000
1978-79
74
4,500
1977-78
67
4,000
1976-77
64
3,600
Table 95
Clients' Subsidy Rates, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Subsidy Rate Per Hour
1980-81
$1.00
1979-80
.73
1978-79
.73
1977-78
.625
1976-77
.625
Small centres may receive a fixed grant of
$ 1,000 per month in lieu of the client per
hour schedule of payments.
 70        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Table 96
Approximate Hours of Client Service Provided,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Hours
1980-81
4,458,025
1979-80
3,880,989
1978-79
3,403,364
1977-78
3,345,968
1976-77
2,573,533
Table 97
Achievement Centres,
Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$4,903,669
1979-80
3,518,475
1978-79
3,003,611
1977-78
2,497,997
1976-77
3,327,585
Achievement Centres
REGION 1
Kettle Friendship Society
944 Commercial Drive
Vancouver, BC   V5L 3W7
REGION 2
Vancouver Central Lions Club
CARSCRAFT Bluebird Shop
1549 West Broadway
Vancouver, BC    V6J 1W7
Canadian Mental Health
Association
Vancouver Activity Centre
#203 - 283 East 11 th Avenue
Vancouver, BC    V5T 2C4
Arbutus Work Incentive Society
Kitsilano Workshop
Rear- 1080 West 7th
Vancouver, BC    V6H 1B3
Arbutus Work Incentive Society
Mt. Pleasant Workshop
and Re-employment Centre
190 Smithe Street
Vancouver, BC    V6B 2C4
REGION 3
Armstrong-Enderby Association
for the Mentally Retarded
Kindale Workshop
Box 94
Armstrong, B.C.    V0E 1B0
19,200.00
99,956.53
12,000.00
12,930.00
Grand Forks and District Society
for the Handicapped
Broadacres Achievement Centre
Box 662
Grand Forks, BC    V0H 1 HO
Canadian Mental Health
Association
Discovery Clubs (2 Clubs)
1551 Lambert Avenue
Kelowna, BC    V1Y4H4
Kelowna and District Society for
the Mentally Retarded
Kelowna Diversified Industries
555 Fuller Avenue
Kelowna, BC    V1Y7W8
Penticton and District Society for
the Mentally Handicapped
Penticton Training Centre
180 Industrial Avenue West
Penticton, BC   V2A 6X9
Vernon and District Association
for the Retarded
"Venture" Training Centre
Box 1300
Vernon, BC   V1T6N6
1980-81
Canadian Mental Health
Grant
Association
Vernon Workshop
$ 53,892.00
3105 Coldstream Avenue
Vernon, BC   VIT 1X8
31,121
91,19j
93,40;
127,51
128,741
44,40-
53,188.37
REGION 4
Kootenay Society for
the Handicapped
Clay Castle
PO Box 3204
Castlegar, BC    VIN 3H5
Kootenay Society for
Handicapped Children
Cranbrook Achievement Centre
Wood Factory
PO Box 68
46 - 17th Avenue South
Cranbrook, BC   V1C4H6
Kootenay Society for
Handicapped
Cresteramics Workshop
Box 1427
Creston, BC    V0B 1G0
Windermere and District Social
Service Society
Lake Windermere Workshop
PO Box 360
Invermere, BC   V0A 1K0
Kootenay Society for
the Handicapped
Silver King Industries
Box 243
Nelson, BC   V1L5R1
30,35:
70,640
47,795
20,060
47,2-'61
 COMMUNITY SERVICES       71
isenay Society for
REGION 7
tje Handicapped
$ 32,182.64
^Rehabilitation Industries
Terrace Association for the
■31
Mentally Retarded
$ 20,250.70
iil, BC   V1R2S8
5010 Agar Street
Terrace, BC   V8G 1J1
GION 5
Kitimat Association for the
ffle George and District
Mentally Retarded
12,000.00
Riciation for the Retarded
63,642.72
Kitimat Workshop
rora Activity Centre
660 West Columbia Street
6 Fifth Avenue
Kitimat, BC   V8C 1V5
■ George, BC   V2L 3K7
Prince Rupert Association for
lesnel and District Association
the Mentally Retarded
14,831.00
Rhe Mentally Retarded
21,660.44
Prince Rupert Achievement
Centre
His Achievement Centre
]B\nderson Drive
PO Box 533
esnel, BC   V2J 3K6
Prince Rupert, BC   V8J 3P9
warns Lake and District
association for the Mentally
Retarded
21,081.58
REGION 8
nmil
<4036
Dawson Creek Society for
Bis Lake, BC   V2G 2Y2
Retarded Children
PeaceLand Activities Centre
33,980.56
SION 6
Enterprises
9937 - 17th Street
Dawson Creek, BC   V1G 4B7
'A Community Services
65,070.40
20 Montrose Street
botsford, BC    V2S 3S9
REGION 9
A Association for the Retarded
72,149.88
Idwood Training Centre
aE23
Kamloops Society for
rMsford, BC   V2S 4N3
the Retarded
Pleasant Industries
152,454.94
illiwack and District
145 Briar Avenue
Opportunity Workshop
43,851.52
Kamloops, BC    V2B 1C2
W> Williams Road North
flSvack, BC   V2P 5H3
Nicola Valley Association for
the Mentally Retarded
12,000.00
pe Association for
Ska-Lu-La Workshop
he Retarded
16,847.91
Box 997
icum Workshop
Merritt, BC    V0K 2B0
< 1299
pe, BC   VOX 1 LO
Princeton and District
Community Services
12,000.00
jSEy Association for
Princeton Handicapped
he Handicapped
47,794.16
Achievement Training Centre
idge" Achievement Centre
Box 1960
<3344
Princeton, BC    VOX 1W0
ley, BC   V3A 4R7
Revelstoke and District
•sion Workshop Association
72,226.61
Association for the Mentally
1 Royal Canadian Legion
Retarded
12,000.00
■165 Lougheed Highway
HUB Achievement Centre
lision, BC   V2V1B4
Box 2880
'per Fraser Valley Society
Revelstoke, BC    V0E 2S0
tfflthe Retarded
33,716.44
Salmon Arm Association for
■ishine Drive Occupational
the Mentally Retarded
47,324.41
Centre
Shuswap Sheltered Workshop
i<228
Box 104
^dis, BC   VOX 1Y0
Salmon Arm, BC   V0E 2T0
 72
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
REGION 10
Campbell River District
Association for the Mentally
Retarded $ 45,374.50
"Our Place" Achievement Centre
1153 Greenwood Street
Campbell River, BC    V9W 3C5
Bevan Lodge Association 114,029.02
Special Opportunity Centre
RR #3, Box 3327
Courtenay, BC   V9N 5N5
Duncan and District Association
for the Mentally Handicapped 82,490.08
Cowichan Opportunity Centre
5856 Clements Street
Duncan, BC    V9L 3W3
Canadian Mental Health
Association 12,000.00
(Contact House) White X Centre
1665 Grant Street
Nanaimo, BC    V9S 5K7
Nanaimo Association for the
Mentally Retarded 81,277.23
Narco Centre
98 - 7th Avenue
Nanaimo, BC    V9R 1C8
Alberni District Association for
the Mentally Retarded 41,640.27
Arrowsmith Services
Box 222
Port Alberni, BC   V9Y 7M7
Parksville-Qualicum Beach
Association for the
Handicapped 25,338.96
TECH Achievement Centre
Box 578
Parksville, BC    V0R 2S0
REGIONS 11, 20
Capital Region Association for
the Mentally Handicapped 30,634.02
Langwood Achievement Centre
3861 Cedar Hill Cross Road
Victoria, BC    V8P 2M7
Capital Region Association for
the Mentally Handicapped 146,375.89
(Sentinel) Winnifred
3861 Cedar Hill Cross Road
Victoria, BC    V8P 2M7
Capital Mental Health
Association 12,000.00
Community Explorations
1450 Elford Street
Victoria, BC    V8S 3S8
Capital Mental Health
Association $ 25,227i
Pathways Achievement Centre
c/o 1450 Elford Street
Victoria, BC   V8S 3S8
Capital Mental Health
Association 97,6441
White Cross Centre - Victoria
1450 Elford Street
Victoria, BC    V8S 3S8
Garth Homer Society for
the Handicapped 125,6205
813 Darwin Avenue
Victoria, BC   V8X 2X7
Saltspring Island Community
Society 12,000:
Saltspring Island Achievement
Centre
PO Box 1106
Ganges, BC    VOX 1E0
REGION 12
Semiahmoo House Society for
the Handicapped 154,5401
1184 Oxford Street
White Rock, BC   V4B 3P6
Vancouver-Richmond Association
for the Mentally Retarded 72,912
Workshop #3
2979 West 41st Avenue
Vancouver, BC   V6N 3C8
REGION 13
Burnaby Association for the
Mentally Handicapped 112,MJ
Burnaby Activity Workshop
4190 East Hastings Street
Burnaby, BC   V5C 2J4
New Westminster-Coquitlam
Society for the Retarded 109,833 J
Beacon Services
(governing agency), NWD
125 Mclnnes Street
New Westminster, BC V3M 3W8
SANE Society 96,l '
Sha Sha Achievement Centre
482A East Columbia Street
New Westminster, BC    V3L 3X5
Canadian Mental Health
Association 79,398 )i
Burnaby Achievement Centre
203 - 283 East 11 th Avenue
Vancouver, BC   V5T 2C4
 COMMUNITY SERVICES       73
BON 14
REGION 18
liadian Mental Health
Surrey Association for the
ffiociation
$ 26,244.00
Mentally Retarded
$109,417.00
rner House
Clover Valley Industries
h East 4th Street
Box 1204, Station A
Ifth Vancouver, BC   V7L 1H9
Surrey, BC    V3S 2B3
lm Shore Association for
Surrey Rehabilitation Society
71,964.00
Ira Mentally Handicapped
95,400.00
Surrey Achievement Centre
oinda Progress Services
for Handicapped Persons
lind ARC Woodworking
5 - 10694- 135 Street
lervices
Surrey, BC    V3T 4C7
1 3069 Lonsdale Avenue
Iffi Vancouver, BC    V7N 3J6
REGION 19
veil River Association for
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows
he Mentally Retarded
66,469.96
Community Services Council
50,147.56
1 ui Training Centre
Haney Activity Centre
<223
11907 - 228th Street
veil River, BC   V8A 4Z6
Maple Ridge, BC    V2X 8G8
hhelt and District Association
Maple Ridge Association for
Ifflthe Mentally Retarded
12,000.00
the Mentally Retarded
47,345.16
ishine Achievement Centre
Harold E. Johnson Centre
< 1128
Box 111
hsons, BC    VON 1V0
Maple Ridge, BC   V2X 7E9
New View Society
68,110.90
DION 15
c/o 2232 Elgin Avenue
Port Coquitlam, BC    V3C 2B2
Ijames' Social Services Society
Istown Workshop
I - 333 Powell Street
24,008.76
New Westminster-Coquitlam
Society for the Retarded
51,627.05
hcouver, BC   V6A 1G5
Beacon Services
(Port Moody Division)
125 Mclnnes Street
3ION 16
New Westminster, BC V3M 3W8
icouver-Richmond Association
TOTAL
$4,458,025.31
SBthe Mentally Retarded
374,034.59
ffihops #1 and #2
LOWER MAINLAND
Kv/est 41st Avenue
icouver, BC    V6N 3C8
SPECIAL SERVICES
rine Drive Centre
Lower Mainland Special Services
is responsible
'1 SE Marine Drive
for providing a variety of services
to Vancouver
JMDrive Workshop
and Lower Mainland areas. As we
I, the division
16 Clark Drive
is responsible for operating the
Helpline for
Children, which serves the entire
province.
3ION 17
Lower Mainland Special Serv
ices are pro-
vided under the statutory authority of the Fami ly
asjt Foundation Society
103,353.00
and Child Service Act, Guaranteed Available In
> East 11th Avenue
come for Need Act, Child Paternity and Support
icouver, BC    V5T 2C4
Act, Family Relations Act, and
Systems Act,
icouver-Richmond Association
which provides the statutory authority for the
aphe Mentally Retarded
12,000.00
Systems Team.
wick Memorial Centre
The staff of the 14 special services teams are
^Dsoyoos Crescent
trained experts who act as consu
tants, offering
icouver, BC    V1T1X7
information and advice to mini
stry staff and
ffiuver Mental Patients
complementing the services ava
lable through
ISpciation
78,000.00
ministry district offices.
16 Yew Street
Lower Mainland Special Services operates
j&uver, BC   V6K 3G7
from three locations: Vancouver, Coquitlam and
 74        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
1
Cloverdale. Five broad areas of services are provided: Emergency Services and the Helpline for
Children, Emergency Shelters, Child Abuse
Team and Volunteers, Medical Clinic and Clinical Services, and In-Home Services.
The division of Lower Mainland Special Services was established by the ministry in 1978 to
provide specific services to regions in the Vancouver and the Lower Mainland areas. The special services programs that were administratively combined were Vancouver and Coquitlam
Emergency Services, Child Abuse Teams, Court
Services, In-Home Services, Volunteer Services,
Orthopsychiatric Services, Medical Clinic and
Transition House.
Since January 1978, Lower Mainland Special
Services has expanded its programs and resources to meet the increasing need for specialized services. A major addition to Emergency
Services was the Helpline for Children, a province-wide child abuse hot line set up in August
1979. A new component, the Streetwork Program, was added to the Vancouver Emergency
Services' Youth Section in 1979 to reach juveniles on the streets of downtown Vancouver. In
November 1980, the Senator Hostel was established to temporarily house and provide a counselling facility for street youths. A new section,
the Systems Team, was formed in 1980, at Vancouver Emergency Services, to maintain a computerized bed index referral system and the
computerized information on the Helpline for
Children.
Emergency Services
The Emergency Services division provides
emergency social services 24 hours a day, seven
days per week. These services are provided under the statutory authority of the Guaranteed
Available Income for Need Act, Family and
Child Service Act, Systems Act, and Family Relations Act (section 29).
More than 80 crisis intervention workers in
Vancouver, Coquitlam and Cloverdale respond
to calls and referrals concerning child welfare,
child abuse and neglect, family counselling and
disputes, juvenile problems and repatriation,
emergency income assistance and personal crises. The Emergency Services division works in
co-operation with the Metropolitan Board of
Health, the police department, Corrections
Branch, and other organizations, to provide
emergency social and health services to Vancouver, North and West Vancouver, and the
Lower Mainland.
Emergency Services  is divided  into three
teams: Cloverdale, Coquitlam, and Vancoijl
The largest of these teams, Vancouver Emerjj
cy Services, operates three special progras
the Helpline for Children, the Streetwork (I
gram and the Stress Car (or Car 86).
Helpline for Children
Social workers at Vancouver Emerges
Services respond to calls to the province-vl
Helpline for Children, a 24-hour child atj
hot line. Staff respond to more than 1,lj
calls each month. Most of these calls relaq
child abuse and neglect and may involve t
phone counselling. Emergency Services J
follow up calls by advising and consult;
with the local district office in the area wl
the calls originate.
Streetwork Program
The streetwork program was started in 1
to provide specialized social services to sts
youths in downtown Vancouver. Emerge
services, counselling, referrals and lial
work are provided by two social workers \i
work on the streets and in a streetfrontoffica
Emergency Services Youth Section. In ati
tion to 15 to 20 new referrals each month, it
two street workers meet with betweeM
and 200 youths each month.
Stress Car
The Stress Car is staffed by a social \»;
and a plain-clothes police officer. It resffl
primarily to family dispute situations anal
cial service crises requiring both social wl
and police expertise. The Stress Car respol:
to between 125 and 155 referrals each mall
 COMMUNITY SERVICES       75
L ble 98
incouver Emergency Services Statistics,
1980-81
l\
umber of Child
ren
Total
Service
Sex
Requests APP*
CBC*
CIC*
GEN*
J DA*
NW*
PROB*
SUP* TOTALS Abuse
Neglect Abuse
TOTALS
iril 1980
8,772      38
132
425
1,319
7
65
0
3
1,989
163
132       23
318
ly 1980
5,223      24
64
292
1,105
6
59
3
2
1,555
117
138       11
266
ie 1980
7,298      37
88
468
1,500
3
84
1
5
2,186
152
164       15
331
I; y 1980
7,911       44
54
331
1,711
1
46
1
6
2,194
166
185       21
372
igust 1980
7,822      41
60
317
1,760
7
36
0
7
2,228
152
209       27
388
1 ptember 1980
6,768      34
97
323
1,437
11
55
0
16
1,973
136
187       10
333
■ [fiber 1980
6,808      51
112
367
1,364
17
46
2
1
1,960
144
162       21
327
ivember 1980
6,918      38
77
420
1,438
5
51
5
2
2,036
132
122        17
271
icember 1980
5,836      36
72
260
1,091
0
47
4
5
1,515
119
152        17
288
wary 1981
6,244      49
70
338
1,172
8
43
1
4
1,685
110
125       18
253
lifiary 1981
6,453      49
92
313
949
1
75
4
4
1,482
123
140       10
273
irch 198 J
7,745      45
60
389
1,195
5
46
0
5
1,745
109
135       28
272
IiItals
83,798   486
978
4,243
16,041
71
653
21
60   :
2,553
1,623
1,851     218
3,692
L .bbreviations:
1 P      Apprehensions
C     Childrer
Before the Court
1 Z      Children in Care
N     General
1 \      Apprehended Under the
Juven
le Delinquents Act
V       Non-Wards
1 OB    Probationary Status
1 P      Supervis
ion Order
Lble 99
ncouver Emergency Services Provided,
1980-81
CW
H/
Place
A
Drug
G
Makers* Shelter
ment*
Repat*
Form*
Cash
A*
Form*
MT*
Multi*
Refuse
Taxi  Other
TOTALS
ril 1980
18      2,545
29
73
35
236
17
75
3,270
145
311
326     24
4,439
ly 1980
13      1,289
17
30
3
130
12
46
1,319
74
143
188       3
1,918
ie 5980
36      1,636
29
36
3
198
18
65
1,505
39
173
376       6
2,383
/1980
28      1,661
12
50
19
216
19
123
1,534
82
226
304     37
2,560
gust J 980
35       1,709
16
59
6
317
30
117
1,875
63
244
313     15
2,980
itember 1980
30       1,576
14
36
34
249
18
121
1,343
41
206
333     58
2,403
:tober 1980
26       1,647
27
54
2
214
17
121
1,196
34
112
279   105
2,080
vember 1980
27       1,548
29
28
5
168
15
102
1,051
37
159
317     50
1,909
cember 1980
31       1,256
34
25
5
108
20
95
738
33
196
274     23
1,492
uary 1981
32       1,299
14
31
2
150
22
75
699
31
233
260     43
1,515
iruary 1981
20       1,290
29
36
2
132
10
86
703
6
233
252     67
1,501
rch 1981
30       1,498
35
34
9
129
21
114
856
15
219
302     45
1,710
TOTAtS
326     18,954
285
492
125    2,252
219
1,145
16,089
600
2,455 .
,529   476
26,890
.bbreviations:
1 takers
Homemakers
J Placement
Child Welfare P
acement
iat
Repatriation
ix>rm
Computer Document to Pay Voucher
JgA
Drug Authority
,:9£m
General (Hotel,
Food,
Clothing, Emergency Assistance)
Meal Ticket
Iti
Multi-use Meal Ticket (for use
at44C
ub)
 76        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
Table 100
Coquitlam Emergency Services Statistics,
1980-81
Number
of Child
ren
Total
Service
Sex
Requests APP*
CBC*   CIC*
CEN*
DA*
NW*
PROB*
SUP*
TOTALS Abuse Neglect Abuse
TOTf
April 1980
942      24
29        93
349
6
43
1
5
550
104
69
17
May 1980
795       14
18         92
365
3
34
2
3
531
74
86
13
June 1980
892      22
18       120
411
3
34
0
3
611
64
91
10
July 1980
1,000      28
25         55
403
2
29
0
0
542
84
99
12
August 1980
983       22
28         88
517
6
26
0
4
691
67
113
7
September 1980
1,455       10
18       148
457
11
25
0
3
672
67
78
16
October 1980
1,209      27
17       135
492
0
35
0
3
709
82
70
7
November 1980
1,041       17
14       123
539
2
9
0
2
706
70
68
7
December 1980
796       17
9       146
334
2
24
3
0
535
51
51
4
January 1981
1,102      29
15       145
519
4
16
2
3
733
67
66
12
February 1981
912       13
10       108
423
0
18
0
2
574
63
45
8
March 1981
990       13
20         83
397
4
25
0
2
544
51
50
8
TOTALS
12,117    236
221    1,336
5,206
43
318
8
30
7,398
844
886
121
1.8
* Abbreviations:
APP       Apprehensions
CBC      Childrer
Before the Court
CIC       Childrer
in Care
GEN      General
JDA       Apprehended Under the
Juvenile Deli
.quents Act
NW        Non-Wards
PROB    Probationary Status
SUP      Supervision Order
Table 101
Coquitlam Emergency Services Provided,
1980-8
CW
H/
Place
A
Drug
G
Makers* Shelter
ment*
tepat*  Form*
Cash
A*
Form*
MT* Multi* Refuse Taxi
Othe
rTOlS
April 1980
12          38
35
1
5
16
0
20
0
0
5      29
1
May 1980
12          56
21
1
7
8
2
10
1
0
3      31
1
l
June 1980
15          58
43
5
3
9
0
15
0
0
3      35
0
l
July 1980
10          67
30
1
2
15
0
16
1
1
7      28
2
August 1980
10         68
27
2
7
18
0
22
5
1
8      45
4
1
September 1980
26         56
49
8
3
30
1
17
2
1
9      49
9
1:
October 1980
19         43
64
2
13
12
2
20
2
0
4      50
2
11
November 1980
18          58
47
3
4
10
0
17
0
0
15     62
7
i
December 1980
14          44
25
1
2
5
1
17
0
0
7      49
1
January 1981
19          50
59
0
6
26
2
21
0
1
7      67
2
1:
February 1981
10          63
38
1
5
23
1
35
0
0
7      57
4
1.
March 1981
20          53
47
1
3
23
1
23
0
0
25      39
3
1
* Abbreviations:
H/Makers
Homemakers
CW Placement
Child Welfare P
acement
Repat
Repatriation
A Form
Computer Document to Pay Voucher
Drug A
Drug Authority
G Form
General (Hotel,
Food, Clothing, Emerg
^ncy
Assistance)
MT
Meal Ticket
Multi
Multi-use Meal Ticket (for use
at 44 Cl
JD)
 COMMUNITY SERVICES        77
:ile 102
rentage Over One Year of types of Calls
Stress Car, on a Primary Basis, 1980-81
Hi Call
Percentage
Iffllt (non-family)
2
ll Welfare
13
nily Dispute
12
Iffly Dispute with Violence
12
IPcated Persons
8
l;al (traffic, back-up
!ind other police matters)
17
icellaneous (death notifications,
,iouse fires, etc.)
26
Ichiatric
9
Ki/Suicide Attempt
1
lie 103
les of Calls on a Primary
Basis, to Stress Car, 1980-81
le of Call
March
July
November
March
1980
1980
1980
1981
/ault (non-family)
3
3
1
2
(Id Welfare
19
11
16
13
[ayed (calls in
Ijfflch the response
as been delayed
ue to work-load)
0
10
3
4
[lily Dispute
9
18
11
15
hily Dispute with
ISence
14
12
8
18
Ixicated Persons
2
17
14
5
Lai (traffic, back-
p, and other
lroe matters)
1
28
19
25
icellaneous (death
atifications, house
'es, etc.)
26
36
25
30
':hiatric
8
9
10
10
ijffid (calls refused
I je to work-load)
0
5
0
0
to or Suicide
rttempt
1
2
3
3
fe 104
(Vcouver Emergency Services, Number of Calls to Stress Car, 1980-81
'th
Number of Calls
* 1980
110
' 1980
123
» 1980
154
B1980
143
136 980
129
Nrpber 1980
141
|bgr1980
118
limber 1980
109
'imber 1980
148
airy 1981
142
Il4'1981
103
*h 1981
120
 78        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
}
Emergency Shelters
The Emergency Shelters program provides security for children, women, and families who
are in emergency situations, by placing them in
specialized resources where skilled care and
support are available. These services are provided under the Family and Child Service Act,
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act, and
Family Relations Act (section 29).
Emergency shelters operated under this pro-
Senator Hostel
The Senator Hostel is a short-stay hostel for
street youths who frequent downtown Vancouver and who are in need of protection.
Child-care services are contracted through
the Alternate Shelter Society. Funding is provided by the Ministry of Human Resources,
and other ministries and agencies. The shelter
caters to juveniles between the ages of 12 and
18 who are on the street and who may be engaged in prostitution or drug and alcohol
abuse. As part of the Vancouver Emergency
Services Streetwork program, the Senator
Hostel provides temporary shelter, offers
skilled child-care services for up to 20 juveniles, and provides them with a counselling
facility, medical care, and referrals to community resources. The resource shelter provides a place for youths to meet with social
workers, family court workers, probation officers and police. The main objective is to get
these juveniles off the street and to give them
viable alternatives to street life. Since its inception, the Senator Hostel has served 49
juveniles.
Cypress House
Cypress House is a supervised 10-bed
emergency resource for juveniles aged 13 to
16. Shelter is provided for teenagers needing
protection who are in transition between repatriation or placement in resources as foster
homes. Although Cypress House is not a treatment facility, its staff are trained to assess a
child's circumstances and determine suitable
types of placement. Referrals to Cypress
House are handled through the Youth Section
of Vancouver Emergency Services. While
many of the youths are transients, some are
teenagers from the Vancouver area whose
placements have broken down. Cypress
House accepts over 70 referrals per month
from emergency services.
Transition House
Transition House has been operatingSI
1973 as a short-term refuge for batteredflffl
en with children. It provides a safe emm
ment for these women while they exaW
their situations and consider the alterrffH
available to them. The house providesBi
and shelter as well as counselling, liaison «
advocacy services, and information on m j
cal, legal and social services.
ln the past year, a second child-care co
sellor joined the staff, and plans to mcfflj
resource to a better facility have been™
ed. From April 1980 to March 198]H
women and children depended on TraH
House.
Child Abuse Team
The Child Abuse Team program providsH
sultation and training to improve the abilit:
ministry staff and other professionals worffl
the area of child abuse and neglect, and se):
abuse. This program operates under the st.
tory authority of the Guaranteed Availablei
come for Need Act (section 2, subsectjaj
Family and Child Service Act, and Family Rj
tions Act (section 29).
Lower Mainland Special Services has
child abuse teams, based in Vancouver and :
quitlam. Social workers on these two teams
consultants specialized in child abuse and;
gleet, and sexual abuse, with expertise inB
nition, intervention, reporting and folW
procedures. The teams give advice, informa
and support to social workers and other pro;
sionals in the Vancouver and Lower Mainl
regions. They also provide staff training™
trict offices throughout the province. EvegJB
months, approximately 100 people arej^B
by the child abuse teams at out-of-region, ir
regional and city-wide workshops.
In addition to consultation and trainifflH
child abuse teams are committed to inter-mi
terial liaison, resource development, comm
ty education and research. They also act as<
pert witnesses in court cases involving c
abuse and neglect, and sexual abuse, and
available for consultation after hours to En
gency Services.
In 1980-81, the Vancouver team handrail
cases, of which 279 involved physical abi
145 involved neglect, 194 involved se:a
abuse, and 91 involved emotional abuse.
Associated with the child abuse teams is»
Post Partum Counselling program, whose tn
 COMMUNITY SERVICES        79
Iftial workers provides assistance to parents
Cjjng with difficulties following the birth of a
I Id. This program works with an average of 70
\men and their families each month,
[lilunteer Services staff members also work
ISly with the child abuse teams. They collate the work of 300 volunteers who present
[ffination on child abuse and neglect to the
[piunity. Members of the child abuse teams
Mrolunteers to present workshops, talks, and
seminars to schools, lay and church groups, and
other community organizations. These sessions
are supervised and co-ordinated by Volunteer
Services. During the year, 295 such presentations were made.
Volunteers also provide a variety of services to
families, children, the elderly and the handicapped. In 1980-81, more than 54,000 people
benefited from the services provided by
volunteers.
]Rl05
M-abuse Team Statistics, Vancouver, 1980-81
April-June 1980 July-Sept. 1980 Oct.-Dec. 1980 Jan.-March 1981
Out of Out of Out of Out of
Regions Regions Total Regions Regions Total Regions Regions Total Regions Regions Total
jffier of cases
let
nsultation
iicellaneous
Consultation/
inquiries
Iralnterview
cessment
lit Counselling
IRhops/MHR
prkshops/
ItSmmunity
4ulti-disciplinary
(nmunity/High
ichool Education
90
26
79
34
32
15
12
12
3
2
13
122
41
91
14
21
14
43
126
42
98
9
41
16
6
43
14
17
169
56
103
28
42
16
7
4
20
121
24
151
6
22
19
6
36
54
15
5
44
2
2
175
39
156
50
44
21
6
36
122
42
99
12
21
17
3
13
47
53
22
23
20
5
175
64
122
32
26
17
3
13
21
47
lie 106
les of Abuse, Vancouver Child Abuse Team, 1980-81
Breakdown of Cases
Number*
Physical Abuse
Neglect
35
6
11
38
18
14
46
25
13
70
36
19
49
25
18
51
33
15
70
26
14
61
29
13
44
14
7
48
20
5
51
27
9
44
23
6
Til 1980
'y1980
le1980
1/1980
(gust 1980
htember 1980
l»er 1980
Ivember 1980
Icember 1980
llftry 1981
Iffiary 1981
'rch 1981
IRe cases may have been dealt with more than once.
Sexual Abuse
Emot
onal Abuse
20
3
11
4
12
4
17
15
14
8
5
9
26
8
17
7
14
10
24
4
18
10
18
7
 80
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
:j
Table 107
Post Partum Counselling Statistics, 1980-81
Total Number of Clients
Number of New Clients
Number of Volunteers
Number of Men
Bi-Monthly Figures
Number of Hours Spent in
One-to-One Counselling
Number of Hours Spent in
Conjoint Counselling
Public Health Nurse
Referrals
Physician/Psych iatrist
Referrals
Self/Brochure Referrals
Other Referrals
Total Referrals
Table 108
Child Abuse Team Statistics, Coquitlam, 1980-81
1980
1981
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
V
74
80
74
77
70
65
62
58
66
68
66
|
40
44
41
46
37
35
34
33
39
39
38
4
29
28
26
25
27
27
24
24
24
20
20
2
5
8
7
6
6
3
4
1
3
9
8
19
26
12
16
10
5
—
2
7
4
4
2
2
3
2
6
9
6
8
10
23
14
14
23
19
Apr
l-June 1980
July-Sept. 1980
Oct
-Dec. 1980
Jan.
March 191
Out of
Out of
Out of
Out of
Regions Regions
Total
Regions Regions
Total
Region;
Regions
Total
Regions Regions ffi
Number of cases
196
9
205
173
4
177
172
5
176
146
7       1
Direct
57
7
64
45
4
49
32
4
36
43
5
Consultation
122
2
124
150
—
150
146
1
147
137
2        1
Miscellaneous
Consultation/
Enquiries
30
—
30
39
1
40
22
—
22
13
1
Joint Interview
83
1
84
65
—
65
78
—
78
102
—      f
Assessment
4
—
9
1
—
1
2
—
2
11
—    i
Joint Counseling
—
—
—
—
—
—
9
—
9
2
—
Workshops/MHR
22
2
24
7
—
7
10
1
11
1
1
Workshops/
Community
Multi-
Disciplinary
15
4
19
8
3
11
9
13
22
12
—    1
Community/High
School Education
34
—
34
—
—
—
52
—
52
2
—    i
Table 109
Types of Abuse, Coquitlam Child Abuse Team, 1980-81
Breakdown of Cases
Total Nurr
ber*
Phys
cal Abi
se
Neglect
Sexual Abuse
Emotional Ab
April 1980
68
39
16
22
11
May 1980
63
32
11
23
9
June 1980
75
44
17
20
14
July 1980
58
23
28
8
5
August 1980
59
28
18
16
4
September 1980
60
28
22
9
5
October 1980
66
21
34
7
5
November 1980
57
20
29
6
5  j
December 1980
53
22
25
10
6
January 1981
43
18
18
7
5
February 1981
53
19
30
7
4
March 1981
57
21
23
15
3
* Some cases may
ha
ve been dealt with
more
than
once.
 COMMUNITY SERVICES       81
Real Clinic and Clinical Services
The Medical Clinic and Clinical Services pro-
| m provides comprehensive medical and psy-
jSric services to children in the ministry's
I e. These services are provided under the stat-
Lry authority of the Guaranteed Available In-
Lne for Need Act (section 2, subsection 1),
Imjy and Child Service Act, and Family Rela-
IHKct (section 29).
"he Medical Clinic program includes day-to-
\i medical care, and consultation for social
[ffiers, child-care workers, foster parents and
[oral parents on health problems.
Im/ariety of other services are provided,
Ifflding medical examinations for abused chil-
tn, medical examinations for adoptions, year-
health assessments and planning for handi-
pped children, prolonged adolescent
raselling, workshop presentation on health
re, and consulting services to foster parents
BIJKOcial workers for children with special
pds. Physicians are available on call after
hrs to Vancouver Emergency Services. Last
ir, the program expanded to include sexual
pise medical examinations and back-up work
court cases when a medical examination is
tided before a child is apprehended. During
110-81,   the   Medical   Clinic   served   2,807
ients.
ffichiatrists and psychologists in Clinical Series work closely with the Medical Clinic by
ividing assessment and consulting services to
Hal workers and foster parents in the Vancou-
1le110
S'ices Provided by Medical Clinic, 1980-81
Pilry Care 1,709
Cisultation j 2
Nssion Medical 507
C:harge Medical 121
jffon Medical 27
S)ected Sexual Abuse* 2
Siected Child Abuse 39
^or Surgical Procedure 20
S':utaneous Injection 138
Ponged Counselling 134
Irte Consultation 4
Hpital Visits 94
T'AL Patients Seen 2,807
F'l Number of Patients
if||rred to Specialists 209
ikljNumber of 'Not Kept'
■* Cancelled' 816
* iorto December 1, 1980, suspected sexual
•use was recorded under Suspected Child
mse.
ver area. Clinical Services also provides support
to ministry staff involved in complex child apprehension and custody court cases. In 1980-
81, Clinical Services assessed approximately
520 children.
In-Home Services
The In-Home Services program is a home-
maker service for low income and income assistance families under stress. The services are administered under the Family and Child Service
Act, and Guaranteed Available Income for Need
Act (section 27; section 2, subsection 1).
In-Home Services provides relief for overburdened mothers, and a teaching service in the
areas of nutrition, budgeting, meal preparation
and household management. The service is provided to prevent family breakdown and avoid
apprehension of children. Staff members offer
support and help in whatever ways they can to
encourage positive changes in the daily lives of
these families.
During 1980-81, 9,748 families were served
through this program.
In-Home Services also provides emergency
homemaker services during evenings and weekends through Vancouver Emergency Services.
SENIOR CITIZENS' COUNSELLORS
The Senior Citizens' Counsellors program helps
senior citizens in British Columbia become
aware of services and programs available to
them. The program is provided under the statutory authority of the Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act (section 2).
Senior citizens' counsellors are seniors who
work as volunteers.
The program began in 1968 with 30 senior
citizens' counsellors appointed by the ministry.
The original selection of counsellors was made
with the assistance of various senior citizen organizations throughout the province. The number of counsellors has grown to 176 in 1980-81.
The counsellors perform services which include driving elderly people for medical appointments, visiting the lonely, advising on
government programs, assisting with the completion of forms, helping to develop new community programs to meet the special needs of
senior citizens, and providing information,
counselling, and referral services.
The volume of work, and number of cal Is and
interviews made by counsellors during a month
varies according to area. Counsellors submit
 82
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
monthly reports for out-of-pocket expenses and
may be reimbursed for up to $75 per month.
Counsellors work closely with their local ministry office. They update their knowledge of services, and changes in federal and provincial
programs (OAS, GIS, GAIN, SAFER, etc.), by attending workshops and seminars.
Counsellors are appointed on recommendations from regional managers. They have usually
been involved in some community work before
retirement.
Regional workshops are held yearly, and a
provincial conference takes place every two
years. Upon appointment, counsellors attend a
two-day orientation workshop in Victoria. Contact with other senior citizens' counsellors is
maintained through monthly reports, letters,
phone calls, the monthly newsletter 'Counsellor
Reporter', and workshops.
Table 111
Estimated Numbers of People Served by Senior
Citizens' Counsellors, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year Number
1980-81 120,000
1979-80 102,000
1978-79 85,500
1977-78 73,500
1976-77 70,000
Table 112
Senior Citizens' Counsellors, Expenditures,
1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$139,697
1979-80
126,125
1978-79
85,782
1977-78
56,208
1976-77
58,117
SENIORS' DAY CENTRES
The Seniors' Day Centres program pr<3
community-based drop-in centres for theffl
ly. The centres may provide counselling am
formation, recreational activities, and arfj
crafts, together with an opportunity to socia
The program is provided under the statutoffl
thority of the Guaranteed Available Income
Need Act (section 2).
The Ministry of Human Resources B§
funding seniors' centres in 1974 when nonfl
societies were unable to generate sufficietm
erating funds themselves.
Grants are provided to nonprofit sodE
which operate seniors' centres. The grantsra
with building upkeep, utilities, staff costs,
program expenses. In some cases, a rf»
membership fee is charged.
Grants made during fiscal year 1980-M
tailed $528,296.
Region Name of Day Centre
2 Kitsilano Senior Citizens' Recreation and Social Centre
3 Penticton and District Retirement Centre
5 Elder Citizens' Dew-Drop In
6 Matsqui-Abbotsford Seniors' Centre
10 OAP Branch 52 Activity Centre
10 Cowichan Lake Seniors
10 Coombs Hobby Pensioners
10 Cowichan Valley Seniors'Program
11 Silver Threads Service (four centres)
14 Silver Harbour Manor Society
15 Japanese Seniors' Drop-in Centre
15 DERA Senior Citizens Club
15 Strathcona Community Centre Association
16 Renfrew Collingwood Seniors
17 Marpole Oakridge Seniors' Drop-in
17 '411' Seniors' Centre Society
TOTAL
7,646
4,247
7,078
7,981
16,815
12,714
14,394
Amu
$ I
28,
11,
27,
—      26,
i
124,4
92, (
43,
50, (
14,1
107,'C
$528,*
 COMMUNITY SERVICES       83
lis passes
|| Bus Passes program aids and encourages
Iffility among low-income senior citizens and
IBn for Handicapped adults. All holders of
linistry of Human Resources bus passes travel
|8>n local transit in the province, according to
bat transit is available in the community. The
Ipgram operates under the statutory authority
lithe Guaranteed Available Income for Need
lljulations (section 3, a and c) and Ministry of
1 man Resources Act.
The program began in 1967, when the Minis-
hof Human Resources distributed fare cards to
Ijible residents in Greater Vancouver and
pater Victoria for British Columbia Hydro
nsit service. The $5.00 fee charged by the
I^try semi-annually was submitted to British
klumbia Hydro.
Iffiring 1980, a new system was installed to
rlace the existing six-month $5.00 passes with
hive-month $10 passes for 1981.
n 1980, the Bus Pass program was extended
BI7 British Columbia communities having lo-
Iffiansit service.
lus passes are issued to:
■residents of British Columbia, 65 years or
I   over, who are receiving the Federal Guar-
I   anteed Income Supplement or GAIN Sen-
iors Supplement;
■Residents of British Columbia, 60 years of
I   age or over, who are receiving GAIN bene-
fits; and
■Residents of British Columbia under 65
I   years of age who are receiving GAIN for
IiBnandicapped benefits.
Igministrative costs, and a $60 per pass sub-
g/, are borne by the ministry, under the Office
S>ply and Services division. In 1980-81, ex-
hffljtures for the Bus Pass program totalled
|3496,186.
Sof March 31, 1981, 34,096 persons had
reived  Ministry of  Human   Resources  bus
Fses. These were distributed as follows:
• Greater Vancouver (GVRD), 27,759;
Kreater Victoria (CRD), 4,978; and
IBther communities (UTA), 1,359.
Table 113
Number of Bus Passes Issued, 1976 to 1981
March 31, 1981 34,096
December 1980 32,638
June 1980 33,972
December 1979 31,930
June 1979 33,131
December 1978 32,100
June 1978 31'838
December 1977 29,765
June 1977 30,443
December 1976 29,543
June 1976 28,718
BRITISH COLUMBIA COUNCIL
FOR THE FAMILY
The British Columbia Council for the Family, operating under the Societies Act of British Columbia, has three objectives:
• to act as a forum for representatives of communities to communicate with each other
about the needs of families;
• to help representatives prepare plans and
self-help projects to strengthen families in
British Columbia; and
• to promote public support for the well-being of the family in association with local,
provincial, or national groups.
The British Columbia Council for the Family is
a nonprofit organization which was incorporated under the Societies Act of British Columbia
on March 23, 1977. Since that time, the council
has developed a wide network of local
branches, affiliated organizations and contact
persons, who represent 120 communities
throughout British Columbia. Council representatives are from religious bodies, ethnic groups,
and community agencies.
The council initiates and supports family programs, provides information to voluntary organizations about family support programs, and
prepares program materials. As well, the council publishes a quarterly newsletter which contains information about council activities, current family concerns and resource addresses. An
annual workshop is sponsored each year. In order to support private agencies, the council
sponsors an annual workshop for private agency
members and distributes a private agency
directory.
In 1977, the British Columbia Council for the
Family established the month of May as Family
Month in British Columbia to increase public
awareness of the importance of the family in our
society.
 84        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
The Ministry of Human Resources supports
the work of the British Columbia Council for the
Family by providing office space and salaries for
a director and an administrative support person.
Ministry funding of approximately $50,500 was
provided in 1980-81. The council also raised
approximately $24,800 through donations and
membership fees. This covered the cost of program development and promotion, and assisted
in the organization of local branches.
During 1980-81, the council held a series of
regional workshops in Marriage Preparation
Leadership training, in co-operation with community colleges. As well, the council held its
first Working Together for Family Learning Con
ference this year, in co-operation with the M <
try of Education Continuing Education Divis
An advisory committee consisting of represe;
tives from the council and the Ministry of Edjl
tion will work to develop a discussion pape
family learning activities in British ColurnS
During the year, the council publishetB^
ries of handbooks for instructors of prograi
Marriage Preparation, New Parents, and Par
of Toddlers. New brochures initiated du
1980-81 included Family Time, TV Time, :
tions for Fathering, Family Role in Educat
Education and the Handicapped Child, and I
iors and the Family.
Table 114
BC Council for the Family, Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
1980-81
1979-80
1978-79
Area Funded
Ministry Funds (salaries, travel, office expenses)
Council (Council operation and programs)
Ministry Funds
Council
Ministry Funds
Council
1977-78
(August 1 - March 31) Ministry Funds
(April 1 - March 31) Council
$48,237
24,814
45,897
24,760
41,580
19,020
22,593
12,683
Total   I
Expendituffl
$73,0511
70,65a
60,600]
35,27S
 SECTION VII
Residential Services for
the Mentally Handicapped
 86        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
-I
INTRODUCTION TO
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES
The goal of Residential Services for the Mentally
Handicapped is to provide mentally handicapped persons with a place to live, in their
own communities where possible, that will fulfill their specific needs and increase their
independence.
The program provides different types of facilities throughout the province so that handicapped persons and their families can choose
the residence that is best for them.
COMMUNITY RESIDENTIAL CARE
Community Residential Care provides homes
for mentally handicapped adults in their own
communities. The homes provide a setting in
which trained staff assist and encourage mentally handicapped persons who are learning to become independent.
This program is operated under the statutory
authority of the Guaranteed Available Income
for Need Act (section 2, subsections 1 and 2) and
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Regulations (sections 22, 24, 25, and schedule C).
Standards of care are determined by the Community Care Facilities Licencing Act and Adult
Care Regulations and Hospital Act (section 6).
To meet its objectives, the Community Residential Care program uses the following models,
all of which are classified by the Community
Care Facilities Licencing Act as specialized residential resources:
Group Homes
Group homes provide living quarters for six
to twelve residents, and are operated by nonprofit societies.
Proprietary Boarding Homes
Proprietary boarding homes are commercial enterprises. If they have three or more
beds, they require licencing under the Community Care Facilities Licencing (CCFL) Act.
Assessments and rates in these homes are the
same as those of the Ministry of Health Long-
Term Care program.
Respite Care
Respite care for mentally retarded children
is provided to families in several ways. Short-
stay hostels are funded and staffed to provide
emergency and respite care from overnight up
to 30 days. They are sponsored by nonprofit
societies. Bed subsidy homes offer a similar
service, but are private homes which are paid
a retainer fee by the Ministry of Humafl
sources plus an additional user fee by thtw
ilies. Some group homes have one oB^
beds set aside to provide respite care. I
Independent Living Homes
Independent living homes are commffl
based facilities specially designed to piSI
the greatest amount of independence wn
alistic in-home support for mentally iffl
capped adults who are able to live in gre:
of two to four in homes or apartments IS^
from nonprofit societies. The objective™!
provide a bridge between institutiorw
community residential care, and indepenc
living.
Community Living Society
The Community Living Society helps
ministry make appropriate community plj
ments for mentally handicapped personSj
are, or were, residents of Woodlands. Sfl
the society assess the needs of each per
and, together with the individual's famiM
ministry staff, develop a plan for a sucfflffl
community placement. The plan inaffl.
housing, life-skills training, recreatio™
education.The Community Living SocieM
develops local resources for mentally M
capped persons.
The ministry provides the adminisfm
and program funding to enable the socM
develop the best plan for the developmeffl
disabled person; one which will easethS|
sition from a residential centre tej
community.
The Community Living Society has smj
the following number of clients:
• 40, in 1980-81;
• 33, in 1979-80; and
• 15, in 1978-79.
Community Living Skills
Community Living Skills provides fflj
limited training in life-skills to mentally hari
capped adults.
Learning life-skills such as personaBI
giene, good eating habits, and time mall
ment, is an important step tofflj
independence.
The ministry contracts with a society,'!
qualified individual, to teach life-skillsm,
ment for service is based on an hourly twi
maximum of 21 hours per week, for 12 we I
to 12 months, may be purchased on behfpj
each person. A contract is drawn up for e.h
client, detailing specific goals, the tirfflj
quired to meet these goals, and methosjit
measuring progress.
 RESIDENTIAL SERVICES FOR THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED
87
ISS115
mmunity Living Skills, 1979-80 and 1980-81
Approximate
Average Cost
Number of
Number of
Per Unit-
Unit-Hours
Clients Who
Hour of
of Services
Received
ir
Services
Provided
Services
30-81
$8.50
109,214
433
79-80
7.65
20,575
80
ile 116
immunity Living Society, 1978-79 to 1980-81
■Year
JJ 980-81*
TO79-80
K78-79
Expenditure
$954,000
327,849
238,523
Number of
Clients Served
40
33
15
Wjirect grant of $316,271 was provided for
vmimunity Living Society administrative
osts and some services. Additional funds of
approximately $550,000 were committed for
life-skills training and semi-independent
residential programs operated by the society.
Training Centres
The four residential training centres for the
mentally handicapped currently operated by
nonprofit societies in British Columbia are:
• Beaver Lodge, Oliver;
• Endicott Centre, Creston;
• Northern Training Centre, Smithers; and
• Variety Farm, Ladner.
These training centres are co-educational,
and provide vocational training during an
average stay of approximately two years.
They are run by nonprofit societies and serve
large regions.
US117
lilities Operated by Nonprofit Societies, 1978-79 to 1980-81
Total Number
Vocational
of Mentally
Croup
Training
Handicapped
Ir
Homes
Residents
Homes
Residents
Residents
110-81
37
397
4
150
547
■1'9-80
31
340
4
150
490
T8-79
26
315
4
153
468
He 118
l^ber of Residents
in Proprietary
Residential Care
Facilities, by Levels of Care, 1980-81
Total Number
of Mentally
Personal
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Handicapped
bidences*
Care
Care 1
Care 2
Care 3
Residents**
219
237
308
202
115
862
'his includes all forms of proprietary residences, private hospitals, boarding homes, unlicenced fam-
imiomes and long-term care facilities which provide care for some mentally handicapped persons.
nWise are end-of-year figures. Some residents came into the program during the year; others were
iMssessed to a higher level of care part of the way through the year.
He 119
Siafor Levels of Care (Proprietary), 1978-79 to 1980-81
Intermediate
Intermediate
Intermediate
Yr
Personal Care
Care 1
Care 2
Care 3
Average
10-81
$15.13
$19.65
$23.50
$37.80
$24.07
19-80
14.20
18.20
21.75
35.00
22.29
18-79
13.50
16.45
20.55
28.30
19.70
 REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
lk
Table 120
Nonprofit Homes, Expenditures, 1978-79 to
1980-81
Average
Year
Expenditure
Per Diem
1980-81
$6,723,649
$33.68
1979-80
5,816,759
32.52
1978-79
5,310,030
31.08
Table 121
Proprietary Care,
Expenditures,
1978-79 to
1980-81
Average
Year
Expenditure
Per Diem
1980-81
$6,603,104
$20.99
1979-80
5,821,745
18.26
1978-79
4,805,260
15.17
Table 122
Capital Grants*, Expenditures, 1978-79 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$125,000
1979-80
155,443
1978-79
524,367
* Capital grants are provided for maintenance of
building and equipment facilities for the mentally handicapped.
Table 123
Start-up Grants*, Expenditures, 1978-79 to
1980-81
Year
Expenditure
980-81
$29,850
979-80
82,883
978-79
30,052
* Start-up grants are provided to start a
program for the mentally handicapped.
Table 124
Other Residences*, Expenditures, 1978-79 to
1980-81
Year
1980-81
1979-80
1978-79
Expenditure
$254,953
327,791
821,114
: Funds are provided to accommodate
handicapped persons who are living in
homes which do not fall under other
residential categories.
During 1980-81, an in-depth review oil
cenced residential facilities caring for menll
handicapped adults was carried out by tea
composed of representatives from the Min 1
of Human Resources, Ministry of Health, i
British Columbia Association of Private Carel
cilities. A total of 56 licenced facilities werjel
viewed in 1980-81.
Throughout the province, new commuj
programs for the mentally handicapped vrl
developed in 1980-81.
In August 1980, a residence for 10 menll
handicapped adults was opened in Dav\jl
Creek. Sponsored by the Dawson Creek Assl
ation for the Mentally Retarded, this resident!
the first community residential facility in Rejl
8 (North and South Peace River). In Regie!
(Kootenays), two semi-independent In
homes were developed during 1980-81,^1
with the capacity to serve four mentally hall
capped adults. New life-skills training progrJ
were started in Region 13 (Fraser North) anda
gion 10 (Vancouver Island North of Malali
These programs help mentally handicap!
adults develop skills to enable them to liya
independently as possible in the commuiBjl
RESIDENTIAL CENTRES
Services to mentally handicapped persil
whose special needs cannot be met in their cn]
munity, are provided by three residential ij
tres: Glendale Lodge, serving Vancouver Isl.rJJ
Tranquille, serving the interior of the provia
and Woodlands, serving the Lower Maim
and the north coast. The resources and expes]
of the residential centres are made availabi
assist surrounding regions to develop their ct|
munity services and to reduce admisil
requests.
Residential centres personnel work witjSH
ilies of handicapped persons, societies, andn
in nearby Ministry of Human Resources regnl
to develop alternative community resouisa
These services are provided under the statta
authority of the Mental Health Act, Guarantl
Available Income for Need Act, and Familylj
Child Service Act.
Woodlands
Woodlands admits only those persorBJH
cannot benefit from community-based facjl 5l
Woodlands is home to 836 persons, ofwhicill
out of seven are adult and most are severelej
tarded adults. Many residents have addithH
handicaps such as cerebral  palsy, deafiM
 a|T—
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES FOR THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED
ndness, epilepsy, or severe emotional or be-
IBpural problems.
There are 31 residential areas under the su-
jgision of the Nursing Department providing
-hour accommodation and life-skills training.
Swards provide acute medical care. Dietary,
usekeeping, and furniture and building main-
lance services are provided under the busi-
ss administrator.
Over 50 "off-ward" programs, including spe-
.il education, adapted aquatics, camping,
.mmunity school, and work, are provided as
|itof resident training and education. In addi-
JSto the educational, recreational, vocation-
(Rrsing and health care workers, other pro-
ISpnal staff, such as psychologists, social
IjlKers, dentists, physicians, physiotherapists,
Imxcupational therapists, provide an inter-
Ifflplinary service delivery.
Iffiroughout the years in which Woodlands
II been providing care for mentally handi-
loped persons, successive changes in the phi-
Imhy of working with the retarded have been
pected in the updating of facilities and the de-
popment of improved and innovative pro-
Iffming. Under the Ministry of Provincial Sec-
Inry and Government Services, sheltered
EBdial care gave way to a developmental ap-
Ipach under the Ministry of Health. Wood-
lids reached its maximum population of 1,400
i 1959. By July 1, 1974, when the responsibil-
i :or Woodlands was transferred to the Ministry
iHuman Resources, the resident population
#> 1,097. Over the years, increasing emphasis
evoluntary admission, least restrictive envi-
r ment, and replacement into the community,
1. coincided with the trend towards a greater
blvement of parents and community staff in
IBng for residents.
Hiring the summer, the Division of Health
Si'ice Planning at the University of British Co-
lltibia, provided a graduate student to work
|Vi Woodlands, regional ministry staff, and
fcimunity agencies, to develop plans for a pi-
Kcommunity training home for severely and
pfoundly retarded adults. The first phase of the
Pi (Glenbrooke program) was implemented
ey in 1981.
he Glenbrooke program and three new pre-
'ational programs (NOVA: Basic, Mid and
Hi) provided off-ward programs for an addi-
[ial 30 severely and profoundly retarded
''dents.
here were 282 volunteers enrolled at Wood-
l;ls as of March 31, 1981. Throughout the
|| volunteers provided 3,345 hours of
s'ice.
Following planning and negotiation with
Douglas College, the 11-month certificate program for human service workers in mental retardation commenced in September 1980. Over 40
Woodlands staff members are enrolled in the
part-time program also offered by the college.
Table 125
Resident Population, Woodlands, 1979-80 and
1980-81
Resident
Population
Year        Admissions   Discharges at March 31
1980-81 31 42 836
1979-80 40 55 849
Table 126
Woodlands, Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$27,546,171
1979-80
23,620,917
1978-79
22,730,220
1977-78
19,598,096
1976-77
16,938,113
Tranquille
The primary goal of Tranquille's residential
services is to provide care and training to help
residents reach their developmental potential
and acquire preparation for independent living.
To meet this objective, an individual training
plan is prepared for each resident, by a multi-
disciplinary team. The team is responsible for
ensuring that the appropriate social, educational, vocational, recreational and care services
are provided.
Tranquille also provides a range of services to
communities outside the centre, including assessments, case consultations, home management services, assistance with training of community service providers, and assistance with
development of services and resources.
Tranquille's services are divided into four program units, each with a program director and
manager who are responsible for directing and
co-ordinating the work of multi-disciplinary
teams in the delivery of programs:
Youtbi Program
This program unit provides care and training to children and young people. As a result
of special services focussing on preparation
for school, enrolment of Tranquille residents
in community schools increased from 30 to
50 in the 1980-81 school year. The unit's pre-
 90
REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
:j
vocational program, which was initiated during 1979-80, has expanded with the additional services of another staff person.
Adult East Program
This pre-vocational program for the profoundly retarded, started this year, places
continuing emphasis on develoment of self-
care and community living skills as a preliminary step towards placement into community
facilities.
Adult West Program
The non-ambulant children and adults in
this unit are given special stimulative services
to develop mobility, co-ordination, and increased intellectual functioning. These children are now attending a community school.
One resident has been transferred to the Youth
Program as a result of his increased independence in walking and feeding.
ln keeping with Tranquille's objective of
normalizing living environments, two segregated wards in the main building (for ambulant residents) have been integrated into coeducational living areas.
Outreach Program
This program provides comprehensive assessments, consultation and home management services to non-resident mentally handicapped children and adults from the interior
of the province. This year, the program expanded by providing follow-up services to
residents discharged to the community, and
developing training services for field staff and
service providers in the community.
During 1980-81, priority was placed on developing independent living skills of residents.
Concurrent with this objective, special effort has
been made to upgrade staff skills through in-
house programs and formal upgrading courses
offered by Cariboo College. In this fiscal year,
two five-month upgrading courses forthe Health
Care Worker 2 classification were completed by
39 staff members who received certification as
Community Health Service Workers.
All staff hired this year have undergone two
weeks of orientation at Tranquille and received
an introduction to behavioural approaches in
care and training.
Table 127
Resident Population, Tranquille,
1979-80 and 1980-81
Year       Admissions"
1980-81 36
1979-80 42
Resider
Populati'
Discharges at Maffl
41 363
42 367 |
* Of this number, 15 admissions were for
short-term respite care; 3 were for in- 1
patient assessment; and 18 admissions m
for ongoing care and training.
Table 128
Tranquille, Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$11,529,979
1979-80
10,414,001
1978-79
9,327,128
1977-78
8,615,521
1976-77
7,604,316
Glendale
Glendale Lodge provides residential, ass<
ment, and training services to handicapped t
mentally retarded adults and children from Vi
couver Island and the Gulf Islands.
Services and facilities provided at Glence
Lodge include:
• 300 beds for the care and development
severely and profoundly retarded pers
on a long-term basis;
• 20 beds for the retarded on a short-term &
sis (one week to three months) to prove
parent relief, parent vacation, parent resjs
in family illness or emergency, or trairylo
facilitate accommodation in an indivwf
own home or a community resource™!
• short-term training for severely haii
capped persons;
• comprehensive assessment service^ «
handicapped individuals, where therfflJB
indication of retardation or of severe cn
munication problems (a service whicrait
includes a travelling clinical team win
visits the major centres in the geographil
area served four times a year, or more o n
if requested by professional persons in ie
area; this team operates in conjunctly
the Ministries of Health, Human Resoui.s
and Education, and provides training |$i
grams for teachers in schools, parent cd
selling in general, and advice and guida e
to parents who wish to keep childceifi
their own homes);
——. __—-
 s
RESIDENTIAL SERVICES FOR THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED       91
• a screening assessment for those with im-
Ifcaired hearing (in conjunction with the
[■Ministry of Health and other professional
groups involved with hearing programs);
• a nine-to-five day-care program, five days a
week,   for  the   physically   and   mentally
[■handicapped of the Greater Victoria area
Iw'ho live at home; and
• dental services for mentally handicapped
persons in the Greater Victoria area.
Glendale Lodge is operated by the Glendale
jdge Society, a nonprofit society registered un-
irthe British Columbia Societies Act. In addi-
n to the lodge, the society operates three
;)up homes, accommodating 25 severely reared residents, in Victoria.
ile 129
liident Population, Glendale,
79-80 and 1980-81
Resident
Population
{Hear       Admissions   Discharges at March 31
312.80-81 110 112 318
"979-80 134 144 329
lile130
(mdale, Expenditures, 1976-77 to 1980-81
Year
Expenditure
1980-81
$10,105,353
1979-80
8,975,568
1978-79
8,579,857
1977-78
8,306,394
1976-77
6,402,674
  SECTION VIII
Legislation
 94        REPORT OF THE MINISTRY, 1980-81
1
The Ministry of Human Resources administers
the following legislation. These statutes were revised and consolidated in 1979-80.
Ministry of Human Resources Act, RSBC 1979,
Chapter 274
This act establishes the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Human Resources over all matters re-
latingto social and public welfare and income
assistance.
Guaranteed Available Income for Need Act,
RSBC 1979, Chapter 158, and Regulations (BC
Regulation 476-76) and Amendments
This act and regulations provide guaranteed
minimum incomes to the handicapped, all
residents 60 years of age and older, and financial assistance and social services that are essential for individuals and families. The social
services include day-care, homemaker services, residential care, counselling and rehabilitation services.
Adoption Act, RSBC 1979, Chapter 4, and Regulations (BC Regulation 278-78)
The purpose of this act is to provide the same
rights and privileges for adopted children as
for children born to both parents in a family.
Child Paternity and Support Act, RSBC 1979,
Chapter 49
This act ensures that the rights of children
born out of wedlock and their mothers are
protected.
Family and Child Service Act, RSBC 1979,
Chapter 119
This act provides protection and care for children who are neglected, abused, abandoned,
or living without proper supervision or
guardianship.
Human Resources Facility Act, RSBC 1979,
Chapter 185, and Regulations (BC Regulation
586-76)
This act and regulations authorize provincial
grants to nonprofit organizations for the development of residential facilities or centres
for children, disabled persons, and senior
citizens.
Community Resource Board Act, RSBC 1979,
Chapter 58
This act empowers the government to establish Human Resource and Health Centres
where the provincial income assistance pro
grams, social services, and health sem
may be administered by boards compose'
local citizens.
Social Workers Act, RSBC 1979, Chapter 3)
and Regulations (BC Regulation 45-69)  1
This act permits the government to esffl
the Board of Registration for social worki
Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters Act, RSBC 1
(BC Regulation 411-78) and Amendments
This act provides for payment of month"
assistance to eligible residents of the prom
who receive Old Age Security benefiS
pay rent.
Residence and Responsibility Act, RSBC 1S!
Chapter 364
This act requires municipalities to contfil
to the costs of specific social assistant)]
grams for persons in need.

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