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Ministry of Education One Hundred and Tenth Annual Report July 1, 1980, to June 30, 1981 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1981

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Full Text

 Province of
British Columbia
Ministry of
Education
  Ministry of
Iducation
[ie Hundred and Tenth Annual Report
y 1,1980, to June 30,1981
in. Brian R. D. Smith
mister of Education
 British Columbia Cataloguing
in Publication Data
British Columbia. Ministry of Education.
Annual report. — 109th (1979/80)
Cover title: Report on education
1979/80 —
Report year ends June 30.
Continues in part: British Columbia.
Ministry of Education, Science and
Technology. Annual report.
ISSN 0711-9151
ISSN 0711-9410 | Annual report —
Ministry of Education (Victoria. 1980)
1. British Columbia. Ministry of
Education.   2. Education — British
Columbia — Periodicals.    I. British
Columbia. Ministry of Education. Report on
education.    II. Title: Report on education.
L222. B7A22 354.71106851
 e Honourable Henry Bell-Irving
tenant-Governor of
Province of British Columbia
V it please Your Honour:
beg respectfully to present the One Hundred and Tenth Annual
lort of the Ministry of Education, covering the period from July 1,
X to June 30, 1981.
XO    dy^-'TA
Brian R. D. Smith
Minister of Education
 COVER PHOTO:
Gary Poole, English 9 teacher at Eric Hamber Secondary School in
Vancouver, works with students Melissa Luhtanen and Tony Horaci
PEMC Photo by Doug MacPhail
 ONTENTS                            h
NISTER'S INTRODUCTION
9
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL FINANCE
ICANIZATION CHART
12
RESEARCH
62
(SONNEL
15
MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT
63
HOOLS DEPARTMENT
20
DIVISION OF OPERATIONS AND
HVISION OF SCHOOLS PROGRAMS
20
MANAGEMENT SERVICES
63
Curriculum Development
20
Management Services
63
Career Programs
21
Personnel Services
64
Learning Assessment
26
Project Planning Centre
64
Scholarship and Student Assessment
28
.TftbrasiQN OF POLICY AND LEGISLATIVE
Program Implementation
28
SERVICES
65
Modern Languages Services
29
DIVISION OF DATA AND INFORMATION
Correspondence Education
32
SERVICES
66
JIVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
33
Data Services.;.
67
learning Assistance/teaming Disabilities
35
Data Development
67
Hearing Impaired
36
Data Operations
68
Jericho Hill School
36
Statistical Services
68
Visually Impaired
36
Information Services
69
Indian Education
37
. Ministry Library
70
MVISION OF OPERATIONS AND SERVICES
38
SPECIAL REPORTS
71
Field Services
38
MINISTER'S TOUR
71
School Operation's
39
MICROCOMPUTERS IN EDUCATION
72
Support Services
39
THE KNOWLEDGE NETWORK OF THE WEST
75
Publication Services
39
YOUNG ARTISTS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
78
Print Services
40
COLLEGE REGIONS AND SCHOOL DISTRICTS
86
Provincial Educational Media Centre
40
STATISTICAL TABLES
DIVISION OF INSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS
41
Teacher Services
42
DEPENDENT SCHOOLS
45
iST-SECONDARY DEPARTMENT
46
BsiON OF MANAGEMENT SERVICES
46
Operations and Planning
47
Institutional Support Services
47
Trades and Industrial Training
48
DIVISION OF PROGRAM SERVICES
48
Academic/Technical
50
Vocational Programs
51
Research and Curriculum Development
51
JIVISION OF CONTINUING EDUCATION
51
iST-SECONDARY COUNCILS
54
KhDEMIC COUNCIL
54
OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING COUNCIL
54
1
MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL
55
'UCATIONAL FINANCE DEPARTMENT
57
DIVISION OF THE MINISTRY COMPTROLLER
58
DIVISION OF SCHOOL FINANCE
AND FACILITIES
59
Finance
59
Facilities
60
DIVISION OF POST-SECONDARY
FINANCE AND FACILITIES
61
Finance
61
Facilities
62
7
  IISTER'S INTRODUCTION
jthe end of the  1980/81 school year — my first full one as
Kr of Education — I was able to mark the completion or near-
Htjpn of a number of initiatives which are likely to have a
Kht bearing on British Columbia's education system,
ghost among them was strong restatement of the principle that
education is not the prerogative only of those who provide it,
so of those who use it. Soon after I took office in the fall of 1979,
ermined that no major change should take place in the education
mm until I had ascertained how the people of the province
eeived it, and where they would like it changed for the better,
jefore, during the fall of 1980,1 conducted a series of 41 public and
ressional forums, the latter primarily for educators, and talked with
Sireds of students, parents and concerned citizens throughout the
Iftice.
(was a very productive experience. From parents, teachers, school
tees, special interest groups, students and members of the public
Ifiyed, and subsequently studied with my professional staff in the
1 istry of Education, hundreds upon hundreds of constructive
lotions. By the end of June I was able to write a report of the
>ms which deals with the issues raised and lists more than 100
)ific actions which have already been taken or set in motion to
[love our educational service.
I(ie of the major conclusions arising out of the forums was that
Ifys a clear need for a document defining the mandate of the
iol system. The mandate, preparation of which has already begun,
■express the tasks of the schools as they relate to other agencies
pi contribute to education, and will define the role of the various
bponents of the school system in the performance of those tasks,
kmandate statement will be the basis for the revision of the School
1
rnong other actions taken or set in motion as a result of the
Bms are measures to strengthen the curriculum, notably in the
|! of English and consumer education; improved programs and
■ffes for children with special needs; improved services and
pities for small rural and northern schools, and steps to strengthen
itraining of teachers.
second major initiative brought to completion during the year
■me reorganization of the Ministry of Education, which was
Min under the deputy ministership of Dr. Walter G. Hardwick and
fcpleted under that of R. James Carter, who succeeded Dr.
IHwick in September, 1980. The most important aspect of the
Pganization was the creation of a fourth department within the
 ministry, the Management Operations Department, to complem
the existing Schools, Post-secondary and Ministry Finance
departments. The co-management of education by the ministrviB
its field agencies — school districts, colleges, institutes and post-
secondary councils — had become so complex that innovative
direction to the administrative processes was required. The new
department is responsible for providing that direction by establish)]
and maintaining suitable management systems.
The reorganization affected almost all branches and divisions in
some way. I would like to mention only two more because they
reflect new emphases in our thinking and planning.
Special Programs, which deals with children with special needs, Isl
been elevated from a branch to a full division of the Schools
Department. This change, with the staff and budgetary provisions tl
go with it, will enable the ministry to fulfill the commitments I hav<]
made, in the forums report and elsewhere, to provide improved I
program services for the handicapped.
The other change is the establishment, within the Educationaml
Finance Department, of a Division of Educational Finance Researc
which I created to study financial issues such as alternative sources
revenue for schools, their impact on school budgets and operatio,
and school financing systems in general. Many of us, particular!™!
some of the Lower Mainland school districts, were alarmed at the
effect rapidly increasing property values and assessed values had (
our school taxes. I cannot anticipate that the new research divisio I
will cure all the problems associated with educational finance
overnight, but I am glad that we are making a start on a problem a
has perplexed us for years.
Another subject I would emphasize in this brief look at some oft:
year's major educational developments is the Knowledge Network
the West Communications Authority. The Knowledge Network is ai
educational television system which co-operates with the various
educational institutions — school districts, universities, colleges anc
provincial institutes such as the Open Learning Institute — in the
delivery of their programs via satellite and cable; KNOW also links I
teaching hospitals and universities and provides services to othe™
ministries such as Human Resources for the professional developrmt
of its staff. It was gratifying to me that though we only establtshe^Hf
network, as a non-profit organization under the Societies Act, in M',
1980, it was delivering programs to people in isolated areas of the
province in January, 1981.
Both Dr. Patrick McGeer, whose Ministry of Universities, Science
and Communications was a major participant in the Knowledge
Network, and I, hold great expectations for it. For many years the
ministry's Correspondence Education Branch has delivered man
programs to isolated, school-age children; more recently the G^l
Learning Institute has performed a comparable service for adulfSJ
Now the Knowledge Network can carry those adult programs, am
10
 r
Mothers from the colleges, universities and institutes, to all parts
Hie province instantaneously.
Ilfflcond new institution came into being during the year. Douglas
lege, which since its inception has served a heavily-populated
\ on both sides of the Fraser River, has been divided. It continues
;;rve the New Westminster, Burnaby, Coquitlam and Maple Ridge
IBs north of the river. A new college, Kwantlen, serves the
Iffly, Surrey, Delta and Richmond districts south of the river. It is
Imteenth in the network of two-year community colleges that
ISthis province, from Terrace in the west to Cranbrook in the
liprom Dawson Creek in the north to the United States border in
Mith.
ie ideal of equality of educational opportunity may never be 100
cent attainable, but the struggle towards it never ceases.
11
 ORGANIZATION CHART
Ministry of Education
As of March 1981
Deputy
Minister's
Office
I Inspector of
I Independent
Manager,
Budget
Educational
Finance
Department
Sller,s |
Audit Branch     1
ISSS Branch)
1 Schools
Project
j       Control            ■
Management
Operations
Department
Post-Secondary I
Finance &
Facilities              1
Division
Project
|       Planning
Centre
Post-5ecor
Finance B
at'n
Post-Secor
Facilities
dary   1
Operations &
t Management
Services              1
Division
Personnel
Services          1
Branch
Management 1
Services I
Branch
Policy &
Legislative
Services
! Division
Informatii
Services
Branch
Ministry I
Library
12
 Schools
Department
Post-
Secondary
Department
Schools
■operatic
■Branch
Field
Services.
Branch
Supporl
Services
Branch
Publication
Services
■Section
Special
Educatio
Division
Branch
Special
Education
Services
Branch
Hearing &
Speech
impaired
Branch
Institution;
Affairs
Division
Co
Edi
caiion        1
Div
sion
]
Management
Services
Division
Operations
& Planning
Branch
Institutional
Support
Services
. Trades &
Indust.Tra
Branch
Vocational
Programs
Branch
Academic/Tech.
Programs
Branch
Research &
Curriculum         ,
Dev. Branch
13
  pSONNEL 1980/81
VNISTER'S OFFICE
Assistant Director, Career Programs
J. Jupp
vister of Education
Director, Modern Languages Services
f| Honourable Brian R.D. Smith, B.A.,
V.., LLB.
N. Ardanaz, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Co-ordinator, French Language Programs
C. Fournier, B.A.
Director, Learning Assessment
IfijTY MINISTER'S OFFICE
Vacant
IRy Minister of Education
Assistant Director, Program Assessment
teCarter, B.A., M.Ed.
D.J. Bateson, B.Ed., M.Sc. Ed.D.
Ltant Deputy Minister — Schools
Assistant Director, Scholarship and Test
wartment
Development
||»<all, B.A., B.P.E., M.Ed.
W.J. Zoellner, B.A. B.Ed.
Ksitant Deputy Minister — Post-
Director, Program Implementation
iemdary Department
B.D. Buchanan, B.Ed., M.Ed. (Secondment)
j. Fisher, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D.
Director, Correspondence Education
Bitant Deputy Minister — Educational
W.B. Naylor, B.A., M.Ed.
hi nee Department
BFIeming, B.A.
Iisitant Deputy Minister — Management
pi rations Deparment
Operations and Services
Division
iffieliuk, B.A., M.Ed.
Executive Director, Operations and Services
Exutive Director
A.J.H. Newberry, B.A., M.Ed., Ed.D.
Igity, B.A., M.Ed.
Managing Director, Support Services
D.L. Hartwig, B.A.
Director, Provincial Educational Media
SPOOLS DEPARTMENT
Centre
B.A. Black, B.Ed.
Pigrams Division
Director, Publication Services
Emutive Director, Programs
P.J. Northover, B.A., B.Com., M.B.A.
IJHissio, B.Sc, M.A., Ph.D.
Director, Print Services
Dictor, Curriculum Development
T.F. Wrinkle, B.A., M.A.
Viint
Director, Field Services
Aiitant Director, Curriculum
D.R. Sutherland, B.Ed., Dip. Ed. Admin.,
ftelopment
M.Ed.
|| Oliver, B.A.
Assistant Director, School Accreditation
Ai.tant Director, Curriculum
Vacant
jdelopment
Eiputant, B.Ed., M.A.
Director, School Operations
Vacant
15
 Special Education Division
Executive Director, Special Education
W.J. Desharnais, B.A., M.Ed.
Director, Indian Education
S.E. Arbess, B.A., M.Ed., M.A., Ph.D.
Director, Special Education
J.A.C. Cittins, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Administration
M. Epstein, B.A., M.A.
Director, Hearing and Speech Impaired
H. Minto, B.Ed., M.Ed.
Co-ordinator, Visually Impaired
E.Y.P. Lau, B.A., M.Ed.
Principal, Jericho Hill School for the Deaf
Vacant
Institutional Affairs Division
Executive Director, Institutional Affairs
W.L.B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed.
Director, Teacher Services
B.A. Andrews, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Teacher Services
E.D. Cherrington, B.A., Dip. Ed., Dip. Public
Admin.
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
Inspector of Independent Schools
E.L. Bullen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D.
POST-SECONDARY
DEPARTMENT
Program Services Division
Acting Executive Director, Program Services
L.J. Thompson, B.A., B.Sc, F.C.I.S.
(Secondment)
Director, Vocational Programs
D.R. MacRae, B.Sc.
Director, Academic and Technical Programs
T.H. Clement, B.Sc, M.Ed., Ph.D.
16
Director, Research and Curriculum
Development
W.G. Davenport, B.Sc, Ph.D.
Management Services Divi:
Executive Director, Management Sen
J.F. Newberry, B.Ed., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Operations and Planning
K.A. Maclver, B.A.
Director, Institutional Support Servic*
J.D. Meredith
Director, Institutional Support Service
R.C. McCandless, B.A., M.P.A.
Co-ordinator, Student Services
D.L. Clarke, B.A., M.Sc.
Continuing Education Diviio
Executive Director, Continuing Educan
R.L. Faris, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D.
Director, Continuing Education
N. Rubidge, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ed.D.
Co-ordinator, Adult Basic Educational
S.R. Harvey, B.A., B.Ed.
EDUCATIONAL FINANCE
DEPARTMENT
Manager, Budget Development
D.F. Hughes, Dip. Public Admin,   j
Ministry Comptroller DivisM
Ministry Comptroller
G.G. Wilcox, C.G.A.
Schools Finance and Faciliiffi
Division
Executive Director, Schools Finance <<h
Facilities
J.L. Doyle, B.A., M.Ed.
Senior Architect - Schools
N.O. Jackson, Dip. Arch.
J
 'r;ct Control Manager
a ndle, Dip. Bus. Admin.
lictor, Schools Finance
jlamble, R.I.A.
fit-Secondary Finance and
luities Division
Kiitive Director, Post-Secondary Finance
[Facilities
Ificlntyre, B. Arch., F.R.I.B.A.
c3t Architect
IjicLelland, M.R.A.I.C.
fit Project Manager
fciuttleworth
fetor, Post-Secondary Finance
It Adams, C.G.A.
H.NAGEMENT OPERATIONS
i'ARTMENT
(icy and Legislative Services
lision
Butive Director, Policy and Legislative
pees
Wn, B.Sc, M.Ed.
la and Information Services
liision
Butive Director, Data and Information
pices
I Greer, B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
iterations and Management
pices Division
Butive Director, Operations and
piagement Services
ilStoodley, C.A., R.I.A.
■■tor, Personnel Services
pHolmes, Dip. Public Admin.
DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS
OF SCHOOLS
T.G. Ellwood, B.Ed., M.Ed., Courtenay
T. Good, B.A., M.Ed., Howe Sound
C. Hopper, B.Ed., M.Ed., Agassiz-Harrison
R.W. Huestis, B.Comm., B.Ed., Gulf Islands/
Lake Cowichan
W.B. Johnston, B.Ed., M.Ed., Summerland
N. Keis, B.S.A., M.Ed., Princeton/Keremeos
D.N. Newman, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.,
Central Coast
M. Roscoe, B.A., M.A., Vancouver Island
North
D.R. Smyth, B.P.E., Saanich
R.B. Taylor, B.Ed., M.Ed., Cranbrook
PROMOTIONS AND
APPOINTMENTS
R.J. Carter, Deputy Minister
G.G. Wall, Assistant Deputy Minister,
Schools Department
G.L. Fisher, Assistant Deputy Minister,
Post-Secondary Department
J.R. Fleming, Assistant Deputy Minister,
Educational Finance Department
C Daneliuk, Assistant Deputy Minister,
Management Operations Department
E.L. Bullen, Inspector, Independent Schools
J.L. Canty, Executive Director, Deputy
Minister's Office
W.J. Desharnais, Executive Director, Special
Education
J.L. Doyle, Executive Director, Schools
Finance and Facilities
R.N. Greer, Executive Director, Data and
Information Services
W.L.B. Hawker, Executive Director,
Institutional Affairs
H.L. Mclntyre, Executive Director,
Post-Secondary Finance and Facilities
J.J. Mussio, Executive Director, Schools
Programs
A.J.H. Newberry, Executive Director,
Operations and Services
B.R. Stoodley, Executive Director,
Operations and Management Services
17
 J. Walsh, Executive Director, Policy and
Legislative Services
K.A. Maclver, Director, Operations and
Planning
D.L. Hartwig, Managing Director, Support
Services
H. Minto, Director, Hearing and Speech
Impaired
P.J. Northover, Director, Publication
Services
D.R. Sutherland, Director, Field Services
D.J. Bateson, Assistant Director, Program
Assessment
J. Randle, Project Control Manager,
Schools Finance and Facilities
AWARDS AND
ACHIEVEMENTS
25-Year Continuous Service
Certificate
J.F. Fillipoff
V.E. Rickard
E.E. Sowerby
Executive Development
Training Plan Graduate
R.L. Connolly
RETIREMENTS
H.G. Pidcock, Administrative Officer,
Post-Secondary Finance, 39 years
J. Wardhaugh, Clerk 3, Management
Services, 34 years
N.D. Daggett, Administrative Officer,
Publication Services, 34 years
L. Aitkens, Clerk 4, Data and Information
Services, 34 years
D.W.C. Huggins, Director, Publication
Services, 33 years
O.M. Bowes, Research Officer, Learning
Assessment, 27 years
V.E. Rickard, Senior Program Analyst,
Post-Secondary Management Services,
25 years
18
J. Phillipson, Inspector Independent I
Schools, 23 years
K. Tai, Food Service Worker, Jericho 3
School, 18 years
E.M. Watt, Office Assistant,
Correspondence Education, 18 years
A.D. MacPhail, Photo Arts Technician,
P.E.M.C, 17 years
J. James, Equipment Control Officer,*
Post-Secondary Management ServS
15 years
H.A. Krueger, Instructor Corresponden
Schools, Home Economics Branch,
13 years
F.L. Savage, Education Officer,
Post-Secondary Program Services,™
12 years
A. Armstrong, Research Officer, Libral
Services, 11 years
E. Henry, Graphic Artist, Print Services
11 years
F. Witzke, Office Assistant, Scholarship!
Test Development, 10 years
H. Rowson, Storesworker, P.E.M.C,   I
10 years
E.A. Maglio, District Superintendent ol
Schools, 9 years
L.B. Beduz, District Superintendent of
Schools, 6 years
DECEASED
F.M. Neligan, Clerk 3
  SCHOOLS DEPARTMENT
The Schools Department is responsible for the overall directiSl
and administration of the public school system. Its mandate is to
ensure the high quality and efficient delivery of all school prograiJ
from kindergarten to grade 12. The department completed its   ]
reorganization during the 1980/81 year and now consists of four
divisions; School Programs, Special Education, Operations and   '
Services and Institutional Affairs. The functions of each are descri (
in the following pages.
Among the department's major activities during the year were \\
participation in the minister's forums, the revision of the
Administrative Handbook for Elementary and Secondary Schools, a
the growth to 68, of 75, in the number of school districts whichmpj
locally-appointed superintendents of schools. These and otherfl
activities and accomplishments are detailed in the reports of the
divisions.
DIVISION OF SCHOOL PROGRAMS
The Programs Division of the Schools Department is responsible
for the development of provincial programs for all pupils from   I
kindergarten to grade 12. The development and implementation!
curriculum and the assessment of student learning are major
functions of the division. It is also responsible for career programsn
modern languages services, correspondence education and
scholarship examinations.
Curriculum Development
During the 1980/81 school year the Curriculum Development
Branch continued to work with other branches involved in
curriculum-related activities. In particular the procedures already (\
established with the Learning Assessment and Program
Implementation Branches were further developed and refined, pj
Considerable progress was made in establishing a process with the
Schools Finance and Facilities Division which will ensure curricifflBJ
input into decisions related to equipment to support provincial**
programs. In co-operation with the Publication Services Branch, a  I
long-range costing of learning resources planned for implementatnj
over the next several years was successfully developed. This
projection will permit better planning of priorities, implementaffl|
dates, and budget.
20
 iring the year liaison was established between the branch and
B|r provincial ministries involved in producing educational
£ rials. A formal procedure was agreed upon which provides the
■wry of Education with the opportunity to evaluate all such
lifces, and a booklet listing materials developed by other
Bffiies for use in classrooms was published for the information of
Kiers and administrators.
Hiring 1980/81 members of the branch spent considerable time
Loving the curriculum development procedures which had been
Bfficed over the previous few years and a handbook about them
prepared. Continuing emphasis was placed on expanding input
■ the revision process. In addition to the large number of
bators serving on curriculum committees, many teachers and
bet and school administrators were invited to sit on advisory
(Sttees and to react to draft curricula at various stages of
Is lopment.
e branch's system for the evaluation of textbooks and other
Biing resources was revised and a kit containing complete
wmation about the process was published,
re implementation of a number of new curricular and learning
tsjrces was planned for September, 1981, notably in secondary
hical education, secondary music and secondary French-as-a-
I (id-language.
Baddition to these major revisions, the ministry made available
BBerature texts for use in English 11 and additional reading
■Bients in the elementary language arts area. Among
plications prepared to assist teachers were a series of physical
dation handbooks, literature and media resource books for
Boitary language arts, and an English-as-a-second-language
puree manual.
plview work continued in elementary and junior science,
pndary English, agriculture, writing 11, theatre 11 and 12,
Bffijarv art and social studies. Work was begun in the area of
BBnent, elementary fine arts, and science safety.
highlight of the continuing work in social studies revision was
development of a formal field testing procedure to assist in the
viation of learning resources. It is hoped this pilot will be the
a of a process which will become an integral part of all
lliculum revision work in the future.
I' e Curriculum Development Branch continued to improve
jHunication with teachers and administrators at the district and
:lol level. Staff members were involved with the Implementation
DfflB in orientation sessions related to new curriculum.
'■eer Programs
ireer Programs, which became part of the Curriculum
pelopment Branch, continued to support school districts in the
if s of industrial education, business education, home economics,
21
 L
Availability of
Curriculum
Materials
22
1
Availability of Curriculum Materials — 1
Sept.     80                       1 Sept.     81
; English Language Arts f§7)
lementary S
:hools'
Sept     82
(Authorized)
Lang. 3, 4-7
Spell 5,6,7
Novels 6,7
Diet 6,7
Anthology 7
Late Imm. (6,7)
Guides & Texts
Sept.      83
Science 1-7
Print Materials
Social Studies 1-6, G
L.A. 1-7 Guide; Reading Series
(1-7), Spelling Res. Bk. (2-7)
Language Series (4-7) (Pres.)
Resource Books
French (K-7)
(Authorized)
Language 3
(SPIL)
Spell 2,3,4
Novels 4,5
Diet 1-5
Early Immersion Guides & Texts (K-7)
I
Programme-Cadre (K-7)
Guides and Texts
Science (1-7)
French-as-a-Second
Language (K-7)
E.F.S.L. Guides and Texts
Science 1-7 Gde Update
Resource Books
Social Studies (1-6)
Fine Arts (1-7)
Fine Arts (1-7) Guldi
I and Resource Book I
Family Life Education
Kindergarten
1 Guide and Resource I
1°°°"
Availability of (B-12) Curr
English
En 11 Texts
Fine Arts
culum Materials — Secon
"■' "■' " — j
lary Schools'
1
En 8 Wr Texts
1  En 9 Wr Texts
I
En 12 Texts
Composition 11
Guide and Texts
Wr 11 Texts
French Immersion (8-12
Guides
En 10 Wr Texts
English 8-10
Additional Texts
Art 8-12 Guide &
Resource Materials;
Acting 11,12 Gde&
Stagecraft 11,12
Guide & Texts    "
Directing & Script-
writing 12 Guide &'
En  11 Texts
j
Vr 11 Guide
Music 8-12 Guide and Student Materials
Drama 9,10 Guide and Materials
French
Fr. 8-12 Gde & Texts
Physical Education 8-11
Programme-Cadre 8-12
Guides
P.E. 8-11 Guide and Teacher Handbooks
Business Ed. 9-12
is.
Business Ed. 9-12 Gde, Txts & Res. B
Career Preparation 11,1
2
Home Economics 8-12.
CP. 11,12 Guides
CP. 11,12 Guides             CP. 11,12 Guidesi
Home Ec 8-12 Guide, T
Ktbks & Res. Books
 nsumer Education 9/
(Biematlcs8-10
cial Studies 7-11
rah 8-12
mily Life Education
Ixnen's Studies
Ph. 11,12 Guide
Physics 11 Texts
I Sc 8-10 Guide/
j Resource Book
' Ph 11 Submental
Labs & Ph 12 Txts
Lab Man. & Res. Gde
Cons. Education
9/10 Guides & Txt
Resource Books
Resource Books
Science 10
Text Update
I Ma 8 Texts/Update
I Soc. St. 7-11 Guide
I Spanish Gde & Txts
lurricuium for Exceptional Children (K-12) — All Schools1
>.L. (K-12)
W.H., T.M.H. Program;
wve Indian Children
E.S.L. Res.
Book/Texts
Resource Books
Gifted
E.M.H., T.M.H.
Programs
Hearing Impaired
Resource Book
Native Indian
Students
Resource Book
| 'New curriculum materials available for the first time In September 1982.
ling and Falling
blic School
rolments
1977 to 1980 3-Year
Average Percent Increase
in Enrolments*
in School Districts
lal Kindergarten to Grade XII
bile School Enrolments September, 1980
mpared with September, 1977.
ce: September Form I
Wry ot Education.
23
 graphic communications, agriculture, work study-work experiena
metric conversion and career preparation programs. The latter alii
secondary graduates to earn advanced placement, post-secondary
credit or immediate entry into appropriate post-secondary trainm
Career preparation programs continued to expand, from 42
programs with 300 students participating in 1979/80 to 108 program
with 2,763 students in 1980/81. Fifty-nine schools in 35 school disti
were involved. During the year all school districts were invited to
participate in career preparation programs and the projection for
September, 1981, is for 191 programs involving 5,000 students in 7(
schools in 41 school districts.
Seven regional career preparation workshops held in the 1979M
school year at the school district level were duplicated at the pos'i
secondary level in 1980/81, with a total of 15, involving all post-
secondary institutions, being held. They included representative^
from the public, the secondary school system, the B.C. Teachers™
Federation, the Occupational Training Council and organized lata
The Schools Department and Post-Secondary Department, witffl
seconded staff, together developed curricula in mechanics, busm
and the hospitality industry. These curricula will be field-tested in
1981/82 school year. Eventually all career preparation programs ot
use curricula jointly developed by the two departments.
Business education continues to be an active program in seconc
schools and for many students leads to direct employment. Out o
the total of 2,763 students enrolled in career education programs!
were in business education. The total number of students in thea
business field was 98,283, a decrease of 7.6 per cent from 1979/80J
Industrial education courses also continued to attract large
numbers of students, with 152,018 in total and 1,331 in the new 1
career preparation programs.
24
 ie Career Programs section continued to recruit tradesmen (54)
[third-year students from the five-year university program (25) to
vide schools with well-trained industrial education and career
iparation program teachers. Training is conducted through the
IBry-sponsored Industrial Education Teacher Training Program at
Ifflniversity of British Columbia. The number of industrial
I cation teachers employed in 1980/81 was 1,231.
■ he home economics revised curriculum is now in effect in all
Iffidary schools. A specialist consultant was seconded to the
inch to review supporting equipment lists and to write
IRications for essential items. The number of students enrolled in
ine economics courses in 1980/81 was 100,398, a decrease of 5.3
■lent from 1979/80.
eventy-two school districts (including one class at Jericho Hill
iool) enrolled 18,734 students in the work study-work experience
■Ram. This represents an increase of 10.9 per cent over 1979/80.
|Krov/nc/ai Guide for Work Study-Work Experience is now in its
Indraft and will be distributed during the 1981/82 school year.
iHe handbook for teaching metrics, Metrics in the Schools: A
tmbook for Educators, was distributed to all district resource
: tres to be reproduced at the local level. This booklet is extremely
»ular and may have to be distributed in larger numbers next year.
fiugh the Career Programs section continues to assume
IIMnsibility for metric conversion within the ministry, metric
IBrsion in the schools, to all intents and purposes, is complete.
25
 Learning Assessment
The Learning Assessment Branch launched the 1980/81 academi
year with the publication of the 1980 reading assessment resultsH
assessment was noteworthy in that it was the first in the repeat c|
of assessments, allowing for changes in provincial performances
four years since the first reading assessment to be examined.
The 1980 report found B.C. elementary pupils performing welH
when compared both to their age peers four years earlier and iS
elementary pupils elsewhere in Canada and the U.S.A. Improves
in the comprehension skills were found to be particularly positivel
different picture emerged at the grade 12 level where overall
performance was found to be poorer than in the previous assessmj
in B.C., although it was comparable to other Canadian and AmeriJ
results for students of this age level. However, gains were found ii
all grade levels tested in such applied reading and study skills as
scanning newspaper items for details, understanding misleading!)
advertising, and using reference materials, all of which were
identified as weaknesses in 1976/77.
The report recommended changes in the policies for hiring teaal
and administrators so as to place an emphasis on skills required foaB
teaching of reading and better reading programs at the secondaryjl
level. It also recommended more in-service training for teachers.
Other recommendations called for a co-operative effort by thai
ministry and school districts to ensure that all students learn to rfflB
in the primary school years, and to place a high priority on
improving the reading skills of secondary students.
The results and recommendations of the assessment were used ■
the ministry and individual school districts to establish priorities fc
follow-up activities to address areas of weakness. These activitieSI
included a series of in-service sessions sponsored by the ministry™
secondary school levels. The third assessment of reading is schedulJ
for 1984.
The past year also saw the completion of a kindergarten needs a
assessment designed to provide a broad base of information on
which to make decisions concerning future programs for the
youngest group of students in the schools. The assessment surveyf
representative samples of kindergarten, pre-school and grade one
teachers, parents, and program administrators for their views on
current programs and future alternatives. Among the
recommendations presented in the report was a call for a revised
curriculum guide. Also recommended was the inclusion of a clear
statement of the goals and purposes of kindergarten, the place of
play in learning, and the role of reading and reading readiness in
kindergarten. In-service opportunities for teachers to establish I
continuing communication with pre-schools was also recommend ■
26
 h: report also urged that districts explore ways of including parents
rre meaningfully and consistently in school activities, and that they
Ifflite meetings for kindergarten parents to help them more fully
derstand the school and its programs.
he report is now serving as the basis for the deliberations of a
Idergarten curriculum committee which will be putting forward
pposals for a revised kindergarten program in the 1981/82
I demic year.
p'he 1980/81 year also saw the launching of the second assessment
{mathematics in all public and funded independent schools. This
cessment was designed to monitor changes in performance since
I: first assessment of mathematics in 1977, to survey current
Ipgranri status, and to provide directions for the future of
rthematics education in preparation for a mathematics curriculum
■Sin in 1982/83. In addition to monitoring student performance
■JEttitudes, the assessment also placed considerable emphasis on
bveying the opinions and views of parents, employers, professional
ijcators and other members of the public concerning mathematics
tnpetencies likely to be required for future generations. Reports of
p assessment are scheduled for release in the fall of 1981.
"he Learning Assessment Branch intensified its efforts to assist
kssroom teachers with the day to day evaluation and testing of
pdents through its achievement test bank. Over half a million tests
hre provided on request to teachers across the province in subject
||Kincluding mathematics, chemistry, and written expression. A
WMV of users of these testing materials indicated strong support for
I^fctivity and brought many requests that the ministry continue to
pvide these materials in more subject areas and grade levels.
enty-six tests are now available.
\K major undertaking of the branch was the revision of the
Social report cards. Following consultation with educators and
rents, the revised cards were finalized and were to be available to
Ijpls in the fall of 1981.
27
 Scholarship and Student Assessment Programs
This area is responsible for administering the Grade Twelve
Scholarship Program and General Educational Development Testil
Program (GED). The branch also issues transcripts for students vm
obtained secondary school graduation in British Columbia betwej
1890 and 1973, and evaluates secondary school records from outf
the province. During the school year the branch issued 3,179
transcripts and evaluated 167 records from outside the province
Scholarships are currently $1,000 each, with the top 20 Candida
receiving $2,000. To receive their scholarships, eligible students rri
enrol in a post-secondary educational institution. The ministry all
provides awards of $500 to one per cent of each district's grade 1;
enrolment. These awards are intended for vocationally-oriented
students enrolling in a post-secondary institution. During 1980/8i|B
902 students earned provincial scholarships, and a further 373 eand
district awards. The winner of the Governor-General's Silver Meal
for the highest average in the provinical competition, 96.23 per at)
was Krista K. Lemke, a graduating pupil of Burnaby South Senior i
Secondary School. The winner of the Governor-General's Bronze )
Medal for second place was Peter M. Kayll, a graduating pupil of <
Argyle Secondary, North Vancouver, who had an average of 95.65m
cent.
British Columbia continues to lead Canada in successful GED
candidates. During 1980/81, 6,649 adult candidates applied to wrral
the tests and 4,493 received a secondary school equivalency stand g
Program Implementation
During its third year of operation the Program Implementatioml
Services Branch provided increased support services to school   j
districts in the implementation of provincially-developed program
Twenty-five curriculum implementation workshops related to   I
recent changes in the programs for secondary physical education,
elementary language arts, and-secondary English were offered in
centres throughout the province. Through the co-operation of 1
superintendents of schools, outstanding teachers were seconded
from school districts to act as resource persons in planning and I
conducting these meetings, which were attended by 525 educator:
from the province's 75 school districts and from the faculties of J
education of the universities. Recommendations arising out of the
second provincial assessment of reading were a major topic of   i
discussion at the language arts and English workshops.
Priority in 1980/81 was given to developing and offering
workshops on the critical role of the principal in facilitating planm
changes in the school program. Staff members conducted worksjaH
on this topic at the request of nine school districts. In addition, thi
potential of telecommunications for reaching a wider audience wa
explored. In co-operation with the Provincial Educational MediMJ
28
 r
tre, videotapes on the revised curriculum in secondary physical
ration were developed and distributed to school districts. The
otapes, which received a very positive response, provide
Cation on the new curriculum and demonstrate the program in
in at pilot schools.
HgWicant development during the year was the offering of some
Wjce training directly to teachers. In the past, ministry orientation
m-service activites were designed largely for administrators and
Jlict staff. This year the Program Implementation Services Branch
Dated a two-year teacher in-service project on the teaching of
,v:en expression, to be conducted during the summer for the
ti stry by resource teachers from Richmond schools. This pilot in-
;eice project will produce in-service "packages" which will include
tj.otapes and print materials that can be used by elementary schools
pes for effective professional development.
[I hile the in-service education of teachers and administrators is a
tor responsibility of universities, school districts, and professional
lljptions, the Ministry of Education has increased its sponsorship
Bffisrvice training in priority areas such as special education.
Fds also have been allocated to support field-initiated in-service
HDOsals which are submitted to the Program Implementation
pices Branch.
: the request of school districts, the branch undertook an
pnsive study on the need for a provincial clearinghouse for
■Slum projects developed at the local level. Plans are now
Deplete for establishing this new service to school districts and for
Iflgrating existing provincial resource centre service.
Ii order to keep districts informed of the branch's activities, the
it. has maintained regular communication with personnel from
Hjsfdistricts. In addition, in-service meetings were held with over
Bffiict-based persons who are involved with planning educational
chge. As an additional aid to planners in school districts, a
eurce document entitled Guidelines for Planning Program
|n/ementat/on was developed and distributed.
Ividern Languages Services
I ie Modern Languages Services Branch is mainly responsible for
finch language programs and relevant teacher education, and for
TUiculturalism in education.
Ir the 1980/81 school year the programme-cadre de frangais (French
M;uage Core Curriculum) enrolment increased to 659 students from
Blast year. Fourteen school district introduced classes where ten or
pe students who spoke the language well enough to accept
irruction in it could be enrolled.
ie programme-cadre de francais is designed for Francophone
B ents. Because French is used as the exclusive language of
Ruction, except for the time given to English Language Arts, the
29
 a
students have the opportunity of achieving a high level of oral an
written French competence.
The student's level of oral and written English is also expectedH
be high because the English Language Arts program is continuous
reinforced by the English-speaking milieu.
The programme-cadre de frangais parallels the English Languag]
core curriculum from kindergarten through grade 12. It is not an
immersion-type program for students whose native language is
English, but is intended for students whose mother tongue is Freni
French immersion programs, on the other hand, are designed
primarily for non-francophone students and are introduced at
different levels.
Early immersion, beginning in kindergarten and/or grade 1, anc
continuing through the secondary grades, can be expected to   j
provide students with functional bilingualism by the time they   ]
graduate from grade 12. This means that a student who has
completed the program should be able to participate easily in Fre:l
conversations, take post-secondary courses with French as the   J
language of instruction, and accept employment with French as tl
working language. Enrolments reached 4500 in 17 school districts
during the year.
Late immersion begins in grade 6 and can be expected to provi
students with instrumental bilingualism by the time they gaduatejl
from grade 12. This means that a student who has completed thai
program should be able to communicate adequately in French, bi
would probably not be as fluent as one who had the benefit of e;y
immersion. In the 1980/81 year 192 students in four school district
were enrolled in late immersion.
French-as-a-second-language courses are aimed at developinjSI
basic French-language communication skills and offer an
understanding of, and appreciation for, French culture. Such cours
were offered in all 75 school districts at the secondary level and irif
school districts at the elementary level, involving a total of
approximately 200,000 students.
A new elementary French-as-a-second language guide was
distributed in May. The guide offers three optional entry points fc
school districts to introduce the program: at kindergarten, grade '9
and grade 6. The objective of the various entry points is to assist
school districts in selecting a sequential program based on specific
goals, objectives and learning outcomes which are best suited to
their situation.
A resource team of teachers began identifying specific ideas to
make up the content of resource books for elementary teacheraEM
French-as-a-second-language. It is expected that these books will '
ready for 1982.
The secondary French-as-a-second-language reading and literfijsl
guide is now being developed, for implementation in 1982. Teacbfn
are being consulted about specific input for both the guide and fi 3
30
M
 Finch Instruction Grows in Popularity
1975/76
B des all secondary correspondence enrolments.
it*: September 30 Elementary Minority Language Survey, 1975-80
September 30 Form K — Organization of Secondary Schools, 1975-30
W Programme Cadre
de Francals
Elementary Only
iiinthology being written for British Columbia schools,
p provincial multicultural survey was conducted to gain
■jrmation about the current status of multiculturalism in the
Ipols and to identify the major needs of school districts in the
fire development of educational programs and policies in
■fflulturalism. The results of the survey are expected in July.
uring the year French language support grant funds were
Bributed to school districts under an interim Federal/Provincial
Keement for Bilingualism in Education. The following programs
Pier the agreement were also made available to school districts:
Such Teachers' Bursary Program, Second-Language Study
Bowship Program, Second-Language Monitor Program, Full-Time
fciitor Program, Summer Language Bursary Program, Special
fleet Funding and funding for Language Training Centres. The
BUch programs co-ordinator and his staff continued to provide
pinsive consultative services to school districts in connection with
ffabove programs.
31
 Correspondence Education
The two main functions of the Correspondence Education Bram
are to supply educational services to school-age students who arel
isolated from regular school attendance by distance or illness, ancl
supplement curriculum offerings for students in secondary school I
The latter service is particularly valuable for students in small, rur<|
and northern secondary schools.
During the 1980/81 school year requests for services from the j
branch increased significantly. Registration of full-grade elemental
school pupils rose to 1,670, an increase of just under 400 from thel
previous year. At the secondary school level the increase was eveil
more dramatic with close to 22,000 course enrolments processed :|
opposed to just under 15,000 in 1979/80.
The branch also continued to supply services to the children o|l
British Columbia residents temporarily living outside the province!
Courses were provided for some 400 children in 57 countries. As ;
well, the branch continued to provide course materials for the 1
satellite correspondence school operating out of Dawson Creek.
In addition to school-age children, the branch provides servical
adults who wish to take secondary school courses for upgrading*!
vocational or personal interest purposes. Approximately 3,000 adul
took advantage of this service over the past year. This number has.
remained relatively constant over the past few years even though i
Open Learning Institute now offers similar services to adults.
The branch continued its program of course development in an;
effort to maintain curricular validity with courses prescribed for thf
public school system. Major areas of work this past year were ig
language arts field at the elementary level and in the business
education and science fields at the secondary level.
Education by Correspondence
16,565    16,486
14,830    14,805    14478
Secondary Course Registration
1973/74      74/75     75/76     76/77     77/78     78/79     79/80     80/81
Source: Correspondence Education Branch, Ministry of Education
32
Jl
 VISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
:ne Special Education Division is responsible for developing,
(rlementing and communicating policies and procedures on
IBs relating to the education of exceptional children. It uses a
tiding device known as the "special approval" — this year valued
biore than $26,160 — which allows the Ministry of Education to
Btribute to the shareable cost of school districts' special programs,
br 2,900 special programs approvals were granted to the 75 school
Hricts during the year in the following areas:
ilCIAL APPROVALS IN THE 1980/81 ACADEMIC YEAR
anentary Learning Assistance (K-7) 880.0
BDndary Learning Assistance (8-11) 512.5
pare Learning Disabled 130.0
ficable Mentally Handicapped 173.0
finable Mentally Handicapped 149.5
sure-Profound Mentally Handicapped 29.5
Bpital-Homebound 86.5
jsically Handicapped 41.5
lidential 8.5
Kially Impaired 56.0
Bring Impaired 91.0
Mstic 36.0
Bite Behaviour Problems 93.0
^abilitation 173.5
inate and Distance — Specialized 31.0
I Training for Moderately and Severely Handicapped 27.0
■Mi-as-a-Second Language 241.0
ran Education 186.5
lers — Specialized 44.5
P'AL 2990.5
I creasing numbers of severely handicapped children attended
Wlic school programs in 1980/81. Special resources were provided
c:hem through special aid grants to support approved regional and
■rfflcial programs, and through continuing inter-ministerial co-
Bration and the division's participation on the Provincial Inter-
|My Children's Committee,
ie Special Education Division continued to be involved in a variety
Jojancils and committees of an advisory nature, such as the
Jffir's Advisory Council for the Hearing Impaired. Also, in
Iffijction with the Curriculum Development Branch, a number of
jirtjittees have been at work developing curriculum guides and
pher resource guides. Among them are:
33
 • Mathematics Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Speech Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Life Skills Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Survival Skills Resource Guide for Hearing Impaired
• Visually Impaired Resource Guide
• Language Arts Handbook — Native Indian Children
• Educable Mentally Handicapped — Curriculum Resource G»;'381
• Trainable Mentally Handicapped — Curriculum Resource Gu/ffll
The division sponsored extensive regional and provincial in-ser :i
training activities, workshops and conferences for teachers, parenl
and special education administrators. They included workshops fo
teachers and parents of hearing impaired children and visually
impaired children, hospital-homebound teachers, teachers of aunl
children, mentally handicapped children, severely handicapped
children, teachers and para-professionals involved with native Iner
children, learning assistance teachers, supervisors of special
education, school principals, teachers and parents of deaf-blind
children, and teachers of children requiring behaviour managemtl
Regular inter-ministry discussions and co-operation continued il
the areas of speech pathology, the provision of auditory training
equipment, school health services, and programs for pre-school
handicapped children. With the assistance of the Division of Sp«3l
and Hearing of the Ministry of Health, the division continued to I
underwrite costs to school districts of auditory training equipmSI
and speech therapy programs.
 I rning Assistance/Learning Disabilities
||Sfi,rovincial Program for Learning Assistance/Learning
|ffiities was expanded as a support service to school districts. The
|ffify of Education awarded special approvals assistance to all
[ol districts for learning assistance programs and to 46 districts for
[;rams for severely learning disabled students.
pport services, including in-service training and consultations
jrding programs, were provided to districts by the Co-ordinator,
ning Assistance/Learning Disabilities.
Iffistry-sponsored in-service programs to provide in-depth study
Ijffactice for learning assistance teachers were held in four
||fis. The topics included assessment, programming in
lematics, written language and reading, peer tutoring,
Imtation, case studies, native education, structure of the intellect
Ijfflrning assistance in the secondary school.
ie preliminary planning and organization for two Regional
IJajonal Support Centres for children with severe learning
ISuities was completed during the year. These centres, located in
lliwack and Kamloops, will begin operation in September, 1981,
twill provide assessment and programming services to children
I severe learning disabilities who reside in the neighbouring
/e school districts participated in the final year of the primary
[ilopment project to develop a modified research project to
[stigate the use of early identification and intervention strategies
■[Kindergarten children.
L
35
 36
Hearing Impaired
The Provincial Program for the Hearing Impaired enabled 700
students to be assisted through school district special programs
and/or itinerant teacher programs. Support was provided to pare
and to the 90 teachers offering services to them, in 40 school    ,
districts. The ministry advised school districts on appropriate
educational placement and programming of hearing impaired   1
students through its own staff and through the Provincial Educati
Review Committee for the Hearing Impaired. Professional
development activities were organized for teachers and necessaS
resources, including the provision of auditory training equipmen
were provided.
Jericho Hill School
Jericho Hill School enrolled a total of 165 students ranging inn
from five to 19 years. Programs were provided in both on-campu
and off-campus settings, including the provision for 30 studentsfi
secondary classes at a Vancouver school district secondary school
(Kitsilano). The on-campus programs offered academic and pre-
vocational courses to 106 day students and 59 residential studerra
Students attended Jericho Hill School from all areas of British
Columbia. Day students travelled from Greater Vancouver school
districts, while 59 students from other areas lived in the school
residence, with frequent home visits.
In addition to its educational program, Jericho Hill provided a I
health care program through a contract with the Vancouver
Metropolitan Health Department. Services included continuing
medical supervision, psychological and psychiatric services, speecl
therapy, dental hygiene, nutrition consultation and occupational I
physical therapy. Audiological services were provided by the Mral
of Health.
The report of a committee to recommend future directions fori
school was completed and submitted to the Minister of Educatioi /
a result, Jericho Hill is to remain as the central educational facflral
the hearing impaired for the province, and it was determined tha
various aspects of its services will be expanded. An implementatii
committee has developed preliminary plans.
Visually Impaired
The Provincial Program for the Visually Impaired enabled over i(
visually impaired students to receive instruction in regular classes
with the support of itinerant and resource teachers.
In September, 1980, the ministry implemented a program of
orientation and mobility instruction for blind students attending
schools in the province. The program aims at assisting blind studtti
in public schools to acquire safe independent travel skills both|||
outside the schools. As of June, 1981, 85 students from 31 schotMjl
JJ
 I lets had been assessed and seen by the two orientation and
llflity instructors employed under a contract with the Canadian
ional Institute for the Blind. Fifty-four students received
uction.
Iffing the year the ministry continued to fund a Braille instruction
[ram for teachers, and aides, of visually impaired students. The
ijram was offered in both lecture and correspondence formats,
-service for the year included a provincial workshop for both
rialist teachers of the visually impaired and regular classroom
hers and aides working with such children. A number of small
Ijffars were conducted for school district personnel on specific
i such as orientation and mobility, the Braille Nemeth Code and
use of the abacus.
ie ministry has continued to support deaf-blind children
iding the W. Ross Macdonald School, Brantford, Ontario and
llEehool district programs. During the summer of 1981 the
llstfv will fund a summer program for eleven deaf-blind children
ie province under a contract with the Canadian Deaf-Blind and
ella Association (B.C. Chapter).
ie Provincial Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired lent
bialized instructional resources to the school districts. These
jded special editions of curriculum materials such as "talking-
ks," Braille books, and visibility enhancement devices for the
\wn sighted. The resource centre produces or purchases special
lat editions to keep up with curriculum changes and student
is. In 1980/81, 2945 Braille volumes, 5139 cassette tapes, 76 large-
t reference books and 146 professional textbooks were added to
collection.
Ilian Education
> meet the special needs of native Indian children, programs were
Iffied not only to develop basic skills but also to reflect the
ural, linguistic and social background of the children. The
iion supported such programs in 51 districts during the 1980/81
lemic year.
pgrams are usually implemented by school districts in co-
ration with the Indian community to provide native language
ling, cultural studies, counselling, tutoring and alternative
cation programs, as well as to engage native para-professional
kers, such as home-school counsellors and teacher-aides, in areas
'< a significant native Indian enrolment.
1980/81 the Indian Education program was upgraded to the
is of a branch under the Divison of Special Education, and a
mjng was made on a comprehensive five-year plan.
ie first of what is planned to be a series of resource books on
an education was completed and will be distributed to the field
Sail of 1981. It is entitled "Listen to What I Really Say — A
ource Book for Teaching the Language Arts to Native Indian
37
 Students, K-7."
For the first time, the branch carried out an in-service program!
directly in the classroom. The program, called "New Strategies iri
Indian Education," was given to some 50 classrooms throughout tl
province. Seminars were also held after each day on optimizing fl
environment of the inter-cultural classroom. A total of some 300:
teachers participated.
DIVISION OF OPERATIONS AND
SERVICES
The Operations and Services Division is responsible for monitdjl
field activities throughout the province, through both the
provincially-appointed district superintendents of schools and thai
locally-appointed superintendents of schools. It is responsible for a
accreditation of secondary schools, provides resources which assis:
with the assessment of elementary schools, and manages the suppj
systems for learning material distribution, printing design and
production, and media resource material. The division also arrangJ
leadership clinics and management seminars for senior educatiorSI
personnel in the 75 school districts. These functions are carried oil
by three branches: Field Services, School Operations and Support
Services.
38
Field Services
This branch is made up of two sections, accreditation and
professional development. The Field Services Branch maintains liaisi
with, and supports, district superintendents of schools and
superintendents of schools, and their staffs. It has developed a
Superintendent Selection Professional Service which is a consulting
service available to school boards to assist in the selection of the loil
superintendent of schools.
Sixty-eight boards of school trustees now have locally-appointed
superintendents of schools, and seven have district superintendeni
of schools — a major move to the local employment of
superintendents. Several school districts have their own full-tim«l
superintendent of schools for the first time.
During the year the Field Services Branch organized and
implemented a number of significant inservice and professional 1
programs for senior administrators in the ministry and the school
districts.
Thirty-two secondary schools undertook the accreditation proce
the purpose of which is to provide for a systematic evaluation and
improvement of school programs and operations. The process
—i
 Hives the school staff and administration in the examination
|the philosophical, organizational, curricular, physical and
iport services aspects of the school. External teams expand on
fijhternal assessment. They conduct a comprehensive assessment
i provide suggestions and recommendations for improvement,
raring the year secondary accreditation guidelines were clarified
ifBublished in a new booklet. A major revision was undertaken of
Hfcovincial elementary assessment materials. A new manual titled
Mff's Assessment of its Elementary School and School Materials
I be implemented next year.
hools Operations
"he Schools Operations Branch, established during the year as part
I^E ministry's reorganization, is responsible for the provision of a
ige of operational management services to school districts,
ticularly those related to general administrative requirements
der the School Act, such as general operation of support services,
BlPjistrict agreement, operation and resource allocations standards
IJKbjectives, and the issuance of various administrative bulletins.
Iipport Services
iupport Services is responsible for the Print Services Branch, the
lijfticial Educational Media Centre, and the Publication Services
IRh, which supply learning materials to the school system.
sport Services also ensures the appropriate planning, co-
IjBation, integration, and time-phasing of learning resource
terial procurement to satisfy the requirements of curriculum
nsjons and the introduction of new curricula.
plication Services
he primary objective of the Publication Services Branch is the
pehase, inventory and timely distribution of learning resource
[terials to meet the teaching needs of public and independent
ools. Nearly 2,000,000 kilograms of material were shipped during
year and, under authority of the Purchasing Commission Act,
oices in excess of $11.5 million were processed.
chool district textbook orders are funded through the Credit
'acation Plan. Adjustments were made to the plan during the year
[give small and medium-size districts proportionately more
:tbooks than in previous years, and to give school districts more
fponsibility and choice in the development of local priorities.
-hanges in the curriculum implementation schedule were studied
<h a view to improving delivery of textbooks. A long-range budget
:n for funding the curriculum materials selection was produced, as
►II as The Catalogue of Learning Resources, which lists all the
IjSibed and authorized titles available to schools under the Credit
pcation Plan.
39
 Additional savings were realized by having used or damaged rl
repaired by binderies in Surrey and Kelowna. In 1980 over 100,0(31
repairs were made at a significant saving over the cost of purchasl
new textbooks.
The branch also administers the School Library Book Purchase!!
under which a selection of books authored and published in B.c||
distributed free to every school library.
Print Services
Print Services is responsible for providing a complete range ofl
specialized publishing services to the various divisions of the Mini
of Education. Primary emphasis is on the development and
publication of new and revised learning and learning-support    ,
materials. The branch is also responsible for the development ofl
publication policy, standards, and procedures for the ministry. Taj
meet these objectives Print Services has organized a professional!
manuscript development staff comprising manuscript editors, col
editors, graphic designers, illustrators, proofreaders, and indexes
Two major projects conducted by the branch during the year w
the publication of Education: A Report from the Minister and tha
Administrative Handbook for Elementary and Secondary Schools.
Other projects include the newly-integrated language arts progra
for the Correspondence Education Branch; the elementary
handwriting and secondary physics curriculum guides as well as a
English as a Second Language/Dialect Resource Book for the
Curriculum Development Branch; the Boilermaking Manual for tj
Post-Secondary Research and Curriculum Development Branch; a
a series of French-as-a-second-language resource books for the sj
Modern Languages Services Branch.
Provincial Education Media Centre
Provision of media materials to support the goals and objective!!
ministry programs continued to be the major focus of the Provincl
Educational Media Centre. Priorities in the past year reflected
curriculum changes in secondary physical education, business
education and elementary science, for which appropriate materia
were acquired or produced, and distributed. Product informaticSI
was provided through the development of annotated media resoi.:
guides in the respective subject areas which aided teachers in   i
locating suitable programs keyed to the curriculum.
One of the major activities of the branch during the past yeaml
its involvement in the creation of the Knowledge Network of the
West. PEMC administrative, professional and technical staff played]
significant roles in the development of the network, and PEMC I
facilities, equipment, and program resources were used extensiveli
the preparation of the broadcast schedule.
Another new development was the production of teacher in-all
service video-tapes to assist in the implementation of new curriSI
40
 Iffirst set of tapes accompanying a new secondary physical
ication curriculum was tested in regional workshops and
| ributed to all districts in readiness for local workshops.
lire first catalogue for post-secondary institutions was compiled
IRlistributed in the 1980/81 school year. Cross-indexed, it listed
X) programs with specific application to courses offered by the
leges and institutes of the province. The resulting 20 to 25 per
it increase in demand for video-tape programs was met by
Iffifying and shifting the video duplication centre from the
naby Production Centre to the Richmond Distribution Centre.
Lo-operation with the Correspondence Education Branch resulted
he experimental distribution of sound filmstrips to primary grade
respondence students and the development of a video-based
logy course for use in small secondary schools,
he evaluation and selection of appropriate media support
terials has reached such extensive proportions that a co-operative
pmgement with selected school districts has been developed.
I^Sthis system classroom teachers are trained in evaluation
icedures and criteria. Under the management of school district
puree centres, teachers make preliminary selections of appropriate
Igrams for final approval by materials selection committees
Iblished by the ministry.
IVISION OF INSTITUTIONAL AFFAIRS
[he Ministry of Education's reorganization has resulted in the
rouping and strengthening of a number of functions and services.
™few Division of Institutional Affairs, which was established
rch 1,1981 and will become fully operational on August 1, 1981, is
bsult of this process.
l|BB3ivision is an outgrowth of the previous Administrative Services
lision. In addition, several other significant tasks are being
Hirerred to it, including teacher services, student affairs, and
Bgy/school district liaison.
he ministry's responsibilities pertaining to school district
'ernance, elections, boundaries, teacher salary negotiations, school
ECres and the school year calendar will be administered by the
I^Bivision. Issues relating to student discipline, attendance,
pension and exchanges also come under its jurisdiction.
Iffi establishment of effective two-way communication between
muiistry and the field, the clarification of ministry policy to
ool boards, and keeping the ministry informed regarding school
Iffit concerns and issues, is the primary objective of the liaison
-• In addition the division will, in response to school board
Irasts, provide advice and consultation concerning governance,
icy development and organizational practices.
41
 Elementary
22.47
Teacher Services
The principal responsibilities of the Teacher Services Branch
include the certification and decertification of teachers, dismissal
transfer appeals, and international and inter-provincial teacher
exchange programs. The director of the branch also represents tl
ministry on the Teachers' Pension Board.
The number of teaching certificates issued during the last schoc
year fell slightly to 3,677, reflecting a small decline in faculty of I
education enrolment at the universities, and a reduction in both
inter-provincial teacher mobility and teacher immigration.
.17.82
.16.86
1962 1967 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980
i June 1962 to 1967 (five year Interval*) — Depart
Education Annual Report*.
September 1971 to 1979 (single year Interval*) -
Ministry ol Education FORMS J and I.
Declining
Pupil/Teacher
Ratios
The reduced opportunity for inter-district mobility, a condition!
aggravated by slow growth or static pupil enrolments, has acceleni
interest in teacher exchange. Over 250 applications for exchange I
fellowships were received from teachers during 1980/81, of which)
resulted in foreign or domestic assignments. The Teacher ServicSB
Branch now administers 10 international and inter-provincial teacla
exchange programs. Twelve B.C. teachers received exchange
fellowships to Great Britain, 15 were placed in Australia, one in th
United States, one in France, and one in West Germany. Four
teachers and one principal exchanged positions with colleagues irj
the province of Ontario and one accepted an exchange assignmei
to Quebec. Sweden and the provinces of Manitoba and Nova Sco
have agreed to exchange teachers for the 1981/82 school year.   I
Teaching Experience of
B.C. Public School Teachers
Percentage of Teachers by Years Experience
Ik17-™
7.9%
£ 16.6°/
17.0%^^^
18.3%
H
14.9%^—
Years of Teaching
Experience
0-3
4-6
Years
&
15+
Years
..
M
1975                            1980
975
1980
1975
1980
1975
1980
1975
Source: Form J Sept 1975 -1980, Ministry of Eductl
42
b
 |S> branch is a
so responsible for establishing boards of reference
1 review commissions, as required under the provisions of the
00/ Act, and processes transfer review requests. During the
0/81 reporting period, five Boards of Reference, three Review
[Rjissions, and four transfer Review Committees were struck to
iew teacher appeals.
Teaching Assignments of New Teachers
leaching Areas*
Kindergarten
489
1 2991
Primary
1188
I     8121
Intermediate
1322
■ 10047
tmenlary Special
290
1484
1 Agriculture
3
Art
65
j    565
ilness Education
93
1    922
ome Economics
132
[    830
Guidance
16
450
Industrial
92
1       1220                                                                                                                               BBBHaaaaM
■^^^^^                                        All Teachers 1980  I
English
291
I    2358                                                                ^^HK
French
96
New Hirlngs 1980 1
759                                                                                         M^zSim
Ither Languages
10
I    163
Mathematics
197
I    2170
Music
35
367
Meal Education
198
I     1471
General Science
114
W127S
Biology
22
I    321
Chemistry
14
260
Physics
13
[   209
Social Studies
176
RLHJafli       W,
Theatre
31
I    328
alional/lndustrial
2
ess
23
Other
153
I    1810
condary Special
154
1           ~^^
880
* Individual teachers can be teaching in more than one teaching area.
Source: Form J, Ministry of Education
43
 Certification of Independent School Teachers
Total
No. Teachers
1307
12.0%
Certified by
Ten-Year Clause
1416
1350
465%
Certiltedby
Inspector of
Independent
Schools,*
415%
Certified under i.
B.C. School Acts
Spring 78
Spring 79
Spring '80
Spring '81
'includes Certified by Inspector with Restriction, Granted a One-Year Permit to Teacher, Volunteer Apostles
and Teachers of Religion Only as well as a few applications not yet processed.
Source: Independent Schools Branch, Ministry of Education
44
 H the 1980/81 academic year, 115 schools with 19,624 pupils and
■ 6 teachers qualified for support under the terms of the Schools
Voort (Independent) Act, an increase of six schools, 1,373 pupils
, 66 teachers over 1979/80.
[ uring the year 112 schools qualified for maximum grants of 30 per
L: of the average per-pupil operating costs of the public school
lifts in which they were located. This averaged $674 per pupil,
lie other schools qualified for the lower grant level, which in
11/81 continued at nine per cent and averaged $200 per pupil,
lints for the year totalled $13,022,306 payable in 1981/82.
juring the spring session of the Legislature, two amendments to
| Schools Support (Independent) Act were passed. The first made
Wsion for the payment of partial grants on behalf of pupils who
kiot attend the same school for the full school year. Previously,
§ y schools lost revenue because of the transfer of pupils both in
lout during the year. The second amendment reduced the
Iiired waiting period before new schools can apply for assistance
■<i five years to three.
IBpty-eight schools were evaluated by external evaluation teams
ing the year. Reports written by the teams to the inspector were
|msed with principals and other school authorities. Although
iiol evaluation remains a sensitive issue, the evaluation process
cinues to be refined in order to satisfy the requirements of the
tind at the same time benefit the schools to the maximum extent
dble and in ways that fully respect each school's independence.
Jfirluation process appears to be having a positive effect. In
|E>n to formal evaluations, school visits for monitoring purposes
h conducted.
i inual data forms were extensively revised during the year, and
tn on a new Independent Schools Information System begun with
■distance of the ministry's Data Services Branch. This new system,
feof the overall School, Teacher, and Timetable System being
kiloped by the ministry, promises to yield much useful
nrmation on the operation of British Columbia's publicly-
piorted independent schools.
growing spirit of co-operation and mutual assistance between
t'ic and independent schools was noted in a number of districtswtt
pe and more independent schools are cblbperating in the
Bilppment and operation of local and regional sports programs
parts festivals, and more and more public school districts are
ng available to independent schools their learning resource
feres, transportation services, and psychological testing services.
Rt
45
 POST-SECONDARY
DEPARTMENT
The overall governance of the 15 colleges and six institutes wfl
make up the post-secondary system is the responsibility of the Pc
Secondary Department. The allocation of funds to the institutjdj
carried out by three provincial councils.
The department is responsible for policy review and analysis,™
monitoring of college and institute operations, the co-ordinatioB
the development and administration of educational programs ami
the general administration of the post-secondary system. It proyll
staff assistance to the three provincial councils and maintains liaisi
with other government ministries and agencies.
The department consists of three major divisions and works clcj
with the other departments of the ministry.
One college was created during the year. Kwantlen College ]
became the 15th regional college when Douglas College was divi;
into two separate institutions. Douglas College is to continue send
the north side of the Fraser River — School Districts 40 (New   j
Westminster), 41 (Burnaby), 42 (Maple Ridge), and 43 (CoquitlaraB
Kwantlen College will serve the area south of the Fraser comprisi;
School Districts 35 (Langley), 36 (Surrey), 37 (Delta) and 38
(Richmond).
The launching of a three-year funding assistance program to
establish women's access programs was another highlight of the ;a
DIVISION OF MANAGEMENT SERVIC
Management Services consists of three branches: Operations^]
Planning, Institutional Support Services and Trades and Industrial
Training which includes industry-based training.
The division's major functions are to provide administrative
services for the Post-Secondary Department; manage the allocaral
budgets, both operational and capital, to the colleges, institutitSI
and councils; co-ordinate, monitor and evaluate the developmerd
the post-secondary system, including facilities, programs, policral
procedures; maintain liaison with other government ministries an
departments (provincial and federal); plan for manpower purchBI
and training plans; develop institutional planning and establish ar
evaluation process, and to fund and administer student aid progrjs
The division's manpower training section is primarily responsijjl
for facilitating the operation of the Canada Manpower Training!
Program in the province. During 1980/81 the Canadian Employml
46
 iimigration Commission spent approximately $39,000,000 to
base training in the province's vocational training system. With
Increasing demands for funds for specific manpower needs, the
tion has responded positively to ensure that the federal
gernment moves to expand English language training and establish
Iffljaining for Native Indians program successfully. Through a
fecial North East Coal Training Advisory Committee, the division is
[(working closely to develop a policy for meeting the labor
lljwements of this major development.
[iterations and Planning
lajor initiatives by the Operations and Planning Branch in the
f!)/81 academic year were in the area of five-year planning and
lire projections for the college and institute system. Projects given
|ftiority included the analysis of sector-wide five-year operating
elget forecasts (utilizing submissions completed by 17 of the 20
|l|htions), assessment of budget impacts of capital facilities plans,
n the review of educational plans submitted by institutions.
mong the operating tasks undertaken by the branch were the
kew of institutional by-law submissions and operating capital
wests as well as the preparation of materials relating to the
|mtive program and to the post-secondary policy manual.
ititutional Support Services
srmed in December, 1979, the Institutional Support Services
inch was assigned three major areas of responsibility: budget co-
pination and institutional analysis, management information
hems development, and student financial aid.
hie implementation of the Colleges and Institutes Act which
B?ned budget allocation responsibilities to appointed provincial
bncils necessitated a change in the budget process and increased
ir required analysis of institutional operations. The branch provides
t: support to the councils, and develops system and institutional-
|cj.fic studies in preparation for budget allocations.
major development in 1980/81 was the full implementation of
p Post-Secondary Activity Classification System in the colleges and
pvincial institutes. This improved classification system was
jd for both the monitoring and budget allocation processes,
pall clerical staff was established to collect enrolment,
|vk-load and financial data from the institutions
kor projects were instigated to improve
f ittitional and ministry data systems.
i the area of student financial aid,
It responsibility for the Student
H'ices Branch was assigned to
|jmtional Support Services,
f1 a policy review process
Kwantlen
College
Opens
New Kwantlen College
S.D.
35 Langley
36 Surrey
37 Delta
38 Richmond
New Douglas College
S.D.
40 New Westminster
41 Burnaby
42 Maple Ridge
43 Coquitlam
 was begun in November, 1980. The objective of the review was tl
assess existing policy in the light of changing enrolment patterns,
other new requirements of students seeking financial assistance. I
addition, a study by the B.C. Systems Corporation began which ii
expected to improve the processing capability of student service!
to produce more timely and comprehensive management inform
Trades and Industry Training
Many, but not all of the post-secondary institutions of British!
Columbia were involved in the delivery of full-time in-school
training to the 16,000 apprentices registered with the B.C. MinisfJ
Labour. Apprentices return to school for four to eight weeks in e
year of their apprenticeship. Eight hundred and forty-seven full-n
apprentice classes were conducted by the college system in 1980]
the highest number on record and an increase over the previous I
year of more than 28 per cent. Some 55 per cent of the apprentk
who returned to school attended the large Burnaby Campus of til
Pacific Vocational Institute for training.
With increasing frequency, industry in British Columbia has beil
seeking the assistance of the college-institute system in the
production of skilled workers and in addressing the bothersomell
shortages of skills that exist in the labor force from time to timt»l
colleges and institutes had been expanding industry services on s
cost-recovery basis as a means of assisting employers to train and
upgrade employees. Provincial industrial training consultants are.ll
housed in selected colleges throughout the province to assist    I
employers with the development of training plans. These provincl
consultants work closely with counsellors in the Canada Emplowl
centres. During 1980/81, some 13,000 persons were trained in   j
industry in B.C. under the Canada Manpower Industrial Training
Program with the employers recovering a substantial share of vS|
from the federal government and receiving assistance with the
training from the college/institute system.
DIVISION OF PROGRAM SERVICES
Over the past year, B.C.'s college and institute system achieve
new level of maturity, evidenced by the new programs being
proposed, consolidations occurring and redundant offerings bell
phased out. Seventy-one programs new to the proposing institffll
were approved and subsequently funded by the appropriate crS|
Probably two of the most exciting additions to the programs
occurred in the north and in the interior. Northern Lights Collegj
was given approval to offer aircraft maintenance and Cariboo i
College was granted approval and funding to start the province'sr
48
 lam in animal health technology,
jivo rather substantial supplementary funding plans were
U jemented. Early in the fiscal year the minister announced his
^cial Initiatives Grant, a $4 million increase in funding to colleges
IIinstitutes to tackle the twin problems of unemployment and
IJequate labor supply in specified areas. Following extensive
a lysis of institutional requests, funds were allocated to institutions
iollows: Lower Mainland, $1,929,932; Vancouver Island, $504,785;
linterior, $532,821; the North, $445,284 and the Kootenay's,
[#178.
the second funding supplement was for Women's Access. Some
$3,000 was given to colleges and institutes in the first phase of a
Eje-year plan to expand educational opportunities for women
thughout British Columbia.
IjQring the last three years the division has supported a variety of
Iffiives for the establishment and maintenance of a system-wide
pgram of professional development and institutional renewal for
tl colleges and provincial institutes in the province. Efforts in
10/81 were concentrated on the preparation of facilitators who are
bned to give instructional skills workshops at their own institutions.
pr 142 instructors have completed this training and the program is
fining successfully at many of the institutions.
pi co-operation with Capilano College a teaching techniques series
p'ideo-tapes and booklets was produced. This series provides an
boduction to various aspects of teaching through the use of real
Bractors in spontaneous learning situations with their students.
he Management Skills for Supervisors Program, originally
a eloped at the request of business and industry, is now available
badministrators in the provincial system.
mm
49
 Academic/Technical
The Academic/Technical Branch has the responsibility for assesii
provicial needs, assessing new program proposals, and making
funding recommendations to the appropriate council. The brand!
divided into four major program areas: health, human services a|
fine arts, business and science, and technology.
One of the major accomplishments of the branch during the ye
was the completion of a Task Force Report on Technological TraJ
in Engineering, Health Science and Related Fields. A variety of
recommendations were made concerning the need for new
graduates in all areas of technology and the distribution of
programs within the province in order to meet regional and
industrial needs. The report also included a number of
recommendations concerning standards and governance. This i-9
was released to the public in late June, 1981, for comments and j
criticisms.
The Academic/Technical Branch's curriculum projects included
assessment process for long-term care; a counselling package fol
Royal Nurse refresher program, an in-service package for instruefl
who will have handicapped students entering their classrooms, an
competency profiles for the social service programs, the licensegl
practical nurse program and the dental auxiliaries program.
Vocational Programs
The Vocational Programs Branch of the Program Services DivfS|
was actively involved with the Schools Department in the
implementation of the Career Preparation Program for high schoi
students. Extensive liaison occurred in establishing linkages in the'
development of a laddered concept of program delivery betweffl|
secondary schools and colleges and institutes. Three articulated*
programs were developed and more will follow in the coming ye,
A great deal of other vocational curriculum development occuK
during the year, but the major accomplishment was completioi™|
the new modular format for welding training. Final acceptanceffl|
new format and instructional process marked the end of a long
arduous journey, the result of which should be greater producfS|
and greater access to training.
50
 I
larch and Curriculum Development
Mbranch completed a number of program outlines in fields
ffing hospitality management, welding, core drafting, aircraft
itenance, dental auxiliary training, diamond drilling and practical
llflg- In addition, individualized programs in adult basic
t:ation, mathematics and communications, and a Canadian
Iffiints anthology, were developed.
;ogram Research assisted East Kootenay Community College,
i:hern Lights College, Selkirk College and the College of New
jjdonia with surveys and reports on their regions, and piloted a
Iffiuing vocational follow-up system on three colleges: Malaspina,
a Kootenay, and Camosun College. A version useful for the entire
k system is now being developed.
IBnler studies involved a women's access study for Northern
limlollege, a study to ascertain demand for junior computer
tt;rammers, and a number of curriculum validations and job
IBs studies.
3VISION OF CONTINUING
tuCATION
ie 1980/81 academic year marked a decade of steady growth and
Ifficant change in school district, college and institute adult
Btcation programs. Policy statements on community and general
Brest education, adult basic education and vocational education
Blither adopted by the Ministry of Education or are in the final
Res of development.
■Sessional development initiatives included the production of an
iwidualized adult education instructor training program, a
Brinuing education progammers manual and handicapped
Ivreness materials for use during the International Year of Disabled
ISBs. The first conference on lifelong learning for trustees, college
cd members and professionals was held in the fall of 1980.
IrKulation of continuing education programs and institutional
ps were two other areas of concern which received attention. A
e>rt on the Douglas College articulation with school districts was
Based, providing an example of role clarification. Selkirk College
I the surrounding school districts also initiated program
Iffition projects.
iuring 1980/81 the Division of Continuing Education continued to
II with the colleges and school districts to initiate, support and
pove the quality of adult basic education and English language
piing. The Continuing Education project system was used
;f rtively by many institutions to undertake needs assessments,
Wilop curricula, and implement innovative programs and delivery
y:ms.
51
 Two major curriculum development projects were completed
during 1980/81. One resulted in the publication of a document
entitled ESL for Adults: A Curriculum Guide, while the second  |
produced two publications, Adult Basic Literacy Assessment Kit,Wt
An Abridged Bibliography to Accompany ABL: Curriculum and!
Resource Guide. It is expected that these documents will have a  >
significant impact on the quality of education in these program aa
In the area of adult special education, with 1981 being design™
as the United Nations International Year of Disabled Persons it wir
appropriate that the division undertook a number of special
initiatives. A draft ministerial policy was distributed for discussion!
a special fund was established to assist post-secondary institution!!
introduce or expand services and programs to the disabled aduffl^
In the area of part-time vocational training, it has been recogml
that the demographic profile in British Columbia is changing. As
result, there will be a lower percentage of the population in the -
24 years of age group, which constitutes the majority of full-time
Continuing Education
Student Course Registrations by Program Type, 1980/81
225,223
Student Course Registrations
High School Completion 0.3% Q
Academic Upgrading 2.3%
English for New Canadians
Community Education
Vocational    34.0%
General Education    45.7%
178,548
5.4% High School Comal
2.1% Academic Upgradir I
5.0% English for New CaB
23.5% Community Educatl
15.0%      Vocational
49.0%     General Education
Colleges and Institutes School Districts
Source: 1980/81 Continued Education Annual Report (CE 120)
52
JJ
 ents enrolled in vocational programs, and a significant increase
i e percentage of the population between 25 and 40 years of age,
/I will require access on a part-time basis to learning opportunities
Blow them to upgrade their present vocational skills, and to
gilop new ones. To enable the continuing education system to
!t these demands, the ministry has initiated the development of a
|:y on part-time vocational training.
53
 POST-SECONDARY
COUNCILS
Under terms of the College and Institute Act three councils —
Academic Council, Occupational Training Council, and Managa
Advisory Council — allocate funds provided by the ministry to t
community colleges and provincial institutes and advise the Mm
of Education on non-university post-secondary education matter
ACADEMIC COUNCIL
The Academic Council has responsibilities for academic progr;
designed for university transfer, career-oriented technical progr;
and certain vocational programs given by the community college
and provincial institutes. It examines budget submissions and
programs proposals from these institutions, makes funding
recommendations to the minister, and allocates the funds availS
the institutions.
In 1980/81 the Academic Council set high priority on encouraj
the individuality of each institution, while at the same time ensffl
that overall provincial needs were recognized and met. It increa
its knowledge about the unique characteristics of each institute
visits, careful perusal of annual reports and five-year plans, anaffl
of statistics gathered by the ministry, and several research projeo
students in academic and career-technical programs.
The council enlarged the scope of its knowledge of employna
market needs through the work of its advisory committees andffl
attending conferences and hearings where federal, provincial, an
local needs and programs were discussed.
An Arts Advisory Committee was established during the year, ill
the Health, Computer/Data Processing, and Recreation CommrfflB
continued to provide critical suppport to the council.
The orderly transfer of credits between post-secondary institifflB
was actively fostered by the council's continued support of the 3
provincial articulation committees. Instructors from these acadenl
and career/technical programs meet once or twice a year to reSB
any questions relating to transferability.
OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING COUNH
The Occupational Training Council's function is to review
54
 I national programs, existing and proposed by the colleges and
|ffies. After a review of proposals, the council makes
Immendations to the Minister of Education with respect to
I ing. When the minister has established the amount of money to
nade available, the Occupational Training Council allocates the
(able funds to the institutes and colleges for the programs for
l:h it is responsible.
II Occupational Training Council, having completed its third full
I of operation, has become more familiar with the processes and
■edures required to examine both program proposals and
|Sjal considerations. Its nine consultative committees — for
Jffiture, communications and public utilities, construction,
|5y, hospitality, marine training, metal fabrication and
ufacturing, mining and smelting, and transportation — provide
ce regarding manpower needs and related matters,
ie council continued to operate and expand the popular
puter-based CHOICES program which assists school and college
isellors in providing career counselling.
rVNAGEMENT ADVISORY COUNCIL
he major functions of the Management Advisory Council are to
ew and co-ordinate the financial requests for the operation of
Instructional programs such as counselling, library,
|l8ffistration, and facilities, to make recommendations to the
l^er regarding those requests, and to allocate funds when they
llmanted by the government.
he council is empowered to establish committees to examine
Icial matters and relies heavily on committee work. This year there
|Kive such standing committees — for capital facilities, executive
iters, finance, library management and personnel.
h the last two years a system of collecting, reviewing and
Bfibling the various capital requests has evolved. The culmination
:he process was the production of the Second Annual Five-Year
hning Document.
» policy with regard to escalation of project costs was adopted
ing the past year by the Management Advisory Committee.
pMionary increases are now monitored by using a suitable index,
|.?are increased regularly to reflect the "current" dollar cost by
l$fct'
he primary role of the finance committee is to prepare for
broval of council annual budget estimates and allocations in the
hport service areas for all provincial colleges and institutes. In
iition the committee continued to monitor and advise on the
|K>pment of management systems, procedures and services
liirable to provide information on the college and institute system.
55
 The library management committee oversees the management <
the B.C. Union Catalogue which is administered by Vancouver ]
Community College on a fee-for-service basis. The catalogue was
made available in January, 1980 and uses the University of ToronS
UTLAS system. The 28 libraries using the catalogue include the 1
universities, colleges and institutes, and a number of specialty ':
libraries.
Studies of the feasibility of developing a B.C. Library Network I
with computer facilities in B.C. are being undertaken by the Prog
Planning Centre with the Management Advisory Council havingfl
responsibility for funding.
56
 IJCATIONAL FINANCE
IPARTMENT
lie Department of Educational Finance is responsible for advising
Iffiinistry on financial and budgetary matters and for developing
ii maintaining financial systems which support the delivery of
wcation programs and the provision of facilities. The department
trfaces with the central financial agencies of the government to
oi.ent the ministry's immediate and long-range fiscal needs, and to
-eond to central financial management requirements. The
jiartment is responsible for the ministry's financial arrangement
IHther levels of government and educational agencies.
lie Department of Educational Finance is organized by
llffiisibility into four divisions: The Division of the Ministry
Cnptroller, with responsibility for ministry financial management,
:hDivision of Schools Finance and Facilities and Post-Secondary
p nee and Facilities, with responsibilities for the provision of
hidings and equipment throughout the province, and the Division
educational Finance Research, with responsibility for the
instigation of major financial issues facing the system. The latter
w just being staffed as the year ended. In addition a branch of
Biget Development was established to assist in the preparation of
HBmistry's first zero-based budget.
epartmental responsibility for financial management was
aanced at the beginning of the year with the implementation of
pcomputer-managed financial information system. Long-range
alining objectives were served when five-year planning systems
lijejpped by the department were used in co-operation with the
btral financial agencies to strengthen ministry and government
iiincial planning in support of education.
Iwartmental endeavors to improve budgetary and financial
prting processes continued to produce more effective methods
W procedures, thereby increasing the ministry's ability Miscellaneous
lexercise appropriate expenditure control and
Buuntability. Over the year considerable effort
W devoted to working out satisfactory financing
aingements with the federal government for
Irbilingual education and English-as-a-second-
a;uage programs. The department initiated
Bfflnations into ways of improving the local
sool taxation system and into revisions to
tl schools capital financing system. The
Silts of these examinations should be
< wn in the next fiscal year
Sharing the 1980
School District
Budgets
Provincial Funding   I
Property Taxes
Residential
(net of Home
Owners Grant)
Sourc«: 1980 School OI*lrtct* Composite Budget,
Mlnlilry ol Education 1960/81 Eitfmate* Book,
B.C. Aiess merit Authority
37.1%
Direct
Provincial Grants
 Sharing the Costs of Education
in $ millions
$297.9
Property Taxes
(Net of Home-
Owners Grant)
$92.0
I Home-Owner
ftSrant
$460.2
Direct
Provincial
Grants
1975/76 76/77 77/78 78/79 79/80
Source: School District Composite Budgets, Ministry of Education Estimates Book
80/81
DIVISION OF THE MINISTRY
COMPTROLLER
The Division of the Ministry Comptroller is responsible for thai
development and maintenance of effective internal financial
reporting and control systems.
The division maintains liaison with various branches of the MifflO
of Finance, including the Comptroller-General's Office and Treastafl
Board Staff, regarding matters of finance and financial administrated
In addition, the division is responsible for liaison with the Auditors]
General's Branch regarding expenditure audits. It is also responsiti?
58
 Hnistry accounts, monitoring and maintaining records of all
^itures, transfer of funds, payroll and internal audit. It arranges
K distribution of monthly financial management reports to all
^ability centre managers who are responsible for budgets,
ling the 1980/81 year, the division completed a major project
lie successful implementation of new financial management
ro, introduced new procedures for budget preparation which
:d in the development of the 1981/82 estimates submission,
Iiced new reallocation procedures, and concluded a project on
Btion of authority. Late in the year the reorganization of the
iwy placed new emphasis on the need for the division to
gtrate on developing comprehensive internal accounting
is and identified the need for a strong internal audit capability.
VISION OF SCHgOLS FINANCE
IP FACILITIES
Result of the reorganization of the Ministry of Education
ing the last school year, the former Division of Facilities Services
the Schools Finance Branch were combined to form the Schools
mce and Facilities Division. The new division is responsible for
ffioring the expenditures of capital and operating funds and for
co-ordination and development of capital budgets for building
pica! facilities in all school districts.
W division also assumed responsibility for the pupil conveyance
Ransportation assistance program, formerly under the direction
^sDivision of Administration Services.
nee
Ire main function of the Schools Finance Branch is to provide
■Pal assistance to school districts through consultation and
Mg activities associated with capital and operating budgets,
^activities include analysis of budget requirements, calculation
E|tructional unit values, advice to government on a variety of
ping levels, recommendations for school property tax mill rates
the calculation of educational grants payable to each school
fict.
:hool expenditures for the 1980 calendar year exceeded $1.2
bn. The table on the following page shows how operating and
ital costs were shared between the government and school
ricts. (The same table also shows sharing between the government
colleges and institutes and the amount the government
tributes to the Teachers' Pension Fund).
Eenty-eight capital expense proposals were processed between
1,1980 and June 30,1981. Capital Expense Proposals provide
Bring authority to the school districts for the acquisition of
59
 capital assets. The actual cost is met by sale of debentures throuj
the British Columbia School Districts Capital Financing Author™
In 1980/81 the branch continued the process of developing fivj
year operating budget projections and a system capable of
generating key management indicators. These indicators provide
both ministry and school district officials with measures of
management efficiency not previously available.
OVERALL PROVINCIAL - LOCAL SHARING RATIOS
1975-76 1976-77 1977-78 1978-79 1979-1
19818
Schools
Shared
Operating
Costs
Prov. $396,165,710 $443,847,507 $485,802,995 $500,441,713 $561,126,637 $616,377,466      $   740)1
Loc. -112,983,794 187,528,964 227,198,892 300,183,304 308,710,718 335,067,677 424, ,t
Total $509,149,504 $631,376,471 $713,001,887 $800,625,077 $869,837,355 $951,445,113      $1,175jf
Schools
Local
Cost
Prov.
Loc.
Total
$        0
133,341,259
J,.$133,341,259
$        0
123,871,918
$123,871,918
$        0
94,866,24
$ 94,866,24
$         0
90,831,161
$ 90,831,161
S        0
99727,036
$ 99,727,036
$        0
126,066,514
$126,066,514
$
219, J]
$219,3)
Schools
Capital
Prov.
Loc.
TotaJ
$ 38,722,390
37,995,435
$ 76,717,725
$ 44,414,937
39,579,472
$ 83,994,409
$ 53,007,778
44,488,121
$ 97,485,899
$ 59,994,896
47,220,653
$107,215,549
$ 64,957,220
51,174,954
116,132,174
$ 69,177,738
57,025,006
$126,202,744
$ 76,?
68 J
5145,-4
Teachers'
Pensions
Prov.
Loc.
Total
$ 22,300,000
0
$ 22,300,000
$ 29,200,000
0 1
$ 29,200,000
$ 38,300.000
0
$ 38.300,000
$ 40,600,000
0
$ 40,600,000
$ 40,470,000
0
$ 40,470,000
$ 68,765,000
0
$ 68,765,000
$ 83,11
$83|
Colleges and
Institutes
Operating
Prov.
Loc.
Total
$ 86,000,000
13,589,000
$99,589,000
$105,180,000
16,800,793
$121,980,793
$117,901,000
18,328,900
$136,229,900
$147,475,757
23,149,725
$170,325,482
$188,958,367
0
$188,958,367
$213,056,584
0
$213,056,584
$253/3
$253,3
Colleges and
Institutes
Capital
Prov.
Loc.
Total
$    9,000,000
0
$    9,000,000
$    8,000,000
0
$    8,000,000
$    7,296,620
0
$    7,296,620
$    5,000,000
0
$    5,000,000
$ 19,750,000
0
$ 19,750,000
$ 26,750,000
0
$ 26,750,000
$ 38.JJJ
$ 38il
Total
(excluding
Universities)
Prov.
Loc.
Total
$552,188,100
297,909,488
$850,097,588
$630,642,444
367,781,147
$998,423,591
$   702,308393
384,882,155
$1,087,190,548
$   753,512,426
461,384,843
$1,214,897,269
$  875,262,224
459,612,708
$1,334,874,932
$   994,126,758
518,159,197
$1,512,285,955
$1,193,13
71231
$1,90531
% of                     Prov.
Total                       Loc.
(excluding Universities)
64.96%
35.04%
63.-16%
36.84%
64.60%
35.40%
62.02%
37.98%
65.57%
34.43%
65.74%
34.26%
IS
Facilities
The Schools Facilities Branch continued the task of assisting scrjl
boards in the preparation and processing of capital budgets.
Members of the branch visited school districts to provide
consultation on site acquisition, building standards, safety and fire
protection improvements and other matters.
The division approved 681 building projects during the year. TH
projects recognize a significant change in the schools capital seen:
Though overall pupil enrolment continued a slow decline,
elementary enrolments increased. This is particularly evident infll
such as the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island and certain intefflr
districts. The 1980/81 capital activity included a number of Sectior
217's (emergency funding) and mid-year Capital Expense Propo^
60
 iditures for 1980/81 fiscal year:
$   9,898.459
96,656,098
t 9,424,779
9,690,683
$125,670,019
^cations are that elementary enrolment growth will continue for
^foreseeable future. New facilities will be needed and the
Iffisment to upgrade aging facilities to current standards will
Ijmue.
Pinewood Drive Elementary School, Delta
IVISION OF POST-SECONDARY
MANCE AND FACILITIES
Ihe Division of Post-Secondary Finance and Facilities was formed
ling the year through the amalgamation of its former separate
i ncial and facilities services. Having the approving and funding
ISpsibilities in one unit undoubtedly led to a more efficient and
lictive process.
fiance
Curing the year the Finance Branch continued to play an effective
ijffi support of the operating budget system (Post-Secondary
Wity Classification Structure), and the capital budget system (Five
B Capital Plan).
Ijsstance was given in budget support work to the Management
'"isory Council and the Ministry Standing Committee which,
o:ther with the Academic and Occupational Training Councils, are
eonsible for reviewing, and making recommendations on college
u institute budgets.
61
 1
The branch's involvement continued in the cost-sharing
arrangements between the provincial and federal governments 1
related to post-secondary education.
Facilities
With the space inventory system well established, the FacilitieS
Branch emphasis began to move towards obtaining better utilizatj
of existing space. It will inevitably lead to a larger proportion of
capital funds being channelled into renovations and alterations^
existing premises and a lesser proportion to new space. The
preliminary data base for a simple computer system to control sp;j
use is complete and will likely be put into operation next year. I
During 1980/81, 17 major capital projects were approved withral
total value of $47 million, and a further $7 million was approved™
variety of renovation and public works projects.
Northern Lights College, Fort Nelson Campus
PVI Electrical Training Centre
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL
FINANCE RESEARCH
This division has just begun operation as the year covered bum
report ends. Its major assignments include an investigation of she
and long-term revisions to the educational finance system for I
schools, research connected with potentially new school distrieB
budget systems, and research related to federal-provinical fiscaH
relations in education, particularly in the post-secondary sectoB
62
 lNAGEMENT operations
'ARTMENT
I e Department of Management Operations was created in
nary, 1981 as a result of the reorganization of the Ministry of
iation. It is charged with providing leadership and direction to
foolicy and management processes of the public education
lip. The Department contains four divisions: Operations and
kagement Services, Data and Information Services, Policy and
liSive Services, and Research Services. Operations and
Itagement Services came into existence at the end of the year
ft; Research Services will be established next year. The other two
IRs were operational and transferred to the department from
tlr areas of the Ministry.
Iirjng the past year, the existing two divisions concentrated on
(ning the revision of the School Act and Regulations,
ISjIdating the policy formulation of the ministry, and developing
■Implementing many new data systems.
■Bury Board, Government Employee Relations Bureau, the
tl c Service Commission, the B.C. Systems Corporation and the
■Mjlding Corporation were the central agencies of government
pved with this department in the discharge of its responsibilities.
Ith the addition of the Operations and Management Services and
parch Services Divisions, the department will be able to become
Braitally involved in the management systems development and
■:, as well as longer term planning for optimum resource
Iffions.
II/ISION OF OPERATIONS AND
8VNAGEMENT SERVICES
e Division of Operations and Management Services is newly
Wed and is to provide conceptual, analytical and operational
Ipqrt in the development and implementation of ministry
telgement processes and a strategic overview in the design of the
aius systems.
Haccomplish these tasks the division incorporates three branches,
pagement Services, Personnel Services and a Project Planning
(ere.
Wiagement Services
W- function of the Management Services Branch is to develop and
h|!ment a wide variety of management systems and related tools
63
 including system-wide planning, assessment of the performance!
financial and administrative systems, monitoring and forecasting
systems for ministry and field-related operating budgets,
comprehensive auditing and program evaluation systems and a   I
corporate plan for management systems.
The main thrust of the branch is to play a leadership role in th !
development of ministry-wide systems and mechanisms for the stl
and effective management, administration and direction of prowl
education as led by the ministry in its co-management mode witHu
field agencies.
Personnel Services
The function of the Personnel Services Branch is to provide a
broad range of recruitment and personnel management serviciS
assist in the development of an efficient and effective work forceo
to ensure that ministry personnel practices and policies conform I
applicable legislative requirements and the regulations of the Pule
Service Commission, Treasury Board and the Government Employe
Relations Bureau, as well as the collective agreements in effect.Bl
branch also provides personnel consultative services to all minist ?
officials in terms of staffing and recruiting, classification,
organization, grievance and collective agreement administration!
labor relations, training and staff management.
During the past year a major focus of the branch has been its!
participation in the development and implementation of the new :
ministry organization. In other areas of responsibility the branch is
progressively assumed much greater responsibilities for staff
recruitment and selection, in accordance with the general Public :
Service Commission policy of delegating staffing functions to ]
ministries.
Increased responsibilities have also been assumed for job anaftl
position classification reviews and staff development, mainly as a
result of increased decentralization of these former central agenci
functions.
Project Planning- Centre
The prime function of the Project Planning Centre is to offer
project management expertise, tools and techniques for planniral
and controlling computerized and non-computerized projects to
ensure that they are developed on time, according to a clear plai
and to meet specific objectives.
Between 20 and 30 major projects are being managed by the
centre at any one time. In the 1981/82 year these included,
CHOICES, Career Preparation, Instructional Use of theMicrocrSl
a Publication Services Project, College and Institutes Capital
Equipment Inventory, Traffic Safety Project, Ministry Financial
Management System, B.C. Library Network, Occupational Trainin;
64
i
 ncil Requirements Analysis and a Word Processing Project,
ie direction of each   project is determined by a project review
jllmittee. Representation on these committees was very wide and
njded people from school districts, colleges and institutes, officials
Hie Ministry of Education and other provincial and federal
|»rnment departments, post-secondary councils, unions, and the
I Systems Corporation.
tie project planning centre also prepared discussion papers and
Isffit reports, facilitated the preparation of contracts for
IMltants and served as an information centre on project progress.
[IVISION OF POLICY AND
ICISLATIVE SERVICES
uring the 1980/81 school year, the complementary services of
acy development and legislative services were joined to form one
iision. Policies are derived from existing legislation. The need for
|iK>licies causes changes in legislation, and changes in legislation
m;e possible the development of further policies. The research
Imped with both policy and legislative development is very
lj^ related. In addition to their being complementary, both
pices require continuing and intensive liaison with other ministries
ii organizations about legislation and the policies which can be
pved from it.
ie legislation developed in the spring of 1980 came into effect
jTOroclamations in the fall of 1980. The amendments to the
ioo/ Act include improvements in the grievance and appeal
picedures for teachers, designed to provide increased informality
III at the same time protecting teachers' rights; permission for
pool districts to assist in the costs of educating a student outside
f province; the setting of December 1 as the date on which new
■■trustees assume office each year in order to parallel the
Bmeipal Act; and giving the power to cabinet to determine the
kuneration received by trustees rather than having the amount
kby legislation.
i unique and major influence on the development of legislation
Iroplicies during the year was the Minister's 1980 Fall Tour. The
■MSrian Smith visited each region of the province to determine
Bhtthe people of the province want and expect from the
(rational system. He held 41 public forums and 19 meetings with
j^'ts. Notes were made of all oral presentations, and where
ffically possible, the presentations were recorded. Nearly a
ihsand written briefs were analyzed. The 2,700 specific issues that
pi;e were divided into the following categories: Curriculum and
Bited Issues, Pre-Service and In-Service for Teachers, Personnel
■Irons, Children with Special Education Needs, Material Support,
En
65
 I rt
an
Independent Schools, and Major Concerns (which included
discipline, multiculturalism, the financing of education; scholars!?
awards, government examinations, libraries, access to student
records, and parental involvement in schools). This information I
been used, and will continue to be used, as a guide in the
development of legislation and of policies.
Following the tour, policy changes were made which did not 1
require changes in legislation. There have been, for example,
changes in the policies governing approval for capital expenditures
space allotments, and in prescribed and authorized courses. The
policies in the new Administrative Handbook for Elementary and   '
Secondary Schools were particularly influenced. In some instances*
the message from the forums was to leave certain policies aloneM
Some amendments to the School Act were made in the spring c
1981 and more will follow. The minister can now establish the
methods and the symbols to be used in reporting pupil achievemerr
In addition, the Independent Schools (Support) Act was amended 3
that independent schools can now register for grant purposes at tl
end of three years instead of five and a new pupil equivalency   j
formula was worked out to replace the former minimum 135 daysill
attendance rule.
One theme which will be of great significance to this division |
emerged with regularity during the minister's fall tour. It is the nenJ
to reassess and reaffirm the mandate of the public school system. .
During the next year this is likely to lead to the development of ni'
legislation and of the policies which can be derived from it. Reseats
to support this major effort has already begun.
Finally, the regulations to the former act, The Public Schools Act
has been updated and revised.
DIVISION OF DATA AND
INFORMATION SERVICES
The Division of Data and Information Services co-ordinates
ministry-wide activities in the areas of data operations, data projec
development, system assurance, system security. Statistical ServiSI
Information Services, the Ministry Library, and public relations. Ml
major mandate is to develop policies, standards, systems and
processes which meet not only the general operating data and  1
informational needs of the ministry and its field delivery systemSJ
agencies, but also to convert this information into a managemerMJ
resource for purposes of analysis, decision making and strategioJJ
planning. To fulfill this mandate the division co-ordinates the
functions of the Data Services Branch, the Information Services
Branch and the Ministry Library.
The division provides data and information services required by
66
 ir
■ffliistry for cost-effective planning, administration, and the
aigement of the education system. With the data-related side of
Mandate, the division interfaces with the B.C. Systems
ooration, the B.C. Research Council and other government and
3 government organizations involved in data services. It also co-
Kites with Statistics Canada, the B.C. Statistics Bureau, and the
lies committees of the Council of Ministers of Education,
a da. In its information-related functions, it is the Ministry's
lisentative with the Government Information Services and the
j c media.
/najor responsibility of the division is the custody and release of
Itmation. Because of changing technology, the Data Release
iV, which explains to other jurisdictions and organizations how
hs can be obtained to current and historical data, is continually
pr review. A major revision was undertaken in the past year to
re judicious access while at the same time protecting individual
j , to privacy.
a Services
H; year marked the reorganization of the responsibilities of Data
!r:es into three distinct areas: data development, data operations
Btatistical services. The major function of the branch is to collate these three areas of activity and provide overall data
t.es to other ministry branches. It acts as the central contact
pcding technical assistance to the ministry, school districts, and
bisecondary institutions, assisting in computerized system
bopment, processing data and providing management reports,
piical analyses and publications. Data Services also monitors the
BMf's computing charges and identifies cost-saving procedures or
Rfflient.
1: Data Services Branch identifies management information
brements, ensures that systems are developed and integrated to
e those needs, processes data in the most expeditious manner,
provides the capability to generate special reports and analyses
b ;mand.
pi Development
U Data Development section is responsible for determining and
p-'dinating the data requirements of ministry program areas and
tr educational agencies and for improving data and information
smse capabilities and data bases. During the year the section
Mnued its work with the B.C. Research Council and the B.C.
'Srns Corporation in the enhancement of present systems and the
opment of new systems to meet the ever-increasing demands
If nd complexity of, information needs.
{ensuring the application of established procedures,
©mentation and integrated systems design, compatibility and
p
67
 non-overlapping data collection throughout the ministry is achiea
To this end, a data dictionary was initiated as well as a ministry fS
catalogue.
For the past year, system development by the Data Services Bra
has concentrated on the entry and retrieval of schools data throifl
STATS (School, Teacher, and Timetable System) which will replacl
Forms I, ) and K (enrolment, teachers and course organization   j
forms). In addition, the manual editing of forms has been reduce
eliminated because computerized editing is conducted as the dal
entered at a terminal. File structures have been redesigned to aim
the use of data elements in various files simultaneously, improves
the reporting capabilities. In addition to STATS, other system projl
were developed for independent schools, special education, and
personnel services.
Data Operations
A goal of the data services branch has been to provide all useffl
with direct access to data. Modern technology is making it ever rr
possible for "users" to have this direct access to data banks, enter]
and retrieving data at will. During the year hardware was set up u
various parts of the ministry to provide this direct access. For
example, a Northern Telecom 445 processor with five data entryH
terminals was installed to allow data entry and retrieval of Septeffl
30 schools data from the STATS system by November as opposed!
February in previous years. This faster turnaround will allow Da™
Operations to provide management information in a more timely
manner.
This ease of access, however, has made it even more necessafjBJ
control the quality of the data being entered, and to achieve a hiii
level of data security. New systems, therefore, have been designs:
with sophisticated editing capabilities. A data security system guar
access to data and logs daily which user obtained access to, or tri<
to obtain access to, particular files.
Statistical Services
The Statistical Services section provides statistical and analytic™
services for the preparation of studies, reports and surveys. DurHL
the year it was decided to cease distributing large numbers of copa
of statistical tables. In their place a service has been provided    ]
whereby the specific needs of ministry managers or individuals ors
groups in the school districts or post-secondary institutions are mi
In the past year examples included a detailed analysis of a
kindergarten testing program, a report on the hiring of new teach's
and an analysis of the implications on the teaching force of
curriculum changes.
The installation of new terminals and redesigned file structures*
68
 Jo STATS development has given a greater capability for
ding to requests for data and statistical analyses. An indexing
Imd a statistical library were designed and organized allowing
raentification of existing statistical reports and programs, and
Ring any duplication of service.
lhange in the character of the functions provided by Statistical
ices underlines the radical changes which are taking place in the
if information. The change tends to be from "what is or what
|ffi>wards "what will be if." With correlation of files and the
ling ease of direct access to data, the Statistical Services Section
ling the ground work for even more specialized and
JSicated applications which will assist the ministry in policy
■sis and decision making.
urination Services
e Information Services Branch in 1980/81 continued to serve the
istry's requirements in maintaining internal lines of
Imunication and providing the public with information about
[ilopments in education.
[ratal of 64 news releases were issued during the year and articles
IKiture stories were developed for the monthly publication,
lation Today, which again won an award of distinction for
Iraon publications in a U.S. competition. The annual report for
/80, produced by the branch, also received an award of
■Bon.
Irastaff newsletter, Bonus, was expanded during the year to
rde special reports on various ministry branches as well as
Iffing on events and personalities in the ministry.
Iffier Information Services activities included support, through
[s releases and articles, for the public and professional forums
IBiroughout the province by the minister, as well as publicizing
[inauguration of the Knowledge Network of the West and the
Ipjroject on the use of microcomputers in the classroom.
Brodition. Information Services mounted an ambitious exhibit at
|>©:ific National Exhibition featuring a display and demonstrations
rhe use of microcomputers in the classroom. The branch also
td as co-ordinator for a major PNE exhibit by several colleges and
limes.
[formation officers in the branch maintained liaison with school
■IMS, colleges, institutes and others in the field of education
1 ugh professional associations such as InformEd, the National
pol Public Relations Association, National Association of State
nation Department Information Officers, and the National
lircil for Community Relations.
ie branch continued in 1980/81 to provide editorial and graphic
pices to other sections of the ministry, and published a series of
THres and pamphlets to this end.
69
 Ministry Library
During the past year the ministry library converted its holdingal
from a card catalogue to a computer-produced microfiche cataffll
using the services of the University of Toronto Library AutomatSI
Service and Special Libraries Cataloguing Inc. of Vancouver.
Microfiche copies of the catalogue, with regular updates, are no\
available in various ministry locations in Victoria and Richmond.
Plans were also developed to consolidate all ministry publicatioffl
into a separate government documents collection which will be
catalogued on microfiche.
Special efforts to better serve school districts and other field st;
through more customized information retrieval and inter-librarM
services were made during the year, and studies were initiated in
the possibility of providing on-line retrieval services for all staffBJ
A brochure explaining the nature and availability of the library'
new services was prepared for printing. Through its membershH
the B.C. Union Catalogue, and its close co-operation with other
education-oriented libraries and research institutes in British
Columbia, the library was able to improve its support services toB
research activities of the ministry.
70
 JCIAL REPORTS
Minister's tour
toon after his appointment as  Minister of Education in November,
h9, the Honourable Brian Smith announced his intention of
Ifflcting a personal survey of what he called "the vast enterprise
the education system in B.C." His purpose was to ascertain the
iirations of educators and the public alike for the education system
ihis province.
IR minister first made a series of visits to several school districts
llftommunity colleges in the early months of 1980. Those sojurns
i) the field gave him a quick reading of the diversity of the system
|ffihe need for mutual understanding and co-operation to develop
Iffitential.
|Wrisits were very informal and consisted mainly of meetings with
i Jents, teachers and administrators going about their daily routine.
[ffesults were so positive that they strengthened his resolve to
Iffiict a major and comprehensive series of public and professional
[ffiis throughout the province. He said that no major changes
<uld be made in the School Act, nor in the Administrative Guide to
tientary and Secondary Schools, until the hearings were
iroleted, an account published, and trustees, teachers and other
ups given an opportunity to comment.
K forums — 41 in all plus numerous meetings with students —
Wield in the fall of 1980 and some 2,700 recommendations were
Wed. Subsequently the minister published a report on the
urns in which he outlined more than 100 specific changes which
had made already or set in motion.
jwthe report the minister remarked on the value of his province-
^Kour.
^included that it should not be a one-time venture. The
mess and quality of advice that I received has hopefully been
Red in the report. I feel that it is valuable for a Minister of
Ration to visit the field regularly and listen to the educators, the
dents, and the public. Consequently, I plan further visits on a
;ular, though necessarily more limited, basis each year."
71
 MICROCOMPUTERS IN EDUCATION
A pilot project to explore the use of microcomputers in pubTS
school classrooms was implemented by the Ministry of Education
September, 1980.
One hundred Apple II microcomputers were installed in 12 sch
districts at a cost of approximately $200,000 in order to obtain
information about the value of the microcomputer as a
teaching/learning aid for instruction, tutorials and enrichment, an
to develop computer literacy among students — knowledge of hci
computers work and how they affect everyday living.
The microcomputers were used 48per cent in elementary schoi:
31 per cent in junior secondary schools and 21 per cent in senior
secondary schools. About 39 per cent of usage was for tutorial ami
special education, 28 per cent for enrichment, and the remaindSI
general literacy and computer science studies.
The approach used in the British Columbia pilot project on thai
instructional uses of microcomputers has been described in an ami
by Annette Wright, research associate at Joint Educational
Management and Carl Daneliuk, Assistant Deputy Minister,
Management Operations, Ministry of Education. Following are 1
excerpts from that article published in Education Canada and somi
conclusions from the Ministry of Education discussion paper on th
subject.
As have other provinces, British Columbia has found particular
difficulties with traditional computer-delivered education.
Geographically remote communities wanting to participate in time
sharing systems have to contend with (among other things) the lac
of high speed transmission lines (or even the lack of adequate phc
services); transmission breaks (particularly between Vancouver Islai
and the Mainland); transportation problems and difficulty of acragj
for suppliers and system breakdown specialists, and problems wffl
getting participants to one place at one time for meetings.
For all these reasons, and a few more, there is often a feelingHJ
the business and economic centres of the province have benefited
from educational experiments to a far greater extent than the large
but sparsely populated region which constitutes the rest of the J
province. This has often been true and the feeling that large pairo
the province do not participate is difficult to overcome.
Why?
The impetus for integrating computer-oriented activities into
school curricula has arisen from two major sources: the need to ,|l
educate students about computers in general — their pervasivenes
in society, their advantages and drawbacks (in short, computer   ]
literacy); and the potential use of microcomputer hardware and l|
72
 (are as tools in the instructional process.
/nore immediate reason to develop a project in British Columbia
i hat the introduction of microcomputers was happening anyway.
|mber of teachers had acquired machines and were
l-imenting with them in school. More significantly, computer
lyists among the students were becoming very skilful in using
^computers. The gap between the "computer literate" and the
kiputer ignorant" seemed to be widening and a strong feeling
lijpwing that only the school system could take the responsibility
llfroducing students to computers in a reasonable, economical
kiducationally sound way.
/the first step, what was needed for preliminary investigation and
tort had to be identified and the mechanisms to maintain this
[ort had to be established within a framework acceptable to the
iitry and the field.
la province-wide effort, regular channels of communication were
pitial so that classroom teachers could take advantage of the latest
loest which microcomputer-augmented instruction had to offer.
Bsfore the project team published a monthly newsletter entitled
ISscope which allowed for the exchange of information of
Biological development, in-service opportunities, conferences,
pming events and microcomputer applications.
be pilot project was known as the Instructional Use of
liocomputers Project, and its successes so far are in large part due
Iffiing the expertise available in the field to maintain the
B-Sry support mechanisms. For example, many teachers had
HJssed interest even before the project was launched. The final
kltion of participants was made from those who had already
73
 expressed a commitment and interest. In-service was provided
project team, but was, and still is also being offered by universm
and colleges. Co-operating in the project are the Ministry of
Education, the B.C. Systems Corporation, schools districts, schcB
universities, colleges, other educational agencies and computej
agencies.
Response to the project has been enthusiastic and many teachfl
are requesting more equipment and the chance to diversify thai
of it. Attention is also turning to special needs applications — fo..
handicapped or learning disabled children, for example, and for
school administrative purposes or classroom management.
A search of the literature regarding the instructional use of
computers has revealed that for the most part, researchers are   '
generally optimistic about its future in education. They feel that a
hardware problems are being dealt with. However, it is also gentl
accepted that the problem of ensuring an adequate supply of qui
courseware and of training teachers how to use the computer in 1
effective manner will continue to impede the widespread integral
of computer technology into the school system. It is also general
accepted that solving these problems is going to be expensiveBB
Until the research can be more specific, it seems reasonable tn
the resources of institutions, schools and ministries should
concentrate their efforts on areas where computer-assisted
instruction has proven itself to be both effective and cost effecffll
report to the Alberta Department of Education, noted that "thSI
students who will benefit most from computer-assisted instructSI
are those for whom the patience and repetitiveness of the coniBI
are of great assistance in their learning, those who require indivh
attention, those who for some reason have failed to learn in thai
regular classroom environment, those who feel inadequate and
inferior and do not seek help from a teacher for fear of displa™|
their ignorance, those who do not have ready access to schools
those studying subjects in which the computational and informati
processing power of the computer enhance learning."
They said that computer assisted learning must be given timeffl
evolve while courseware builds up and irrational fears of compM
are overcome. In this way, they believe that "computers shoulcBJ
naturally find their place in the educational system."
74
 KNOWLEDGE NETWORK OF THE
5T
ie challenge of getting British Columbia's Knowledge Network of
■West on the air has been likened to a combination of starting a
( college and a major television station at the same time. The fact
l only four months elapsed between the time the first full-time
h members settled into their offices and the network's first day of
•{ramming Jan. 12, 1981, was phenomenal.
ie Knowledge Network of the West Communications Authority is
rducational television system which co-operates with the various
Ijational institutions — school districts, universities, colleges, and
T'incial institutes such as the Open Learning Institute — in the
i/ery of their programs via satellite and cable television to isolated
kple throughout the province.
was a long road from an idea in the mind of the Minister of
I'ersities, Science and Communications, Dr. Patrick McGeer, to
nestablishment of an educational telecommunications system in
■sh Columbia. It required extraordinary co-operation between the
e of Dr. McGeer's ministry and that of the Minister of Education,
f. Brian Smith. WitK&it their foresight and perseverance — not to
hition government funding — the whole idea would have remained
■ a dream.
liBfirst task, the selection of someone to lead the enterprise, was
hie easier by the availability of Dr. Walter Hardwick who had just
feed as Deputy Minister of Education. Dr. Hardwick's appointment
May, 1980, as chairman of the board and president provided the
IjSrk with the credibility needed to attract very special people.
nee the network had been formally established as a non-profit
cety on May 29,1980, Dr. Hardwick began assembling a small team
|(:h had to combine expertise in both education and
fecommunications — a combination not very common. Operating
piof leased offices in a World War II army hut on the University of
Kdria campus, its members began arranging for programming,
pnical facilities and program sponsorship by the various
licational institutions in the province. By the Jan. 12 sign-on there
|v a weekly schedule of 77 hours of programming, 55 hours of
Ivch was offered for credit by universities, colleges, provincial
p tutes and school districts.
■ffi of the major tasks was arranging sponsorship of Knowledge
pwork telecourses and interactive sessions by educational
luitiitions across the province. The key to this was helping
Bifjonal campus-oriented educators learn to think in terms of a
Bjffle, innovative open-learning system.
ie first element is the students and the public, without whom the
75
 1
whole system would have no reason to exist.
The second element is the educational institutions, the frontillB
an open-learning system. They provide the courses, supplies, tutcai
and administrative arrangements and ensure that students have tl
resources they need to secure a full learning opportunity.
The third element is the network itself. As a carrier — a utility •,
the Knowledge Network transmits by television and also serves as;
pool of technical expertise to assist the educational institutions to :
provide the programming through their sponsorship of telecoursal
and interactive sessions on the network.
The development of the network would have been impossiblaB
without the encouragement and support of educational institutSB
and government agencies, including the British Columbia Institutoi
Technology, North Island College, Vancouver Community Colleffil
the University of Victoria, the University of British Columbia and e
Provincial Educational Media Centre. The federal Department of
Communications provided the key communications link, Canada'!
Anik-B satellite.
The province's mountainous terrain and widely dispersed
population have always been barriers to access to education, but
Anik-B, located more than 30,000 kilometres above the equatoiBJI
provided the perfect means of overcoming topography and shrfHll
distance. It allowed the Knowledge Network to beam into
communities large and small. For the first time, educators were at1
to economically substitute instant communication for transportaljl
Through co-operation among the network, the community
colleges, school districts and B.C.'s cable operators, more than 40
communities had Knowledge Network programming within theBJI
three months.
Future plans for the network include a microwave and cable  |
closed-circuit television system linking the three universities, the
teaching hospitals in Vancouver and Victoria and other selected™
facilities.
There are also plans for a second satellite system which will be
used for professional and educational purposes. Other technologil
innovations under consideration for the Knowledge Network inclie
slow-scan television and tele-text communications.
76
 pwledge Network Centres
O Whllehorse (Yukon)
O Dawson Creek
O Kamloops
Campbell River Q       q Powell River
Kelowna
Gold River O
O Courtenay
Port Alberni O
Nanaimo O
West Vancouver    ^^^^^^
North Vancouver    Q Kelowna
Port Moody
Coquitlam
Port Coqultlai 	
Pitt Meadows _/>>0 Frultvale
Maple Ridge      Rowland O**^ Oasis
|k™  Warfletd   Tralt^BaBBB.™
O Nelson     Q cranbrook
Saanich
Oak Bay
Victoria
Esquimau
83 BN:
Westminster
Richmond
Surrey
Delta
White Rock
77
 YOUNG ARTISTS OF BRITISH
COLUMBIA
The Second Biennial Exhibition featuring works by young Bril
Columbia artists was organized by the Outreach program of thai
Emily Carr College of Art and Design with the assistance of the   I
Ministry of Education and the Vancouver School Board through tl
use of the Teachers' Centre.
The exhibition which featured 199 paintings, photographs, and]
drawings selected from thousands of works submitted by young ll
artists varying in age from 3 to 18 years, had its first showing at tfcl
Robson Square Media Centre in Vancouver and then travelled toi
other cities throughout the province.
This special section of the annual report features a selection frc
that exhibition which was described as important because of its
promising optimism and zest for living.
 >aul Barron, age 17
'ancouver
iusan Chambers, age 13
iummerland
Erin Perry, age 5
Victoria
Shelley Davles, age 18
Vancouver
79
 Jean Kwan, age 12
Vancouver
Suzanne Taskinen, age 15
Kitimat
Ingrid Hansen, age 17
Summerland
Maureen Brown, age 14
Vancouver
sleeping crtiLD
80
 r
Mo rag Northey, age 17
Port Moody
Sally Brown, age 17
Vancouver
imie Fielder, age 14
81
  t Yano, age 13
Moody
\%
Gary Stasiuk, age 13
Richmond
83
   College and Main
Campus:
CAMOSUN COLLEGE
Victoria
CAPILANO COLLEGE
North Vancouver
CARIBOO COLLEGE
Kamloops
COLLEGE OF
NEW CALEDONIA
Prince George
DOUGLAS COLLEGE
New Westminster
EAST KOOTENAY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Cranbrook
FRASER VALLEY COLLEGE
Chilliwack
KWANTLEN COLLEGE
Surrey
MALASPINA COLLEGE
Nanaimo
NORTH ISLAND COLLEGE
Comox
NORTHERN LIGHTS COLLEGE
Dawson Creek
NORTHWEST
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Terrace
OKANAGAN COLLEGE
Kelowna
SELKIRK COLLEGE
Castlegar
VANCOUVER
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Vancouver
School Districts
included
in College Region:
61, 62, 63, 64
44, 45, 46, 48
24, 26, 27, 29, 30, 31
55, 56, 57, 28
40, 41, 42, 43
1, 2, 3, 4, 18,
% Of 86,
(South of Sanka Creek)
32, 33, 34, 75, 76
35, 36, 37, 38,
65, 66, 68, 69, 47
70, 71, 72, 84, 85, 49
59, 81, 87, 60
50, 52, 54, 80, 88, 92
14, 15,16,19, 21, 17, 22, 23, 77, 89
7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
Vi of 86 (North of Sanka Creek)
39, 38, 41
 COLLEGE REGIONS
AND
SCHOOL DISTRICTS
  PUBLIC SCHOOLS
1. Pupils  T3
2. Teachers  T63
3. Finance  T87
4. Schools  T97
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
5. General      T106
POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
6. General       T107
Continuing Education — Course Registrants       T126
T1
  1.   PUPILS
TABLE Page
1.1 Actual enrolment by type of school  T4
1.2 Distribution of pupils by grade and sex   X5
1.3 Average daily attendance by type of school  T6
1.4 B.C. public school teacher and enrolment data — September 30, 1980   T7
1.5 Recapitulation of public school enrolment by type of school, grade, and
sex of pupils September 30, 1980  T61
1.6 Changes in enrolment during the school-year, from September to September,
and from June to June   T62
T3
 TABLE 1.1
ACTUAL ENROLMENT BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
Enrolment in public schools decreased from 511,671 in September 1979 to 509,805 in
September 1980. Elementary increased by 4,135 and secondary decreased by 6,001.
Actual Enrolment, September 1980
Senior secondary  28
Secondary  148
Junior secondary  H6
Elementary-senior secondary  25
Elementary-junior secondary  66
Elementary  1,217
TOTALS  1.600
13,407
13.315
26.722
53.751
52.790
106,541
30,008
28.580
58.588
4.279
4.005
8,284
7,218
6,823
14.04]
52.504
143.125
295,629
Source: September 1980 Form I.
1 Actual enrolment is defined as the number of pupils actually enrolled for whom an attendance record is required to
be kept as of the reporting date.
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:
Secondaryschoolcorrespondenceclasses.regularstudents :  759
Secondary school-age students (exclusive of the 9,718 officially registered in other schools)
taking correspondence courses (part-time) towards graduation   1,069
Elementaryschoolcorrespondenceclasses,regularstudents  1,670
Under section 19 of ihe School Act, pupils receiving instruction  61
T4
 TABLE 1.2 DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY
GRADEANDSEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for
September 1980 and a comparison of the totals with September 1979.
... _      . Total Toial Ralio
Grade Male Femalc        Sept. 1980      Sept. 1979      1980:1979
Secondary
Grade XII  18-264 18,441 36.705 36,792 0.998
GradeXI  20,059 20,432 40.491 40,811 0.992
Totals, senior secondary grades	
GradeX	
Grade IX	
Grade VIII	
Totals, secondary grades	
Secondary special	
Totals, secondary grades	
Elementary
Grade VII  19.456 18.618 38.074 37,084 ,   1.027
Grade VI  20.122 19.206 39.328 37.738 1.042
GradeV  20.711 19.634 40.345 38,807 1.040
GradelV  19.749 18,471 38.220 39,674 0.963
Totals, grade IV to VII  80,038 75.929 155.967 153.303 1.017
GradelH  18.863 18.041 36,904 37,529 0.983
Gradell  18.566 17.377 35,943 36.403 0.987
Gradel  19.104 17.641 36,745 35.948 1.022
Kindergarten  18.142 17.361 35,503 34,298 1.035
Totals, kindergarten to grade III  74.675 70,420 145.095 144,178 1.006
Elementary special  3,296 2.000 5.296             4,742 1.117
Totals, elementary grades  158.009 148.349 306.358 302,223 1.014
GRANDTOTALS  261,167 248.638 509.805 511,671 0.996
Source: September 1979FormB.
September 1980 Form I.
Note: Occupational has not been reported separately as it is now included with secondary special.
38,323
38.873
77,196
77.603
0.995
20.643
20.113
20,172
20,320
19.345
19,330
40,963
39.458
39.502
43.580
42.146
40.231
0.940
0.936
0.982
60.928
58.995
119,923
125,957
0.952
3.907
2.421
6,328
5.888
1.075
103,158
100,289
203,447
209.448
0.971
T5
 TABLE 1.3 AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE BY
TYPE OF SCHOOL FOR 1980-81 SCHOOL YEAR
Actual as
Per Cent
Average Actual Average Possible of Possible
Daily Attendance Daily Attendance
Attendance
Senior secondary  22.905.8 24.800.4 92.4
Secondary ...,.  93.557.3 101,911.4 91.8
Junior secondary  50.919.1 55.474.7 91.8
Elementary-senior secondary  " 6.995.0 7.617.1 91.8
Elcmcnia ry-junior secondary  15.051.1 16.069.3 93.7
Elementary  274.923.8 291,366.1 94.4
TOTAL..
Source: June 1981, Form I.
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 r
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
2.   Teachers
TABLE Page
2.1 Distribution of full and part-time professional staff by type of school  T64
2.2 Teachers' certificates   T65
2.3 Teachers and principals with and without university degrees  T66
2.4 Highest degree by faculty and level    T67
2.5 New inquiries and sources of full-time and part-time teaching force  T68
2.6 British Columbia public school full-time and part-time teacher flow, September T69
1979 to September 1980	
2.7 Changes in numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) teachers during the school T70
year	
2.8 Sources of teachers beginning in British Columbia, September 1980 (those with T71
less than one year of British Columbia experience) 	
2.9 Numbers of trainees completing certification programs at British Columbia uni- T72
versifies in 1979/80 and teaching/not teaching in September 1980 	
2.10 Certificates issued during the 1980/81 school year (July 1, 1980 to June 30, T73
1981)	
2.11 Number of full-time and part-time teachers by type of certificate and average T73
years of British Columbia experience	
2.12 Certificates and degrees of full-time and part-time teachers, principals and super-        T74
visors, September 1979 and September 1980 	
2.13 Certification of full-time and part-time British Columbia teachers according to T75
location of initial teacher training, September 1979 and September 1980	
2.14 Statistical summary of British Columbia exchange teachers and their geographic T76
distribution	
Teachers' Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Salaries by Type of School:
2.15 Supervising principals and vice-principals   T77
2.16 School attached teachers (including teaching principals and vice-principals)  T78
2.17 District-wide supervisory and instructional staff  T79
2.18 Total district-wide supervisory and school attached teachers  T80
2.19 Full-time equivalent district-employed — administrative and instructional staff T81
(not assigned to specific schools)	
2.20 B.C. public school pupil/teacher ratios by school district         T82
2.21 Age distribution of full and part-time B.C. public school teachers by sex in T83
September 1980 expressed as a percentage 	
2.22 Source of initial teacher training of B.C. public school teachers by year initial T84
teacher training completed for all B.C. public school teachers 	
PROVINCIAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTRE
2.23 School broadcasts        T85
2.24 (1) Distribution of audio-visual materials           T85
(2) Distribution services circulation report         T86
T63
 TABLE 2.1
DISTRIBUTION OF FULL AND PART-TIME
PROFESSIONAL STAFF BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
Administrative
Staff1
Instiuctio:
Staff1
Total
"ofcssional
Staff
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary ....
Elementary-junior secondary	
Elementary	
District-wide instructional staff...
Di strict- wide administrative staff .
TOTALS 	
1.407
5.878
3.279
515
832
14.754
3.496
550
Source: September 1980 Forms I and J.
1 Administrative staff includes principals and vice-principals who spend 51 % or more of their time in
administration
2 Instructional staff includes principals and vice-principals who teach at least 50% of their time
T64
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T65
 TABLE 2.3 teachers and principals
WITH AND WITHOUT UNIVERSITY DEGREES
SEPTEMBER 1980
Per Cent
Masters or of teachers
Doctorate     in school type
PerCent
of teachers
in school type
PerCent
of teachers
in school type
Senior secondary  1.044
Secondary  4,588
Junior secondary  2,731
Elementary-senior secondary  396
Elementary-junior secondary  608
Elementary  9,429
District-wide instructors  437
Total instructional staff	
District-wide supervisory staff
Totalstaff  19.420
1.478
6.188
3.4%
550
891
15.660
21.0
11.9
19,233
3.564
77.3
6,221
21.1
29.018
98.4
187
246
1.5
33
0.1
466
1.6
29.484 100.0
Source: September 1980 Form J.
Note: Part-time teachers are included.
T66
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T67
 TABLE 2.5 new inquiries and source of
FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME TEACHING FORCE
Source of
Initial Teacher
Training
New Inquiries
Received in
School Year
First Certificat
Issued in
School Year
1980/81
to Persons
Inquiring
■ Teaching in
Sept. 1980 but
not Teaching
in B.C.
Public School
System in
Sept. 1979
Total
Sept. 1980
Teachers
British Columbia:	
Number	
PerCent	
Prairie Provinces:	
Number	
PerCent	
Ontario:	
Number	
PerCent	
Quebec:	
Number	
PerCent	
Atlantic Provinces:	
Number	
PerCent	
Total Canada:	
Number	
PerCent	
United Kingdom:	
Number	
PerCent	
Other Europe:	
Number	
PerCent	
United States;	
Number	
PerCent	
Australia, New Zealand:	
Number	
PerCent	
Other Non-Canadian and Not Reported:
Number	
PerCent	
Total Non-Canadian and Not Reported:.
Number	
PerCent	
46.4
527
2,230
82.2
2,549
72.1
3.230
91.4
22.123
75.0
1,013
3.4
2.739
100
3,535
100
       3.383
29.483
Source: Teacher Services Branch records and September, I980FormJ.
T68
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T70
 TABLE 2.8 source of teachers'
BEGINNING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 1980
(THOSE WITH LESS THAN ONE YEAR OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE)
Location of Initial
Teacher Education
Elementary Beginners
PerCent
ofEle-
PcrCent
of All
PerCent
ofSecon-
PerCent
of All
Beginners
British Columbia —
UBC   	
U.Vic	
SFU	
NDU  	
B .C. Normal School, other and
not reported 	
TOTALS. PROVINCIAL	
Alberta   	
Saskatchewan  	
Manitoba	
Ontario   	
Quebec 	
Atlantic Provinces	
Yukon 	
TOTAL, OTHER PROVINCES ...
United Kingdom and Europe 	
United States 	
Africa  	
Asia	
Australia 	
New Zealand 	
Other North America	
South America	
TOTAL, NON-CANADIAN   	
NotReponed	
TOTAL, BEGINNERS	
16
1.3
0.9
6
0.9
0.3
22
836
68.2
44.6
448
69.1
23.9
1,284
77
6.3
4.1
45
6.9
2.4
122
33
2.7
1.8
8
1.2
0.4
41
47
3.8
2.5
14
2.2
0.7
61
72
5.9
3.8
62
9.6
3.3
134
33
2.7
1.8
11
1.7
0.5
44
23
1.9
1.2
11
1.7
0.5
34
—
—
—
_
—
—
—
287
23.4
15.3
151
23.3
8.0
438
39
37
3.2
3.0
2.1
2.0
21
1.7
3.2
0.5
1.1
50
58
89
7.3
4.8
38
5.9
2.0
127
13
1.1
0.7
II
1.7
0.5
24
648 100.0
34.5        1.873
Source: September 1980FormJ.
1 Includes school-attached and district-wide full-time and part-time public school teachers.
T71
 — o     *"
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T72
 TABLE 2.10 CERTIFICATES ISSUED DURING
THE 1980/81 SCHOOL YEAR
(JULY 1,1980 TO JUNE 30,1981)
* Standard Professional ^. ,
ice Diploma
155 997
576 1,820 58
731 2.817 58
In addition, 200 Letters of Permission were issued forthe 1980/81 school year.
Source: Teacher Services Branch records.
Teaching
Licence
Standard
Professional
Instructor's
Diploma
Other
Total
imerim
155
576
997
1,820
58
-
Non-expiring	
2,454
TOTALS	
11
731
2.817
58
3.617
TABLE 2.11 NUMBER OF FULL-TIME AND
PART-TIME TEACHERS B Y TYPE OF CERTIFICATES AND AVERAGE
YEARS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA EXPERIENCE
Number of teachers	
Average years of British
Columbia experience .
Source: September 1980FormJ.
T73
 TABLE 2.12        certificates and degrees of
TEACHERS, PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS
SEPTEMBER 1979 AND SEPTEMBER 1980
Sept
mber 1979
Septembe
1980
Changes i
of Staff
1 Qualifications
Sept. - Sept.
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
Percentage
of
Total
Teachers
Number
Per Cent
Certificate —
22.887
4,645
66
1.029
79.4
16.1
0.2
3.6
0.2
0.4
23.658
4.564
52
998
72
140
80.2
15.5
0.2
3.4
0.2
0.5
771
- 81
- 14
- 31
7
11
3.4
- 1.7
- 21.2
- 3.0
TOTALS	
28.821
100.0
29.484
100.0
663
2.3
Degree
Doctorate	
79
0.3
11.9
65.7
22.2
87
3.723
19.419
6.255
0.3
12.6
65.9
21.2
8
300
498
-143
10.1
6.398
TOTALS	
28.821
100.0
29,484
100.0
663
2.3
Source: September 1980 Form J.
1 Including Professional Advanced. Professional
2 Including Elementary A.
Jasic, Professional C.
T74
 TABLE 2.13        certification of full-time and
PART-TIME BRITISH COLUMBIA TEACHERS ACCORDING TO
LOCATION OF INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING,
SEPTEMBER 1979 AND SEPTEMBER 1980
Source of Initial Teacher Training
Current
British Columbia
Certificate
British Columbia
Other"
Canadian
Provinces
Other
Countries
Not
Reported
Sept. 1979 Sept. 1980 Sept. 1979 Sept. 1980 Sept. 1979 Sept. 1980 Sept. 1979 Sept. 1980 Sept. 1979 Sept. 191
Professional
  17.354
  80.0
  75.8
  60.2
Standard2
  3,348
  15.4
  72.1
  11.6
Teaching Licence3
  860
  4.0
  78.5
  3.0
Instructor's Diploma
  48
  0.2
  73.8
  0.2
Letter o f Permission
  80
  0.4
 ,,  62.0
  0.3
TOTALS
  21,690
  100.0
  75.3
  75.3
73.1
11.3
3.7
77.7
0.2
76.4
3,094
78.0
3,340 2,433
80.0 " 77.6
14.1 10.6
15.2
13.9
18.6
12.8
0.4
0.5
68.0
10.9
10.7
13.2
0.0
0.1
0.1
3,137
3.138
25
100.0
100.0
100.0
10.9
10.6
0.1
10.9
10.6
0.1
22,887
23,658
79.4
80.2
100.0
100.0
79.4
80.2
4,645
4,564
16.1
15.5
100.0
100.0
22,123
100.0
75.0
75.0
3.969
100.0
13.8
28.821
29.484
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Source: September 1980FormJ.
N = Number of teachers from that jurisdiction who hold the type of certificate shown expressed as a percentage
of:
A = Percentage of teachers from that jurisdiction holding all types of certificates.
B = Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding that type of certificate.
C = Percentage of teachers from all jurisdictions holding all types of certificates.
1 Including Professional Advanced, Professional Basic and Professional C certificates.
2 Including Elementary A certificates.
3 Including Elementary B certificates.
T75
 TABLE 2.14
STATISTICAL SUMMARY
OF -BhRITISH COLUMBIA EXCHANGE
TEACHERS AND THEIR GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION
Interprovincial
School
Year
U.K.
U.S.
Ontario
Quebec
Saskatchewan    Nova Scotia
Australia          Other
Total
I921
4
4
I922
5
—
—
—
—                —
_                  —
5
1923
3
—
—
—
_                —
—                  —
3
I924
3
—
—
—
—                —
—                  _
3
1925
9
—
—
—
—                —
—                  —
9
1926
7
—
—
—
—                —
—                  —
7
1927
9
—
—
—
—                —
—                  —
9
1928
8
—
—
—
—                —
—                  —
8
1929
8
—
—
—
_                _
—                  —
8
1930
13
—
—
—
_                —
_                  —
13
g
1932
8
_
_
—
_                _
_                  _
8
1933
2
—
—
—
—                —
—                  —
2
1934
5
—
—-
—
_                _
—                  —
5
1935
9
—
—
—
—                —
—                  —
9
1936
17
—
—
—
—                —
_                  —
17
1937
1938
1939
18
-
—
—
—                —
—                  -
18
14
z
	
_
_                _
                   _
14
1947
16
—
—
—
—                —
—                  —
16
1948/49
13
1
4
3
—                    2
—                    1
24
1949/50
17
6
8
3
—                    1
—                  —
35
1950/51
12
2
6
1
1                  —
—                  —
22
1951/52
21
!
5
—
1                  —
_                  _
28
1952/53
18
4
2
I
—                    1
—                  —
26
1953/54
19
2
4
1
—                  —
_                  _
26
1954/55
18
4
3
—
—                    1
—                  —
26
1955/56
22
3
1
1
1                     1
—                  —
29
1956/57
22
4
2
—
1                     1
—                  —
30
1957/58
23
1
1
—
_                  —
—                  _
25
1958/59
26
1
2
—
—                  —
_                  _
29
1959/60
26
	
2
	
                   	
                   	
28
1960/61
26
2
1
—
—                  —
—                    1
30
1961/62
1962/63
23
1
1
1
—
—                  —
—                  —
25
23
1963/64
22
—
1
—
—                  —
—                  —
23
1964/65
23
—
—
—-
—                  —
—                  —
23
1965/66
20
—
2
—
—                  —
—                  —-
22
1966/67
24
—
2
—
—                  —
—                  —-
26
1967/68
25
1
1
9
—                  —
—-                  —
36
1968/69
16
_
—
])
—                  —
—-                  —
27
1969/70
13
2
1
3
—                  —
—                  —
19
1970/71
17
1
3
—                  —
—                  —
21
1971/72
16
1
—
—
—                  _
_                  _
17
1972/73
15
—
—
—
—                  _
—                  —-
15
1973/74
21
2
—
—
—                  —
—                  —
23
1974/75
10
2
—
—
_                  —
6
18
1975/76
10
2
_
—
—                  —
7                  —
19
1976777
10
2
	
	
—                  —
8                    —
20
1977/78
12
2
9
—
—                  —
14
37
1978/79
17
2
7
—
—                  —
17
43
1979/80
14
3
2
1
—                  —
15                    4
38
1980/81
12
1
5
I
—                  —
15                    2
36
TOTALS
792
53
73
38
4                    7
82                    8
1.056
T76
 TABLE 2.15          school-attached full-time
EQUIVALENT (FTE) SUPERVISING PRINCIPALS
AND VICE-PRINCIPALS
Cumula
*»"»-          Sr            S           J™            Seen-           Se„i„,
Total
tive
PerCent
FTE
Salaries
$
51,499—51,998	
—             —             —             —             8.0
8.0
100.0
50.999—51,498
—                —                —                —               1.0                —
1.0
99.5
50.499—50.998
—                —                —                —                                   1.0
1.0
99.4
49.999—50.498.
—                —                —                                                       1.0
1.0
99.4
49.499—49.998.
—                  —                  —                  —                4.0                 —
4.0
99.3
48.999—49.498.
—                  —                 —                  —                5.0                 3,0
8.0
99.1
48.499—48.998.
—                 1.0                 —                 1.0                 8.0                 1.0
11.0
98.6
47.999—48.498.
2.0              - —                 —                  —                7.0                  —
9.0
97.9
47.499—47,998.
—                 1.0                  —                 1.0                 1.0                 1.0
4.0
97.3
46.999—47.498.
1.0                                                            6.0                 1.0                 1.0
9.0
97.0
46.499—46.998
—                  —                                      2.0                4.0                 1.0
7.0
96.5
45.999—46.498.
1.0                 1.0                                      4.0                 5-0                2.0
13.0
96.0
45.499—45,998.
—                 1.0                                      8.0                 5.0                2.0
16.0
95.2
44,999_45,498.
—                  —                 —                 1.0                4.0                2.0
7.0
94.2
44,499—44.998.
49,0                 —                2.0                4.0                 5.0                 3.0
63.0
93.8
43.999—44,498.
—                 —                  —                6.0               15.0
21.0
89.8
43,499—43.998.
13.0                 —                 1.0                 9.0               14.0                5.0
42.0
88.5
42.999—43,498.
7.0                 1.0                 1.0                 8.0                 6.0                 2.0
25.0
85.9
42.499—42,998.
13.0                2.0                                     10.0               12.0                 2.0
39.0
84.3
41.999—42.498.
20.0                 —                2.0                 6.0               14.0                 6.0
48.0
81.8
41.499—41,998.
13.0                 2.0                 1.0                 6.0                9.0                 2.0
33.0
78.8
40.999—41.498.
40.0                 1,0                4.0                 7.0                 7.0                 1.0
60.0
76.8
40.499—40,998.
46.0                  —                 2,0                 8.0               11.0                 2.0
69.0
73.0
39.999—40.498.
29.0                 3.0                  —               11.0               10.0                2.0
55.0
68.7
39.499—39.998.
52.0                 1.0                 3.0                 6.0               11.0                 2.0
75.0
65.2
38.999—39.498.
23.0                 2.0                 1.0                 6.0               12.0                7.0
51.0
60.5
38.499—38.998.
25.0                2.0                2.0                 8.0                 8.0                2.0
47.0
57.3
37.999—38.498.
69.0                 1.0                2.0                 6.0               13.0                3.0
94.0
54.3
37.499—37.998.
39.0                2.0                 1.0                 6.0               13.0                2.0
63.0
48.4
36.999—37.498.
53.0                2.0                                      9.0               10.0                 2.0
76.0
44.5
36.499—36.998.
47.0                2.0                                      9.0               10.0                 1.0
69.0
39.7
35.999—36.498.
33.0                 1.0                4.0                9.0                 5-0
52.0
35.4
35.499—35.998.
28.0                4.0                 1.0                 5.0               13.0
51.0
32.1
34.999—35.498.
41.0                 1.0                 1.0                 7.0                 5.0
55.0
28.9
34.499—34.998.
44.0                 2.0                 1.0                 7.0               11.0                3.0
68.0
25.4
33.999—34.498.
32.0                2.0                 1.0               10.0               10.0                2.0
57.0
21.2
33.499—33.998.
29.0                3.0                  —                7.0                 6.0
45.0
17.6
32.999—33.498.
18.0                2.0                 1.0                 1.0                 3,0                 1.0
26.0
14.8
32,499—32,998.
26.0                2.0                 2.0                 3.0                 2.0                2.0
37.0
13.1
31,999_32,498.
17.0                 1.0                  —                 6.0                4.0                 1.0
29.0
10.8
31.499—31.998.
16.0                 3.0                 1.0                 1.0                4.0
25.0
9.0
30.999—31.498.
8.0                  —                  —                 3.0                 2.0
13.0
7.4
30,499—30.998.
24.0                 1.0                 —                 2.0                 3.0                 1.0
31.0
6.6
29.999—30,498.
7.0                 2.0                  —                 1.0                 3.0
13.0
4.6
29,499—29.998.
6.0                 2.0
8.0
3.8
28.999—29,498.
11.0                 1.0                  —                  —                  —                 1.0
13.0
3.3
28.499—28.998.
1.0                 1.0                 1.0                4,0                  —
7.0
2.5
27.999—28.498.
5.0                  —                  —                  —                  —
5.0
2.1
27,499—27.998.
7.0                 —                  —                  —                 1.0
8.0
1.8
26.999—27.498.
—                  —                  —                 1.0                 1.0                  —
2.0
1.3
26.499—26,998.
4.0                 1.0                  —                 1.0                  —
6.0
1.1
25.999—26.498.
1.0                                                             1.0
2.0
0.8
25,499—25.998.
1.0                  —                 —                  —                  —                 —
1.0
0.6
24.999—25,498.
1.0                 1.0                  —                  —                 1.0                 1.0
4.0
0.6
24.499—24.998.
1.0                  —                  —                  —                  —
1.0
0.3
23.999—24,498.
—               _               _                              —              —
—
—
23.499—23.998.
2.0                  —                  —                                    —                 —
2.0
0.3
22.999—23.498
—                  _                  _                                     _                  _
—
—
!      22.499—22.998.
_                                                                         _                  _
_
—
21.999—22.498
—               1,0                —                                 —                —.
1.0
0.1
21.499—21,998
—                 1,0                                                                         —
1.0
0.1
Not Reported ...
-----
TOTALS      905.0               57.0               35.0             217.0             307.0               71.0
1.592.0
MEDIANS $37,400         $35,687         $38,874         $39,124         $40,124         $41,249
$38,132
1     MedianSalary = $38,132;MeanSalary = $38,209.
Source: September30,1980FormJ.
T77
 TABLE 2.16 SCHOOL-ATT ACHED FULL-TIME
EQUIVALENT (FTE) TEACHERS (INCLUDING TEACHING
PRINCIPALS AND VICE-PRINCIPALS)
Elcm-
tary
Elem.-
Junior
Secondary
PerCent
FTE
$
44,499—44.998   1.0
43,999—44,498   —
43,499—43,998   —
42,999—43,498   —
42.499—42,998   —
41,999—42,498    —
41,499—41,998   —
40,999—41,498   —
40,499—40.998   —
39,999—40,498   —
39,499—39.998   7.0
38,999—39,498   1.0
38,499—38,998   2.0
37,999—38,498   29.0
37,499—37,998   9.0
36,999—37,498   6.0
36,499—36,998   16.0
35,999—36,498   11.0
35,499—35,998   12.0
34,999—35,498    25.0
34,499—34,998   28.0
33,999—34,498   28.0
33,499—33,998   22.8
32,999—33,498   24.0
32,499—32,998   25.0
31,999—32,498   91.1
31,499—31.998   172.7
30,999—31,498   150.1
30.499—30.998   71.4
29,999—30,498   53.5
29,499—29,998   56.9
28,999—29,498   419.5
28,499—28,998   527.9
27,999—28,498   450.6
27,499—27,998    135.8
26,999—27,498   172.9
26,499—26,998   180.2
25,999—26,498 ......... 214.8
25,499—25,998   462.9
24,999—25,498   940.6
24,499—24,998   647.9
23.999—24,498   316.7
23,499—23,998   372.9
22.999—23,498   343.5
22,499—22,998   478.7
21,999—22,498   492.8
21,499—21,998   1,065.6
20,999—21,498   908.7
20,499—20,998   434.6
19,999—20,498   618.3
19,499—19.998   515.9
18,999—19,498   607.3
18.499—18,998   413.2
17,999—18,498   341.8
17.499—17,998   426.8
16,999—17,498   354.3
16,499—16,998   282.7
15,999—16,498   273.0
15,499—15,998   174.6
14,999—15,498   99.6
14,499—14,998   157.1
13,999— 14,498   39.3
13,499—13,998   50.3
12,999—13,498   15.5
12,499—12,998   —
11,999—12,498    —
11,499—11,998   —
10,999—11,498   —
10,499—10,998   —
9,999—10,498   1.0
Not Reported  3.0
—
—
—
1.0
'/-,— "
1.0
100.0
—
—
—
1.0
"1__—
1.0
100.0
1.0
1.0
—
—
—
2.0
100.0
—
—
—
—
—
7.0
100.0
—
—
—
_
2.0
3.0
99.9
—
—
—
1.0
—
3.0
99.9
—
—
—
—
—
29.0
99.9
1.0
1.0
—
—
1.0
12.0
99.8
—
—
—
2.0
—
8.0
99.8
2.0
—
1.0
1.0
—
20.0
99.7
—
—
1.0
3.0
—
15.0
99.7
—
—
1.0
2.0
_
15.0
99.6
—
2.0
1.0
—
1.0
29.0
99.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
—
—
31.0
99.4
3.0
1.0
5.0
74.0
6.0
117.0
99.3
2.0
3.0
7.0
62.0
12.0
108.8
98.8
3.0
7.0
22.0
51.0
21.0
128.0
98.4
2.0
2.0
29.0
37.5
17.0
112.5
97.9
6.0
7.6
34.0
228.0
35.0
401.7
97.5
10.0
12.0
64.1
283.0
98.0
639.8
95.9
15.3
12.0
106.5
234.6
112.7
631.1
93.4
6.0
10.0
45.7
115.0
29.0
277.1
90.9
13.0
6.0
68.5
120.3
26.0
287.2
89.8
14.4
5.0
52.5
76.0
30.0
234.8
88.7
13.0
29.9
139.0
507.5
55.0
1.163.9
87.8
37.8
9.0
315.9
411.1
214.6
1.516.3
83.2
35.0
2.2
278.9
457.3
154.8
1,378.8
77.3
28.7
6.0
62.0
152.1
27.0
411.6
71.8
11.5
20.0
72.6
124.6
30.5
432.1
70.2
21.1
7.0
47.0
116.1
32.0
403.4
68.5
22.7
7.6
68.6
133.2
44.0
490.9
67.0
17.0
11.0
110.5
180.2
33.0
814.6
65.0
28.4
24.5
162.9
198.3
52.0
1,406.7
61.8
23.4
14.0
144.6
225.3
39.0
1,094.2
56.3
28,6
9.6
80.5
154.8
28.0
618.2
52.0
15.4
18.5
113.5
149.6
32.0
701.9
49.6
31.6
19.0
91.1
177.5
25.5
688.2
46.8
17.8
19.0
118.8
165.6
29.5
829.3
44.1
37.0
22.0
97.0
173.2
20.0
842.1
40.9
29.7
25.0
123.1
129.6
34.8
1,407.8
37.6
22.6
14.5
115.5
191.3
35.5
1.288.2
32.1
28.2
17.8
99.0
105.6
15.7
700.8
27.0
44.0
21.0
83.5
146.1
16.4
929.3
24.3
36.8
32.5
81.6
120.4
20.0
807.2
20.6
41.3
28.0
68.3
111.5
17.5
873.9
17.4
26.5
16.4
69.4
94.5
10.0
630.0
14.0
24.3
8.0
56.7
78.5
4.5
513.8
11.5
21.6
3.5
57.9
81.6
13.0
604.4
9.5
20.5
12.0
45.3
37.8
6.8
476.8
7.2
12.1
14.0
18.3
24.9
_
352.0
5.3
13.5
8.0
30.6
32.8
2.8
360.7
3.9
11.0
4.0
4.0
6.0
—
199.6
2.5
5.5
—
12.4
4.5
4.0
126.1
1.7
3.0
7.0
5.0
3.0
2.0
177.1
1.2
5.0
—
1.0
4.0
—
49.3
0.5
	
1.0
5.0
—
3.0
59.3
0.3
—
_
4.0
1.4
—
20.9
0.1
TOTALS 	
MEDIANS 	
    $22,111
794.2
$22,909
503.6
$22,950
3,224.8
$25,261
5,793.4
$27,193
1,394.4
$28,381
25.493.4
$24,082
Median Salary = $24,082; Mean Salaiy = $24,141.
T78      Source: September30,1980FormJ.
 TABLE 2.17 district-wide full-time
EQUIVALENT(FTE) SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL
STAFF (NOT ATTACHED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
Salary Range
Cumulative
Salary
Number of
PerCent
lid-Point
FrE Persons
FTE
Salaries
$
50,499—50,998.
49,999—50,498 .
49,499—49,998 .
48,999—49,498 .
48,499—48.998 .
47,999—48,498 .
47.499_47.998 .
46,999—47,498 .
46,499—46,998 .
45.999—46,498 .
45,499—45,998 .
44,999—45,498 .
44.499—44,998 .
43.999—44,498 .
43,499—43,998 .
42,999—43,498 .
42.499—42,998 .
41,999—42,498.
41,499—41,998 .
40,999—41,498 .
40,499—40,998 .
39,999—40,498 .
39,499—39,998 .
38,999—39,498 .
38,499—38.998 .
37,999—38,498 .
37,499—37,998 .
36,999—37,498 .
36,499—36,998.
35,999—36,498.
35.499—35,998 .
34,999—35,498 .
34,499—34,998 .
33,999—34,498 .
33.499—33.998 .
32,999—33,498.
32,499—32,998 .
31,999—32,498.
31,499—31,998 .
30,999—31,498 .
30,499—30,998 .
29,999—30,498 .
29,499—29,998 .
28,999—29,498 .
28,499—28,998 I
27,999—28,498 .
27.499—27,998 .
26,999—27,498 .
26,499—26,998 .
25,999—26,498 .
25,499—25,998 .
24.999—25,498 .
24,499—24,998 .
23.999—24.498 .
23,499—23,998.
22,999—23,498 .
22,499—22,998 .
21,999—22,498.
21,499—21,998 .
20,999—21,498 .
20,499—20.998 .
19,999—20,498 .
19,499—19,998 .
18.999— 19,498 .
18,499—18,998.
17,999—18,498.
17,499—17,998 .
16,999—17,498 .
16,499—16.998 .
15,999—16,498 .
15,499—15,998 .
14,999—15,498.
14,499—14,998 .
13,999—14,498 .
13,499—13,998 .
Not Reported	
50.749
50,249
49.749
49,249
48,749
48,249
47,749
47,249
46,749
46,249
45,749
45,249
44,749
44,249
43,749
43,249
42,749
42.249
41.749
41,249
40,749
40,249
39,749
39,249
38,749
38,249
37,749
37,249
36,749
36,249
35.749
35,249
34,749
34,249
33,749
33,249
32,749
32.249
31,749
31,249
30,749
30.249
29,749
29,249
28,749
28,249
27,749
27,249
26,749
26,249
25,749
25,249
24,749
24,249
23,749
23,249
22,749
22,249
21.749
21.249
20,749
20,249
19,749
19,249
18.749
18,249
17,749
17,249
16,749
16.249
15,749
15,249
14,749
14,249
13,749
10.0
18.0
14.0
16.0
17.0
19.0
17.0
48.0
29.0
25.0
25.0
18.0
29.7
62.6
35.0
18.5
18.8
22.6
31.4
15.5
44.2
29.0
21.8
23.3
18.2
10.3
11.9
9.2
13.6
100.0
99.9
99.8
99.0
98,6
98.3
97.9
97.7
97.5
97.4
96.9
95.8
95.4
94.4
94.2
92,7
92,1
91.9
91.0
89.5
88.5
87,0
85.3
84.5
82.7
81.9
81.0
80.2
79.0
77.6
77.1
75.2
73.8
71.4
69.9
68.3
66.9
62.8
60.4
58.2
46.8
43.8
42.2
40.6
38.7
36.9
34.7
30.6
27.6
26.4
24.7
22.8
20.1
18.8
10.7
8.8
TOTAL	
1,180.8
-
MEDIAN	
T79
M>ri;»„ ci
^OJM^|jiiS|1|[s^^2^DL
 TABLE 2.18 TOTAL FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE)
DISTRICT-WIDEAND SCHOOL-ATTACHED TEACHERS
Salary
Mid-Point
Number of
FTE Persons
Cumulative
PerCent
FTE
T80
51,499—51,998 .
50,999—51,498 .
50,499—50,998 .
49,999—50,498 .
49,499—49,998 .
48,999—49,498 .
48,499—48,998 .
47,999—48.498 .
47,499—47,998 .
46,999—47,498 .
46,499—46,998 .
45,999—46,498 .
45,499—45,998 .
44,999—45,498 .
44,499—44,998 .
43,999—44,498 .
43.499—43,998 .
42.999—43,498 .
42,499—42,998 .
41,999—42,498 .
41,499—41,998 .
40,999—41,498 .
40,499—40,998 .
39,999—40,498 .
39,499—39,998 .
38,999—39,498 .
38.499—38,998 .
37,999—38,498 .
37,499—37,998 .
36,999—37,498 .
36.499—36,998 .
35,999—36,498 .
35,499—35,998 .
34,999—35,498 .
34,499—34.998 .
33,999—34,498 .
33,499—33,998 .
32,999—33,498 .
32,499—32,998 .
31.999—32.498 .
31.499—31.998 .
30.999—31,498 .
30,499—30.998 .
29,999—30,498 .
29,499—29.998 .
28,999—29,498 .
28.499—28,998 .
27,999—28,498 .
27,499—27,998 .
26,999—27,498 .
26,499—26,998 .
25,999—26.498 .
25,499—25.998 .
24,999—25,498 .
24,499—24.998 .
23,999—24,498 .
23,499—23,998 .
22,999—23,498 .
22,499—22,998 .
21,999—22.498 .
21.499—21,998 .
20.999—21,498 .
20.499—20,998 .
19,999—20.498 .
19,499—19.998 .
18,999— 19,498 .
18,499— 18.998 .
17,999— 18,498 .
17.499—17,998 .
16.999— 17,498 .
16,499— 16,998 .
15.999— 16.498 .
15,499— 15,998 .
14.999— 15.498 .
14,499—14,998 .
13,999—14,498 .
13,499—13,998 .
12.999—13,498 .
12,499—12,998 .
11,999—12,498 .
11,499—11,998 .
10,999—11,498 .
10,499—10,998 .
9.999—10,498 .
Not Reported.....
TOTAL	
MEDIAN	
51.749
8.0
51,249
1.0
50,749
2.0
50,249
2.0
49,749
4.0
49,249
18.0
48.749
15.0
48,249
13.0
47,749
9.0
47,249
11.0
46,749
10.0
46,249
14.0
45,749
16.0
45.249
13.0
44,749
77.0
44.249
25.0
43,749
54.0
43,249
28.0
42.749
57.0
42,249
55.0
41.749
36.0
41,249
71.0
40,749
88.0
40,249
69.0
39,749
99.0
39,249
75.0
38,749
59.0
38,249
144.0
37,749
84.0
37.249
95.0
36,749
99.0
36,249
81.0
35,749
82.0
35.249
90.0
34.749
121.8
34.249
190.0
33,749
182.8
33.249
171.0
32,749
168.5
32,249
447.7
31,749
712.8
31.249
673.1
30.749
333.1
30.249
325.2
29.749
260.8
29.249
1.206.6
28.749
1.585.9
28,249
1.418.8
27,749
438.1
27.249
452.9
26.749
432.0
26,249
513.9
25,749
841.9
25.249
1.459.2
24.749
1.131.0
24,249
631.6
23,749
723.8
23.249
711.4
22,749
860.7
22,249
858.6
21.749
1,453.0
21.249
1.317.2
20,749
722.6
20.249
952.6
19,749
825.4
19.249
884.2
18.749
641.9
18,249
523.0
17,749
618.0
17.249
483.6
16,749
364.8
16.249
367.8
15.749
202.0
15.249
129.8
14,749
181.6
14.249
50.3
13,749
61.3
13,249
20.9
12,749
1.0
12,249
—
11.749
—
11,249
_
10.749
—
10,249
1.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
99.9
99.9
99.8
99.8
99.7
99.7
99.7
99.6
99.6
99.5
99.2
99.2
99.0
98.9
98.7
97.5
97.2
96.9
96.7
96.2
95.9
95.6
95.2
94.9
94.6
94.3
93.9
93.2
92.6
92.0
91.4
82.6
81.6
77.4
71.7
66.7
65.2
63.6
62.0
60.2
43.3
40.8
37.7
34.7
29.5
24.9
22.3
19.0
16.0
12.9
10.6
 fT
TABLE 2.19 FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED ADMINISTRATIVE AND
INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
(NOT ASSIGNED TO SPECIFIC SCHOOLS)
l-Widc
ativc StalT
District-Wide
Instructional StalT
Total
ct- Wide StalT
1. Femic	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberlcy	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesncl	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merrill	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby ,
42. MapleRidge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. CentralCoast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52. Prince Rupert ,
54. Simmers	
55. BumsLake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulflslands v£a&
65. Cowichan	
66. LakeCowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualieum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. CampbellRiver	
75. Mission	
76. Agassi/.-Harris on	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. FortNelson	
84. Vancouver Is. West	
85. Vancouver Is. North	
86. Creslon-Kaslo	
87. Stikinc	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL	
8.0
11.0
19.0
12.0
10.0
22.0
12.0
15.0
27.0
3.0
2.0
5.0
8.8
7.0
15.8
6.0
6.6
12.6
8.0
9.5
17.5
9.0
12.3
21.3
14.0
20.7
34.7
23.0
94.S
117.5
14.0
12.0
26.0
22.0
18.0
40.0
40.5
64.0
104.5
9.0
9.1
18.1
17.0
25.5
42.5
12.5
17.4
29.9
11.0
14.9
25.9
16.0
12.8
28.8
6.0
15.6
21.6
4.0
10.0
13.4
38.4
16.5
23,5
8.0
16.0
70.0
84.0
10.6
22.6
7.0
15.0
2.6
3.6
6.0
14.0
2.7
3.7
60.0
71.2
1.8
3,8
12.0
21.0
9.1
17.1
21.0
25.0
2.5
7.5
Source: September 1980 Form J.
T81
 TABLE 2.20        B.C. PUBLIC SCHOOL PUPIL/TEACHER
RATIOS BY SCHOOL DISTRICT
SEPTEMBER 30, 1979 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1980
FTE
Pupils
September 30. 1979
FTE
Teachers
FTE
Pupils
September 30, 1980
FTE
Pupil/
Ratio
1. Femie  3,463.5
2. Cranbrook  4,673.0
3. Kimberley  1.918.0
4. Windermere  1,350.5
7. Nelson  4,005.5
9.  CasUegar  2,719.0
10. Arrow Lakes  984.0
11. Trail  4.276.5
12. GrandForks  1,385.5
13. Kettle Valley  712.0
14. Southern Okanagan  2,277.0
15. Penticton  4,740.5
16. Keremeos  603.5
17. Princeton  979.5
18. Golden  1.439.0
19. Revelstoke  2,074.5
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen  1,378.5
22. Vernon  8,317.0
23. Central Okanagan  15,640.0
24. Kamloops  17,294.5
26. North Thompson  1,287.5
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin  8.267.0
28. Quesnel  5,221.0
29. Lillooet  1,020.0
30. South Cariboo  1,832.0
31. Merrill  2,440.0
32. Hope  1,585.0
33. Chilliwack  7.750.0
34. Abbotsford  9,217.0
35. Langley  12.559.5
36. Surrey  28,332.5
37. Delta  17,812.5
38. Richmond  17,823.5
39. Vancouver  55,800.0
40. New Westminster  4,224.5
41. Burnaby  20,380.0
42. Maple Ridge  7.520.5
43. Coquitlam  21,901.0
44. North Vancouver  17,942.0
45. West Vancouver  6,094.5
46. Sunshine Coast  2,635.0
47. Powell River  4,069.0
48. Howe Sound  2.812.5
49. Central Coast  754.5
50. Queen Charlotte  1,213.5
52.  Prince Rupert  4.074.5
54. Smiihers  2,806.0
55. Bums Lake  1.907.0
56. Nechako  3,201.0
57. Prince George  20.205.5
59. Peace River South  5,180.5
60. Peace River North  5,748.0
61. Greater Victoria  23,487.0
62. Sooke  7,696.5
63. Saanich  6.009.5
64. Gulflslands  1.013.0
65. Cowichan  7,398.5
66. Lake Cowichan  1,260.0
68. Nanaimo  11,774.0
69. Qualicum  2,664.5
70. Alberni  7,425.5
71. Courtenay  7,121.5
72. Campbell River  5,799.0
75. Mission  4,445.0
76. Agassiz-Harrison  770.0
77. Summerland  1,345.5
80. Kitimat  2,961.5
81. FortNelson  1,139.5
84. Vancouver Is. West  1.056.0
85. Vancouver Island North  3.040.5
86. Creston-Kaslo  2,343.0
87. Stikine  558.5
88. Terrace  5,414.5
89. Shuswap  5,420.5
92.  Nisgha  530.0
GRAND TOTAL  494,522,0
201.50
247.50
116.12
82.60
233.10
149.40
68.68
239.90
83.30
44.90
134.70
250.90
36.35
59.50
86.20
125.50
81.50
443.10
855.00
986.39
78.00
454.10
310.70
64.70
116.05
142.30
93.00
430.50
491.00
676.23
1,541.80
971.90
981.10
3.005.56
247.00
1.155.30
430.87
1.201.80
1.022.84
334.75
153.25
234.70
158.39
59.05
82.00
248.90
160.15
118.40
194.50
1,138.29
299.70
323.40
1.272.63
426.12
338.60
67.30
434.50
82.13
680.10
142.37
428.10
373.02
333.00
246.90
48.00
75.75
174.70
67.00
66.00
197.10
140.95
42.36
307.20
313.45
43.50
17.19
18.88
16.52
16.35
17.18
18.20
14.33
17.83
16.63
15.86
16.90
18.89
16.60
16.46
16.69
16.53
16.91
18.77
18.29
17.53
16.51
18.21
16.80
15.77
15.79
17.15
17.04
18.00
18.77
18.57
18.38
18.33
18.17
18.57
17.10
17.64
17.45
18.22
17.54
18.21
17.19
17.34
17.76
12.78
14.80
16.37
17.52
16.11
16.46
17.75
17.29
17.77
18.46
18.06
17.75
15.05
17.03
15,34
17.31
18.72
17.35
19.09
17.41
18.00
16.04
17.76
16.95
17.01
16.00
15.43
16.62
13.18
17.63
17.29
12.18
3.593.5
4.639.5
1,945.5
205.10
260.45
120.40
85.80
4.046.5
240.10
2.716.5
154.37
997.5
68.34
4.267.0
244.45
1.353.5
81.70
638.5
44.50
2,191.0
134.03
4.701.5
251.77
566.0
35.25
987.5
59.50
1.432.0
85.80
2,086.0
129.70
1.430.5
82.50
8.189.0
449.60
15.623.0
854.80
17,233.5
995.30
1.279.5
80.00
8.307.5
467.30
5.168.0
307.75
1.006.0
66.30
1.826.0
113.10
2,379.0
141.70
1.573.5
96.50
7.581.0
430.10
9.672.0
510.50
13.137.5
730.70
29.262.0
1,647.90
18,073.0
1.002.90
17,808.0
1.017.60
53.770.5
2.959.30
3.895.0
244.60
19,417.0
1.152.19
7.608.5
452.57
21.844.5
1.240.70
17.048.0
996.35
5,727.0
332.28
2.733.0
161.56
4,067.5
241.90
2,919.0
168.37
468.0
40.80
1,202.0
82.00
4.052.5
246.85
2,907.0
165.85
1.841.0
118.60
20.113.0
5.070.5
5.896.0
22,706.5
7,546.0
6,180.0
1.036.5
7,398.5
1,230.0
12.052.0
2.939.0
7,267.5
7,063.0
5,933.0
4.777.5
797.5
1,347.0
3,038.0
1,150.5
1,113.0
3.083.0
2,270.5
587.5
5.607.0
5.505.5
540.5
198.70
1.166.63
297.17
338.60
1.287.06
431.10
358.80
70.90
426.10
80.53
714.40
166.89
428.60
382.57
339.90
264.20
48.50
74.75
176.90
75.50
73.50
197.31
141.33
44.10
321.90
323.20
43.50
17.52
17.81
16.16
16.02
16.85
17.60
14.60
17.46
16.57
14.35
16.35
18.67
16.06
16.60
16.69
16.08
17.34
18.21
18.28
17.31
15.99
17.78
16.79
15.17
16.15
16.79
16.31
17.63
18.95
17.98
17.76
18.02
17.50
18.17
15.92
16.85
16.81
17.61
17.11
17.24
16.92
16.81
17.34
11.47
14.66
16.42
17.53
15.52
16.20
17.24
17.06
17.41
17.64
17.50
17.22
14.62
17.36
15.27
16.87
17.61
16.96
18.46
17.46
17.17
15.24
15.14
15.63
16.07
13.32
17.42
17.03
12.43
TOO        Source: September 1979, 1980 Form I and J.
 TABLE 2.21          agedistributionoffull and
PART-TIME B.C. PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS BY
SEX IN SEPTEMBER 1980 EXPRESSED AS A PERCENTAGE
Age                                                Mule
Female
Total
<20
20                                                   —
—
—
21
0.3
0.2
22                                                   0.1
1.2
0.7
23                                                    0.7
2.4
1.6
24                                                    1.1
3.2
2.2
25                                                    1.4
3.9
2.8
26                                                    2.0
3.8
3.0
27                                                    2.4
4.0
3.2
28                                                    2.8
4.4
3.7
29                                                    3.4
5.1
4.3
30                                                   4.2
4.8
4.5
31                                                    4.4
5.0
4.7
32                                                   4.7
5.1
4.9
33                                                    5.5
4.8
5.1
34                                                   4.9
4.0
4.4
35                                                    4.4
3.2
3.8
36                                                   4.7
3.5
4.0
37                                                   4.5
3.3
3.9
38                                                    4.2
2.9
3.5
39                                                   4.1
2.7
3.4
40                                                    3.7
2.6
3.1
41                                               3.5
2.2
2.8
42                                                    3.0
2.0
2.5
43                                                    2.4
1.9
2.1
44                                                    2.5
1.8
2.1
45                                                    2.2
1.9
2.0
46                                                    2.0
1.6
1.8
47                                                    1.8
1.5
1.7
48                                                    2.0
1.7
1.9
49                                                    2.0
1.7
1.8
50                                                    1.9
1.6
1.7
51                                                     1.8
1.5
1.6
52                                                    1.5
1.4
1.5
53                                                    1.5
1.3
1.4
54                                                    1.5
I.I
1.3
55                                                    1.2
1.0
I.I
56                                                    1.2
1.0
1.1
57                                                    1.1
0.9
1.0
58                                                    0.9
0.8
0.9
59                                                    0.8
0.8
0.8
60                                                   0.5
0.6
0.6
61                                                    0.4
0.5
0.5
62                                                    0.4
0.4
0.4
63                                                    0.2
0.4
0.3
64                                                    0.3
0.3
0.3
65+                                                —
0.1
0.1
TOTAL                                            100.0
100.0
100.0
Source: September 1980 Form J.
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TABLE 2.23  provincial educational media centre
SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Television
Programs Broadcast        173
Schools Reporting Use        581
Radio
Programs Broadcast        162
Schools Reporting Use        417
TABLE 2.24(1) distribution of
AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS
Total Films Supplied  43,810
PEMC   K-12 Films/Videotapes/Audiotapes Catalogue  7,000
PEMC   Post-Secondary Films/Videotapes/Audiotapes Catalogue  2,800
Singout! 1980-81 (Students' Booklet)  80,000
Songs & Stories of Canada (Guide)  5,000
Ear Bending (Teachers'& Students'Material)  45,000
Bric-a-Brac '81 (Students' Booklet)  20,000
Chantez! '81   12,000
FaitesVosIeux  2,000
Broadcast Guides  24,000
Broadcast Calendars  12,000
Media Resources Guides
—Secondary P.E  3,000
—Elementary Language Arts  13,000
—Business Education  1,100
—Elementary Science  18,000
Alphabet Drawing Masters & Frieze  3,000
Promotional Material (Fernie, B.C.)  2,000
Videotape Programs  18,902
Audiotape Programs  10,342
T85
 TABLE 2.24 (2)
DISTRIBUTION SERVICES
CIRCULATION REPORT
16mm Films
Supplied
T86
Cranbrook	
Kimbcrlcy	
Windermere	
Nelson	
Castlcgar	
•Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
Vemon	
Central Okanagan	
Kamloops	
North Thompson	
Cariboo-Chilcotin	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Hope	
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster	
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Sunshine Coast	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Bums Lake	
Nechako	
Prince George	
Peace River South	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River	
Mission	
Agassiz-Hamson	
Summerland	
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Vancouver Island West....
Vancouver Island North ...
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine	
Terrace	
Shuswap	
Nisgha	
Provincial Colleges	
Independent Schools	
Miscellaneous	
1,278
1.082
 i
 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
3.   Finance
TABLE
Page
3.1 Comparison of enrolment and expenditure for public education
at June 30   T88
3.2 Expenditure for education, calendar year 1980   T89
3.3 Cost per pupil, calendar year 1980  T90
3.4 Expenditure by school district for the calendar year 1980  T9I
3.5 Revenue by school district for the calendar year 1980   T93
3.6 Transportation costs   T95
3.7 Summary of school dormitory data, 1980/81   T95
T87
 TABLE 3.1
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND
EXPENDITURE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION AT JUNE 30
Teachers
Employed
Average
Daily
Atten-
Percentage
Atten-
Total
Operating
Expenditures
Total
Expenditure
1882/83  69
1887/88  128
1892/93  267
1897/98  429
1902/03  607
1907/08  816
1912/13  1.597
1913/14  1,859
1917/18  2,246
1922/23  3,118
1927/28  3,668
1928/29  3,784
1929/30  3,854
1930/31  3,948
1931/32  3,959
1932/33  3,912
1933/34  3,873
1934/35  3,942
1935/36  3,956
1936737  4,025
1937/38  4.092
1938/39  4,194
1939/40  4,220
1940/41  4,248
1941/42  4,224
1942/43  4,055
1943/44  4,162
1944/45  4,354
1945/46  4,512
1946747  4,833
1947/48  5.116
1948/49  5,496
1949/50  5,873
1950/51  6,272
1951/52  6.598
1952/53  7.105
1953/54  7,574
1954/55  8.185
1955/56  8,690
1956/57  9,474
1957/58  10.171
1958/59  10.839
1959/60  11.513
1960/61  12,137
1961/62  12,772
1962/63  13,571
1963/64  14,415
1964/65  15,327
1965/66  16,173
1966/67  17.7426
1967/68  19.191
1968/69  20,481
1969/70  21,828
1970/71  22,678
1971/72  23,224
1972/73  23,365
1973/74  24,5857
1974/75  26,877
1975/76  27,870
1976/77  28,390
1977/78  28,820
1978/79  28,866
1979/80  28,821
1980/81  29,483
2,693
1,383
6,372
3.093
11,496
7.111
17,648
11,055
24,499
16.357
33,314
23,195
57,608
43.274
62,263
49,377
67,516
54,746
94,888
77,752
108,179
91,760
109,588
94,410
111,017
96,196
113,914
99,375
115,919
103,510
116,816
104,978
115,792
103,389
117,233
101,893
116,722
101,873
118.431
104,044
120,360
106,515
120,934
107,660
120,459
108,826
119,634
103,192
118,405
102,085
115,447
93,473
119.043
102.999
125,135
107,599
130.605
114.590
137,827
121,334
146.708
129,859
155,515
138.941
164,212
147,583
173,354
154,077
183,112
163.364
195,290
176.138
210,174
191.061
223,840
204.239
240,674
218,303
260,069
235,396
277,070
252,490
291.223
267,052
305,837
281.513
321.760
298,175
340.290
312,173
358,905
332.585
378.64]
348,472
400.080
367,718
420.790
379,045
445,228
408,452
467,486
425,514
489,596
447.643
513,079
466.264
527,106
476,643
534,523
481,353
537.106
481.686
548,999
489.303
553,991
494,877
555,238
495,715
547,994
484.226
539,198
478,792
528.752
477,145
525.491
477,169
522,888
464,352
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
86.08
87.91
88.36
88.81
89.67
90.26
89.19
89.58
90.62
91.25
91.63
91.12
90.98
91.71
92.32
92.61
93.23
92.69
93.76
93.23
93.25
91.50
93.28
92.64
93.87
93.74
93.41
93.38
93.20
92.86
93.13
92.95
93.13
92.89
93.07
93.35
93.40
60.758.752
113,689.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473.802.29
544,671.60
1,663.003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3.176,686.28*
3,532,518.95
3,765.920.69
3,743.317.08
3,834.727.19
4.015.074.37
2,849,972.02
2,611,937.80
2,835,040.74
2,972,385.04
3,277.660.23
3,524,962.69
3,630.670.78
3.585.769.00
3,963,848.24
4,028.397.88
3,924,243.53
4,244,898.82
5,022.534.59
5,765.205.50
9.398,473.46
12,468,653.18
17,363.430.94
22.809,631.23
25.830,076.88
26,885,980.43
26.555.080.24
24.060,233.15
34,279,302.27
41,067,740.34
43.989,524.32
50.861,473.63
53,288.028.94
59,472,055.06
70,174,999.84
77,632.903.48
83,782,121.79
95,497,375.16
105,017,594.75
119,871.278.31
144,702,607.40
181,854,578.21
251,827,287.92
292.556,398.29
354,470,298.48
382,221,877.00
425.505,748.00
481,823,740.00
551,647,880.00
704,839.307.00
822,600,150.00
923.735.364.00
939,872,187.00
1,082.192,325.00
1.213.874,699.00
215.056.223
425.555.10
604,357.86
1,220.509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.54*
9.261.094.98
11.149,996.27
10.008.255.66
10,061,387.99
9.719.333.81
8.941.497.34
8.213,369.04
8.458.156.00
8,775,353.78
9,593.562.64
10.193.367.08
10,640,740.47
10.521.684.92
10,982.364.49
11,120,801.94
11.502.291.35
12,231.029.35
13,683.538.18
14.818,625.81
20.176,930.53
25,768.392.09
35.538.079.88
47.726.750.37
54,195.133.95
57.881,559.48
58,401.121.15
70,791.844.25
80.823,263.71*
69,314.181.24s
77,653,192.32
90.483.765.63
101.351.107.94
115,941,018.06
133,401,622.84
145,535.715.48
157.614,783.79
177.539.584.16
199,114.313.75
227.937.392.31
269,217,969.40
332,702,367.21
384,336,617.68
437,743,656.54
516,309.118.90
557,875,205.00
612,808,108.00
694,357.161.00
832.876.042.005
1.068.408.139.00
1.223.758,028.00
1,374,983,287.00
1.514,050,579.00
1,689,934.617.00
1,695,906,543.00
T88
1 Average daily attendance as a percentage of FTE net enrolment. Since 1968/69, percentage of attendance is total
actual attendance as a percentage of total possible attendance.
The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
Excluding unknown expenditure made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
Since 1922/23 this amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the provincial universities and since
1963/64 to school district and regional colleges.
Since 1955/56 this amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
The numbers of teachers reported from 1966/67 on include district-wide teachers with supervisory and administrative duties. These district-wide teachers were excluded from this table priorto 1966/67.
7 Since 1973/74 the number of teachers is reported as of September 30 rather than June 30.
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J
 TABLE 3.6
T.RANSPORTATION COSTS
Conveyance
Total District
Conveyance
Costs as a
r"ear                                               Expenditures
Costs
Percentage of
District Expenditures
S
$
2,477,202
2,611.370
2,721,510
2,886.696
3.125.447
3.475.895
4,009.393
4,610,089
5.355.378
5,891,894
2.0
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.87
1.82
                    127.616.486
19691 	
                    323.153,465
1970' 	
                    361,429,563
6,556,422
1.81
7,216.520
8,072.883
1.89
1.84
19721 	
                    438,901.005
19731.....	
                    502,596,294
9,688,206
1.93
12,548,230
16,363.823
19,298.273
2.09
2.19
2.24
1976' 	
                    863,163,406
1977' 	
                    972,529,889
21.930,833
2.25
19781 	
                 1.051,344.671
24,253.143
2.31
1979' 	
                 1,161,912,446
26,618,014
2.23
1980	
                 1,287,129,312
30,404,769
2.36
1 Excluding college expenditures.
TABLE 3.7
SUMMARY OF SCHOOL DISTRICT
DORMITORY DATA, 1980/81
Capacity                    Occupancy
Staff
Grade Limits
Number and Name
Male         Female         Male         Female
Time           Time
7             —
4               I
8            12
8               12
29. Lillooet	
            30             30              30             30
4               1
12               4
8               12
8              12
92. Nisgha	
            47             47              47             47
27               6
■
T95
  PUBLIC SCHOOLS
4.   Schools
TABLE Page
4.1 Number of public schools in operation by type, September 1975 to 1980  T98
4.2 Senior secondary schools  X98
4.3 Secondary schools  T99
4.4 Junior secondary schools   T100
4.5 Elementary-senior secondary schools    T101
4.6 Elementary-junior secondary schools  T101
4.7 Elementary schools  T102
4.8 Summary of all schools   T103
4.9 School organization for schools enrolling secondary students, (September
1978 to 1980)   T104
4.10 School organization for schools enrolling secondary students by type of
school and by size of school   T105
T97
 TABLE 4.1 NUMBER OFPUBLIC SCHOOLS IN
OPERATION BY TYPE, SEPTEMBER 1975-80
Type
Numbers Open in September
1975        1976        1977        1978        1979        1980
Change
1975-80
Senior secondary	
Secondary	
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary..
            1
1,232
1.229
1,234
1.235
1,225
1.217
-15
1,582
542,688
1,602
536,192
1,611
527.771
1,615
517.786
1,606
511,671
1,600
509,805
Source: September 1980 Form Band I.
TABLE 4.2
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
:t Number and Nar
Number of
Schools
NumberofFTE
School-Attached
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
15.00
209
62.00
1.245
119.00
2.190
37.00
720
38.00
667
212.50
3,624
68.00
1,195
173.50
3,229
111.00
1,991
199.00
3,722
73.00
1,205
38.50
694
94.79
1,893
55.00
1,064
85.10
1,566
45.00
852
39.00
656
21. Armstrong-Spaliumchccn .
22. Vemon	
24.  Kamloops	
27. Cariboo-Chilcoiin	
28. Quesnel	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41.  Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
47.  Powell River	
61. Greater Victoria	
65.  Cowichan	
68.  Nanaimo	
71.  Courtenay	
89.  Shuswap	
TOTAL	
Source: September 1980 Form I.
T98
 TABLE 4.3
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
:t Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of FTE
Sc hool-Attached
September 30
Teachers
Enrolment
73.00
1.218
50.00
851
28.00
455
29,00
502
49.50
782
46.50
828
21.00
273
74.00
1,292
36.00
588
19.00
258
62.33
999
62.67
1.128
17.50
236
27.00
401
35.00
624
50.00
775
24.00
416
306,50
5.533
114.30
1.681
28.00
464
23.50
463
2.00
25
24.00
401
43.00
625
40.00
680
25.00
414
102.50
1,819
85.51
1.617
178.60
3,299
136.50
2,381
187.00
3.271
1.258.40
23.781
107.00
1.813
197.70-
3.296
155.00
2,491
268.65
4,962
158.78
2,776
48.00
777
53.00
879
12.00
145
20.00
232
36.00
653
50.25
841
30.60
482
38.50
601
350.75
5,806
38.50
713
42.00
803
230.28
4.231
13160
2,289
116.40
2,133
22.00
357
35.00
562
28.50
370
34.50
528
44.00
780
97.00
1,648
37.00
662
76.00
1.359
39.50
676
37.75
628
74.50
1,286
14.60
208
57.60
888
48.00
757
65.60
1,118
47.50
711
1. Femie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7. Nelson	
9.  Castlcgar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. GrandForks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Kcrcmeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
22. Vemon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcodn	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merrill	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delia	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast	
48. Howe Sound	
49. CentralCoast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52.  Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake 	
56. Nechako	
57. PrinceGeorge	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
84. Vancouver Island West..
85. Vancouver Island North .
86. Creston-Kaslo	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL	
Source: September 1980 Form I.
T99
 TABLE 4.4
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Nar
Number of
Schools
Number of FTE
September 30
Teachers
Enrolment
59.95
1,034
35.00
597
24.50
394
54.00
886
22.00
399
77.00
1.401
79.00
1.353
200.16
3.197
101.50
1,745
79.00
1,268
17.00
233
94.80
1,539
104.59
1,883
91.00
1,535
291.40
5,128
118.00
2,083
210.00
3,886
160.60
2.687
26.00
441
322.00
5,532
72.90
1.126
17.06
213
65.40
1,042
14.00
211
46.60
737
19.50
318
86.10
1,431
53.17
832
64.00
1,070
215.62
3,841
35.00
599
98.50
1,605
164.00
2,810
28.00
449
91.70
1.543
35.50
580
59.10
989
1.00
17
53.50
988
54.70
966
2. Cranbrook	
7. Nelson	
11. Trail	
15. Penticton	
21. Armslrong-Spallumchecn .
22. Vemon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
31. Merritt	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast	
47. PowellRiver.	
48. Howe Sound	
52. Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
57. Prince George.	
59. Peace River South	
60. PeaceRiverNorth	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
65. Cowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
70. Mbemi	
71. Courtenay	
72. CampbellRiver	
75. Mission	
84. Vancouver Island West	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
TOTAL 	
Source: Septemberl980FormI.
T100
 TABLE 4.5
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
:t Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of FTE
September 30
Teachers
Enrolment
27.50
358
18.00
258
7.00
128
17.00
252
67.50
1,162
32.50
479
21.00
344
26.00
394
69.00
1,070
16.25
199
25.00
424
13.50
171
31.00
539
26.00
382
29.00
414
24.00
362
26.80
422
21.10
320
14.00
201
26.50
406
7. Nelson	
10. Arrow Lakes  	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
32. Hope	
39. Vancouver	
41. Burnaby	
50. Queen Charlotte	
55. Bums Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George 	
59. Peace River South ....
60. Peace River North ....
70. Alberni	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
81. FortNelson 	
84. Vancouver Island West
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
92. Nisgha	
TOTAL 	
Source: September 1980 Form I.
TABLE 4.6
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
NumberofFTE
School-Attached
Teachers
September 30
Enrolment
1
18.50
249
1
31.60
494
1
11.40
145
1
23.17
415
1
17.00
266
1
26.00
478
1
20.40
435
1
4.10
67
8
35.50
671
2
7.90
98
1
8.80
108
1
13.00
222
I
37.00
637
1
32.10
524
1
47.90
885
1
26.00
368
2
11.10
158
1
2.00
38
2
12.00
198
3
34.00
418
1
11.50
169
3
10.50
143
4
45.40
760
1
26.14
456
4
86.30
1,518
2
11.70
151
1
14.00
267
2
45.19
805
3
54.00
907
3
40.80
726
1
1.00
14
1
5.50
76
3
48.70
729
3
18.00
248
I
6.00
37
1
9.00
161
I. Bernie	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
9. Castlegar	
11. Trail	
22.  Vernon	
24.  Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
30. SouthCariboo	
32. Hope	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
41.  Burnaby	
44.  North Vancouver	
47. Powell River	
49. CenlralCoast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52.  Prince Rupert	
55.  Bums Lake	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace RivcrNonh	
61. Greater Victoria	
63. Saanich ,	
64. Gulf Islands	
66. LakeCowichan	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
72. Campbell River	
81.  FortNelson	
84. Vancouver Island West..
85. Vancouver Island North .
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Sbuswap	
TOTAL	
Source: September 1980 Form I.
T101
 TABLE 4.7
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
1. Femie	
2. Cranbrook 	
3. Kimberley 	
4. Windermere	
7.  Nelson	
9.  Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes 	
11. Trail	
12. GrandForkS	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton 	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spa! lumchccn
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel 	
29. Lillooet	
30. SouthCariboo	
31. Merrill	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley 	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver 	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. MapleRidge	
43. Coquitlam 	
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sunshine Coasi	
47. Powell River 	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Central Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52.  PrinccRupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Bums Lake	
56. Nechako	
57. Prince George  	
59. PeaceRiverSouih 	
60. Peace RiverNorth 	
Number of
Schools
Number of FTE
School-Attached
Teachers
111.60
143.00
57.80
43.40
121.10
78.20
27.34
119.95
43.70
25.50
66.70
131.10
16.75
31.50
48.80
73.70
45.50
241.60
447.30
514.44
42.90
247.00
168.25
41.30
60.30
79.70
38.50
215.30
299.10
426.40
890.00
566.90
562.00
1,528.91
119.50
560.00
241.67
693.80
527.00
151.90
92.50
113.10
96.37
23.80
28.00
116.85
92.10
48.00
81.20
675.13
148.50
157.70
Sepiember30
Enrolment
2,287
2.905
1.067
769
2.457
1,565
496
2,441
802
407
1,255
2,833
9.232
10,349
3.310
646
1.163
1,539
737
4.493
6.579
8,833
19,357
11,528
10.832
30.596
2,223
10.726
4,990
13,353
9,928
3,106
1.858
2,305
1.957
303
479
2,417
1,883
871
1,676
13.467
3,181
3,322
636.23
241.90
141.10
33.60
223.60
34.30
359.60
73.90
197.60
191.77
162.60
158.10
21.50
37.00
96.40
40.50
27.40
87.01
62.53
4.00
174.30
150.50
13.00
              20
               13
4,933
2.726
569
4.415
              34
7,582
70.  Alberni	
               19
3.984
4,259
87.  Stikine	
88. Tetrace	
92.  Nisgha	
3,203
159
TOTAL 	
14,691.10
Source: September 1980 Form I.
T102
J
 TABLE 4.8
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
District Number and Name
NumberofFTE
School-Attached
September 30
Teachers
Enrolment
203.10
3,754
252.95
4,790
117.40
2.016
83.80
1.416
233.10
4.194
147.87
2,808
66.34
1.027
235.45
4,393
79.70
1.390
44.50
665
129.03
2.254
247.77
4,847
34.25
588
58.50
1.022
83.80
1.483
123.70
2.164
82.50
1.482
430.60
8,474
832.80
16.118
968.30
17.852
75.00
1.332
451.50
8.609
295.15
5,368
65.30
1,047
112.10
1,896
136.70
2,452
93.50
1,625
412.60
7.851
489,20
10.079
696.00
13.667
1.530.40
30.490
976.90
18.714
977.60
18.471
2.854.81
55.539
226.50
4,036
1.109.70
20.064
422.67
7.922
1,214.80
22.607
967.55
17,589
310.68
5.882
157.56
2,848
228.10
4,199
163.37
3,047
37.80
486
81.00
1.253
233.45
4,225
161.85
3,042
116.10
1.916
188.70
3.347
1,128.23
20.903
275.67
5.293
322.60
6,126
1,203.06
23,403
408.50
7,821
343.80
6,377
67.30
1.077
412.10
7.646
76.80
1.279
643.20
12.486
163.09
3.056
407.60
7.527
365.47
7.3)6
314.90
6.171
256.70
4.993
47.50
821
74.75
1,382
170.90
3.167
70.50
1,206
72.50
1,159
193.31
3,216
137.33
2,348
43.10
617
313.40
5.814
300.70
5,697
39.50
564
1. Femie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
7.  Nelson	
9.  Castleg.tr	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. GrandFoitcs	
13. KetUe Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen .
22. Vernon	
23. Central Okanagan	
24. Kamloops	
26. North Thompson	
27. Cariboo-Chilcotin	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. SouthCariboo	
31. Merrill	
32. Hope	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby	
42. MapleRidge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver	
45. WestVancouver	
46. Sunshine Coast	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Centra] Coast	
50. Queen Charlotte	
52.  Prince Rupert	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Nechako 	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich	
64. Gulf Islands	
65. Cowichan	
66. LakeCowichan	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-Harrison	
77. Summerland	
80. Kitimat	
81. FortNelson	
84. Vancouver Island West	
85. Vancouver Island North...
86. Creston-Kaslo	
87. Stikine	
88. Terrace	
89. Shuswap	
92.  Nisgha	
TOTAL	
Source: September 1980Form I.
T103
 TABLE 4.9 school organization for
SCHOOLS ENROLLING SECONDARY STUDENTS,
SEPTEMBER 1978 TO 1980
Partial
School Year
Semester
Semester
Semester
and Partial
10-Month
Other
Total
1978/79
145
48
3
12
136
24
368
1979/80
155
45
4
11
135
21
371
1980/81
161
37
2
13
131
30
374
Source: September 1978,1979and 1980FormK.
T104
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UDENTS BY TYP
CHOOL
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T105
 INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS
TABLE 5.1    GENERAL INFORMATION, 1980-81
1. PUPILS
Number of qualifying pupils
(group 1 and 2 schools)         19,624
2. TEACHERS
Number of teachers
(group 2 schools)  1,416
3. FINANCE
Percentage of average operating costs of the school district in which
the independent school is located applicable to grant.
Group 1 schools 9 Per Cent
Group 2 schools 30 Per Cent
4. SCHOOLS
Number of schools receiving grants  115
Classification of group 1 and 2 schools
Elementary (K-VII)  78
Elementary-junior secondary (K-X)  8
Elementary-senior secondary (K-XII)  12
Junior secondary (VII-X)  2
Secondary (VIII-XII)  15
115
T106
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T110
 TABLE 6.4
ENROLMENT1 INB. C. COMMUNITY
COLLEGES AND PROVINCIAL INSTITUTES
OCTOBER 31,1980
University                Career/
College
Institution
Transfer               Technical
Preparatory
Vocational
Total
INSTITUTES
[      BCTT	
Full-time
—                    3,936
—
23
3,959
Part-time
11.667
—
—
11,667
Total
15,603
—
23
15,626
B.C. Mining School 	
Full-time
—                         —
—
45
45
Part-time
—                         —
—
—
—
Total
—                         —
—
45
45
Emily Can-College of An ...
Pull-time
—                       524
—
—
524
Part-time
—                            16
—
—
16
Total
—                       540
—
—
540
Open Learning Institute	
Full-time
14                           2
24
—
40
Part-time
789                       883
518
—
2,190
Total
803                       885
542
2,230
Pacific Marine Training
Institute	
Full-time
83
83
Part-time
—                         —
—
—
Total
—                         —
—
83
83
I     Pacific Vocational Institute..
Full-time
—                         —
—
2,347
2,347
Part-time
—                         —
—
—
—
Total
—                         —
—
2,347
2,347
I     Sub-total	
Full-time
14                       4,462
24
2,498
6,998
Part-time
789                   12.566
518
—
13,873
Total
803                   17,028
542
2.498
20.871
COLLEGES
Full-time
476                       723
311
1,091
-2,601
Part-time
834                       308
245
—
1,387
Total
1,310                     1,031
556
1,091
3,988
Capilano	
Full-time
645                       639
—
432
1.716
Part-lime
1.173                       768
—
—
1.941
Total
1,818                     1,407
—-
432
3,657
Cariboo 	
Pull-time
428                       316
44
984
1,772
Part-time
546                       424
186
_H
1,156
Total
974                       740
230
984
2,928
Douglas	
Full-time
1,685                       653
—
832
3,170
Part-time
2,666                       593
—
—
3,259
Total
4,351                     1,246
—
832
6,429
Full-lime
76                         41
317
434
Part-time
239                       254
85
578
Total
315                       295
85
317
1.012
1       Fraser Valley	
Full-time
332                       212
11
416
971
Part-time
570                       313
80
—
963
Total
902                       525
91
416
1,934
Full-time
452                       396
61
888
1.797
Part-time
1,008                       491
81
—
1,580
Total
1.460                       887
142
888
3,377
New Caledonia	
Full-time
359                       387
—
835
1,581
Part-time
474                       385
—
—
859
Total
833                        772
—
835
2.440
[     North Island 	
Full-time
Part-time
133                         22
1,100                        160
16
469
187
358
1,729
Total
1,233                        182
485
187
2.087
Northern Lights	
Full-time
28                          14
9
353
404
Part-time
166                       322
9
497
Total
194                       366
18
353
901
Full-time
49                         32
—
572
653
Part-time
286                         66
21
—
373
Total
335                         98
21
572
1.026
Okanagan	
Full-time
643                        556
88
803
2,090
Part-time
531                        469
106
—
1.106
Total
1,174                     1,025
194
803
3.196
Selkirk	
Full-time
312                       401
21
382
1.116
Part-time
252                        197
25
—
474
Total
564                       598
46
382
1.590
Full-time
1,695                     1.120
257
2,402
5,474
Part-time
2,075                       494
1.065
_
3.634
Total
3,770                     1.614
1.322
2,402
9,108
Full-time
7,313                    5.512
818
10.494
24,137
Part-time
11.920                    5,244
2.372
19.536
Total
19,233                   10,756
3.190
10,494
43,673
TOTAL 	
Full-time
7,327                    9,974
842
12,992
31.135
Part-time
12,709                   17,810
2,890
—
33,409
GRAND
TOTAL
20,036                  27,784
3,732
12,992
64.544
Source:   Academic/Technical data: College Statistical Reports. Data reported as at October 31,1980
Vocational Data: Form TV-21
Note:      Continuing Education enrolments are excluded from this tab
e. General Studies enrolments
T111
are included with University Transfer and Career/Technical enrolments.
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