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Liquor Distribution Branch Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs Peter S. Hyndman, Minister 60th… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1982

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 r
—-
Liquor Distribution Branch
Ministiy of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
Peter S. Hyndman, Minister
60th aAaimual Report
April 1,1980 — March 31,1981
Queen's Printer for British Columbia
Victoria, 1982
By Authority of the Legislative Assembly
 Letter of Transmittal	
Organization & Scope	
The Year at a Glance	
Organization Chart	
The General Manager's Report....
Total Liquor Consumption	
Volume Sales	
Retail Price Breakdown	
Comparative Classification of Sales
Financial Statements	
Staffing Summary 	
Finance	
Management Services 	
Personnel	
Store Operations  	
Distribution	
Security	
Purchasing	
Products	
Internal Audit	
Communications	
Summary of Store Sales 	
British Columbia Cataloguing in Publication Data
British Columbia. Liquor Distribution Branch.
Annual report. — 57th (1977/78) —
Report year ends Mar. 31.
Continues: British Columbia. Liquor Distribution Branch. Liquor DistSffl
Branch and Liquor Control and Licensing Branch: annual report. ISSN 0706-39S
ISSN 0710-8648 = Annual report — Liquor Distribution Branch.
1. British Columbia. Liquor Distribution Branch. 2. Liquor traffic — Brifis
Columbia — Periodicals.
HV5087.C3B74      354.71100761
 Liquor Distribution Branch
Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
Vancouver, British Columbia
December 31,1981
Honourable Peter S. Hyndman
Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, British Columbia
Sir:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Sixtieth Annual Report of
the Liquor Distribution Branch, covering the year ended March 31,1981.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
R.A. Wallace
General Manager
 Organization and Scope
The Moderation Act of 1921 established the provincial government inffl
operations, as exclusive importer, shipper and seller of alcoholic beverages in Britii
Columbia. In June of that year, the first liquor stores opened for business, under II
Liquor Control Board.
The Liquor Control Board continued to be responsible for all liquor achyii
under Government control until 1975, when the Board as such was abolished and
government liquor operations reorganized. Two branches, currently under the
Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs, were created to handle the separah
aJ^L~—^!^^^SS^^&r' ""'   &■      closely related functional areas of
lta]u  -       j stag.  - ^  \V)i\Villi
ii I o
Distribution and Control and Licensi:
The purpose of the Liquor
Distribution Branch is, in accordance
with the Liquor Distribution Act,ffl
provide service acceptable to consnm
of alcoholic beverages in British ■
Columbia; to achieve established fina
returns, to provide suppliers with a
controlled access to the marketplace.
fair and equitable basis; and to encou
moderation and maturity in the use i
alcoholic products.
The Liquor Distribution Bra
is solely responsible for the selection,
purchase, pricing and distribution of all alcoholic beverages (wine, spirits and beer)
throughout the Province, in a retail store system and to license holders. The Bran
handles duty-free and in-bond product and bottles its own line of private label
products. All financial returns from retail liquor sales and licensee assessmentt^ffi
controlled by the Branch.
The Liquor Control and Licensing Branch is responsible for the receipt o(
applications, approval, and issuing of licenses to all liquor outlets other than retail
stores i.e. hotels, restaurants, clubs, and oversees and controls the performanoffi
these licensees. As well, the Branch licenses all wineries, breweries and distillei^j
the Province and their agents, and monitors and controls liquor advertising.
Headquartered in Victoria, the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch has inspectto
offices around British Columbia.
A portfolio of approximately 2,000 products is offered for sale to the Liqr
Distribution Branch's customers. With over 200 outlets in the Province, sales ■
exceeding three quarters of a billion dollars, 75 million customer contacts per year
almost 3,000 employees during peak periods, the Branch is the largest retail  1
organization in British Columbia. A ten acre Head Office and Distribution Cehge
complex is maintained in Vancouver.
 The Year at a Glance
Year Ending
March 31,1981
Sales
Revenue
Operating Expenses
Largest Store — Sales
Smallest Store — Sales
Through Liquor Stores
Retail  $583,176,007
Licensee  $110,842,783
$694,018,790
Direct Deliveries to Licensees
(Malt Liquor)  $104,772,159
All Sales Total  $798,790,949
Net Revenue  $280,410,866
Total Operating Expenses  $ 78,998,408
Central Licensee  $ 37,224,642
Port Edward  $       204,445
Government Liquor Stores  211
Agency Stores      53
Total Outlets  264
Regular Employees   1,799
Auxiliary Employees     1,491
Total Personnel  3,290
Cases Shipped From Distribution
Centre  7,900,000
Products Carried
General Listings  1,400
Specialty Listings     562
Total Products  1,962
Stores
Personnel
Products
 Organization Chart
as at March 31,1981
MINISTRY OF CONSUMER AND CORPORATE AFFAIRS
MINISTER
The Hon. PS. Hyndman
DEPUTY MINISTER
(Acting)
E.T. Cantell
B.C. LIQUOR DISTRIBUTION BRANCH
GENERAL MANAGER
RA. Wallace
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
LA. Burfoot
CHIEF AUDITOR
D.W. Chung
COMMUNICATIONS MANAE
C.J. Courtney^!
SECURITY MANAGER
J.R. Bowcott
DIRECTOR
STORE
OPERATIONS
A.V. Branham
DIRECTOR
FINANCE
LN. Dyer
DIRECTOR
MANAGEMENT
SERVICES
S.P. Dubas
DIRECTOR
DISTRIBUTION
CE. Ruddick
DIRECTOR
PURCHASING
K.D. Brownlow
MANAGER
RECRUITMENT
& STAFF
DEVELOPMENT
AJ. Allen
MANAG
CLASiHj
nojgl
LABOl
RELATC3
K.L. Lei
 ff
The General Manager's Report
A LOOK AT 60 YEARS
By Robert A. Wallace
The close of fiscal year ending March 31, 1981 marked the sixtieth year of
operation for the Liquor Distribution Branch and its predecessor, the Liquor Control
Board.
Over these sixty years, the history of the Branch's operations is a reflection of
the many changes that have taken place in the Province of British Columbia. There
have been significant shifts in public policy regarding liquor sales and consumption in
response to changing societal norms and attitudes over the years.
The overall scope of operations
has come a long way. In 1921, total sales
through government liquor outlets was
$6.4 million while for the year ending
March 31,1981, sales through liquor
stores was $694.0 million. The net
revenue transferred to the Province of
British Columbia in the first year of
operation was $400 thousand as
compared to $280 million for the year
under report. In 1921, there were 50
liquor stores, while in 1980/81,
government liquor stores and agency
stores numbered 264. There were less
than 100 products available in the first
year, compared to just under 2,000
listings offered by the Branch for the
year ending March 31,1981.
Since the early years, the
employees of the Branch have worked very hard to achieve the continuing and, at
times, conflicting objectives of providing a high level of customer service, while
meeting revenue targets; making beverage alcohols available yet acknowledging the
social responsibility of their use; and utilizing innovative and modern merchandising
methods within a highly regulated system.
The Liquor Distribution Branch today is a consumer oriented progressive
retail organization, responsive to its "shareholders", the general public of B.C.
In 1980/81, the Branch opened the largest retail liquor store in the Province
(the "flagship" Cambie store in Vancouver), continued to service customers during the
disruptions of a long labour dispute at domestic breweries, introduced a sophisticated
Financial Information & Control System, made a commitment to proceed with a
satellite Distribution Centre in the Interior, doubled the number of specialty products
offered, developed a modern laboratory and analysis facility, and continued the
aggressive upgrading program for stores throughout B.C., among many other new
and established programs.
I take this opportunity to recognize the contribution and hard work of all past
employees, with a special thank you to all the staff who helped achieve our objectives
for the period reported in this sixtieth Annual Report to the Minister.
 -m
Total Liquor Consumption
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31,1981
(Based on Imperial Gallons)
Spirits 11.9%
Domestic Wine 9.3%
Import Wine 4.6%
Import Beer 5.0%
Cider 1.1%
Domestic Beer 68.1%
100%
 Volume Sales
YEAR ENDING MARCH 31
(Based on Imperial Gallons)
TOTAL SPIRIT MARKET
MILLIONS OF GALLONS
78 1      1 5,757,843
79 1        1 6,335,032
80           16,142,011
81 |         | 7,024,566
0                   10                   20
30                  40                   50                  60               70
TOTAL WINE MARKET
MILLIONS OF GALLONS
78          | 5,727,861
79 1        B 6,829,624
80             I 6,896,705
81 1                 8,219,110
0                   10                   20
30                  40                   50                  60                70
TOTAL BEER MARKET
MILLIONS OF GALLONS
78 1
49,001,000
79 1
40,930,000
80
49,904,000
81
43,824,739
0                    10                   20
30                 40                  50                 60               70
TOTAL MARKET
MILLIONS OF GALLONS
78 I
60,486,704
79 1
54,094,656
80
62,942,716
81 1
59,068,415
0                   10                   20
30                   40                   50                   60                70
9
 Retail Price Breakdown
i
Examples as at March 31,1981
Note: Product categories not shown also have unique price structures.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TABLE WINE
750 ml bottle
Prime Cost from Supplier $2.20
IMPORTED TABLE WINE
Freight .01
Federal Excise Tax .21                 \
Federal Sales Tax .28
LDB Markup 1.25
Provincial Sales Tax.28
750 ml bottle
Prime Cost from Supplier $1.46
Freight .46
Total Cost to Consumer $4.23
Federal Import
Duty and Excise Tax .34
Federal Sales Tax .21
LDB Markup 2.48
Provincial Sales Tax .35
Total Cost to Consumer $5.30
DOMESTIC SPIRITS
710 ml bottle
IMPORTED SPIRITS
710 ml bottle
Prime Cost from Supplier $1.94
Freight .01
Federal Excise Tax 1.87
Federal Sales Tax .46
LDB Markup 4.72
L           -<
Total Cost to Consumer $9.63
Prime Cost from Supplier $1.96
Freight .25
Federal Import Duty 1.95
Federal Sales Tax .47
LDB Markup 5.32
Provincial Sales Tax .70
Total Cost to Consumer $10.65
10
  Comparative Classification of Sales!
1981 1980
Spirits
Canadian         $286,177,989 $230,297
Imported           102,679,627 85,392
$388,857,616 $315,689
Wines
British Columbia         $ 71,454,773 $ 47,782
Other Canadian              1,250,591 1,616
AUDIT
72,705,364 49,3®
Imported Wines  82,069,194 68,687
$154,774,558       $118,086
Malt Liquor (Beer)
Canadian         $224,031,023       $213,424
Imported  24,680,167 9,273
$248,711,190 $222,697
Cider
Canadian         $    5,313,643 $    3,486
Imported  112,084  99
$    5,425,727       $    3,586
Total Liquor Sales        $797,769,091       $660,059
Non-Alcoholic Sales  1,021,858 872
All Sales — Total        $798,790,949       $660,932
Less Direct Deliveries to Licensees (Malt Liquor)
Canadian         $104,772,159       $ 95,315
Liquor Distribution Branch Sales        $694,018,790       $565,tlR
The annual audit of the accounts of the British Columbia Liquor DistriBB
Branch was completed by the Auditor General for the fiscal year ended March m
1981. The Auditor General's Report on the audit is incorporated in her report to tl
Legislative Assembly for this fiscal year.
12
 Financial Statements
1980
Assets
Current Assets
Cash (note 2)         $       48,354 $ 1,576,061
Accounts receivable                702,657 309,470
Inventories           28,741,009 26,244,301
29,492,020 28,129,832
Fixed Assets, at cost (note 3)           18,795,875 11,608,624
Less accumulated depreciation             8,988,100 7,662,968
9,807,775 3,945,656
$39,299,795 $32,075,488
Liabilities
Current Liabilities I
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities        $34,820,388 $26,207,071
Province of British Columbia
Working capital advance  4,479,407 5,868,417
$39,299,795 $32,075,488
Commitments (note 5)
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
R.A. Wallace L.N. Dyer
General Manager Director of Finance
13
 STATEMENT OF INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,lj
1981 1980
Sales (note 4)               $694,018,790 $565,617,J
Cost of merchandise sold           370,994,246 304,899, J
323,024,544 260,718,:
Provincial Malt Levy (note 4)            32,662,639 31,164,1
355,687,183 291,882, (
Operating expenses (schedule)            78,998,408 69,272,
276,688,775 222,609,
Other income              3,722,091 1,464,'
Net Income         $280,410,866 $224,073,1
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN PROVINCIAL ADVANCE
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1981
1981 1980
Balance at beginning of period        $    5,868,417 $   6,801,i
Net Income           280,410,866 224,073,'S
Cash payments to Provincial Treasury         (281,799,876) (225,007,i
Balance at end of period         $    4,479,407 $    5,868.
14
 STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FINANCIAL POSITION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1981
1981 1980
Funds Derived From Operations:
Net income    $280,410,866 $224,073,996
Add charges not involving an outlay
of funds
Depreciation    1,658,135 671,150
Net book value of fixed asset
disposals        55,074  37,188
282,124,075 224,782,334
Funds Applied To:
Acquisition of fixed assets  7,575,328 2,288,092
Cash payments to the Provincial
Treasury   281,799,876 225,007,188
289,375,204 227,295,280
Increase (Decrease) in working capital  (7,251,129) (2,512,946)
Working capital at beginning of year  1,922,761 4,435,707
Working Capital (Deficiency),
at end of year         $   (5,328,368) $    1,922,761
Working Capital
Current assets           $ 29,492,020 $ 28,129,832
Current liabilities  34,820,388 26,207,071
Working Capital (Deficiency),
at end of year        $  (5,328,368) $    1,922,761
15
 FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1981
1. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES:
Revenues and expenses are reflected on an accrual basis.
Merchandise inventory is valued at its latest landed cost. Customs and excise taxi
are not included in the value of inventory where payment is due upon shipment! I
from the bonded warehouse.
Expenditures for buildings, leasehold improvements, furniture, fixtures and   j
equipment are capitalized and are subject to depreciation on a straight line basis a
follows:
Buildings
Leasehold Improvements
Furniture, fixtures
and equipment
2. CASH:
Cash on hand and in banks (overdraft).
Cash in transit	
7V5% per annum
a minimum of 10% per annum or a i
rate sufficient to write off the cost I
over the remaining life of the ;
respective lease.
25% per annum
1981 1980
$(3,023,186)        $(2,49JRJ(
3,071,540 4,067,9,
$      48,354 $ l,5ZcfB;
3. FIXED ASSETS:
Land	
Buildings	
Leasehold
Improvements.
Furniture
Fixtures and
Equipment
Net Book Value .
1981
1980
Cost
Accumulated
Depreciation
Cost
AccumuUL
Depreciatt
801,752  $  —
6,712,737   4,146,293
$  450,752  $  -
5,734,951   4,043,6
1,618,749
-169;506;-
35,734
15,a
9,662,637   4,672,301    5,387,187   3,604,(8
18,795,875   8,988,100   11,608,624   7,662,!j
j  9,807,775 $ 3,945,656
16
 4. SALES:
Included in sales are non-alcoholic items amounting to $1,021,858 (1980 —
$872,710).
Sales made directly to Licensed Establishments by authorized Brewers' agents on
behalf of the Liquor Distribution Branch totaling $104,772,159 (1980 —
$95,315,359) are not included in the sales reported by the Branch. The Provincial
Malt Levy reported on the Income Statement represents the margin on these sales.
5. COMMITMENTS:
Employees of the Branch contribute to the Public Service Superannuation Fund 6%
of their salaries for basic pension purposes, plus Yi% of salaries for cost-of-living
indexed increases in pension benefits. The contributions shown in the Schedule
include in addition to matching employee contributions, supplementary assessments
paid by the Branch to fund any deficiency in pensions for employees who retired
during the year. This supplementary assessment was $1,681,585 in 1981
($1,958,813 — 1980).
An actuarial evaluation of the Public Service Superannuation Fund was made at
March 31,1977. Details of the unfunded liability are described in the Public
Accounts of British Columbia. The portion of the unfunded liability attributable to
the Liquor Distribution Branch was not determined by the actuary.
The Branch maintains inventory in its bonded warehouse for which Customs and
Excise tax has neither been paid nor recorded. As at March 31,1981 the future
liability for these taxes approximates $3,300,000.
In 1979, a new procedure to warehouse imported stocks by Suppliers' Agents was
implemented. Under this new concept, the Branch has a contractual obligation to
purchase all inventories held by the agent should he opt out of the program. The
obligation of the Branch should all agents choose to terminate their contracts, totals
approximately $32,000,000 as at March 31,1981.
Total commitments to March 31,1981 for lease of premises amount to $25,350,000.
Of this $4,200,000 becomes payable during the year ending March 31,1982.
6. COMPARATIVE FIGURES:
Certain of the 1980 figures provided for purposes of comparison have been restated
to conform with the classifications used in the current year. These changes have
had no effect on the net earnings.
17
 OPERATING EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1981
Salaries and Wages	
Superannuation Fund ..
Unemployment
Insurance 	
Canada Pension 	
Dental and Extended
Health 	
B.C. Medical	
Long-Term Disability ...
Workers' Compensation
Board	
Group Insurance	
Rents	
Freight to Stores	
Data Processing 	
Sundries	
Depreciation	
Light, Water and Fuel...
Store Wrapping
Supplies  821,875 821,875 649i
Repairs and
Maintenance  94,977 464,617 229,994 789,588 768J|
Travelling    291,480 424,942 716,422 630,3
Agency Commissions  701,868 - 701,868 480,8
Printing and
Stationery  29,530 274,336 331,139 635,005 375.C
Bank Charges  — — 318,312 318,312 299,8
Telephone and
Telegraph  1,401 128,477 177,454 307,332 244,1
Property Charges  221,984 57,765 279,749 260,i
Litter Act — Container
Disposal Cost  — — 229,630 229,630 1,247H
Staff Benefits    1,763 30,445 107,554 139,762 7J1
Postage and Express  42,501 — 42,501 541
Insurance  45,700 45,700
Municipal Business
Taxes  — - — lTftl
1981
198C
Warehouse
Retail Store
Administrative
Total
Totai
$3,313,005
$41,372,999
$ 5,550,621
$50,236,625
$44,731
150,165
1,887,045
1,912,730
3,949,940
4,067,1]
43,051
540,996
66,267
650,314
500.C
39,487
496,216
60,782
596,485
518,t
38,236
480,485
58,855
577,576
474.S
22,721
285,527
34,975
343,223
306.8
21,692
272,597
33,391
327,680
326,.;
19,701
247,574
30,325
297,600
313,1
11,009
138,345
16,946
166,300
150,':
238,329
4,432,345
—
4,670,674
3,951,.:
—
4,170,616
—
4,170,616
3,159.E
—
—
3,163,638
3,163,638
1,585, a
390,742
629,628
1,187,013
2,207,383
2,174,8
372,812
720,815
564,508
1,658,135
671.)
107,085
847,390
—
954,475
998,5
$5,117,690       $59,335,942        $14,544,776 $78,998,408      _$69,272J
18
 WINES OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
t ■wl,ltllM_____r <$£££$
:**Sft
'■jjaflrr^r—•-
Sum
Pife:™
 Establishment of Regular Positions
Department/Division
Posit
Store Operations
 ,  1
Audit                                                                                                                              -'^B
1
20
 The year 1980/81 was of singular significance in the Finance Department. It
marked the introduction of a computerized General Ledger and a unique Stores Data
Collection System, which combined to form the Financial Information and Control
System (F.I.C.S.). In addition, a new and greatly expanded Budgeting and Financial
Analysis System was introduced, an integrated Accounts Payable System implemented
and an automated Customs Documentation System designed. The resulting major
changes in tasks and responsibilities necessitated reorganization of the Department
into a number of divisions.
CONTROLLER
The Management Sciences of
America computerized package was
chosen as the General Ledger vehicle.
The control and maintenance of that
system became the responsibility of the
newly created Financial Reporting
section. In order to integrate Accounts
Payable with that system, a
Disbursements Accounting section was
formed to process all invoices and control
payments. An extensive training program was undertaken so that existing staff could
make the transition from manual to computerized accounting. During this fiscal year,
the responsibility for product pricing was transferred from the Purchasing
Department to the Cost Accounting section of the Controller's Division.
RETAIL ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATION
The voluminous transaction-posting originating with over 200 Branch outlets
flowed into the Stores Data Collection System, a main responsibility of this Division.
The system includes monitoring the processing of entries into the financial accounts.
Data collected in this "front-end" system continued as the prime source of statistical
data reported to all levels of management. Various administrative functions were
assigned to this Division, including the Branch insurance program, store imprest bank
accounts, manuals and procedural instructions, claims and accounts receivable
procedures and maintenance of computer records for each of the products listed by the
Branch.
BUDGETS AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
This newly established Division successfully designed, developed and
implemented a formal operating, capital and man-year budget system. The
introduction of the "Authority for Expenditure" concept established the control and
evaluation of capital expenditures prior to acquisition. Various periodical budget
reports were published on a timely basis to advise senior management of the status of
sales, operating and capital expenditures and manpower consumption pertaining to
their area of responsibility, with variances analyzed and explanations provided. The
Division provided financial analysis and recommendations to senior management on a
request basis on all Branch activities having financial implications.
21
 Management Services
CORPORATE SYSTEMS
Fiscal year 1980/81 saw several significant changes within this Divisionffl
Management Services Department.
The acquisition of new computer hardware to support the growing sysrem
function within the Branch necessitated the construction of and move to a new dat
centre at the Head Office complex. Among other equipment, four computer svsmfl
continued to operate 24 hours a day by a team of data processing staff.
In October, 1980, a new computer-based ordering system came on-lineJMl
licensees in the Greater Vancouver Regional District, providing improved service le'
for commercial accounts.
The fully automated Financial Information and Control System (F.I.C.SjmBu
implemented to handle the 20,000 data transactions daily from the store system"
The 1981/82 fiscal year will see further innovation in the Corporate Syster
area; with a planned organizational chart to include regularization of current staff; I
establishment of an on-site "Problem Centre" staffed by British Columbia Systems
Corporation personnel; and the visible development of a production schedule for
Senior Management use.
SUPPORT SERVICES
A word processing centre was established as a support service to all
Departments within the Branch, utilizing several systems.
22
 INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
The Industrial Engineering Division continued to provide service to
management in such areas as construction, space planning, materials handling,
productivity systems and cost analysis. During this period, the Division helped
implement an On-Line Order Entry System for Licensees, completed a major
Cafeteria renovation project, completed facilities for a Satellite Distribution Centre at
Lake City (Burnaby), and completed a variety of other Branch projects.
MARKETING RESEARCH AND
CORPORATE PLANNING
In response to very diverse
functional areas, during the course of the
fiscal year the Division completed several
market analyses with sales forecasts in
connection with store location, relocation,
conversion and sizing decisions. In
fulfilling its mandate as a marketing
research entity, the Division continued to
provide sales and other information to
in-house personnel as well as to external
parties. A direct result was the
publication of the first issue of the
Quarterly Market Review midway
through the year. Compiled from the
large data base and showing statistical
trends within product groups, the
publicly distributed report is unique in
Canada among provincial liquor
authorities. Another on-going role was
the monitoring and evaluation of sales
and specific market changes, such as the impact of the new Cambie specialty store.
As a corporate planning function, the Division was responsible for the further
development, implementation, integration, and evaluation of the Branch Business
Plan. Finally, as a general research department, several policy and position papers
were prepared at the request of senior management.
_
23
 ^i
Property Planning and Developmeni
A planned program to upgrade the overall store system was carried out
during the year by the Property Planning and Development Division of the
Management Services Department. The section carried out project coordination^
including site selection, lease negotiation, interior store design, materials handlirSI
fixtures design, space planning, store safety and security, project cost control,
advertising, tendering, and local community liaison. The new store designs
incorporated many innovative techniques into the Branch's retail outlets for imnWI
customer services such as energy conservation features, climatized unloading facilitf
heated entry vestibules, revamped
checkouts, and individual store decors; I
often incorporating the history or ■
industry of the local communityJB
Among the elements of the
program were store fixtures designed 3
this Division and custom-made for the 1
Branch, for example the continuo^Ml
beer racks. The new internal sign
program for customer information wa
built around a two-colour theme fo» I
policies and products. The store extern
sign program was virtually completed )
by year-end.
Whenever feasible, the life of i
existing stores in good locations was   I
extended by making them more   I
functional, with increased capacity for products. Rejuvenation of older facilities was
accomplished by new heating and air-conditioning systems, improved staff facilities
end aisle displays, wire wine islands, meeting rooms, better parking and truck acces I
During 1980/81, major renovations were done on 6 stores, including 3 conversic^SI
self-serve. New premises were completed in 12 locations, with 4 of these additions
the overall store system.
In mid year, the Branch opened the largest self-serve store in B.C. (and
the largest in Canada), a unique 22,000 square foot specialty outlet at 39th
and Cambie, on Vancouver's south slope. Featuring many innovative marketing ani
merchandising techniques and offering the full range of wines, spirits, and beer, thi
new concept Cambie store displays wines by country and region of origin and house
separate temperature and humidity controlled room for vintage and rare winesM^
24
 II
PREMISES OPENED
Store Location
Completion Date
Project Features
Tahsis
Chalet Plaza, Tahsis
April 30, 1980
Replacement and conversion
to self-serve
Kerrisdale
2060 West 41st Avenue,
Vancouver
September 2,1980
Major renovation
Broadway & Maple
2020 West Broadway,
Vancouver
September, 1980
Major renovation
Creston Valley
Creston Valley Mall, Creston
September 18, 1980
Replacement and conversion
to self-serve
Creston Canyon
Canyon Street, Creston
September 18, 1980
New conventional
"convenience"
Hope
770 Fifth Avenue, Hope
October 15,1980
Major renovation and
conversion to self-serve
Quadra & Hillside
2670 Fifth Street, Victoria
October 31,1980
New
Westview
770 Westview Shopping Centre
North Vancouver
November, 1980
Major renovation
Prince George Hart
Hart Shopping Centre
3825 West Austin Road,
November 6,1980
Replacement
Prince George
Oliver
329 First Avenue, Oliver
December 1,1980
Major renovation and
conversion to self-serve
McBride
Robson Valley Centre, McBride
December 3,1980
Replacement and conversion
to self-serve
Lougheed Plaza
9638 Cameron Street, Burnaby
December 5,1980
New
Whistler
Whistler Town Centre,
Alta Lake
December 11, 1980
Replacement from trailer
39th & Cambie
5555 Cambie Street, Vancouver
December 13,1980
New, Specialty
Nanaimo Terminal Park
1533 Estevan Road, Nanaimo
January 12,1981
Replacement
Radium
Highway 95, Radium
February 12,1981
Replacement
Cassiar
Connell Drive, Cassiar
February 19,1981
Replacement and conversion
to self-serve
Castlegar
1101 Fourth Street, Castlegar
March 17,1981
Major renovation and
conversion to self-serve
25
 Personnel
REORGANIZATION
At the end of this fiscal year, further reorganization took place in PerscS
a part of the reorganization within the Ministry, dividing Personnel Services foam
Branch into two separate functional areas: Recruitment/Staff Development and
Labour Relations/Classifications/Administration.
RECRUITMENT/SELEC™
Area Managers and Store]
Managers as well as Department
supervisors became increasingly invol
in and more knowledgeable of the]
selection process. Regular positioi^H
during the year totalled 164, with MM
auxiliary/statutory term employees!
STAFF DEVELOPMENTS
TRAINING
Leadership was provided to
internal training sessions includingffit
P.O.S. (Point of Sale) and the F.I.cm
(Financial Information and Control
System) programs, and for a variety c
specialized technical/supervisory   j
programs in the Distribution CentS
addition, administrative services were
provided for the 3,635 employees
attending 63 courses on a wide vaMj
topics, including Stress, Labour RelSi
Grade 12 Equivalency, and Safetyfflj]
Cashier Retraining Program was
introduced during this year with i^ffl
policy and procedures developed in
conjunction with Store Operation^™
Revision continued on the "Handbook
New Employees", and "SupervisoiM^
Handbook", for completion in the^ffi
fiscal year. An audio visual orientals
program was produced for use in nev
employee training.
26
 LABOUR RELATIONS
Continued improvement in overall Labour Management Relations was noted
in this fiscal year. This improvement was due in large part to a general increase in
management skills, as well as greater familiarity by the bargaining unit with the
Collective Agreement signed in 1979. During the summer, the Branch was indirectly
involved in a labour dispute between the Brewery Workers and their employers —
Molson, Labatt and Carling OTCeefe Breweries. The Branch premises were picketed by
the Brewery Workers, and a Cease and Desist Order was obtained from the Labour
Relations Board. When the Brewery Workers' Union refused to comply with the order,
it was subsequently filed as a Court Order, and when this too was defied, the Branch
sought and was granted leave to sue for damages. This suit is presently still under
judicial review. During the year, Labour Relations training modules were presented to
the majority of liquor store managers and well received. The overall improvement in
labour/management relations was in part attributed to greater understanding by first
line managers of the Labour Relations process.
SAFETY
There were 30 Workers' Compensation Board inspections, of which 10
resulted in no written orders. One order was disputed, with the order subsequently
being withdrawn. All other orders were either complied with or, where major
structural change was involved, were included in renovation plans with a notice of
compliance issued. Seven Occupational Environment Branch orders were written
against the Liquor Distribution Branch in this fiscal year. Notices of compliance have
been filed on all orders.
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
There were 264 referrals to Occupational Health in this fiscal year, a slight
increase over the previous report. The Screening Committee received 11 applications
of which 5 are still awaiting disposition. Of the others, 3 were accepted for transfers
which occurred, 2 were rejected and one was concluded as a result of medical inability
to return to any work.
27
 Store Operations
As the major line department of the Branch, the mission of Store Operand
continued to be to operate the retail store system. The effective and efficient
management of that system with courteous and informed staff was the goal of Stc
Operations within the overall Branch consumer service mandate.
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR STORES
The total number of government 1
quor stores at year-end stood at 211,
consisting of 141 self-serve and 70 conventional (counter) stores.
Ten Largest Stores (by item
Ten Smallest Stores (by item
volume, beginning with the highest
volume
beg
inning with the lowesB
ranked as at March 31,1981):
ranked
as at March 31,1981):
1. Central Licensee
1.
Port Edward
2. Broadway & Maple
2.
Atlin
3. Nanaimo Terminal Park
3.
Greenwood
4. Campbell River
4.
New Denver
5. Richmond Brighouse
5.
Pender Island
6. Fort Street
6.
Lytton
7. Victoria Drive
7.
McBride
8. Government Street Licensee
8.
Granisle
9. Kennedy Heights
9.
Gabriola Island
10. Robson Street
10.
Ocean Falls
28
J
 POINT OF SALE
By the end of the fiscal year, a total of 72 liquor stores throughout the
Province were utilizing their new sophisticated electronic cash registers, as part of the
continuing Point of Sale Project.
In the Fall, 55 stores were trained and began operation with the new cash
register system. The stores receiving the new registers were mostly outside of the
Lower Mainland, including the Prince George, Victoria, Fort St. John, Kamloops,
Kelowna, Nelson, Powell River, Port Alberni, Campbell River, Vancouver North-Shore,
South Burnaby-New Westminster, Prince Rupert, Terrace, Williams Lake, White Rock,
Squamish, Haney and Lower Fraser Valley areas, as well as the 39th & Cambie outlet in
Vancouver.
To the credit of the staff in these stores, the new system was so successful that
15 more stores were implemented during February and March of 1981, in the Surrey-
Delta, Nanaimo, and Courtenay areas.
AGENCY STORES
The Agency store program continued to provide service in remote
communities. A total of nine agencies were appointed during the year, while two were
closed, bringing the total to 53.
Opened
Seton Portage  April, 1980
Mahood Lake  June, 1980
Aspen Grove  June, 1980
Gillies Bay (Texada Island)    July, 1980
Salmon Lake  August, 1980
Moyie  September, 1980
Canim Lake   October, 1980
Riondel  November, 1980
Balfour  March, 1981
Closed
Crawford Bay    August, 1980
Upper Fraser    August, 1980
During 1980/81, the Branch also signed Agency agreements which formalized
the authority for operation of five retail stores at B.C.'s commercial wineries (Andres
Wines in Port Moody, Calona Wines in Kelowna, Casabello Wines in Penticton, Golden
Valley Wines in Westbank, and Ste. Michelle Wines in Surrey) and approved a similar
on-site outlet at Park & Tilford Distillery in North Vancouver.
29
 Distribution
The Distribution Department physically distributed all products except 1
domestic beer which continued to be shipped directly by the breweries to Roverraal
liquor stores and licensees.
The fiscal year 1980/81 was one of significant growth in volume of alcohfflj
beverages distributed by the Branch. Vancouver Distribution Centre activity reache
7.9 million cases, up from 6.6 million cases in 1979/80, an increase of 20%.
During the domestic beer labour dispute in 1980, a separate and temporasy
distribution system was established to receive and distribute imported beer. This™
centre handled more than 1.4 million cases of import beer while in operation. Asa
result, in total, Distribution throughput exceeded 9.3 million cases in total.
The Department continued to expand two programs geared to improving
service to the Branch's stores. Store delivery frequencies were increased for both
Vancouver area stores and stores beyond the Greater Vancouver Regional District.
Telephone ordering service replaced mail ordering for all stores in the Province, wit!
the exception of those stores to be supplied from the new Kamloops Distribution
Centre. Improved delivery frequency and telephone ordering provides better custorr
service at the retail level, by giving stores improved access to Distribution Centra
inventory and quicker processing of store orders.
During the year, the Branch decided to proceed with the development of a
second distribution centre in Kamloops. The new Kamloops Distribution Centre is
being constructed and equipped at a cost of 3 million dollars, and is scheduled for
production start-up in the Fall of 1981. The centre will service 62 stores in the   j
Kamloops, Okanagan, and Southeastern regions of the Province, and will provide
telephone ordering service and opportunities for increased frequency of delivery. Th
Kamloops Distribution Centre will provide much needed additional distribution M
capacity for the Branch. The current Vancouver Distribution Centre is fast reaching
capacity, and it is expected that Kamloops will play a greater role in distribution in
future years.
The BCL line of products took on a new image in 1980 with the installanffl
a new bottle capper which automatically applies "pilfer proof" aluminum caps on ti|J
Branch's bottling line. BCL brand products continued to be popular with the
consumer. The source of supply of BCL Brandy, a longtime market favourite, was
switched from Portugal to France during the year.
Public carriers transferred most of the product from the Distribution Cemm
to the retail outlets, supplemented by a small fleet of 5 Branch trucks. The LDB trud
fleet added two large power tail-gate equipped vehicles in late 1980 and three small 11
year-old vehicles were retired. The new vehicles enabled the Department to provide
higher level of service to Vancouver area stores, and at the same time to reduce
distribution costs.
30
 Security
The In-House Security group completed its seventh year of operation, making
significant progress since its inception. The Incident Reporting System, developed and
introduced to capture all pertinent data surrounding Security related incidents
anywhere in the Province, continued to generate vital information for long-term
planning, development of new policies and procedures, analyzing of trends, budgeting
and the measuring of stock loss. Incidents reported on included robbery; break & enter
and theft; shoplifting and wilful damage. The experimental Store Security Officer
Program continued during the fiscal year, to improve customer/staff relations, to curb
the number of intoxicated persons served, and to reduce the number of minors
attempting to purchase alcoholic products. Staff training in the Security theme of
"Total Security Involvement by all Employees" continues to receive a high priority and
the results very encouraging. To sustain this objective, the Division operates with four
separate sections: Administrative, Uniformed Security Officers, Technical and
Investigation. The development and introduction of a comprehensive Manual on all
aspects of Security was undertaken, for the guidance and direction of all Branch
employees.
 Purchasing
The Purchasing Department continued to develop and enhance specifiiB
programs to augment the service aspect of the Department to the Branch and
consumers.
LISTINGS
The Purchasing and Marketing Policy Manual was modified from its oriBi
version, and re-published in June. The manual outlined Branch listing and delismEi
procedures, and specifies sales quota requirements for listed products. In additicBK
provided market access informatioi™
potential beverage alcohol suppliers ol
the Branch. Two sessions of the Lisui
Committee were held in the Spring ai
Fall, to review the Branch produc^B
portfolio, and to select new product!!
tendered for general listing. As a resu
a total of 85 new listings were added I
the selection of products, half of t^ffi
table wines.
PRODUCT EVALUATION
In order to review the quaffi
more than 1,400 new product
applications, and to evaluate existing products, a laboratory and organoleptic analys
facility was constructed on the mezzanine floor of the Head Office facility. A senso
evaluation panel, comprised of store and office employees, meet once per week to
examine the attributes of each product offered for listing by current and potential
suppliers. In addition to providing the Listing Committee with an initial produc^B
acceptability concensus, the process provides an educational medium to store
employees.
SPECIAL ORDERS
In addition to the product portfolio offered by the Branch, the Special l^j
Division is provided to meet unique requests from consumers. A regulation
amendment in September provided special order access to licensees. To respond to
new market demand, a booklet was developed outlining the procedure to obtain a
product which is not contained within the Branch portfolio.
NON-LIQUOR COMMODITIES
A major part of the Purchasing Department function continued to be to
provide the Branch with a procurement service for all operational and capital itgjffij
32
 As of March 31,1981, the
Imported
Branch carried a total of 1,962 listings.
Blended Scotch Whisky
57
GENERAL LISTINGS
Malt Scotch Whisky
4
General listings are those
products which have been made available
for distribution to all Branch stores.
Bourbon and American Whiskey
Irish Whiskey
Dry Gin
2
2
8
vjenever l_>in
1
Domestic Imported
Total
Vodka
5
Spirits and
Rum
9
Liqueurs           364
168
532
Tequila
7
Wines                     365
416
781
Brandy and Cognac
21
Cider and Beer        65
22
87
Liqueurs
Miscellaneous Spirits
49
3
Total                       794
606
1,400
Fortified Wines
52
The general listings
are bro
ken
White Table Wine
189
down further as follows:
Rose Table Wine
Red Table Wine
8
136
Domestic
Sparkling Wine and Champagne
29
Canadian Rye Whisky
119
Sake
2
Scotch Whisky (Canadian Bottled)
9
Cider
1
Bourbon (Canadian Bottled)
1
Beer
21
Canadian Gin
33
Total
606
Canadian Vodka
54
Canadian Rum
73
SPECIALTY LISTINGS
Tequila (Canadian Bottled)
1
Specialty products
include such
Brandy
12
items as rare or premium wines and
Liqueurs
53
spirits, unique products or
products .
ivith
Miscellaneous Spirits
9
unique packaging.
B.C. Wines
344
Other Canadian Wines
21
Canadian Spirits
29
B.C. Cider
5
Canadian Wines
13
B.C. Beer
Imported Spirits
96
Bottles — 53
Imported Wines
423
Cans    —   7
60
Imported Beer
 1
Total
794
Total
562
33
 Internal Audit
The duties of the Audit Division were expanded to include (a) store audits
(b) external audits, and (c) Head Office and warehouse audits. Store audits usuffl
consist of a review of the financial and related operational procedures implemeiitti
store managers. During the year, the Auditors completed 133 such store audit^B
External audits were performed on business operations related to the Branch, for
example, agency stores, import agents participating in the Agent Stocking Progran
and breweries. In addition to traditional financial audits, the Auditors performed
operational audits at the Head Office and distribution centres. High priority was p
on the review of the financial and
information systems of the Branch. 1
benefits expected to be realized will b
systems documentation and the
identification of areas requiring exteii
audit examinations in the future.
Efforts were concentrated or
upgrading the quality of audit staff,
rather than expanding the number ol
auditors. As a result, a competent
Operational Audit section was   j
established. The achievements of tlffl
operational auditors during the yean
encouraging and indicated that thesS)
Division's contribution in meeting w\
needs of management will improve in
1981/82. Staff continued to be    j
encouraged to enrol in courses leadffl
professional accounting designations •
well as other related courses. Two
members of the audit staff in the   |
Operational Audit section completed
requirements to become ChartereiMI
Accountants during the year. A stcffl
auditor also became a member of the
Certified General Accountants
Association.
34
 Communications
The Communications Division, responsible for public relations and
information, initiated and participated in a number of programs to evaluate attitudes
and earn understanding and acceptance of policies and procedures amongst customers,
staff, media, suppliers, licensees, special interest groups and government. Much of the
program's efforts during the year were directed at maintaining open communications
prior to, during and after the eight week labour dispute at B.C.'s breweries. An
average of two News Releases per month were issued in 1980/81 to announce and/or
explain new stores, new products, new prices, and other details of operations. Several
audio-visual presentations were
developed and produced, including the
Branch's orientation A-V for new
employee training. Special events were
planned and organized, such as a Preview
Opening of the new "super-store" at 39th
& Cambie in Vancouver, and the annual
meetings of two national liquor board
organizations. Large volumes of
consumer and trade correspondence
continued to be drafted, and telephone
complaints and inquiries handled directly.
Several information pamphlets and signs
were produced for in-store information
displays. A number of position papers and
briefing material were developed for
management on current issues. Visits to
liquor stores throughout the Province
were continued to establish good
employee communications, and regular
staff publications produced, including the
GrapeVine bi-monthly newspaper and
Weekly News, administrative newsletter. A
prototype consumer Product Catalogue
was developed and introduced internally,
and a Project Team established to
implement the publication early in the
next fiscal year. The Annual Report and
Finanaal Statements were prepared and
produced in accordance with legislation.
35
 Summary of Store Sales
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1981
by Electoral District
Store
No.
034
040
042
055
056
104
118
157
216
043
060
063
156
201
221
Government
Liquor Store
Total
Sales
Alberni Electoral District
Qualicum
Port Alberni
— 10th
Parksville
Gold River
Tahsis
Port Alberni
— Northport
Tofino
Parksville North
Ucluelet
1,293,105
3,898,700
2,075,036
736,423
534,419
2,900,364
650,711
2,182,847
814,765
Atlin Electoral District
004
Atlin
248,285
047
Stewart
499,589
084
Cassiar
821,370
Boundary Similkameen
Electoral District
014 Greenwood 287,156
015 Grand Forks 1,749,435
019 Keremeos 659,907
039 Penticton 3,951,780
069 Oliver 1,370,125
083 Osoyoos 1,552,744
130       Penticton Plaza 4,097,109
Burnaby Electoral District
121       Royal Oak 2,817,130
137      Kensington 3,161,821
203       South Burnaby 4,362,710
217       North Burnaby 6,719,490
220      Middlegate 7,218,079
224       Brentwood 4,435,707
077      Lougheed Plaza 1,519,115
Cariboo Electoral District
Quesnel
Cache Creek
Williams Lake
Quesnel West
Clinton
100 Mile House
3,653,320
830,442
5,530,521
1,453,335
537,527
3,027,741
Chilliwack Electoral District
001       Abbotsford 3,916,078
007      Chilliwack 5,492,373
057      Vedder Crossing 2,788,289
Store
Government                 Tbt<
No.
Liquor Store                  Sale
Columbia River Electoral Di
016
Golden                            2,08
017
Invermere                     2,32
245
Radium                              92
Comox Electoral District
005
Campbell River
008
Cumberland
010
Courtenay
115
Port McNeill
128
Port Alice
225
Alert Bay
235
Comox
236
Port Hardy
9,301
58
5,53.
1,29.
50.
48'
2,33
2,39
Coquitlam Electoral District
011       Port Coquitlam 4,55'
089       Prairie Mall 2,73
153       Como Lake 4,45.
200      Austin Road 5,32.
205       Port Moody 3,62
Cowichan Electoral District
012       Duncan 7,33.
024      Ladysmith 1,62.
067      Lake Cowichan 1,23
134      Gabriola Island 41'
206      Chemainus 1,33'
Delta Electoral District
006 White Rock 3,67
025 Ladner 2,83
098 Tsawwassen 3,86
110 Ocean Park 2,93
145 Scottsdale 4,40
241 Kennedy Heights 8,05
Dewdney Electoral District
027
Mission                         3,63
064
Agassiz                          1,41
065
Haney                           6,52
Esquimalt Electoral District
068      Esquimalt 3,14
125       Langford 2,96
219       Colwood 2,50'
229       Sooke 1,45
36
 Store
No.
026
036
096
106
114
126
154
239
021
079
088
108
138
139
147
223
022
070
109
127
149
041
080
082
093
230
232
Government
Liquor Store
Total
Sales
Fort George Electoral District
McBride
Prince George
— 6th
Valemount
MacKenzie
Prince George
— Hart
Prince George
— 10th
Prince George
— College
Heights
Prince George
— 20th
419,949
3,612,620
620,173
1,522,448
1,655,804
6,811,915
1,399,614
6,348,624
Kamloops Electoral District
Kamloops
Sahali
Clearwater
Valleyview
Barriere
Logan Lake
Westsyde
North Kamloops
6,136,837
2,421,445
1,177,041
2,753,254
571,511
473,616
1,000,712
4,686,169
Kootenay Electoral District
009 Cranbrook 3,650,121
013 Fernie 1,741,036
028 Sparwood 1,138,907
066 Kimberley 1,999,384
131 Elkford 626,808
151 Tamarack 1,776,954
Langley Electoral District
Langley
Cloverdale
Aldergrove
Fort Langley
Clearbrook
7,269,293
3,893,600
2,790,894
1,577,791
3,103,907
Mackenzie Electoral District
Powell River
Gibsons
Ocean Falls
Madeira Park
Sechelt
Bella Coola
5,252,446
2,243,802
399,392
892,223
2,141,184
666,543
Store
No.
030
107
133
247
Government
Liquor Store
Total
Sales
Nanaimo Electoral District
033       Cavan Street 4,246,877
159       Harewood 1,999,526
243      Terminal Park 8,796,884
Nelson - Creston Electoral
District
032       Nelson 4,112,859
075       Creston 1,731,125
207       Salmo 562,487
162       Creston Canyon 287,493
New Westminster Electoral
District
031      10th Street 6,844,481
097      8th & McBride 4,888,057
North Okanagan Electoral
District
062      Vernon 5,750,405
135       Poison Place 3,692,548
214       Lumby 865,901
North Peace River Electoral
District
003       Fort St. John 6,828,679
222       Fort Nelson 2,117,368
234       Hudson Hope 477,557
North Vancouver ■
Electoral District
North Vancouver
— 2nd
Westview
Dollarton
Lynn Valley
Seymour
5,512,592
7,122,005
1,832,948
5,500,785
Omineca Electoral District
073      Burns Lake 1,319,246
081       Vanderhoof 1,203,533
091       Fraser Lake 684,563
099       Houston 1,426,306
119       Granisle 433,649
248       Fort St. James 1,046,203
Prince Rupert Electoral District
035       Prince Rupert 5,869,917
105       Masset 1,022,147
132       Port Edward 204,445
211      Queen Charlotte
City 1,300,828
37
 Store
No.
044
051
078
095
050
059
140
155
204
242
020
086
103
143
148
246
Government
Liquor Store
Total
Sales
Revelstoke - Slocan Electoral
District
018      Kaslo
045      Revelstoke
074      New Denver
202      Nakusp
548,432
3,298,060
324,482
941,475
Richmond Electoral District
076       Brighouse 8,283,093
085       Lansdowne 5,192,814
120       Shellmont 2,852,464
244      Seafair 3,477,757
Rossland -
District
Rossland
Trail
Castlegar
Fruitvale
Trail Electoral
833,912
3,573,466
2,512,745
616,970
Saanich & The Islands Electoral
District
Sidney
Trafalgar Square
Cedar Hill
Pender Island
Ganges
Saanich
4,421,825
1,914,619
4,078,741
326,090
1,640,355
7,505,799
Shuswap Electoral District
048 Salmon Arm 2,928,754
049 Enderby 1,029,543
092 Sicamous 1,130,090
215       Armstrong 1,024,960
226 Chase               mM T369,899
Skeena Electoral District
046       Smithers 2,318,256
052      Terrace 4,850,£§9
213       Kitimat 2,845,183
227 Hazelton 698,152
South Okanagan Electoral
District
Kelowna — Leon 3,460,566
Summerland 1,358,408
Kelowna
— Capri 5,952,383
Westbank 2,131,830
Kelowna South 3,595,267
Rutland 3,997,026
Store
No.
212
238
Government
Liquor Store
Toti
Sale
South Peace River Electoral
District
Dawson Creek 4,50
Chetwynd 1,34
Surrey Electoral District
116 North Surrey 4,29
122 Whalley 5,22
240      Guildford 5,33
Vancouver Electoral District
038      Marpole 6,43
053 Harbour Centre 2,63
054 Hastings Street 4,28|
058      Hastings &
Slocan 6,24
087      Victoria Drive 8,43
090       4th & Alma 6,83.
094      Bute Street 4,02.
100      Central Licensee 37,22
102      Dunbar 3,06.
111 •■Commercial 6,31
112 Cardero 4,15'
113 Senlac 7,22.
117 Broadway &
Maple 8,91i
123 Kingsgate 7,56:
129 Thurlow 7,20i
136 Arbutus 3,17
141 13th & Granville 2,35:
144 Mandarin Centre 1,09
146 18th & Cambie 3,22!
160 39th & Cambie 2,921
210 Kerrisdale 3,74:
233 Robson 7,62'
237      28th & Main 5,50.
Victoria Electoral District
061 Nootka Court 3,59:
124 Gorge & Tillicum 7,28.
142 Yates Street 3,30.
150 James Bay 2,38'
218 Fort Street 8,53;
231 Government Street 9,00.
161 Quadra & Hillside 2,25.
38
 Store
Government
Total
Store    Government
Total
No.
Liquor Store
Sales
No.       Liquor Store
Sales
West Vancouver Electoral
Yale - Lillooet Electoral District
District
002      Ashcroft
638,622
072
West Vancouver
6,207,224
023       Lillooet
1,260,735
101
Pemberton
544,164
029       Merritt
2,185,385
152
Capilano Mall
3,683,202
037      Princeton
1,352,891
208
Squamish
3,013,173
071      Hope
2,037,890
228
Park Royal
7,250,455
209       Lytton
340,053
302
Whistler
1,111,864
Total Sales through
Government Liquor
Stores
$694,018,790
39
 Copies of this document
may be obtained from the
Communications Division.
Province of British Columbia
Liquor Distribution Branch
Head Office & Distribution Centre
3200 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. V5M 1Z6
Phone (604) 254-5711
Telex 04-53470

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