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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-seventh Annual Report 1967/68 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1969

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ninety-seventh Annual Report
1967/68
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
  The Honourable Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C., LL.B., Minister of Education.
  G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.,
Deputy Minister of Education.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.),
Superintendent of Education.
  To Colonel the Honourable John R. Nicholson, P.C., O.B.E., Q.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Ninety-seventh Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
DONALD LESLIE BROTHERS,
Minister of Education.
January, 1969.
  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1968
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Donald Leslie Brothers, Q.C., LL.B.
Deputy Minister of Education:
G. Neil Perry, B.A., M.P.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D.
Superintendent of Education:
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Assistant Superintendent (Administration): Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed. J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Assistant Superintendent (University of College Affairs):
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.
Acting Chief Inspector of Schools:
R. B. Stibbs, B.A.
Co-ordinator of Services:
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, B.A., M.A., Nanaimo.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Mission City.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Kamloops.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Surrey.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
R. S. Boyle, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Squamish.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., M.CC.T,
Hope.
J. Chell, M.A., Superintendent, Victoria.
R. B. Cox, B.A., Prince Rupert.
C. Cuthbert, B.S.Acc, B.Ed., M.Ed., Oliver.
J. M. Evans, B.A., M.Ed., Vanderhoof.
D. L. Feir, B.A., M.A., Quesnel.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, North Vancouver.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Richmond.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Qualicum Beach.
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Port Alberni.
R. R. Hanna, B.A., B.Ed., Merritt.
W. L. B. Hawker, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St.
John.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pxd., Victoria.
E. J. Irwin, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Haney.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Powell
River.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.Paed., Kimberley.
W. J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
A. J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Victoria.
R. F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Courtenay.
W. E. Lucas, B.A„B.P8ed.,NorthVancouver.
A. P. McKay, B.Com., M.Ed., Kamloops.
D. E. McFee, B.A., M.A., Kitimat.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
F. D. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Relieving
Superintendent.
D. H. MacKirdy, D.F.C.,B.A.,B.Ed.,M.Ed.,
Ladysmith.
J. I. MacDougall, B.A., M.A., M.Ed., D.Paed.,
Chilliwack.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Nelson.
E. Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
F. T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Creston.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., (Coquitlam)
New Westminster.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Kelowna.
G. M. Paton, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Penticton.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Sidney.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
P. B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Assistant Superintendent, Burnaby.
A. C. Rutledge, B.Ed., M.Ed., Victoria.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Pasd., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., M.Ed., F.C.C.T.,
Murrayville.
E. C. Stewart, B.A., B.Ed., Terrace.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Burnaby.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ladner.
D. P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
F. M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
D. N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
J.  H.  Wormsbecker,  B.A.,  M.A.,  Ed.D.,
Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
C. C. Wright, B.A., Salmon Arm.
W. J. Zoellner, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
 G 10 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.Ed.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: M. J. Tidmarsh and R. Smith.
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvtne, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Curriculum: W. B. Naylor, B.A.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Acting Director of School Broadcasts: B. A. Black.
Director of Research and Standards: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director of Secondary School Correspondence: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows, B.Ed.
Director of Textbook Branch: D. W. C Huggins.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
P. Freemantle, N.C.T.D. Dip. (Eng.), B.Ed.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  13
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)  39
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)  41
Report of the Director of the Curriculum Division  44
Report of the Co-ordinator of Adult Education  47
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (University and College Affairs)  54
Report of the Co-ordinator of Services  57
Report of the Director of Research and Standards  59
Report of the Director of Home Economics  62
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
Secondary and Vocational Courses  67
Elementary Correspondence School  72
Report of the Director of the Division of School Broadcasts  73
Report of the Assistant Director of Visual Education  75
Report of the Director of the Textbook Branch  79
Report of the Acting Chief Inspector of Schools  81
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment  85
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  88
Report of the Director of the Community Programmes Branch  102
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind) 112
Report of the Registrar and Division of Examinations  114
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act 125
Statistical Returns  127
 G 12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Enrolment and Attendance by Type of School  13
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  14
Distribution of Instructional Staff and P/T Ratios by Type of School  15
Teachers' Certificates and Degrees  15
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  17
Number of School Districts and Number of Schools in Operation  18
Number of Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District—
Senior Secondary  18
Secondary  19
Junior Secondary  20
Elementary-Senior Secondary  21
Elementary-Junior Secondary  21
Elementary  22
District-employed Instructional Staff  23
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils 24
Classification of Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  25
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1967  30
Operating Costs per Pupil, Calendar Year 1967  30
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1967  31
Revenue by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1967  34
Enrolment in Adult Education Courses  51
Enrolment in Universities and Colleges  55
Enrolment in Courses in Home Economics  62
Enrolment by Courses in Correspondence Schools  69
Enrolment by Courses in Regional Vocational Schools  92
Enrolment by Courses in the British Columbia Institute of Technology  97
Enrolment by Courses in Industrial Education  99
Teacher Certification and Supply  114
Examinations and Scholarships  120
Enrolment by Programme, Grades XI and XII  128
Summary of Enrolment by Schools in the Various School Districts  146
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Type of School, Sex, and Grade  200
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1967/68
Education Office,
Victoria, British Columbia, January, 1969.
To the Honourable Donald L. Brothers,
Minister oj Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-seventh Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1968.
ENROLMENT AND AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE
Enrolment in the public schools of the Province rose from 445,228 in June,
1967, to 467,326 in June, 1968. The increase of 22,098 (5.0 per cent) reflects
the increasing number of births to 1960, very high interprovincial migration between
1965 and 1967, an inflow from private schools in the lower elementary grades,
increasing public kindergarten enrolments, and a sharp increase in retention in
Grades XI and XII. Grade XIII declined by 374 pupils as additional students went
directly to university or to regional and district colleges. All other grades except
Grade I showed an increase over the previous year. Average daily attendance rose
from 408,452 to 425,514, and the percentage of regular attendance decreased from
91.7 to 91.1.
Type of School
Number
of Schools
Enrolment of Pupils
Boys
Girls
Total
Per Cent
of Total
Attendance of Pupils
Mean Daily
Attendance
Per Cent
of Enrolment
Senior secondary..
Secondary..
Junior secondary ..
Elementary-senior
secondary	
Elementary-junior
secondary —
Elementary	
Totals-
17
109
82
20
43
1,182
6,583
42,948
26,680
6,205
6,889
151,809
5,824
40,687
24,797
5,819
6,275
142,810
12,407
83,635
51,477
12,024
13,164
294,619
2.7
17.9
11.0
2.6
2.8
63.0
10,528.4
74,498.4
46,735.3
10,761.5
11,988.1
271,001.8
84.9
89.1
90.8
91.1
92.0
1,453
241,114
226,212
467,326
425,513.5
91.1
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the Secondary School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 4,766 officially registered in other
schools)         2,273
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular students   794
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving instruction   8 5
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
Day 	
Night 	
3,152
18,044
10,349
13
 G 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Adult education—Continued
Public-school adult education  127,659 x
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)   9,204
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)   188
British Columbia Institute of Technology—
Day   2,130
Night   2,929
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session)   94
Selkirk College  1712
University of Victoria non-credit courses  1,3293
University of British Columbia non-credit courses  6,8474
181,925
i Includes 97,682 non-vocational.
2 This figure does not include the following enrolment:  16 summer session (credit).
3 This figure does not include the following enrolments:   1,107 summer session (credit and non-credit), 736
extra-sessional (evening division).
4This figure does not include the following enrolments:  6,548 summer session (credit and non-credit), 1,608
extra-sessional (evening division), 1,016 correspondence courses.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table provides a distribution of pupils by grade and sex for the
school year 1967/68 and a comparison of the totals with 1966/67. It will be
noticed that the greatest increases are now in the secondary grades.
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total, 1967/68
Total, 1966/67
Grade XIII-
Grade XII—
Grade XI..
Secondary
Grade X-
Grade IX..
Totals, senior secondary grades*..
Grade VIII  —
Totals, Grades VIII to X„
Occupational 3—  	
Occupational 2	
Occupational 1_
Totals, occupational classes	
Totals, junior secondary grades-
Totals, secondary grades	
Elementary
Intermediate Special	
Grade VII	
Grade VI	
Grade V	
Grade IV  	
Totals, intermediate grades .
Primary Special	
Grade III 	
Grade II 	
Grade I	
Kindergarten-
Totals, primary grades	
Totals, elementary grades-
Grand totals .	
1,145
11.652
14,041
765
11,191
13,235
1,910
22,843
27,276
2,299
20,383
25,835
26.838
25,191
52,029
48,517
15,757
17,904
19,087
15,377
16,874
18,207
31,134
34,778
37,294
29,086
32,427
34,649
52,748
50,458
103,206
96,162
776
1,135
1,389
529
678
783
1,305
1,813
2,172
1,270
1,797
2,264
3,300
1,990
5,290
5,331
56,048
52,448
108,496
101,493
82,886
77,639
160,525
150,010
2,901
18,728
19,399
19.619
20,323
1,630
18,330
18,731
19,144
19,698
4,531
37,058
38,130
38,763
40,021
4,272
35,735
36,290
37,237
38,161
80,970
77,533
158,503
151,695
2,354
21,751
22,124
22,876
8,153
1,295
20,419
20,607
20,861
7,858
3,649
42,170
42,731
43,737
16,011
3,480
39,961
41,515
43,896
14,671
77,258
71,040
148,298
143,523
158,228
148,573
306,801
295,218
241,114
226,212
467,326
445,228
i See pages 128 to 144 for enrolment by programme in Grades XI and XII.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G  15
DISTRIBUTION OF INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND PUPIL/TEACHER
RATIOS BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The number of teachers employed in the different types of schools and the
average numbers of pupils per teacher are shown in the following table:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Supervising
Principals
Instructional Staff
Total
School
Staff
Average Number of Pupils
per Staff Member
Enrolling
Divisions
Special
Staff
Total
Instructors
Enrolling a
Division
Instructing
On Total
Staff
Senior secondary.	
Secondary
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior
secondary	
Elementary-junior
secondary	
Elementary
District-employed
teachers
17
109
82
20
43
1,182
16
107
82
16
28
330
396
2,818
1,713
416
475
9,412
205
1,101
613
140
84
796
141
601
3,919
2,326
556
559
10,208
141
617
4,026
2,408
572
587
10,538
141
31.33
29.68
30.05
28.90
27.71
31.30
20.64
21.34
22.13
21.63
23.55
28.86
20.11
20.77
21.38
21.02
22.43
27.96
Totals	
1,453
579
15,230
3,080
18,310
18,889
30.69
25.52
24.74
District supervisory staff members totalling 302 persons are not included.
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the numbers and per cents of teachers, including
part-time teachers, by certificate level at lune, 1968. In addition, there were 27
exchange teachers and three others to whom British Columbia certificates had not
been issued:—
Type of School
Certificate Level
Total
P-A
PB
PC
S-T
E-A
E-B
E-C
E-T
Voc.
Certificates
Senior secondary—
Number
Per cent.	
Secondary—
Number 	
Per cent..	
Junior secondary—
Number —	
165
26.8
980
24.4
279
11.6
120
21.1
34
5.8
312
3.0
16
11.3
353
57.3
2,178
54.2
1,271
52.9
239
42.1
154
26.2
1,235
11.7
25
17.7
43
7.0
352
8.8
315
13.1
56
9.9
69
11.8
1,751
16.6
20
14.2
13
2.1
78
1.9
57
2.4
12
2.1
13
2.2
35
0.3
6
4.3
13
2.1
187
4.7
250
10.4
45
7.9
124
21.1
2,959
28.1
21
14.9
15
2.4
170
4.2
185
7.7
73
12.9
169
28.8
3,854
36.6
43
30.5
1
0.2
17
0.4
15
0.6
13
2.3
12
2.0
281
2.7
7
5.0
11
1.8
52
1.3
27
1.1
9
1.6
12
2.0
96
0.9
3
2.1
2
0.3
7
0.2
4
0.2
1
0.2
616
4,021
2,403
Elementary-senior secondary—
Number	
568
Elementary-junior secondary—
Number	
587
Elementary—
Number
10,523
District-employed instructors—
Number	
Per cent  	
141
Total instructional staff—
1,906
10.1
5,455
28.9
2,606
13.8
214
1.1
3,599
19.1
4,509
23.9
346
1.8
210
1.1
14
0.1
18,859
District supervisory staff—
Number.     	
141
46.7
86
28.5
38
12.6
2
0.7
24
7.9
7
2.3
1
0.3
1
0.3
2
0.7
302
 g 16 public schools report, 1967/68
Teachers and Principals with and without University Degrees
Highest Degree
No Degree
Total Teachers
Type of School
Bachelors
Masters or
Doctorates
Per Cent of
Teachers
in Group
Number
Per Cent of
Teachers
in Group
Number
Per Cent
of All
Teachers
443
2,771
1,542
317
233
2,814
42
71
453
154
58
20
175
12
5.6
35.4
18.6
4.1
2.8
32.8
0.6
103
802
712
197
334
7,549
87
1.1
8.2
7.3
2.0
3.4
77.2
0.9
617
4,026
2,408
572
587
10,538
141
3.3
21.3
12.7
Elementary-senior secondary
Elementary-junior secondary
3.0
3.1
55.8
District employed   instructors	
0.7
Total instructional staff	
8,162
943
100.0
9,784
100.0
18,889
100.0
District supervisory staff ...   .
178
80
(85.4)
44
(14.6)
302
(100.0)
Highest Degree by Faculty and Level (Teachers, Principals,
Administrative and Supervisory Staff)
Faculty
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorates
Total
4,046
2,816
758
190
193
112
112
48
18
8
39
523
372
64
9
7
3
3
3
15
8
14
2
4,577
Arts   -  	
3,188
822
199
193
Agriculture
119
112
Music
Library Science 	
51
21
Social Work
11
14
Other fields
56
8,340
999
24
9,363
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G  17
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877/78	
1882/83	
1887/88	
1892/93	
1897/98	
1902/03	
1907/08	
1912/13	
1913/14.	
1917/18	
1922/23	
1927/28	
1928/29	
1929/30	
1930/31	
1931/32	
1932/33	
1933/34	
1934/35	
1935/36	
1936/37	
1937/38	
1938/39	
1939/40	
1940/41	
1941/42	
1942/43	
1943/44	
1944/45	
1945/46	
1946/47	
1947/48	
1948/49	
1949/50	
1950/51	
1951/52	
1952/53	
1953/54	
1954/55	
1955/56..	
1956/57	
1957/58	
1958/59	
1959/60	
1960/61	
1961/62	
1962/63	
1963/64	
1964/65	
1965/66	
1966/67	
1967/68	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
7,574
8,185
8,690
9,474
10,171
10,839
11,513
12,137
12,772
13,571
14,415
15,327
16,173
17,457
18,889
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
93
87
87
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,064
420,790
445,228
467,326
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
379,045
408.452
425,514
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
92.03
91.91
90.08
91.70
91.10
$48,411,
60,758.
113,679.
174,775
290,255
473,802.
544,671.
1,663,003
1,885,654
1,653,796
3,176,686.
3,532,518.
3,765,920.
3,743,317.
3,834,727.
4,015,074.
2,849,972.
2,611,937.
2,835,040.
2,972,385.
3,277,660.
3,524,962.
3,630,670.
3,585,769
3,963,848.
4,028,397.
3,924,243.
4,244,898.
5,022,534.
5,765,205.
9,398,473.
12,468,653.
17,363,430.
22,809,631.
25,830,076.
26,885,980.
26,555,080
24,060,233.
34,279,302.
41,067,740.
43,989,524.
50,861,473.
53,288,028.
59,472,055.
70,174,999
77,632,903.
83,782,121.
95,497,375.
105,017,594.
119,871,278
144,702,607
181,854,578
141
751
361
43
26
29
60
34
11
60
283
953
693
083
193
373
023
803
.743
043
233
693
.78 s
.003
243
$215,
425,
604,
1,220,
4,658,
4,634,
3,519,
7,630,
9,261,
11,149,
10,008,
10,061,
9,719,
8,941,
8,213,
8,458,
8,775,
9,593.
10,193.
10,640,
10,521,
10,982,
11,120,
11,502
12,231,
13,683,
14,818,
20,176
25,768.
35,538,
47,726,
54,195,
57,881,
243| 58,401
153| 70,791,
80,823,
69,3<14,
77,653,
90,483,
.9481101,351.
0631115,941,
,843|133,401
,4«3|145,535.
.79-4157,614,
.163|177,539.
.753199,114,
.313|227,937,
.403<|269,217,
.21  1332,702
.533
.823
593
.503
.463
.183
.943
.233
883
.4331
273|
343|
323|
6331
056.222
555.10
357.86
509.85
894.97
877.56
014.61
009.543
094.983
996.273
255.663
387.993
333.813
497.343
,369.043
,156.003
,353.783
,562.643
,367.083
,740.473
,684.923
,364.493
801.943
,291.353
,029.353
,538.183
,625.813
,930.533
,392.093
,079.883
,750.373
.133.953
,559.483
121.153
,844.253
,263.713
,181.244
,192.32*
765.634
,107.944
,018.064
,622.844
,715.484
,783.794
,584.164
,313.754
,392.314
,969.404
367.214
i The total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial universities and to school
district and regional colleges.
4 This amount is exclusive of capital expenditures from by-law funds.
 G 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number of classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1967/68:—
Municipal school districts   73
Rural school districts  12
Total
85
Number of Public Schools in Operation by Type, June, 1963-68
Type
No.
Number Open in June
Change
1968-63
Type of School
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
Senior secondary   	
Secondary
6
5
4
3
2
1,0
4
77
29
83
164
984
5
88
44
73
103
1,055
9
97
52
58
83
1,084
15
99
56
44
44
1,114
18
105
71
24
47
1,164
17
109
82
20
43
1,182
+ 13
+32
+53
—63
— 121
Elementary-senior secondary
+ 198
1,341
1,368
1,383
1,372
1,429
1,453
+ 112
Total net enrolment in thousands	
......
359
379
400
421
445
467
+ 108
One senior secondary school became secondary in 1968 by the addition of
Grade X. There is a distinct trend for schools with both elementary and secondary
pupils to become either elementary or secondary as enrolment increases and for
schools to become much larger with increasing density of population. The one-
teacher elementary schools and the two- or three-teacher elementary-secondary
schools are disappearing rapidly.
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in schools enrolling pupils in Grades XI to XIII during the
school-year 1967/68 was 12,407 students, of whom 6,583 were boys and 5,824
were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions, and number of pupils are
shown in the following table. The total staff of 618 principals and teachers is reduced by part-time assignment in these schools to 611.7.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
22. Vernon	
34. Abbotsford..
36. Surrey	
38. Richmond—
41. Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam-
52. Prince Rupert-
57. Prince George..
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River-
89. Shuswap	
Totals-
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
IT
23
26
50
50
86
43
11
28
11
22
15
15
_____
396
37.5
39.3
76.0
75.0
122.0
71.6
17.5
52.0
16.0
29.5
22.3
26.0
27.0
611.7
711
819
1,578
1,607
2,617
1,447
344
989
277
652
420
466
480
12,407
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT                                      G 19
SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling pupils in Grades VIII to XII or XIII was
increased by four in 1967/68 and an additional 5,621 students were enrolled.   Of
the 83,635 students, 42,948 were boys and 40,687 were girls.   Part-time teaching
reduced the total of 4,026 principals and teachers to an equivalent of 4,012.6 full-
time teachers.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
5
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
28
16
11
20
28
9
54
21
30
42
11
17
20
11
116
91
9
28
28
10
19
21
42.0
25.4
18.5
30.0
40.0
12.8
81.6
28.0
35.0
57.0
14.0
23.0
30.8
17.0
153.4
139.7
13.5
43.5
38.7
14.4
28.6
30.0
25.0
90.0
76.0
69.6
97.5
955.1
125.0
59.0
100.0
68.0
239.0
164.0
40.5
36.0
36.0
27.0
18.0
25.9
11.0
29.0
33.5
202.6
14.5
15.0
42.0
30.0
23.0
62.0
22.0
57.0
26.0
54.0
27.0
10.0
46.5
9.0
14.0
13.0
47.0
56.0
796
3. Kimberley
408
339
7. Nelson
634
831
223
11. Trail
1,581
553
14. Southern Okanagan
15. Pentirtnn
671
1,167
252
18, Roldpn
434
629
351
3,443
3,010
201
908
874
70, Tillnnef
231
30. South Cariboo
458
31. Merritt
680
1 |             18
2 |             67
2 1             55
3 47
2        |             71
14        1           669
471
33. Chilliwarl-
1,975
1,593
36.  Surrey
1,416
37. Delta
2,197
21,106
1
1
3
2
6
3
2
1
2
95
42
71
46
168
114
27
26
25
19
15
2,735
1,261
i.1. Maple Rirlge
2,198
1,412
4,873
3,350
46. Krrhelt
693
47. Powell River
714
682
54, Smithers
565
339
17
495
58- McRride
1         I                6
163
^9. Peace River South
21
24
141
11
10
596
710
4,432
6?,   SnoVe
311
64. Gulf Islands.. .    	
223
1        |             28
1        |             20
1        I             16
1                         43
771
552
67. Ladysmith
436
1,266
2
1
2
2
14
43
19
40
16
6
32
7
8
7
31
43
398
7fl    Alherni
1,221
513
1,288
544
79   IMiieler-Tnfinn
171
80. kitimat
815
81,  Fort Nelson
125
155
206
Rfi.   Creston-lfaeln
913
1,077
Totals
109
2,818
4,012.6
83,635
 G 20                                    PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
Eleven more schools enrolling pupils in Grades VIII to X were in operation in
June, 1968, and the enrolment rose from 43,792 to 51,477, of whom 26,680 were
boys and 24,797 were girls.   The increase in grade VIII was larger than in any
other grade.   The number of principals and teachers increased from 1,989.9 to
2,398.0.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2. Cranbrook   	
1
12
16.5
358
1
19
27 0
567
7. Nelson  	
1
22
32.0
655
1
10
12.0
265
11. Trail  	
1
21
30.0
636
2
3
26
55
36.0
74.5
808
1,450
22. Vernon —	
1
32
43.0
900
25. Barriere
1
5
7.6
123
1
1
19
13
26.4
18.0
566
374
28. Quesnel-  	
33. Chilliwack    .
3
44
61.0
1,316
34,   Abbotsford
2
50
66.0
1,538
1
11
17.0
322
36. Surrey  	
7
185
249.3
5,765
37. Delta
1
4
8
106
11.0
144.0
176
3,329
38. Richmond  , .
6
170
243.0
5,166
5
101
148.5
3,046
44. North Vancouver
3
89
122.0
2,575
1
1
26
26
42.4
37.0
891
852
3
78
109.0
2,298
59. Peace River South	
2
36
50.0
1,117
60. Pea^e River North
1
8
2
3
18
216
26
38
25.0
303.3
39.0
52.0
522
6,655
766
1,115
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich
65   Cowichan
3
44
57.5
1,177
68   Nanaimo
3
69
98.2
2,079
1
6
9.0
198
70,   Alherni
2
3
38
35
52.8
48.0
1,212
995
71. Courtenay               	
72. Camphell River
1
36
53.0
996
89. Shuswap 	
Totals
2
23
37.0
669
82
1.713
2.398.0
51,477
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
G 21
The number of schools enrolling pupils in all elementary and secondary grades
is decreasing rapidly, from 44 in June, 1966, to 24 in June, 1967, and 20 in June,
1968. As a result, the enrolment decreased almost 800 during the past year, and
the number of full-time teacher equivalents decreased from 607.4 to 569.4.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
30
13
19
25
5
7
183
32
12
18
19
16
11
14
12
38.0
17.0
25.2
31.0
7.2
8.0
267.0
42.0
14.0
22.0
27.0
23.0
14.0
17.0
17.0
847
268
437
17. Princeton  	
18. Golden  	
19. Revelstoke	
736
110
198
5,814
770
323
59. Peace River South                                              .
484
536
484
318
425
Unattached:  University Hill.	
274
Totals 	
20
416
569.4
12,024
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling pupils in both junior secondary and elementary grades has decreased 121 during the past five years and four since June, 1967.
Enrolment declined to 13,164, of whom 6,889 were boys and 6,275 were girls, and
the June, 1967, staff of 681.1 was reduced by 112 teachers.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie 	
4. Windermere	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan .
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet  —
32. Fraser Canyon..
41. Burnaby..
47. Powell River	
50. Queen Charlotte..
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George—
58. McBride	
71. Courtenay..
72. Campbell River	
83. Portage Mountain	
85. Vancouver Island North-
87. Stikine	
88. Skeena-Cassiar 	
89. Shuswap	
Unattached:  Belmont Park-
7
10
3
25
16
20
10
5
9
8
61
7
34
8
28
35
10
21
12
29
57
7
8
21
24
8.0
12.4
3.0
29.3
18.5
28.5
10.2
6.0
10.0
10.0
85.0
8.5
38.2
9.3
32.4
42.5
10.5
24.0
13.4
37.2
65.5
7.5
8.0
26.6
25.0
198
263
41
736
454
689
233
146
169
188
1,938
163
804
189
802
797
275
569
259
874
1,499
226
179
645
828
Totals-
43
475
569.5 13,164
 G 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The number of schools enrolling pupils between Grades I and VII or Kindergarten and Grade VII is still increasing, although not as rapidly as in recent years.
The enrolment increase during the year was 12,461 versus an increase of 24,438
from 1966 to 1967. The net increase due to the opening of new kindergarten
classes was 726. Grade I is now on a plateau and its enrolment actually decreased
159 pupils. The instructional staff in elementary schools increased from 9,723
persons to 10,538 during the year and from 9,559.7 to 10,350.1 in terms of full-
time equivalents.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie—	
2. Cranbrook
3. Kimberley,
4,
7,
Windermere-
Nelson	
8. Slocan..
9.
10,
11,
12,
13,
14.
15,
16.
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley 	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos _.	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.-
Vernon	
. Kelowna 	
Kamloops 	
Barriere .	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo-
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley _.
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond—
Vancouver..
New Westminster	
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River-
Howe Sound-
Ocean Falls.—
Queen Charlotte-
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake 	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
5
6
8
7
14
11
12
4
11
3
4
2
9
3
3
6
6
2
11
30
30
5
6
29
22
5
10
6
6
28
33
27
56
17
34
89
8
38
19
31
32
13
10
13
10
6
1
9
4
8
9
39
4
20
23
43
14
14
22
65
49
21
83
23
66
23
103
26
9
28
81
16
3
35
41
18
110
184
255
16
23
110
94
23
50
49
36
165
139
121
517
153
303
1,483
115
506
124
416
413
167
52
104
60
14
1
87
30
35
37
294
15
136
107
569
95
22.5
71.8
51.8
22.1
90.5
23.1
70.1
23.7
113.3
29.0
9.0
31.5
88.0
16.0
3.0
38.8
44.5
20.0
122.3
199.6
291.3
16.6
23.5
119.7
99.9
26.0
55.0
52.4
38.5
176.0
140.3
128.0
563.5
171.0
332.0
1,678.8
130.0
561.0
132.4
459.2
455.1
197.9
59.0
115.9
64.0
15.0
1.0
95.0
32.4
36.4
40.0
332.6
15.5
148.4
114.8
627.0
101.7
93.9
676
2,227
1,419
569
2,560
559
1,859
662
2,957
826
141
844
2,700
478
41
1,007
1,268
664
3,508
5,958
7,601
412
577
3,075
2,766
652
1,413
1,477
1,101
5,170
4,301
3,661
16,566
4,982
9,864
47,726
3,695
16,170
3,735
14,627
13,045
5,385
1,533
2,920
1,751
249
13
2,844
934
885
997
9,490
375
4,286
2,876
19,940
2,933
2,891
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
G 23
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
64. Gulf Islands               	
5
24
9
8
30
8
18
15
17
17
6
2
3
4
3
6
6
13
11
6
17
23
1
1
1
19
117
43
47
217
38
162
121
101
67
18
21
16
67
15
9
26
29
61
9
90
81
17
2
11
19.0
127.8
46.4
49.6
231.5
39.8
178.1
138.0
110.8
70.2
18.7
23.1
16.7
80.1
15.8
9.0
28.2
29.4
65.6
9.0
94.7
84.3
18.0
2.0
13.0
436
3,499
1,140
1,446
6,397
1,130
4,882
3,773
2,823
2,024
450
699
425
2,121
444
141
605
634
1,734
157
2,632
2,331
505
32
318
65. Cowichan  	
68. Nanaimo
70,   Alhprni
72. Campbell River	
7Q    TTrli.plpt-T'Mir.r.
80. Kitimat __ -                   	
81, Fort Nf.1«.on
87   Chilrntin
87. Stikine.
89. Shuswap	
Unattached:
Totals
1,182
9,412
10,350.1
294,619
DISTRICT-EMPLOYED INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
(Not Assigned to Specific Schools)
District Number                               Number of                 District Number
and Name                                        Teachers                          and Name
3. Kimberley       2                44. North Vancouver	
4. Windermere        1                45. West Vancouver	
7. Nelson        2                46. Sechelt 	
Number of
Teachers
5
3
6
1
7
6
3
1
1
4
7
4
2
1
2
1
2
141
15. Penticton         _               4                55. 1
Jurns Lakt
Greater Vi<
16. Keremeos                         1                61. <
:toria
22. Vernon       2               62. Sooke	
24. Kamlooos       3               63. Saanich 	
28. Ouesnel     10                64. (
3ulf Island
Is	
33. Chilliwack        7                65. Cowichan .
34. Abbotsford        9                66. 1
Lake Cowi
chan	
35. Langley       3                68. Nanaimo	
36. Surrey      13                70. Alberni 	
37. Delta       1                75. Mission 	
38. Richmond       1                76. /
39. Vancouver      13                79. 1
\gassiz
Jcluelet-T(
)fino
41. Burnaby       1               86. Creston-Ka
43. Coauitlam                        12                 88. Skeena-Cas
slo 	
siar
Full-time, 98.       Part-time, 43.
Total	
Total full-time equivalents,
116.9.
 G 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The net number of schools open in June, 1968, was 24 larger than in the
previous June. Enrolment increased 22,098 to a new record and is expected to
exceed 500,000 within two years. The school staff increase was 1,350 equivalents
of full-time teachers, not including district-employed teachers and supervisory staff.
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
Fernie-
1
2. Cranbrook
3. Kimberley.
4,
7.
9,
10,
11.
12.
13.
14,
15.
16,
17.
18.
19.
21.
22.
23.
24,
25.
26.
27.
28.
29,
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
Windermere-
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden 	
Revelstoke 	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Vernon 	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
. Lillooet 	
South Cariboo..
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley 	
Surrey 	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver.-.
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound 	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride 	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands-
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
10
10
17
14
14
6
15
4
6
4
12
4
4
3
16
35
34
6
7
35
25
7
13
7
8
33
36
30
68
20
40
106
9
49
22
39
41
16
12
16
12
8
6
11
6
10
12
45
6
24
25
56
18
18
6
28
10
10
34
59
105
84
42
138
42
104
35
203
47
25
78
149
27
28
57
68
29
188
300
378
21
32
167
140
42
69
70
62
276
215
187
799
232
459
2,335
210
865
195
606
670
281
79
163
85
46
35
124
61
58
82
435
31
211
149
926
143
148
29
189
63
82
329
68.5
130.3
104.2
53.0
169.5
48.3
122.1
39.5
254.2
57.0
27.5
95.0
181.0
30.0
34.0
69.0
83.3
37.0
234.3
353.0
474.0
24.2
37.0
199.8
162.6
50.4
83.6
82.4
73.5
327.0
245.6
221.0
958.4
279.5
551.0
2,900.9
255.0
1,070.0
232.4
747.3
816.1
361.9
99.5
202.8
100.0
57.0
39.2
149.5
73.4
63.7
98.3
536.1
37.0
249.4
173.3
1,132.9
171.2
175.4
34.0
227.8
76.4
99.6
391.7
1,721
3,381
2,394
1,171
4,117
996
2,955
926
5,910
1,379
595
2,204
4,675
730
777
1,551
2,095
1,015
5,669
9,401
11,511
535
778
4,782
4,160
1,052
1,871
2,157
1,760
8,461
6,658
5,576
25,325
7,355
14,800
74,646
6,430
27,152
5,933
20,532
20,493
8,735
2,226
4,688
2,433
1,019
817
4,040
1,822
1,413
2,294
13,574
813
6,483
4,108
31,027
4,287
4,658
659
5,447
1,692
2,418
9,742
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT                                        G 25
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
10
21
21
21
18
7
3
4
5
4
6
1
8
19
14
7
20
30
5
58
243
211
164
107
34
37
22
99
22
9
29
34
93
103
16
141
155
66
70.8
287.9
258.3
203.2
124.2
41.7
50.1
26.7
126.6
24.8
9.0
37.2
42.2
107.9
126.6
16.5
158.7
191.9
75.0
1,726
7,315
6,270
4,544
3,312
934
1,243
596
2,936
569
141
874
760
2,339
2,965
383
3,888
4,550
1,957
79. Ucluelet-Tofino -    	
81   Fort Nelson
87   .Stikin*
Totals
1,453
15,230        |   18,511.8
467,326
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following tables classify teachers according to position, type of school, and
annual salary obtained by multiplying the June, 1968, salary by 10.   Each salary
that is listed represents a class interval of ±$250;  for example, $7,500 includes
salaries from $7,250 to $7,749.
Supervising Principals (Principals Not Enrolling a Division)
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$20,500	
20
21
64
27
43
41
29
19
18
14
7
11
6
3
4
3
1
1
1
2
3
1
3
1
2
4
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
8
21
7
9
6
14
7
3
4
1
1
9
1
4
11
9
16
14
8
8
2
9
4
2
3
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
4
3
1
10
3
7
15
17
40
47
45
89
46
63
49
37
27
22
18
11
13
6
5
5
3
100.0
99.8
98.1
97.6
96.4
93.8
90.8
83.9
75.8
68.0
52.7
44.7
33.9
25.4
19.0
14.3
10.5
7.4
5.5
3.3
2.2
i.
20,000  	
19,500 	
19,000	
18,500	
18,000	
17,500
17,000	
16,500	
16,000.	
15,500	
15,000.	
14,500	
14,000	
13,500	
13,000	
12,500	
12,000   .
11,500...
11,000 	
10,500	
10,000    	
9,500	
9,000..—	
Totals
330
28
16
82
107
16
579
Total number,
579; median
salary, $15
081; mean
sa
ary, $14,8
75.
 G 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$16,500	
1
1
14
11
22
58
52
48
100
93
161
195
134
383
235
309
796
1,032
1,585
1,131
1,261
1,198
697
234
86
7
1
1
1
1
3
4
11
5
7
26
16
21
25
34
48
70
67
58
55
54
18
5
3
1
1
2
1
4
2
10
15
44
31
58
33
12
32
31
26
39
40
57
47
39
13
7
4
1
5
7
8
10
12
13
25
51
98
88
241
68
164
126
173
201
241
245
299
156
44
14
4
4
3
11
10
12
19
11
18
42
138
304
318
277
432
139
243
238
255
284
323
320
284
145
34
11
8
1
1
2
1
3
4
3
4
10
11
48
50
24
94
16
32
36
44
28
54
47
53
18
4
1
1
4
15
20
37
43
51
95
130
241
558
595
615
1,021
385
875
691
841
1,396
1,760
2,321
1,872
1,674
1,347
748
255
95
9
100.0
16,000
100.0
15,500	
99.9
15,000...
99.8
14,500
99.6
14,000
99.3
13,500	
n.noo
99.0
98.5
17,500
97 8
17,000
96.4
11,500
93.3
11,000
89.9
10,500
86.4
10 000....
80.6
9,500
78 5
9,000
73 5
s.sno
69.6
8,000
64.9
7,500
57 0
7,000   .
47 0
6,500
33 9
6,000
5,500    _
13 9
5,000..
6 3
4,500
2 0
4,000.
0 6
Less than $3,750	
0.1
Totals	
9,844
534
550
2,297
3,881
588
17,694
Total reported, 17,694;  median salary, $7,399;  mean salary, $7,995.
Part-time Teachers
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$10,500     	
1
1
1
2
7
3
9
14
18
24
61
73
49
35
27
15
12
2
2
6
4
1
2
4
2
2
1
i
~~2
1
1
1
2
1
3
3
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
3
2
3
3
3
5
2
3
1
5
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
6
10
6
15
20
27
38
67
85
56
43
33
19
14
100.0
9,500
99.8
9,000....
8,500
8,000
7,500
99.6
99.1
98.7
7 000
98.0
6,500
96.7
«nnn
94.4
5,500
93.1
5,000
89.7
4,500
85.3
4,000
79.2
3,500
70 8
3,000 ...
2,500.
55.8
36 8
7,000
24 3
1,500.
14 7
1,000
7 4
500
3.1
Totals	
352
25
2
24
33
12
448
Total reported, 448;  median salary, $3,096; mean salary, $3,471.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 27
Full-time Teachers and Principals Enrolling a Division
(Including Special Staff)
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
percent
$16,000 	
1
1
14
11
22
49
49
45
84
89
144
174
122
344
207
289
708
970
1,521
1,084
1,216
1,165
689
232
85
2
1
1
3
6
4
5
22
12
18
22
31
41
65
62
57
46
53
17
5
2
1
1
4
10
35
14
42
22
11
23
23
22
32
31
48
42
28
13
6
4
~ 4
13
25
67
62
183
55
129
95
130
157
184
199
245
111
31
10
4
2
1
1
22
75
216
221
205
339
99
170
179
194
221
243
260
226
100
21
8
6
1
1
" i
7
3
29
32
13
69
11
21
27
29
21
42
36
37
11
2
1
2
2
1'
14
12
24
51
87
149
395
427
471
809
310
705
553
695
1,180
1,535
2,126
1,691
1,512
1,285
731
251
90
5
100.0
15,500 	
100.0
15,000	
14,500	
14,000..    ...
100.0
99.9
99.8
13,500       	
99.6
13,000
99.3
12,500	
98.7
12,000      	
97.7
11,500
95 1
11,000
92.3
10,500
89 2
10,000
83 8
9,500	
9,000
81.8
8,500    .
8,000—	
7,500
68.9
61.1
7,000..
50.9
6,500	
6,000
36.8
25 6
5,500
15 6
5,000
7 1
4,500
2.3
0.6
4,000
Less than $3,750	
0.0
Totals	
9,401
473
412
1,706
2,809
394
15,111
Total reported, 15,111;  median salary, $7,218; mean salary, $7,715.
 G 28                                    PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Full-time Teachers and Teaching Principals Not Enrolling a Division
(Including Special Staff)
Salary
Elementary
Elem.-
Junior
Sec.
Elem.-
Senior
Sec.
Junior
Sec.
Secondary
Senior
Sec.
Total
Cumulative
per Cent
$16,500  -	
1
3
4
100.0
16,000	
11
2
13
99.8
15,500 ....
1
2
5
10
1
19
99.3
15,000	
1
7
12
3
23
98 6
14,500	
1
8
18
4
31
97.7
14,000
9
1
4
1
10
12
11
17
2
4
27
44
96.5
95.5
13,500	
13,000	
3
2
6
9
20
3
43
93.8
12,500	
3
1
5
12
63
8
92
92.1
19,000
16
5
9
26
88
19
163
88.5
11,500
4
1
17
31
97
18
168
82.2
11,000	
17
2
16
26
72
11
144
75.7
10,500	
21
12
4
4
11
1
58
13
93
40
25
5
212
75
70.2
61.9
10,000	
9,500	
38
3
9
35
73
11
169
59.0
9,000	
28
3
8
31
59
8
137
52.5
8,500	
20
3
4
44
61
15
147
47.2
8,000	
88
7
7
44
63
7
216
41.5
7,500	
62
5
9
57
80
12
225
33.1
7,000	
64
5
9
46
60
11
195
24.4
6,500	
48
1
5
52
58
16
180
16.9
6000
45
9
11
45
45
7
162
9.9
5,500	
33
1
14
13
2
63
3.6
5,000    	
8
1
1
4
3
17
1.2
4,500
2
2
4
0.5
4,000	
1
1
1
3
0.4
3,500
1
1
2
0.3
3,000     -
1
1
2
0.2
2,500	
2
2
0.1
2,000	
Totals
1
	
	
	
1
0.0
527
61
138
591
1,072
194
2,583
	
Total reported, 2,583; median salary, $9,014; mean salary, $9,285.
-
 report of superintendent
District-employed Special Instructors
g 29
Salary (± $250)
Number of Instructors
Part Time
Persons
Full-time
Equivalents
Cumulative
per Cent
F.T.E.
Salaries
$14,000..
13,500-
13,000-
12,500-
12,000-
11,500-
11,000-
10,500..
10,000..
9,500.
9,000.
8,500..
8,000..
7,500...
7,000..
6,500-
6,000_
5,500-
5,000..
4,500-
4,000-
3,500_
3,000-
2,500...
2,000-
1,500..
1,000-
500-
Totals..
1
2
8
4
1
6
1
5
5
4
14
7
10
12
6
3
1
2
2
98
0.6
0.9
1.3
1.7
0.5
1.8
3.4
4.3
1.0
1.0
0.7
1.4
0.3
18.9
141 persons
100.0
96.5
95.7
94.3
88.7
85.1
84.4
79.4
78.7
71.6
66.7
63.8
53.9
46.8
34.0
23.4
15.6
11.3
8.5
6.4
1.4
116.9 F.T.E.s
Medians: Full time, $7,964; part time, $3,000; all F.T.E.S, $7,475.
 G 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
EXPENDITURES FOR EDUCATION, CALENDAR YEAR 1967
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Expenditures by school districts  $248,031,667.00
Department of Education expenditures for administration,
correspondence schools, Teachers' Pension Fund, free textbooks and maps, adult education, vocational and technical
schools, grants to colleges and universities, services, etc.  *181,854,578.21
Grand total expenditures  $332,702,367.21
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1967
Grand total cost of education .  $332,702,367.21
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue  $3,031,718.00
Debt charges on school district debt  30,951,756.00
Department of Education expenditures for
post-secondary and adult education,
correspondence schools, vocational and
technical schools, grants to colleges and
universities, etc.   76,408,205.47
     110,391,679.47
Total operating costs   $222,310,687.74
Operating cost per pupil for year on daily average attendance of 425,514    $522.45
* Gross expenditures.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
G 31
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 G 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
IN RETROSPECT
The school-year 1967-68 saw major change in the basic system of financing
school operation which had been in force, with periodic minor changes, from 1955.
Without repeating the detail to be found in the Public Schools (Amendment) Act,
1968, the new formula continued those features of the old which were designed to
maintain at uniform local cost the level of basic education services. No change was
therefore made in the principle whereby the basic grant to a school district consists
of the difference between the cost of the basic programme and the amount raised by
a fixed mill-rate levy in all districts.
What was new was the method of determining the cost of the basic educational
programme by multiplying a dollar figure by the total number of instructional units
in the school district. This concept of "instructional units" replaced the old detailed calculation of the number of teachers under entitlement, the placement of
those teachers on a " salary scale for grant purposes," and other minutia..
Several great advantages are expected from the new formula. It brings the
basic education programme into reasonable line with actual operating expenses,
recognizing a growth factor not present in the older formula. It provides School
Boards with meaningful guidelines in the preparation of their annual budgets, giving
them reasonable foreknowledge of their revenues as weU as their expenditures.
Boards are given greater flexibility in implementing responsible policies without being
subject to detailed regulation. All of these features actually result in greater
autonomy to Boards.
There are provisions in the amendment for keeping increased amounts of expenditure within determined limits, although there is also provision for these limits
to be exceeded under certain conditions.
The new formula incidentally freed the Department from the necessity of determining years of experience for each teacher and made it possible to turn this responsibility back to the Boards of School Trustees. As a corollary of this, the Department
was able to reduce the number of categories of teaching credentials to be issued to
new teachers in the Province.
Another amendment to the Public Schools Act made it possible for persons who
were not property-owners in a district to be representatives or trustees. Still another
amendment removed the anomaly from the Act whereby a teacher without full
qualifications employed on a letter of permission was not a teacher within the meaning of the Act.
The school-year saw studies made in a variety of fields. These are mentioned
in the reports of the various branches of the Department, but attention should be
called to at least two.
In May Dr. G. Neil Perry, the Deputy Minister of Education, was named to
chair an Advisory Committee on Inter-University Relations. The Chairman of the
Academic Board and nominees of the three public universities also served on this
important committee.
In March a Committee on School Utilization was formed under the chairmanship of Mr. J. L. Canty, Co-ordinator of Services, and with nominees of the School
Trustees Association, the Teachers' Federation, and the Parent-Teacher Federation
as members. This Committee was asked to study possible methods of obtaining
greater use of public-school facilities.
In April a welcome announcement was made that the new Provincial Vocational School in Terrace would commence operation in September of 1968.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT G 37
SENIOR STAFF CHANGES
In May, 1968, the Honourable D. L. Brothers assumed the portfolio of Minister
of Education, coming to this Department from his previous position as Minister of
Mines and Petroleum Resources, thus ending the Department's long association with
the Honourable L. R. Peterson, who left to assume the position of Attorney-General.
There were several changes in the Civil Service staff of the Department during
the school-year.
Mr. R. B. Stibbs, a retiring District Superintendent of Schools, acted as Chief
Inspector of Schools throughout the school-year. Upon his retirement from the
Acting Chief Inspectorship, the position was changed to that of Assistant Superintendent (Field Services). Appointed to it was Mr. C. I. Taylor, formerly District
Superintendent of Schools for the large municipal area of Burnaby. Mr. Taylor had
previously served as a District Superintendent in Courtenay and Kimberley after
having been a teacher and principal in the Province.
The appointment of Mr. Taylor brought the number of Assistant Superintendents or equivalent, each of whom is in charge of a branch of the Department,
to five.
Mr. H. M. Evans, who first joined the Department in 1947 as Assistant Registrar and was promoted to Registrar in 1953, resigned in June in order to take up
a post with Simon Fraser University.
Before joining the Department, Mr. Evans had been an instructor at the University of British Columbia and a high-school teacher in the Province, as well as
having served with the Canadian Army in 1943-45. He has been succeeded by
Mr. E. A. Killough, previously Assistant Registrar.
Another long period of service with the Department came to an end with the
retirement of Miss Mildred Orr, Provincial Director of Home Economics. Miss Orr
joined the Department as an Assistant Inspector in the year 1945 and was appointed
to the position of Director in 1952. Miss Jean Irvine, formerly Inspector of Home
Economics, has taken over the Directorship.
The retirement of Mr. J. R. Pollock brought to an end a long and distinguished
service with the Department. Mr. Pollock was recruited from the Vancouver school
system in 1946 to organize the Division of Visual Education. He was therefore its
first and only Director. His work attracted attention not only in Canada, but in
other countries, and Mr. Pollock was asked to organize similar services both in
Indonesia and in Kuwait. No successor has been appointed to the position as a
consolidation and reorganization of services has been planned in this area.
Four District Superintendents of Schools also retired in this school-year.
Mr. W. H. Gurney, District Superintendent for Port Alberni, joined the Department in 1959, having previously served as a teacher in Vancouver, New Westminster,
and Kamloops and as a principal in Keremeos and Kamloops. His first superin-
tendency was centred in Kitimat.
Mr. I. H. R. Jeffery taught at Clayburn, Yahk, Coal Creek, and Trail before
becoming an Inspector of Schools in August, 1949. He served at Kimberley, Chilliwack, and Powell River before being appointed to the position of District Superintendent of Schools at Maple Ridge in 1960.
Mr. A. D. Jones, District Superintendent at Duncan, taught in Victoria schools
as a teacher and principal before joining the Department as an Inspertor of Schools
in June, 1953. His previous superintendencies were centred at Prince Rupert and
Kitimat.
Mr. F. A. McLellan, Relieving District Superintendent, joined the Department
in August, 1943, as an Inspector of Schools and was assigned to the Peace River
 G 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
District. He saw service in various parts of the Province, having been either an
Inspector or District Superintendent in Prince George, Trail, Kamloops, Sooke, and
Saanich.   He had first entered teaching in 1922 in Slocan City.
As replacements to the staff of District Superintendents the following were
appointed in June, 1968: Mr. A. Campbell, formerly principal of the Mount Baker
Senior Secondary School in Cranbrook; Mr. C. Holob, formerly principal of Alpha
Junior Secondary School in Burnaby; Mr. W. Ramsay, formerly principal of Alberni
District Secondary School; and Mr. J. Walsh, formerly Director of Elementary and
Secondary Instruction in the Courtenay School District.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The duties of this office would be much heavier were it not for the co-operation
and devoted efforts of my colleagues in the Department, the school trustees who
voluntarily undertake the task of administering school policies in their districts, and
the hard-working teachers in the school system whose work in the classroom finally
determines the quality of education in British Columbia.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. P. LEVIRS,
Superintendent of Education.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH G 39
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF J. PHILLIPSON, B.A., B.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT
OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION AND SCHOOL BOARD RELATIONS).
Miscellaneous
The year has been one of consolidation following several years of change. The
School Building Manual was completely reorganized to incorporate changes issued
by Administrative Bulletin during the recent period of curriculum change.
The cost of school construction has become a matter of concern. A special
committee was appointed by the Honourable the Minister to study the problem.
The committee points to modular concepts—using standardized and pre-built components—combined with a " systems " approach as the answer being found in other
countries and other fields of construction.
There were numerous schools opened in the Province which incorporated the
principle of the " open area," enabling teachers to experiment in a variety of new
techniques and to use modern equipment.
The Department has held meetings with the School Construction Committee
of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. These talks were exploratory to the
concept of maintaining a continuing liaison with the classroom teacher and the Department in school construction matters.
The Department, through representations from the Administrative Branch, was
active in attending a variety of conferences, workshops, and School Board meetings
during the year. The several field trips where local problems were discussed on the
site are most satisfying for the Department officials and are appreciated by the
trustees.
Amalgamation of School Districts
The Department is on record as favouring the reduction of school districts in
the Province where the combination of existing districts will result in improved educational opportunity to a significant group of projects or where economic or administrative efficiencies will evolve.
During the year two amalgamations took place. The first resulted in the combination of School District No. 51 (Portland Canal) and School District No. 53
(Terrace) to bring about School District No. 88 (Skeena-Cassiar). The second
change brought together School District No. 20 (Salmon Arm) and School District
No. 78 (Enderby) to form the new School District No. 89 (Shuswap).
A number of other Boards are examining the possibility of amalgamation. The
Department, at this time, is not taking the initiative in this matter, but acts as adviser
and consultant with respect to consideration of the many questions which are raised.
Conclusion
The year has been one of continued growth in the total school plant in the
Province. There has been an opportunity to examine the escalation of school construction cost. Maximum ceiling costs applied on the basis of $16,000 per elementary classroom and $22,500 per secondary classroom have proven that functional
and quality classrooms can be built for these amounts.   The experience points to the
 G 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
need for all those persons concerned with school design and school construction to
take a new look at traditional approaches with a view to getting the best value for
the construction dollar.
Certain statistical data concerning the affairs of the Administrative Branch for
1967/68 are shown below:—
School District Organization
Municipal school districts  73
Rural school Districts     8
Unattached school districts     4
Total   8 5
School Board Organization
Five-member Board  24
Seven-member Board  3 7
Nine-member Board  18
Official trustees (number of districts)     6
Total   85
Capital Expenditures (Section 190 Approvals), Calendar Year 1967
Site purchases and improvement  $6,409,100
Buildings—construction   44,727,699
Equipment  7,993,928
Plans and supervision  3,415,216
Total  $62,545,943
Referenda, Calendar Year 1967
Referenda approved by Department  $74,535,862
Referenda approved by owner-electors  $63,341,332
(a) Shareable  $62,005,410
(£>) Non-shareable        1,335,922
Total   $63,341,332
Referenda defeated by owner-electors     11,194,530
$74,535,862
School Total
Districts Referenda
Successful referenda  20 28
Unsuccessful referenda  13 17
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 41
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include curriculum development, prescription and provision of textbooks, provision of audio-visual aids, testing and development of
standards, and other matters relating to the instructional programmes in public
schools. Certain of these services are administered by a separate division and are
reported on in the report for that division.
Accreditation of Schools
Accredited schools are those granted authority to recommend a proportion of
Grade XII students for standing in certain subjects leading to graduation on the
Academic-Technical Programme. Under the general supervision of the Board of
Examiners, an Accrediting Committee is responsible for assessing applications from
public secondary schools offering Grade XII subjects. The following is a statistical
summary of the assessment made this year:—
Total number of schools offering Grade XII  143
Number of schools assessed for accreditation     73
Accredited for one year     12
Accredited for two years     10
Accredited for three years     26
Accredited for four years       4
Total number of schools accredited, 1967/68     52
Number accredited in previous years and still retaining accreditation    73
Total number of schools accredited as of 1967  125
Teacher Certification
In September, 1967, the Superintendent of Education set up a committee of
senior officials of the Department with instructions to examine the whole system of
certification and bring in recommendations that would set out a more workable
structure and at the same time maintain existing standards of qualifications.
A revised procedure was recommended, based on certain specific principles:—
(1) Maintenance of the existing responsibility of the Council of Public Instruction to grant authority to teach in public schools.
(2) Continuation of the distinction between the awarding of a certificate to
a teacher with professional training and the granting of authority for the
employment of a person without professional training to undertake certain
instructional duties under special circumstances and for a limited period
of time.
(3) Reduction of the number of categories of teaching certificates.
(4) Separation of certification, a Provincial responsibility, from its present
close association with placement on local salary schedules, a matter of
school district jurisdiction.
(5) Retention of the existing principle of requiring two years of successful
teaching for permanent certification.
 G 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Revisions were approved in the regulations in respect of teacher certification
to provide for two types of permanent teaching certificates. The first of the two
certificates is a Standard Teaching Certificate, awarded to those who have successfully completed an acceptable three-year programme beyond secondary-school
graduation and including both academic and professional studies. The second, the
Professional Teaching Certificate, will be awarded to all applicants who have successfully completed an acceptable four- or five-year programme of professional and
academic studies normally culminating in a degree. Provision is also made for a
Teaching Licence granted to an applicant who provides evidence of successful completion of an acceptable programme of academic and professional studies but who
does not yet qualify for the Standard Certificate.
Letters of Permission are to be retained for issue to persons without professional
training whose services are required for special purposes. The conditions governing their issue are to be altered to reduce the number of annual requests and to
impose stricter regulations.
In order that certificated teachers from other Provinces of Canada may obtain
certification in British Columbia without delay, a simple table of equivalencies has
been developed to determine the British Columbia certificate to be granted to those
holding certificates from other Provinces.
Choice of Programmes, September, 1967
The school-year 1967/68 saw the second graduating class of the new organization of the secondary-school curriculum begun in 1962. The following shows the
percentage of Grades XI and XII pupils electing the programmes indicated:—
Programme Per Cent
Academic and Technical  63.3
Commercial  18.7
Industrial  11.4
Community Services      3.9
Visual and Performing Arts     1.3
Other new programmes     1.4
It should be noted that considerable flexibility exists within the above programmes whereby pupils may complete with more than one specialty and may elect
to study courses not normally a part of the programme they are completing. It
should also be noted that principals have been granted authority to make some
alterations in the requirements of these programmes where it is in the educational
interests of the pupils to transfer from one programme to another.
Organization of Secondary Schools
The newer types of school organization providing for the reorganized curriculum are becoming established.   Types are shown below:—
Number of Schools
1966-67 1967-68
Senior secondary     18 17
Secondary  105 109
Junior secondary     71 82
Elementary and secondary     24 20
Elementary and junior secondary     47 43
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 43
The size of schools, with reference to secondary enrolments only, is shown
below:
Enrolment
Over 2,000 _
1,001-2,000
501-1,000
251-   500
101-   250
51-   100
Under 51 _
Number of Schools
1966
1967
2
3
33
34
93
102
58
54
38
43
16
14
23
18
Totals ...
263
268
Grade XIII Enrolment
A significant decline in enrolments may be noted in the following figures and
is due to the establishing of Simon Fraser University, Vancouver City College, and
Selkirk Regional College.
1966-67 1967-68
Number of districts with Grade XIII        32 26
Number of schools       34 28
Enrolment  2,299 1,910
Kindergartens
Kindergartens increased in number and enrolment, as follows:
1966-67
Number of districts with kindergartens
Number of schools	
Enrolment	
33
. 217
.14,671
1967-68
39
254
16,011
Schools for Trainable Retarded Children
The table below shows enrolments in schools operated by local chapters of
the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia and supported by
grants:—
Districts
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils in Relation to Grants
Fully
Eligible
Kindergarten
Ineligible
Total
1966
40
36
43
38
448
424
51
29
33
49
532
1967            .
502
Classes for trainable retarded children were also operated as part of the regular
public-school system:—
1966 1967
Number of school districts     15 18
Number of schools     15 15
Number of pupils  673 758
 G 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed in supervisory and special capacities as at September 30th:—
1966 1967
Directors of instruction     31 34
Supervisors of instruction  105 116
Teacher consultants      28 32
Special counsellors     48 57
District teachers other than relieving teachers     81 121
Totals   293 360
Special Classes in Public Schools
Enrolments, as reported on September 30th, are shown in the following
table:-
Type of Class
Number of Teachers
Number of Pupils
1966
1967
1966
1967
319
110
11
35
11
15
2
2
13
67
4
8
335
162
12
51
12
16
2
2
20
79
3
9
6
4,362
1,587
(2)
608
121
422
16
80
113
673
(2)
57
4,577
2,298
(2)
791
153
272
11
13
143
758
(2)
72
37
597
709
8,039
9,125
i Enrolment varies greatly.
2 Not given.
Entitlement of Teachers
The total number of teaching positions within entitlement for grant purposes
and the number established over and above entitlement by local districts, as at
September 30th, are shown below:—
1966
  16,616.79
Teaching positions within entitlement	
Teaching positions over entitlement        782.51
1967
17,698.68
1,140.97
Totals
17,399.30        18,839.65
DIVISION OF CURRICULUM
Report of W. B. Naylor, B.A., Director
Included among the responsibilities of the Division of Curriculum are the
development of new courses, the revision of prescribed courses in the curriculum,
the preparation of curriculum guides for authorization and publication, and the
evaluation and selection of textbooks for authorization. In addition, the Division
advises on the administration of the curriculum and provides advice and assistance
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 45
to other divisions within the Department on matters related to curriculum. This
work is carried on with the assistance of advisory committees of teachers and other
experts.
The following table gives some indication of the extent of the work done by
these advisory committees. The figures for the preceding year are also given to
show the increasing programme of activity in the field of curriculum development.
1966 1967
Number of committees        22 26
Total membership      181 186
Total number of meetings      168 187
Number of full-day meetings        51 83
Total number of member-hours (estimated)   5,299 6,033
In view of the above figures, it is significant to note that the assistance given
by members of these committees is voluntary. The policy of providing released time
for teacher members was continued.
Also continued was the policy of encouraging and guiding curriculum innovation at the local level. Modification of prescribed courses, trial use of experimental
courses, changes in school organization to facilitate continuous learning, development of new procedures for reporting to parents, use of new teaching equipment are
among the new developments initiated at the local level. A total of more than 182
schools reported curriculum innovation in one form or another in 41 school districts.
Revision work was continued in the following curriculum areas of the Provincial curriculum: Art, commerce, French, German, health, home economics,
industrial education, language arts, music, science, and social studies. New studies
were undertaken in Italian, Latin, and Spanish. As a result of these studies, a total
of 12 new or revised courses and 106 new textbooks were prepared for use in
September, 1968. In addition, a revised library manual was prepared by a committee established for that purpose, and a committee was formed to do a preliminary
evaluation of the secondary-school organization. Two special summer workshops
were held: one to do course writing in the field of elementary health education and
the other to rewrite the draft of the Grade X science programme taught experimentally during the year in 72 classrooms in various parts of the Province. The regular
procedure for reviewing and recommending books for school libraries was continued.
Approximately 800 books were reviewed and 529 were recommended, and four lists
with notations were issued to all schools.
Significant changes in the types of courses being developed can be illustrated
by referring to the new Social Studies 8 Course, the first of a series of courses being
developed in that field for secondary schools. Whereas in the previous course a
body of knowledge to be acquired by all students was prescribed, in the new course
the amount of factual knowledge to be acquired by all is limited, a list of skills and
concepts to be learned is provided, and pupils are encouraged to acquire these
through independent studies in selected historical periods and geographical areas.
Single survey-type texts, adequate for the previous type of course, would not meet
the needs of pupils undertaking the new course. To provide for these needs, smaller
quantities of a wide variety of resource books are provided.
Successful implementation of courses of this type requires a great deal of
preparation by the teacher both in background information and in teaching method.
To allow teachers time for this preparation and yet not prevent teachers who are
prepared from proceeding, a new policy, referred to as permissive implementation,
 J
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 47
has been developed. Under this scheme, local authorities have permission to implement the new course or delay its implementation for a specified period of time,
usually one year.
Acknowledgment
The assistance and advice provided by the members of the various revision
committees and the two professional committees are hereby acknowledged. The
co-operation received from the British Columbia Teachers' Federation and the three
public universities in the Province has been greatly appreciated.
Curriculum Consultants
The practice was once more continued whereby two outstanding teachers in
the Province were released on loan by the Boards of School Trustees to work with
the Division of Curriculum. This year appointees were Mr. G. H. House (Burnaby)
and Mr. J. D. Wilson (Terrace). The enthusiasm and knowledge combined with
the practical experience and professional training of both Mr. House and Mr. Wilson
made an invaluable contribution to the work of this Division.
Information and Related Services
Services related to the curriculum were also provided by the staff of the
Division. In addition to meetings and consultation with curriculum officials of other
Provinces, members of the Division participated in various meetings and conferences
at which information on curriculum development was provided.
PUBLIC SCHOOL ADULT EDUCATION
(A. L. Cartier, M.A., Co-ordinator of Adult Education)
The enrolment in PubUc School Adult Education in British Columbia increased
over last year by 13.8 per cent to a total of 127,659. In 22 school districts the
increase was over 20 per cent. Most of this increase was in the non-vocational
sector, where the Provincial enrolment was up by 16.9 per cent.
The most notable growths in enrolment occurred in the following course types:
There were 5,504 persons enrolled in business management courses, up 16.5 per
cent; there were 1,572 enrolled in upgrading courses for the service trades, up 43
per cent; there were 17,837 enrolled in courses for academic credit, an increase of
51 per cent over last year; there were 6,993 enrolled in non-credit liberal education
courses, up 35.7 per cent; and there were 3,706 parents enrolled in family life
education courses, up 60.4 per cent from last year.
The enrolment in the various types of courses gives some indication of the
apparent reasons why adults enrol in continuing education classes. Forty-four
per cent of enrollees are taking courses to improve earning capacity by up-grading
their vocational skills or academic achievement. Another 28 per cent are enrolled
in courses designed for personal development or improvement in homemaking skills.
A diminishing percentage of the total, now only 11.5 per cent, take recreational and
hobby courses. A secondary reason for enrolling in adult classes which is given by
most adults is the fact that these classes offer opportunities for socializing and forming new friendships. With this in mind, course leaders are encouraged to use group
discussion methods and provide coffee breaks or other special occasions for
socialization.
 G 48
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
Class in sculpture, Institute of Adult Studies, Greater Victoria School District.
New Trends in Public School Adult Education in British Columbia
1. The most notable present trend is the rapid development of enrolment in
courses for academic credit. Last year the increase was 18 per cent over the previous year. This year the increase was 51 per cent over last year. This rapid
increase is apparently due to greater public knowledge of the opportunities available,
a tendency to tailor the method of presentation to the special needs of adults, much
more convenient time-tabling and use of the semester system.
2. There has been a rapid development by public-school adult educators of
the use of conference and workshop techniques. These techniques not only add
variety to an adult education programme, but they involve participants who cannot
commit their time to long courses and they make possible the use of resources from
distant communities.
3. Another trend is the growing participation upon the part of community
membership in the development of programmes whether by group evaluation sessions, co-operative planning, or co-sponsorship.
4. Because many adults have found it difficult to relate their previous education
to the many new types of adult secondary programmes, it was necessary for local
directors of adult education to call upon or develop counselling services. These
counselling services are performed by telephone, personal interview, and group
counselling.
5. Many of the directors of adult education have attempted to respond to requests for programmes to help adults cope with some of the social stresses due to
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 49
rapid social change.   This has resulted in a rapid increase in courses and conferences
devoted to family life education or dealing with current social problems.
6. The increase in the number of working mothers has created a demand for
more nursery schools and kindergartens, with the consequent demand for pre-school
teacher training. Directors of adult education, in co-operation with the Social
Welfare Department, which licenses such teachers through the Welfare Institutions
Board, have developed training programmes in all the larger centres of the Province.
7. In co-operation with the British Columbia Safety Council, the Vancouver
Traffic and Safety Council, and the Motor-vehicle Branch, the directors of adult
education have been organizing a programme in defensive driving. The enrolment
in defensive driving has grown to 550 in 26 classes. This programme of driver
re-education will continue to expand because insurance companies and the Motor-
vehicle Branch are encouraging many drivers to use this training to improve their
driving records.
8. Methods of promotion are a major reason for the growth of adult education.
Adult education needs some promotion because enrolment and attendance are voluntary. The methods of promotion include newspaper advertising, the direct mailing
of descriptive brochures, and the use of radio and television. In the larger centres,
school districts pool resources to advertise co-operatively on radio and television.
In the smaller centres, open-line radio programmes and television interviews are
available for promotion. Co-sponsorship of programmes with church groups and
other community organizations makes use of the communications channels of the
co-sponsoring organizations.
Services of the Adult Education Division
This Division is primarily concerned with assisting local school districts with
the development and improvement of their adult education programmes. However,
it also provides consultative services and assistance to voluntary community groups
and government agencies which are in some way involved with the education
of adults.
Batik art class, Institute of Adult Studies, Greater Victoria School District.
 G 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
A. Assistance to Local School Board Adult Education
During the past year the Co-ordinator of Adult Education accepted invitations
to consult with 13 School Boards or their officials. The Co-ordinator also arranged
for or conducted workshops or conferences for adult education directors or instructors at Port Alberni, Sechelt, Prince Rupert, Kamloops, Nelson, Nanaimo, and
the Lower Mainland area. A Provincial conference was held for directors of adult
education at Victoria in May.
B. Co-operation with Other Government Agencies
1. With Other Branches of the Department of Education.—This Division assisted the Community Programmes Branch with leadership training workshops and
conferences at Kelowna, Williams Lake, Prince George, Salmon Arm, and Cranbrook. It also assisted the Community Programmes Branch to conduct community
evaluations of its services.
Assistance was also provided to the administration of special services in the
development of a workshop for the local school district supervisors of school-bus
drivers.
This Division also assists the Technical and Vocational Branch by supervising
the development of business management programmes by the local school district
adult education directors. During the past year there were 5,504 businessmen enrolled in 253 business management and supervisory training courses operated by
local school districts. Assistance has also been given to the Technical and Vocational Branch in the organization of courses for the service industries.
2. With the Social Welfare Department.—Assistance was provided to the
headquarters staff in the organization of conferences for foster-parents, adopting
parents, and foster-children, as well as in developing educational programmes for
prospective foster-parents and adopting parents.
This Division also collaborated with the Social Assistance and Rehabilitation
Division and the Slocan School District in responding to a request from the Doukho-
bor people of the area for basic education for adults. Two classes were organized
and held in the Mount Sentinel School at South Slocan. The members of these
classes advanced an average of three grade levels.
The Social Welfare Rehabilitation Division pays the fees for welfare recipients
wishing to improve their earning potential by taking either vocational or academic
courses.
3. With the Attorney-General's Department.—Arrangements have been made
between the Corrections Branch and local school districts to conduct courses within
Provincial gaols and in some cases to permit selected inmates of correctional institutions to attend regular night-school classes.
Collaboration has also been arranged between the Motor-vehicle Branch and
local school districts to encourage persons with poor driving records to enrol in the
defensive driving classes organized at the local level.
4. With Various Federal Departments.—Procedures have been worked out
with the Indian Affairs Branch as to methods of organizing and financing adult
education for native Indians. Last year local directors of adult education arranged
with adult education committees of Indians for 35 special classes for Indians, in
which there were 365 Indians enrolled. In addition, the Indian Affairs Branch paid
the fees of 105 Indians enrolled in regular classes. Of course many more Indians
enrolled in adult classes and paid their own fees.
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
G 51
In collaboration with the Department of the Secretary of State, 319 classes
of English and Citizenship Education for New Canadians were organized, with a
record enrolment this year of 5,284.
The Department of Manpower and Immigration is now beginning to use some
of the services available through Public School Adult Education. More and more
adults are being counselled by Manpower to enrol in courses, and more and more
" spaces " are being purchased. The local school district programmes are able to
provide services within their scope near where the person who needs training resides,
thus often avoiding family disruption and costs of maintaining two residences per
trainee.
C. Assistance to Community Voluntary Organizations
With a view to strengthening rather than undermining voluntary organizations
that have adult education functions, this Division attempts to help through consultation and arranging for co-sponsorship of projects with directors of public school
adult education. During the past year this type of help has been provided to various
church groups, the Y.M.C.A., Indian Bands, the British Columbia Hotelmen's Association, the B.C. Safety Council, the St. John Ambulance Association, family
service agencies, and the Mental Health Association.
D. Communications Centre and Information Service for Adult Education
Much of the development of Public School Adult Education takes place as the
result of a continuous dialogue between directors of adult education and the public
they serve. The value of this dialogue and projects developed as a result of it is
greatly increased when the benefits of this process can be shared over the whole
Province. Hence this Division provides for an exchange between school districts of
the new ideas, new courses, or new projects. This is done by a regular mailing from
this Division of such information to all school districts.
In a similar way this Division distributes information that becomes available on
new developments in adult education to all school districts. A library of pertinent
books and pamphlets is being built up and film service is provided both through our
library and our ready access to various other sources of films.
Summary Showing Trends in Enrolment, Number of Classes, Number
of Instructors, and Number of School Districts Participating
(These statistics are gathered from annual reports submitted by the directors
of adult education of the participating school districts.)
Year
Number
of School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60                   	
58
64
65
68
70
70
71
69
671
40,867
40,917
46.548
70,405
78,461
91,579
100,292
112,105
127,659
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
3,454
3,828
4,141
4,982
5,610
1,578
1960/61
2,220
1961/62 _	
2,219
1962/63  	
3,070
1963/64     -         _ 	
1964/65
3,964
4,261
1965/66                                    	
1966/67
1967/68
5,067
5,637
6,230
1 The number of districts is smaller this year due to amalgamation of school districts.
 G 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Vocational Programme
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60 _	
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
17,510
21,393
25,477
28,556
29,977
540
552
518
685
880
1,029
1,194
1,432
1,479
322
1960/61
552
1961/62 -	
512
1962/63
681
1963/64
910
1964/65
1,116
1965/66
1,384
1966/67
1,511
1967/68
1,566
Non-vocational Programme
1959/60..
1960/61-
1961/62.
1962/63..
1963/64..
1964/65..
1965/66.
1966/67...
1967/68..
27,328
28,387
36,765
56,008
60,951
70,186
74,815
83,549
97,682
1,256
1,393
1,755
2,264
2,574
2,799
2,947
3,550
4,131
1,256
1,648
1,707
2,389
3,054
3,145
3,683
4,126
4,664
Classification of Courses and Enrolment
Vocational Programme1
Course
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
Business Management-
Commercial 	
Automotive	
Machine Shop _	
Construction Trades..
Electronics	
Lumbering and Forestry..
Engineering	
Service Trades	
Agriculture-
Vocational Preparatory-
Miscellaneous -	
5,504
7,621
780
1,321
2,127
1,520
1,948
1,531
1,572
734
990
4,329
243
343
54
86
116
87
69
64
87
41
65
224
Totals
29,977
1,479
253
403
54
95
128
82
83
58
84
31
65
230
1,566
i These are vocational courses sponsored by night schools operated by local school districts only.
Non-vocational Programmes
Academic (for credit).
English and Citizenship-
Liberal Studies (non-credit)..
Fine Arts	
Domestic Arts.
Hobbies and Crafts _	
Parent Education —	
Recitation and Fitness.
Miscellaneous	
Totals .
Total enrolment.
17,837
5,284
6,993
10,450
14,950
10,018
3,706
14,596
13,848
97,682
4,131
127,659
5,610
783
319
361
531
846
575
96
598
575
4,684
6,250
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES G 53
The cost of instruction and administration of the above programmes for the
school-year 1967/68 was $2,182,827.02. This figure does not include light, heat,
extra custodial services, or depreciation of plant. Provincial grants-in-aid amount
to just over 25 per cent of the above figure. In most school districts the balance of
the above costs are raised through the participants' fees.
Not only is this programme growing, but its rate of growth is accelerating.
This probably reflects an expanding adult population with its growing awareness of
the need for continuing education.
 G 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS
REPORT OF WILLIAM D. REID, B.A., M.Ed., ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS)
General
The Division came into being as a full-time entity on September 1, 1967.
Previously the embryonic Division had operated for nearly a year with an acting
part-time head. The part-time head of the Division for the year 1966/67 left the
service in early May, 1967.
In late June, 1967, the as yet unestablished Division was requested to undertake the administration of Canada Student Loans, and the designated head of the
Division was asked to act as Chairman of the British Columbia Student Aid Loan
Committee. The administration of Canada Student Loans thus became a duty of
the Division.
During the loan-year 1967/68, which commenced July 1, 1967, the Division
issued 11,434 loans in the total amount of $8,037,053. The average amount of a
loan was $702.91.
The Division is attempting to co-ordinate the planning of the several colleges
with a view to avoiding unnecessary duplication of courses and programmes. To
this end, much has been done by the principal of the British Columbia Institute of
Technology to assist colleges in providing general courses at the first-year level
which will permit students to transfer to the second-year level in specific sophisticated
courses at the Institute.
Much of the work of the Division has been with the establishment of regional
colleges. The table below shows the state of development of these institutions as
at June 30, 1968:—
Table I
Regional or District College Present Status
Vancouver City College  Open and operating.
Selkirk College (Castlegar)  Open and operating.
Okanagan Regional College  To open in September, 1968.
Capilano College  To open in September, 1968.
College of New Caledonia (Prince George) Approved but not open.
Malaspina College  (Central  Vancouver
Island)  Approved but not open.
A series of report forms was designed in co-operation with university and
college officials which are used for the provision of detailed information to this office.
In the light of experience, these will continue to be modified and improved. It is
anticipated that the data provided by these forms will assist in research and enrolment projections.
 DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE AFFAIRS G 55
Enrolments for the year 1967/68 are shown in the tables below:—
Table II.—British Columbia Universities
University
of British
Columbia
University
of Victoria
Notre
Dame
University
Simon Fraser University
Fall
Semester
Spring
Semester
Summer
Semester
Full-tune degree enrolment—
15,831
2,065
3,742
95
527
4,242
257
4,567
287
1,962
Full-time graduate _  .
296
Totals
17,896      !      3,837
527
4,499      |      4,854
2,258
Part-time degree enrolment—
Correspondence	
On campus
668
1,596
380
5,216
640
943
8
11
16
189
289
222
384
Summer session	
	
Totals     	
7,860
1,583
224
289      1         222
384
25,756
5,420
751
4,788
5,076
2,642
Table III.—British Columbia Colleges and British Columbia Institute
of Technology
British
Columbia
Institute
of Technology
Selkirk
College
Vancouver City College
Fall
Semester
Spring
Semester
Summer
Semester
Full-time enrolment—
Transfer programme _.   .
Technical programme	
1,776
372
126
1,675
462
1,396
404
326
Totals
1,776
498
2,137      |      1,800      [         326
Part-time enrolment—
Transfer programme  	
Technical programme
1,408
182
185
1,212            1,582
1,178
Totals
1,408
367
1,212            1,582             1,178
3,184
865
3.349       1       3.382
1,504
Regional Colleges
In the spring of 1967 the Honourable Minister of Education established a
committee known as the Lower Mainland Regional College Co-ordinating Committee. The terms of reference and objectives were to examine
(1) a suitable form, membership, and terms of reference for a permanent
body to co-ordinate the planning and operation of colleges in the area
as a whole;
the present groupings of school districts to determine their suitability in
planning for the needs of the area as a whole;
ways and means of preventing unnecessary duplication of programmes
and facilities;
ways and means of ensuring flexible access arrangements for students in
the over-all area.
To date the Lower Mainland Regional College Co-ordinating Committee has
recommended the establishment of a regional college on the North Shore of Burrard
Inlet, in which the Minister has concurred (see Table I).  The Committee is continuing its work and may report further to the Minister in the near future.
(2)
(3)
(4)
 G 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
The Division has worked closely with the Academic Board of Higher Education
and is particularly indebted to the Chairman, Dean S. N. F. Chant, and the executive
secretary, Mr. D. Franklin, for advice and guidance always given in a most cordial
manner.
The Department of Education has taken the view that regional or district colleges are important post-secondary institutions which are needed in the Province of
British Columbia. In keeping with the principle of permitting more local and
regional control in education, legislation which permits local School Boards to establish and maintain district or regional colleges was passed several years ago. Local
control of institutions implies and carries with it the need for local contribution in
the operation of the institutions.
School Boards have responded with enthusiasm to the extension of their responsibilities into the field of post-secondary education. Planning committees have been
established in almost every area of the Province. Following the tradition which has
long been established in the support of public-school education, the people of the
Province have given excellent support to the Boards and the college planning committees. In a relatively short time, five regional colleges and one school district
college have been established. Plebiscites have been rejected by a few school districts, but in each region a sufficient number of districts have passed plebiscites to
enable viable colleges to be established. Changes in the Public Schools Act now
enable non-participating Boards to enter into agreements authorizing payment of
money toward the cost of a district college or a regional college. Agreements of this
sort will assist students from districts which are not participating directly in the
operation of a college to obtain higher education.
Under " tight money " conditions it is extremely difficult to obtain capital funds
for the construction and equipment of new college buildings. Under such circumstances there might have been some temptation to abandon plans to develop strategically located regional colleges. Fortunately none of those concerned have taken
a negative or defeatist attitude. Instead there has been a diligent search for ways
and means of providing the essential college services without the expenditure of large
capital sums. The Department has recommended that college services be provided
in existing facilities in various centres of the college regions until such time as the
required capital funds can be more readily obtained. Every effort must be made to
prevent duplication of costly faculties and services, and exploratory periods of operation in temporary facilities will enable college councils to prepare realistic referenda
when the time comes to provide the new college buildings.
Colleges must break from the rigid confines of centralized services as traditionally offered by universities. Institutions offering services all in one place are not
necessarily best in the contemporary scene. Services must be provided in various
centres; for example, technological media facilitate the establishment of satellite
operations fed by a mother system. Post-secondary education has assumed a new
dimension requiring the use of new modules.
Boards and College Councils have readily accepted the challenge and rapid
progress has been made, particularly in the Okanagan and on the North Shore, where
extensive college-level instruction will be available in September, 1968.
Conclusion
The writer wishes to express appreciation to the Deputy Minister, his senior
colleagues, members of the field staff of the Department of Education, officials of
universities and colleges, as well as members of Regional College Councils for cooperation and courtesy during a year in which many difficult problems had to be met.
 REPORT OF COORDINATOR OF SERVICES
G 57
REPORT OF COORDINATOR OF SERVICES
REPORT OF J. L. CANTY, B.A., M.Ed.
Conveyance of School-children
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance
school-children during the school-year 1967/68:—
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  73
2. Number of unattached school districts providing transportation 1
3. Total number of vehicles        707
(a) District-owned   511
(£>) Contract   190
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)        6
4. Total daily approved mileage  51,454
(a) Average distance per vehicle (miles)        72.8
(b) Average number of trips per vehicle         2.0
5. Total number of daily trips by all vehicles     1,414
Average distance per single trip       18.2
6. Total number of pupils carried daily  65,456
(a) Elementary   30,759
(£>) Secondary   34,697
7. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle       92.6
8. Average number of pupils carried per route       46.3
of
Transportation Assistance
During the school-year 1967/68, the Province shared in transportation assistance of 2,513 pupils in 67 school districts at a cost of $400,879.
Table of Transportation Costs
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district expenditures and the total conveyance costs over the past 12 years:—
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1956...  .
$69,234,423
80,966,873
91,279,662
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
150,790,702
165,814,555
185,566,119
214,156,353
248,031,667
$1,918,902
2,104,443
2,236,918
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721,510
2,886,696
3,125,447
3,475,895
4,009,393
4,610,089
2.8
1957
2.5
1958
2.4
1959 	
2.2
1960
2.1
1961
2.0
1962    _
2.0
1963
1.9
1964
1.9
1965
1.9
1966
1.9
1967
1.9
 G 58
public schools report, 1967/68
Summary of School Dormitory Data, 1967/68
School District*
Capacity
Occupancy
Staff
Grade Range
Accommodated
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
Part
Time
From
To
24.  Kamlnnp-
15
20
30
17
20
14
20
30
20
20
15
13
26
9
26
14
32
13
62
18
14
12
25
15
13
21
26
10
54
6
1
3
2
2
3
2
4
2
6
2
2
—
....
__
....
2
10
10
8
8
8
8
8
13
12
27. 100 Mile House  .  .              ...
12
9
29. I.illnoet
12
16      I      16
12
47
16
68
43
16
58
13
58.  MrRrirte
8      |      12
8      1      12
64. Gulf Islands
18      1        6
8      |      12
Totals
309       1     281
228
196
27
4
1
i There are dormitories also in Quesnel, Vanderhoof, and Peace River South which were not in operation
during 1967/68.
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitory
facilities, the School Board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under
this arrangement, a pupil can receive up to $40 a month on a basis shared by the
Department of Education. During the past school-year, 1967/68, the Province
shared in boarding allowances of 698 pupils in 53 school districts who received a
total of $277,804.
Committee on School Utilization
A special committee to examine the possibility of increasing the utilization of
school buildings was appointed in February. Members of the committee are Mrs.
A. B. Thompson, of Victoria; Mr. C. W. Dick, of Vancouver; and Mr. P. C. D.
Powell, of North Vancouver, whose names were suggested by, respectively, the Bri-
ish Columbia Parent-Teacher Federation, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, and the British Columbia School Trustees Association. The Co-ordinator of
Services was appointed chairman of the committee.
The committee, which has held several meetings, has invited submissions from
various organizations and visited certain schools which demonstrate unusual features
of utilization. The committee hopes to issue a report to the Minister of Education
early in 1969.
Jericho Hill School Advisory Board
The committee, which consists of the two principals of the School for the Deaf
and for the Blind, and of nominees of the Deaf and Blind School's Parent-Teacher
Associations, and the Vancouver School Board, is chaired by the Co-ordinator of
Services. The Board meets regularly throughout the year, considers matters relative to the operation of the school, and provides reports of these meetings to the
Department.
The accompanying report of Mr. P. F. Freemantle, the superintendent of the
Jericho Hill Schools, contains the pertinent statistics relating to the enrolment in
the school.
School Board Services
The Department has been able to offer consultation to several Boards during
the school-year. Although the time available for such services is necessarily limited
by the pressure of other duties, the Department is always happy to be able to assist
the districts when asked for such help.
 RESEARCH AND STANDARDS BRANCH G 59
RESEARCH AND STANDARDS BRANCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P__d., DIRECTOR
The former Tests and Standards Division was reorganized and expanded in
March, 1968, after 22 years of operation. During the early years it functioned primarily as a testing division, but it gradually acquired functions as a statistics and
demographic branch and finally became the chief source of information in matters
comparing enrolment data and projections, retention, immigration, and population
distribution. The Province had a population of 1,003,000 in June, 1946, just before
the Division was established, and is believed to have reached the 2,000,000 mark
early in 1968. The estimated increase from mid-1946 to mid-1968 is 100 per cent,
and suggests why such matters have been of increasing importance. During the
same period the increase in enrolment in British Columbia's public schools was 258
per cent, and the following recent annual growth rates of population and enrolment
during the 1961 to 1966 or 1960 to 1965 periods are of interest:—
Annual
Compound
Growth Rate
(Per Cent)
British Columbia school enrolment  5.51
British Columbia total population  2.84
Ontario school enrolment  4.26
Ontario total population  2.86
Canada school enrolment  3.77
Canada total population  1.87
California total population  2.80
United States total population  1.50
South America total population  2.75
Asia (U.N. estimate) total population  2.50
Unfortunately the increases have not been evenly distributed throughout the
Province, and one large school district has had an annual growth rate of 7.0 per
cent in population and 14.3 per cent in enrolment. Another has had an annual rate
of 10.5 per cent in population and 13.0 per cent in enrolment. Fortunately neither
population nor enrolment is expected to continue rising at its recent rate. Net interprovincial immigration of children has declined to an average level in 1968, and the
British Columbia crude birth rate of 16.9 per 1,000 population in 1967 was the
lowest in 30 years. A wave of foreign immigration is a distinct possibility, however:
British Columbia received over 9,000 foreign children in 1957, immediately after
the Hungarian revolution.
A study of methods of forecasting British Columbia enrolments was made. It
included comparisons of projections, predictions, and estimates obtained by different
methods and presents population and enrolment estimates to 1986. It forecast further increases of relatively small size until 1970 for elementary schools, followed by
a trough which should return total enrolment in Grades I to VII to almost its present
level by 1977 and then be followed by a rapid additional increase. Secondary and
higher enrolments will continue to rise through to the 1980's, and the Provincial
labour force is expected to increase rapidly each year for the next 20 years.
 G 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Changes in the British Columbia Age-Specific Fertility Rates, 1961 to
1967, and Their Effect on Grade I Enrolment
Female Population
1961
A.S.F.
Rates
1967
Birthsi at
1961 Rates
Actual
1967
Births
Approximate 1967
A.S.F.
Rates
Per Cent
Age
Estimated,
1967
Census,
1961
Decrease,
1967/61
58,110
61,220
58,300
54,940
58,910
69,540
80,720
93,680
102,010
89,820
56,379
61,006
58,604
54,229
56,132
63,811
77,722
89,005
100,091
91,804
.0015
.020
.065
.129
.214
.254
.073
.0003
87
1,224
3,789
7,087
12,606
17,663
5,893
28
40
687
2,394
4,586
8,685
11,660
4,760
28
.0007
.011
.041
.083
.147
.168
.059
.0003
54.0
40-44   „    	
35-39    „    	
44.0
37.0
30-34   „           . 	
35.0
25-29    „          	
31.0
20-24   „   -
34.0
15-19    „   . .              	
19.0
10-14    „
0.0
5- 9    „
0- 4   „    	
48,3771
32,840
32.1
i If the 1961 a.s.f. rates had continued, 48,377 children would have been born in British Columbia in 1967,
and after net Immigration and retardation, estimated at 16 per cent, the enrolment in Grade I in 1973-74 would
have been more than 56,000. Actual births were only 32,840, and at the same immigration and retardation rates
the estimate for Grade I in 1973-74 is 38,100. The a.s.f. rate is still declining during the first half of 1968, although the number of births has increased slightly because of the rapidly increasing numbers of potential mothers.
During the past year the greatest numerical increase on record (2,526) occurred
in Grade XII, and the number of Academic-Technical graduates soared to more
than 10,400. Both of these probably are results of changes in examination and
recommendation procedures. Grade XII in 1968 was 88.5 per cent of Grade XI in
1967 and 79.3 per cent of the corresponding Grades II to VI enrolment in 1958-62.
The latter is believed to be an all-time record for retention to Grade XII in any
Canadian Province.
Owing to an unfortunate combination of circumstances—the absence of the
Director on loan to the Atlantic Development Board and the resignation of the
Registrar, Mr. Evans—the burden of scaling fell on our new Research Officer, Mr.
Robert May, the new Registrar, Mr. E. A. Killough, and Mr. R. Smith, who rewrote
the computer programmes in 1964. The fact that they were able to carry out this
high-pressured and complicated procedure successfully with the assistance of only
a few long-distance telephone calls is a credit to all three. The number of Grade XII
papers that were written, including 5,466 scholarship papers, has decreased to 44
per cent of the maximum reached in 1964, and June and August Grade XIII papers
were only 46 per cent of their maximum in 1965, but the proportion of scholarship
candidates has risen rapidly in Grade XII. In 1968 almost exactly 25 per cent of
the regular Grade XII papers that were written were written for scholarship purposes. In Grade XIII the number of scholarship candidates has decreased more
rapidly than the enrolment, and only 18.6 per cent of the papers were designated as
scholarship papers in 1968 vs. 23.9 per cent in 1967.
A survey of the scholastic ability of Grade XII students, an investigation of
typing standards in Grade XI, and the standardization of an aural French test for
Grade XII were conducted during the Director's absence under the direction of Mrs.
O. Bowes. Unfortunately some of the French tapes, which had been of uniformly
high quality the previous year, were blurred in reproduction. Some method must be
devised to check future tapes without requiring a person with a good ear for the
language to listen to tapes for hundreds of hours. The work of producing norms for
the three tests is continuing. It presents a particular problem in Typing 11, which
often includes students in their first, second, or third year of instruction, as well as
 RESEARCH AND STANDARDS BRANCH G 61
students who actually are taking Typing 9 or 10. The chief problem is one of obtaining comparability in the grading of students who are making adequate progress
according to their year of instruction but not an employment point of view.
A comparison of pupils in the primary grades who had attended public, private,
or no kindergarten, a Departmental study that had been summarized in the Royal
Commission Report in 1960 (pp. 118-127), was published in full as the first of a
series of studies and reports by the Educational Research Institute of British Columbia. A chapter on the history of kindergartens in British Columbia was added
in order to clear up some misconceptions and misreporting of legislation regarding
kindergartens. It covers the period from 1922 to 1967 and contains recent data on
the increases in kindergarten enrolment. In June, 1958, 3,522 pupils were enrolled
in 47 public kindergartens in 12 school districts. In June, 1968, there were 16,100
pupils in 268 schools in 45 school districts, an increase of 357 per cent, which may
be compared with an increase of 40 per cent in Grade I. Many school districts are
discontinuing the 13th grade at the top and adding one at the bottom.
 G 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in Home Economics and Community Services Programme
courses in the public schools of British Columbia during the 1967/68 session was
69,750.   The enrolment by courses was as follows:—
HE 8  17,932 Fd 11   4,338
FN 91   7,728 Fd 11/12a—combined..       57
FN 9Ai         33 Fd 12a      815
FN 9b i         98 Fd 12b      403
CT/FN 9Ai   7,563 Fd 12a/12b—combined       14
CT/FN 9b i   2,073 Tx 11   4,109
CT 91   8,775 Tx 12a  1,409
CT 9a1         34 Tx 12a/12b—combined       12
CT 9b1         45 Tx 12b      467
CC 9   1,733 Mgt 11   1,589
CFS 9   2,953 CC 12  1,948
Occupational 1, 2, 3.  2,445 HIS 12      244
Jericho Hill        44 CR 12  2,889
i Reporting of figures for FN 9, CT 9, and combinations of these courses on a semester basis varies somewhat, dependent upon which of FN 9 or CT 9 courses, and upon which part of each of these courses, students
are enrolled in at the time of year statistics are submitted.
Notes regarding enrolment figures for 1967/68:—
(1) In 1967/68 the course enrolment figures are used.
(2) In 1967/68 the course enrolment in CR 12 (2,889), which is a course of
the Community Services Programme, is included in the grand total enrolment; in 1966/67 the CR 12 total was not included in the course enrolment total for home economics and community services.
(3) Foods 11, Foods 12a, and Foods 12b enrolment figures include both boys
and girls. There are no separate figures available on the number of boys
enrolled in the three senior foods courses listed above.
(4) Course enrolment figures in Grades XI and XII community services
courses are somewhat difficult to interpret where certain of these courses
are double programmed and their enrolments reported as one total.
(5) Total enrolment for community services courses numbered 11, 12, 12a,
and 12b, when compared with the total for pupils enrolled in a complete
community services specialty, as shown below, indicates a fairly large
number of pupils on other programmes (including Academic-Technical)
are taking one or more community services courses as electives. The total
enrolment in a complete specialty of the Community Services Programme
was 1,910, made up as follows: Foods Specialty, 687; Textiles Specialty,
742; Home and Industrial Services Specialty, 481.
Although the 1967/68 total enrolments in the Foods and Textiles Specialties
are slightly higher than those of 1966/67, the percentages in relation to total Grades
XI and XII enrolments remain the same as those of 1966/67. The percentage of
those enrolled in the Home and Industrial Services Specialty in relation to total
Grade XI and Grade XII enrolment dropped slightly (by 0.1 per cent) in 1967/68.
This may be due in part to slowness of the Industrial Services Specialty to gain
acceptance by pupils, parents, and community and (or) to the difficulty in assem-
 DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS G 63
bling, and the time necessary to assemble materials and organize the use of outside
resources for the HIS 12 course of this specialty. The Textiles Specialty continues
to attract slightly more students than does the Foods Specialty.
There were some pupils enrolled for home economics and (or) community
services courses with Secondary School Correspondence Education.
In 1967/68 there were 240 secondary schools offering home economics and
(or) community services courses, which is an increase of 10 over the total for last
year. Home economics departments were started for the first time in the following
school districts: No. 13 (Kettle Valley), No. 50 (Queen Charlotte), and No. 84
(Vancouver Island West). An additional secondary school with a home economics
department was opened in each of the following school districts: No. 22 (Vernon),
No. 37 (Delta), No. 54 (Smithers), No. 56 (Vanderhoof), No. 61 (Victoria), No.
68 (Nanaimo), No. 71 (Courtenay), No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo), and No. 89 (Shuswap).
As of January, 1968, home economics was offered in one or more secondary
schools in 78 of the 81 school districts in British Columbia, as well as in two unattached secondary schools and in Jericho Hill School.
During the current year, in the 240 secondary schools having home economics
departments, 528 rooms (combination, foods, clothing, textiles rooms) were in use.
Auxiliary facilities included teaching-cafeteria kitchens in nine senior secondary or
secondary schools, and management areas (bedroom, bathroom, and multi-purpose
living area) in most secondary and senior secondary schools.
Teaching-cafeteria kitchens to provide auxiliary teaching and practical experience facilities for students on the Foods Specialty of the Community Services Programme were opened during the year at Chilliwack Senior Secondary School (School
District No. 33), Kelowna Secondary School (School District No. 23), Carson Graham Secondary School (School District No. 44), Prince George Senior Secondary
School (School District No. 57), and Georges P. Vanier Senior Secondary School
(School District No. 71). The latter two teaching-cafeteria kitchens were not in
operation during the fall term, but opened later in the year.
A teaching-cafeteria kitchen is not a required facility for the present Foods
Specialty. The three senior foods courses (Foods 11, 12a, and 12b), which are
part of the Foods Specialty, may be offered, as presently set out, in a foods room
or a combination room with the equipment indicated as necessary for each of these
three courses. Teaching-cafeteria kitchens are limited to larger secondary schools
(minimum, 600 pupils enrolled in Grades XI and XII). As of June, 1968, there
were nine schools with teaching-cafeteria kitchens operating, an increase of five over
the preceding year. Where teaching-cafeteria kitchens are set up, their physical
facilities are used also for a daily food service to the school. The problems of organizing pupil activity in a teaching-cafeteria kitchen in a comprehensive secondary
school are many and difficult—not all problems have been solved during the second
year of operation of teaching-cafeteria kitchens in the Province. Many variations
in organization have been tried and continue to be tried. Again this year the cooperation and willingness of staff and administrators to meet new problems and to
attempt to solve them are to be commended.
In 1967/68 there were 552 home economics or community services teaching
positions (including teachers of home economics to the Occupational Programme
classes). In October, 1967, approximately 50 per cent of the home economics and
(or) community services teachers held a Bachelor of Home Economics degree or
its equivalent. Thirteen men were instructing or collaborating with home economics
teachers in teaching in one or more of CFS 9, Fd 11, Fd 12a, Fd 12b.
 G 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
The revised standard layouts, detail of fixed furniture, and related information
for home economics and community services rooms and for auxiliary facilities became available in the revised School Building Manual released in January, 1968.
The percentage turnover of home economics and community services teachers
tends to be somewhat higher than that of teachers in general because a large proportion of home economics and community services teachers are married women
who must interrupt teaching service due to home and family responsibilities. The
openings for teachers qualified in home economics and community services still
exceed the supply. The re-entry to the teaching profession of qualified home economics teachers whose families are old enough to permit the mother resuming employment outside the home and the use in some schools of two half-time teachers
for a one-teacher load are two ways in which the shortage is being alleviated. The
Faculty of Education and the School of Home Economics of the University of British
Columbia have also continued to help ease the shortage of home economics graduates for teaching positions in secondary schools by continuing to make available in
1968 the three summer session teacher training programmes for Home Economics
graduates, to which have been admitted some of the current year's B.H.E. graduates and some graduates of former years who are now available for and interested
in preparation for teaching home economics.
A member of the Division of Home Economics was at the School of Home
Economics of the University of British Columbia for one or two days each week of
the summer session to interview teachers and prospective teachers of home economics.
The Director of Home Economics spoke to a meeting of fourth- and fifth-year
Home Economics and Home Economics Education students at the University of
British Columbia in February to give some information about teaching home economics in secondary schools in British Columbia.
Frequent contacts with Miss M. Johnson, supervisor of home economics in
Greater Victoria schools, and with Mrs. M. Murphy, co-ordinator of home economics in Vancouver schools, were arranged for consultation throughout the year.
A half-day conference with Miss Johnson; Mrs. Murphy; Mr. J. Meredith, Assistant
Superintendent (Instructional Services); and Mr. Bruce Naylor, Director of Curriculum, was held in April.
The Director of Home Economics and Miss Jean Irvine, Inspector of Home
Economics, attended the Canadian Home Economics Association convention in
Regina. Preceding the convention, the Director of Home Economics attended a
meeting in Regina of supervisors, inspectors, and Provincial directors of home economics in secondary education from across Canada. Miss Irvine attended the Canadian Home Economics Association pre-convention course—Modern Communications in Home Economics—at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.
A survey to estimate the average cost per pupil of supplies for food courses
was made of approximately one-third of the public schools offering home economics
and community services for the five-month period of September, 1967, to January,
1968. The average costs for this period differ only slightly from the average costs
for a similar period the preceding year. The data which were compiled from the
survey were forwarded in May to District Superintendents of Schools for their information.
A complete catalogue of the Division of Home Economics reference library
was compiled and sent to all home economics and community services teachers in
September, 1967.
 DIVISION OF HOME ECONOMICS G 65
A bulletin with current information regarding home economics and community
services courses was compiled and sent to all home economics and community services teachers in September, 1967.
The Home Economics and Community Services Textbook Selection Committee
continued work on assessing needs for textbooks in home economics and community
services courses and evaluating books presently available. Some new prescribed
textbooks are to be available in September, 1968, for HE 8, Foods 11, Textiles 11,
and Home and Industrial Services 12.
In March, 1968, the Home Economics and Community Services Textbook
Selection Committee was requested by the Director of Curriculum to broaden its
terms of reference and to become a Home Economics Committee to act in an advisory capacity as might be requested from time to time.
During 1967/68 the Division of Home Economics stocked and made available
to Community Services course teachers, on request, certain booklets prepared and
made available from the Co-ordinator of Accommodation and Food Services, Department of Education.
In October, 1967, the Director of Home Economics attended the fall meeting
of the Council of the School of Home Economics at the University of British Columbia.
A conference concerning the continuing need for and the preparation of home
economics and community services teachers for secondary schools was arranged in
January by the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment of the Department of Education, in consultation with the Dean of Education and the Director of the School of
Home Economics of the University of British Columbia. Others attending the conference, which was held at the University of British Columbia, were several members of the Faculty of Education and some members of the staff of the School of
Home Economics of the University of British Columbia, representatives of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, the supervisor of home economics for Greater
Victoria schools, the co-ordinator of home economics in the Vancouver schools,
Miss Jean Irvine (Inspector of Home Economics), and the Provincial Director of
Home Economics.
In February the Provincial Director of Home Economics, with Mrs. M. Murphy, co-ordinator of home economics in Vancouver schools, visited briefly the home
economics departments in some Vancouver secondary schools. Following the visits
to some of the home economics departments in Vancouver schools, the Director
met on invitation with Mrs. Murphy and the heads of home economics departments
of the Vancouver schools.
The Director attended two meetings of the British Columbia Nutrition Coordinating Committee—one in Vancouver and one in Victoria—at which nutrition
informaton from members of the staff of the Department of National Health and
Welfare, Ottawa, and from members of the British Columbia Nutrition Co-ordinating
Committee was presented and discussed.
During the year, consultation and exchange of information on matters of mutual
interest and concern have taken place with the Public Health Nutrition Consultant
of the Health Branch of the Provincial Department of Health Services and Hospital
Insurance and with the Home Economist of the Provincial Department of Agriculture.
In July the Director of Home Economics on invitation attended the sessions of
the last day of the July 5th to 12th seminar, " Recent Trends in Home Economics,"
at the University of British Columbia, and spoke to the members of the seminar.
 G 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
The return of Grade VII to the elementary-school programme in 1961/62 removed Grade VII pupils from the home economics enrolment in public schools in
British Columbia, and resulted in a marked decrease in total enrolment in home
economics for 1961/62. However, following reorganization of the secondary-school
programme, reassessment of the home economics programme, and revision of the
home economics programme and home economics courses, total course enrolment
in home economics and community services has increased considerably and has
tended, to a degree, to reflect and keep pace with increasing school enrolments. It
is, of course, recognized that some increase in course enrolment in community services courses is due to the greater number of courses a pupil on a full specialty of
the Community Services Programme takes in each of Grade XI and Grade XII.
1961/62      1967/68
Total home economics and community services course
enrolment in public schools (including occupational)   36,072        66,861!
Number of home economics and community services
teaching positions        366 552
Number of public schools with home economics departments         204 240
iThe total, 66,861, includes community services course enrolments with the exception of Community Recreation 12 enrolment, in order that comparison of course enrolment totals may be more valid.
The increased number of teachers of home economics and community services
(an increase of 140 over the past three years) in the secondary schools of the Province and the increasing spread of home economics departments in secondary schools
to the more distant parts of the Province continue to necessitate considerable change
in the pattern of field work of the Division of Home Economics. Field work of the
professional personnel of the Division of Home Economics includes much consultation and conference with teachers, principals, and District Superintendents of
Schools, as well as some inspection and assessment of learning situations in home
economics and community services classes. The increased number of teachers of
home economics and community services and the increased number of schools offering home economics programmes have made it necessary to eliminate visits to the
classrooms of the better-qualified and better-established teachers, and, in general,
to decrease the number and length of visits to home economics and community services classrooms.
It is with mixed feelings that I sever my connections with the Division of Home
Economics after 23 years, nine of them as Director of Home Economics. I appreciate the opportunity which I had of joining the staff of the Division of Home Economics under Dr. Jessie L. McLenaghen, the first Provincial Director of Home
Economics for the Department of Education in British Columbia, and of continuing
on the staff of the Division of Home Economics under her successor, Miss Bertha
Rogers.
I look forward with great interest and high hopes to the future development of
home economics. To my successor, Miss Jean Irvine, I offer my best wishes as she
assumes the position of Provincial Director of Home Economics.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS G 67
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Secondary School Correspondence Branch
REPORT OF J. R. HIND, B.A., B.Paed., DIRECTOR
In addition to the usual statistical analysis, the 1966/67 Annual Report for
this Branch of the Department of Education contained a summary of the types of
persons who register for our courses and some of the special advantages to the adult
who is employed at irregular times and in places away from the normal services.
It is proposed to include in this report a summary of the organization of courses
as they are now prepared and released by the Branch. Justification for this intrusion
is perhaps the changes which have been occurring since the introduction of the
reorganized curriculum and a better understanding of this part of the work of the
Branch.
The Branch caters to pupils of school age and to adults. The secondary-school
courses have been designed for completion within a school-year by pupils of school
age. These pupils are provided with time-tables to encourage each to maintain a
uniform output. Adults have the option of following this arrangement or completing
within a shorter or longer time. Many adults actually complete a course within
three months, including the necessary administration.
The enrolment in Grade VIII courses consists mostly of isolated pupils who
must complete a full programme via correspondence instruction. The Grade VIII
programme consists of seven courses, an addition of one course over old programme
requirements. To maintain the proper balance, the number of papers per course has
been reduced to 30 from 36 with tests following Papers 12, 24, and 30. The papers
are carefully balanced to enable pupils to complete one paper per course per week,
representing 30 weeks of work, with the rest of the time devoted to review, testing,
and administration.
In the past, courses for other grades have consisted of 20 papers, somewhat
longer than Grade VIII papers, with tests following Papers 7, 14, and 20. Again, in
an effort to adjust to new requirements, Grades IX to XII courses are being reduced
where possible to 18 papers with tests following Papers 7, 14, and 18. A shorter
third term in the courses enables a full-time student to complete one additional
course in the school-year and has the effect of encouraging him in the final " lap "
of his work.
The details of programmes of study, the regulations of the Branch, and a description of courses are set forth in the booklet " Regulations and Detail of Courses
for Secondary School Education." This booklet and new application forms, Forms
S.C. 1 and S.C. 2, are released annually in July. The 1967/68 booklet omitted
reference to the numbering system which applied to the old programmes. In many
instances this numbering system had been retained in previous booklets for the
convenience of students who had one or more courses to complete for standing in
terms of the old programmes. The 1967/68 booklet listed 11 new courses and two
major revisions. These new and revised courses were released to coincide with the
opening of schools in September, 1967.
 G 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
The details of service rendered by the Branch during 1967/68 follow:—
Enrolment
(a)  By Age: 1965/66
18 years and under     9,117 7,617 7,039
19 years and older     8,109 9,296 9,204
1966/67 1967/68
Totals  17,226 16,914 16,243
Note.—A continuing successful effort on the part of the Province to meet
school accommodation and staffing problems is reflected in the smaller enrolment
figures for pupils of school age (see 18 years and under).
(b)  By Residence:
British Columbia	
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
16,281
15,896
15,044
755
860
990
190
158
209
Elsewhere in Canada	
Outside Canada	
Note.—Enrolment of persons abroad increased slightly over recent years.
Approximately 28 countries are represented.   The most distant was South Africa.
(c) In Schools.—Certain pupils were unable to obtain normal classroom instruction in particular courses, as follows:—
Small secondary schools (fewer than 1965/66 1966/67 1967/68
140 pupils in Grades IX to XII).... 1,279 1,065 870
Larger secondary schools (more than
140 pupils in Grades IX to XII).... 4,030 3,817 3,636
Private schools  445 501 260
Totals     5,754 5,383 4,766
The reasons accepted as a basis for this service and the numbers involved
1966/67 1967/68
follow:— 1965/66
Courses not offered in school  4,015 2,902 2,641
Time-table difficulties  899 956 794
Failure in a subject  838 678 577
Acceleration .  2 3 4
(d) By Special Arrangement.—Certain persons were exempted from enrolment fees in the amount of $49,313, compared with $47,645 in 1966/67. This
service is an effort to overcome disparity in educational opportunity and is also a
rehabilitation measure.   It was extended as follows :•—■
1965/66       1966/67       1967/68
Illness  465
Needed at home  6
Living too far from a school  425
Correctional institutions   954
Social assistance  143
Immigrants (special English)         	
(e) Of Adults.—(i) Per cent of total enrolment: 1964/65, 49.8 per cent;
1965/66, 47.1 per cent;  1966/67, 54.9 per cent;  1967/68, 56.6 per cent.
(ii) Counselling and evaluation of documents were provided when persons
expressed a wish to complete an interrupted (adult) or other programme of studies.
The Branch attempts to limit the preparation letters of evaluation to bona fide cor-
484
479
9
6
360
284
,095
1,155
117
165
	
90
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS G 69
respondence students in accordance with usual procedures. However, there is
evidence that this service was requested far beyond this acceptable limit.
(iii) Private companies and several Provincial Government departments continued to use courses for staff-training programmes.
(iv) A significant increase in requests was noted from persons who had been
interviewed by Federal Government departments, as follows: Department of Manpower and Immigration, Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Armed Forces.
Instruction
(a) The instructional staff consisted of the following: Inside staff (Grade
VIII instructors), 2; outside staff, 98; total, 100.
(b) Outside instructors are not Civil Servants. Papers are forwarded to these
instructors via mail for marking and grading in their own homes. Remuneration is
on a piece basis.
(c) Additions and replacements in the outside instructional staff numbered 10.
(d) A total of 184,164 papers was graded in 1967/68, compared with 195,713
papers in 1966/67. The reduction in the number of papers was due to alteration
in the length of courses, as mentioned earlier, and a slightly decreased enrolment.
(e) Course-writers attached to staff were available at all times for counsel and
assistance to instructors and for adjudication of student papers as required.
Courses
(a) Registration was accepted in a total of 133 courses.
(b) New courses and major revisions were prepared and released as follows:
Air Navigation, English 8 and 9, Foods 11, General Mathematics 9 and 10, Guidance and Health 9 and 10, Loan Granting for Credit Unions, Management 11,
Mathematics 112 and 113.
(c) The work of course writing and revision was shared by four course-
writers attached to the Branch and certain outside writers working on a temporary
basis. This staff continued to deserve special commendation for meeting so well
the changes brought about by the reorganized curriculum. The level of production
continued to remain 2.5 times that of a normal year.
(d) The Centennial Year course, The Realm of Canada, released in January,
1967, continued in great demand throughout the year 1967 and well into March,
1968. As explained in the 1966/67 Report, this course was directed at segments
of the population who lived for the most part in smaller centres and remote regions
of the Province, who have a formal education to the level of Grade X, and probably
limited knowledge of the history, geography, and economic background of Canada.
At the conclusion of its term of life, plans were under way to revise and continue
the course on a permanent basis.
(e) A total listing of courses offered by the Division and enrolment in the
subject field follows:—
(i) Secondary-school and Grade XIII Courses:
Agriculture 9, 10, 38, 39  137
Art 9, 10, 39  269
Auto Mechanics 10, 30  382
Bible Literature 9, 10, 11, 12  51
Bookkeeping 11, Accountancy 12  771
 G 70
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
(i)
(ii)
Secondary-school and Grade XIII Courses—Continued
Business Fundamentals 10	
Chemistry 101	
Child Care 12	
Clothing and Textiles 9	
Diesel Engines 11	
Drafting 11	
Economics 11	
Electricity 10	
Electronics (Radio and Wireless)
English courses
English and Citizenship 19, 29
Extramural Music 9, 10	
Foods 11 	
Foods and Nutrition 9
Forestry 11
  117
  4
  45
  92
  90
  148
  149
  230
  199
  5,763
  232
  30
  21
  110
  193
  118
  1,661
  262
  801
  331
  110
  886
  633
  652
  49
  311
  53
  347
  380
  208
  45
Mathematics 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 112, 113  3,543
Frame House Construction 11 .	
French 8, 9,10,11,12,110, 120.
General Business 11, 12
General Mathematics 9, 10, 11	
Geography 12	
Geology 12	
German 9,10,11,12,90,110, 120
Guidance and Health 8, 9, 10, 11 ...
History 12, 101, 102	
Home Furnishing 11 	
Homemaking 8, 91	
Industrial Power 11	
Latin 9, 10, 11, 12, 110, 120	
Law 11	
Living Science 11 	
Management 11
Mechanical Drawing 8, 9
Office Orientation 12	
Physics 101 	
Physical Science 11 	
Record Keeping 9	
Science 8, 9, 10
Secretarial Practice 12
Shorthand 10, 11,31 _
Social Studies 8, 9, 10, 11	
Spanish 9, 10, 11,12, 110,120
Textiles 11	
Typewriting 9, 10, 11 	
Special Vocational Courses:
Air Navigation
Business Law for Credit Union Officers
Dressmaking
Electricity for the Building Trades
Glove-making
House Painting and Decorating
Industrial Mathematics 	
518
107
40
36
241
838
16
249
1,581
582
39
549
39
49
33
228
11
32
437
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS G 71
(ii) Special Vocational Courses—Continued
Loan Granting for Credit Unions  17
Mathematics for Second-class Steam Engineering  99
Spherical Trigonometry  14
Steam Engineering, Fourth Class  420
Steam Engineering, Third Class  207
Steam Engineering, Second Class  41
Stationary Engineering, First Class  12
Steam Heating for Plant Operators (Class B)  40
Realm of Canada (Centennial course)   415
Meeting of Correspondence Branch Directors
(a) On November 23 and 24,1967, the Directors of Correspondence Branches
for the Departments of Education in the Provinces of Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia met in conference at Winnipeg. This was the
first meeting of its kind in Canada.
(£>) The purpose of the conference was as follows:—
(i) To review the services presently provided in each of the five Provinces,
(ii) To exchange information on administrative practices,
(iii) To explore the possibility of co-operative action in the field of course-
writing.
(c) It was possible in the full sessions that ensued to become aware of techniques and procedures proved elsewhere which could be employed to our advantage.
The conference has been followed by an exchange of material which has eliminated
the necessity for some research in the development of new course material.
(d) It was interesting to note that British Columbia easily surpassed other
Provinces represented in the production of courses which may be referred to as
special vocational courses.
 G 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1967/68, pupils of school age totalling 794 were
registered in Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, 709 were registered
at Victoria and 85 at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District.
The following tables show the active monthly enrolments at each of the
centres:—
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Month
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Total
September _ __	
67
80
81
84
80
81
78
85
83
86
62
67
68
74
79
81
86
88
84
83
51
55
66
65
71
71
71
73
70
70
58
51
52
56
59
59
58
61
63
64
56
65
71
72
73
72
78
81
80
81
67
65
70
73
69
71
76
74
78
84
66
81
94
99
107
109
113
108
108
109
427
October 	
464
502
December	
523
538
February   	
544
560
April    	
570
May	
566
577
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September..
October	
November...
December-
January _.
February....
March	
April	
May —
June	
9
14
15
16
17
18
17
17
17
14
11
12
13
13
15
16
16
16
16
9
12
13
13
13
13
14
14
12
8
10
7
7
7
7
7
9
51
62
62
67
68
71
70
72
72
66
The number of papers of school-aged pupils marked at the two centres was as
follows: Victoria, 86,767; Pouce Coupe, 9,997; total, 96,764.
In addition to above numbers, adult students enrolled in courses Grades III to
VII, inclusive, totalled 188, and 5,408 papers were marked at the Victoria centre.
In all, courses were provided for 982 individuals, and 102,172 papers were
marked by the instructors at the two centres. No outside markers or instructors
were employed.
The average number of papers marked per instructor was 8,514. The average
number of papers submitted per pupil was 104.
As additional services, kindergarten kits were supplied to 221 pre-school-age
children and instruction kits for teaching illiterate adults were sent in 24 cases.
Authorized under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, correspondence instruction classes were established at 19 centres with a total enrolment of 76 pupils.
During the school-year the following entirely new courses were produced: Language Arts (Language), Grades I, II, and III; Language Arts (Spelling), Grade III;
Art, Grade VI. Revisions were carried out in two other courses currently used, and
supplementary source material was produced for the Language Arts courses in
Grades I to VI, inclusive. AU these were devised, written, and illustrated by the
staff of the school in Victoria.   No outside course-writers were employed.
The Victoria staff consisted of a Director, 11 instructors and five clerks; at
Pouce Coupe, one instructor and one instructor-clerk.
 DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS G 73
DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
REPORT OF BARRIE A. BLACK, DIRECTOR OF
SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Programmes Presented
Radio
Provincial programmes (planning, preparation, supervision of production, evaluation)   105
Regional programmes produced locally (planning, preparation, supervision, evaluation)   29
Regional programmes produced elsewhere (planning, evaluation)  55
National programmes (planning, evaluation)  37
Total number of radio programmes presented  226
Television
Provincial programmes (planning, preparation, supervision of production, evaluation)   28
Regional programmes produced locally (planning, preparation, supervision of production, evaluation)  7
Regional programmes produced elsewhere (planning, evaluation)  22
National programmes (planning, evaluation)  89
Total number of television programmes presented  146
Manuals and Guides (Prepared and Distributed)
Junior music booklets  75,000
Intermediate music booklets  70,000
A Propos and Chantez booklets  16,000
British Columbia Teachers' Bulletins—
Elementary   10,000
Secondary  3,000
Calendars—
Radio  13,000
Television   13,000
Use of School Broadcasts
Schools reporting  1,215
Schools using radio broadcasts  809
Divisions using radio broadcasts  3,607
Students using radio broadcasts  127,843
Schools using television broadcasts  530
Divisions using television broadcasts  2,876
Students using television broadcasts  91,674
 G 74
public schools report, 1967/68
Comparison of School Broadcast Utilization
Radio
1966/67
1967/68
Increase or
Decrease
(-)
Television
1966/67
1967/68
Increase
Schools -sing-
Divisions using-
Students using...
833
4,074
124,713
809
3,607    |
127,843    I
-24
—467
3,130
446
2,484
74,661
530
2,876
91,674
84
392
17,013
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION G 75
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF R. KERKHAM, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education covering the period September 1, 1967, to August 31, 1968:—
District Number and Name
1. Fernie .       ...                    	
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
    .       268
Number of
Filmstrips
Supplied
225
2. Cranbrook    .
146
103
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere       	
        249
        230
458
520
7. Nelson       	
        636
1,136
8. Slocan    ..        .   	
    .         43
139
9. Castlegar _    	
...   ..      .       337
568
10. Arrow Lakes ...         	
197
38
11. Trail 	
12. Grand Forks
        234
____    ....       224
125
327
13. Kettle Valley          	
          82
33
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton 	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton  .   .    ... 	
        264
        257
          66
        117
3
255
6
234
18. Golden .               	
    .       248
237
19. Revelstoke    	
    .       560
436
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen 	
22. Vernon .         	
        268
        627
263
682
23. Kelowna 	
        398
570
24. Kamloops     	
770
917
25. Barriere 	
26. Birch Island .    	
        108
          34
144
42
27. Williams Lake .
1,167
1,448
28. Quesnel 	
29. Lillooet        .
        429
-_.   .          191
1,075
164
30. South Cariboo	
        450
388
31. Merritt .      	
        104
279
32. Fraser Canyon  	
        269
371
33. ChiUiwack.       	
            2,643
909
34. Abbotsford 	
        506
568
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
             881
978
     3,396
3,917
37. Delta	
....            292
222
38. Richmond           	
          39
409
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster.       	
        928
       1,139
417
505
41. Burnaby    	
40
224
42. Maple Ridge	
        645
1,304
43. Coquitlam 	
         993
885
44. North Vancouver	
        572
221
 G 76
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
District Number and Name
45. West Vancouver .
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte ._
52. Prince Rupert 	
54. Smithers 	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof 	
57. Prince George	
58. McBride 	
Peace River South .
Peace River North
Greater Victoria ...
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan	
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66. Lake Cowichan
67. Ladysmith 	
68. Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni 	
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
76.
77.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
Courtenay	
Campbell River.
Mission	
Agassiz 	
Summerland 	
Ucluelet-Tofino
Kitimat 	
Fort Nelson	
Chilcotin	
Portage Mountain	
Vancouver Island West ...
Vancouver Island North
Creston-Kaslo	
Stikine 	
Skeena-Cassiar 	
Shuswap
Unattached 	
Miscellaneous
Totals
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
338
288
811
247
345
441
371
222
163
178
290
413
703
309
550
622
696
256
215
131
211
889
274
468
954
1,196
301
39
287
158
107
84
48
206
308
302
175
464
575
329
789
36,800
Number of
Filmstrips
Supplied
116
688
894
49
389
419
433
409
266
450
54
160
924
415
1
960
704
335
313
9
541
675
714
1,850
2,162
269
72
288
137
107
92
33
121
276
265
181
376
883
479
520
353
40,127
This year, regrettably, saw the retirement of Mr. J. R. Pollock, who has been
the Director of the Division of Visual Education since its inception. His extensive
knowledge in the audio-visual field and his wise council in matters of administration,
which have proved so valuable in the past, will be hard to replace.
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION G 77
During the year the Division distributed a considerable amount of free material
of a historical nature which was donated by Imperial Oil. It reproduced 250 tapes
of French language tests for curriculum development, as well as 50 from the previous year's tests. We also made 75 tapes from our own recordings for distribution
to schools. It is anticipated that in the future we will move more into this field.
The circulation of the Recreation and Conservation and Community Programmes
libraries not only go to individual borrowers, but are now included in the booking
and shipping to schools in British Columbia. This, naturally, has made a larger
number of films supplied than that listed on the previous sheets (approximately
10 per cent increase). Members of the Division took part in the guidance tour for
teachers covering the MacMillan Bloedel complex on Vancouver Island, taking
pictures of the operation at the time for use in future filmstrips. They also attended
a visual aids and photographic convention in Portland, as well as a single-day
seminar on movies in industry in Seattle.
The Photographic Section prepared and produced 380 colour filmstrips on
forestry in British Columbia, 300 filmstrips titled " The Century of Progress," completed 48 filmstrips for the Technical Vocational Training Programme on hospitality
and vocational training in British Columbia. This Section also shot 16-mm. footage
on wrestling techniques, to be used as loops as this sport is becoming widespread
in schools. A number of 8-mm. loops were made on various subjects and also from
our current 16-mm. productions for single concept use.
In addition, photographs were supplied to and used by Teacher Recruitment,
Curriculum Development, British Columbia Teachers' Federation publications,
Jericho Hill School, and vocational schools. Large blow-ups of mural size were
made for use in displays at the Pacific National Exhibition and vocational schools.
In this field the Division acted as co-ordinator for the Department during the construction of the educational exhibit at the Pacific National Exhibition, at that time
producing 48 large blow-ups which were mounted and put in place in time for the
exposition.
  TEXTBOOK BRANCH G 79
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF D. W. C. HUGGINS, DIRECTOR
In the 1967/68 fiscal year the Textbook Branch was required to meet the
demands of over 9,200 school orders to fill the textbook needs of the schools of the
Province. Parallelling these orders were the purchases made by schools, educational agencies, and stores, which entailed the processing of over 17,000 additional
invoices. To accommodate the anticipated demand for the 1968/69 school-year,
orders have been placed with 45 publishers to provide the 338 titles involved,
representing over 2,500,000 books with an average weight of just over 1 pound per
book. Ninety-two per cent of the books ordered are from Canadian sources, with
65 per cent being manufactured in British Columbia. With this volume of books
it is possible to effect economies in purchase and shipping costs by co-ordinating
movements in and out and contracting favourable freight rates by competitive bidding. However, the highly seasonal aspect of school supply creates a strong challenge in the ever-pressing task of distribution within the relatively short period of
school closure during the summer months.
Of the 101 new titles prescribed for the 1968/69 school-year, 46 are to be
found in the social studies area of Grade VIII. Forty-one of these new social studies
titles are available on a choice basis. Thus, of a record authorization of 101 new
titles, almost 50 per cent are available in quantities at the discretion of the teacher.
Another area of the enlargement of the multiple prescription principle in the
1968/69 school-year will be found at the Grade VIII and Grade XI levels, where
the choice of two major French programmes, structured throughout the entire secondary level of instruction, is prescribed.
Multiple prescriptions are not new in the British Columbia curricula, having
been previously introduced with novel selections in all the secondary English Courses
and in the Management Course of Grade XII home economics, but the problem of
maintaining inventory at economic levels becomes more complex as the purchasing
process becomes more dependent on inductive reasoning. Again, the task of storing
books with practical accessibility becomes more difficult as the number of titles
grows and the order quantity in each title diminishes. The utilization of current
housing facilities to accommodate the quantities needed for school supply and, at the
same time, provide ready access to permit individual order filling calls for continuing
review of stock location and materials-handling methods.
Regulations governing book issues, as well as the format of the requisitioning
forms, have been amended in an attempt to provide control of distribution desired
by the redesigned curricula and, at the same time, facilitate the expedient handling
of orders in this short period of school inventory up-dating. As is common in all
organizations with widely dispersed divisions, communication is the key factor to
efficient interchange of understanding and, to this end, field trips have been carried
out by the Textbook Branch staff, resulting in direct communication with school,
and school district administrators. It is hoped that the benefit derived from this
interchange of ideas will manifest itself in improved service to all the schools of the
Province.
The repair of textbooks remains as a significant factor in the economic operation of inventory maintenance, and further improvements have been effected in the
current year's programme. More school districts have been directed to the summer
procedure of repair during school recess and, consequently, further savings in new
 G 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
inventory maintenance are anticipated. As more schools comply with the instructions issued by the Textbook Branch pertinent to this service, administration problems will be considerably eased by more diligent screening of titles against the lists
supplied by this Branch.
Statistical comparisons of operations are shown below:—
Amounts
1968
1967
Increase (+) or
Decrease (—)
Amount
Per
Cent
Sales	
Purchases .
Year-end inventory	
Operating costs (sales).
Accounts receivable	
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund-
Rental Plan operations—•
Depreciation expense  	
Operating costs.
Gross cost of plan-
Fees collected	
Net cost (subsidy) of plan..
Charges to the Free Vote (Grades I to VI)..
Delivery activities—
Freight—■
Items   — 	
Weight (lb.).
Express—
Items	
Weight (lb.).
Mail-
Items	
Weight (lb.).
Cost 	
$1,576,183
$3,658,173
$2,538,765
$135,511
$24,406
$4,393,848
$1,756,785
$90,341
$1,847,126
$1,038,172
$808,954
$861,869
49,271
2,135,409
6
238
47,390
96,897
$14,464
$1,473,036
$4,013,400
$1,903,332
$70,059
$19,499
$3,721,011
$1,629,468
$105,088
$1,734,556
$976,279
$758,277
$774,884
50,579
2,247,157
74
1,906
37,148
103,364
$15,812
-f$103,147
—$355,227
+$635,433
+$65,452
+$4,907
+$672,837
+$127,317
—$14,747
+$112,570
+$61,893
+$50,677
+$86,985
— 1,308
— 111,748
—68
—1,668
+ 10,242
—6,467
—$1,348
7.0
8.9
33.4
93.4
25.2
18.1
7.8
14.0
6.5
6.3
6.7
11.2
2.6
5.0
91.9
87.5
27.6
6.3
8.5
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES G 81
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND  SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT BY R. B. STIBBS, B.A., CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS (ACTING)
Staff, District Superintendents
In 1967/68 there were on staff in British Columbia 57 District Superindendents
and seven Vancouver education officials, including Dr. R. F. Sharp, superintendent
of schools.
Four new District Superintendents were appointed and assumed their positions
on August 1, 1967. Mr. W. L. B. Hawker, who was principal of the Dr. Knox
Secondary School in Kelowna, was assigned to the Fort Nelson, Portage Mountain,
and Stikine School Districts; Mr. A. P. McKay, who was principal of the Kamloops
Senior Secondary School, was assigned to the Barriere, Birch Island, and McBride
School Districts; Mr. A. C. Rutledge, who was supervisor of secondary instruction
for Chilliwack, was appointed Relieving District Superintendent of Schools; and
Mr. E. C. Stewart, who was principal of the Courtenay Senior Secondary School, was
assigned to the Skeena-Cassiar and Smithers School Districts.
Field-staff transfers for the school-year 1967/68 were as follows:—
(1) Mr. R. F. Lucas to Courtenay and Comox Airport from Ocean Falls and
Vancouver Island North.
(2) Mr. C. C. Wright to Shuswap from Creston-Kaslo.
(3) Mr. G. H. Nelson to Coquitlam from Salmon Arm and Enderby, now
called Shuswap School District.
(4) Mr. R. S. Price to Saanich and the Gulf Islands from Lake Cowichan and
Ladysmith.
(5) Mr. D. H. MacKirdy to Lake Cowichan and Ladysmith from Terrace and
Smithers.
(6) Mr. R. S. Boyle to Peace River South from Fort Nelson, Portage Mountain, and Stikine.
(7) Mr. F. T. Middleton to Creston-Kaslo from Barriere, Birch Island, and
McBride.
(8) Mr. W. J. Zoellner to Ocean Falls and Vancouver Island North from
Relieving District Superintendent of Schools.
(9) Mr. J. L. Canty to the position of Co-ordinator of Services from Peace
River South.
(10) Mr. R. B. Stibbs, who retired on August 31st, to the position of Chief
Inspector of Schools (Acting) for one year, from Coquitlam.
(11) Mr. C. E. Ritchie and Mr. F. A. McLellan, who had served as District
Superintendents for many years, retired on July 31st and October 31st
respectively.
Miss Jean Irvine was appointed Director of Home Economics, replacing Miss
Mildred Orr, who retired on August 31, 1968.
  INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES G 83
District Superintendents' Annual and Monthly Reports
An examination of reports of District Superintendents shows that they are becoming more and more involved with School Board matters other than those normal
duties authorized under the Public Schools Act.   These reports also indicate that:—
(1) The integration of native Indian pupils into the public schools of the
Province is progressing well.
(2) Boards of School Trustees are engaging persons as school service aides
and instructional assistants in increasing numbers.
(3) Library and audio-visual aids centres (resources centres) appear to be
growing in number and effectiveness and assist materially in facilitating
and enriching instruction.
(4) A number, of school districts are experimenting with team teaching and
the use of large open areas, new report cards, continuous progress,
permissive attendance of pupils, the use of team specialists, and the use
of television.
A statistical review of certain items in the District Superintendents' " Monthly
Reports to the Chief Inspector " received to the end of June, 1968, indicates that
a total of 10,255 visits to classrooms was made and 2,986 formal reports were written on the learning situations in classrooms. Teachers were issued 823 " Comments
on Visitation " reports. District Superintendents attended a total of 4,713 meetings
in the districts. The majority of these were School Board meetings. Visits to classrooms by directors, supervisors, and consultants were 5,915, 22,443, and 4,107
respectively.
C.A.S.S.I.'s Interprovincial Visitation Project for 1967/68
Office records indicate that 12 of our District Superintendents visited other
Provinces on invitation and 35 Inspectors and Superintendents came to British
Columbia from other parts of Canada.
Zone Conferences
Zone conferences of District Superintendents of Schools were held in 1967/68
as shown below:—
Zone Location Date(s)
Northern Dawson Creek October 13, 1967.
Okanagan Revelstoke October 19 and 20,1967.
Fraser Valley. Agassiz October 30, 1967.
Kootenay Kimberley November 6, 1967.
Island Nanaimo November 24, 1967
Northern Vanderhoof March 22, 1968.
Island Saanich March 29, 1968.
Okanagan Kamloops April 4 and 5, 1968.
Kootenays Nelson April 8, 1968.
Fraser Valley Squamish April 29, 1968.
District Superintendents expressed to the writer their appreciation for being
able to meet to discuss matters of interest and of concern. In today's evolving educational climate, such conferences are indeed necessary. The Chief Inspector was
in attendance at all meetings and was accorded a place on the agenda to bring to
the attention of the field staff information from the Department.
 G 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Principals' Conference
The 1968 biennial conference, which was sponsored by the Department of
Education, the British Columbia School Trustees Association, the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation, and University of British Columbia's College of Education,
was held in the Totem Park Auditorium on the campus of the University of British
Columbia from July 15th to July 26th, inclusive. The theme was " Emerging
Trends and the Principal." The chairman and the co-ordinator was Dr. N. S. Watt.
The sessions were well attended and were most successful. Dr. Watt deserves
thanks for a job well done.
Appeals by Teachers from the Action of Boards of School Trustees
under Section 134 (1) of the Public Schools Act
An interesting experience for the writer was to be appointed by the Superintendent of Education as chairman of six investigation committees. These involved
appeals to the Council of Public Instruction by teachers who were transferred, dismissed, or suspended by Boards of School Trustees. Noted below are the dates
and locations of the hearings:—
November 9 and 10, 1967—Duncan.
November 21 and 22, 1967—Ladner.
December 18 and 19, 1967—Sooke.
February 5 and 6, 1968—Cranbrook.
June 12 and 13, 1968—Hope.
June 24 and 25, 1968—Nelson.
Conclusion
Through the courtesy of the Department of Education, it has been a real privilege to serve this year as the last Chief Inspector of Schools since Mr. C. I. Taylor,
on August 1, 1968, assumed the duties and responsibilities of this office under the
title of Assistant Superintendent of Education (Field Services).
Dr. G. Neil Perry, Mr. F. P. Levirs, and the branch heads of the headquarters
staff have been most kind, co-operative, and helpful. District Superintendents have
carried out their duties in a most commendable manner.
The writer wishes to express his sincere gratitude to all with whom he has
been associated.
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT G 85
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
The function of this Branch is to a considerable extent promotional, informational, and advisory. Much of its work is done in conjunction with organizations
concerned with the preparation and supply of teachers.
Through the Joint Board of Teacher Education, which meets five times a year,
contact is maintained with the university faculties of education. During this year,
revisions and additions to programmes leading to teacher certification were a major
concern of the Board.
The Teacher Recruitment Advisory Committee, for which the Co-ordinator of
Teacher Recruitment acts as chairman, met three times during the year. This body
is representative of the universities, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, and
the British Columbia School Trustees Association, as well as the Department of
Education. Its function is to consider ways and means of ameliorating the chronic
teacher shortage. Special attention was given this year to the matter of financial
assistance for student teachers.
Other special recruitment activities in which this Branch participated included
the annual Trustee Day at both the University of Victoria and the University of
British Columbia, and a meeting of those concerned with teacher recruitment at the
annual British Columbia School Trustees Association convention. Teacher supply
was discussed with a class of senior university students, and a general meeting for
those interested in teaching was held at the University of Victoria during a noon
hour. The university also co-operated through the distribution of informational
material on teaching as a career.
This year, emphasis was placed on the preparation of teachers in two specialist
areas—commerce and home economics. A specially selected group of people with
demonstrated business competence were given basic preparation as teachers of
commercial subjects. Talks were initiated with the School of Home Economics at
the University of British Columbia, which, it is hoped, will lead to the removal of
some of the difficulties in supply of home economics teachers.
Through the co-operation of the Technical and Vocational Education Branch,
posters were prepared calling attention to the need for specialist teachers in the areas
of physical education, industrial education, home economics, and commerce. These
have been given wide distribution throughout the Province.
Numbers of general inquiries about teaching, availability of positions, teacher
preparation programmes, and the like were dealt with. In this connection the usual
close contact was maintained with the Registrar's office.
As an important part of the recruitment programme, Future Teachers Clubs
were operating within most of the secondary schools of the Province. Numbers remain fairly constant from year to year. During this year 106 clubs were in existence
with a total membership of 2,138. Approximately 75 per cent of these intend to
proceed with a teacher education programme. Future Teachers Clubs give students
an opportunity to explore and discuss details of a teaching career, and in most cases
to do some class visiting in order to observe the teaching and learning processes at
first hand.
Materials providing information and programme suggestions were regularly
sent to Future Teachers Clubs.   A complete revision of the booklet " Teaching in
 G 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
British Columbia " was issued during the year, and a supplement was prepared detailing new teacher certification regulations. During the year, clubs were also supplied with three issues of a newsletter.
In January, education students at the University of British Columbia held a
two-day Future Teachers Conference to which two members of each club were
invited. A general invitation was also sent out to club sponsors. Three club rallies
were held during the year. Clubs of Southern Vancouver Island met for an afternoon at the University of Victoria, Okanagan VaUey clubs met for a day at Kelowna,
and Vancouver clubs held an afternoon rally at John Oliver High School. The
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment participated in all of these, and took part also
in a conference for sponsors of Future Teachers Clubs organized by the British
Columbia School Trustees Association.
Teachers' scholarships are awarded each year to those who have performed
outstanding service in the classroom. This year there were 22 applications. Scholarships went to Mrs. M. E. MacLachlan, Montgomery Junior Secondary School,
Coquitlam; Mr. D. N. Taylor, Oak Bay Senior Secondary School, Victoria; and
Mrs. P. Weinstein, Killarney Secondary School, Vancouver.
Guidance Services
This Branch has charge of the Department of Education guidance services to
schools. During the year 70 separate pieces of material were sent to schools, as
well as two issues of a guidance bulletin. The latter included reviews of a considerable quantity of guidance material of interest to schools. On a day-to-day basis
a good deal of occupational information continued to be distributed by this office.
Contacts were maintained with a number of commercial organizations interested in vocational guidance. Through the co-operation of the Vancouver Board
of Trade, the Chilliwack Chamber of Commerce, and Dr. J. I. Macdougall, District
Superintendent of Schools, a one-day Business-Education Conference was held at
Chilliwack. This is the first time such a conference has been conducted at a distance from Vancouver. The Branch also held discussions and participated in
vocational guidance planning with MacMillan Bloedel Limited and the British
Columbia Aviation Council, particularly as concerns supplying occupational information to schools.
A basic guidance course for teachers was conducted during July at the University of Victoria, and the head of the Branch also participated in the Counsellors'
Workshop held at the university during August. The Branch was involved in
several other similar conferences, including the British Columbia School Trustees
counselling seminar, the Okanagan Valley Teachers Association convention, and
meetings of the Provincial Directors of Guidance held at Windsor, Ont., during the
annual conference of the American Personnel and Guidance Association.
The report of the Pupil Personnel Services Committee was received in September, and action was begun on a number of the recommendations. It is anticipated
that there will be changes made in the School Building Manual to indicate the need
for adequate school guidance and counselling facilities. A major study of guidance
at the elementary level will likely be undertaken.
The Young Voyageur Programme
The Centennial Youth Travel Programme finished its fourth and final year,
with the reception of 25 student groups from other parts of Canada during the
summer, a similar number of British Columbia students going on Canada visits.
In all, 1,200 Grade XI and XII students moved in and out of the Province.   The
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT G 87
following communities acted as rallying points and host centres: Abbotsford, Burnaby, Cloverdale, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Duncan, Grand Forks, Kamloops, Kimberley, Ladner, North Vancouver, Prince George, Qualicum, Richmond, Summer-
land, Vancouver, Victoria, and West Vancouver.
As a result of the unquestioned success of this Federal-Provincial project, it
was decided that it should be placed on a continuing basis under the name Young
Voyageur Programme. Plans were made for a slightly reduced number of units,
17 to be received by and travel from this Province. The reorganization of the
project will probably allow for half the schools of the Province to participate each
year. In general the District Superintendent or his nominee acts as chairman of
each local committee. Each travelling unit is accompanied by two escorts—usually
teachers, and almost always a husband and wife team. The enthusiastic co-operation which this undertaking has enjoyed throughout British Columbia has done
much to ease the administrative load.
 G 88
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
and muchiaigerHteu? * ™g gtmiPM™ "nd wiU include a new
Okanagan College!   V°Catl°nal sch°o1 there s° ** to provide some facilities for the
staff ^S5^^-^^ T SCh°01 Y^ —ing completion:
Redmond, itan5SyScSch__to^^ °P? "I*6 M °f 1968"   Mr E- C-
Terrace school. P       pd at Nanaimo> h^ been appointed principal to the
Students of the British Columbia Vocational School Aeronautics Course in Burnaby do
maintenance and systems inspection on helicopter and a Harvard MK. II.       *
 —
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 89
New courses were introduced in the Victoria school—for example, data processing, repair of business machines, electronics, and draughting—and expansion
of other courses was possible. It is expected that tenders for the construction of a
new and larger school will be called for in August, 1968.
Liaison with the many interested agencies—for example, Social Welfare, Canada Manpower, industry, rehabilitation, school districts, and others—continues to
occupy much time in our endeavours to reassess training needs so as to provide new
courses and, if necessary, eliminate existing ones which are not sufficiently well
supported.
One of the major problems faced each year is the temporary replacement of
instructors to enable regular staff to take vacations and attend summer schools. The
value of a large number of such temporary short-term instructors is a matter of considerable concern to our schools.
British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby
All areas of training have expanded, with an over-all approximate enrolment
increase of 17.8 per cent.
For the first time the school was successful in placing graduates with Air Canada even as far afield as Montreal. Student participation in the Abbotsford International Air Show resulted in a handsome award to the scholarship fund, and
additional awards were made to top students by the Advisory Committee of the
Aircraft Maintenance Programme and the British Columbia Aviation Council. The
school's programme has been recognized nationally to the extent that the curriculum
on maintenance used by Burnaby is to be adopted on a national basis.
Plans for the introduction of an Industrial Instrumentation Course are well in
hand and have necessitated considerable construction alterations in order to provide
a laboratory.
A new course of machine-shop training was added.
After a levelling-off of enrolments, night-school classes expanded again, and it
was apparent that industry in general was becoming more aware of and using the
facilities available to advance the training of their personnel.
British Columbia Vocational School—Dawson Creek
The significant increase in enrolment over the 1966/67 school-year is due
largely to the greater awareness of the school and its facilities by the public. This
trend should continue into 1968/69.
A one-quarter section of land located approximately 3 miles from the school
has been obtained. Buildings to house swine, sheep, cattle, and crop storage will
be completed by winter. Students from both the agricultural and carpentry classes
will be involved in the actual construction of the buildings. The school farm and
its facilities will enable the agricultural students to apply, in a practical way, the
lessons taught in the classroom. In addition, courses in animal husbandry will be
offered to the practising farmers.
The school facilities have been used throughout the 1967/68 school-year by
the Department of Agriculture for numerous short courses such as farm management,
beekeeping, horticulture, and 4-H training programmes.
Private industry, particularly the automotive industry, has also used the facilities
to demonstrate new equipment and techniques. Both the instructional staff and the
student body have participated in these upgrading programmes.
The student body, in spite of their short stay at the school, have actively participated in community activities, particularly sports.
During the past year 600 visitors have been conducted through the school.
 g 90 public schools report, 1967/68
British Columbia Vocational School—Kelowna
Enrolment remained steady. New short courses such as spraying, insect control, pruning, and fertilizers were offered, and, in addition to conducting some
1,000 visitors through the school, a one-hour programme was presented on the local
television station, CHBC-TV.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nanaimo
In spite of a slight increase in enrolments in most courses, there was an over-all
decrease due to the closure, through fire hazard and snow, of the logging division.
The school is otherwise operating to full capacity and has been forced to use
the student canteen and staff room as classrooms. A new course for operating
engineers commenced, and it already appears that it will both continue and grow.
British Columbia Vocational School—Nelson and Kootenay
School of Art
An in-service training programme was organized and conducted by the staff
for their own advancement. A special vehicle safety course was held at the request
of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
The number of persons conducted through the school on organized tours increased, and additional favourable publicity was earned through the award of a
$4,500 grant to Mr. S. Mignosa of the art school to enable him to complete his year's
study in Italy. Further recognition was accorded both the school and Mr. N. Martin
by the latter's appointment as adviser in welding to the Turkish Government for one
year.
The student body continued to be very active in many fields—for example, the
city's annual parade, industrial competition, and sports leagues — and within the
school itself they participate very fully in all safety projects.
British Columbia Vocational School—Prince George
A total of 737 students entered full-time day classes during the year; of these,
587 completed successfully, a percentage completion rate of 79.6 per cent.
Night-school enrolment totalled 877 students in 26 different classes. The
night school has become a significant factor of the local educational resources, and
the programme is receiving increasing attention from employers who wish to upgrade
skills of presently employed workers.
Enrolment in the pre-apprentice millwright class was hmited to five students
who started training in September, 1967. As only one application was received for
the March, 1968, class, it was decided to discontinue the programme. There are
several factors involved in this decision that should be noted:—
(1) Reduction of the course length from 11 to 6 months did not improve
enrolment.
(2) Employers were reluctant to hire graduates of a six-month course as they
felt that such graduates would have minimum usefulness as apprentices.
(3) Advertising of the programme was minimal and evidently not effective.
(4) The term " millwright" is not understood by many young men who might
make good candidates for this course.
>(5) The local apprenticeship counsellor did everything in his power to promote this course, but a lack of interest in the graduates by employers was
evident.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 91
(6) A lack of support from other government agencies contributed to the failure of the course.
Many of the courses offered were given in close co-operation with the night-
school programme sponsored by School District No. 57 (Prince George). As a
result, needless duplication of courses was avoided.
Inspection Report, Regional Vocational Schools
During the past year all regional vocational schools were visited for varying
periods of time. A full inspection was carried out on the staff of the British Columbia Vocational School—Dawson Creek. This involved a preliminary supervisory
visit in the fall and an inspection visit during the spring.
Individual staff inspections were carried out as required, and as time permitted,
at the British Columbia Vocational Schools at Burnaby, Kelowna, Nanaimo, Nelson,
Prince George, and Victoria.
As a result of the delegation of responsibility to principals for the reporting on
instructor efficiency, supervisor inspection reports were reduced somewhat over
previous years. A total of 110 instructors was visited during the year in regional
vocational schools, resulting in 32 official reports being submitted to the Department.
The Haney Correctional Institution was visited on three occasions, with supervisory visits being carried out on instructional staff and meetings held with the
administration.
During the spring of this year the supervisor's services were seconded to the
Department of Education of the Yukon Territory for a period of two weeks.
In addition to inspections, considerable time was spent on selection of instructional staff, school planning and equipment, and branch administrative meetings.
_ Students enrolled in the Broadcast Communications Course at the British Columbia
Institute of Technology receive instructions on the latest industry equipment. The two-
year course covers both radio and television. In this picture a group of students are
producing their own television show.
 G 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
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G 93
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 G 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Vocational Night-school Enrolment in Regional Schools
School
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
2,889
249
455
216
845
22
6,0651
9271
2,787
71
590
783
255
821
36
42
6,1921
1,7391
3,186
159
Kelowna	
287
583
121
877
25
34
4,676
Vancouver School of Art.-	
401
Totals
11,668
13,316
10,349
Sundry	
66
i These figures included some non-vocational classes.
Night-school Enrolment in School Districts
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
8,723
13,590
9,158
8,885
702
3,087
11,096
9,033
659
2,687
Miscellaneous    - -	
Totals  	
22,313
21,832
23,475
 A British Columbia Institute of Technology Radiographic Option student is making
nK-ray of a dry bone skull, using special precision craniographic apparatus.
an
 In the unit operation laboratory of the Chemical and Metallurgical Technology at the
British Columbia Institute of Technology, an instructor and student prepare to draw off a
product of the Bubblecap distillation column.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
G 97
British Columbia Institute of Technology
Day Enrolment
Broadcast Communications
Building  —...
Business Management	
Chemical and Metallurgical	
Civil and Structural, Electrical and Electronics
Food Processing	
Forestry	
Forest Products	
Gas and Oil	
Health	
Male
58
81
326
65
62
34
134
Female
13
2
53
8
179
29
Hotel, Motel, and Restaurant
Instrumentation and Control _
Mechanical 	
Medical Laboratory 	
Medical Radiography	
Mining 	
Survey 	
Totals 	
67
2
32
53
196
69
10
66
102
8
194
15
164
39
69
	
1,459
671
Total, 2,130, includes 701 on register at beginning of school-year.
Total night-school enrolment, 2,929.
Industrial-teacher Training School
Twenty-three sections of technical courses were organized and conducted at
summer sessions in three different centres for a total enrolment of 305 students.
In addition, a series of five-week courses was offered leading to a vocational
instructor's certificate and enrolled 94 students.
Enrolment for the Industrial Education Course was 83, with 73 completions.
Curriculum Development Division
New or revised courses were developed for 15 apprentice and pre-apprentice
courses and for 24 pre-employment courses.
Instructional materials were produced for some 34 different areas and manuals developed for 36 courses.
In addition, a number of slide sets were prepared covering both specific courses
and general areas of school operation.
Examinations for six courses were developed and considerable publicity material was produced, much of which found its way across Canada and a number of
foreign countries.
Secondary Schools
Assistance is provided for approved programmes in technical, industrial, commercial, agricultural, community services, visual and performing arts, occupational,
and other programmes for particular occupations.
 G 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Construction
The 34 school districts qualifying under the Vocational Schools Assistance
Act have completed the 78 projects, with equipment in place, in 68 schools. A
gross total of $31,000,000 was involved to provide teaching areas and equipment
for technical, commercial, industrial, community services, visual and performing
arts, occupational, and programmes for particular occupations. Supporting classrooms, laboratories, and service rooms have also been included.
The objective of this expansion was to provide a completely functional composite secondary school offering programmes under the British Columbia reorganized senior secondary curriculum.
Projections have been prepared for a limited allocation of support for secondary schools under the Transitional Capital Agreement, which allows funds on
a 50-50 basis. The Vocational Schools Assistance Act Amendment Act, 1965,
requires that where the Federal-Provincial sharing is 50-50, the School Board provides 20 per cent, the Province 40 per cent, and the Federal Government 40 per
cent of the capital cost.
Considerable technical and vocational facilities have been provided in the
smaller schools by moneys obtained under normal referendum procedures.
This is the second year that students have graduated from Industrial Specialties
in Construction, Mechanics, and Electricity-Electronics. Few of these graduates
have been able to enjoy proper and fully equipped facilities for the full programme
from Grades VIII to XII. The spectacular progress in providing shop facilities
which has occurred has provided the students with splendid learning conditions.
An upsurge of interest in the various practical-oriented industrial education courses
is evident, particularly by boys (and some girls) electing into courses from academic
and other specialties.
Construction specialty courses encourage the building of full-size housing projects, and many have been completed, such as homes, cottages, portable classrooms,
boats, house trailers, picnic shelters, greenhouses, etc. In most instances these
projects are self-supporting financially. Occupational pupils are gaining through
the presence of the new industrial facilities, through being programmed in the new
shops in useful practical-work learning experiences.
Visits were made continuously during school-days by the two Inspectors of
Technical Classes. Contact was made with a majority of the instructors while they
were engaged in charge of classes. Two visits during the term were attempted to all
beginning teachers, and to those where requests were received from the instructor
himself, or from his principal, the District Superintendent, or the School Board. It
was not possible during the 199 school-days to visit all of the industrial education
staff and some principals, who would have welcomed assistance, suggestions, or
advice. However, a plan to hold geographical district staff meetings of industrial
education instructors from reasonably nearby schools was initiated this spring.
Staffing
The 1966/67 survey indicated that 95 technical teachers would be required for
September, 1968. The graduating class from the industrial education accelerated
programme at the University of British Columbia numbered 73.
Ninety-two persons have been recruited for training during the 1968/69 year.
It would appear that the perpetual shortage of industrial education teachers may be
overcome by September, 1969. A further survey of all school districts will be carried out in the fall of 1968 to determine the forecast requirements for the next two
years.
 technical and vocational education g 99
In-service Training
Hydraulic Workshop, Easter, 1968
Seventy teachers attended the workshop, 48 in Burnaby and 22 in Penticton.
Practically all of the teachers were from the Interior or the Upper Island, as Vancouver, Victoria, and Burnaby districts conduct their own in-service training in
hydraulics. Seventy persons would then be approximately 20 per cent of those concerned with industrial education, and consequently over 50 per cent of the instructors
teaching hydraulics.
The Department of Education co-ordinated the workshop and paid for all
operating costs, including honoraria to the instructors.
Day Workshops
Two single-day programmes were held, one in Burns Lake and the other in
Terrace.
School Building Manual
The industrial education section of the newly issued manual contains suggested
shop plans and furniture details. The outstanding drawings are being completed
and will be issued with the first revision.
Student Enrolment
Industrial education pupils in Grades VIII, IX, and X normally enrol in the
equivalent of one course or block of time, although it is permissible to enrol for
additional study. Grades XI and XII pupils normally take from one to three
courses. The following figures are, therefore, the number of industrial education
courses being taken by students:—
I.E. 8  19,007 Occupational 1  1,109
I.E. 9  36,317 Occupational 2      554
I.E. 10        131 Occupational 3      680
I.E. 11  20,630 	
I.E. 12  10,293 Course total  2,343
Course total  86,378 Programmes for particu-
==__=                   lar occupations (specifics)   1,091
Junior secondary  55,455
Senior secondary  32,014
Occupational      2,343
Grand course total  89,812
Teachers instructing in industrial education, 744, representing an increase
over the previous year of 10 per cent.
Supervisory and Management Training
Training the management team is not unique, but here in British Columbia,
more than in all other parts of Canada, industry and business seem to realize the
importance of well-informed leadership.
Top management are also aware of the need to produce more high-quality
goods and to control costs.   To this end, British Columbia executives are making
 G 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
full use of the supervisory management training facilities of the Department of
Education. Two intense courses are sponsored by the British Columbia Department of Education in Burnaby, to meet these needs:—
(a) Communications and Human Relations.
(b) A course in the technical approach to improvement of product, service,
and office procedure, The Techniques of Work Study.
During the first period, July 1, 1967, to June 30, 1968, enrolment in both
courses was at a record high. Additional sessions were held and larger facilities
were needed to meet the demand from industry; new facilities are being arranged
to handle the 1968 fall schedule of courses.
Special courses during the year included a course in The Techniques of Work
Study for the Aluminum Company of Canada at Kitimat, the first in a plant-wide
programme to train all engineering and supervisory staff; a course in Kelowna
for fruit-growers and light manufacturing; and a series of courses held in Prince
Rupert expressly for the fishing industry covering Communications and Human
Relations and The Techniques of Work Study.
Enrolments
Communications and Human Relations conducted in Burnaby and
throughout the Province  193
Work study conducted in Burnaby and throughout the Province  133
Conference conducted within industry throughout the Province  309
Total  635
Tourist Services
Despite non-participation by Canada Manpower, training in this particular
field of adult education continued as in the past.
Courses were organized and conducted in conjunction with industry and school
districts throughout British Columbia and students from our Cooks and Baking
Courses participated in such courses by giving practical demonstrations of their own
skills pertaining to the restaurant industry.
In all, some 38 separate projects engaged the active attention of our Coordinator.
With the annual repetition of the waitress training courses in the spring, a
reserve of young trained persons has been created, many of whom return each year
for summer work.
There is an increasing awareness amongst employers of the value of this kind
of training resulting in a demand for more such courses.
Enrolments
Waiter/waitress  146
Room maid    27
Sundry (upgrading food services, travel counsellors, catering management)   242
Total  415
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION G 101
Armed Services Vocational Training
The Branch continued to administer in certain areas of this training which has
been affected by a number of changes made by the Federal authorities.
Sundry Courses
Twenty-four trainees were passed through the Provincial forestry school at
Surrey, which receives financial support from this Department.
Training in Small Business Management, which is conducted by many of the
school districts as a special Federal project, provided some 66 separate courses for
a total of 1,351 student places.
The Air Brakes Course conducted by the Department of Commercial Transport on behalf of vocational education enrolled 16 students during the year.
 G 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
J. H. PANTON, M.Sc, DIRECTOR
During the 1967/68 year the development of policies for regional district recreation services was under study by the Community Programmes Branch in conjunction with the Department of Municipal Affairs. When regional districts are able to
provide recreation services, there will probably be changes in the future procedure
of the Community Programmes Branch relative to Branch services to the communities of British Columbia. As indicated in the 1966/67 Report, it will take much time
and experimentation before new procedures will achieve some permanency.
The field services of the Community Programmes Branch were disrupted with
the resignation of one recreation consultant and the announcement that another
would resign in August of 1968.
The Branch has continued to develop regional and local leadership activities.
These include clinics, conferences, workshops, and seminars of many varieties. Recreation education is essential in order to create a good understanding and appreciation of leisure in our society. With this in mind, the Branch is endeavouring to
stimulate interest and desire in people to become aware of the role recreation services
can play in their communities.
The growth chart for Recreation Commissions in British Columbia to March
31, 1968, follows:—
1958  250 1964  359
1959  266 1965  375
1960  281 1966  390
1961  307 1967  396
1962  332 1968  408
1963  3 51
This does not indicate growth of recreation in the Province. There are few
communities not reached by the Community Programmes Branch, and there are not
many new Commissions established during a year. The Community Programmes
Branch is now endeavouring to strengthen existing Commissions rather than organize
new ones.
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Coluumbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional recreation consultants.
(2) Fitness and Amateur Sport Division, which provides special services to
sports organizations, communities, and schools.
(3) Adult Education Division, which provides grants, consultation, clinics,
and conferences to School Board adult education divisions.
(4) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(5) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(6) Drama library, materials, and advisory services.
(7) Leadership training through regional workshops, conferences, clinics,
seminars, and a Provincial summer seminar.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 103
(8) Grants-in-aid to Recreation Commissions on behalf of full-time recreation
directors and to aid with the expenses of public recreation programmes.
(9) Provide resource personnel and act in advisory capacity for Provincial
conferences.
(10)  Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
Recreation Commissions
The following is a fist of recreation commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
* Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Inactive Commissions.
Recreation Commission
Abbotsford 	
Adams Lake	
t Ainsworth 	
Alert Bay	
tAlexandria 	
Alexis Creek	
Argenta-Iohnsons Landing
Armstrong
tArrowhead-Sidmouth
tArrow Park West	
Ashcroft 	
Avola	
Annual
Grant
$480.00
360.00
720.00
240.00
300.00
600.00
300.00
240.00
Baldy Hughes       240.00
Balfour	
Bamfield	
Barnhart Vale	
tBarnstone Island .
Barriere	
tBear Creek	
Beaver Creek 	
tBeaverdell	
Belmont Park	
Bessborough	
Birch Island	
Blackburn Road..
Black Creek	
Blue River	
Blueberry Creek	
Bonnington-Corra Linn .
Boston Bar	
Boswell	
Bouchie Lake	
t Bowen Island	
Bralorne-Pioneer
Bridesville 	
Brisco 	
Britannia Beach
tBrocklehurst .	
tBrookmere 	
*Burnaby	
Burns Lake	
Burton 	
Cache Creek	
♦Campbell River
Canal Flats	
Canyon 	
540.00
480.00
240.00
360.00
480.00
540.00
240.00
240.00
240.00
480.00
144.00
240.00
240.00
300.00
420.00
360.00
600.00
240.00
240.00
480.00
3,600.00
480.00
420.00
240.00
1,800.00
300.00
300.00
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Cape Mudge       $420.00
tCawston        	
Cecil Lake	
Cedar	
Central Saanich ...
Chapman Camp ...
Chase	
Chase River	
Chehalis Crossing
Chehalis Reserve .
Cherry Creek	
Cherryville
  240.00
  420.00
  480.00
  480.00
  300.00
  360.00
  420.00
  240.00
  600.00
  480.00
  480.00
  300.00
  600.00
  600.00
  300.00
  240.00
  300.00
  300.00
  240.00
  1,500.00
  240.00
♦Coquitlam     3,300.00
Cheslatta District
Chetwynd	
Chilliwack	
Chilliwhack	
tChristian Valley _
Christina Lake	
Clayhurst 	
Clearwater 	
Clinton 	
Columbia Valley
*Comox Village	
Coombs	
2,400.00
540.00
2,100.00
300.00
360.00
600.00
480.00
♦Cumberland _ 1,500.00
tDawson Creek       	
Decker Lake
Deep Creek _
*Delta 	
♦Courtenay
Cowichan Indian Band
♦Cranbrook 	
Crawford Bay	
Crescent Valley	
Creston	
Cultus Lake	
Denman Island
Departure Bay .
Deroche	
Dewdney
District of Matsqui 	
District of Mission	
District of Salmon Arm .
♦District of Surrey	
Doe River	
420.00
300.00
1,800.00
420.00
540.00
360.00
420.00
600.00
480.00
600.00
3,600.00
240.00
 G 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Recreation Commission
Donald 	
tDragon Lake	
Duhammel 	
Duncan	
Eagle Valley	
East Kelowna __
East Wellington .
Edgewater	
tElko	
Emerald Mines
tEnderby	
Erickson	
Errington 	
♦Esquimalt	
Falkland	
Fanny Bay	
Farmington 	
Ferndale	
Fernie	
Field 	
Forest Grove
Fort Fraser _.
tFort Nelson _.
tFort St. lotm .
Francois Lake —
Franklin River _
tFraser Lake	
Fruitvale 	
Fulton River	
Gabriola Island .
Galiano 	
Galloway	
Genelle	
Gibsons 	
Gillies Bay	
tGiscome 	
t Glenmore 	
Glenora 	
tGolata Creek .
Golden 	
Gold River .....
Grand Forks ..
t Great Central.
Greenwood 	
Gray Creek _
Grindrod	
Groundbirch ..
tHaida Masset.
Halfmoon Bay	
Happy Valley-Glen Lake
Harewood 	
Harrison Hot Springs
tHarrop
Hatzic Prairie
Hazelton 	
Hedley	
Hixon 	
Holberg (R.C.A.F.)
Holberg 	
Hope	
Hornby Island	
Horsefly	
420.00
300.00
1,200.00
300.00
480.00
240.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
420.00
300.00
480.00
240.00
360.00
360.00
600.00
540.00
No grant
420.00
420.00
600.00
800.00
1,500.00
420.00
240.00
300.00
420.00
No grant
420.00
540.00
600.00
240.00
300.00
240.00
600.00
300.00
240.00
600.00
300.00
300.00
Annual
Grant
$240.00
Recreation Commission
Houston  	
Inonoaklin 	
Invermere 	
loco   	
Jordan River	
Annual
Grant
$600.00
600.00
420.00
600.00
240.00
600.00
480.00
480.00
600.00
420.00
Justportel   	
Kaleden    	
360.00
420.00
420.00
Kaslo __ 	
♦Kelowna   	
Kent               .
600.00
     2,700.00
600.00
480.00
tKeremeos   	
Kersley	
Kettle Valley
Kilkerran	
♦Kimberley 	
Kingfisher .
Kitwanga Valley.
tKootenay Bay	
tKyuquot 	
Lac la Hache	
Ladysmith 	
tLa France	
Laidlaw 	
Lakeview Heights
Langford	
♦Langley 	
Lantzville 	
tLardeau 	
Lavington-Coldstream
Lillooet	
Lister	
Little Fort	
tLone Butte	
Lower Nicola	
300.00
240.00
240.00
2,400.00
300.00
360.00
  300.00
  540.00
  240.00
  300.00
  480.00
  1,500.00
  600.00
  600.00
  240.00
  480.00
  300.00
  240.00
Lower Similkameen  No grant
Lumby  300.00
Lund  420.00
Lytton  420.00
Mahatta River  300.00
Mahood Falls  180.00
Malaspina   300.00
Maple Ridge  600.00
Mara  240.00
Marysville   600.00
Mayne Island   360.00
♦Merritt  1,800.00
Merville   420.00
Metchosin   480.00
Mica Creek  300.00
Midway  300.00
t Minstrel Island	
Minto	
♦Mission City
Montney	
Montrose	
Moose Heights .
Moricetown	
Mount Currie _
tMud River	
McConnell Creek
tMcBride 	
MacKenzie	
420.00
1,200.00
300.00
600.00
180.00
300.00
360.00
240.00
600.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
v
Recreation Commission
tMcLeese Lake	
Nakusp	
♦Nanaimo 	
Nanaimo Indian Band
Nanoose 	
Naramata	
tNarcosli Creek	
Nazko	
Nelson 	
New Denver	
New Hazelton	
tNew Masset	
New Westminster
Nicomen Island _
Annual
Grant
$600.00
3,300.00
420.00
420.00
300.00
240.00
No grant
240.00
360.00
Noralee-Clemretta-Colleymount
North Bend	
♦North Cowichan	
tNorthfield	
North Saanich	
No grant
360.00
360.00
480.00
1,500.00
North Shore (Nelson)
North Shuswap _ _
tNorth Vancouver	
♦Oak Bay
tOkanagan Centre
Okanagan Falls
tOkanagan Indian Band
tOkanagan Mission	
t Oliver 	
100 Mile House	
tl50 Mile House	
tOsoyoos	
Oyama	
Palling	
Parksville 	
tPaul Creek	
tPeace Canyon	
Peachland	
Pemberton Valley .
Pender Harbour ...
tPendleton Bay	
Penticton	
420.00
600.00
360.00
1,400.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
420.00
600.00
300.00
540.00
No grant
tPitt Meadows ...
Pleasant Valley .
Popkum	
♦Port Alberni .	
Port Alice	
♦Port Coquitlam
♦Port Hardy	
Port Mellon	
♦Port Moody	
Port McNeill ...
Port Renfrew ...
♦Port Simpson ...
Pouce Coupe ...
♦Powell River	
♦Prince George .
♦Prince Rupert „
Princeton	
Procter 	
Progress
600.00
420.00
480.00
1,800.00
420.00
1,800.00
900.00
No grant
1,200.00
540.00
420.00
900.00
300.00
3,000.00
1,500.00
2,700.00
600.00
480.00
300.00
tQuadra Island	
Qualicum Beach
Recreation Commission
Queen Charlotte 	
t Quesnel 	
Radium Junction	
Red Bluff	
tRedwell 	
tReid Lake	
Revelstoke	
♦Richmond 	
Riondel	
Riske Creek	
Riverside 	
Rivervale	
Roberts Creek
Robson	
Rock Creek _
Roe Lake	
Rose Lake _
Round Lake
Royston	
Rutland 	
tSaanich Indian Band	
Salmo 	
♦Salmon Arm	
Saltspring Island
Saltair	
tSandspit	
Saturna	
Savona 	
Sayward 	
Seabird Island.
Sechelt (special grant) 	
70 Mile House and Watch Lake
tShalalth	
Shawnigan Lake	
Shirley	
Sidney	
Silver Creek (1) 	
Silver Creek (2) 	
Silverton	
Skidegate Mission
tSlocan 	
tSmithers 	
Soda Creek 	
Songhees Indian Band .
Sooke 	
tSorrento 	
Southern Cortez...
South Cowichan _.
South Hazelton ....
South Kelowna	
Southside	
South Slocan	
tSouth Taylor	
South Wellington.
Sparwood	
Spences Bridge
Sproat Lake	
♦Squamish
tSquamish Indian Band
Stewart	
300.00
tStikine (Telegraph Creek)
Straiton 	
G 105
Annual
Grant
   $360.00
360.00
300.00
480.00
3,900.00
300.00
300.00
300.00
240.00
No grant
600.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
300.00
600.00
600.00
420.00
240.00
300.00
480.00
240.00
6,000.00
180.00
480.00
240.00
540.00
300.00
300.00
No grant
480.00
240.00
480.00
540.00
420.00
540.00
360.00
300.00
360.00
420.00
360.00
600.00
180.00
420.00
900.00
420.00
420.00
360.00
 G 106
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Stuart Island       $240.00
Sumas 	
Summerland
Sunnybrae
Sunrise Two Rivers
Sunrise Valley	
Sunset Prairie 	
600.00
480.00
180.00
300.00
240.00
240.00
Tarrys and District
300.00
♦Tasu
1,200.00
Tatla
420.00
tTatlavoko T.ake                    	
Taylor            . _ .   	
        420.00
Tchesinkut Lake          	
        300.00
tTelkwa         __ _       _ __      ...   	
Texada                    —. 	
        300.00
♦Terrace       —. .. _.. _
     1,500.00
Thornhill                  	
        420.00
Tofino
        540.00
Tonlev
480.00
tTower Take               __            ...  __   _
♦Trail-Tadanac                 . ..
     3,000.00
Tulameen 	
Ucluelet 	
300.00
        600.00
Union Bay 	
University Hill
Valemount 	
Valleyview 	
480.00
420.00
360.00
360.00
♦Vancouver Parks Board  24,875.00
Vanderhoof        360.00
Recreation Commission
Vavenby 	
♦Vernon 	
View Royal	
♦Wallace Gardens 	
Wardner 	
Warfield 	
tWasa Lake	
Wellington 	
tWells 	
Westbank 	
West Bench	
Westbridge 	
West Creston	
Westsyde 	
Annual
Grant
$240.00
2,700.00
540.00
804.00
300.00
600.00
  420.00
  420.00
  300.00
  300.00
  180.00
  240.00
♦West Vancouver  2,400.00
Whaletown	
White Lake	
Williams Lake ._
tWillow River	
Wilson Creek	
Windermere 	
Winfield	
Winlaw	
Wistaria (Ootsa)
Woodfibre 	
Wynndel	
Yahk	
Yale	
Ymir	
Zeballos	
360.00
420.00
600.00
No grant
420.00
300.00
360.00
240.00
480.00
600.00
240.00
360.00
300.00
420.00
Quarterly Reports
The quarterly reports of Recreation Commissions indicate that almost every
type of recreational activity has participant interest in British Columbia. Although
there are many approaches to community recreation organization and promotion,
all communities seem to be very concerned with leisure-time services, especially to
young people. There is also much interest in elderly citizens' programmes. The
middle-age group is not very often emphasized by community recreation groups.
The quarterly reports do indicate that many thousands of British Columbians
engage in a wide variety of public recreation programmes. This does not include
the thousands who have recreation pursuits of their own which are not part of a
public recreation programme.
Quarterly reports also indicate the need for planning, programming, and leadership in public recreation.
Staff
Resignations: Mr. G. A. Bruce, October, 1967; Mr. R. A. Lancaster, to be
effective August 1, 1968.
There were no appointments.
The loss of Mr. Bruce was serious for the North-west Region, which had only
had a consultant for two years following another period of several months without
consultative service.
The consultant staff terminated their Centennial work at the end of 1967.
Their contribution was a most significant factor in the success of the 1966 and 1967
Centennials. They organized all of the unincorporated community committees and
provided advice and guidance throughout the Centennial period of some 31/- years.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH G 107
During 1967/68 the consultant staff travelled 23,664 miles on Centennial business and 59,579 miles on Branch work, and 1,081 visits were made to communities.
Staff meetings were held as follows: April 25th, during the N.R.P.A.-B.C. Recreation Conference; July 10th to 14th, during the Kelowna Seminar; and November
1st to 3rd, in Victoria (formal staff meeting).
Community Programmes Branch staff and locations are as follows:—
A. L. Cartier, Victoria—Adult Education.
K. K. Maltman, Vancouver—Sports and Fitness.
D. M. McCooey, Abbotsford—Fraser-Sechelt.
E. W. Mayers, Kamloops—Central British Columbia.
G. J. Pynn, Victoria—Vancouver Island, and Smithers—North-west British Columbia.
J. M. MacKinnon, Kelowna—Okanagan-Similkameen.
R. C. Davis, Quesnel—North-east British Columbia.
R. A. Lancaster, Nelson—Kootenays.
Miss A. Adamson, Victoria—Drama.
Leadership
The provision of recreation education opportunity and the development of
leadership services is the major role of the Branch. The field staff are continually
evaluating field services to determine the most effective and acceptable way of involving communities so that each community will be given the opportunity to understand recreation and take advantage of all services supplied by government and
many other agencies.
Local clinics, regional conferences and workshops, zone meetings, and Provincial seminars, workshops, and conferences come within the scope of Community
Programmes Branch aid. The Province is almost a network of these activities, as
indicated by the statistics listed in this section.
The Provincial seminar of one week's duration in Kelowna met with success
and disappointment. The division on leadership for professional people and larger
community administrators, under the direction of Dr. W. B. Baker, of Ottawa, was
excellent. The lay leadership and sports sections were not well attended. This has
necessitated evaluation, and Provincial services may be changed in the future.
The Annual Provincial Conference was combined with the National Recreation
and Parks Association Conference at Banff in April, 1967. Many British Columbia
recreation people took advantage of this combination and travelled to Banff. Although the Provincial aspect of the conference was minor, the total conference was
very good.
Regional seminars for professional people were conducted in the Kootenays,
Okanagan, and on Vancouver Island.
A Youth Conference was organized by the North-west and North-east Regions
in Prince George. More than 300 young people from the North attended what was
considered a most successful venture.
Communities in British Columbia are in an excellent position to avail themselves of highly competent guidance and leadership through the local clinic programme. The Branch sends experts in any field of recreation to community clinics
to conduct leadership and development projects.
 G 108
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Leadership Statistics
Regional
Clinics
Conferences
Seminars
Workshops
Number
83
3,181
196
19
786
120
$6,121.10
2
45
25
11
94
24
7
Cost 	
$6,600.44
$1,216.84
$793.90
1 At Kelowna.
Courses:
Leadership.
Attendance, 50.
Total cost, $7,391.49
Provincial Seminar, Kelowna, July 10 to 15, 1967
Community  Leadership   I,   Community   Leadership   II,   Sports
Miscellaneous Activities
Okanagan Summer School of the Arts  $300.00
Vancouver Island Summer School of the Arts  200.00
Notre Dame Drama Leadership Workshop  500.00
Dominion Drama Festival  300.00
British Columbia Federation of School Athletic Associations  400.00
British Columbia Arena, Auditorium, and Stadium Association.. 700.00
British Columbia Recreation Association Sports Seminar, Vancouver  700.00
British Columbia Professional Recreation Association meeting,
Banff  120.95
Community survey, Cranbrook  378.00
Community survey, Terrace  178.00
All Native Basketball Tournament  91.00
Elementary School Physical Education Workshops (2), Victoria 335.00
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $9,408; 136 communities received this
aid. These grants are provided to encourage community activity in these extremely
important aspects of recreation.
Library Services
A start was made on revision of the Community Programmes Branch film service in order to delete old films and establish a procedure designed to encourage
groups and organizations to recommend films relative to their activities which should
be included in the library.
Books are not used as extensively as they should be, although the Branch library
contains many excellent publications.
Publications
"Community Recreation" is forwarded to all Recreation Commissions and
many other agencies on a quarterly basis.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
G 109
Provincial Advisory Board
The Board met once during the year on October 31, 1967. There were no
changes and there were two vacancies at March 31, 1968. Board members are:
Mr. A. T. Alsbury, Vancouver; Dr. A. W. Mooney, Vanderhoof; Mr. R. F. Osborne, Vancouver; Mrs. W. Saxton, Ucluelet; Dr. B. E. Wales, Vancouver; Mr. J.
E. Fletcher, Trail; Mr. D. L. Cunnings, Coquitlam; and Mr. L. J. Wallace, Victoria.
The Board was appointed to act in an advisory capacity to the Department of
Education concerning policy and procedure as related to the Community Programmes Branch.
Drama
Interest in the theatre is at a high level. The development of more Community
Arts Councils throughout the Province is contributing significantly to arts development.
During 1967/68 more than 35 festivals of speech, drama, music, and dance
were staged. The Community Programmes Branch provided workshops and clinics
with prominent resource people. These proved very beneficial, and a noticeable
increase in requests for this assistance was experienced by the Branch.
The British Columbia Secondary School Festival final was held in Vancouver.
Victoria Senior Secondary School won first-place honours under the direction of
Mr. A. Farr.
Kelowna hosted the British Columbia Drama Festival. Kitimat won the first-
place award with " Fragments," directed by R. G. Pooley.
The British Columbia Drama Association was very active during 1967/68.
Most significant has been the interest in workshops designed to upgrade all aspects
of amateur theatre. Outstanding workshops were held at Vernon for five weeks
under M. Jacques Zouvi, of Montreal, and in Vancouver in conjunction with the
regional festival in March. Emphasis was placed on the revitalization of member
groups throughout the Province. President of the association is Mr. D. Huggins, of
Vernon. The Community Programmes Branch works very closely with the British
Columbia Drama Association by providing resource and financial assistance for
workshops, grants to festivals, and fees for adjudicators.
All drama groups in British Columbia are assisted by the library services of the
Drama Division of the Branch. More than 8,000 booklets, plays, periodicals, and
other information are sent out annually. Many inquiries from other parts of Canada
and the United States are indicative of the high standard of service in this respect.
The new Cultural Fund grants available to Community Arts Councils and other
art groups in the Province have made it possible for many fine arts organizations
to increase their programmes and contribute much more to this aspect of community life.
Sports and Fitness Division
(K. K. Maltman, B.P.E., Co-ordinator)
1967/68 was the first year of the second three-year agreement between the
Federal Government and the Province of British Columbia for aid to sports and
fitness in the Province.
The pattern of service provided by this Division was the same as during
the first three-year agreement. However, the demand on the services was greater
due to the better understanding by sports bodies of the assistance available.
The Division again concentrated on developing a communications service to
all Provincial sports organizations and agencies concerned with sport and fitness
development.
 G 110
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Significant Developments and Services
1. Project development meetings: These were held in September to encourage
discussion and questions concerning submission procedure and rules and regulations
governing projects.
2. Project appraisal meetings: All groups and agencies met in January to
present projects. This provided opportunity for understanding of the magnitude of
requests made and objectives set for each project.
3. Formation of a committee of six representing the B.C.R.A., B.C.S.F., and
B.C.A.S.C. to sit in on grant allocation meetings. The purpose of this committee
was to acquaint these bodies with grant procedure and to provide suggestions and
guidance to the Branch concerning use of grant funds.
4. The Division conducted a survey to ascertain the magnitude of volunteer
aid to sports in British Columbia.
5. Administered use of sports equipment belonging to the Province.
6. Provided clerical aid to sports organizations and agencies.
7. Advisory assistance to sports organizations and agencies.
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1967/68
Administration costs of C.P.B. Sports and Fitness office	
Physical education and recreation student summer assistance
Executive office for B.C.RA. and B.C.S.F	
Provincial Leadership Seminars, Kelowna	
Sechelt Recreation Area Director Experiment	
Undergraduate scholarships and bursaries	
British Columbia Archery Association	
British Columbia Badminton Association	
British Columbia Basketball Association	
British Columbia Rugby Union	
Boys' Clubs of Vancouver	
Boy Scouts of Canada
British Columbia Fencing Association	
British Columbia Section, Canadian Figure Skating Association	
British Columbia Section, Canadian Football Union	
Girl Guides of Canada	
British Columbia Golf Association	
British Columbia Gymnastic Association	
British Columbia Handball Association	
British Columbia Amateur Hockey Association	
British Columbia Kayak and Canoe Association	
British Columbia Lacrosse Association	
British Columbia Lawn Tennis Association	
British Columbia Field Hockey Association	
British Columbia Minor Baseball Association	
British Columbia Mountain Access Committee	
Canadian Amateur Ski Association	
British Columbia Soccer Commission	
British Columbia Amateur Softball Association	
Canadian Amateur Synchronized Swimming Association.
Canadian Amateur Swimming Association	
British Columbia Table Tennis Association	
$20,916.58
6,000.00
18,500.00
7,391.49
6,863.70
14,000.00
2,000.00
800.00
3,500.00
1,600.00
1,600.00
800.00
700.00
3,000.00
2,000.00
400.00
500.00
2,500.00
200.00
3,500.00
1,800.00
500.00
2,000.00
1,996.00
2,500.00
500.00
3,000.00
2,500.00
300.00
2,500.00
1,000.00
500.00
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH G 111
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1967/68—Continued
British Columbia Track and Field Association  $4,500.00
British Columbia Volleyball Association  3,500.00
British Columbia Weightlifting Association  1,000.00
British Columbia Women's Field Hockey Federation  2,500.00
British Columbia Amateur Wrestling Association  3,500.00
Canadian Yachting Association  1,500.00
Canadian Youth Hostel Association  1,000.00
Vancouver Y.W.C.A  1,700.00
British Columbia Branch, Royal Life Saving Society  500.00
Fitness and sport specialist for Vancouver Board of Parks
and Public Recreation  1,500.00
British Columbia Region, Canadian Water Skiing Association  500.00
Seminar for representatives of sports governing bodies  155.80
Total  $137,723.57
Miscellaneous
Sechelt Experiment.—This project concluded in September of 1967.   A full
report was released and made available to all Recreation Commissions and Regional
District Boards in April of 1968.
Centennial Athletic Awards Programme.—This  programme  concluded  in
early 1968.
Number of participating students  295,600
Gold crests awarded     35,929
Silver crests awarded     47,102
Bronze crests awarded     46,225
Participation crests awarded  166,344
Canadian Summer Games, 1969.—The Community Programmes Branch was
designated as the responsible body for British Columbia participation in the games
to be held in Halifax in August of 1969.
 G 112 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF P. FREEMANTLE, N.C.T.D.Dip.(Eng.), B.Ed.,
SUPERINTENDENT
The net enrolment for the 1967/68 school-year was divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
121
38
113
234
61         1          99
Totals                      	
159
174         1         333
General Remarks
With the reopening of school, two further classes were added to the existing
four off-campus classes. One of these opened in Trafalgar Annex B, and the other
was started in the Henry Hudson School. This brought the total of off-campus
classes to six. The Trafalgar Annex B class was the second group of deaf day
children from the metropolitan area from Sunny Hill Hospital pre-school programme, while the other was a class of both deaf day and resident children transferred from Jericho Hill School.
The programme of providing required Braille copies of prescribed texts with
the assistance of transcribers at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind and
volunteers from the British Columbia Telephone Company Pioneers Club, as duplicators, continued in a successful vein. Consequently our integrated programme
of blind pupils in sighted secondary classes also continues with success.
As a result of several meetings held throughout the previous year with persons
of the Vocational and Technical Branch, a course was commenced in practical
horticulture on February 8th, and also during the latter part of the year two more
instructors were taken on staff to prepare courses in seamstress and garment repair
and small-appliance repair.   These courses will commence in September, 1968.
Throughout the year, meetings were held with persons from the Department
of Public Works to discuss proposals for the long-planned blind children's playground and play areas for the deaf children. By the end of the year, plans and
specifications were completed, and it is hoped construction will commence in August.
Preliminary discussions were held between consultants and the school administration to explore plans for food service facilities. These meetings involved all
areas within the school where there are food services and took into account the
future growth of the school.
During August of 1967, with the retirement of Dr. C. E. MacDonald, and with
my appointment as superintendent of the campus and principal of the School for
the Deaf, Mrs. D. Corrigan was appointed principal of the School for the Blind.
The duties of this position involve the sole responsibility for the education of the
blind. Mr. C. D. Rose was appointed vice-principal of the School for the Deaf,
succeeding me in this position. The appointment of a principal of the School for
the Blind is in keeping with the concept of a two-school campus with two principals.
I wish to acknowledge with grateful thanks the co-operation of the Advisory
Board and the loyal support of the staff in this my first year.
 Learning arithmetic, School for the Blind, Jericho Hill, Vancouver.
 G 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF
EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF EDWARD A. KILLOUGH, B.Ed., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual record for each person, including teaching service. The following chart shows
developments in the past 10 years, and indicates that the number of individual service records to be maintained has increased by approximately 98 per cent in this
period.
1 	
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
2a 	
10,119
10,856
11,547
12,148
12,815
13,624
14,470
15,263
16,281
17,575
19,075
2b	
297
332
369
327
254
336
376
359
360
448
434
2c	
637
737
691
601
667
809
846
883
1,018
1,294
1,500
2d   	
6.7
7.3
6.4
5.2
5.5
6.3
6.2
6.1
6.7
7.9
8.5
3 a	
1,165
1,270
1,357
1,356
1,503
1,562
1,715
1,757
2,061
2,146
2,571
3b	
12.3
12.6
12.5
11.7
12.4
12.2
12.6
12.1
13.4
13.2
14.6
4	
313
348
388
317
385
418
404
350
481
442
556
5a..„	
1,802
2,007
2,048
1,957
2,170
2,371
2,561
2,640
3,079
3,440
4,071
5b	
19.0
19.8
19.0
16.9
17.9
18.5
18.8
18.3
20.2
21.1
23.2
1. School-year.
2a. Teachers employed as at October, from district nominal rolls. Up to 1963/64 inclusive the regular staff
of the Vancouver Vocational Institute and Vancouver School of Art are included. These are omitted in later
figures. If included for 1964/65 the figures would be: 2a, 15,359; 2b, 389; 2c, 889; 5a, 2,646. Figures include
supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates or letters of permission for lack of qualifications, or qualified but
over age, included in 2a.   A change in age regulations occurred for 1966/67 and continued thereafter.
2c. Increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of year
shown; that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4. Numbers who left positions during the school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
In 1967/68 there was a significant change in the number of temporary certificates or letters of permission issued. Many of these persons so employed had undertaken a year of teacher-training but had not qualified fully for certification. The
number of teachers employed rose significantly. There was an increase in drop-outs,
and these two factors led to an increased demand for teachers.
II. Letters of permission and temporary certificates, 1959/60 to 1967/68,
were as follows:—
Year
Total
In
Public
Schools
Year
Total
In
Public
Schools
1959/60.        	
1960/61      	
1961/62   ..     -
369
327
254
336
376
335
285
228
312
345
1964/65	
1965/66  -
1966/67	
1967/68       	
389
359
360
448
1962/63
434
1963/64 _ .
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G 115
In 1963/64, of the 345 in regular public schools, 10 were temporary elementary certificates (E-C) because of age and 6 were temporary secondary certificates
(P-C), leaving 329 letters of permission. In 1964/65, of the 359 in regular public
schools, 7 were temporary elementary certificates and 5 were temporary secondary
certificates, leaving 347 letters of permission, of which 216 were E-T and 131 were
S-T with degree qualifications. Figures for 1965/66 were generally similar. In
1966/67 there were 271 E-T, 156 S-T, 5 temporary E-C, 2 temporary P-C, and
14 V-C. In 1967/68 there were 229 E-T, 191 S-T, 2 temporary E-C, 2 temporary
P-C, and 10 V-C.
III. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year courses for graduates at the university.
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since
1956/57 such training has been in the Faculties of Education of the universities and
enrolment figures are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-training programme as enrolments cover all years of training. The following charts,
however, covering some 19 years, permit of useful comparisons.
1949/50
1950/51
1951/52
1952/53
1953/54
1954/55
1955/56
M.
F.|
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
la	
175
109
54
338
152
96
44
292
36
259
128
423
32
249
117
398
211
368
182
761
184
345
161
690
_
170
124
79
473
137
110
66
313
9
2
2
13
300
35
251
162
448
30
239
149
418
2
2
6
10
408
205
375
241
821
167
349
215
731
11
4
8
23
708
102
108
33
243
88
96
24
208
13
10
23
184
39
228
136
403
35
214
124
373
2
12
1
15
358
141
336
169
646
123
310
148
581
15
22
1
38
543
77
116
48
241
67
102
44
213
5
3
1
9
204
35
284
156
475
35
271
149
455
1
6
3
10
445
112
400
204
716
102
373
193
668
6
9
4
19
649
86
114
40
240
71
100
37
208
8
5
1
14
194
22
219
125
366
20
206
119
345
13
4
17
328
108
333
165
606
91
306
156
553
8
18
5
31
522
91
204
90
385
74
185
83
342
2
2
4
338
22
342
155
519
17
322
150
489
8
3
11
478
113
546
245
904
91
507
233
831
2
10
3
15
816
72
196
99
367
55
177
93
325
3
12
6
21
304
50
393
228
671
44
369
222
635
2
11
6
19
616
122
lb
lc	
ld  	
2a  .  	
2b	
2c	
589
327
1,038
99
546
315
2d 	
3a         ,,,,.,
960
5
23
3 c
12
3d. 	
40
4 	
920
References:   M.=male;   F.=female; T.=total;  a=University of British Columbia;  b=Vancouver Normal;
c=Victoria Normal.
1. Enrolments in teacher-training as at October.
2. Number graduating as at June of the school-year, available for September following.
3. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were not teaching in November following.   Some
entered teaching in later years.
4. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were teaching in November following;   that is,
supply from training institutions.
Note.—Figures are for the University of British Columbia and University of
Victoria only through the following Sections III, IV, V, and VI.
 G 116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
1964/65
M.   F.    T.
1965/66
M.   F,
1966/67
M.
T.
1967/68
M.
la..
lb.
lc...
2a..
2b_
2c_
3a..
3b.
3c...
4a_
4b_
4c._
5a..
5b-
5c...
766
985
1,353
378
410
523
1,144
1,395
1,876
549
716
967
131
135
177
630
851
1,144
487
657
835
120
119
199
607
776
1,034
(?)
589
787
(?)
16
46
525
605
833
(?)
46
99
(?)
125
114
(?)
171
213
1,635
666
2,301
1,149
200
1,349
1,026
216
1,242
893
47
940
145
186
331
2,006
798
2,804
1,416
257
1,673
1,258
266
1,524
1,009
57
1,066
154
326
480
2,127
855
2,982
1,506
266
1,772
1,371
284
1,655
1,019
63
1,082
181
421
602
2,021
957
2,978
1,451
285
1,736
1,417
316
1,733
1,056
40
1,096
193
473
666
2,234
1,172
3,406
1,664
328
1,992
1,594
329
1,923
1,085
35
1,120
179
651
830
432
12
444
100
134
234
2,429
1,297
3,726
1,793
409
2,192
1,725
378
2,103
1,202
28
1,230
304
603
907
2,382
1,318
3,700
1,846
377
2,223
1,729
453
2,182
1,210
33
1,243
228
719
947
2,426
1,321
3,747
1,859
426
2,285
1,691
388
2,079
1,163
27
1,190
283
626
909
2,543
1,480
4,023
1,890
488
2,378
References:   M.=male;   F.=female;   T.=total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in all years; (a) elementary training, (b) secondary training, (c) total.
Additional persons from Simon Fraser University and Notre Dame were trained and entered teaching. See
Tables VII, VIII, and IX.
2. Enrolled in training programmes likely leading to a certificate at end of year. The discrepancy between
the total of 3c and totals of 4c plus 5c arise from the fact that some not included in 3c passed further work
to be included in 4c plus 5c. Until 1964/65 University of Victoria students were included in elementary training
above although some were secondary.   The distortion is relatively small.
3. Listed by training-college at close of year, and teaching considered likely (includes those who may be
considered for temporary certificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and a
limited number of special cases)—prior to summer session and supplementals.
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training;
(a) numbers with regular certificates, (b) numbers with temporary certificates, (c) total—after summer session
and supplementals.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3; (a) not teaching as at November but certificates issued, (b) not
teaching and no certificate issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
IV. The following table shows the certificate classifications awarded those in
the training-college in the year shown who were teaching in November of the year
following; that is, actual supply from the training-college. Note that E-C supply
dropped from 211 in 1959 to 26 in 1967, E-B supply is now somewhat lower, and
E-A supply rose from 68 to 316 in 1966, but is 301 in 1967. Similarly, P-C rose
from 58 to 210 in 1966, 200 in 1967, and P-B from 155 to 366. (These figures
include certificated teachers who may have left teaching to return for further winter-
session training in the Faculty of Education in the year shown.) The supply obtained from these teacher-education institutions in 1967 dropped somewhat from
the past two years.   Demand has risen significantly in recent years.
Certificate
»N
"*-.
VO
o\
OS
**
rH
53
40
129
99
435
357
132
199
10
4
1964/65
M. [   F.  I   T.
I I
1965/66
M.
I
1966/67
M.  I   F.
E-T-
E-C.
E-B
E-A.
S-T...
P-C.
P-B...
P-A.
Totals.
45
211|
2921
68|
11
58|
155 j
31
833
44
186
387
101
3
55|
155|
9\
48
187
438
79
9
92
206
7
28
73
300
271
84|   133|   138
234j   256|   285
5[       8|       7
6
16
22
46
61
236
59
234
6
67
120
22
68
297
293
6
187
221[   1311   352
2|       3|
I
9| 24
101 28
78j 227
731 243
7
671 143
223| 106
4! 1
33
38
| 305
' 316
' 7
| 210
329
5
9
23
232
260
8j       5
49|   151
238    128
3        2
14
26
265
301
13
200
366
5
940| 1,066
I	
1,082|1,096|1,120
I I
444    786|1,230
471|   772
I !
1,243
380|   81011,190
J
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G  117
V. The following chart shows the certificate classification of those in these
training institutions in the years shown who were not teaching in November following. E-T and S-T indicate that had the individual taught, a letter of permission
would have been required. The figures do not include those who would not have
received a certificate or been considered for a letter of permission, nor those in programmes not normally leading to certification; for example, first-year elementary,
various years secondary. Note that the numbers of persons eligible for a certificate
who did not enter teaching the September following rose from 201 in 1959 to 799
in 1966 and 779 in 1967, and that in the same period the level of certificate classification of those individuals rose significantly. In part, the figures reflect the decision of trainees to undertake extended training for higher qualifications before commencing teaching and changes in programmes of the universities. The process is
aggravating numerical supply in terms of demand but may be creating a pool of
longer-trained persons who may be expected to enter teaching within the next year
or two, thereby increasing numerical supply and quality supply. However, in 1967,
of 727 persons qualified with P-C or higher certification, 156 did not teach (21.5
per cent). Eighty-nine of these hold P-B or higher certification. Similar situations
pertained in 1965 and 1966 but the percentage is increasing.
Certificate
o\
in
s
CO
m
o
_>
^H.
Os
*r>
Os
_
o
_
Os
so
_
Os
_
s.
_
SD
m
so
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1   1
M. 1 F.  T.
1
1   1
M. 1 F. 1 T.
1   1
M.
F.  T.
e-t..	
E-C	
E-B     	
11
56
81
30
1
10
23
1
95
58
83
49
4
18
23
1
128
98
157
48
7
16
26
141
130
196
73
9
19
34
130
141
225
105
7
28
29
144
169
300
115
13
40
48
1
35
39
68
40
4
17
30
1
79
119
295
120
3
22
33
2
114
158
363
160
7
39
63
3
26
32
61
47
8
15
35
1
107
110
313
129
7
28
28
133
142
374
176
15
43
63
1
24
13
41
39
14
24
46
2
88
89
296
145
4
43
38
3
112
102
337
E-A          	
184
S-T
18
P-C         	
67
P-B 	
84
P-4
5
213
201
331 | 480
232 | 345
602
452
666
529
830
673
234
195
673
591
907
786
225
191
722
608
947
799
203
165
706
614
909
Total <
sligible certificates 	
Total E-T, S-T. _
779
12
99 1 135
150 I 137
157
39
82
121
34 1 114 ! 148
38 1 92 1 130
VI. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from these training
institutions as a percentage of demand:—
S
la.
lb.
2_
3a...
3b..
960 607
920 525
1,860 I 1,802
51.6 j 33.7
49.5 | 29.1
I
I
776 1,034
605 j 833
2,007 | 2,048
38.7 [ 50.5
29.9 40.7
1,242     1,524
940 [ 1,066
1,957
63.5
48.0
2,170
70.2
49.1
I
1,655
1,082
2,371
69.8
45.6
1,733
1,096
2,561
67.7
42.8
1,923
1,120
2,646
65.5
42.3
2,103 2,182 2,079
1,230 j 1,243 | 1,190
3,079 j 3,440 1 4,071
68.3 [ 63.4 | 51.1
39.9 | 36.1 | 29.2
la. Numbers in training-college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training-college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training-college in June as a percentage of demand;   that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training-college who taught, as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of
2—actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
 G 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
VII. The following tables show the numbers of those who completed successfully the Professional Development Programme (teacher education) at Simon
Fraser University and the certificates for which they were qualified as at November following.
(a) Numbers Teaching as at November Following
Certificate
August,
1966
December,
1966
April,
1967
August,
1967
Totals,
1966/67
M.
1
F. 1 T.
M.
F.
T.
M. 1 F.
1
T.
M. 1 F.     T.
1        1
E-T	
10
i     i
1 l
2 12
5
4
12
1
4
4
12
1
9
2
1
2
10
28
1
12
28
1
3
9
4
12
21
10
1
4
30
14
1
16
E-C	
E-B  	
46
E-A  	
S-T	
54
P-C 	
3
P-B	
28
PA 	
.... | _..
....  |  __
Totals.         	
10
4
14
5
21
26
5
39
44
25
36  1  61
131
(£>) Numbers Not Teaching as at November Following
E-T                  -	
1
1
::::
....
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
2
5
....
1
2
2
8
1
1
9
3
3
1
2
2
13
5
1
14
7
3
E-C              	
E-B 	
26
E-A
12
S-T 	
P-C   ..                -	
P-B                               	
11
P-A...
Totals	
1
1
2
4
6
10
5
10
15
5
19
24
49
VIII. The following tables show the numbers of those listed by Notre Dame
University who undertook teacher education leading to certification. The figures are
not complete because of a variation in the system of reporting.
(a)  Numbers Teaching in Public Schools as at November Following
Certificate
1965/66
1966/67
M.
F
T.
M.
F.
T.
EX.-	
1      i
4
2
2
8
3
12
2
2
1
3     '
~5
E-C   	
E-B—  -
7
E-A	
1
S-T  ...	
P-C  	
P-B..                  .     —              	
3
P-A  	
	
Totals	
	
7
10
17
6
5
11
(b) Numbers Not Teaching in Public Schools as at November Following
P.T
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
8
2
1
1
E-C._.
i       1
E-B	
10
E-A —	
2
S-T  	
P-C 	
1
P-B __	
P-A
Totals  _	
1     '
6
7
2
13
15
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G  119
IX. The supply of teachers from the training institutions of the Universities of
British Columbia, Victoria, and Simon Fraser, as calculated from the lists provided
by these institutions, is shown below. Figures for Notre Dame are not included,
but represent less than 1 per cent of the demand. Figures prior to 1966/67 include
only the Universities of British Columbia and Victoria.
—
(N
tn
VO
t-
CO
SO
so
VO
VD
VO
■**■-.
"--,
CJ
VO
t—
VO
vo
VO
VO
as
ON
Os
as
as
1—1
1-1
*H
'""'
*~*
1-1
•H
1 -
920
525
605
833
940
1,066
1,082
1,096
1,120
1,230
1,257
1,321
2 	
1,860
1,802
2,007
2,048
1,957
2,170
2,371
2,561
2,646
3,079
3,440
4,071
3   ...
49.5
29.1
29.9
40.7
48.0
49.1
45.6
42.8
42.3
39.9
36.5
32.4
1. Numbers in training institutions listed for previous training-year actually teaching in October of school-
year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous;   that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements during the school-year.
3. Numbers from training institutions who taught,  as a percentage of demand;   that is,  actual training-
institution supply as a percentage of demand.
Teacher Recruitment in the United Kingdom
A District Superintendent of Schools (District No. 57) proceeded overseas
to carry out recruitment in the United Kingdom in 1966. In 1967 arrangements
were made for a District Superintendent, accompanied by a Vancouver superintendent to recruit similarly.
School Boards are encouraged to list the number of specific positions available.
(1) These lists are used by the interviewing officers, who offer appointment
direct to one of these positions.
On return from the United Kingdom, the interviewing officers provided
the Registrar with a list of suitable persons interviewed for whom appointments had not been made. This special listing was circulated to
District Superintendents and Boards in order that direct negotiations and
appointments might be made.
A number of other individuals worked independently of the interviewing
officers, and in many cases came direct to the Province or were appointed
direct by Boards, although negotiations commenced under the recruitment
plan.
The chart below indicates these refinements of recent years. Figures for official United Kingdom recruitment are as follows:—
(2)
(3)
Certificate
vO
tn
in
in
Ov
r-
m
vo
m
Os
00
in
r-
m
Os
ON
in
"■--.
oo
m
as
o
VO
*->
Os
m
as
VD
"V
O
VO
Ov
(N
VO
vo
ON
cn
VO
--.
<N
SO
ON
SD
rr,
SD
Os
SD
SD
OS
SD
so
-Hh
in
SO
Os
t-H
SO
"Hh
SD
SO
Os
00
SD
t-
SD
OS
Elementary certificates—
By interviewing officer 	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
20
21
21
20
12
43
23
49
72
16
60
Independent 	
Totals	
21
30
48
61
33
35
20
19
32
41
53
115
148
Secondary certificates—
—
	
—
—
—
	
—
14
14
21
5
7
21
13
18
35
3
Independent.-	
12
Totals.....
41
35
33
30
35
27
9
15
14
28
33
52
50
Grand totals	
62
65
81
91
68
62
29
34
46
69
86
167
198
In addition to the above group, an indefinite number of teachers from the
United Kingdom proceed annually to this Province.
 G 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
Teacher Exchange
Teacher-exchange applications proceed through the Registrar's office. The
number of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange positions available. In 1967/68, as a special Centennial project, encouragement was given to interprovincial exchange between English-speaking and French-
speaking teachers. Nine individuals from British Columbia undertook such an
exchange. This project is being continued for 1968/69. Exchanges in recent years
were as follows:—
m
vO
m
as
CO
m
t-
m
as
Ov
<n
"*%
CO
m
ON
o
VO
ON
m
Os
vo
--H.
o
vo
ON
vO
vo
ON
cn
vo
v.
*N
VO
Os
<*
vO
rn
vO
Ov
tn
VO
•<*
vO
Os
so
vo
"V
in
vo
Os
_-•
VO
VO
vo
ON
CO
VD
rr-
vo
Ov
22
4
5
I
23         26
1           2
1    |      1
26
2
28
1
1
23
1
1
22
1
22
1
23
20
2
24
2
25
Interprovincial   _
Elsewhere    ..
10
1
Totals       	
31
25    |    29
1
28
30
25
23
23
23
22
26
36
Division of Examinations
Again this year, school students required to write Grade XII Departmental
examinations received final standing based on the average of a mark assigned by
the school plus the mark earned on the regular Departmental examination, each of
equal weighting. Grade XII students writing for scholarship purposes were required to write examinations in their two best subjects. These scholarship examinations consisted of the regular examination plus a special scholarship section, each
of equal weighting. Until the end of the school-year 1964/65, there was an annual
increase in examination candidates registered with the Division.
The following two years saw the phasing-out of former University Programme
Departmental examinations at the Grades XI-XII level, and introduction of new
Academic-Technical Programme requirements characterized by fewer examinations. Consequently, although 1967/68 brought a significant increase both in
the number of students registered for and the number completing Grade XII
academic programme, a reduction from 25 to 11 in the number of examinable
Grades XI—XII courses accounts for a decrease in papers marked in 1967/68.
The number of Grade XII candidates writing scholarship examinations again increased this year.
Number of Markers
Os
m
"h,
OO
H-l
Os
o
SO
OS
V.
Os
so
o
SO
OS
r-l
SD
SD
OS
ro
SD
—.
Ch
SD
Os
*H*
SO
m
SO
Os
SD
^s
Hfr
SD
OS
so
SD
V.
SD
Os
SO
so
SD
Os
00
SO
*Hh
rn
SO
Os
290
48
301
50
343
61
395
61
439
19
511
16
562
15
519
15
344
11
300
August.. - 	
16
Totals 	
338
351
404
456
458
527
577
534
355
316
Nw
nber o
f Cand
idates
(June)
Grade XII  	
Grade XIII     	
14,933
2,204
16,786
2,673
19,113
3,253
20,103
3,597
22,411
4,044
25,793
4,157
28,246
4,792
18,586
3,068
21,952
2,784
17,470
2,016
Totals	
17,137
19,459
22,366
23,700
26,455
29,950
33,038
21,654
24,736
19,486
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS G 121
Number Completed in June
ON
in
00
Os
o
vo
--.
as
m
Os
VO
©
VD
ON
3
vO
VD
ON
cn
vo
VD
Ov
■tf
VO
*»,
rn
VD
Os
m
vo
*-,
VD
ON
vo
vo
--.
«n
vo
ON
r-
vD
vo
VD
ON
OO
VO
r-
as
Grade XII -	
4,215
464
4,720
587
5,651
620
5,779
659
6,827
840
7,840
S09
9,490
936
9,870
733
10,722
602
11,448
Grade XIII_ _	
470
Totals	
4,679
5,307
6,271
6,438
7,667
8,649
10,426
10,603
11,324
11,918
Papers
Marked in June
Grade XIIi
1          1          |
1
4,927 |    5,466
Grade XII	
36,236 1 41,963  | 46,227 | 49,318
8,055 [    9,751 | 11,974 | 13,812
54,488
15.649
62,654
15.995
60,333
18.825
38,919
12.278
24,676 | 21,955
Grade XIII	
10.534 1    8.813
Totals 	
44,291 | 51,714 | 58,201
1               1
63,130
70,137 | 78,649 | 79,158
1               I
51,197 I 40,137 | 36,234
1               1
1 Scholarship section.
Papers Marked in August
Grade XII   .
6,844
1,727
8,931
1,869
9,236
2,489
8,569
2,192
1
1,226 |
Grade XIII  	
1,943
2,018
2,181
961
776
Totals	
8,571
10,800
11,725
10,761
1,943
2,018
2,181
1,226 |
1
961
776
Number of Candidates (August)
Grade XII   	
i
4,178 |
1,164 j
5,985 1
1,262 |
6,245
1,537
5,878
1,434
      	
1,556
1               1
....    ...       1 	
Grade XIII
1,315 1
1,352
909
658 |
528
Totals 	
5,342 |
1
7,247 |
1
7,782
7,312
1,315  1
1
1,352
1,556
909
658 |
1
528
Number Completed in August
Grade XII 	
1
534 |
132 1
1
882 |       993
161  |       210
712
172
189
1
      	
Grade XIII	
219
267
202 |
87
67
Totals 	
666  |
1
1,043 |    1,203
1
884
189 |       219
1
267
202 |
1
87
67
Total Grade XII and Grade XIII papers for June and August, 1953/54, to the
present were as follows: 1953/54,27,943; 1954/55,30,894; 1955/56,32,255;
1956/57, 35,460; 1957/58, 43,184; 1958/59, 52,862; 1959/60, 62,514;
1960/61, 69,926; 1961/62, 73,891; 1962/63, 72,080 (with University Programme August examination discontinued); 1963/64, 80,667; 1964/65, 81,339
(with reduction resulting from only a single paper in English 40); 1965/66,
52,423 (with Grade XI starting to disappear and Vancouver City College reducing
Grade XIII; 1966/67, 41,098 (with major decline in numbers of papers reflected
as a result of the reduced number of Grade XII examinations applicable to the
new Academic-Technical Programme, and continuing reduction in Grade XIII
enrolment resulting from Vancouver City College and Selkirk College registrations); 1967/68, 37,014 (with disappearance of all former Grades XI-XII University Programme examinations).
For 1967/68, examinations were prepared for June for those working on the
new Academic-Technical Programme covering 11 subjects, and for June and August
in 20 Grade XIII subjects. In June, 1968, 77 regular and special examination
centres were established in the Province and 20 outside British Columbia, with the
farthest-removed centres being in Ecuador, Germany, and France.
 G 122
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
Scholarship Awards
The top-ranking scholarship candidates for 1967/68 on Departmental examinations appear below in academic order. The Grade XII averages are based on
the candidate's two best subjects, with the standing obtained on the regular examination and special scholarship section being averaged. For Grade XIII, averages
comprise marks on Grade XIII English and four other subjects.
Name
Grade XII
Kent Montgomery Brothers (winner of the Governor-General's Silver Medal)  	
Geraldine Ann Bergen1  -—
Patricia Joan Cockell1  	
Robert Clifford Bruce Steacyi..
Norma Jean Broderick 	
OwenHertzman	
Frederick Matthew Irvine-
Peter James Martin	
Paul William Whaley	
Douglas Lynn Caldbeck—
David Douglas Lemon	
Eric Arthur Parkinson	
John Scott Whittaker	
Grade XIII
Barbara Lynn Martin..
Frederick Lochousky...
Elaine Fretz	
School
J. Lloyd Crowe Secondary 	
J. Lloyd Crowe Secondary 	
Delbrook Senior Secondary	
Courtenay District Senior Secondary
Carson Graham Senior Secondary	
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary	
J. Lloyd Crowe Secondary 	
Prince of Wales Secondary	
Princess Margaret Senior Secondary-
John Oliver Secondary	
Lord Byng Secondary  _
New Westminster Secondary 	
Cowichan Senior Secondary  	
Semiahmoo Senior Secondary	
Institute of Adult Studies	
Salmon Arm Senior Secondary 	
Per Cent
95.00
94.50
93.75
93.50
93.50
93.50
93.50
93.25
93.25
93.25
93.25
89.10
87.20
85.40
1 Winner of the Governor-General's Bronze Medal.
Financial Assistance
1. The Provincial Government continued its programme of scholarship assistance to students proceeding with appropriate post-secondary education at the universities, colleges, British Columbia Institute of Technology, and Grade XIII,
with awards going also to those competing in the Grade XII examinations. Again
this year, approval was given to the winning of an award on the basis of competition on completion of a semester of study at those institutions on a semester system, with payment to be made for taking a further appropriate semester. The
regular full-year competition remained for other institutions. Competitions, therefore, occur three times a year, and data for 1968 will not be complete until the
close of the 1968 year. First-class awards were valued at two-thirds the tuition
fee of the next period of study; second-class awards were of two types, with upper
second-class awards representing one-half the tuition fee, and lower second-class
awards one-third such fee. Approximately one-half the second-class awards were
of upper value and one-half lower. An average of 70 per cent continued to be
the minimum requirement for second-class awards.
Candidates writing Grade XII or Grade XIII examinations apply through
the Division of Examinations, and university and college students through their
respective institutions. All applications are then considered by the Scholarship
Selection Committee, representative of, the public universities of British Columbia
and the Department of Education, chaired by the Registrar. Notification to all
candidates is made from the Registrar's office.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
G 123
Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based
on applications received:—
Original Applications
Final Awards
Examination-year
Number
Received
Eligible
First
Class
Second
Class
Total
First
Class
Second
Class
Amount
1958/59.	
2,703
1,860
552
1,308
1,782
531
1,251
$229,175
1959/60...	
3,466
2,300
635
1,665
2,192
612
1,580
276,513
1960/61	
4,223
2,557
703
1,854
2,437
677
1,760
304,117
1961/62 	
4,488
2,871
771
2,100
2,727
739
1,988
336,472
1962/63__	
4,929
3,210
896
2,314
3,067
870
2,197
383,479
1963/64	
5,647
3,464
931
2,533
3,339
898
2,441
474,513
1964/65	
6,008
3,893
1,064
2,829
3,783
1,037
2,746
621,483
1965/66	
6,511
4,701
1,286
3,415
4,568
1,261
3,307
753,190
1966/67	
10,480
6,929
2,174
4,755
6,763
2,164
4,599
1,361,111
Grade XII Examinations
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
1965/66
1966/67
1967/68
First class (80 to 100
268
337
271
298
492
403
313
554
506
354
550
383
399
557
458
393
631
539
552
636
595
534
605
502
959
786
595
954
Second   class   (70   to
79.9 per cent)	
894
666
Total applications
876
1,193
1,373
1,287
1,414
1,563
1,783
1,641
2,340
2,514
Grade XIII Examinations
First class (80 to 100
per cent) 	
Second class (70 to
79.9 per cent)	
26
104
37
133
1
1
33    j       37
1
169          213
271    |     279
51
173
261
54
186
297
46
207
347
37
219
253
43
159
20
103
Ineligible	
100    |     170
225    |     153
Total applications
230    |     340
1
473    |     529
1
485    |     537
I
600
509    |     427    |     276
1
To assist local school authorities, complete tabulations showing schools concerned and final academic averages obtained by all Provincial Grade XII and Grade
XIII scholarship candidates were provided to the District Superintendent of Schools.
II. The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Government, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake
further training. An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of
financial need. Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken. This
year it proved possible to increase significantly the amount of both minimum bursary awards and average bursary awards so that awards varied from $120 to
$400 (compared with $50 to $400 previously), depending on academic standing and need, with most awards in the range of $120 to $160 (compared with $70
to $120 previously). These awards may be made available to those undertaking
undergraduate university and college studies within the Province (Universities of
British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser, and Notre Dame, and Selkirk College
and Vancouver City College), recognized nurse's training in the Province, and for
recognized university study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses of
training not available in this Province; for example, veterinary science. All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and Bursary Selection
Committees, representative of the universities and chaired by the Registrar, recommend awards.    Responsibility for final decision on awards and general bursary
 G 124
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
policy rests with the British Columbia Student Aid Committee, chaired by the
Assistant Superintendent (University and College Affairs). Notification to all
candidates is made from this office, with cheques issued through the Departmental
Comptroller.
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the deadline. A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
Original Applications
Final Awards
Year
Number
Received
Eligible
Number
Amount
1959	
821
1,071
1,395
1,426
1,886
2,411
3,057
3,863
4.772
693
904
1,171
1,199
1,619
1,966
2,501
3,184
T950
653
865
1,125
1,168
1,574
1,924
2,439
3,088
3,937
$82,650
1960                     _   .
1«61
113,465
133,145
1962
140,285
1963                                   	
19fi4
152,680
190,725
1965
231,815
1966 	
19671
296,560
474,194
19K82
5.728                   4.779
1
1 Exclusive of seven special awards (veterinary science) totalling $19,100.
2 Exclusive of 14 special awards (veterinary science) totalling $38,500.
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting. Cadet awards have been made to the National Cadet Camp, to
the annual Cadet Trades Training Camp at Vernon, for cadet rifle-shooting competition, and to British Columbia cadets attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district super-
intendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the
schools showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These
awards were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained
by the winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value. Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings, five on 1959/60,
six on 1960/61, five on 1961/62, five on 1962/63, five on 1963/64, six on
1964/65, six on 1965/66, eight on 1966/67, and eight on 1967/68.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers
the moneys received and consists of military representatives and representatives of
the Department of Education. The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local
Committee, for some years and is British Columbia's representative on the Executive Council, Strathcona Trust Fund.
Certification of Professional Librarians
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective in November, 1954. The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for
Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates
authorized. Since new regulations were introduced, the numbers of certificates
issued were as follows: 1955, 57; 1956, 62; 1957, 16; 1958, 18; 1959, 10;
1960, 17; 1961, 10; 1962, 40; 1963, 7; 1964, 30; 1965, 30; 1966, 46;
1967, 39.
 EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT G 125
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. VERNA KINGSLEY, SECRETARY TO
THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1967/68 a total of 425 applications was considered
by the Commission. Of these, 118 were turned down, the chief reason being that
family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes. For
the first payment of the grant, 307 students were eligible; for the second payment
of the grant, 285 applications were approved. Of the 22 students who became
ineligible for the second payment, 20 had withdrawn from school and 2 were
turned down for insufficient attendance.
The students who were eligible for the second payment of the grant were distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 73; Grade X, 78; Grade XI, 61; Grade
XII, 73.
The students in the greatest financial need received $114.20 for the year; the
balance received $99.20.
  STATISTICAL RETURNS
 G 128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
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PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
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  G 146
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
tal
Boys
847
414
198
97
300
153
24
13'
53
25
287
137
12
7
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 1 (Fernie)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—-Fernie..
Elementary Junior-Secondary—Jaffray-
Elementary—
Isabella Dicken	
Elko   __ __
Grasmere   	
Sparwood   _
Waldo_.   	
Totals, District No. 1_
District No. 2 (Cranbrook)
Secondary—Mount Baker	
Junior Secondary—Laurie	
Elementary—
Muriel Baxter	
Cranbrook Central..
Moyie  	
T. M. Roberts	
Tenth Avenue	
Amy Woodland	
Totals, District No. 2..
District No. 3 (Kimberley)
Secondary—Selkirk-
Junior Secondary—McKim.
Elementary—
Blarchmont	
Chapman Camp..
Lindsay Park	
Marysville	
Meadowbrook	
Ta Ta Creek	
Wasa 	
A. A. Watkins..
Totals, District No. 3_
District No. 4 (Windermere)
Secondary—David Thompson	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Canal Flats	
Edgewater 	
Elementary—
Brisco	
Galena	
Invermere	
J. Alfred Laird..
Radium	
Wilmer 	
Windermere..
Totals, District No. 4	
District No. 7 (Nelson)
Secondary—L. V. Rogers	
Junior Secondary—Trafalgar.	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Salmo..
Elementary—
Balfour	
Blewett 	
A. I. Collinson_
Harold Lakes	
Hume	
Nelson Central..
North Shore	
Procter	
Rosemont	
Salmo   . 	
South Nelson„
433
101
147
11
28
150
5
58
28
21
65
6
10
311
2
17
94
5
14
44
1
10
73
2
7
30
6
1,721
846 |       875
86
135
175
128
796
358
160
627
18
529
365
528
419
187
89
320
7
277
200
277
377
171'
71
307
11
252
165
251
64
62
127
19
65
4
63
44
64
26
69
6
56
71
66
3,3'81 | 1,776 |. 1,605
253
408
567
251
113
148
204
76
24
23
580
222
297
127
52
80
102
47
13
13
291
186
270
124
61
68
102'
29
11
10
289
	
	
34
37
58
18
20
11
64
34
50
30
I  26
23
8
9
9
6
10
8
7
6
10
36
53
50
394
1,244
339
179
121
63
142
76
19
1   13
14
9
261
134
117
57
46
29
37
15
75
38
1,150
160
58
66
6
5
127
60
17
22
37
203'
195
219
i  28
17
17
11
13
)  13
6
6
2
3
6
	
34
i  22
26
25
23
18
7
/   9
10
11
11
6
12
17
16
1,171 |  613 |
558
634
655
268
34
167
131
28
517
474
111
85
193
352
361
344
337
136
15
90
64
20
259
245
57
42
109
188
196
290
318
132
19
77
67
8
258
229
54
43
84
164
165
56
61
32
37
45
—
	
7
7
18
18
5
6
58
51
47
60
13
19
9
7
33
28
59
41
36
39
4
23
19
5
68
53
13
19
22
52
59
10
10
283 |  259 |  294 |
27
"27"
12
4
16
137 1  124 [i  108 |
13
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 147
ENROLMENT
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
XIII
Special
1
2
3
74
72
66
93
9
4
7
105
107
103
114
93
21
13
20
21
 —
	
	
24
26
25
7
8
30
4
3
33
11 i
36
..___
--
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
3
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
140
128 \     133
169
9 |,        4 |         7 |   	
129
133
128
114
93 |   	
5
13
8
192
226
208
144
	
17
	
237
104
	
	
23
26
34
65
2
75
34
74
73
66
141
21   :
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
70
73
76
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
69
115
74
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
273 |c    238
288
291
38
5
13 I         8
237
■    296
226
208
144 f   	
60
189
159
	
	
 ■
	
16
15
9
179
202
146
46
41
35
20
26
18
	
	
25
3-
28
~~28
'
20
12
18
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
90
~~81
84
172
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
201  |     192 ]     183
i    200
10 |       16 |i      15 |         9
179
202 '
'    206
189
159 |,   _ _
,
10
12
7
74
62
82
51 I
41
12
7
:       9
13
13
5
15
5
1
31
13
15
32
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13
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4
26
68
54
	
	
	
	
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6
15
9
5
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15
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114 |       92
97
99
13
10
12
7
104
80
i      82
51
'      41 |
i
'
i    193'
237
2041
	
	
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16
|      10
8
302
1    267
52'
	
	
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6
1
62
48
46
36
13
	
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6
4
1
20
22
25
29
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4
60
17
5
61
1      23
3
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36
	
	
	
	
	
	
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70
69
57
i      57
	
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15
11
12
28
	
	
	
13
19
18
	
	
	
	
26
17
18
17
	
39
63
61
	
	
	
	
29
37
52
34
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
■	
 G 148
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 7 (Nelson)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
W. E. Wasson   	
Willow Point	
Ymir	
Totals, District No. 7_
District No. 8 (Slocan)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
W. E. Graham 	
Lucerne	
Mount Sentinel ...
Elementary—
Appledale	
Crescent Valley-
New Denver—_
Passmore	
Perry Siding-
Silverton	
Slocan	
Slocan Part-
South Slocan..
Vallican	
Winlaw	
Totals, District No. 8~
District No. 9 (Castlegar)
Secondary—Stanley Humphries	
Junior Secondary—Kinnaird 	
Elementary—
Blueberry Creek — _	
Brilliant 	
Castlegar	
Kinnaird	
Ootischenia.
Pass Creek—
Robson .
Shoreacres	
Tarrys	
Twin Rivers	
Valley Vista	
Woodland Park_
Totals, District No. 9_
District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
Secondary—Nakusp_
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Needles.
Elementary-
Burton	
Edgewood 	
Glenbank  —
Nakusp   	
Totals, District No. 10-
District No. 11 (Trail)
Secondary—
J. Lloyd Crowe 	
Rossland  	
Junior Secondary—Trail  	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Fruitvale..
Elementary—■
Beaver Falls      	
Cook	
Genelle	
Glenmerry..
MacLean—.
Montrose	
Laura J. Morrish_
Sunningdale	
27
33
47
12
15
28
117
2,157
129
63
132
69
176
97
27
11
108
62
95
52
20
12
19
13
52
26
76
42
48
23
48
28
17
8
49
29
1,960
66
63
79
16
46
43
8
6
26
34
25
20
9
20
996
535
831
403
265
135
83
50
51
37
169
80
404
210
50
23
40
20
227
107
39
17
162
75
395
215
74
38
165
88
428
130
33
14
89
194
27
20
120
22
87
180
36
77
2,955 |,   1,498 |    1,457
223
116
41
24
64
34
70
43
185
96
343
167
107
17
30
27
89
176
926
480 |
1,125
588
456
223
636
334 i
736
410
20
8
270
142
43
27 '
299
146 i
379
191
267
135
559
294
190
109
446
537
233
302
326
12
128
16
153
188
132
265
81
258 |     309
26
25
15
14
18
1
22
4
10
303f351
12
30
"io
4
26
14
7
15
24
10
26
14
98
103  |
89
	
	
15
20
ii
74
27
30
13
8
9
6
44
46
12
5
27
22
42
32
22
19
10
25
60
"33
294 \    262 I     295
56
20
17
30
53
11
21
33
36
15
9
25
44
56 |.     120 I     101  I
93
_
	
	
io
"~73
72
8
9
3
44
37
33 '
13
11
10
48
I  47
40
53
63
52
34
33
38
72
69
88
22
24
29
13
11
11
13
13
11
 STATISTICAL RETURNS                                              G  149
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
1
2
3
XIII
6
6
3
11
8
8
	
	
=
; -
	
315 |     341 1     372 |     335
17 |i       18
16
,        9
364 |     315 |i    291
273
!    217 |   	
17
17
11
9
20
20
12
8
31
8
■       15
19
~~II
i      15
17
14
26
23
34
14
4
I
;        8
6
28
26
32
28
'      24
27
18
33
I      32
17
8
21
12
18
12
74 |       94 |       76 [       83
14 1        4 |         8 ]         6
86 |       79 |       83
46 f      42 |   	
16
53
9
9
35
12
28
74
~29
14
51
7
5
32
31
64
28
71
5
6
38
29
68
34
85
~~32
116
14
10
12
6
265
■    225
219
178
181
	
265 |.     232
251  |     233
14
10  |:        12 |          6
265 |:    225 |     219
178 |i     181 |   	
13
12
25
38
5
11 '
27
32
8
17
38
11
	
~_i
46
	
.
'
	
78
6
42
9
41
7
27
35
	
88 |.      75
63
85
-|_|             |
84 |i       51   |       48
27 |i      35 j   	
95
~46
9
41
53
37
84
25
70
39
51
55
38
73
27
T 74
42
43
48
40
79
30
"""76
29
29
55
47
83
33
	
6
13 -
3
11
S
6
125
318
85
	
118 '
288
100
436
86
355
62
334 1
I      53
	
	
 G 150
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 11 (Trail)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Tadanac  	
Trail Central	
James L. Webster-
Totals, District No. 11-
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
Secondary—Grand Forks	
Elementary—
Christina Lake	
Grand Forks	
John A. Hutton-
Totals, District No. 12_
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Greenwood	
Midway	
Elementary—
Beaverdell	
Bridesville	
Kettle Valley..
Westbridge	
Totals, District No. 13	
District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
Secondary—Southern Okanagan-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Osoyoos	
Elementary—
Okanagan Falls	
Oliver  	
Totals, District No. 14L
Distrlct No. 15 (Penticton)
Secondary—Penticton	
Junior Secondary—■
McNicoll Park 	
Princess Margaret	
Elementary—
Carmi Avenue  _
Kaleden  	
Naramata.-
Nkwala	
O'Connell	
Queen's Park.
Snowdon	
Uplands	
West Bench	
Totals, District No. 15..
District No. 16 (Keremeos)
Secondary—Similkameen	
Elementary—
Cawston	
Hedley_
Keremeos..
Totals, District No. 16... 	
District No. 17 (Princeton)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Princeton-
Elementary—
Allison Pass  	
Coalmont	
Tulameen..
Totals, District No. 17-
90
494
3'46
49
258
164
I
553
43
586
197
1,379
327
127
45
40
30
26
168
61
24
17
16 [
12
595
298 |
90
754
47
403 |
1,167
617
404
215
404
210
533
272
102
52
13«
78 i
310
149
509
261
492
262
326
167 '
134
75
156
76
41
236
182
5,910 | 3,078 | 2,832
I
I
281 |  272'
I
24 |
296
95
19
290
102
696 |  683
252
154
65 i
259
114
83
34
131
730
362
736
9
15
17
777
392
7
9
8
416
159
66
21
23
14
14
297
671 i   349 I  322
689   371 I  318
43
351
2,204 'j' 1,170 |, 1,034'
550
189
194
261
50
60
161
248
230
159
59
4,675 | 2,434 || 2,241
138
71
31
12'8
368
344
2
6
9
361
13
59
44
21
56
42
11
64
4!
!  490
485 |  481 |
22
7
62
38
10
82
35
6
74
28
107
127
108 |
II  77
27
13
18
14
!  31
30
13 i
14
7
7
6
8
1
5
58
69 i
19
109
68
10
108
|  197
186
59
9
25
5'8
65
66 I
52
23
18
72
14
26
53
70
77
41
20
15
96
11
102
209
75
17
15
43
73
55
52
25
19
49
30
6
25
25 I
10 f
33
17
7
27
49 |
61
68 |  51
S3
53
44
1
4
4
53 1
66
3
5
3
77
70
2
73
11
64 |	
14
14
13
375 j 388 |  374 |;
17
10
10
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 151
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
15
12
18
'
64
64
57
96
12
	
	
	
	
37
56
71
55
	
	
 .
	
	
	
	
	
	
506
485
502
503
12 |,       19 |       14' |,        9
528
506
522
417
387 |
11
1
t
9
1
107
i
111
i      96
117
101
5
7           8
76
79   .      79
119
4
i
	
1
28
35 1      33
	
-
 [   	
	
	
	
	
1     -
109 |     121  |     120
119
4
11 t        9|        1
107
Ill
r      96
117
101  I  	
40
35
3j8
" 52
i
	
23
35
50
53
1
2
12
5
6
I
	
	
	
	
13
17
	
	
	
   1
5
i        7
3
	
	
	
	
	
1	
i  	
	
  1   	
59 |       60 |       64 |       52
  |   -  |     ...     |     -
58
50
!      53
      1     1   	
27
15
17
134
107
122
138
1
111 1 	
72
62
64
65
18
i
	
70
47
58
	
16
14
9
11
[
96
97
103
107
1«
	
	
	
184 |     173 |)     176 |     183
36 |       27 |       15 |       17
204
154
180
138
111 1 	
|
12
19
11
119
112
133
406
297
58
146
137
121
	
	
	
141
150
,     113
65
78
84
96
1
(
21
13
13
15
	
	
	
._
_
22
12
25   '       13
	
.   ..
	
_	
45
35
38
38
	
	
	
	
94
59
77
71
65
65 i
72
79
	
41
50
50
40
21
16
17
12
	
	
	
20
33
26
25
	
	
	
	
	
	
394 |     361  |     402 |     389
  |       12 |       19 |       11
406
399
367
406
:    297 |       58
5
3
5
58
43
42
57
,      39
24
20
21
17
13
9
12
8
29 i
24
26
30
6
	
 |   	
	
66 |       53  |i      59 |       55
6 |         5|        3 |         5
58
43
42
57
39 1   - .
57
57
56
61
9
5
2 |        4
66
47
61
46'
32
1
2
2
1
4
1
	
2
7
	
.	
	
	
	
_
63
65
60
61
9
5
2 f       4
66
47
61
46'
32 |	
1
 G 152
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys        Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 18 (Golden)
Secondary—Golden-
Elementary-Senior Secondary-
Elementary—
Alexander Park	
-Field-
Columbia Valley-
Donald 	
Golden	
Nicholson	
Rogers Pass	
Totals, District No. 18	
District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
Secondary—Revelstoke..
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Mica-
Elementary—
Big Eddy	
Farwell	
Mount Begbie	
Mountain View-
Selkirk	
Trout Lake-
Totals, District No. 19..
District No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen)
Secondary-—Armstrong  	
Elementary—
Armstrong-
Len W. Wood-
Totals, District No. 21.
District No. 22 (Vernon)
Senior Secondary—
Vernon Senior Matriculation	
Vernon	
Junior Secondary-
Charles Bloom—
Clarence Fulton..
W. L. Seaton	
Elementary—
B.X 	
Beairsto	
Cherryville...
Coldstream..
Harwood	
Lavington	
Lumby .
Okanagan Landing-
Silver Star	
South B.X	
West Vernon ._ 	
Totals, District No. 19..
District No. 23 (Kelowna)
Secondary—
George Elliot..
Kelowna	
Dr. Knox	
George Pringle..
Rutland	
Elementary—
Bankhead..
Benvoulin..
Black Mountain-
Central	
De Hart	
East Kelowna	
Ellison	
434
110
233
110
30
454
163
17
225
58
117
64
16
233
78
8
209
52
116
46
14
221
85
9
11
33
19
8
69
28
4
40
18
9
62
31
3
13
18
19
4
50
34
14
551
799
629
326
198
101
102
50
258
138
228
122
437
220
227
j  124
16
i    8
752
172 II  169
138
14
303
97
52
120
106
217
103
2,095 | 1,089 | 1,006
351
436
228
171
228
121
180
208
107
33
19
57
34
81
3
25
27
56
29
64
3
227 |! 204
79
100 i
27
24
68
32
66
2
16
219 |  16
85
1,015
520 |  495
68
643
236
589
625
182
637
63
353
498
125
473
146
454
39
538
36 •
337
126
277
342
101
331
26
176
253
56
234
75
224
23
259
32
306
110
312
283
81
306
37
177
245
69
239
71
230
16
279
|  79
100
85
i
24
24
23
95
74
77
10
10 i
7
55
45
70
59
71
68
18
19
18
i  77
69
72
26
22
14
62
63
68
I   9
11
12
85
93
63
34
11
15
5,669
2,876
209
115
1,745
891
789
388 •
275
145
425
198
535
256
41
26
14
6
405
203
93
55
92
57
53
32
520 |; 501 |  492 [,
60
94
854
401
130
227
279
15
8
202
38
35
21
	
	
	
68
55
61
12
12
6
4
3
7
46
33
17
9
. 24
17 '
11
16
14
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 153
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
DC
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
9
8
4
114
84
95
69
51
9
13
8
10
	
	
	
	
7
•      11
17
5
'  	
	
45
33
52
12
18
4
51
11
5
48
10
15
	
	
	
	
	
1	
	
	
	
37
113
~10
	
19
28
23
	
	
 .
	
	
'	
	
	
3
6
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
149 |     144 |     131  |,     13'8
22  |         9
8 |         4
121
95
1     112'
74
51
■	
i        8
8
1
153
129
133
106
91
20
16
41
37
14
16
36
37
1      14
10
1
	
i  	
20
16
9
9
	
59
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
70
,      79
104
165
19
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
3
1
3
	
	
	
	
1	
,  	
	
185 |:     185 |     178 f     178
20 |         8 |         8 |         1
173
,     145
142
115
91  |   	
	
	
	
	
'      11
1
3
73
75
60
80
48
102
70
18
119
78
13
	
	
	
	
i  	
	
	
	
102
88 |     119 |       78
13  |       11  |         1
3
73
75
1      60
80
48 |   	
	
	
	
	
	
10
4
1
81
76
64
338
305
68
_
_
184
i    204
201
	
_
	
	
	
!       16
16
10
207
199
177
	
	
29
23
30
i      29
1 _..
_
80
7
53
76
13
50
90
t        8
i      42
81
8
38
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
i
75
69
67
74
4
.
	
	
	
	
22
18
16
I      14
_.
.
	
71
58
57
54
	
	
 .
	
	
	
	
.      .
24
20
23
17
	
	
.. ..
	
	
	
	
70
7
88
78
47
66
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 >■
58
82
69
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
526 |     463
462 |i    450
34 |       26 |       20 |       11
472
479
442
338
305 |       68
60
49
59
25
16
1
...
 _
..
	
,      43
30
19
328
322
275
389
.    276
63
	
	
_
	
	
227
222
162
97
i      81
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
75
72
47
51
30
I
	
	
 |   	
	
-—
	
—
121
127
,    101
39
37
67
11
%
110
78
	
:—
	
•	
	
	
	
80
~~vi >
9
94
~~94
~31
-
105
~~32
	
	
	
	
|	
i 	
	
	
■	
 G 154
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
otal
Boys
376
195
168
79
125
73
49
29
142
72
250
118
395
204
99
49
126
59
110
63
16
12 i
145
82
79
42
137
76
466
237
427
229
126
68
480
251
208
94
164
77
273 i
150
219
121
145
71
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 23 (Kelowna)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Glenmore 	
Glenn Avenue-
Gordon	
Graham	
Lakeview Heights-
Martin	
A. S. Matheson	
Mission Creek	
Mountainview	
North Glenmore	
Okanagan Centre	
Okanagan Mission..
Oyama	
Peachland	
Raymer Avenue	
Rutland 	
South Kelowna	
South Rutland	
Dorothea Walker-
West Rutland	
Westbank	
Winfield	
Wood Lake-
Totals, District No. 23_
District No. 24 (Kamloops)
Secondary—
Chase 	
Kamloops.
North Kamloops-
Junior Secondary—John Peterson-
Elementary—
Adams Lake	
Barnhart Vale_
Beattie	
Ralph Bell	
Kay Bingham—
Brocklehurst	
Chase	
Dallas 	
Bert Edwards	
Fitzwater	
Haldane	
Arthur Hatton	
Heffley Creek	
George Hilliard	
Lloyd George	
Allan Matthews...
Monte Lake	
North Kamloops.
Overlander	
A. E. Perry	
Pritchard	
Rayleigh .	
Savona 	
George Slater	
Arthur Stevenson-
John Tod	
Valleyview	
Westsyde	
Westwold	
Stuart Wood	
Totals, District No. 24_
9,401
4,823
225
110
1,081
576
1,704
877
900
505
8
6
11
6
395
199 i
262
142
451
240
262
135
229
113
207
97
527
281
58
35
195
105
554
286
33 i
17
489
264
498
246
475
254
25
13
431
221
51
25
342
184
17
9
142
79
159
77
173
I        90
275
147
480
256
360
■      192
172
97
86
43
234
122
11,511
6,049
181
89
52
20
70
132
191
50
67
47
4
63
37
61
229
198
58
229
114
87
123
98
74
4,578
115
505
827
395
2
5
196
120
211
127
116
110
246
23
90
268
16
225
252
221
12
210
26
158
8
63
82
83
128
224
168
75
43
112
52
5,462
52
24
36
24
27
21
46
19
66
23
7
42
17
23
66
73
18
92
~Io
44
55
16
43
35
25
20 i
34
51
15
60
25
9
64
6
19
74
60
28
53
32
32
51
76
91
28
17
39
42
20
39
18
24
68
48
14
61
10
27
29
42
10
25
11
917 |  875
807
60
3
4
59
33
58
66
34
22
89
70
9
69
53
64
5
59
25
51
4
16
41
26
43
74
35
20
14
33
1,079
3
5
57
46
37
61
49
20
91
68
13
83
59
68
4
59
26
53
5
13
17
29
40
64
60
27
19
32
2
2
76
35
42
66
47
21
72
104
11
70
71
58
5
65
38
8
17
29
27
50
83
52
25
16
32
1,108     1,124
25
35
37
2
8
_27
134
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 155
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
59
26
29
75
i      76
!      74
.....
	
	
	
'.	
	
	
12
19
18
	
	
	
	
•  	
	
40
39
39
3'8
	
	
1 	
	
	
44
50
59
57
21
i _	
.	
'  _
.
11
25
	
29
	
 ; —
	
	
26
!      16
	
	
_.__
■	
—
	
	
! —
........
20
16
1      18
19
20
~16
	
—
	
■ —
	
	
	
51
70
62
75'
	
55
57
57
77
_
...
14
19
16
17
	
51
66
75
I      70
12
	
i	
42
59
49
48
_	
	
28
27
20
1
46
36
42
35
16
36
32
1
	
—
	
	
—
	
60
!      69
	
	
—
	
—
	
772 |     835 -|     823
803
66 |       43
30 |       19
811
'    792
644
601
440
63
62
58
47
37
21
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
i    332
336
1    273
140
	
	
	
23
29
26
451
377
322
299 '
177
 	
32
34
16
433
i    385
::
54
!      51
46
52
-
35
34
45
34
_
...
33
69
47
90
86
74
6
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
-- --
41
30
39
34
79
66
68
6Q
23
	
	
	
	
70
~~67
58
	
67
84
87
74
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
68
63
71
65
61
67
73
114
	
	
51
66
52
63
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
4
	
	
	
	
	
_
	
56
62
66
56
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
39
34
38
32
30
	
	
	
	
—
...
1   ....
34
17
~~22
23
	
'
26
9
14
23
	
28
29
34
48
33 c
39
22
58
68
73
60
53
56
51
53
	
	
27
25
30
18
	
8
10
6
13'
32
39
36
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1,019
1,007
1,043
960
75
55
63
42
946
820
:    701
672
471
140
 G  156
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 25 (Barriere)
Junior Secondary—Barriere 	
Elementary—
Barriere  _.	
Brennan Creek-
Chu Chua	
Little Fort	
Louis Creek	
Totals, District No. 25..
District No. 26 (Birch Island)
Secondary—Clearwater.  	
Elementary—
Avola  _	
Birch Island-
Blue River	
Dutch Lake-
Star Lake	
Vavenby	
Totals, District No. 26	
District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
Secondary—
Columneetza..
100 Mile	
Junior Secondary—Williams Lake..
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Boss Mountain	
Bridge Lake  _	
Horsefly 	
Elementary—
Alexis Creek  ...	
Big Creek-   	
Big Lake .
Buffalo Creek	
Canim Lake	
Chilcotin Road	
Crescent Heights	
Deka Lake	
Dog Creek-
Eagle Creek-
Forest Grove-
Gang Ranch...
Glendale	
Kwaleen	
Lac la Hache.
Lakehill	
Likely-
Lone Butte	
McLeese Lake	
Meldrum Creek-
Mountview	
Poplar Glade	
Riske Creek East-
Wildwood	
Williams Lake	
Wright Station—
100 Mile	
150 Mile	
93 Mile	
Totals, District No. 27_
District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Secondary—Quesnel	
Junior Secondary—Cariboo	
Elementary-Junior Secondary -
ville	
- Wells-Barker-
123
289
11
18
43
51
201
47
40
82
286
79
43
778
444
464
566
76
61
96
19
15
13
61
13
122'
225'
11
13
32
131
15
244
87
133
34
19
46
36
14
203
279
40
94
563
19
408
133
53
517
151
3
10
20
19
66
138
535 |       260
275
116
26
21
48
155
40
20
56
3
6
5
13
41
1
3
3
12
31
3
2
4
10
83 |       60 |
50
21
19
34
131
39
23
13
7
21
39
14
426
352
94
219
243
285
35
37
54
10
9
8
32
5
63
124
6
9
19
74
8
127
42
es
15
10
28
16
8
97
126
23
47
304
10
219
67
31
225
221
281
41
24
42
9
6
5
29
8
59
101
5
4
13
57
7
117
45
68
19
9
18
20
6
106
153
17
47
259
9
189
66
22
4,782 |    2,475 |    2,307
874
374
146
451 |
174
80 I
423
200
66
24
51
2
2
5
17
3
43
16
14
6
1
8
6
1
40
35
10
16
63
2
59
21
13
8
5
14
3'4
27
7
i>
9
15
37
13
95
76 f
13
10
11
17
6
5
4
8
2
13
37
2
1
5
22
2
40
13
17
6
4
1
4
2
35
47
5
19
75
2
66
10
7
11
5
15
5
3
1
10
2
20
39
3
1
7
18
3
38
10
17
5
2
7
6
1
44
39
7
11
71
6
51
26
6
12
13
509 f    498 |,    490 f      26
26
11
14
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 157
ENROLMENT—
-Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
;
41
39
43
46
32
34
49
1
1
12
5
10
2
1
9
1
	
	
	
	
—
	
■ •
	
	
____
	
	
	
	
	
	
10   !          6
i  	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
60 |       57 |       52
50
|      .      |   —     |   . .
41
39
43
10
6
11
7
i        6
8
i	
	
6
1        2
2
59
44
43'
26
19
	
7
7
6
	
	
	
	
	
	
 ■
	
	
58
36
53
68
	
1
	
	
1  	
	
	
	
7
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
92 |;      66 |'      67
74
 1         6 1         2 |.        2
59
44
43
26
19|    .
|
197
139
108
	
 .
	
	
	
_ 	
	
128
124
78
87
47
	
	
	
	
	
24
20
11
264
247
	
	
	
	
13
8
11
5
8
9
9
9
7
_.....
 	
	
■  	
5
_	
12
2
1
11
1
1
2
i      14
8
2
3
	
	
	
5
1  	
	
	
	
 —
1
1
 |
	
	
	
	
	
■	
	
	
5
3
13
1        9
3
18
9
2
12
8
1        1
22
____
	
	
	
—_
	
r	
■ ■
	
	
■
	
36
2
2
>      30
2
2
32
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
3
~
	
 —
8
4
3
.........
:  _
	
	
29
2
39
!      15
4
33
18
1
35
i       12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16
"             '
	
11
12
11
14
!    	
.. '
	
	
.	
20
19
21
25
.	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
 .
	
8
4
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
 _
_
	
	
	
4
3
3
2
	
	
	
..	
..  ■
	
	
 _
5
1      12
!      12
	
6
3
11
	
	
 	
	
_...
    ■
	
	
 .
3
2
4
1
	
27
35 .
22
	
. .
	
42
41
37
38
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
	
	
6
4
6
2
	
	
	
   ....
	
 '
_
	
	
	
16
16 i
16
	
	
 „
81'
2
54
45
2
60
1      76
5
41
124
16
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
49
15
'
™   -
26.
15
19
16
	
 .
i  _.
 .
3
10
2
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
'	
490 |     435 |     433
376
33 |;      24 |       20 |.      11
410
371
275
226
155
	
198
200
144
191
141
	
	
	
	
32
3
7
116
122
94
	
■ ■
	
16
18
12
■14
	
	
	
11
12
12
	
 G 158
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
UI
Primary
Special
District No. 28 (Quesnel)—Continued
Elementary—
Ahbau Creek	
Alexandria	
Australian	
Baker.. —
Barlow Creek..
Bouchie Lake-
Carson	
Helen Dixon	
Dragon Lake—
Kersley..
Lakeview	
Le Bourdais-
Milburne Lake-
Moose Heights..
Narcosli	
Pinecrest	
Quesnel View	
Red Bluff	
Rich Bar	
Riverview	
Strathnaver	
West Fraser..	
Totals, District No. 28..
District No. 29 (Lillooet)
Secondary—Lillooet	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Bralorne.
Elementary—
Blackwater Creek	
Bridge River	
Cayoosh 	
Pavilion	
Riverview..
Totals, District No. 29-
District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
Secondary—
Ashcroft	
Kumsheen.
David Stoddart-
Elementary—
Ashcroft	
Big Bar-
Cache Creek-
Chasm 	
Clinton	
Green Lake	
Lytton
Scotty Creek	
Seventy Mile House-
Spences Bridge	
Totals, District No. 30..
District No. 31 (Merritt)
Secondary—Merritt	
Elementary—
Collettville. 	
Diamond Vale-
Bench 	
Merritt Central-
Nicola Lake	
Nicola-Canford.
Totals, District No. 31-
District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
Secondary—Hope_
21
44
12
399
112
178
208
403
110
94
161
54
14
18
48
123
23
242
101
264
61
76
15
25
6
189
61
87
108
202
60
41
82
27
9
10
31
61
11
131
51
136
36
37
6
19
6
210
51
91
100
201
50
53
79
27
5
8
17
62
12
111
50
128
25
39
4,160 I 2,121
2,039
231
169
17
84
420
33
98
119
91
9 f
43 |
222 |
20 |
46 I
112
78
41
198
13
52
,052
550 |
161
'   84
154
77
143
64
359
180
26
12
235
122 i
26
15
292
171
17
6
316
167
33
21
55
29
54
24
502
77
77
79
179
14
113
11
121
11
149
12
26
30
871
972
680
-  356
181
85
346
178
137
74
528
280
52
32
233
110
899
324
96
168
63
248
20
123
2,157 | 1,115 | 1,042
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Boston Bar_
471
188
I
I
260 |
94 \
211
94
7
3
61
19
27
26
39
18
10
29
12
3
10
11
24
15
37
32
41
13
7
2
52
27
21
35
61
15
12
33
10
4
5
6
9
8
40
8
36
12
10
21
10
4
61
9
27
28
40
13
17
18
5
3
3
8
12
34
14'
43
17
32
J470 |  425
401
32
56
56
67
24
"_7
14
7
7
51
6
25
18
3
6
30
5
27
23
7
16
33
6
35
110
89 I  120 I
11
11
63
4
60
3
45
2
35
4
13
15
—
	
37
32
4
4
21
40
1   8
48
26
3
4
28 .
37
5
5
12
11
11
6
15
11
~14
118 I  244 I  177
165
40
16
56
71
22
72
12
56
289
17
18
53
21
63
6
24
185
21
23
51
28
72
7
42
223 I
16
14
30
14
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 159
ENROLMENT—
-Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
8
3
57
4
63
7
59
46
	
	
'
	
	
	
	
	
13
11
14
i      19
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
27
30
23
23
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
29
42
25
23
.....
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
47
45
62
51
26
	
	
1     	
	
	
	
	
	
 .
14
;     15
14
21
	
	
	
1   	
	
	
	
10
13
11
21
	
 .
	
	
	
	
'	
	
	
26
16
13
5
19
6
1      23
	
	
	
	
	
	
'  	
	
	
	
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
.	
	
	
'	
	
	
	
8
8
7
....
	
....
	
.
	
 .
14
12
20
32
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
49
26
;      26
30
	
	
	
	
13
10
13
11
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
42
35
31
36
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
12
13 i
11
_
.
	
	
	
	
	
	
5
13
10
14
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
413
376 |     370
364
26 '|       32 |         3 |         7
325
334
250
191
141 |	
11
10
2
50
55
40
38
25
16
21 '
18
18
	
	
	
22
10
9
	
	
	
7 18
12
To
"li
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
58
59
56
62
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
3
2
4
	
	
	
	
	
■	
	
	
	
	
       	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
99 .|       95  |      86
99
15 ||       11 |       10 |         2
72
65
49
38
25 |   	
'
51
49
28
33
13
7
1
29
35
28
24
17
.	
	
	
 ■
■	
	
	
	
	
46
50
23
15
9
	
38
4
29
8
41
1
24
9
35
43
4
24
6
32
4
38
6
29
6
35
	
	
	
.	
	
	
	
	
	
	
26
1
32
3
36
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
33
	
	
	
	
	
64
13
	
	
	
	
	
	
 •
	
	
7
7
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
8
7
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
168 |     152 |,     169
167
13 |       13
7
1
126
134
79
72
26 |       __
  J       28 i
19
14
151
123
142
109
,      94
30
29
25
50
20
73
52
21 ■
78
36
25
51
33
	
	
	
	
 •
	
	
	
	
	
87
16
7
10
10
	
	
_
	
	
	
	
i	
	
	
,	
18
24
33
22
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
198 |,     214
180
142
16
28
19
14
151
123
142
109
94 |	
13
9
6
103
96
108
84'
1      52
20
16
16
17
	
	
	
	
27
1       19
5
	
	
	
 G 160
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
Grade
Grade
I
II
III
98
91
83
5
2
5
17
10
10
30
26
28
5
5
5
16
13
11
Primary
Special
District No. 12 (Fraser Canyon)—Continued
Elementary—
Coquihalla  	
Flood
North Bend-
Silver Creek-
St. Elmo	
Yale	
Totali, District No. 32L
District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
Secondary—
Chilliwack-
Sardis _
Junior Secondary—
Chilliwack	
Rosedale..
A. D. Rundle-
Elementary—
Atchelitz	
Bernard	
Camp River—
Chadsey	
Cheam..
Chilliwack Central-
Culms Lake	
East Chilliwack	
Evans 	
Fairfield Island-
Greendale	
Kipp Primary	
F. G. Leary	
Little Mountai__
Lotbiniere	
McCammon	
Miller	
Robertson—
Rosedale	
Ryder Lake..
Sardis 	
Southlands	
Strathcona	
Sunshine Drive-
Unsworth	
Vedder	
Watson	
Yarrow	
Totals, District No. 33-
Distrlct No. 34 (Abbotsford)
Senior Secondary—Abbotsford	
Junior Secondary—
Abbotsford	
Clearbrook .	
Elementary—
Aberdeen	
Alexander	
Arnold	
Barrowtown..
Bradner	
Clayburn	
Clearbrook	
Dunach	
Gladwin	
Glenmore	
Godson	
Good Shepherd.
Huntingdon	
Jackson	
644
32
89
210
38
331
16
49
109
21
49
313
16
40
101
17
39
61
13
34
13
1,760
929
831
137 |,     188 |     168 |     156 |
I
967
1,008
663
273
380
118
299
57
103
75
537
152
119
76
111
204
127
156
441
52
264
81
218 |'
211
61
355
97
129
40
86
242
429
330
498
516
330
126
189
65
141
36
62
41
258
77
60
32
50
99
64
79
216
26
141
43
108
116
28
192
45
58
24
38
139
227
175
469
492
333
147
191
53
158
21
41
34
279
75
59
44
61
105
63
77
225
26
123
38
110
95
33
163
52
71
16
48
103
202
155
1
1
	
	
20
15
17
45
36
35
10
10
7
10
12
16
11
15
14
i  46
47
54
23
28
23
1  17
17
13
15
17
13
18
9
14
24
28 .
29
33
54
34
26
20
19
49
68
56
10
9
9
'  34
32
42
11
11
7
23
20
27
22
29
10
11
12
40
46
44
29
32
36
24
21
15
7l5
.13
_ 13
43
31
28
68
68
56
43
39
65
16
6
15
16
16
18
14
14
8,461
4,299
819
419
1,054
565
484
240 ■
168
71
299
163
20
15
123
69
180
i  106
44
25
159
78
127
54
25
10
54
28
411
238
22
12
89
53
123
67
4,162
724
731  [    700 |     115
400
489
244
97
136
5
54
74
19
81
73
15
26
173
10
36
56
' —
1
1
12
13
13
35
50
29
9
..
1  11
20
20
'  20
25
,  24
16
6
10
8
...
	
31
13
22
21
8
11
.   6
9
9
12
54
45
49
~i_
~ii
7
12
20
18
28
11
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 161
ENROLMENT—
■Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
69
78
60
90
7
1'
6 •         5 |         9
	
11  |       14 |       14
	
22 j       23 1       22
25
  '
	
	
7 j.       10 |         6
	
14            8 j.       13
	
	
149 |     154 |     140
132
7 |       13 |         9 |         6
130
115
113
84
52 |   	
3'8
41
16
14
391
346
121
260
252
227
160
109
	
15
236
218
194
	
1
  |   	
115
139 ■
87
126
7H
115
	
	
20
13  i       17
16
41
39 ■'       34
53
	
	
	
14
11  |         5
[
	
	
	
14
14 1       23
14
10          12 |;       13
	
S3
94 |       99
97
17
	
	
	
18
18 |       19
23
	
19
14 |       22
17
	
	
12 •        10 |         9
	
13
23 I       10
24
  i
24
40 |       25
34
	
  i
	
	
19
15  1        19
23
	
54
57 |.      51
90
I
	
10 !         6|         8
	
	
28 |       41
31
56
„ .
	
13
14
11
14
	
44
44
42
45
	
	
	
32
27
40
18
	
	
	
10 |   .—..
9
9
	
	
45
46 !      44
76
14
	
	
25
20
24
	
i
j	
...
22
	
	
	
7 |         9
11'
18
	
35 |       31
36
22
2
	
	
69 1       46
50
58
	
	
42 1       48
43
33
"      	
  |
	
	
	
	
701  1     692 |     695
740
72
53 |       41  |       16
750
683
621
551
455 |'     121
389
1
1
335 |       95
31
28
i       14
353
319
309
179
154
1SI
	
	
31
35
36
28
52          44
48
41
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
16 [       20
19
8
	
31  |       30
29
25
i
8 !         8
4
34 |       25
37
32
17 |       18
19
17
	
13
	
4
7
""
60
48
47
47
33 I
11   1
	
	
	
	
18
19
10
12
15
18
21
19
—      .....
	
	
	
6
 G 162                                    PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pu
pjls Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
Total
Boys
Girls
District No. 34 (Abbotsford)—Continued
Elementary—Con tin tied
Jubilee -  _-._  	
Kilgard	
27
22
125
241
85
94
330
97
49
29
222
227
219
185
127
11
21
70
276
10
10
61
124
41
43
159
57
23
18
117
118
115
94
61
5
12
39
142
17
12
64
117
44
51
171
40
26
11
105
109
104
91
66
6
9
31
134
	
12
3
22
29
11
9
33
9
11
11
43
,      35
28
28
2
7
38
24
9
9
15
24
6
10
22
25
15
10
10
Mount Lehman North. _  	
North Poplar ,    -.. 	
21
40
12
5
9
58
32
30
29
7
32
26
9
32
13
8
9
,      61
28
24
21
2
7
39
Philip Sheffield. _ ,  	
Simpson  _ 	
Margaret Stenersen   	
Ten-Broeck  	
Totals, District No. 34 	
District No. 35 (Langley)
Secondary—
Aldergrove   '  	
6,658
3,462 |'   3,196
  |     570
605 |     567 |       54
•
580
1,013
322
277
94
279
105
144
20
249
188
268
136
106
50
112
193
141
186
45
100
142
98
46
91
30
108
240
137
76
279
525
174
156
45
154
62
65
11
301
488
148
121
49
125
43
79
9
27
12
31
12
20
9
33
29
24
29
17
14
19
27
18
27
8
21
26
15
8
11
13
27
13
14
41
16
41
15
17
37
19
18
22
11
12
10
30
22
17
7
10
28
14
4
19
21
26
23
8
16
30
Junior Secondary—Fort Langley  	
Elementary—
59
43
12
43
16
24
11
28
9
21
33
16
12
18
25
19
31
10
13
24
18
10
12
13
26
23
15
Anderson ■  .  	
126 !       123
WS              73
147 |       121
66 |         70
49  j         57
22            28
59 j         53
98 |         95
73  |         68
97            89
21   f         24
61  j         39
73 |,        69
58 j'        40
20 |i        26
48 |         43
16 !         14
Langley Central _	
North Otter            -     	
Otter  _	
Peterson Road     -..
Simonds     _ _ 	
South Carvolth _ 	
South Otter                	
Sperling    	
66
115
72
35
42
125
65
41
West Langley 	
Willoughby — ■  _ 	
Totals, District No. 35	
5,576
,   2,908 |    2,668
59 |     525
504
488
46
District No. 36 (Surrey)
Senior Secondary—
587
991
465
501
450
794
788
310
511
251
265
240
411
277
480
214
236
210
383
	
Secondary—
Lord Tweedsmuir 	
Junior Secondary—
415  |       373
1
—. |   ........
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  163
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
|
XIII
Special
1
2            3
12
21
16
17
1
	
	
	
41
31
30
61
	
11
17
13'
13
	
9
22
12
12
49
47
53
46
15
	
	
	
15
18
14
16
	
	
8
6
11
	
	
60
49
86
92
  1   	
	
39
24
28
33
	
23
23
33
24
	
31
18
	
	
2
3
	
	
47
40
44
56
	
........
	
642
588
617
599
59
31 |       28 |       14
532
473
460
389
335
95
12
1
I
8   '        7
149
123
108
96
77
15
6 |       11
230
201
169
200
181
	
8
1        9|         8
96
116
85
41
41
43
41
	
	
17
16
21
37
48
39
40
	
9
14
23
16
	
18
18
15
32
	
44
33
	
34
40
	
32
25
25
20
13
12
19
71
88
15
	
	
30
22
........
	
17
15
13
17
	
12
	
13
22
12
18
22
31
24
34
	
	
	
24
15
13
30
	
29
24
26
32
8
5
7
i
17
18
21
29
20
15
12
19
8
12
15
6
3
14
18
17
	
17
10
19
15
20
25
21
36
27
16
19
16
	
	
15
9
15
	
	
	
	
	
531
489
504
456
59
35 |       23 f      26
415
440
362
296
258
	
.-  j   —	
267
227
93
  I   -----
 - 1	
i
........
110
58
540
239
210
409
116
164
42
69
	
69
224
157
	
	
8
8
9
263
258
248
24
14  |          5
1             I
278
279
1
188
 G  164
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
District No. 36 (Surrey)—Continued
Junior Secondary—Continued
Johnston Heights  	
778
742
967
931
765
183
453
163
198
389
345
377
395
352
213
385
55
435
112
106
21
426
91
394
505
118
35.9
296
1S1
173
211
608
213
232
249
47
201
685
242
226
137
746
328
908
218
351
455
281
300
608
42
124
62
298
247
228
157
172
4'85
643
157
413
414
490
491
400
92
225
81
108
192
182
200
211
183
108
212
30
244
58
54
14
236
49
233
2*8
66
181
161
91
82
96
306
118
109
122
27
114
344
119
117
67
378
179
493
110
201
246
153
158
309
19
62
31
137
118
122
80
100
272
331
90
365
328
477
440
365
91
228
82
90
197
163
177
184
169
105
173
25
191
54
52
7
190
42
161
237
52
178
135
70
91
115
302
95
123
127
20
87
341
123
109
70
36.
149
415
108
150
209
128
142
299
23
62
31
161
129
106
77
72
213
312
67
24
83
30
35
48
49
60
51
53
29
43
18
63
22
10
6
68
23
49
78
16
51
46
31
15
34
82
30
32
43
66
88
39
36
24
116
56
146
30
69
36
54
80
7
16
21
41
37
35
26
27
70
63
50
30
61
15
25
61
52
49
56
54
39
51
21
69
14
17
5
53
18
63
87
18
52
34
22
25
36
95
35
26
40
68
105
44
31
19
116
37
144
12
62
71
48
39
104
18
16
8
43
44
35
22
18
70
76
52
Mary Jane Shannon 	
West Whalley    ...
White Rock—	
Elementary—
Anniedale  	
James Ardiel   ...  	
25
82
28
31
65
55
79
42
48
34
40
16
69
20
10
10
68
16
74
74
13
65
32
26
30
32
72
14
David Brankin _  	
Cedar Hills	
Clayton  	
~~27
Crescent Park     ... 	
Simon Cunningham  ..
Elgin      ,    	
1
19
15
Hjorth Road	
Kensington Prairie  	
Latimer Road  	
A. H. P. Matthew   	
47
  j       32
25
16
Newton   . .
North Surrey Handicapped	
33
67
89
31
37
19
111
51
122
26
Old Yale Road	
Port Kells 	
7
T.E.Scott.....        	
	
42
56
42
42
86
17
13
33
33
30
33
30
29
63
60
55
12
12
15
Dr. F. D. Sinclair .   . „	
Erma Stephenson  	
Strawberry Hill...  	
Surrey Centre „  	
H. T. Thrift 	
White Rock 	
18
K. B. Woodward... „       	
33
Totals, District No. 36 	
25,325
13,300
12,025
  | 2,437
2,455
2,525
262
District No. 37 (Delta)
Secondary—
Delta      	
North Delta—   	
J
1
1,198
999
1
594
524
1
604
475
	
1
	
,
__
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  165
ENROLMENT-
-Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
DC
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IIIX
Special
1
2
3
18
i
!        14
17
265
245
219
'
19 |       17
16
298
269
1     123
7
7
13
3B1
309
270
14
12 |'      20
313
•    329
243
,
	
12
23 |       10
264
291
165
21
21
30
32
1
  1   —	
i.	
64
50
59
54
  1   	
  [   	
26 i       17
30
17
27
30
24
26
i
49
53
46
53
46
40
41
46
16
41
46
41
61
■   _	
1
67
67
55
57
1
50
40
41
66
!  	
34
28
28
21
1      	
48
43
54
48
31
57
65
49
63
9
12
19
15
1
15          20
18
16
72
56
52
38
I      ......
15
19
 ..
  !   	
56
58
50
44
  I   	
	
-
57
66
69
59
	
15
22
11
23
...
1
45
49
i      48
34
15
'    - I   -----
  1   	
36
41
35
42
30
  1   	
18
23
19
22
 - 1   ----- 1   	
27
24
24
28
27
30
27
25
	
	
72 |       81
78
70
11
	
38 |       28          27
23
	
25          30          22
44
12
	
34 !       36
32
31
21
	
	
	
	
87
111
109
65
31
30
29
33
36
	
29
31
34
28
	
18
20
18
19
	
__    „
96
115
98
94
	
	
	
	
49
46
41
34
7
	
	
	
140
126         131
99
	
	
56
47
57
46
	
41
45
50
39
30
.   .
	
71
57
61
58
	
35 ]       35
37
33
	
"      ..
35  j       44
40
46
-   r   	
97 ]       82
85
74
	
20  j        25  |        13
21
	
50
35
41
44
11
38
33
24
41
	
34
32
34
25
22
27
16
14
29
21
25
23
_
54          69
59
68
14
92 ;     115
  i   -	
106
  I
98
~ )    -■	
	
2,214 | 2,240 | 2,141
2,063
229 [     102 |       95 |       90
2,042 '
1,980
1,693
1,480 | 1,073 |     204
2
7 |         8
189
300
266
232
194
	
1
	
6
12 |         7
227
227
211
165
144
 G  166
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
District No. 37 (Delta)—Continued
Junior Secondary—Tsawwassen  —
Elementary—
Annieville  	
176
671
121
294
44
97
351
279
53
161
360
150
541
736
282
52
227
563
90
343
71
165
22
48
188
143
24
71
180
80
291
381
136
28
131
286
86
328
50
129
22
49
163
136
29
90
180
70
250
355
146
24
96
277
98
32
17
13
19
55
41
17
102
37
22
10
21
46
53
10
29
60
25
60
111
42
13
26
95
112
32
28
9
17
38
34
14
31
61
24
70
102
50
5
31
72
10
Canadian Forces Station 	
East Delta  —.
English Bluff                          —
Heath    .    _ 	
fi4
Kennedy  	
25
84
105
49
14
10
11
South Park     ._.
7
28
  |       89
Totals, District No. 37	
7,355
3,796
3,559
  i     770
762
730
38
District No. 38 (Richmond)
Senior Secondary—
974
633
925
678
820
906
503
3i81
629
577
462
36
97
66
531
119
517
176
475
130
784
4211
101
44
452
179
302
92
79
192
82
536
306
172
239
109
3H4
70
418
273
523
310
472
338
!      400
460
270
191
327
297
240
20
45
34
285
63
265
105
262
64
398
203
43
24
230
74
167
45
42
109
40
258
161
96
\       113
66
162
29
'      233
152
451
323
453
1      340
420
446
233
190
302
280
222
16
52
32
246
56
252
71
213
66
3'86
218
58
20
222
105
135
47
37
83
42
278
145
76
126
43
152
41
I      185
121
i       15
24
I      96
70
68
35
29
13
31
95
67
58
29
22
63
32
54
52
47
42
110
45
17
13
57
54
62
33
15
35
24
68
42
21
58
30
40
17
61
65
24
85
70
65
33'
15
79
29
45
70
43'
52
122
41
18
9
51
49
51
27
12
33
19
91
48
27
42
31
41
21
46
57
Steveston   	
Junior Secondary—
Robert C. Palmer         .
Elementary—
Blundell— 	
Lord Byng  	
William Cook	
15
Crestwood-  	
	
|       36
	
Alfred B. Dixon  	
64
22
—
15
  II      53
40
''       34
_  \       316
|      134
 _. |       34
1        I'l
-   1        14
  I'      56
|       55
|      51
|       32
10
  \       34
j       17
 - 1       72
|       54
28
  ';      59
..— |       26
..  f|      37
19
j>      59
  f      50
W. D. Ferris. 	
14
B. W. Garratt              	
R. M. Grauer 	
Austin Harris -  — —
Charles E. London	
Sidaway —  	
1     ..
Tait  ... -
Daniel Woodward	
—
Totals, District No. 38 ..	
14,800
7,616
7,184
1,438
1,467
1,446
80
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 167
ENROLMENT—
■Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
'
176
97
84
76
92
i
20
.
!  	
	
	
24
74
51
78
	
!
12
17
13
10
	
	
45
53
44
70
	
. .	
.
43
37
36
35
	
	
i
12
_.
_ _
i
.
21
27
33
	
1
	
	
	
58
46
36
35
    '<  	
34
16
19
11
i
.
64
72
70
78
33
112
90
95
99
11
_
57
28 j       56
7
........ |   .	
6
!   	
30
38         40
34
69
72 [       71
95
	
 f    -   -
722 |.     650 |     633
616
61
8 |       19 |       15
592 |     527
477
397
33® |   	
1
	
  1   	
50
461
390
73
------ i   -	
	
340
293
12 1       13
255'
324' '
321
■
17
14
245
224
178
■
19
is : 	
380
230
176
'    j   -	
28
16
299
i    319
244
119
113
122
121
	
!
27
85
88
88
14
109
81
83
74
6
	
61
89
86
91
28
.
64
77
62
54
14
	
	
	
	
	
65
76
96
88
	
21
77
101
92
95
 ! —
73
95'
95
88
	
111
109
110
:      88
	
50  |.       92
71
88
13 1       20   !       11
11
8
  j   	
71
46  J        87
84
21
;
47 j       52 ]       39
13
15
14
41
23
26
	
22
83
66
83
73
34
44
36
!      48
24
28
20
24
1
51
34
!
22
	
	
. _
55
57
46
38
13
........
■  _ ...
59
48
55
90
45
56         ._..
1   	
	
1,399 ; 1,407
1
' 1,322
1,243
62
76 ]       58 ;       50
Ii
1,179 | 1,097
919
801
|     683 |       73
1
 G  168
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pi
pils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
District No. 39 (Vancouver)
Secondary—
1,298
1,585
1,797
1,757
1,519
2,007
539
921
2,178
1,229
1,083
1,790
1,755
1,648
1,820
2,050
1,944'
616
S65
872
299
634
236
293
765
533
421
383
111
445
212
628
345
824
731
841
418
530
109
790
559
272
741
777
290
606
420
540
885
190
676
859
598
631
607
123
656
466
480
836
218
936
378
243
707
270
688
823
922
902
769
1,010
272
464
1,131
635
549
917
868
817
945
1,059
1,044
303
280 '
440
154
331
130
149
393
277
201
221 '
55
208
105
328
169
422
378
447
212 ■
276
54
409
290
140
368
400
134
307 i
207
270
441
110
336
440
296
340
277 •
68
335
249
227
434
111
467'
205
126
335
146
610
762
875
855
750
997
267
457
1,047
594
534
873
887
831
875
991
900
313
285
432
145
303
106
144'
372
256
220
162
56
237
:07
300
176
402
353
394
206
254
55
381
269
132
373
377
156
299
213
270
80
340
419
302
291
330
55
321
217
253
402
107
469
173
117
372
124
86
96
59
85
55
60
51
97
79
43
35
18
37
55
85'
30
1'lcS
58
105
46
69
30
100
61
70
73
98
83'
59
58
57
90
45
75
104
65
84
60
46
92
50
82
71
50
106
49
61
72
55
92
83
87
82
60
74
81
92
73
54
47
24
48
44
92
37
119
57
103
45
77
30
124
83
78
79'
66
74
82
49
51
68
46
64
124
69
89
75
26
83
63
86
7'8
61
81
53
61
65
83
93
70
94
71
6'8
48
67
106
68
52
50
19
32
60
83
35
130
58
126
64
62
27
126
68
74
72
67
70
72
57
54
105
55
72
108
77
69
76
28
83
70
73
75
51
137
41
58
59
67
65
73
i       90
61
57
54
58
90
63
45
46
24
!      3'8
53
95
31
-94
81
1.15
43
61
22
106
76
50
54
70
63
82
48
67
101
44
88
83
68
87
89
23
93
53
53
87
56
119
43
63
58
65
Sir Winston Churchill  	
Killarney. '-,  	
Magee    ——	
David Thompson  	
	
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
Kitsilano   —
Vancouver Technical— ..	
Elementary—
Begbie Annex — — —
General Brock. 	
14
Graham Bruce   	
15
Carnarvon 	
34
Edith Cavell                                         	
16
Cavell Annex ...  	
20
Cook Annex  	
80
Sir James Douglas  _  	
15
Grandview Annex..... 	
Sir Wilfred Grenfell 	
15
15
11
Dr. A. R. Lord.	
Dr. H. N. MacCorkindale         	
14
Sir William MacDonald-   	
15
Sif nii-hcird MrBride
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 169
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
XIII
Special
1
2
3
20
11
13
2
273
301
270
216
192
,  	
309
305
32®
339
304
	
46
12
14
6
359
39®
317
332
!     313
	
24
27
401
|     373
320
323
289
20
14
7
4
306
I    303'
303
295
267
3il
21
13
425
442
386
375
!     314
__
15
111
97
129
91
96
	
182
19®
203
155
183
	
46
18
17
461
■    432
437
436
331
	
26
223
208
245
210
'    239
245
244
233
252
187
	
46
19
44
33
314
350
341
316
327
50
24
26
3«4
344
!    343
318
266
	
28
401
366
I    348
276
239
	
89
71
23
21
33®
356
295
329
298
73
46
59
3®
37
405
1     390
i     393
327
282
_
—
245
119
19
46
17
356
311
303
274
i    254
	
65
80
77
58
64
56
57
54
12
........
	
■  _
165
152
151
74
'    	
	
85
83
98
98
16
	
	
	
36
93
81
82
79
30
60
60
74
56
	
1
40
43
49
50
11
i
47
52
48
42
6
j   -	
76
66
83
65
	
'  —	
	
	
1   	
	
	
61
"~62
77
'       73
,  _
34
27
31-
27
13
110
85
!      86
69
15
72
90
99
'    106
95
_
 	
85
99
116
92
47
54
48
54
17
71
52
66
72
	
88
88
91
67
-—
70
71
65
65
	
\    	
107
110
128
Hi
124'
120
109
ll,
30
	
	
74
75
77
70
49
44
38
32
34
90
72
69
72
8
	
127
126
132
136
	
	
93
91
93
100
97
137
108
98
63
78
70
108
73
75
80
74
82
79
75
71
	
	
76
76
71
68
62
61
62
45
60
52
49
14
133
135
125
132
	
	
	
126
102
130
135
-
	
	
62
61
69
	
111
114
101
1217
	
	
 G 170
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 39 (Vancouver)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Dr. R. E. McKechnie _	
Walter Moberly    	
Moberly Annex A  	
Moberly Annex B  _ 	
Mount Pleasant	
Lord Nelson	
Florence Nightingale..
Nootka  	
John Norquay...	
Oakridge...
David Oppenheimer..
Sir William Osier	
Osier Annex	
Queen Alexandra	
Queen Elizabeth-
Queen Elizabeth Annex..
Queen Mary 	
Quilchena  	
Renfrew	
Renfrew Annex..
Cecil Rhodes	
Lord Roberts	
Laura Secord	
Lord Selkirk	
Selkirk Annex.....
J. W. Sexsmith-
Seymour	
Shaughnessy	
Southlands...	
Southlands Annex	
Lord Strathcona	
Tecumseh	
Tecumseh Annex B..
Lord Tennyson.	
Trafalgar-
Trafalgar Annex B 	
Sir William Van Horne..
Waverley_
Dr. George M. Weir-
General Wolfe	
Totals, District No. 39-
District No. 40 (New Westminster)
Secondary—New Westminster	
Elementary—■
Connaught Heights	
F. W. Howay	
Lord Kelvin   .	
Sir Richard McBride..
Queen Elizabeth	
John Robson 	
Herbert Spencer	
Lord Tweedsmuir	
Totals, District No. 40..
District No. 41 (Burnaby)
Senior Secondary—■
Burnaby Central	
Burnaby North-
Secondary—Burnaby South-
Junior Secondary—
Alpha—   	
Cariboo Hill  	
Kensington  	
McPherson Park	
Moscrop  	
Royal Oak 	
376
874
263
288
483
1,032
571
565
852
183
447
422
60
724
817
254
817
485
641
185
607
628
700
958
234
764
797
627
456
188
1,047
751
221
510
594
137
778
633
97®
614
199
443
143
147
237
513
317
296
455
108
217
212
29
356
416
141
389
241
333
100
331
330
374
477
110
389
405
328
243
99
518
385
116
264
292
65
387
313
297
34®
I
2,735
186
295
485
766
370
440
615
53®
1,380
149
249
403
184
223'
319
284
177
431
120
141
246
519
254
269
397
75
230
210
31
368
401
113
428
244
308
85
276
298
326
481
124
375
392
299
213
89
529
366
105
246
302
72
391
320
281
266
74,646 | 38,179 [ 36,467
1,355
97
146
236
363
186
217
296
254
6,430
3,280
1,282
728
1,335
691
1,261
:      612
595
315
700
341
1,150
592
1,103
572
95®
4S3
660
354
3,150
554
644
649
280
359
558
531
505
306
26
103
65
91
44
125
61
61
129
58
50
110
101
58
89
57
34
93'
68
62
67
157
81
63
119
55
40
20
121
99
70
109
49
34
80
59
59
67
149
73
86
124
40
37
18
87
92
71
105
58 |;
28
	
91
44
64
44
1®
128
	
71
15
79
94
15
183
511
60
22'
89
96
55
110
62
13
12
51
51
50
56
47
43
39
41
15
48
54
47
41
59
74
96
66
64
	
87
93
94
102
15
116
114
104
.  108
16
56
56
67
55
82
87
97
911
4
108
136
124
107
12
59
63
80
87
35
70
62
82
44
127
152
132
132
13
52
65
68
75
17
57
66
55
43
	
66
77
74
57
8
46
i  43
51
56
25
33
41
3®
100
90
95
91
90
93
98
81
60
75
67
76
75
67
74
69
13
5,947 I 6,405  I 6,288 j 5,976
696
27
21
26
36
27
33
86
61
64
96
102
111
61
1  54
55
66
56
62
75
86
94
65
74
69
14
14
15
512
481
514
43
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G  171
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
58
70
27
52
55'
146
5®
76
98
54
45
71
93
102
69
101
33
63
103
126
94
83
9®
109
71
80
76
68
75
25
43
63
103
56
64
104
93
551
58
146
51
138
60
79
52
62
611
117
102
57
97
47
57
93
128
108
78
80
85
73
135
55
95
109
73
85
65
67
191
48
122
48
70
77
44
69
74
117
95
65
9®
~47
62
113'
114
91
67
85
90
91
107
68
100
91
70
84
72
711
140
39
67
50
51
96
497
518
61
59
69
102
105
56
97
50
74
117
95
54
93
74
93
104
99
101
52
63'
74
5,503  | 5,441  1 5,477 | 5,31®
27
18
40
45
711
67
112
129
48
39
55
54
73
85
1      71
81
28
55
73
113
43
68
98
69
50
54
14
29
40
181
72
15
2
28
136
19
34
115
21
30
1,437 |     377 |.     252 |     176
5,458 [ 5,414 | 5,206
4,881  I 4,394
16
42
26
33
590
I    925
48 |       42
44
554
515
26 |.      33
590 |     525 |     554
S3
22
34
202
253
427
3'82
319
201
194
239
359
379
335
200
79
199'
208
364
342
304
181
515
512
668
595
I
434 |
569
592
587
201
 G  172
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
706
340
1,232
661
703
391
469
230
186
100
S55
264
213
100
148
79
708
365
517
259
453
222
650
335
247
130
430
237
683
333
192
103
208
109
64®
334
6®9
347
350
196
406
210
228
101
571
308
425
213
532
272
562
288
415
215
122
52
299
150
369
;      206
227
111
364
187
528
274
522
|      281
316
158
396
208
277
131
402
206
602
3119
568
299
Girls
Kiu
der-
garten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 41 (Burnaby)—Continued
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Burnaby Heights  	
Edmonds .—     	
Elementary—
Armstrong Avenue  	
Aubrey_. 	
Brantford 	
Brentwood Park	
Buckingham  	
Cameron Road   	
Capitol Hill  	
Cascade Heights... 	
Chaffey-Burke 	
Clinton.     —
Confederation Park 	
Douglas Road  	
Gilmore Avenue 	
Gilpin  	
Glenwood  	
Inman.   —
Kitchener- 	
Lakeview    	
Lochdale  	
Lyndhurst     	
Marlborough  	
May wood  _
Morley Street	
Nelson    	
Parkcrest   	
Riverside    	
Riverway West . ,
Rosser   	
Schou — 	
Seaforth  	
Second Street — 	
Sperling     	
Stride—     	
Suncrest  	
Sussex .    	
Twelfth Avenue 	
Westridge   	
Windsor	
Totals, District No. 41 	
District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
Secondary—
Garibaldi _ 	
Maple Ridge ..  	
Pitt Meadows    _.
Elementary—■
Albion    	
Alouette — 	
Blue Mountain .
Fairview	
Glenwood	
Golden Ears	
Hammond	
Haney Central.— —
Eric Langton	
Maple Ridge 	
Meadowland— —
Mount Crescent 	
Pitt Meadows 	
Alexander Robinson..
Ruskin _ 	
Thorn Hill	
Websters Corner	
Whonnock	
Yennadon —
Totals, District No. 42-
366
571
352
239
86
291
113
69
343
24®
231
315
117
193
330
89
99
314
342
154
196
127
263
212
260
274
200
70
149
163
116
167
254
241
158
18®
146
196
283
269
27,152 |  13,952 |: 13,200
496
1,329
373
110
57
150
215
265
240
249
266
166
221
141
412
277
163
120
80
202
160
241
255
668
178
52
28
82
112
134
126
142
135
79
123
68
217
138
83
61
35
108
74
123
241
661
195
58
29
68
103
131
114
107
131
87
9®
73
195
139
80
59
45
94
86
118
5,933  |    3,021  I.   2,912
52
S3
70
20
63
28
27
107
72
71
66
49
54
101
34
27
98
116
56
57
30
8®
61
62
72
54
22
45
41
38
49
92
69
53
40
26
61
85
71
40
94
59
3®
74
39
27
97
63
60
100
39
74
94
39
31
95
98
56
62
33
87
67
72
8®
50
19
31
69
37
66
93
74
50
55'
40
61
95
87
30
71
12
80
36
16
105
77
62
102
32
61
105
32
31
95
100
39
68
2®
98
59
64
85
65
19
55
62
28
53
93
76
59
42
51
52
100
89
12
20
19
16
17
24
26
33
19
26
30
37
39
27
49
37
37
35
36
40
45
26
33
30
30
13
23
32
|      36
31
23
22
23
46
49
51
34
24
42
16
29
21
14
20
22
12
17
10
29
24
31
31
21
26
31
26
34
13
11
16
10
16
16
4
11
11
|' 2,310 [ 2,453  | 2,414 |
16
131
39
3
516
518
572
66
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
ENROLMENT—Continued
G 173
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
1
2
3
XIII
"45
97
69
34
81
32
22
83
71
77
90
35
57
86
27
38
94
90
41
49
35
78
61
62
88
56
19
42
49
32
53
77
74
48
57
35
56
80
86
~~54
99
74
35
78
28
18
91
75
67
1      87
47
57
100
24
30
89
117
48
63
'      32
75
48
68
82
75
21
37
55
34
53
8®
75
39
61
48
57
82
70
45
100
64
37
86
28
24
81
66
55
85
35
47
82
36
29
94
72
45
50
32
67
57
87
77
:      53
11
39
68
31
51
85
79
31
57
37
51
66
48
93
i      71
144
62
~93
22
14
100
68
61
104
80
84
22
83
96
'      39
57
38
63
61
117
'      70
62
50
~27
i      29
~7S
36
73
33
64
94
73
10
	
31
14
15
14
11
~_5
~~i7
2®
I
I  	
	
216
359
220
319
i
I
I  	
1
i
i 	
177
,    223
' _z_
_
	
1  -
1
I
I  _
i	
i 	
i 	
i	
1
2,306  |  2,381   | 2,188
2,258
159
;     44
87
22
2,353
2,245'
2,077
1,775
1,748 |     201
12
22
38
33
41
34
35
24
25
20
45
34
23
16
10
39
22
40
22
16
27
38
23
31
36
18
29
21
67
44
23
13
5
26
22
39
13
17
19
26
34
33
33
24
30
16
54
37
29
21
14
34
21
35
12
17
38
39
33
30
34
21
38
16
50
51
22
14
12
19
17
36
14
15
13
11
8
"~49
i
i      341
28
160
287
102
131
255
88
j    100
!     195
70
61'
249
74
1
1      44
204
39
1      28
513 |,    500
490 |     499
61
49 ||      34
28
549
474 |.    365
384 [;    287 '|i      28
 G 174
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
Senior Secondary—Centennial	
Secondary—
Moody-
Port Coquitlam..
Junior Secondary-
Sir Frederick Banting..
Como Lake	
Mary Hill..
Montgomery..
Winslow	
Elementary-
Alderson.
Viscount Alexander-
Anmore.
Austin Heights..
Lord Baden-Powell-
Sir Frederick Banting-
Brookmere— 	
Cape Horn	
Cedar Drive	
Central	
Coronation Park-
Glen 	
Glenayre..
Harbour View..
Hillcrest	
loco 	
James Park	
Leigh .
Mary Hill..
Millside	
Montgomery	
Moody	
Mountain View_
Mundy Road	
Parkland	
Pleasantside	
Porter 	
Ranch Park	
Seaview —
Sunny Cedars—
Vanier	
Totals, District No. 43_
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
Secondary—
Argyle	
Delbrook.
Carson Graham..
Handsworth	
North Vancouver-
Windsor	
Junior Secondary-
Balmoral	
Hamilton .	
Sutherland	
Elementary—
Blueridge	
Braemar	
Brooksbank	
Burrard View—
Canyon Heights-
Capilano	
Carisbrooke	
Cleveland	
Cloverley	
Eastview	
Fromme	
Highlands	
1,447
562
850
533
651
789
271
431
284
369
46_
569
247
294
831
418
434
246
999
511
87
42
485
269
516
253
707
363
417
214
312
153
401
201
366
188
177
87
494
270
712
3S8
511
254
703
372
84
40
375
194
248
130
803
414
362
201
694
326
515
2S8
513
266 i
641
328
744
381
123
73
612
307
440
250 ,
419
214 ;
89
55
644
331
658
291
419
249
282
215
275
413
188
488
45
216
263
344
203
159
200
178
90
224
354
257
331
44
181
118
389
161
368
257
247
313
363
50
305
190
205
34
313
20,532
867
730
981
969
734
592
935
875
765
101
553
394
349
744
507
590
726
384
589
447
592
10,652 |;   9,880
323
539
505
341
517
447
422
59
276
198
182
367
270
290
376
206
321
229
306
423
407
442
463
393
304
418
428
343
42
277
196
167
377
237
300
350
178
268
218
286
73
126
59
57
103
60
47
65
62
29
61
121
55
104
63
'31
64
48
116
63
64
63
108
30
95
62
61
~~97
1,987
75
136
13
91
64
102
64
46
65
49
28
72
106
66
84
15
57
34
144
58
98
74
72'
102
100
10
72
48
76
87
46
164
10
62
64
98
50
43
66
45
21
68
95
70
94
13
40
32
105
56
87
63
61
102
106
19
74
74
69
~~94
49
134
15
67
76
96
55
41
51
42
25
60
76
68
102
7
48
34
104
31
104
76
68
75
86
21
71
61
63
~~70
15
~14
10
13
5
14
2,068 I' 1,991 | 1,876 |
2
~53
126~
48
87
74
46
85
60
78
101
34
71
72
74
93
86
66
39
105
76
93
93
41
106
70
89
70
68
48
95
85
90
124
59
98
70
68
11
31
13
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 175
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
696
i
■    634
117
158
135
114
87
68
	
	
	
	
 1'      16
5
13
184 ■
164
166
180
12_5
	
208
182
143'
....
	
	
22
21
212
201
209
176
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
5
2
180
153
116
	
	
 .
	
	
■	
	
,  _	
....
217 '
194
15®
	
	
	
	
	
31'
i    ie
13
3111
248
212
	
—
—
44
44
45
'      43
15
122
96
92
104
10
	
_	
	
i _..
	
	
i _	
18
17
14
	
.	
 '
	
	
65
47
47
61
12
■ _	
	
i _	
.	
'	
. ,
62
67
59
54
13
, 	
_...	
	
i _
; _
	
	
i	
77
79
71
66
5
_...
	
	
i _..
 	
	
[	
	
55
48
3®
i      47
	
...
	
'  .	
	
!	
i	
39
36
35
25
	
	
i	
	
	
40
33
37
44
	
1 	
	
! -   _	
50
33
32
40
	
i  	
	
1 |    	
19
22
16
17
	
	
i	
70
66
43
54
	
	
	
	
90
89
64
71
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
63
68
48
60
8
	
_
	
	
 ,
98
78
75'
54
	
	
	
8
5
36
	
...
......
	
.	
	
-
 .
43
33
37
39
15
	
_....
	
1  	
1	
32
27
34
24
	
. _	
	
	
i	
99
92
87
i      92
16
t
	
i .
	
	
	
41
41
31
41
15
	
i	
; 	
	
	
•  _
62
SI
76
70
	
i	
'   	
	
|  	
	
62
56
50
55
16
	
1 	
	
! —...
\  _„
	
1	
t	
63
69
65
51
I _.
. 	
	
1	
	
75
75
79
57
13
	
1 	
 .
	
[	
• 	
97
89
92
66
	
1	
|	
	
1  	
i	
7
19
17
	
	
. 	
	
	
, '
i	
77
76
90
57
	
	
	
 '
	
44
i      48
49
43
9
	
	
	
	
 ,
51
29
34
36
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
I	
—
	
	
	
36
	
	
	
i	
	
	
!  	
	
86
80
62
68
	
—
	
 ■
	
	
	
,  	
i —
1,759  |i 1,643
1,519   |i 1,475
H83i
75
|       47
50
1,459
' ll,2«5*
1,085
963
824
117
250
242
i     210
165
1
	
237
235
258
	
.
.	
24
427
530
	
	
	
	
	
	
249
237
225
132
'    126
	
	
	
_
148
189
i    257
140
	
	
	
	
	
137
128
150
99
I      7-3
!	
424
392
119
	
59
'      62
83'
255
208
208
	
	
1 _	
	
	
	
	
—
	
317
316
132
	
1
! —
82
77
76
75
—
	
	
	
	
	
; 	
c    , .
1 _ . .
72
59
55
	
	
	
	
1 _
36
32
82
66
	
_...
	
;	
1 _	
116
102
111
111
8
	
	
.....
	
1 	
618
72
50
75
21
1 _	
	
	
	
	
1 _
86
89
75
79
	
1 	
104
102
97
92
13
	
	
1 _	
58
44
41
62
14
1 	
77
68
73
70
13
i
	
1 _	
65
,      5®
49
48
15
1 _
96
76
86
i      92
8
1
	
	
	
' 	
1 —
 G 176
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
Grade
I
II
30
41
38
36
33
32
32
33
41
37
25
28
61
40
58
35
89
100
i 112
75
59
77
68
70
72
57
85
67
42
52
52
69
61
73
29
29
'  51
43
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)-
Continued
Elementary—Continued
Keith Lynn	
Larson	
Lonsdale	
Lonsdale Annex
Lynn Valley	
Maplewood	
Montroyal	
Norgate-
North Star	
Prince Charles-
Queen Mary	
Queensbury___.
Ridgeway..
Ridgeway Annex—
Ross Road 	
Seymour Heights-
Sherwood Park	
Upper Lynn	
Westover	
Westview	
Totals, District No. 44~
District No. 45 (West Vancouver)
Secondary—
Hillside	
Sentinel	
West Vancouver.
Elementary—
Caulfeild	
Cedardale	
Chartwell	
Cypress Park	
Eagle Harbour-
Gleneagles	
Glenmore	
Hollyburn_
Irwin Park	
Pauline Johnson..
Ridgeview	
West Bay	
Westcot	
Totals, District No. 45-
District No. 46 (Sechelt)
Secondary—
Elphinstone	
Pender Harbour  	
Elementary—
Bowen Island	
Davis Bay .	
Egmont-
Gibsons	
Halfmoon Bay_
Langdale	
Madeira Park	
Roberts Creek—
Sechelt	
West Sechelt	
Totals, District No. 46-
Dlstrlct No. 47 (Powell River)
Secondary—Max Cameron	
Junior Secondary—Brooks-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Texada_
259
411
344
65
256
173
373
310
667
71
605
459
679
129
514
504
277
467
155
351
138
209
174
33
132
87
190
156
363
46
299
256
365
52
258
254
145
232
89
194
121
202
170
32
124
86
183
154
304
25
306
203
314
77
256
250
132
235
66
157
20,493 | 10,579 | 9,914
949
477
845
440
1,556
809
509
,  252
317
165
239
130
172
74
115
54
410
200
474
261
492
251
510
273
521
267
528
263
552
281
546
260
,735
4,457
571
317
122
60
15
11
51
28
12
4
542
295
12
5
127
72
227
119
136
67
371
197
40
14
714
360
891
470
163
86
472
405
747
257
152
109
98
61
210
213
241
237
254
265
271
286
4,278
254
62
4
23
8
247
7
55
108
69
174
26
2,226 | 1,189 | 1,037
354
421
77
41
31
41
25
48
50
53
52
50
52
53
53
34
37
32
35
29
60
SZ
60
56
47
60
52
56
549 |  610
73
23
59
3
14
78
4
21
24
28
36
10
155
218
20
64
43
38
32
33
55
75
63
68
57
50
63
52
52
35
39
39
28
52
52
49
63
65
65
77
69
693 |  685
3
10
~68
3
27
28
20
32
9
200
24
2
14
5
61
2
19
31
16
35
10
195
29
71
1,911 | 1,877 |
5
11
13
li
2
44
 STATISTICAL RETURNS                                           G 177
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
rv
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Inter-
medi-
ate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
1
2
3
XIII
41
61
52
37
30
60
53
96
~90
59
117
72
81
69
79
32
37
23
93
51
29
28
51
41
101
~62
57
102
65
83
37
52
27
47
50
70
64
33
37
50
35
81
_ 64
63
106
73
75
63
46
34
77
60
34
51
30
108
"~76
76
104
?1
92
58
49
44
27
13
	
	
	
I  	
	
	
i .
	
	
1,926 | 1,728
1,705  [ 1,690
182 |       59 |.      62 |       83
1,632
1,523 | 1,453
1,247 | 1,249 |,     140
70
38
43
25
~66
57
57
66
69
59
55
81
88
48
40
34
71
63
71
68
70
68
76
77
35
47
37
49
55
66
67
73
98
63
83
35
_42
53
51
45
80
86
84
96
15
10
30
10
18
14
	
25
23
215
170
302
1
209
202
283
1
1     195
131
269
188
178
280
1
142
164
282
78
686 |     697 |     667 |     655
99 |       14 |       25 |       23
687 |     694 |     595
646 |     588 |       78
2
13
3
66
3
10
32
15
33
11
2
1
68
""26
30
11
58
2
3
61
""24
27
17
60
1
_67
32
29
58
	
	
11
9
173
40
133
27
93
21
78
21
74
13
—
188 |     196 |     194 |     187
	
	
11
9
213 |     160
114
99
87 |	
	
	
	
22
	
~23
~19
""Is
364
29
328
18
177
142
21
273
246
18
 G 178                                  PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Pri-
mary
Special
Total
Boys
Girls
District No. 47 (Powell River)—Continued
Elementary—
Rlnhhpr Bay
64
320
628
265
18
86
509
252
201
78
31
139
329
35
178
330
138
9
43
263
118
107
33
15
85
168
29
142
298
127
9
43
246
134
94
45
16
54
161
37
32
61
32
59
34
40
~~30
39
47
89
36
3
24
66
35
30
34
3
41
48
71
28
4
64
36
26
26
4
~~54
36
94
32
2
75
26
37
~~ 1
26
41
2
5
Cranberry Lake    .
J. P. Dallos
F.riEelii11
On>f Point
I. C, Hill
K>11y Creek
T.nnd
Stillwater
Totals, District No. 47	
District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
Secondary—
4,688
2,438
2,250
364
428
385
403
7
533
149
12
223
182
10
392
15
193
366
248
110
272
79
4
113
86
1
206
7
96
194
133
63
261
70
8
110
96
9
186
8
97
172
115
47
~~44
26
44
18
53
44
14
3
19
31
3
51
4
18
45
47
15
3
38
23
3
59
5
17
40
28
12
2
23
18
4
65
6
21
44
28
10
"IT
Elementary—
Signal Hill
Totals, District No. 48
2,433 |    1,254 |    1,179
243
236
228
221
"
District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
Elementary-Senior Secondary—
496
274
8
184
33
8
10
6
256
130
3
95
20
6
6
2
240
144
5
89
13
2
4
4
47
61
25
29
11
3
34
17
1
15
8
1
1
36
23
2
27
4
1
2
1
13
Elementary—
South Bentinck
Totals, District No. 49   	
District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
1,019 |       518 |       501
47
129
77
96
13
296
105
277
98
28
13
152
60
150
54
18
4
144
45
127
44
10
9
33
30
23
33
13
6
5
27
15
28
8
3
2
14
8
27
10
4
4
15
Ta«"
Totals, District Nn. 50
817
438
379
33
110
83
67
15
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
344
852
409
6
240
472
11
504
188
479
210
3
134
234
7
250
156
373
199
3
106
238
4
254
~62
83
1
38
86
3
90
38
4
34
61
~85
73
1
39
63
~~56
15
"io
Elementary—
Digby Island.             	
Pnrt FrtwafH
 STATISTICAL RETURNS                                              G 179
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
rv
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
1
2
3
XIII
27
30
59
29
4
50
26
13
6
28
39
42
71
38
3
34
66
36
24
4
29
32
41
81
29
2
28
46
29
24
18
9
~44
44
93
35
58
30
26
39
7
1
25
j
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
311 |     379 |     351 |     347
40
23
19
15
393
346
340
273
246
18
3
20
21
45
~34
37
42
11
1
26
25
36
27
46
26
16
25
25
47
21
28
16
14
28
13
45
24
35
17
18
27
17
17
	
120
47
110
41
124
30
81
15
64
16
	
213 |     203 |     176 |     180
40
17 |       17 |   ....   .
167 |     151
154
96 |       80 |   	
37
21
~~19
4
2
2
1
42
15
1
31
5
1
3
1
36
19
4
24
1
1
40
13
~26
2
1
	
	
	
	
43
44
40
37
37
27
1
30
25
13
8
	
86 |       99
85
82
_   _ |             |
87 |       77 |       65
55 |       21  |   	
46
12
28
14
2
31
10
25
12
3
1
39
4
24
11
2
35
15
16
9
1
1
1
_z
	
	
	
24
8
25
8
1
24
4
27
8
2
10
6
11
5
4
	
	
	
102
82 |       80 |       77
1
	
	
	
66 |       65 |       36
	
	
	
44
40
60
4
60
51
~29
68
43
43
30
63
2
53
47
30
71
2
45
15
25
25
12
330
263
197
184
147
13
 G 180
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Roosevelt Park	
Seal Cove	
Westview	
Totals, District No. 52-
District No. 54 (Smithers)
Secondary—Smithers-
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Silverthorne..
Elementary—
Lake Kathlyn..
Muheim Memorial-
Quick	
Telkwa	
Totals, District No. 54~
District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
Secondary—Lakes District -
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Grassy Plains..
Elementary—
Babine	
Burns Lake 	
Francois Lake	
McKenna-Decker Lake_
Ootsa Lake 	
Pendleton Bay	
Southbank	
Topley 	
Totals, District No. 55-
District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
Secondary—Nechako Valley-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Fort St. James	
Fraser Lake	
Elementary—
Braeside	
Endako 	
Fort Fraser—
Mapes Area..
Mapes..
Prairiedale  —
Sinkut View	
Vanderhoof 	
Vanderhoof South-
Totals, District No. 56-
District No. 57 (Prince George)
Senior Secondary—Prince George	
Junior Secondary—
Blackburn Road	
Connaught
Duchess Park-
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Kelley Road	
Winton 	
Elementary—
Austin Road	
Bear Lake	
Beaverley.
Blackburn Road~
Buckhorn 	
Carney Hill	
Connaught	
Finlay Forks	
Foreman  _
Fort George Central..
561
351
290
294
180
126
267
171
164
83
74
55
95
60
64
96
54
36
4,040 | 2,105
1,935
62
513
441
418
565
323
92
620
35
187
1,822
339
189
80
425
44
138
38
39
30
91
293
173
44
318
12
93
933 |
272
150
48
302
23
94
889
169
86
39
227
23
64
20
18
20
49
413
715
495
252
364
180
438
229
28
16
27
11
113
62
65
34
25
18
65
36
80
40
502
272
92
51
170
103
41
198
21
74
18
21
10
42
698
243
184
209
12
16
51
31
7
29
40
230
41
2,294 | 1,201 | 1,093
989
336
518
1,444
488
309
529
119
166
412
159
348
510
20
19
531
499
181
266
726
254
202
280
55
88
202
81
165
255
7
9
277
490
155
252
718
234
107
249
64
78
210
78
183
255
13
10
254
24
29
99
5
31
35
16
87
8
31
188
177
14
14
80
6
25
6
13
3
20
181
35
57
4
5
24
12
8
11
15
52
28
251
118
25
33
76
33
57
56
9
2
73
12
8
59
11
3
8
4
4
23
32
21
83
5
21
162
15
63
4
38
7
2
6
13
132
38
49
3
5
12
11
7
11
8
48
28
220
101
24
33
50
26
62
57
6
1
65
44
42
4
5
16
8
10
13
18
42
33
235
74
14
30
75
38
64
54
5
77
25
14
15
29
13
18
148 |  32
19
12
"31"
39
8
12
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 181
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
XIII
Special
1
1
3
67
80
74
66
44
35
38
46
	
.
	
	
. ,
	
	
31
27
41
36
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
350 |  333
344
343
15
25 |  25 |  12
330
263
197
184
147
13
19
16
10
130
116
122
90
62
33
25
28
26
	
	
	
28
26
26
18
8
15
11
78
74
98
86
	
	
7
6
4
-
21
24
29
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
154 |  140
159
142
  |  19 |  16
10
158
142
148
108
70
9
12
76
80
66
53
43
17
16
24
21
	
—
24
26
19
10
9
8
8
10
46
57
44
43
15
	
	
5
11
7
	
	
—
23
13
16
20
	
5
6
6
_ _.
3
6
5
6
10
7
	
	
11
6
8
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
130 |  131
118
108
15
9
12 | 	
110
106
85
53
43
	
11
8
7
115
97
100
88
69
47
30
33
42
25
29
22
40
48
40
33
	
51
53
25
	
	
4
5
8
4
4
4
_
15
15
17
14
	
  .
14
10
10
	
	
	
	
	
	
14
9
7
- - -
11
15
13
	
	
70
68
92
105
13
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
222 |  204
224
194
13
11 |   8
7
191
179
147
88
69
546
371
72
132
118
86
	
	
	
184
187
147
	
	
	
	
	
	
584
551
309
	
	
	
94
174
115
105
	
	
	
95
90
61
24
	
	
	
	
77
70
66
15
11
16
17
12
20
22
10
18
53
48
56
42
11
11
25
15
37
54
37
37
80
1
84
3
76
1
103
	
	
	
■	
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
89
4
76
73
~69
	
	
-
=
'—
	
	
	
 G 182
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Prl-
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
District No. 57 (Prince George)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
214
45
171
389
682
393
157
79
529
129
45
110
160
110
473
11
207
567
52
24
46
512
67
23
750
52
107
244
329
117
24
87
200
373
202
75
36
291
61
22
45
74
54
236
5
123
297
23
12
23
268
29
15
386
29
55
116
177
97
21
84
189
309
191
82
43
238
68
23
65
86
56
237
6
84
270
29
12
23
244
38
8
364
23
52
128
152
	
36
7
28
67
101
73
26
39
65
29
5
35
41
29
84
1
42
88
7
4
8
50
13
6
144
6
22
65
63
42
10
37
66
103
64
36
18
72
24
10
33
22
18
91
2
46
103
6
5
6
76
22
5
115
9
20
38
59
25
6
29
37
95
56
20
22
81
24
12
42
26
21
68
2
18
88
11
6
7
76
7
3
128
12
12
37
65
Fraserview  	
Harwin         -    , 	
Highland  -  .
	
MacKenzie   —    —
	
PedenHill                 	
Shady Valley        	
Totals, District No. 57	
13,574
7,002
6,572
1,676
1,583
1,467
68
District No. 58 (McBride)
163
275
46
17
49
263
94
152
27
11
29
139
69
123
19
6
20
124
~_4
26
10
2
4
46
36
6
2
9
27
33
8
3
5
32
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Valemount	
Elementary—
18
13
Totals, District No. 58	
813
452
361
24
88
80
81
31
District No. 59 (Peace River South)
596
674
443
484
282
313
556
49
92
67
573
66
152
62
426
47
265
139
91
81
196
586
43
200
311
345
216
244
153
168
290
23
44
36
291
36
73
28
235
22
133
76
43
45
109
285
21
102
285
329
227
240
129
145
266
26
48
31
282
30
79
34
191
25
132
63
48
36
87
301
22
98
	
49
57
54
10
17
14
109
21
21
21
68
U
44
32
13
14
53
107
8
60
55
45
63
6
11
8
87
7
28
19
58
16
43
24
17
11
58
86
10
37
42
57
62
11
17
16
70
9
16
16
81
14
34
20
11
9
42
82
4
65
Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
28
Grandview   —	
Parkhill	
12
Rolla                  	
Tremblay	
	
Windrem ..
9
Totals, District No. 59 	
6,483
3,329
3,154
-	
783
689
678
49
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 183
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
DC
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
xra
Special
1
2
3
22
6
28
28
10
21
31
6
13
28
2
15
55
60
47
57
	
	
	
	
	
104
89
99
91
	
	
	
	
	
61
44
46
49
	
	
	
	
17
21
16
21
	
	
	
	
—
—
—
72
84
72
83
23
11
7
11
_
_..
_..
	
_
7
6
2
3
	
	
	
	
	
19
17
21
14
14
14
14
	
_.
69
3
32
55
49
57
3
17
	
	
—
—
16
36
69
73
72
74
	
_
10
8
10
	
	
	
4
5
	
	
	
10
6
8
_  _
1
	
	
	
	
	
_
81
81
76
62
	
	
11
14
	
	
	
	
2
1
3
3
	
	
	
93
100
90
80
	
	
	
	
14
4
7
	
	
	
13
20
11
9
	
	
	
	
31
31
23
19
	
	
	
	
34
52
28
28
	
	
	
	
—
—
—
1,290
1,245
1,162
1,114
113 |       90 |       61 |       24
1,074
971
647
546
371
72
46
34
32
22
29
17
39
25
28
23
19
11
	
	
	
9
3
10
4
4
7
5
4
3
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
10
32
28
29
32
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
71
82
69
71
	
	
	
69
53
43
22
29
60
288
214
34
23
20
4
250
233
144
	
166
182
95
	
80
90
81
22
14
6
4
65
44
34
28
16
	
48
50
38
47
31
34
42
61
86
90
81
31
.
7
8
7
	
	
	
_
22
10
15
	
.
	
12
2
7
8
_ .
	
	
	
	
93
80
67
67
13
10
6
	
...
23
6
26
6
45
23
24
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
53
41
62
25
	
	
	
34
29
36
17
11
24
11
	
19
17
14
	
	
9
43
69
13
16
9
—
	
	
	
	
63
77
102
	
	
	
	
	
6
29
7
8
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
601
578
587
516
78 |       37
26
8
481
459
333
316
230
34
 G 184
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Pri-
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
710
376
334
522
262
260
	
	
	
	
	
129
61
68
24
20
19
20
10
10
	
1
4
6
_
12
4
8
	
2
1
3
_
200
101
99
.
42
34
33
13
7
6
3
2
3
176
94
82
	
28
33
31
31
16
15
5
7
5
40
21
19
	
5
9
5
602
329
273
	
80
87
88
31
68
33
35
	
16
12
15
158
92
66
	
30
27
35
474
253
221
	
80
66
66
6
3
3
	
2
	
2
..
40
17
23
	
8
5
9
55
27
28
	
7
7
7
31
14
17
2
5
3
73
42
31
	
11
16
16
302
149
153
	
65
37
33
_
33
16
17
	
6
11
4
175
89
86
	
32
37
34
73
34
39
.
12
8
12
110
50
60
	
21
18
25
55
32
23
	
14
9
7
	
4,108
2,132
1,976
496
455
461
31
733
386
347
563
273
290
	
	
	
	
	
666
327
339
	
	
 .	
	
	
1,110
598
512
	
. ;
	
	
	
1,360
827
533
	
	
	
	
	
877
470
407
	
	
	
	
952
518
434
	
	
907
486
421
	
	
778
417
361
	
	
	
	
	
935
450
485
	
	
	
	
	
935
494
441
	
 .
	
	
	
455
231
224
	
	
	
	
	
816
392
424
	
	
	
	
	
293
123
170
41
45
39
119
60
59
	
29
33
27
148
79
69
	
32
35
38
343
166
177
	
64
52
59
186
91
95
	
26
25
35
620
311
309
82
69
79
88
14
505
256
249
57
60
50
77
970
484
486
114
99
99
128
882
461
421
106
93
112
107
18
165
85
80
33
39
35
506
265
241
99
53
61
42
631
327
304
85
71
75
69
344
166
178
	
47
55
58
29
15
14
	
	
	
14
263
134
129
38
45
53
650
332
318
58
73
79
88
248
120
128
52
53
60
1,132
582
550
119
168
142
119
45
731
362
369
88
86
78
77
14
604
303
301
77
70
77
88
737
368
369
59
64
52
650
318
332
71
77
90
81
8
362
197
165
88
32
35
29
17
475
234
241
	
60
71
71
....
District No. 60 (Peace River North)
Secondary—North Peace	
Junior Secondary—Bert Bowes	
Elementary—
Airport .	
Altona ._	
Attachie	
Ambrose _
Buick Creek-
Charlie Lake_
Clayhurst	
Flatrock	
Fort St. John Central..
Goodlow  	
Grandhaven	
Alwin Holland  	
Jedney Base Camp  	
Mile 18, Beatton River Road.
Montney  	
North Pine	
Prespatou Valley .
Robert Ogilvie	
Rosefield	
Taylor 	
Transpine 	
Upper Pine	
Wonowon 	
Totals, District No. 60	
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
Secondary—
Esquimalt..
Mount Douglas-
Mount View	
Oak Bay	
Victoria 	
Junior Secondary-
Central 	
ColquitZ-
Esquimalt 	
Gordon Head-
Lansdowne	
Oak Bay-
Reynolds —
S. J. Willis-
Elementary—
Bank Street-
Beacon Hill-
Braefoot	
Burnside	
Cedar Hill	
Cloverdale	
Craigflower	
Doncaster 	
Sir James Douglas..
Fairburn	
Glanford 	
Gordon Head	
Hampton
Handicapped Children's Cliriic_
Hillcrest    __ 	
Frank Hobbs	
James Bay..
George Jay	
Margaret Jenkins-
Lake Hill 	
Lampson Street	
Macaulay	
Marigold..
McKenzie Avenue-
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 185
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
TV
XIII
Special
1
2
3
29
19
12
129
102
117
189
113
	
	
	
	
	
	
196
182
144
	
	
25
18
23
3
3
3
	
1
1
1
1
2
	
33
30
28
	
2
2
_
1
	
24
14
26
20
	
_
2
4
5
1
2
	
8
6
4
3
	
68
78
64
76
30
6
6
7
3
3
	
24
21
21
	
50
2
1
80
53
79
	
	
	
	
	
	
6
4
5
2
...
11
11
5
7
5
5
4
7
8
7
6
6
2
1
28
33
37
69
_
6
4
1
1
18
17
20
17
	
_
_
	
10
11
6
9
„
5
12
12
11
11
	
4
8
4
9
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
349
374
333
326
30
29 |  19
12
345
285
261
189
113
........
147
315
271
	
	
	
	
22
299
242
. 	
. ...
	
	
20
_
24
323
299
. 	
	
	
	
	
_
189
505
416
	
	
8
202
621
529
37
13
15
332
314
166
	
 	
19
18
22
318
337
238
	
... .
	
20
20
14
355
363
135
	
	
5
6
	
274
274
219
	
	
21
29
23
312
307
243
	
.
	
362
355
218
	
	
	
	
157
178
120
■	
24
34
5
283
261
209
	
57
30
40
38
33
	
	
	
	
	
	
43
50
39
S3
26
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
34
66
	
73
69
79
67
_
62
67
62
70
	
	
90
114
156
155
15
_
__
104
118
106
118
	
	
	
27
31
	
	
	
.
42
72
73
64
. . .
	
86
79
73
93
	
56
54
36
38
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
i7
42
48
85
87
93
87
	
	
43
40
	
	
134
95
129
125
56
106
80
94
108
	
_
74
68
79
71
150
121
151
140
_
89
78
81
68
7
36
36
38
36
15
._
_
73
62
72
66
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
——
 G 186
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
Grade
I
II
56
83
55
31
34
38
129
117
75
81
27
33
67
63
72
98
65
73
26
35
63
76
72
68
28
44
68
90
57
65
96
98
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Monterey-
North Ward-
Northridge.—
Oaklands	
Quadra	
Quadra Primary_
Richmond	
Rockheights	
Shelbourne	
Solarium	
South Park	
Strawberry Vale_
Tillicum	
Tolmie	
Uplands	
Victor 	
Victoria West-
View Royal—
Willows	
Totals, District No. 61..
District No. 62 (Sooke)
Senior Secondary—Belmont	
Secondary—Edward Milne-
Junior Secondary—
Dunsmuir 	
Elizabeth Fisher	
Elementary—
Colwood	
Dogwood	
Glenlake	
Happy Valley-
Jordan River—
Langford	
Metchosin	
Metchosin Annex.
Millstream	
Port Renfrew	
Sangster	
Saseenos	
Savory	
Sooke	
Totals, District No. 62-
District No. 63 (Saanich)
Senior Secondary-
Junior Secondary-
Mount Newton-
North Saanich ..
Royal Oak _
Elementary—
Beaver Lake	
Brentwood	
Cordova Bay	
Deep Cove	
Durrance Road-
Elk Lake	
Keating _
-Claremont..
Lochside	
McTavish	
Prospect Lake .
Royal Oak	
Saanichton	
Sansbury	
Sidney	
700
378
258
1,040
624
112
425
348
554
30
259
229
581
485
438
60
599
432
895
31,027
277
311
276
490
321
14
287
189
28
564
179
41
162
68
336
174
230
340
652
381
339
395
129
318
492
157
92
87
206
137
103
87
295
130
174
484
Totals District No. 63..
4,658
348
183
78
532
330
56
227
173
263
18
138
119
318
243
199
29
327
216
464
352
195
80
508
294
56
198
175
291
12
121
110
263
242
239
31
272
216
431
62
77
125
79
110
Tl2
90
65
85
104
40
40
135
73
29
58
68
85
39
53
77
55
89
77
111
15,969
15,058
1,849 | 2,422 | 2,587 | 2,653
139
150
152
260
161
9
170
106
12
278
91
19
76
39
176
94
107
177
138
161
124
230
160
5
117
83
16
286
88
22
86
29
160
80
123
163
4,287 | 2,216 | 2,071
370
203
171
204
64
165
266
75
58
44
120
75
55
47
153
78
89
253
2,490
282
178
168
191
65
153
226
82
34
43
86
62
48
40
142
52
85
231
2,168
61
65
49
50
63
288
55
37
24
5
89
23
7
24
17
55
25
26
50
44
37
29
2
99
20
7
23
11
48
28
46
47
44
41
23
6
73
14
13
26
7
59
21
35
51
437 |  441
413
13
34
39
24
19
29
31
20
11
13
28
19
17
70
367
21
40
41
23
11
32
36
13
16
13
38
18
17
49
368
19
32
41
21
9
26
29
23
16
17
38
14
14
79
378
11
16
32
15
"40
244
14
21
7
42
15
~33~
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 187
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
XIII
Special
1
2
3
94
98
107
96
41
47
54
33
	
	
	
	
	
35
	
	
	
	
. ..
	
138
127
135
134
	
	
— .
	
	
	
	
77
77
82
80
	
	
	
	
	
23
	
	
	
	
	
	
—	
-	
	
	
	
73
59
64
41
	
	
-
	
	
	
	
	
	
79
54
~88
93
17
	
14
.
	
	
	
	
	
28
67
71
61
	
	
	
34
31
32
32
	
	
	
70
52
61
77
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
66
69
52
56
10
	
	
	
	
44
40
53
77
7
	
	
	
	
20
	
	
	
	
86
74
70
57
	
	
	
	
56
58
64
55
	
_ 	
111
112
129
136
17
	
	
	
2,608
2,384
2,519
2,403
271
126 |  120
107
2,393
2,389
2,132
2,063
1,757
150
127
8
5
6
95
58
61
45
33
118
93
65
	
	
16
17
9
168
142
138
	
49
45
44
40
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
33
36
28
27
27
33
24
34
22
	
	
	
	
3
4
7
1
_
	
	
_
81
62
68
92
	
	
	
24
39
33
26
	
	
_
	
	
14
	
	
24
27
19
19
	
	
	
.
	
	
	
13
6
5
9
	
	
	
	
_
46
42
43
43
	
	
	
26
29
21
24
	
	
35
37
29
22
	
45
47
46
42
5
	
	
	
	
	
	
426
398
377
367
32
24
22 |  15
381
293
264
195
160
-
324
282
46
21
23
20
102
113
102
_
13
111
114
101
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
143
120
132
	
	
13
21
28
14
	
33
27
38
39
14
	
	
70
82
71
62
12
_
	
26
18
27
18
	
	
16
13
12
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
28
29
32
21
17
22
21
21
8
11
12
20
	
6
17
6
15
	
36
38
34
34
	
19
22
18
20
14
15
16
16
76
50
47
50
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
362
365
362
342
26
34
23
20
356
347
335
324
282
46
 G 188
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
District No. 64 (Gulf Islands)
223
36
12
27
342
19
95
18
6
15
163
10
128
18
6
12
179
9
43
5
3
5
42
4
4
1
3
38
1
4
2
1
40
4
Elementary—
Tntalcs Pisfrict Nn  64
659
307
352
43
59
47
51
District No. 65 (Cowichan)
771
289
463
425
154
389
18
38
234
125
130
205
158
410
100
42
123
280
151
189
162
17
41
89
204
194
17
29
379
151
270
227
76
217
9
23
121
59
62
106
83
209
54
22
66
146
74
99
75
10
19
51
119
93
12
15
392
138
193
198
78
172
9
15
113
66
68
99
75
201
46
20
57
134
77
90
87
7
22
38
85
101
5
14
35
51
29
96
127
25
47
24
28
38
26
15
27
26
78
7
27
15
16
9
24
19
12
9
20
60
~21
39
16
27
24
30
9
63
20
29
9
14
28
13
4
21
53
22
35
22
37
22
7
90
24
23
~"iii
25
26
14
4
Junior Secondary—
Elementary—
Alexander	
24
18
Tnhhlp Hill
34
Mill Ray
17
Totals District No. 65 .,.
5,447
2,847
2,600
410
400
426
438
93
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
552
198
53
139
371
79
23
29
23
225
284
100
23
75
175
44
13
14
13
107
268
98
30
64
196
35
10
15
10
118
49
~47
~32
39
7
46
11
5
4
2
35
47
12
46
14
5
5
6
37
52
10
44
17
4
5
4
28
Elementary—
J. H. Boyd             _
11
Yount    ..                 	
 .
1,692
848
844
128
149
172
164
11
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
436
536
409
46
58
81
435
242
169
6
219
263
210
25
29
48
211
130
90
3
217
273
199
21
29
33
224
112
79
3
48
"~43
48
50
	
55
16
14
10
59
21
43
3
44
7
20
9
45
25
15
1
zz
34
13
13
4
53
18
34
1
Elementary—
15
6
TViPtis Iceland
Totals, District No. 67	
2,418
1,228
1,190
189
221
166
170
21
 STATISTICAL RETURNS                                           G 189
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
1
2
3
XIII
6
1
2
51
6
1
9
43
5
2
3
43
1
5
1
2
42
5
_—
	
	
	
48
1
1
2
4
53
50
34
38
	
60
59
54
55
  1       - - 1    - 1      --
56
53
50
34
38 |   	
24
26
~37
~24
22
22
~~91
5
~28
31
24
~10
10
36
16
~~29
20
73
"~29
~_i
31
18
61
9
7
24
41
~~16
33
34
23
38
~~ 31
"ts
13
20
89
7
~io
25
47
~~34
25
22
59
~"ii
~~15
19
26
77
~~34
16
50
~~28
33
28
~41
33
41
28
111
130
179
106
163
174
191
72
68
72
329
231
20
435
419
397
412
69
33 |       41
28
420 |     443 |     403
329 |     231
20
10
77
11
2
7
5
29
__
~67
13
5
6
3
28
6
70
13
2
2
3
17
~97
"~19
16
6
5
5
128
116
115
93
84
	
141
130
113
116
16 |         6 |         5 |         5
128 |     116
115
93
84
	
50
10
11
—ii
26
13
1
57
~~71
31
26
59
~~84
28
23
"~ii
62
~20
15
12
17
16
17
11
—
	
—
—
110
113
88
104
82
97
65
83
47
54
zz
—
174 |     185
194 |     182
29 |       16 I       17 |       11
223 |     192 |     179
148
101 1   	
 G 190
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys      Girls
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
Secondary—Nanaimo District-
Junior Secondary—John Barsby_
Wellington	
Woodlands	
Elementary—
Bay view	
Brechin  _
Chase River	
Christopher Robin..
Cilaire 	
Departure Bay	
Dufferin Crescent-
Extension	
Fairview	
Forest Park	
Gabriola	
Georgia Avenue-
Pauline Haarer.—
Hammond Bay	
Harewood	
Mount Benson	
Mountain View—
North Cedar	
Northfield	
Park Avenue	
Princess Anne	
Princess Royal	
Quarterway	
Quennell	
Rock City	
Rutherford	
Seaview   	
South Wellington-
Waterloo 	
Woodbank	
Totals, District No. 68-
District No. 69 (Qualicum)
Secondary—Qualicum Beach-
Junior Secondary—Parksville-
Elementary—•
Bowser	
Errington	
French Creek	
Home Lake	
Little Qualicum.-
Nanoose	
Parksville	
Qualicum Beach-
Totals, District No. 69	
District No. 70 (Alberni)
Secondary—Alberni District	
Junior Secondary—
Eric J. Dunn	
A. W. Neill   	
Elementary—
Alberni .—.	
Beaver Creek	
Calgary	
Cherry Creek	
Eighth Avenue...
Faber	
Franklin River..
Gill	
Glenwood	
G. W. Gray-
C. T. Hilton.
1,266
986
186
907
255
434
211
40
166
266
597
26
572
319
36
100
179
37
289
271
116
231
60
225
268
195
238
391
328
84
197
100
38
128
658
497
106
458
135
215
109
19
83
118
305
18
303
145
19
63
94
13
145
133
58
122
44
114
152
88
137
204
173
37
98
58
19
64
608
489
80
449
120
219
102
21
83
148
292
8
269
174
17
37
85
24
144
138
58
109
16
111
116
107
101
187
155
47
99
42
19
64
,742
5,004
398
215
198
92
43
22
79
45
143
76
28
14
55
23
104
52
446
235
232
103 j
4,738
183
106
21
34
67
14
32
52
211
129
1,726 |  877 |  849
1,221
430
782
547
218
400
227
704 |
62
38
427
142
239
183
639
224
372
286
119
220
121
363
24
15
212
72
131
93
582
206
410
261
99
180
106
341
38
23
215
70
108
90
678
804
818
59
31
5
15
21
9
19
45
31
10
52
32
805
92
10
11
14
11
13
48
39
13
90
145 |  136 |  146 |
13
—
	
67
59
34
46
55
72
35
33
112
98
14
11
3
7
56
61
30
13
38
41
62
58
69
24
61 |
42 1
109
12
6
63
19
29
63
16
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 191
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
rv
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
25
212
S31
427
71
—
	
	
21
31
	
427
186
246
351 |     156
	
	
	
—
—
	
12
	
	
386
263
	
	
	
40
39
30
65
~6i
55
-
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
29
25
23 1       27
21
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
ZZ
31
39
35
30 1       38
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
34
129
129 I     155
14
  |   	
	
. .
	
	
6
4
2 |   	
1
	
	
	
48
78
65
57
	
	
	
.
37
9
35
6
30
3
37
—
	
	
 ■
	
	
	
	
"	
	
42
11
42
~44
~55
zz
37
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
29
35
29 |       33
.
	
	
	
16
21
14 |       14
...
	
_	
..
	
.
20
26
25 1       35
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
37
66
32
32 1       35
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
39
29
31
	
23
33
13
	
	
	
	
	
__
11
80
129
146
25
	
.
	
36
41
47
34
—
16
18
16
.
	
.....
	
—
24
19
22 |       39
11
6
17
17
5
13
11 |   	
6 |   	
19 |       16
lb
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
764 |     789
773 |     791
83
33
31
25
859 |     737 |     631
531
427
71
1
-- I   -
9
8
10
71
64
74
108
54
_
	
......
	
	
	
	
73
73
52
	
;
3
13
9
11
9
15
	
	
	
	
	
	
.....
—
17
19
24 |       35
	
 .
	
	
	
	
—
8
12
15 |       20
	
	
ZZ
—
12
13
18 |       19
48
59
54 |       53
15
	
....
25
26
22 |       26
	
 1   	
	
	
	
	
	
	
126
149 |     157
153
15 |         9
8 I       10
144 I     137
126
108
54
—.
53
46
33
174
129
128
344
274
40
174
137 1     119
	
	
	
	
308
253 |     221
	
	
	
68
64
66 |     105
49
44
23
31 |       16
_
_ .....
	
50
49
48 |       65
	
22
28
28 I       39
.
_
94
89
85 |       80
21
_
11
14
. . I   ...
	
	
|
.
._
4
5
4 |         6
	
	
3
55 |       71
60 |       61
	
__
11
17
13 |       17
13
	
	
	
30
39
33 1       29
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
|
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 192
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total       Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 70 (Alberni)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
John Howitt	
Maebelle  _ -	
Maquinna  	
Redford    	
River Bend-
Sproat	
Wood	
Totals, District No. 79..
District No. 71 (Courtenay)
Senior Secondary—Georges P. Vanier...
Secondary—Courtenay 	
Junior Secondary—
Comox    ...
Cumberland-
Lake Trail	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Tsolum_
Elementary—
Arden   	
Beaufort  _
Black Creek	
Brooklyn 	
Comox 	
Courtenay	
Cumberland-	
Denman Island-
Fanny Bay	
Glacier View	
Hornby Island...
Puntledge Park..
Royston	
Sandwick 	
Union Bay. 	
Totals, District No. 71..
District No. 72 (Campbell River)
Senior Secondary—Campbell River	
Junior Secondary—Campbell River	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Mansons Landing	
Sayward  	
Elementary—
Arbutus  	
Campbellton..
Cedar	
Cedar Annex_
Central	
Discovery Passage-
Elm	
Evergreen	
Maple  	
Ocean Grove.
Pinecrest	
Quadra
Rockland	
Stuart Island	
Surge Narrows ..
Whaletown	
Willow Point	
Totals, District No. 72..
District No. 75 (Mission)
Secondary—Mission 	
Elementary—
Bell Road	
Cedar Valley-
249
109
411
324
93
183 |
326
133
55
205
173
45
90
172
420
228
513
252
337
171
212
108
446
231
569
292
271
150
27
15
176
87
266
146
826
419
562
285
382
189
17
10
12
6
155
73
14
9
569
281
343
186
19
13
134
73
466
271
996
492
61
38
198
96
13
12
482
251
253
134
205
103
215
116
167
91
262
129
125
68
173
82
44
16
192
100
199
97
157
83
10
6
12
6
9
4
305
166
1,288
42
185
679
22
97
116
54
206
151
48
93
154
7,315 | 3,764 | 3,551
192
261
166
104
215
277
121
12
89
120
407
277
193
1
6
82
5
288
157
6
61
6,270 | 3,224 [ 3,046
195
504
23
102
1
231
119
102
99
76
133
57
91
28
92
102
74
4
6
5
139
4,544 | 2,361 | 2,183
609
20
33
25
35
33
33
22
51
54
16
33
37
24
24
44
33
17
36
34
15 | __
30 |	
41 1 —
738 |  731
703
46
132
75
44
56
37
45
28
45
104
94
52
3
4
29
1
71
36
9
14
33
39
26
52
138 |
61
44
4
2
28
2
89
38
10
13
35
43
ii
35
112
80
42
1
2
19
4
65
43
441 |  572 |  579 |  525
29
15
	
	
8
6
28
24
75
66
75
59
30
33
23
44
26
35
21
18
33
22
27
32
20
26
24
22
1
2
2
3
_
1
54
66
63
48
447 |  459 |  428
23
17
38
10
27
4
12
13 I	
53
13
9
22
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 193
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
XIII
Special
1
2
3
38
48
43
14
19
18
	
	
 .
	
	
	
	
	
81
95
63
68
	
	
	
...
	
	
	
	
58
21
25
53
32
33
31
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
37
30
46
57
55
32
	
	
	
 .
	
	
	
	
	
	
672
686
616
581
114
53 |       46 |       33
659
519
468
344
274
40
237
183
	
	
	
  1	
	
83
107
118
137
68
- 1   -
172
86
79
.._ |   _
63
89
60
	
18
18 1      16
171
124
99
.. ..
	
51
29
35
76
10
	
  I	
70
58
79
—_
31
47
35
31
	
	
	
	
	
	
29
31
31
—
40
32
32
30
	
.
	
	
91
93
71
66
15
	
!
	
	
	
55
60
68
57
	
_
	
	
	
42
3
49
6
50
47
	
12
	
	
	
	
	
	
4
26
3
64
25
1
55
~28
3
47
	
.....
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
80
10
48
38
44
40
	
	
	
	
	
16
28
20
30
	
	
	
	
	
	
. .
	
	
503
494
464
457
47
18 |       18 1       16
476
440
424
355
320
68
248
165
53
	
	
	
	
18
41
29
14
318
281
295
	
	
	
9
3
7
5
10
8
2
25
23
27
16
	
	
	
	
11
10
4
	
	
	
~73
~66
ZsT
~69
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
55
69
55
56
18
	
	
	
	
	
35
31
~31
29
18
23
17
17
30
33
37
32
27
14
18
13
18
24
16
30
_
17
11
16
	
28
25
24
24
	
.   . _
_
30
27
24
13
17
	
	
_
	
34
1
1
3
35
20
1
2
3
33
28
17
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
34
1
	
	
	
2
	
 :
	
31
	
	
	
	
ZZ
ZZ
439
408
396
353
53
41
29
14
341
299
301
248
165
53
19
9
18
297
265
268
239
173
6
10
8
6
33
27
26
26
	
	
	
	
	
	
 G 194
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
District No. 75 (Mission)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
53
176
21
160
86
14
21
498
46
190
93
24
27
254
134
25
85
12
77
43
7
8
286
23
90
46
14
13
128
75
28
91
9
83
43
7
13
212
23
100
47
10
14
126
59
	
12
23
13
11
10
8
9
62
10
33
9
9
15
34
28
7
5
8
24
7
4
8
79
10
18
13
4
12
37
20
5
21
~_i
12
2
4
45
12
31
8
11
~39
23
13
West Heights
Totals, District No. 75	
3,312
1,730
1,582
	
309
273
281
13
District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Elementary—Senior Secondary—Agassiz	
Elementary—
484
7
81
36
268
43
15
247
3
41
17
142
23
6
237
4
40
19
126
20
9
45
1
12
9
55
14
8
2
8
6
45
7
1
1
11
8
45
13
3
Kent
14
Spring Creek	
	
Tota'", District Ttfn 76
934
479
455
45
99
69
81
14
District No. 77 (Summerland)
Secondary—Summerland
Elementary—
544
579
120
277
311
56
267
268
64
85
16
80
12
79
15
5
Trnnt O-pek
Totals, District No. 77
1,243
644
599
101
92
94
5
District No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino)
171
39
110
276
83
21
54
145
88
18
56
131
~24
37
7
15
36
7
7
28
10
16
29
Elementary—
Tnfinn
Ucluelet   .
12
Totals, District No. 79	
596
303
293
61
58
42
55
12
District No. 80 (Kitimat)
815
291
807
629
394
456
158
402
316
202
359
133
405
313
192
35
119
88
46
43
111
90
48
20
115
78
55
52
124
90
49
Elementary—
K-ilrlala
4
6
Totals, District No. 80.
2,936
1,534
1,402
288
292
268
315
10
District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
125
19
13
412
71
13
7
222
54
6
6
190
	
4
1
92
4
2
61
2
58
Elementary—
Camp Milp 39?
Ci, W, Carl^c-m
Totals, District No. 81	
569
313
256
	
97
67
60
District No. 82 (Chilcotin)
Elementary—
31
15
16
5
15
10
1
4
4
7
1
6
3
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 195
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
DC
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
rv
1
2
3
XIII
7
22
24
17
64
9
29
14
34
19
14
17
17
11
65
5
25
18
33
23
8
33
32
14
57
29
18
43
21
55
29
15
81
~25
13
34
32
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
278 |     265 |     289 |     284
32
19 |        9
18
297
265
268
239
173
1
9
5
42
9
1
33
12
4
22
40
1
11
4
54
1
18
1
16
5
7
10
101
1
69
54
56
39
	
67
71
56 |       74
16
5 |        7 |       10
102 |       69
54
56 |       39
	
73
23
93
17
76
25
81
12
7
10
6
8
115
115
93
104
93
96
110
101 |      93
7
10 |         6 |         8
115
115
93
104 |       93  |
6
13
35
9
17
31
9
33
9
28
7
12
14
36
31
31
22
25
-----
54
57 |       42
37
7
12 |       14 |   .	
36
31 |       31
22 |       25 |   	
35
104
64
62
53
79
70
38
24
78
74
34
29
77
67
50
4
6
19
12
5
207
190
149
110
109
14
265 |     240 |     210 |     223
10
19 |       12
5
207 |     190 |     149
110
109 |       14
3
2
55
4
4
50
1
2
57
3
39
11
	
43
39
19
13
	
	
60 ]       58
60
42
11
	
	
	
43 |       39
19
13
	
5
3
5
1
2
1
1
2
	
	
	
	
__
=
__
 G 196
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total      Boys       Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Primary
Special
District No. 82 (Chilcotin)—Continued
Elementary—Continued
Kleena Kleene	
Poplar Grove  	
Puntzi Mountain   .	
Tatlayoko Lake	
Totals, District No. 82	
District No. 83 (Portage Mountain)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Hudson Hope.
Dtstrtct No. 84 (Vancouver Island West)
Secondary—■
Gold River.
Captain John Meares..
Elementary—
Esperanza .
Fair Harbour-
Gold River	
Kyuquot	
Tahsis River	
Zeballos	
Totals, District No. 84..
District No. 85 (Vancouver Island North)
Secondary—North Island  	
Elementary-Junior Secondary-
Alert Bay
R. H. Richmond-
San Josef 	
Robert Scott	
Woss Lake	
Elementary—
Coal Harbour	
Echo Bay	
A. J. Elliott	
Fort Rupert—	
Kokish     	
Mahatta River-
Minstrel Island-
Nimpkish Lake-
Port McNeill-	
Quatsino	
Sea View 	
Warner Bay-
Winter Harbour-
Totals, District No. 85-
Dtstrict No. 86 (Creston-Kaslo)
Secondary—
Crawford Bay..
Prince Charles..
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Kaslo..
Elementary—
Canyon
J. A. Cochran..
Creston	
Erickson	
Gray Creek	
Jewett	
Lister 	
South Creston	
Wynndel Primary	
Wynndel Intermediate-
Yahk.	
Totals, District No. 86..
12
13
43
27
5
3
24
12
141
72 |
69
32 |  29 |  14 |
874
97
58
7
26
338
11
172
51
760
474
47
32
2
14
163
6
91
31
400
106
109
50
26
5
12
175
5
81
20
48
26
386
374
206
458
169
229
503 |
140 |
10|
23 |
106 I
69 I
44 j
14 |
12 |
20 j
172 I
7|
133 I
5 I
19 |
110
234
92
94
266
69
4
10
44
28
27
6
7
13
91
4
65
2
10
96
224
77
135
237
71
6
13
62
41
17
8
5
7
81
3
68
3
9
2,339 | 1,176 | 1,163
120
793
318
86
195
802
198
40 |
51 I
75 |
113
79
56
39 I
67
418
158
53
109
397
94
19
23
45
59
38
31 |
17 |
53
375
160
33
86
405
104
21
28
30
54
41
25
22
1
5
65
4
24
12
114
2
6
47
5
25
7
91
2
1
43
19
74 |  111
92 |  73
48
33 I
75 |
— |
22
30
54
9
34
54
20
3
4
19
16
13
2
3
9
24
2
27
2
7
58
17
28 i
36 |
11
5
5
17
20
6
4
4
5
23
1
23
2
2
	
60
13
18
_
26
56
9
15
	
2
1
21
15
7
3
2
6
24 |
2 [
21 I
1 I
2 I
I —
I -
208 I  302 |  267 ]  282 |
22
117
2,965
1,528
1,437
117
40
15
27
75
22
9
8
14
33
15
10
268
31
18
17
14
22
23
54
65 |
38
29 |
10
10 1
13
9 1
13
49
27
  I
3 i
255
260 I
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 197
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
rv
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
1
2
5
3
3
6
2
1
2
3
1
2
4
	
6
2
	
	
	
	
1
	
1
	
	
20 |       18 |       14 |       11
 | |	
1
	
-
1
  |   	
103
72
51
55
10
74
44
45
27
36
21
9
4
	
	
	
	
	
	
15
13
10
15
5
2
4
8
	
	
	
	
	
2
	
	
	
	
43
30
2
18
41
21
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
20
15
25
6
5
7
4
	
2
	
	
	
	
	
71 |       59 |       71 |       50
  |     |     |
46
49
31
24
9 |   .....
1
_ 1   _
39
27
35
67
38
60
26
37
19
11
3 |        3
22
26
18
13
12
40
14
	
 |   	
17
17
12
26
24
19
18
	
	
 |   .	
14
7
	
_  _ 1   _
44
37
53
49
6
	
  |   ,	
35
31
18
	
11
16
18
14
	
	
	
	
15
10
10
	
	
	
5
14
18
5
1
19
17
1
3
13
9
2
~~20
1
1
12
	
4
2
10
	
	
	
,
—
2
	
	
	
.....
I 1         1
22 1   ~18
II —
	
1
	
	
	
■	
3|        2 |         1
	
zz
..:... i zz
	
1
	
	
     I     .. ..
  1
234
181 |     212 |     146
6
11 1         3 1         3
143
121
93
67
38 |	
1
i
32
33
28
14
13
	
	
	
	
17
14 |       12
176
187
137
160
90 1   	
23
24
25
33
	
	
	
30
34
23
21
16
16
24
10
23 1
14
30 |
~33
~~13
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
120
116 1     101 |     131
15
	
27
11
8
13
28 1      27 1      27
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
4 1        9 |   	
7 1       12 |   	
	
	
	
	
	
ZZ
	
	
	
18
13 |       20 I      23
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
8
9 |        5|   	
	
 1
	
	
	
  |   	
268
234
243 1     247
1
28
17
14
12
238
254
188
195
119
	
.
 G 198
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type, and School
Pupils Enrolled
Total
Boys
226
108
33
22
12
3
22
9
13
9
35
18
42
24
Girls
Kindergarten
Grade
Grade
Grade
I
II
III
28
18
40
7
8
6
3
2
1
5
2
5
| .	
2
2
1   6
8
3
10
1
9 1
Primary
Special
District No. 87 (Stikine)
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Cassiar..
Elementary—
Atlin	
Dease Lake	
Good Hope Lake	
Haines Road, Mile 48-
Lower Post	
Telegraph Creek	
Totals, District No. 87_
District No. 88 (Skeena-Cassiar)
Secondary—
Hazelton-
Skeena	
Elementary-Junior Secondary—Stewart-
Elementary—
Cedarvale .	
Cranberry River-
John Field	
Cassie Hall	
Kalum    	
E T. Kenney	
Kiti-K-Shian	
Kitsault	
Kitwanga 	
Clarence Michie..
Nass    	
New Hazelton	
South Hazelton..
Thornhill	
Two Mile	
Uplands	
Upper Kispiox _
Totals, District No. 88_
District No. 89 (Shuswap)
Senior Secondary—Salmon Arm	
Junior Secondary—
Enderby
J. I. Jackson...
Elementary-Senior Secondary—Eagle River—
Elementary-Junior Secondary—
Falkland	
North Shuswap.-
Shuswap	
Elementary—
Ashton Creek.	
Bastion    	
M. V. Beattie-
Carlin    	
Centennial	
Deep Creek	
Gleneden 	
Grandview Bench.
Grindrod	
Kingfisher	
Malakwa	
Mara  	
Mount Ida	
North Broadview..
North Canoe	
Notch Hill	
Salmon Arm	
Salmon Arm West-
Silver Creek	
Sorrento 	
South Broadview..
South Canoe	
Trinity Creek	
383
186
891
179
33
18
228
391
117
331
90
6
67
368
25
70
78
496
44
256
14
480
192
477
425
150
153
342
47
68
367
204
10
14
50
15
50
34
81
53
47
40
154
19
562
128 |
45 |
38 j
173 j
126 |
6|
118
11
9
13
4
17
18
29
193
190
29 |  59 |
41
66
92
444
84
19
8
128
178
62
178
43
5
26
197
13
48
43
246
24
138
5
94
447
95
14
10
100
213
55
153
47
1
41
171
12
22
35
250
20
118
9
23
21
8
6
5
4
39
14
. .
71
25
32
99
89
90
	
1
1
11
11
10
~3
17
10
12
8
96
74
7
9
42
41
1
2
24
7
3
36
72
29
101 |
  I
1 I
10 [
  I
6
12
14
97
7
47 |
4 I
1,981
1,907
 |  486
396
470
234
96
268
217
84
79
174
15
34
203
97
6
8
25
5
24
16 I
33
30
28
21
88
5
289 I
76
20
19
94
68
1
246
96
209
208
66
74
168
32
34
164
107
4
6
25
10
26
18
48
23
19
19
66
14
273
52
25
19
79
58
5
105
	
43
42
26
19
13
15
9
7
16
15
69
38
31
27
3
~~6
12
8
3
3
14
13
3
4
12
10
4
8
8
11
7
8
26
29
5
5
63
70
14
16
12
5
7
8
32
24
24
11
	
1
44
28
22
8
21
38
26
~5
13
5
11 I
7 I
14 |
8 I
14 |
6 I
21 I
5 I
68
14
11
4
36
20
2
14
15
29
10
10
12
Totals, District No. 89_
4,550 | 2,357 | 2,193
105 |  456 |  403 |  451 |
32
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 199
ENROLMENT—Continued
Inter
Occupational
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
mediate
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Special
1
2
3
18
4
3
23
1
2
3
13
18
	
11
15
13
	
	
	
1 I   	
4 1        3
_.._.. j   __.._
	
	
	
	
	
2
4
2 1         11         3
2 1         5 |         7
	
	
__...
1
	
	
	
	
	
6
8 1         3|         5
	
  |     I   	
	
	
. .
37 |       41 |       32 |       38
||            |   	
12
15
13
  |   —__
12
1
1
10 |         2
66
35
37
16
8
13
3 1         4
245
210
174
139
103
	
20
15
18
21
	
-  1   -----
14
12
11
	
	
6
3
2
1
2
1
3
	
	
	
	
	
	
31
25
25
44
	
	
	
69
31
27
67
62
50
z~
	
	
zz
—
	
-  1   	
ZZ | ~~
7
64
1
12
83
1
9
100
1
7
91
30
ZZ   ZZ
	
—
	
3
8
6
15
13
2
8
5
1
	
_.... ]..-
	
	
—
	
 1
20
.....
1
78
53
53
45
	
	
	
	
10
5
6
	
	
	
—
	
	
38
34
28
26
	
—
	
	
	
	
—
	
	
	
  |         1
2
4
— 1 	
	
	
	
	
	
400 |     328 |     324 I     291
50 |       25
13 |         6
325
257
222
155
Ill 1 —
	
-----
200
205
75
3
3
6
65
65
50
8
16 |       15
125
159
154
. .     .....
...,	
23
35
40
35
.  I      .....
52
34
28
26
23
	
18
20
13
15
__- |   _..__
11
20
18
11
25
14
15
.	
7
16
32
22 |       13
6 1       10
57 |   ""S3
65
	
	
1
97
74
71
	
	
"~70
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
23
29 |       34
34
	
	
	
	
	
	
7
4
4 1         6
  1   -	
	
—
	
	
	
	
	
7
5
5 |   .	
5 1         5
5
—
  j    "
	
	
	
10
14
11
10
  |   	
	
     I   .
7
5
6
3
12
6
8
	
—
1   	
.....
	
7
21
4
70
4
18
8
19
20
ZZ
	
	
	
zz I z:._
54
52
55
13
 i --
11
9
8
8
32
33
—
—
zz! zz
	
	
	
8
25
6
21
5
35
	
—
—
zz i zz:
	
	
	
	
zz
	
20
25
14
12
—
	
— i —
	
.	
	
  1 —.
2 |         1
	
	
— i —
	
	
	
	
      	
359 |     370 |     380 |     387
13 |       11 |       19 |       21
364
347
303
226
228 |       75
 G 200
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1967/68
SUMMARY OF
District, Type,
and School
Pupils Enrolled
Kindergarten
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Pri-
Total
Boys
Girls
Special
Unattached Schools
Elementary-Senior Secondary—University Hill
Elementary-Junior  Secondary — John  Stubbs
274
828
505
32
318
139
420
256
15
165
135
408
249
17
153
128
47
50
114
50
5
58
112
66
4
37
101
61
4
52
12
Elementary—
Totals, Unattach
;d Schools
1,957
995
962
225
227
219
218
12
RECAPITULATION OF ENROLMENT BY TYPE OF
Grade
Elementary
Elementary-
Junior Secondary
Elementary-
Senior Secondary
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
XIII
	
516
811
918
14
42
57
575
700
849
13
22
44
1,091
1,151
1,767
27
64
101
611
759
856
929
1,012
57
88
78
_617
759
841
873
952
43
32
57
XII
3
5
4
34
i
7
7
58
1,228
1,518
1,697
YT
X
2
3
24
TV
1,802
VIII
1,964
100
	
120
Occupational 1
	
135
Sub-totals
29
46
75
2,358
2,203
4,561
4,390
4,174
8,564
2,530
17,477
18,684
18,887
19,587
2,238
21,033
21,421
22,089
7,834
1,374
17,173
1,8050
18,489
19,023
1,250
19,735
19,942
20,165
7,563
3,904
34,650
36,734
37,376
38,610
3,488
40,768
41,363
42,254
15,397
91
645
515
517
584
108
593
579
632
267
49
639
459
460
530
39
546
533
570
247
140
1,284
974
977
1,114
147
1,139
1,112
1,202
514
178
606
200
215
152
8
125
124
155
52
115
518
222
195
145
6
138
132
126
48
293
VII
1,124
422
VI
V
410
IV
297
14
HI
263
IT
256
I
281
100
Siih-tntals
151,780
142,764
294,544
4,531
4,072
8,603
1,815
1,645 |    3,460
Total's
151,809
142,810
294,619
6,889
6,275
13,164
6,205
5,819
12,024
i Vocational school, district and regional college, correspondence, adult, and night-school enrolments are not
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
G 201
ENROLMENT—Continued
Grade
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Intermediate
Special
Occupational
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
IV
1
2
3
XIII
39
43
49
61
45
37
87
86
64
55
	
	
	
.	
42
27
	
	
	
71
3
45
82
4
41
63
4
35
57
3
8
	
	
	
i
~~_
	
	
ZZ
—
ZZ
—
206
213
166
154
8
	
	
88
78
61
45
37
	
SCHOOL, GRADE, AND SEX OF PUPILS, 1967/68
Junior Secondary
Secondary
Senior Secondary
Totals
,1 Public Schools
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
569
393
962
576
372
948
1,145
765
1,910
	
	
 .
8,268
8,113
16,381
2,773
2,461
5,234
11,652
11,191
22,843
.
	
	
10,114
9,541
19,645
3,168
2,932
6,100
14,041
13,235
27,276
6,233
6,050
12,283
8,150
7,906
16,050
 .
.	
	
15,757
15,377
31,134
9,062
8,525
17,587
7,099
6,772
13,871
	
	
	
17,904
16,874
34,778
9,905
9,410
19,315
7,228
6,962
14,190
	
	
	
19,087
18,207
37,294
314
204
518
355
233
588
36
36
72
776
529
1,305
513
290
803
462
311
773
30
23
53
1,135
678
1,813
630
306
936
624
376
1,000
	
	
....
1,389
783
2,172
26,657 | 24,785
51,442
42,869
40,607
83,476
6,583
5,824
12,407
82,886
77,639
160,525
23
12
35
79
80
159
2,901
1,630
4,531
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
18,728
18,330
37,058
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
19,399
18,731
38,130
....
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
19,619
19,144
38,763
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
20,323
19,698
40,021
	
	
	
 .
	
	
	
.
	
2,354
1,295
3,649
	
—.—.
 .
 .
	
	
	
	
	
21,751
20,419
42,170
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
 —„
	
22,124
20,607
42,731
 ,
	
_____
	
	
	
	
	
	
22,876
20,861
43,737
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
8,153
7,858
16,011
23
12
35
79
80
159
	
	
	
158,228
148,573
306,801
26,680
24,797
51,477
42,948
40,687
83,635
6,583
5,824
12,407
241,114
226,212
467,326
included.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1969
6,030-1168-9000
   

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