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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ninety-fourth Annual Report 1964/65 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1966

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Nmety-fourth Annual Report
1964/65
By the Superintendent of Education
\
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
  The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B., LL.D., F.R.S.A., Minister of Education.
  To Major-General the Honourable George Randolph Pearkes,
V.C., P.C., C.B., D.S.O., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the ninety-fourth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1966.
    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION,  1965
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, Q.C., LL.B.
LL.D., F.R.S.A.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D., LL.D.
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Assistant Superintendent (Instruction):
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Chief Inspector of Schools:
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Nanaimo. W
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc., B.Ed., Mission City. A.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Kamloops. R.
J. E. Beech, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superin- W.
tendent, Surrey. D.
G. C. Bissell, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar. D.
C. A. Bruce, B.A., B.Ed., Revelstoke.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Squamish. C.
J. L. Canty, B.A., M.Ed., Fort St. John. D.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Hope.
J.  Chell,  M.A.,  Assistant  Superintendent, F
Victoria. J.
C Cuthbert, B.S.Acc, B.Ed., Nelson.
D. L. Feir, B.A., M.A., Quesnel. W.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., West Vancouver. E.
R. E. Flower, B.A., B.Ed., Dawson Creek. L.
W. B. Fromson, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Sup- F.
erintendent, North Vancouver. W,
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria. G.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Richmond. F.
S. J. Graham, B.A., New Westminster. G.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superin- R.
tendent, Vancouver. D.
P. C. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Qualicum Beach. P.
W. H. Gurney, M.A., Port Alberni. C.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
R. R. Hanna, B.A. B.Ed., Merritt. C.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pa_d., Victoria. R.
E. J. Irwin, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancou- H.
ver. R.
F. I. Irwin, B.A., Vernon. C.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Haney. R.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., Powell D.
River. F.
A. D. Jones, B.A., Duncan. D.
E. E. Lewis, B.A., B.Paed., Kimberley. C.
J. Logie, B.A., Campbell River.
J. Longmore, B.A., B.Ed., Vanderhoof.
F. Lucas, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., North Vancouver.
E. McFee, M.A., Kitimat.
B. Mackenzie, M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
S. McKenzie, B.A., Trail.
H.   MacKirdy,   D.F.C.,   B.A.,   M.Ed.,
Smithers.
A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Sidney.
I.   Macdougall,   B.A.,   M.A.,   M.Ed.,
D.Paed., Chilliwack.
. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Oliver.
Marriott, B.A., Cloverdale.
A. Matheson, M.A., B.Ed., Penticton.
T. Middleton, B.A., B.Ed., Kamloops.
. J. Mouat, B.A., M.Ed., Abbotsford.
H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Salmon Arm.
J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Kelowna.
M. Paton, B.A., M.Ed., Prince Rupert.
S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Ladysmith.
L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
B. Pullinger, B.A., B.Ed., Cranbrook.
T. Rendle, B.A., Assistant Superintendent, Burnaby.
E. Ritchie, B.A., Courtenay.
F. Sharp, B.A., D.Paed., Vancouver.
D. Stafford, B.A., M.Ed., Murrayville.
B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Burnaby.
F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ladner.
P. Todd, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
M. Wallace, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
N. Weicker, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
C. Wright, B.A., Creston.
 D 10 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Comptroller of Expenditures: S. E. Espley.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., M.Ed.
Supervisor of School Construction: H. Dickinson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Assistant Director of Technical and Vocational Education: V. E. Rickard, B.Ed.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A., and R. Smith.
Inspector of Technical and Vocational Education: P. C. MacGregor.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Inspectors of Home Economics:
Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss J. Campbell, M.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Dip.Ed.
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts:Miss M. Musselman, B.A.
Director of Tests and Standards: C. B. Conway, B.Sc., M.S., D.Pasd.
Director of Secondary School Correspondence: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Director of Textbook Branch: Basil R. Wilson.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D., Litt.D.
 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education     13
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Administration and School Board
Relations)     3 8
Report of the Assistant Superintendent (Instructional Services)  42
Report of the Co-ordinator of Special Services  47
Report of the Director of Curriculum  50
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests and Standards  53
Report of the Director of Home Economics  57
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
Secondary and Vocational Courses     61
Elementary Correspondence School     64
Report of the Director of the Division of School Broadcasts  66
Report of the Director of Visual Education  68
Report of the Director of the Textbook Branch  70
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools  74
Report of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment  80
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  83
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  96
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School) 109
Report of the Registrar of Teachers and Examinations  112
Report of the Commission on Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act 124
Statistical Returns  125
Information re Examination Papers  174
11
 D 12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Pagb
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  13
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  14
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools 15
Teachers' Certificates  15
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  16
Number of School Districts  17
Number of Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  17
Number of Junior-Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils
in Each District  18
Number of Junior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  19
Number of Elementary-Senior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Pupils in Each District  20
Number of Elementary-Junior Secondary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and
Pupils in Each District  21
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  22
District Supervisory and Instructional Personnel  23
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils 24
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each
Type of School  26
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  26
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  27
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1964  28
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1964  28
Expenditure by School Districts for the Calendar Year 1964  29
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1964 by School District  32
Summary of Enrolment by Schools in the Various School Districts  127
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  173
 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1964/65
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1966.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Ninety-fourth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30, 1965.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
378,641 to 400,064, and the average daily attendance increased from 348,472 to
359,442.   The percentage of the regular attendance was 89.85.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
6,929
69,851
29,750
26,696
19,216
238,065
229
369
545
2,131
1,358
4,925
7,158
70,220
30,295
28,827
20,574
242,990
Totals    	
390,507
9,557
400,064
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled: —
In the  Secondary  School  Correspondence  classes,   regular
students (exclusive of the 5,090 officially registered in
other schools)          3,954
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes,  regular
students   863
Under section 20 of the Public Schools Act, pupils receiving
instruction  61
Adult education— '
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  10,6531
Night schools  91,5792
Vancouver School of Art  270
Vancouver Vocational Institute  7,8853
Secondary School Correspondence (adults only)   8,980
Carried forward     124,245
1 Day, 6,865;  night, 3,788.
2 Includes 70,186 non-vocational.
3 Day, 3,634; night, 4,251.
13
 D 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
Brought forward 	
     124,245
174
644
Number of participants in recreational programme 1,646,9304
Vocational teachers-in-training (summer session)   86
University of Victoria         1,03 8 5
University of British Columbia         3,6866
Adult education—Continued
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)
British Columbia Institute of Technology
4 This figure does not include Vancouver.
' This figure does not include the following enrolments:
extra-sessional (evening division).
6 This figure does not include the following enrolments:
1,529;   correspondence courses, 1,296.
1,776,803
962 summer session (credit and non-credit), 501
Summer session, 6,220;   extra-sessional  classes,
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade
for the school-year 1964/65:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
5,863
20,909
19,041
18,138
17,562
17,248
16,777
16,009
15,134
14,630
13,270
12,600
10,324
2,244
7,044
5,606
19,046
18,055
17,422
16,980
16,503
15,669
15,232
14,651
14,001
12,668
11,801
9,934
1,382
4,321
11,469
39,955
Grade 1
Grade 11
37,096
Grade TTT
35,560
Grade IV             _ 	
34,542
Ornrif V
33,751
32,446
firaH-! VT
r.rarlp vn
31,241
r.radp VTTI
29,785
rjrqrtp tx
28,631
fimrip X
25,938
24,401
20,258
r.rarfp vt
nrj-rie XTT
f-.rj.rfi> XTTT
3,626
11,365
Special or Occupational
Totals
206,793
193,271
400,064
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
D  15
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils
per teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teachers
Special
Instructors
Total
227
2,265
1,002
978
708
7,451
82
901
379
309
157
591
277
309
3,166
1,381
1,287
865
8,042
277
7,158
70,220
30,295
28,827
20,574
242,990
1.79
17.55
7.57
7.21
5.14
60.74
31.53
31.00
30.23
Elementary-senior secondary
Elementary-junior secondary
29.48
29.06
32.61
Totals    ..
12,631
2,696
15,327
400,064
100.00
31.67
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
Without
Total
Degrees
Degrees
276
33
309
2,424
742
3,166
921
460
1,381
809
478
1,287
374
491
865
1,544
6,498
8,042
164
113
277
6,512
8,815
15,327
Senior secondary	
Junior-senior secondary-
Junior secondary.
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary_.
Elementary,  _ 	
Unclassified	
Totals..
 D  16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since
1877/78 and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877/78-
1882/83..
1887/88..
1892/93-
1897/98..
1902/03_
1907/08.
1912/13-
1913/14-
1917/18..
1922/23-
1927/28..
1928/29-
1929/30..
1930/31-
1931/32-
1932/33..
1933/34-
1934/35-
1935/36..
1936/37-
1937/38..
1938/39-
1939/40-
1940/41-
1941/42-
1942/43-
1943/44.
1944/45-
1945/46.
1946/47..
1947/48..
1948/49-
1949/50.
1950/51-
1951/52..
1952/53-
1953/54.
1954/55...
1955/56_
1956/57-
1957/58...
1958/59...
1959/60-
1960/61_
1961/62-
1962/63...
1963/64...
1964/65..
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
,597
,859
,246
,118
,668
784
,854
948
959
912
873
,942
,956
025
092
,194
220
248
,224
,055
162
354
512
833
,116
,496
,873
,272
598
105
574
185
690
,474
171
,839
513
,137
,772
,571
,415
327
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
101
98
97
99
100
100
93
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
291,223
305,837
321,760
340,290
358,905
378,641
400,064
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
267,052
281,513
298,175
312,173
332,585
348,472
367,718
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
91.70
92.05
92.67
91.74
92.67
92.03
91.91
$48
60,
113
174,
290
473,
544
1,663
1,885
1,653
3,176
3,532
3,765
3,743
3,834
4,015
2,849
2,611
2,835.
2,972,
3,277
3,524
3,630.
3,585,
3,963,
4,028,
3,924.
4,244,
5,022,
5,765,
9,398
12,468,
17,363
22,809,
25,830
26,885.
26,555.
24,060,
34,279,
41,067,
43,989,
50,861,
53,288,
59,472,
70,174,
77,632
83,782,
95,497,
105,017,
,411.141
,758.751
,679.361
,775.43
,255.26
,802.29
,671.60
,003.34
654.11
796.60
686.283
518.953
920.693
317.083
727.193
074.373
,972.023
,937.803
,040.743
,385.043
,660.233
,962.693
670.783
769.003
848.243
397.883
243.533
898.823
,534.593
,205.503
,473.463
,653.183
,430.943
,631.233
,076.883
,980.433
,080.243
,233.153
,302.273
,740.34*
,524.325
473.636
,028.947
,055.068
,999.84
,903.48
,121.79
,375.16
594.75
$215
425
604
1,220
4,658
4,634
3,519
7,630
9,261
11,149
10,008
10,061
9,719
8,941
8,213,
8,458
8,775
9,593
10,193
10,640,
10,521,
10,982.
11,120,
11,502,
12,231,
13,683,
14,818,
20,176,
25,768.
35,538
47,726,
54,195.
57,881,
58,401,
70,791,
80,823,
69,314,
77,653,
90,483,
101,351,
115,941
133,401
145,535
157,614,
177,539,
199,114,
,056.222
,555.10
,357.86
,509.85
,894.97
,877.56
,014.61
,009.543
,094.983
,996.273
,255.663
,387.993
,333.813
,497.343
,369.043
,156.003
,353.783
,562.643
,367.083
740.473
684.923
364.493
801.943
291.353
029.353
,538.183
,625.818
,930.533
,392.093
,079.883
,750.373
,133.953
,559.483
,121.153
,844.253
,263.713
,181.24*
,192.325
,765.636
,107.947
,018.068
,622.849
,715.4810
783.7911
584.161*
313.7518
i The total expenditure for public schools borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school
districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
* This amount on calendar year 1955, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
5 This amount on calendar year 1956, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
6 This amount on calendar year 1957, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
7 This amount on calendar year 1958, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
8 This amount on calendar year 1959, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds,
o This amount on calendar year 1960, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
io This amount on calendar year 1961, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds,
ii This amount on calendar year 1962, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
12 This amount on calendar year 1963, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
13 This amount on calendar year 1964, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
D 17
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1964/65:—
Municipal school districts  75
Rural school districts  18
Total number of districts.
93
SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior secondary schools during the school-year was 7,158;
of this number, 4,091 were boys and 3,067 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1964/65 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
22. Vernon „._ _	
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
53
80
29
13
11
8
13
19
1
61
106
41
22
14
14
19
31
85
1,642
2,474
965
47. Powell River...  	
417
338
fi?    SnoV(>
229
392
616
Tntfila
10
227
309
7,158
 D 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
JUNIOR-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior secondary schools during the school-year was
70,220; of this number, 36,170 were boys and 34,050 were girls. The number of
schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-
year 1964/65 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
5. Creston	
7. Nelson	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes..
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks-
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
20. Salmon Arm_
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere	
27. Williams Lake_
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. South Cariboo.-
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon..
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford
35. Langley	
36. Surrey-	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond-
39. Vancouver..
40. New Westminster—
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam-
44. North Vancouver-
45. West Vancouver—
46. Sechelt	
48. Howe Sound-
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers _
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George-
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South-
60. Peace River North-
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
65. Cowichan — .
66. Lake Cowichan_
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni .
72. Campbell River_
75. Mission	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby-
79. Ucluelet-Tofino-
80. Kitimat	
2
1
2
5
2
2
10
Totals-
96
24
16
27
20
34
8
36
17
41
9
12
20
13
29
66
59
6
32
22
9
7
19
16
58
24
59
100
52
56
437
41
43
49
84
95
26
23
14
22
14
10
12
33
6
20
18
130
10
14
26
17
15
39
13
41
33
34
15
10
5
25
2,265
34
22
38
27
46
9
52
23
57
13
17
27
22
45
86
86
9
48
35
12
8
24
21
79
32
79
140
72
79
619
56
59
67
124
131
33
30
19
29
18
12
18
49
9
26
25
187
13
17
37
24
20
54
21
56
47
45
24
15
7
33
3,166
712
497
765
600
928
169
1,224
447
1,284
275
322
512
410
960
1,964
1,988
140
978
686
207
150
527
408
1,766
771
1,799
3,084
1,612
1,884
14,392
1,271
1,390
1,470
2,759
2,985
788
614
392
657
364
262
376
1,126
145
561
535
4,390
229
409
720
473
378
1,196
357
1,218
1,085
1,020
497
286
143
663
70,220
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
D 19
The enrolment in junior secondary schools during the school-year was 30,295;
of this number, 15,570 were boys and 14,725 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1964/65 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
6. Kootenay Lake.
11. Trail	
20. Salmon Ann..
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops	
33. Chilliwack-	
34. Abbotsford—
36. Surrey..
40. New Westminster-
41. Burnaby ,	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam..
44. North Vancouver-
45. West Vancouver	
47. Powell River.	
52. Prince Rupert	
57. Prince George	
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South..
60. Peace River North-
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
65. Cowichan	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
Totals..
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
7
1
5
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
6
1
2
3
1
2
~52~
1
21
19
31
11
22
31
37
132
41
140
17
37
48
21
25
26
35
2
20
16
149
19
25
31
22
23
1,002
1
31
26
40
17
31
44
52
179
59
195
24
53
65
28
39
33
48
2
26
20
210
24
32
43
29
30
1,381
15
574
595
862
353
675
923
1,089
3,917
1,412
4,302
466
1,180
1,421
623
832
734
1,063
37
551
440
4,745
545
694
841
688
718
30,295
 D 20 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior secondary schools during the school-year
was 28,827; of this number, 14,871 were boys and 13,956 were girls. The number
of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the
school-year 1964/65 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3
2
2
1
3
1
43
17
16
13
20
3
21
12
23
25
6
19
10
17
19
10
50
22
18
16
24
3
29
14
32
31
6
21
17
21
23
15
13
32
9
532
73
10
10
40
26
3
14
10
23
19
24
21
10
4
57
15
1,086
451
432
7. Nelson
274
8. Slocan  	
452
69
11. Trail               	
573
13. Kettle Valley                    	
297
667
17. Princeton   	
18. Golden _  .._ _	
20. Salmon Arm  _	
712
148
500
350
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops _	
26. Birch Island  _	
471
530
280
29. Lillooet _ '	
1         I              11
237
30. South Cariboo _	
1
29
9
364
54
9
7
31
23
3
10
9
21
16
17
16
8
3
807
224
11,967
1,628
47   Powell River                    	
184
48. Howe Sound 	
170
49. Ocean Falls      _                              	
917
50. Queen Charlotte- _ _	
51. Portland Canal
670
86
322
294
653
64. Gulf Islands	
483
501
542
81. Fort Nelson 	
167
60
6        J            52
1         |              12
1,339
284
Totals
58         1            978
1,287
28,827
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS
D 21
The enrolment in elementary-junior secondary schools during the school-year
was 20,574; of this number, 10,535 were boys and 10,039 were girls. The
number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for
the school-year 1964/65 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2.
3.
4.
7.
10.
11.
13.
14.
15.
20.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
33.
38.
41.
44.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
64.
68.
69.
71.
72.
79.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
Cranbrook —
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Nelson	
Arrow Lakes-
Trail	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Salmon Arm	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo-
Chilliwack	
Richmond	
Burnaby-
North Vancouver-
Terrace  _.
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George _
MsBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North_
Greater Victoria	
Gulf Islands	
Nanaimo—.	
Qualicum	
Courtenay —	
Campbell River.
Ucluelet-Tofino-
Fort Nelson	
Chilcotin _	
Portage Mountain	
Vancouver Island West-
Vancouver Island North-
Unattached districts	
Totals .
11
22
5
22
3
39
10
21
33
6
3
10
21
1
2
12
88
57
24
3
8
5
7
38
7
31
18
28
4
56
15
31
9
3
1
1
10
6
13
29
6
32
3
43
10
26
41
7
3
11
27
1
2
12
116
74
32
3
8
5
9
44
8
37
18
38
4
75
17
36
10
3
1
1
12
7
9
32
865
336
651
103
681
53
1,137
246
617
1,091
141
77
225
561
9
17
384
2,737
1,727
732
69
226
149
228
1,038
229
930
463
913
48
1,639
433
815
219
89
12
26
305
106
222
890
20,574
 D 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 242,990; of
this number, 125,556 were boys and 117,434 were girls. The number of schools,
number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year
1964/65 in each district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow LakeS-
Trail	
Grand Forks-
Kettle Valley-
Southern Okanagan-
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
B arriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel..
Lillooet-
South Cariboo-
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey.-——__
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver- .	
New Westminster..
Burnaby.	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River-
Howe Sound-
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert-
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof-	
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Gulf Islands	
Cowichan _	
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Schools
Divisions
Teachers
Pupils
6
22
24
626
7
60
65
1,950
8
47
48
1,377
9
22
23
578
8
49
54
1,537
2
4
4
96
13
71
80
2,384
10
19
19
430
12
54
59
1,684
4
16
17
489
10
82
89
2,531
3
23
25
777
4
7
7
111
2
27
30
851
7
55
61
1,859
3
14
14
399
3
3
3
33
6
27
30
837
8
36
38
1,113
13
49
52
1,580
2
16
17
558
11
87
92
2,926
27
133
143
4,451
26
176
193
5,489
6
13
14
344
4
12
12
314
37
100
107
2,638
22
73
78
2,196
5
21
21
554
7
24
25
634
9
43
44
1,381
7
32
34
946
26
141
143
4,514
31
115
115
3,475
26
103
108
3,029
51
422
450
14,052
15
102
106
3,195
31
231
246
7,847
63
1,284
1,455
43,178
8
103
116
3,596
34
444
484
15,044
20
102
102
3,117
28
281
296
10,183
27
342
366
11,414
10
121
134
4,033
12
43
47
1,299
12
83
91
2,531
10
40
45
1,072
5
13
13
250
3
6
6
105
1
1
1
16
8
66
72
2,226
11
59
64
1,845
4
19
20
608
10
31
32
782
10
34
35
975
37
187
201
6,050
8
18
19
402
21
92
101
2,774
18
70
74
2,093
38
476
509
18,167
13
76
79
2,402
13
70
72
2,211
2
3
3
52
17
85
93
2,717
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
D 23
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
66. Lake Cowichan .
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni-
71. Courtenay..
72. Campbell River..
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz...
77. Summerland-
78. Enderby -
79. Ucluelet-Tofino-
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
84. Vancouver Island West	
85. Vancouver Island North.
—   Unattached districts	
Totals _
25
8
18
13
13
16
6
2
7
3
4
5
7
3
9
5
1,084
37
37
150
20
135
78
72
59
13
21
20
11
50
14
9
6
12
27
7,451
39
41
158
20
149
82
79
61
13
23
20
11
54
14
9
7
12
30
8,042
1,094
1,142
4,771
556
4,312
2,865
2,159
1,833
309
721
534
259
1,709
397
176
131
210
885
242,990
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
District Number
and Name
2. Cranbrook	
Number of
Teachers
                                           1
3. Kimberley 	
4
6. Kootenay Lake	
                              1
7. Nelson	
                             2
11. Trail	
3
15. Penticton       	
1
20. Salmon Arm	
1
22. Vernon	
6
23. Kelowna	
3
24. Kamloops	
8
25. Barriere            	
      _   _    _„.          1
26. Birch Island	
1
27. Williams Lake	
2
28. Quesnel	
2
29. Lillooet 	
                         1
31. Merritt     .
2
32. Fraser Canyon	
        2
33. Chilliwack     	
                             11
34. Abbotsford	
                    rt__-       7
35. Langley	
5
36. Surrey           	
                            15
37. Delta	
7
38. Richmond 	
5
39. Vancouver 	
33
40. New Westminster	
3
41. Burnaby 	
               22
42. Maple Ridge	
7
43. Coquitlam	
16
44. North Vancouver	
     12
 D 24
I
45.
46.
47.
48.
52.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
75.
80.
85.
The
number
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
DISTRICT SUPERVISORY AND INSTRUCTIONAL
PERSONNEL—Continued
Mstrict Number
and Name
West Vancouver ___ 	
Number of
Teachers
_ 8
_      2
2
2
1
1
1
1
.      6
1
5
_      1
21
3
4
_      3
1
2
_      7
1
9
3
3
2
2
1
277
)f schools,
Sechelt     ._
Powell River	
Howe Sound  	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers	
Burns Lake ___ 	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George  __     __   	
McBride    _ 	
Peace River South    	
Peace River North	
Greater Victoria ___        •         	
Sooke  _    _
Saanich  _ __    	
Cowichan   _     _—	
Lake Cowichan _      _ _   __    _ __   _ _ _
Ladysmith     	
Nanaimo  	
Qualicum   	
Alberni    	
Courtenay 	
Campbell River                                  	
Mission   _     _.   _     _      __     	
Kitimat 	
Vancouver Island North  	
Totals	
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
following table is a summary of all schools, showing number .
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie
2. Cranbro
3. Kimberl
4. Winderr
5. Creston
9
9
10
12
9
5
16
13
14
7
15
4
8
4
10
4
65
95
85
44
76
21
126
39
88
30
199
40
29
71
129
23
74
113
103
51
92
24
157
43
105
32
247
48
31
88
160
27
1,712
2,998
2,525
1,132
2,302
543
3,939
882
2,612
780
6,039
1,224
654
2,135
4,234
674
ok 	
8. Slocan
9. Castlega
10. Arrow I
11. TraiL
12. Grand F
13. Kettle V
14. Southen
15. Penticto
16. Keremec
alley..                              	
n                 . ...      	
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
D 25
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
4
8
9
18
3
15
32
30
7
6
43
26
8
11
10
9
31
34
28
63
17
37
81
10
44
24
34
35
13
14
15
12
7
6
2
10
15
7
12
12
47
11
29
28
50
16
17
5
21
9
10
28
10
20
19
16
17
7
3
8
5
5
7
8
1
8
16
11
28
45
56
106
26
148
227
276
19
25
142
116
42
62
62
57
242
176
162
654
154
375
2,138
185
764
168
402
538
222
66
130
61
44
29
4
103
94
50
46
53
293
33
184
122
783
113
122
23
142
54
69
245
48
198
151
114
93
29
36
30
19
75
23
10
10
15
72
68
34
53
65
129
34
184
270
341
24
31
168
142
48
67
70
66
289
206
192
784
185
446
2,700
234
940
200
489
647
276
79
164
76
53
32
4
120
110
57
50
63
348
39
218
138
965
133
144
26
176
64
87
294
59
243
182
139
108
34
47
35
21
89
25
10
12
18
79
77
745
18. Golden                            -            -	
1,307
1,625
3,226
908
4,833
7,239
8,682
484
671
3,841
3,443
1,007
30   South Cariboo
1,608
11   Merritt-
1,908
1,578
7,587
5,335
35. Langley          	
4,828
21,053
37. Delta _	
4,807
12,468
39. Vancouver    _ 	
71,179
6,279
24,937
47   Maplf"Ridgn
5,053
14,122
17,517
7,072
46. Sechelt . _                    .    	
1,913
47   Powell Fiver
3,964
1,634
49. Ocean Falls	
1,167
775
51, Portland Canal
102
3,298
53    Tprrarp.
2,893
1,492
1,193
1,579
9,277
58   MrRride.
813
5,469
3,531
28,215
67.  SnnVi*
3,405
3,706
64   Gulf Islands
583
4,278
1,567
2,021
7,606
1,346
70. Alberni    _ 	
6,218
5,014
72. Camphell River
3,463
2,853
76. Agassiz  	
851
1,218
78   Fnderby
820
70   UrlneM-Tnfino
491
80   Kitimat
2,372
81. Fort Nelson
576
87   Chilcotin
202
305
297
1,771
2,059
Totals
1,383
12,631
15,327
400,064
 D 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school for the school-year 1964/65:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Daily
Attendance
Total
Boys
Girls
10
96
52
58
83
1,084
309
3,166
1,381
1,287
865
8,042
277
7,158    1      4,091
70,220    1    36,170
30,295    1    15,570
28,827    |    14,871
20,574    1    10,535
242,990       125,556
     1   	
3,067
34,050
14,725
13,956
10,039
117,434
6,106.23
62,971.83
27,522.27
Elementary-senior secondary	
Elementary-junior secondary	
26,298.79
19,012.49
225,806.73
Totals
1,383
15,327
400.064    1   706.793
193,271
367,718.34
1
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars
only) paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Teachers earning less than $1,000 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number
Low
High
Average
Employed
Salary
Salary
Salary
227
$2,630
$10,445
$7,909
2,265
3,200
11,010
7,410
1,002
3,100
10,320
6,790
980
3,080
12,965
6,958
708
1,950
11,611
6,159
7,449
1,552
12,419
5,660
Senior secondary	
Junior-senior secondary-
Junior secondary-
Elementary-senior secondary „
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary  	
Supervising Principals
Senior secondary	
Junior-senior secondary-
Junior secondary-
Elementary-senior secondary-
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary	
$11,845
10,320
10,094
7,845
7,433
4,895
$14,999
15,724
14,272
15,644
14,472
13,335
$13,564
13,169
12,581
12,418
11,959
11,582
Special Instructors
Senior secondary	
Junior-senior secondary-
Junior secondary	
Elementary-senior secondary..
Elementary-junior secondary-
Elementary	
Unclassified	
$13,366
12,959
12,261
13,390
12,059
13,023
16,302
$8,869
8,007
7,442
8,009
7,283
4,906
8,605
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
D 27
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, including principals, supervising principals, and part-time teachers:—
Salary Range
Under $1,200—
$ 1,200-$ 1,299-
1,300- 1,399-
1,400- 1,499-
1,500- 1,599-
1,600- 1,699__
1,700- 1,799-
1,800- 1,899-
1,900- 1,999__
2,000- 2,099-
2,100- 2,199-
2,200- 2,299-
2,300- 2,399-
2,400- 2,499__.
2,500- 2,599__.
2,600- 2,699-
2,700- 2,799...
2,800- 2,899-
2,900- 2,999-
3,000- 3,099-
3,100- 3,199__
3,200- 3,299-
3,300- 3,399__
3,400- 3,499-
3,500- 3,599-
3,600- 3,699_
3,700- 3,799.
Number of
Teachers
53
2
6
  7
  4
  5
6
  10
  3
  8
13
  10
  16
  18
10
  11
6
10
  15
  31
  56
  78
  44
  49
  58
  75
3,800- 3,899-   142
3,900- 3,999  204
4,000- 4,099  190
4,100- 4,199  225
4,200- 4,299  242
4,300- 4,399  339
4,400- 4,499  275
4,500- 4,599  274
4,600- 4,699  256
4,700- 4,799  375
4,800- 4,899  257
4,900- 4,999  277
5,000- 5,099  293
5,100- 5,199  272
5,200- 5,299  408
5,300- 5,399  266
5,400- 5,499  320
5,500- 5,599  416
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
$5,600-$5,699  225
5,700- 5,799  396
5,800- 5,899  365
5,900- 5,999  376
6,000- 6,099  843
6,100- 6J99  301
6,200- 6,299  327
6,300- 6,399—
6,400- 6,499—
6,500- 6,599—
6,600- 6,699—
6,700^ 6,799—
6,800- 6,899—
205
204
455
216
195
193
6,900- 6,999   130
7,000- 7,099   157
7,100- 7,199   142
7,200- 7,299   102
7,300- 7,399   161
194
88
211
148
116
130
73
114
86
105
123
180
173
498
85
112
65
56
163
76
9,400- 9,499-       105
9,500- 9,599   413
9,600- 9,699   67
9,700- 9,799   148
9,800- 9,899_   70
9,900- 9,999   77
10,000 and over  1,015
7,400- 7,499-
7,500- 7,599—
7,600- 7,699-
7,700- 7,799-
7,800- 7,899-
7,900- 7,999-
8,000- 8,099
8,100- 8,199-
8,200- 8,299—
8,300- 8,399-
8,400- 8,499-
8,500- 8,599 __
8,600- 8,699___
8,700- 8,799-
8,800- 8,899-
8,900- 8,999-
9,000- 9,099....
9,100- 9,199—
9,200- 9,299
9,300- 9,399 _
 D 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1964
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts  $165,814,555.00
Add—
Department of Education expenditures for
administration, grants to University of
British Columbia, University of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University,
correspondence schools, adult education, vocational and technical schools,
services, etc  $28,542,675.95
Teachers' Pension Fund       4,048,146.90
Free textbooks, maps, etc  708,935.90
       33,299,758.75
Grand total expenditure  $199,114,313.75
COST PER PUPIL, CALENDAR YEAR 1964
Grand total cost of education  $199,114,313.75
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue__    $2,623,337.00
Debt charges on school district debt     21,923,781.00
Department of Education expenditures,
grants to University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, Simon
Fraser University, correspondence
schools,  adult education, vocational
and technical schools, etc     26,666,719.22
       51,213,837.22
Total operating cost  $147,900,476.53
Operating cost per pupil for year on daily average attendance of 367,718— $402.21
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
D 29
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aeSas.bo.53
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT D 35
IN RETROSPECT
The school-year 1964/65 was again a busy period for everyone in the Department. A great deal of work was done, especially in the area of the secondary-school
curriculum in preparation for the introduction of new courses in September of 1965.
Particular emphasis was placed upon the " vocational " programmes—commercial,
industrial and community services—and considerable assistance was given to the
various School Boards of the Province regarding the installation of facilities for
these courses now coming into existence. The response by members of the staff
has been magnificent. So much so has this been the case that without much additional personnel the branches have up to this point been able to cope with the many
changes that have taken place both on the administrative and instructional side of
education. We look forward to seeing how these innovations will affect the young
people presently in our schools and how well they will be prepared to meet a new
era of scientific and social development occurring, not only in British Columbia, but
throughout the country at large.
In September, 1964, the British Columbia Institute of Technology opened with
an enrolment of approximately 700 students, with a staff of 60 instructors in 17
technologies. The Institute, the first of its kind in the Province, will provide a
very significant and practical type of training in the field of post-secondary education. The programmes of the Institute are the result of a co-ordinated effort of
educational authorities working with the strong support of an Advisory Council
and advisory committees in the various disciplines. The Advisory Council is composed of leading representatives of industry, business, medicine, and other professions, and is also responsible, along with the principal, for seeing that high standards are maintained and that the specific needs of the Province and the nation are
being met at the Institute.
District and regional colleges are well on their way to being established. The
district college for Vancouver will open in September, 1965, while the West Kootenay Regional College expects to enrol its first classes in September, 1966. In the
Okanagan Valley a successful plebiscite was held in April in the nine school districts
now comprising the Okanagan Regional College area. Subsequently a College
Council was set up and a site selected. Consideration will shortly be given to the
appointment of a principal, and to plans for construction of the buildings, and the
courses to be offered.
New regional vocational schools are in various stages of development at Dawson Creek, Prince Rupert-Terrace, Kamloops, and Victoria. These, when completed, will brings the total of our regional vocational schools to 10. It is anticipated
that all of these will be in operation after September of 1967.
SENIOR STAFF CHANGES
In June of 1965 Mr. Franklin P. Levirs, Assistant Superintendent (Instruction) , was appointed Superintendent of Education, succeeding Dr. J. F. K. English,
who was both Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education. The separation
of these two positions became necessary because of the rapid expansion of educational facilities and the added burden of administration and curriculum planning
and supervision.
Mr. Levirs came to the Department of Education as Chief Inspector of Schools
in 1954. Following a teaching career of several years in Creston, Ocean Falls, and
Kimberley, he served as an Inspector of Schools in the Omineca and Cranbrook
areas.    Mr. Levirs received his early education in Victoria.    After obtaining his
 D 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
B.A. degree, he took graduate work at the University of British Columbia and at
the University of Idaho. With his considerable experience in all types of schools,
Mr. Levirs takes over his new post highly trained and well prepared for his new
responsibilities.
RESIGNATIONS
Mr. R. M. Hall, District Superintendent of Schools at Williams Lake, resigned
in June of this year to become regional superintendent of Indian schools in British
Columbia and the Yukon, in the Department of Indian Affairs at Vancouver. He
received his early education in Saskatchewan and subsequently graduated from the
University of Saskatchewan with B.A. and B.Ed, degrees. After serving in the Navy
from 1943 to 1945, he taught in the Fraser Valley and was successively vice-principal
and principal of the Chilliwack Junior High School. He was appointed a District
Superintendent in 1958. After one year in a relieving capacity, he was assigned to
Williams Lake. Mr. Hall, by virtue of his general experience in education, contributed much to the Williams Lake area. As he assumes his new duties with
Indian Affairs, he carries with him the good wishes of his colleagues in the Department of Education.
OBITUARY
The Department of Education suffered a severe loss in the death of Mr.
Laughlin Alexander Matheson, District Superintendent at Penticton. Although the
late Mr. Matheson obtained his early education in Saskatchewan and was a graduate of the University of Saskatchewan, his professional career was in British Columbia. After taking teacher-training at the University of British Columbia in
1926, he taught in the Enderby and North Vancouver high schools. He was later
principal of the Ridgeway Elementary-Junior High School, and from 1940 to 1956
was principal of the Queen Elizabeth High School in Surrey. After his appointment
to the staff of the Department of Education, he served as a District Superintendent
in the School Districts of Smithers, Burns Lake, and Vanderhoof. From 1957 to
1963 he was District Superintendent of the Kimberley, Windermere, and Golden
School Districts in the East Kootenay section of the Province. In 1963 he was
transferred to the Penticton and Summerland districts. " Lockie " Matheson was
a popular and efficient principal and District Superintendent. In spite of impaired
health in recent years, he carried out his duties with courage and devotion. He
will be greatly missed by his many friends.
NEW APPOINTMENTS
In June, 1965, two new District Superintendents of Schools came on staff—
Mr. R. B. Cox, principal of the Princess Margaret Elementary-Junior Secondary
School at Penticton, and Mr. R. S. Boyle, principal of Boothe Memorial Junior
Secondary School at Prince Rupert. Mr. Cox was assigned as District Superintendent in the Prince Rupert, Queen Charlotte, and Portland Canal School Districts.
Mr. Boyle will take over the District Superintendency of the Fort Nelson and Portage
Mountain School Districts. He will also be responsible for the unattached schools
at Good Hope Lake, Haines, Lower Post, McDame Creek, and Telegraph Creek.
Both of these men have had many years of successful experience and join the
Department weU qualified for their new positions.
Two curriculum consultants, Mr. W. J. McConnell and Mr. W. N. Mclnnis,
were appointed for the school-year 1965/66. This is the fourth successive year
that personnel from elementary and secondary schools have been loaned to the
Department to help in curriculum revision in the elementary- and secondary-school
 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT D 37
programmes. Their predecessors, Mr. James Cairnie and Mr. John McLoughlin,
after serving a year in the Department, have returned to positions in the Provincial
school system, Mr. Cairnie to become vice-principal of the Junior-Senior Secondary
School in North Vancouver, and Mr. McLoughlin to join the staff of the Kamloops
school system. Both of these gentlemen, along with their predecessors, have contributed much to curriculum planning during the years they served with the Department of Education.
Mr. Seth Halton joined the staff of the Department in May, 1965, as an
administrative assistant to the Minister of Education and Labour. He is a graduate
of the University of Alberta. For some years he served with the press, first as a
reporter and later in the capacity of editor. He came to the Provincial Government
in 1961 as a member of the Public Information Division of the British Columbia
Forest Servcie.
DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENTS' CONFERENCE
During the Easter vacation a three-day Departmental Conference was held at
the S. J. Willis Junior Secondary School in Victoria for all District Superintendents
and Departmental officials. The emphasis of this conference was upon the new
developments in education, particularly at the secondary level. It welcomed to its
midst the new Dean of Education at the University of Victoria, Dr. Fred Tyler, as
well as Dr. Archibald McKinnon, Dean of Education at Simon Fraser University.
Representatives of the School Trustees Association and the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation were also in attendance. The responsibility for directing this
conference fell to Mr. W. D. Reid, Chief Inspector of Schools. This was a most
successful event and reflected great credit on Mr. Reid, the District Superintendents,
and the members of the Department who participated.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Since a new Superintendent of Education was appointed in June, 1965, this
will be my last Annual Report. During my period in office as Superintendent of
Education I have been fortunate in having a devoted staff, not only in the Department at Victoria, but in the persons of the District Superintendents of Schools
throughout the Province. May I at this time express the hope that Mr. Levirs, my
successor as Superintendent, and the new deputy, when he is appointed, will receive
the same support and goodwill that I have enjoyed from members of the Department.
As I leave this position I am greatly indebted to everyone for their patience
and co-operation. While a good deal has been accomplished by the Department
during my tenure of office, I would be quick to point out that much remains to be
done in the immediate years ahead.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH,
Superintendent of Education.
 D 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
REPORT OF DR. W. A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P^d., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.,
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (ADMINISTRATION AND SCHOOL BOARD RELATIONS).
Introduction
The first half of this century produced many important innovations in teaching
methods. All these changes in the science of education were calculated to make
learning more efficient, but few of them required any great modification in the traditional plan of the standard classrooms. Then suddenly in the fifties, and now
most urgently in the sixties, a radically new approach to learning is demanding extensive modifications in school construction because today's school building has to
be designed to accommodate not only new teaching methods, but it also has to be
designed to utilize a new type of classroom organization and also to provide for
many new and more efficient tools of learning.
All of us in the field of education can view with satisfaction these improvements in instruction that are now taking place around us. We can also feel very
proud that as educationists we are playing a very important role in preparing the
youth of the Province to meet the many challenges of our rapidly changing society.
School District Organization
Provincial legislation places the operation and maintenance of the public schools
in each of the school districts, under the jurisdiction of the locally elected Board of
School Trustees. At the end of the school-year there were 93 school districts in
the Province. These included 75 districts classified as municipal school districts
because they embraced a municipality within their boundaries. The other 18 were
classified as rural school districts. In this latter category there were 10 small
school districts, commonly referred to as unattached school districts.
During the past school-year two new municipal school districts were created.
On January 1, 1965, School District No. 84 (Vancouver Island West) was formed
by the amalgamation of some unorganized territory plus the area embraced by the
former rural school districts of Amai, Esperanza, Fair Harbour, Kyuquot, Muchalat,
Tahsis River, and Zeballos.
The other new district, created at the same time, was School District No. 85
(Vancouver Island North). This was formed by the amalgamation of the former
School District No. 73 (Alert Bay) and the former School District No. 74 (Quatsino).
Boards of School Trustees
A School Board is composed of three, five, seven, or nine trustees, as determined by the Minister of Education. A trustee is normally elected for a two-year
term of office.
Trustees within a municipality are elected in accordance with the provisions
of the Municipal Act. Trustees within rural areas of a school district are elected
in accordance with the provisions of the Public Schools Act. This arrangement
allows rural trustees to be elected in four different manners. They may be elected
at large in the rural area of the school district, or they may be elected from an
attendance zone, or they may be elected by representatives who were elected at
annual meetings of attendance areas. They also may be elected by a combination
of any of the three methods.   During the past year there has been no appreciable
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH D 39
trend toward election at large, and, because the method of election by representatives is apparently breaking down, the Minister of Education has been called upon
to appoint many attendance area representatives as a result of the failure of voters
to elect representatives.
Of the 93 districts in operation at the end of the school-year, there were 15
Boards with nine trustees each, 38 Boards each with seven trustees, 27 Boards each
with five trustees, and 3 Boards each with three trustees. In addition to these
elected trustees, there were 10 official trustees, appointed by the Council of Public
Instruction to operate 10 of the school districts.
School Construction
In this Province we have recently experienced a population explosion and an
expansion in our economy that staggers the imagination. Every school district in
the Province has increased in school population. Instant towns, each with a population of several thousand people, are springing up in areas that were formerly unpopulated. Huge dams are being constructed on our once-untamable rivers to
generate electricity, to control flooding, and to irrigate thousands of acres of formerly
arid land. New mines are being opened, gigantic new pulp-mills are being constructed, and other huge industrial plants are being put into operation in many parts
of the Province. These new enterprises are now converting the raw materials from
our forests, mountains, aud fields into manufactured products.
These new enterprises have resulted in school construction continuing to expand at an accelerated pace. Under the provisions of the Public Schools Act, the
Province shares at least 50 per cent of the capital costs which it considers necessary
to provide adequate sites, buildings, and equipment for public schools. While the
essential requirements for the public schools have been determined by the Department for the cost-sharing purposes, a School Board may, when planning its building, add features and details in which the Department does not share. Because
capital funds for all major capital expenditures are provided by the sale of school
district debentures, the following two types of referenda are submitted to the
electors: Those which are eligible for Government grant and those which are not
eligible for Government grant. Funds thus provided under these two classifications
are commonly referred to as shareable and non-shareable capital funds.
A summary of construction data indicates that contracts for public school
buildings awarded last year were in excess of $20,000,000. This amount covered
327 projects in 61 school districts. Almost 60 per cent of the total construction
costs was allocated for elementary facilities. These facilities for elementary pupils
included 494 classrooms and 59 activity rooms and gymnasia. Approximately 35
per cent of the total construction costs was allocated for secondary-school facilities.
These included 248 teaching areas and 7 auditoria and gymnasia. The balance
of the cost, actually less than 5 per cent of the total, was allocated for miscellaneous
construction, such as maintenance shops, administrative offices, bus garages, etc.
These figures represent a continuation of the recent upward trend in the volume of
school construction that has been necessary to meet the accommodation needs of
the steadily increasing pupil population. Another factor in this upward trend in
costs involves the additional space and facilities required to implement the revised
curriculum. In addition to the $20,000,000 expended on construction, the cost
of school-sites and their development across the Province amounted to approximately $3,000,000, or 15 per cent of the total building costs.
To provide for future school accommodation needs, School Boards were authorized, during the past school-year, to place before their owner-electors a total of 49
 Claremont Senior Secondary School, School District No. 63 (Saanich)
Designed by the School Planning Division of the Department of Education, this school
was constructed at a cost of $310,000. The building consists of a two-floor reinforced-
concrete classrooms block and a one-story glu-lam post and beam structure containing
industrial education and community services areas. An addition to the classrooms wing was
made in 1964 at a cost of $96,000.
Another view of the building which was built in 1961 and added to in July, 1964.
 ADMINISTRATION BRANCH D 41
referenda, totalling over $44,000,000. These referenda were based upon three-
year population projections, and were therefore designed to meet the need for school
accommodation within a period wherein the population and cost factors could be
expected to be predicted within reasonably accurate limits.
In addition to the above referenda for public schools, six School Boards each
placed a question before the owner-electors of their school districts asking approval
of the provision of capital facilities for a regional college for the West Kootenay
area of the Province. Because the necessary percentage of voters cast ballots in
favour, the West Kootenay Regional College will be in operation near Castlegar
by September, 1966.
A plebiscite was also presented in the Okanagan Valley areas to obtain the
opinion of the voters respecting the establishment of a regional college. This
plebiscite was approved by all districts except Penticton. Plans are now well under
way for the presentation of a referendum to implement the proposed college to
serve the Okanagan Valley.
The Work of the School Planning Division
The School Planning Division has completed its busiest year. During this
period the officials of this Division have prepared plans and supervised the construction of 43 elementary projects which amounted to over $1,800,000. In addition, this Division of the Administration Branch reviewed and approved architects'
plans and specifications for the remaining $18,200,000 worth of building contracts
which were put out to tender during the past year. The Division also evaluated
plans and specifications for aproximately $10,000,000 worth of vocational-school
construction that is being built this year under Programme 1 of Provincial-Federal
Agreement.
Tutorial Assistance for Pupils in Isolated Areas
The establishment of classes for pupils living in isolated areas is authorized
where neither school accommodation nor transportation is available. All pupils
in such classes must be assembled in suitable quarters during the regular school-
hours, and they must be tutored by an instructor sanctioned by the Superintendent
of Education.
During the past school-year there were 14 classes of this nature in operation.
These classes enrolled a total of 69 pupils, of which 58 were elementary pupils and
11 were secondary pupils. These classes were operated in conjunction with the
Correspondence Branch of the Department and were authorized under the provisions of section 20 of the Public Schools Act. Under this section, salary aid, in
the form of a grant to the teacher, is paid directly by the Province. Such a grant
is normally $15 per pupil per month of instruction.
 D 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION (INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES)
Instructional services include the work of the following divisions, each of which
has its own director and submits its own annual report: Curriculum; Tests and
Standards; Secondary School Correspondence; Elementary School Correspondence;
Visual Education; School Broadcasts; Home Economics; Jericho Hill School; and
the Textbook Branch. In addition, there are aspects of instructional services that
do not readily fall under any of the above-mentioned divisions; these form the substance of this report.
Accreditation of Schools
The Accrediting Committee considered 92 applications for accreditation, accrediting 56 schools as follows: 10 for four years, 22 for three years, 13 for two
years, and 11 for one year. Six schools were accredited for the first time, and two
more returned to the list of accredited schools after suggested improvements had
been made. One school, no longer enrolling senior pupils, was dropped from the
list. The total number of accredited schools is now 115, a gain of 7 over the previous year.
Adult Education
In respect of interrupted programmes for adults, approval was given to various
night schools and adult day schools to offer courses for credit, as follows:—
Year
School Districts
Schools
Courses
1964/65              —    ._	
29
25
25
29
27
27
|        178
1963/64                                                 	
1        215
1962/63              _.     .    ._        _.
221
A meeting with representatives of metropolitan Directors of Adult Education
formulated plans for a new interrupted programme based on the revised curricula
for Grades XI and XII.
Teacher Qualifications in Secondary Schools
The number of teachers with elementary certification only teaching academic
subjects at Grade X or higher secondary levels declined slightly. Of the 160 teachers concerned with less than four years of university-level training, all but 39 had
improved their standing in the last five years and 77 had taken at least one course
in 1964. Each year a significant number of elementary teachers qualify themselves
for secondary work. Comparable figures for the past three years are shown
below:—
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
D 43
Year
Number with Certificate
Shown
Totals
EA
EB
EC
ET
1964/65                           -    .     — —    —
83
69
67
56
45
58
72
64
70
74
4
5
4
3
7
15
21
8
11
12
160
1Q61/64
167
1962/63-_.      ..   .                 _ 	
143
1961/62.            	
140
1960/61-                                    _	
138
Promotion of Grade VII Pupils and Distribution in Grade VIII
Each year in June, District Superintendents report the promotions of Grade
VII pupils, while in September, Form K shows the actual distribution of the Grade
VIII enrolment.   The table below shows these figures for the past three years:—
June
Recommended to
September Enrolments
Year
Grade
VIII
Occupational 1
Repeat
Grade VII
Grade
VIII
Taking
French 8
Occupational I
1964       	
26,276
25,077
24,564
1,388
1,367
1,550
1,462
1,758
1,821
29,454
28,292
27,850
27,960
26,705
25,695
2,174
1963 _	
2,219
1962.   _	
2,457
It will be noted that as the reorganized system settles down, the tendency to
promote more Grade VII pupils to the regular Grade VIII programme increases,
with a consequent reduction in the number of Grade VII repeaters. Almost 95 per
cent of Grade VIII pupils take French.
Most Frequently Chosen Advanced Electives
The ten most frequently chosen advanced electives were, in order of rank:
Mathematics 91, Chemistry 91, Biology 91, English 91, Physics 91, Geography 91,
English 93, History 91, Home Economics 91, and Law 93. Physics, open for the
first time to Grade XI students, rose sharply in popularity. Law 93 displaced
French 92 from the first 10. Mathematics 91 moved from third to first place,
dropping Chemistry 91 and Biology 91 to second and third respectively.
Grade VII Departmental Examinations
Final examinations at the Grade VII level were prepared and furnished to
those districts requesting them. The table below shows the number of Departmental examinations written:—
Subject 1965
English—
Reading and literature 	
Grammar, usage, composition
Vocabulary, dictation, word study         12,885
Mathematics—
Computation
Problems	
Social studies
Science
Number of Papers Written
1964
8,822
12,635
12,885
7,121
11,402
11,965
12,228
12,131
12,755
12,686
9,408
9,472
11,790
11,499
 D 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Organization of Secondary Schools
The newer types of school organization providing for the reorganized curriculum are becoming established.   Types are shown below:—
Number of Schools
Types 1964 1963
Senior secondary     8 4
Secondary   96 (64) 87 (54)
Junior secondary   50 (38) 46 (34)
Elementary and secondary  57  (34) 73  (44)
Elementary and junior secondary  48  (15) 77 (17)
(The figures in parentheses show the number enrolling all grades in the category given; for example, secondary VIII-XIII, inclusive.)
The size of schools, with reference to secondary enrolments only, is shown
below:—
Enrolment
Over 2,000	
1,001-2,000 	
501-1,000 	
251-   500 	
101-   250 	
51-   100 	
Under 51	
259        268
The trend is obviously toward consolidation of the smaller secondary schools,
especially at senior levels.
The number of Grade VIII pupils in small elementary schools dropped to 112
from 123 in the previous year, leaving out the prediction of last year that a reasonably constant figure has been reached in this category.
The total number of elementary pupils housed in secondary schools was
16,283, as compared to 15,787 in 1963. However, there was a further drop to
5,371 from 8,449 of Grade VII pupils in this total number. It is evident that the
elimination of Grade VII from the junior secondary school is almost complete.
The hypothetical median British Columbia secondary school now enrolls 456
secondary pupils and has a total instructional staff of approximately 22 teachers,
both figures significantly greater than a year ago.
Grade XIII Enrolments
These continue to rise spectacularly, in spite of the increase in other facilities
available at the post-secondary level, as shown in the table below. All figures are
for September of the year mentioned.
Number of Schools
1964
1963
1
1
36
28
83
80
51
60
41
39
17
23
30
37
Number of districts with Grade XIII	
1964
38
41
1963
37
Number of schools     -             __ 	
40
Enrolment
____    3,628
2,957
Kindergartens
Kindergartens also increased in number and enrolment, as follows:—
1964 1963
Number of districts with kindergartens  22 20
Number of schools        155 127
Enrolment  10,894 9,119
 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES
Classes on the Occupational Programme
d 45
This programme completed its third official year, so that for the first time it
graduated pupils on other than experimental basis.   Enrolments were as follows:—
Year
Districts
Schools
Teachers
Pupils
1964-               	
70
65
126
118
!
322
267
5,309
1963       	
4,629
A tentative report was possible on the third year of the programme, found in
91 schools.   Of these, 90 reported.
A total of 1,227 pupils, 726 boys and 501 girls, was enrolled in Year 3 in
September. Of these, 9 per cent left school before the end of the year without definite
employment, 41 per cent had definite jobs by the end of the school-year, and 14 per
cent were committed to further education or training. As the information had to be
collected almost a month before the last day of school, the disposition of all pupils
was not then known.
In the opinion of principals, experience on this programme accounted directly
for the employment of 320 pupils, with 182 employed by employers with whom
they had had work experience.
Schools for Trainable Retarded Children
The table below shows enrolments in schools operated by local chapters of the
Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia and supported by grants:—
Districts
Schools
Enrolment of Pupils in Relation to Grants
Year
Fully
Eligible
Kindergarten
Ineligible
Total
1964—             -	
42
40
45
42
505
482
45
22
64
43
614
1963     	
547
There were also 436 pupils enrolled in public-school day classes in 11 school
districts, making a total of 1,161 trainable retarded pupils in day schools, as compared with 923 in 1963.
Retention of Pupils
For every 100 pupils in the net Provincial enrolment of Grade VII in the year
1958/59, there were 67 in the net enrolment of Grade XII in 1963/64, an increase
of 2 over similar figures of a year ago.
School Population Growth
The percentage of school population growth over the period 1958/59 to
1963/64 was 30 per cent, exactly the same as for a similar period ended a year
earlier.
During this period the 10 fastest-growing school districts were: Chilcotin, 172
per cent; Muchalat, 164 per cent; Merritt, 112 per cent; Coquitlam, 97 per cent;
Fort Nelson, 96 per cent; Golden, 87 per cent; Delta, 84 per cent; Peace River
North 71 per cent; Prince George, 60 per cent; Queen Charlotte, 59 per cent.
 D 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Special Classes in Public Schools
Enrolments, as reported on September 30th, are shown in the following table:
Number of Teachers
Number of Pupils
1964
1963
1964
1963
261
46
8
12
6
14
2
2
2
6
43
2
5
238
29
7
11
6
13
2
2
2
7
36
2
3
3,689
672
208
80
313
17
19
24
62
436
32
3,378
403
177
69
339
15
20
.12
70
376
30
Totals   	
409         1         348
5.552        J        4.889
i Enrolment varies greatly.
Local Supervisory Personnel
The following table shows the number of district teachers employed in supervisory and special capacities as at September 30th:—
Directors of instruction	
Supervisors of instruction	
Teacher consultants	
Special counsellors     41
District teachers other than relieving teachers     49
1964
1963
26
20
83
81
26
19
41
34
49
45
Totals-
225
199
Entitlement of Teachers
The total number of teaching positions within entitlement for grant purposes
and the number established over and above entitlement by local districts, as at September 30th, are shown below:— 19e4 1963
Teaching positions within entitlement  14,711.99        14,069.35
Teaching positions over entitlement        342.02 263.2
Totals .
15,114.01 14,332.55
Additional Activities
With the first pupils on the reorganized school system entering the senior secondary school in September of 1965, a major activity was preparation of programmes
for Grades XI and XII. Acceptance of the locally developed commercial, industrial,
community services, and visual and performing arts programmes by the Government
of Canada as vocational within the meaning of its Programme 1 brought capital
expenditure for larger schools within the scope of the Federal-Provincial Training
Agreement. In preparation for the newer programmes, a team from the Department met in eight zone meetings with all the District Superintendents, principals, and
counsellors from senior secondary schools. These meetings did much to clear up
early difficulties. Meetings were also held with faculty representatives of the public
universities and of the Institute of Technology.
Throughout discussions of the reorganization, the greatest possible measure of
co-operation has been received from those institutions concerned with higher education, an invaluable assistance.
 SPECIAL SERVICES
D 47
SPECIAL SERVICES
of
REPORT OF J. PHILLIPSON, B.A., B.Ed., COORDINATOR OF
SPECIAL SERVICES
Conveyance of School-children
The following statistics indicate details connected with the conveyance
school-children during the school-year 1964/65:—
Item 1964/65
1. Number of large school districts providing transportation  76
2. Number of unattached districts providing transportation         NU
3. Total number of vehicles        644
(a) District-owned  492
(b) Contract  146
(c) Other (water taxis, etc.)        6
4. Total daily approved mileage (miles)   41,033
(a) Average distance per vehicle (miles)        63.7
(b) Average number of trips per vehicle         2.0
5. Total number of daily trips by all vehicles     1,268
Average distance per single trip (miles)        15.9
6. Total number of pupils carried daily  57,364
(a) Elementary  27,524
(b) Secondary   29,840
7. Average number of pupils carried per vehicle       89.1
8. Average number of pupils carried per route       45.6
Transportation Assistance
In addition to the operation of regular school transportation services, each
School Board is empowered to make a grant to parents who provide their own
transportation for their children. These grants are given in cases where there are
insufficient pupils beyond Departmental walk limits to establish a regular bus route.
During the school-year, 2,072 pupils from 69 districts utilized this means of
conveyance at a total cost of $350,813.
Table of Transportation Costs
The following table indicates the relationship between the total district expenditure and the total conveyance costs over the past eight years:—
Calendar Year
Total District
Expenditures
Conveyance
Costs
Conveyance
Costs as a
Percentage
of District
Expenditures
1056
$69,234,423
80,966,873
91,279,662
105,044,901
118,269,991
127,616,486
136,432,687
150,790,702
165,814,555
$1,918,902
2,104,443
2,236,918
2,340,813
2,477,202
2,611,370
2,721,510
2,886,696
3,125,447
2.8
1057
2.5
1058
2.4
1050
2.2
1960
2.1
1061
2.0
1067
2.0
1063
1.9
1064
1.9
  SPECIAL SERVICES
D 49
School Dormitories
In many isolated rural sections of the large school districts, it is impossible
for the School Boards to provide transportation services for secondary pupils who
desire to attend centralized secondary schools. In order to enable these pupils to
attend secondary schools that offer a full secondary-school programme, authority
to operate school dormitories is given to School Boards.
The following table provides data respecting the dormitories that were in
operation during 1964/65:—
School District
Capacity
Occupancy
1964/65
Staff
Grade Limits
Accommodated
Number and Name
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Full
Time
Part
Time
From
To
24. Kamloops — —
15     '
20
15
18
20
24
45
16
30     i
64
14
14
20
15
18
20
20
45
12
30
56
11
li5
19
13
12
19
27
16
23
42
10
9
13
17
12
18
23
11
24
49
10
1
1
1
2
3
3
2
3
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
X
VIII
VIII
VIII
VIII
VIII
IX
vin
VIII
VIII
IX
XIII
XII
100 Mile      -   	
XII
28. Quesnel  —
29. Lillooet-          	
XII
XII
XII
XIII
58. McBride    _	
XII
XIII
XII
64. Gulf Islands   .  	
XII
Totals..— __	
281
261
196
1«6
25
9
Boarding Allowances
For pupils who are unable to take advantage of transportation or dormitization,
the School Board is empowered to provide a boarding allowance. Under this
arrangement a pupil can receive up to $30 per month on a basis shared by the
Department of Education. During the past school-year, 1964/65, there were 541
pupils from 58 school districts who received a total of $160,650 in such boarding
allowances.
Jericho Hill School Advisory Board
This Board consists of representatives from the Deaf and the Blind Parent-
Teacher Association, the Vancouver School Board, and the Department of Education.
The Advisory Board met once each school month during 1964/65 and provided monthly reports to the Department respecting the operation of the Jericho
Hill School.
The accompanying report of Dr. C. E. MacDonald, the Superintendent of the
Jericho Hill School, contains the pertinent statistics relating to the enrolment in
the school.
School Board Services
A number of activities were carried out during the year by request of School
Boards throughout the Province. Investigations and reports on special problems
related to assignment of pupils, location of schools, and similar local matters are
typical examples of assistance provided by the Department. Surveys of the administrative organization within two districts were carried out on request of the Boards
concerned.
The Special Services personnel are pleased to render consultative service to
Boards, throughout the year on request, within limits imposed by staff and time.
 D 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
DIVISION OF CURRICULUM
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
What do children need to learn today to live in the world of tomorrow? What
knowledge must they acquire? What skills and abilities must they develop? What
sense of values will serve them best in the rather confused world of the present and
the unknown world of the future? These are central questions in the work of
curriculum development. In one form or another they are at the basis of virtually
every curriculum revision, from the Grade I language arts programme to the elective
courses in physics in Grade XII. They appear at the classroom level, the district
level, and the Provincial level in all educational systems. Perfect answers have not
yet been found and probably never will be. The best that can be done is to continue
the search with the aid of the combined wisdom of as many persons as possible.
Answers will be tentative, the best that can be devised for the times in which we live.
As in previous years, this was a major theme in the intensive programme of
revision and reorganization undertaken during the year 1964/65. Fifteen specific
subject revision committees were actively engaged in revising courses and in developing new courses and selecting new textbooks in the fields of arithmetic, mathematics, language arts, English, junior secondary-school science, industrial science,
biology, chemistry, physics, social studies, French, German, community recreation,
music, and basic subjects for slow learners. Membership on these committees consisted of 123 persons. In the 10-month period under review, these committees held
149 meetings, representing a total of over 4,000 hours of curriculum development
work. Thirty of these meetings were held for one or more full days, with costs
of substitutes being paid by the Department of Education. The remainder were
held in the afternoons and evenings. All work was voluntary. Out-of-pocket
expenses and a token honorarium were paid for this assistance by the Department
of Education.
In addition to the foregoing, two special work sessions of several days' duration
were held during the summer in the fields of English and mathematics at the senior
secondary level. The English project was under the direction of Mr. J. S. Church,
administrative assistant, British Columbia Teachers' Federation. The mathematics
project was directed by Mr. J. E. Smith, University of British Columbia. Results
greatly facilitated the revisions in the fields concerned. Sincere appreciation is
extended to all who participated and to Mr. Church and Mr. Smith for the excellent
supervision and leadership they gave to these projects.
A similar but more extensive project in course-writing was organized for
courses in all new senior secondary-school programmes. This project involved 28
persons for 10 full days in writing curriculum guides for courses in the commerce,
industrial, community services, and visual and performing arts programmes. At the
special request of the Department of Education, Mr. W. J. Mouat, District Superintendent of Schools (Abbotsford), assumed responsibility for organizing and supervising the project, assisted by Mr. S. J. Graham, District Superintendent of Schools
(New Westminster); Mr. W. H. Gurney, District Superintendent of Schools (Port
Alberni); Miss M. C. Orr, Director of Home Economics; Col. C. J. Strong, Inspector of Technical Classes; Mr. R. Smith, Inspector of Technical Classes; and Mr.
N. M. Henderson, Director of Vocational Curriculum Development, who acted as
general secretary for the project.   Special acknowledgment is due to teachers who
 DIVISION OF CURRICULUM D 51
participated, to consultants, including Miss C. S. Black, University of British Columbia, and to the aforementioned District Superintendents of Schools and Department
staff who undertook these new responsibilities in addition to their regular duties.
The success of the project reflects great credit on all concerned.
The following is a statistical summary of course development work completed
during the year 1964/65:—
Number of courses revised  12
Number of new courses developed  63
Number of new textbooks recommended  52
In addition to the foregoing, certain other curriculum studies were completed,
as follows:—
(1) A special programme for slow learners in primary grades.
(2) Special teaching units on smoking and health for elementary schools and
on venereal disease for secondary schools.
(3) Suggestions for organizing and administering the curriculum in the small
senior secondary schools.
(4) A complete revision of " Library Books Authorized for Use in the Public
Schools of British Columbia," listing with annotations some 6,000 titles
recommended for libraries in elementary and secondary schools.
All of these projects involved the use of teacher committees and could not
have been accomplished without the full co-operation of members of university
staffs and the members and staff of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.
Such co-operation from professional persons is now becoming a matter of course,
but it seems important that the voluntary contribution being made to the improvement of education should be recognized and acknowledged.
Professional Committees
The two professional committees on the elementary and secondary-school curriculum held a total of 18 meetings. These committees are representative of the
various institutions and organizations engaged in public education in this Province.
They function as technical advisory committees to the Department. Among the matters considered by these committees during the current year were the following:—
(a) At the elementary level—time allotments for elementary schools, the
problem of the transfer pupil, priorities to be given to subject revisions,
the improvement of the library in elementary schools, plans to facilitate
continuous educational progress, educational plans for the Centennial
Year.
(b) At the secondary level—the reorganization of the curriculum for senior
secondary schools, promotional policy and procedures, the teaching of
languages other than English, organizing and administering the curriculum in the small secondary school, educational plans for the Centennial
Year.
All members of these committees gave unsparingly of their time and professional advice.   Their assistance is gratefully acknowledged.
Curriculum Consultants
The practice was continued whereby two outstanding teachers in the Province
are released on loan by the Boards of School Trustees to work with the Division of
Curriculum. This year's appointees were Mr. F. J. Cairnie (Victoria) and Mr. R. I.
McLoughlin (Peace River South). The enthusiasm and knowledge combined with
 D 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
the practical experience and professional training of both Mr. Cairnie and Mr.
McLoughlin made an invaluable contribution to the work of this Division.
Interprovincial and National Consultation on Curriculum
This report would be incomplete without reference to the increased extent of
consultation with other Provinces for the purpose of pooling resources for curriculum improvement within each Province and ensuring as far as possible a continuity
in the education of pupils who transfer from one Province to another. This Director
participates in the annual meetings of curriclum officials in the four Western Provinces. As a result of such meetings, information has been exchanged and courses
in some subject fields are being developed along generally similar lines. The Division is also represented at special interprovincial meetings of personnel concerned
with specific courses. Such meetings have been partly responsible for the similarity
of studies in chemistry and physics found in these Provinces. Studies and consultations were also held on a national level. Considerable time was spent on correspondence and interviews with individuals representing or working with national
organizations, departments of government, and the Royal Commission on Bicul-
turalism. A three-day meeting arranged by the Canadian Education Association
for curriculum directors of all Provinces was also attended. Considerable attention
was given to the matter of curriculum uniformity and the transfer pupil. General
agreement was reached concerning possible procedures which each Province might
take to facilitate this transfer. There would appear to be considerable merit in continuing this kind of informal consultation.
Information and Related Services
In addition to specific revision and reorganization work, the Division also
undertook certain informational services, including the preparation and distribution
of curriculum guides; supplements to the lists of recommended library books; the
preparation and distribution of the regular curriculum; administrative, announcement, and teaching-aid circulars of the Department of Education; and provision of
addresses for various public and professional groups.
 DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS
D 53
DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed., DIRECTOR
All British Columbia Grade IV pupils except a few recent immigrants have
now been instructed in the new arithmetic courses for four years. In order to
determine some of the effects of the new curriculum, three arithmetic and one
scholastic aptitude test were administered to halves of the Grade IV enrolment.
The Province was divided alphabeticaUy by school name to form two samples; these
were adjusted slightly on the basis of previous test records to increase equivalence,
and different test programmes were set up for each half.
•' S " Sample " C " Sample
Schools         536 531
Classes        745 746
Pupils tested  16,237 16,555
The " S " sample wrote the Seeing through Arithmetic Test 4, B.C. edition,
only.
The " C " sample was tested with the California Test of Mental Maturity, '57
S Form, Level 2; the California (traditional) Arithmetic Test, Elementary, Form
Y; the California Contemporary Mathematics Test, Lower Elementary, Form X.
Although experience has shown that alphabetic sampling on an odd-even basis
does not produce exact equivalence in the Vancouver area, we may assume reasonable equivalence of the two samples, as adjusted, for the 1,067 elementary schools
in the Province as a whole. This enables us to obtain scholastic aptitude norms and
traditional arithmetic norms for the " S " as well as the " C " sample, and to assume
equivalence of the samples used for item analysis of the three arithmetic tests.
Machine scoring that used mark-sensing of graphite-filled answer spaces was
tried out in this Division many years ago and was found to be less accurate than
carefully controlled hand-scoring. But recent developments in photoelectric scoring
have indicated that it is possible to score objective tests mechanically with a satisfactory degree of accuracy. Consequently an experiment was planned in which the
scoring accuracy of two types of electronic scorers would be combined with the
testing of Grade IV arithmetic and compared with both hand and machine scoring
of similar answer sheets at higher grade levels in a number of different ways.
The procedures involved mechanical identification of pupils by name or number, or visual identification and punching; hand-coding of schools and divisions
versus pupil and teacher coding in answer spaces; scoring twice with scores printed
on the answer sheet, visual identification of differences and hand-scoring; automatic
production of scores on punched cards during scoring versus subsequent punching
and verifying; mechanical identification of courses, programmes, and dates of birth;
computer production of percentiles, stanines, chronological ages, and class lists by a
variety of programmes. The equipment that was used included a Digitek electronic
scorer, with and without punch-card output; an I.B.M. 1235 scoring and computing
combination; 1401 and 1620 computers; and the usual punching and verifying
equipment. Pupil answer and identification sheets that were handled mechanically
totalled 108,000—82,500 in Grade IV and 25,500 in Grades XI and XII. Over
306,000 sub-tests were scored, and over a million data items such as sex, chronological age, stanine equivalents, etc., were produced mechanically. All of these are
being compared with 155,500 sub-test scores produced by hand-scoring and check-
 D 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT. 1964/65
scoring the answer sheets of 31,000 Grade VII pupils, and 5 to 10 per cent of
all mechanically scored tests are being rescored by hand. Unfortunately it will
not be possible to make a direct comparison of the accuracy of scoring by the Digitek
and I.B.M. 1235 machines because sheets scored by the latter were all carefully
edited and cleaned up by hand while the former were not.
By the time a pupil reaches Grade VII, he is expected to have developed
methods of studying and of solving problems, and of using the tools that are available; for example, encyclopaedias, dictionaries, maps, charts and graphs. These
work-study skills had been investigated in Grade VIII 15 years ago, and it is interesting and gratifying to notice that the mean scores obtained in 1964/65 in the
eighth month of Grade VII are all higher than those obtained in 1949/50 in the
first month of Grade VIII. While the differences are numerically small, the table
indicates that they have considerable significance in terms of the grade-equivalent
months in the norms issued with the test.
It should be noticed, however, that there are now more special-class students
not enrolled in " grades," and there is considerable evidence that the 1964/65
group, 65 per cent of whom were born in 1952, are a superior stream to the
" depression " group, mostly born in 1936, that was tested in 1949.
Iowa Work-study
Skills, Advanced Form O
Map
Reading
References
Use of
Index
Dictionary
Graphs,
Charts
B.C. VII-8:  April, 1965-                       	
16.S
14.1
9.5
8.6
13.1
9.8
20.7
17.4
14.4
B.C. VIII-1:  October, 1949    -	
12.0
Difference (grade-equivalent month), —3	
+ 12
+7
+ 16
+ 18
+12
A new scholastic aptitude test, the Henmon-Nelson College Level, Form A,
was administered to University Programme students in May, 1965. The purpose
of this testing, which is carried on at four- or five-year intervals, is to provide
standards by which University entrance candidates enrolled in different courses may
be selected on an equitable basis from year to year and from subject to subject. The
test had been equated to the Dominion Group Test of Learning Capacity on half-
samples of Grade XIII in 1964. Therefore, it was possible to make the transfer to
a new test without loss of equivalence. The numbers of students tested in 1965
were:
Grade XII University Programme  11,6812
Grade XII General Programme        230s
Grade XI University Programme   13,1203
Grade XI General Programme         3594
Grade or programme not stated        120
Total
25,512
i 94.6 per cent of public-school candidates in English 40.
2 About 3 per cent of the G.P.s.
s 92.6 per cent of public-school candidates in Social Studies 30.
* About 3.5 per cent of the G.P.s.
The results of the testing indicated that the Grade XII students enrolled in the
University Programme in 1965, although not as high as those of 1953 and 1954,
have higher scholastic aptitude than those tested in more recent years. This in spite
of an increase in Grade XII holding power from 55 per cent in 1958 to 72 per cent
in 1965 and a greater public tendency to demand preparation for college for a larger
proportion of the population.   Perhaps a more efficient classification of students
 DIVISION OF TESTS AND STANDARDS D 55
into University and General Programmes has been accomplished and there is considerable evidence that the post-war infants, now aged 18, are a distinctly superior
group when compared with those born during the depression. On the other hand,
no increase in scholastic aptitude is noticeable in the 1964/65 Grade XI. Enrolment in Mathematics 30 and Social Studies 30 includes a high proportion of pupils
who might be considered C— or D students; the selection that occurs at the end of
Grade XI has not yet taken place; and the increase in holding power has nullified
any improvement in the total student population.
The data that were collected from this survey were successfully applied to the
scaling of the June, 1965, University Entrance examinations, and with the able
assistance of West Coast Data Processing personnel all deadlines were met. As was
expected, the number of candidates reached a new high, and 72,885 papers were
processed—60,333 at the University Entrance level where only one English 40
examination was administered this year, and 12,552 in Grade XIII.
Selectivity of Grade XI and XII Subjects as Indicated by the per cents of Students
Enrolled Who Are at or above the Grade XII University Programme Median
Score of 53
Number
University Programme Subject Per Cent Tested
Latin 92   78.40 250
French 92   71.01 2,718
English 91   60.18 7,205
History 91   60.16 2,929
German 92  57.45 47
Physics 91   55.17 6,485
Mathematics 91   54.86 9,229
English 40   51.72 11,244
Economics 92   49.95 1,103
Chemistry 91   46.51 8,360
Commerce 92  45.27 349
Commerce 91   43.67 490
Geography 91   42.67 3,274
Law 93   41.63 1,679
Spanish 92   40.00 10
Biology 91   38.76 7,737
English 93   36.56 320
Bible Literature 40   36.36 11
Social Studies 30   34.51 13,732
Mathematics 30   34.01 14,148
The relative position of the subject courses has been remarkably stable since
testing was begun in 1952/53. Physics 91 has declined and English 91 has become
more selective, and it is notable that the Language 92 courses have all become
more selective in terms of student ability. The goal of bilingualism to the level of
fourth-year secondary-school French has been achieved by only 24 per cent of the
University Programme candidates, 14 per cent of Grade XII, and 10 per cent of the
corresponding elementary-school population. But a distinct improvement has occurred since 1960/61 when only 7.25 per cent and 1958/59 when only 5.5 per cent
of the corresponding elementary populations were enrolled in French 92.
New estimates of future enrolment have been prepared during the current
year, and for the first time in a generation a decrease is forecast.   Total elementary-
 D 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
school enrolment will continue to rise until 1970 and secondary enrolment until
1977, but, in spite of the fact that interprovincial immigration is currently at record
levels, both birth rates and birth numbers have fallen so steeply during the past
four years that it is impossible to forecast a mere levelling-off. The low birth rates
of the 1930's have resulted in a shortage of potential mothers aged 25 to 29, and
the true birth rates based on the reproductive age-groups in the female population
have declined 10 to 15 per cent.
 HOME ECONOMICS D 57
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS MILDRED C. ORR, B.A., B.S., DIRECTOR
The total number of pupils enrolled in home economics courses in the public
schools of British Columbia during the 1964/65 session was 52,676, showing an
increase of 8,350 (18.8 per cent) over the total number enrolled during the previous
year.
The enrolment by courses is as follows:—
HE 8  14,122 HE 31        383
FN 9, CT 9, CC 9  23,337 HE 32        161
CFS 9     1,244 HE 91     3,477
HE 20        134 HE 23        657
HE 21        267 HE 24        594
HE 22        116 HE 26        580
HE 30     5,253
Occupational 1, 2, 3  2,238
Tailoring         68
Jericho Hill School        45
In addition to the above, there were approximately nine schools offering home
economics where one or more classes were registered with the Secondary School
of Correspondence, because teachers with sufficient professional home economics
background were not available for teaching the senior home economics courses.
There were 412 teachers of home economics in the Province during the
1964/65 session, showing an increase of 24 home economics teaching positions in
public schools over the previous year. Of the above teachers, 229 held Bachelor of
Home Economics or equivalent home economics degrees.
The number of public schools having home economics departments, as of
September, 1964, was 214.
The total number of home economics rooms in operation in the schools was
423, showing an increase of four over the total number for last year. The home
economics departments in the various schools of the Province vary in size from one
to six rooms, the greatest number of schools having two home economics rooms in
operation.
Home economics departments were opened in September, 1964, as follows:
School District No. 3 (Cranbrook)—Laurie Elementary-Junior Secondary School;
School District No. 8 (Slocan)—Mount Sentinel Secondary School; School District
No. 9 (Castlegar)—Kinnaird Junior Secondary School; School District No. 25
(Barriere)—Barriere Secondary School; School District No. 46 (Sechelt)—Pender
Harbour Secondary School; School District No. 48 (Howe Sound)—Pemberton
Elementary-Secondary School; School District No. 60 (Peace River North)—Fort
St. John Junior Secondary School.
At Kelowna and Mission the junior and senior secondary schools amalgamated
to become one secondary school in each town.
The home economics department at Strathcona Elementary-Junior Secondary
School, Vancouver, closed in June, 1964, and its home economics enrolment was
absorbed in the Vancouver secondary schools.
There is a continued shortage of fully qualified home economics teachers.
With the introduction of the new programme at the senior secondary level, a further
  HOME ECONOMICS D 59
increase in the total number of home economics positions in the secondary schools
of the Province may be anticipated. Through the co-operation of the University of
British Columbia and the Department of Education, the Emergency Summer Session
Teacher Training Programme for Home Economics Graduates was continued at
the University of British Columbia, whereby home economics graduates may fulfil
teacher-training requirements for the Professional Basic certificate in three summer
sessions of prescribed courses. Certificated elementary or academic teachers may
take courses at summer sessions or winter sessions at the University of British
Columbia on the Bachelor of Education Secondary Programme, with major in home
economics, in order to become qualified to teach this subject. A member of the
Home Economics Division was on campus of the University of British Columbia for
part of each week of summer session for interviews with teachers and prospective
teachers of home economics.
In September, 1964, the new Child Care 9 Course, an elective course for
Grade IX or X girls, was introduced into the schools.
Co-operating with the Curriculum Division in the development of new courses
to be introduced in the reorganized senior secondary schools in September, 1965,
the Director of Home Economics chaired a Community Services Programme Workshop in July, 1964, and Miss Jean Irvine, Inspector of Home Economics, served as
a consultant. Community Services Programme course development, which was
begun in 1963, was carried further, and course outlines were completed for Management 11, Home and Industrial Services 12, Foods 11, Foods 12a, Foods 12b,
Textiles 11, Textiles 12a, Textiles 12b, and Child Care 12. A list of equipment for
the Community Services Programme, prepared at the 1963 and 1964 Course Development Workshops, was submitted to the Division of Curriculum following the July,
1964, Community Services Programme Course Development Workshop.
With the School Planning Division, layouts for home economics rooms were
reviewed and amended during the year, and suggestions for community services
rooms were compiled from suggestions made by the Community Services Programme
Course Development Workshop, and by home economics teachers.
In preparation for the introduction of the new Community Services Programme
and courses, an activated in-service programme was conducted, as follows:—
(1) Twenty-four district conferences were held for home economics teachers,
and in many cases District Superintendents, principals, and counsellors
also attended.
(2) In-service Education Regional Workshops were held June 16th to 19th in
five British Columbia vocational schools located at Burnaby, Kelowna,
Nanaimo, Nelson, and Prince George. The five regional workshops were
organized and carried out through the co-operation of the Technical and
Vocational Education Branch.
(3) A non-credit two-week summer workshop on " Concepts and Content of
the Community Services Programme," for home economics teachers
with Secondary Advanced or Secondary Basic certificates, was sponsored
by the University of British Columbia School of Home Economics and
Extension Department. The leader of the workshop, Miss Wilma Johnson, Associate Professor, School of Home Economics, University of
Arizona, was assisted by British Columbia home economics teachers who
had worked on the development of the Community Services Programme,
and by Miss Jean Irvine, of the Division of Home Economics, as
consultant.
 D 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Mimeographed copies of the 11 community services course outlines were
prepared by the Division of Home Economics for interim use in June, July, and
August, until printed copies of course outlines are available. Copies of related
reference materials were also prepared, mimeographed, and supplied to the five
regional workshops, the University of British Columbia workshop, and the Ed. 404
(H.Ec.) class at the University of British Columbia summer session.
In order to assist home economics teachers, two newsletters were sent out—
one in September and the other in January. These bulletins contained information
regarding the various home economics courses, reference books, and other printed
material available.
The annual survey of monthly operating costs in home economics departments
in public schools was carried out in February. Where FN 9 and CFS 9 (full-year
food courses) were given, the cost of food supplies tended to be greater.
The form for the Report of Home Economics Classes was revised. The most
significant change related to this report is that it is to be an annual rather than semiannual report.
The annual conference with the city supervisors of home economics for Vancouver and Victoria schools was held in Victoria in January, 1965.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
D 61
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Secondary School Correspondence Division
REPORT OF J. R. HIND, B.A., B.P/ED., DIRECTOR
The principal effort of the Division has been to keep pace with the development of new courses prescribed as part of the reorganized curriculum, to provide
the old University and General Programmes for those eligible persons who wish
to complete one or other of these programmes, to encourage registration in courses
which are associated with the profitable use of leisure time or upgrading in certain
vocational fields, and to assist generally in the education of New Canadians in the
subject of English as a second language.
The aims and regulations of the Division and a description of the courses offered
by the Division are set forth in the booklet " Regulations and Detail of Courses,"
which is released annually in July. This booklet has been extensively rewritten and
several of the instructions revised.
The service rendered by the Division during 1964/65 is indicated in the following:—
Enrolment
(a) By Age.—Range from 12 to 88 years:-
Under 18 years of age .
1963/64
.    8,719
18 years and older     8,555
Total
17,274
1964/65
9,044
8,980
18,024
(b) By Residence.—The policy of providing assistance beyond British Columbia borders was continued. The Yukon Territory and Ontario accounted for
the majority of students from other parts of Canada. " Outside " students lived in
such distant places as Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Chile, Columbia, India, Paraguay, Kuwait, Japan, British West Indies, Australia, and West Africa.
1963/64 1964/65
British Columbia  16,292 16,930
Canada other than British Columbia       789 832
Outside Canada        193 262
(c) In Schools.—Certain pupils were unable to obtain normal classroom instruction in particular courses, as follows:—
Small secondary schools  (fewer than  140 students in Grades
IX-XII)   1,380
Large secondary schools   (more than  140 students  in Grades
IX-XII)   3,286
Private schools      424
5,090
The reasons accepted as a basis for service to these students and the numbers
involved follow:—
Courses not offered in school
Time-table difficulties	
Failure in a subject	
Acceleration 	
3,508
975
602
3
 D 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
(d) By Grade.—Students were included in this grouping when they were enrolled in school courses normally prescribed for a grade level, as follows:—
Grade VIII	
Grade IX 	
Grade X	
Grade XI _
Grade XII .
Grade XIII
63/64
1964/65
382
503
780
778
,267
1,023
,655
1,697
,765
1,833
642
631
(e) By Special Arrangement.—Certain students were exempted from enrolment fees in the value of $51,399. This service is an effort to overcome disparity
in educational opportunity and is also a rehabilitation measure. It was extended as
follows:—
Illness 	
Needed at home	
1963/64
1964/65
478
476
15
12
493
455
1,020
1,015
214
178
102
68
Living too far from a school	
Correctional institutions	
Social assistance	
Unemployed persons	
(f) Of Adults:
(i) This group comprised 49.8 per cent of the total enrolment,
(ii) The service included the evaluation of school documents in terms of the
University and General Programmes as they apply to adults.   Approximately 7,200 such evaluations were prepared,
(iii) Adults in the senior age-grouping continued to seek enrolment in art,
English, and other courses for personal improvement,
(iv) Employed adults showed a lively interest in vocational courses generally.
Requests for such courses as Electricity for the Building Trades, Steam
Heating for Plant Operators, Stationary Engineering, Diesel Engines, Industrial Mathematics were up 27 per cent over 1963/64.
Instruction
(a) The highly competent instructional staff consisted of an inside staff of two
Grade VIII instructors and an outside staff of 97 responsible for one or more courses
as offered by the Division.
(b) Seventy members of the instructional staff held valid teaching certificates;
63 possessed university degrees ranging from B.A. to Ph.D. and LL.D.; others held
diplomas consistent with their special assignments. Included among these diplomas
were Associate Trinity College of Music, Member Institute of Engineers (Canada),
Fellow Royal Society of Arts, and Diploma in Spanish (University of Mexico).
(c) In 1964/65,219,711 papers were graded and corrected, as compared with
209,837 in 1963/64 and 203,513 in 1962/63. This represented an increase of
9,874 papers over 1963/64, or 4.4 per cent.
(d) Course writers attached to staff were available at all times for counsel and
assistance to instructors and for adjudication of student papers as required.
Courses
(a) The total number of courses offered was 131, compared with 120 in
1963/64.
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
D 63
(fc) New courses were prepared as follows: Business Law for Credit Union
Officers (pilot course), Clothing and Textiles 9, English Literature 9, French 10,
Geology and Prospecting 30, Home Economics 8, Latin 9, Latin 91, Mechanical
Drawing 8, Mathematics 10, Mathematics 101, Mathematics 120.
(c) The work of course writing and revision was shared by four course writers
attached to the Division and certain outside writers working on a temporary basis.
(d) A total listing of courses offered by the Division and the enrolment in the
subject field follows:—
(i)  Secondary-school and Grade XIII Courses:
Agriculture 9 (10), 10 (20), 38, 39	
Art 9 (10), 10 (20), 39	
Auto Mechanics 10 (20), 30	
Bible Literature	
Biology 91	
  243
  373
  775
  53
  213
  712
  277
  316
  277
  160
  67
  116
  187
  2,503
  2,978
  240
  331
  29
  280
  114
English 99 (Short-story Writing)   98
Bookkeeping 34, 91	
Business Arithmetic 9 (formerly Mathematics 12)
Business Fundamentals 10 (24)	
Chemistry 91, 101	
Clothing and Textiles 9	
Diesel Engines 91	
Economics 92	
Electricity 10 (20)
English Literature 8, 9 (10), 10 (20), 30, 40, 100 ..
English Language 8, 9 (10), 10 (20), 30, 40, 101
English Language (remedial course)	
English and Citizenship 1, 19, 29	
English 32	
English 91 	
English 93 (Business English)
Extramural Music 9 (11), 10 (21)
Foods and Nutrition 9
Forestry 30 	
Frame-house Construction 10 (20) 	
French 8, 9, 10, 91, 92, 110, 120	
Geography 91	
Geology and Prospecting 30	
German 9 (10), 10 (20), 90, 91, 92, 110, 120
Guidance and Health 8, 9 (10), 10 (20), 30 __
History 91, 101, 102 __.
Home Furnishing 23 _
91
21
123
165
46
1,335
185
68
716
641
565
121
462
Home Economics 8, 20, 30
Latin 9 (10), 10 (20), 91, 92, 110, 120  487
Law 93	
Mathematics 8, 9, 10, 20, 30, 91, 101, 120
Mechanical Drawing 8, 9 (10), 10 (20) _
Physics 91, 101
Practical Arithmetic 9	
Radio and Wireless 30	
Record-keeping 9 (11) 	
Science 8, 9 (10), 10 (20)
281
4,121
531
307
497
220
339
856
 D 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
(i) Secondary-school and Grade XIII Courses—Continued
Secretarial Practice 92        44
Shorthand 10 (21), 31      295
Social Studies 8, 9 (10), 10 (20), 30, 32  1,639
Spanish 9 (10), 10 (20), 91, 92, 110, 120      445
Typewriting 9(10), 10(20)       818
(ii)  Vocational Non-credit Courses:
Air Navigation I, II  22
Business Law for Credit Union Officers (pilot course)   30
Dressmaking  27
Electricity for the Building Trades  160
Glove-making  5
House Painting and Decorating  13
Industrial Mathematics  247
Mathematics for Second-class Stationary Engineering  108
Spherical Trigonometry  4
Steam Engineering, Fourth Class  339
Steam Engineering, Third Class  163
Steam Engineering, Second Class  36
Stationary Engineering, First Class  29
Steam Heating for Plant Operators  67
New Canadians
(a) Assistance is provided by the Division to the following groups:—
(i)  Students enrolling in two correspondence courses—namely, English 19,
English 29—especially designed to teach English as a second language,
as follows:   1962/63, 194 students;  1963/64, 333 students;  1964/65,
290 students.
(ii) Provision of textbooks and other material for students working privately
under the guidance of a tutor,
(iii) Provision of textbooks and testing material for the use of students enrolled
in public-school classes, as follows:  1963/64—80 classes, 1,533 students;
1964/65—97 classes, 1,614 students,
(iv) Provision of textbooks for the use of students enrolled in private-school
classes.
(Z.) Textbooks are supplied on a loan basis with new textbooks added as the
need demands.    The principal textbooks distributed are English and Citizenship.
Books I, II, and III.    The new books supplied in recent years are as follows:
1962/63, 1,496; 1963/64, 1,318;  1964/65, 1,370.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, B.Ed., DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1964/65, school-aged pupils totalling 863 were registered in Elementary Correspondence School. Of these, 790 were registered at
Victoria and 73 at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District.
The following tables show the active monthly enrolments by grades at each of
the two centres:—
 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
D 65
Month
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Total
September  	
October 	
85
90
90
93
100
104
108
109
110
104
55
69
71
75
76
72
68
68
69
71
68
70
70
70
73
71
71
71
71
73
50
60
58
57
54
55
60
68
69
68
58
59
59
60
65
61
63
62
60
62
55
69
79
78
77
77
79
80
80
79
60
72
79
81
82
82
79
85
88
86
431
489
506
514
527
February  	
March   . .
522
528
543
547
June   	
543
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September	
8
8
10
3
9
5
7
50
9
8
10
3
11
7
7
55
November   	
10
7
10
4
10
7
7
55
December - _	
10
7
10
4
10
7
7
55
January — - 	
10
7
11
6
11
9
7
61
February  	
11
6
12
5
12
9
8
63
12
6
12
5
12
9
8
64
12
6
12
5
12
9
8
64
May 	
12
9
12
6
12
9
8
68
June   	
12
9
11
6
11
9
8
66
The number of papers of school-aged pupils marked at the two centres was as
follows:  Victoria, 92,744; Pouce Coupe, 12,300; total, 105,044.
In addition to above numbers, adult students enrolled in courses Grades III
to VII, inclusive, totalled 174, and 7,176 papers were marked.
In all, courses were provided for 1,037 individuals, and 112,220 papers were
marked by the instructors at the two centres. No outside markers or instructors
were employed.
The average number of papers marked per instructor was 9,352. The average
number of papers submitted per pupil was 109, as compared with an average of
150 in 1963/64.
As additional services, kindergarten kits were supplied to 101 pre-school age
children and instruction kits for teaching illiterate adults were sent in 35 cases.
Authorized in section 20 of the Public Schools Act, correspondence instruction
classes were established at 14 centres with a total enrolment of 61 pupils.
During the school-year the following entirely new courses were produced:
Reading, Grade II; Social Studies, Grades IV and V; Arithmetic and Art, Grade
IV. All these were devised, written, and illustrated by the staff of the School at
Victoria.   No outside course writers were employed.
The Victoria staff consisted of a Director, 11 instructors, and a clerical staff
of 5; at Pouce Coupe, 1 instructor and 1 instructor-clerk.
During the year the School lost the services of Mrs. Anne Dyson and Mrs.
Margaret Stewart, retiring after 19 and 30 years, respectively, of dedicated work
as correspondence instructors.
 D 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, B.A.,
DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
Programmes Presented
Radio
Provincial programmes (* planned, prepared, production supervised,
and results evaluated)     89
Western regional programmes (planned, prepared, production supervised, results evaluated)     29
Western regional programmes (scripts analysed and edited, results
evaluated)     43
National programmes (suggestions and advice given in planning, results evaluated)      46
Total number of radio programmes made available for
classroom and home student participation  207
Television
Provincial (first year of Provincial in-school broadcast television,
total responsibility as of * above)     12
Western regional (British Columbia was responsible for 7 of the 29
telecasts)      29
National (assistance given in advice, in evaluating, and in the distributing of guide material)      72
Total number of telecasts available  113
Manuals and Guides (Prepared and Distributed)
British Columbia Teachers' Bulletins—
Elementary      9,000
Secondary     3,000
Junior Music  45,000
Intermediate Music  50,600
Ecoutez   15,000
Demonstration Classes
Classes were conducted during winter and summer sessions in Victoria and
Vancouver University Education Courses.
 r
DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS
D 67
Extent of In-school Participation in British Columbia
Number
1,175
763
Number of schools reporting	
Number of reporting schools using radio broadcasts 	
Divisions of reporting schools using radio broadcasts        3,461
Students of reporting schools using radio broadcasts  107,869
Number of reporting schools using television
broadcasts   181
Divisions of reporting schools using television
broadcasts  772
Students of reporting schools using television
broadcasts     24,442
Per Cent
83.93
64.94
15.40
Increase in Use of School Broadcasts (from 1963/64 to 1964/65)
1Schools using ___
Divisions using
Students using._
Radio
Television
-11
+ 13
+ 17
+ 137
— 1,207
+4,233
i Reasons for decrease in use of radio broadcasts might include loss of stations carrying, increase in popularity of television.
 D 68
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1, 1964, to August 31, 1965.
District Number and Name
1. Fernie  _    __ _	
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
211
Number of
Filmstrips
Supplied
74
2. Cranbrook _ _ ___   __ _    .... 	
3. Kimberley   	
        107
        264
49
611
4. Windermere          .
125
213
5. Creston  	
          96
62
6. Kootenay Lake	
7. Nelson ._             _ _ 	
          40
        474
80
711
8. Slocan   __ -    ____        _ __   	
235
223
9. Castlegar 	
10. Arrow Lakes  	
        101
        124
462
52
11. Trail 	
350
158
12. Grand Forks       __
        121
102
13. Kettle Valley	
153
501
14. Southern Okanagan   __ _   	
136
254
15. Penticton 	
16. Keremeos
        346
        166
245
40
17. Princeton    __
          57
34
18. Golden               	
        270
508
19. Revelstoke 	
20. Salmon Arm	
        129
        401
231
874
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen    	
        220
310
22. Vernon                   	
        605
955
23. Kelowna 	
        647
947
24. Kamloops
718
647
25. Barriere
          72
339
26. Birch Island _                  	
          35
130
27. Williams Lake	
        720
756
28. Quesnel      	
        359
667
29. Lillooet                     	
        105
47
30. South Cariboo
        234
224
31. Merritt               _   	
          30
524
32. Fraser Canyon	
33. Chilliwack              	
450
908
     1,691
896
34. Abbotsford 	
35. Langley            _     __   _ __
        425
        947
703
398
36. Surrey                                       	
        980
3,928
37. Delta                        	
        139
35
38. Richmond                              	
        905
1,062
39. Vancouver _ _     __ _ 	
40. New Westminster
     1,008
727
301
606
41. Burnaby	
     1,809
1,494
 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
D 69
Totals
36,411
District Number and Name
42. Maple Ridge	
Number of
Motion Pictures
Supplied
        515
Number of
Filmstrips
Supplied
1,201
43. Coquitlam 	
44. North Vancouver _ _	
     1,315
        615
2,029
394
45. West Vancouver     	
    „_       379
235
46. Sechelt             	
             311
588
47. Powell River	
        812
1,114
48. Howe Sound	
        152
19
49. Ocean Falls       	
        309
285
50. Queen Charlotte _ _           	
356
260
51. Portland Canal	
          62
93
52. Prince Rupert
271
265
53. Terrace                  	
      .       348
476
54. Smithers .       _      	
        109
140
55. Burns Lake   -                	
           131
123
56. Vanderhoof         	
        211
300
57. Prince George
632
752
58. McBride ...             	
    __.       152
200
59. Peace River South _        .   ■ _
        535
896
60. Peace River North - ,   _ 	
    __       152
187
61. Greater Victoria  ___   	
     5,162
62. Sooke                     	
              357
468
63. Saanich  _- _        	
        264
591
64. Gulf Islands	
        175
210
65. Cowichan . _   _ 	
        665
1,839
66. Lake Cowichan  _ _   	
          82
8
67. Ladysmith 	
        333
14
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum _      __ __           	
        484
     _-       193
98
343
70. Alberni 	
        424
363
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River	
        535
        620
527
561
75. Mission	
        565
512
76. Agassiz              _
    __-       117
229
77. Summerland    	
        149
206
78. Enderby    	
     _.         17
87
79. Ucluelet-Tofino       	
82
117
80. Kitimat            	
185
435
81. Fort Nelson        ____
      _          15
476
82. Chilcotin	
83. Portage Mountain	
            3
84. Vancouver Island West	
              249
347
85. Vancouver Island North	
        249
250
—    Unattached       	
509
562
- „   Miscellaneous       _ _ _         	
878
834
39,995
In addition, 1,936 other items were circulated (picture sets, dioramas, stereos,
film loops, etc.).
The library contains 3,663 motion pictures and 7,700 filmstrips.
One thousand two hundred and fifty out of 1,452 public schools are registered
with this Division for service.
 D 70
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
TEXTBOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF BASIL R. WILSON, DIRECTOR
Through the excellent staff teamwork and effort, another successful year has
come to an end and all requisitions for textbooks supplied on a " free " loan basis
for Grade I through Grade VI and on the Textbook Rental Plan for Grade VII
through Grade XIII have been completed to the satisfaction of everyone, as have
purchase orders received from book-dealers and others during the year.
In the school-year 1964-65, 5,012 requisitions for free books and supplies
were received and serviced, a slight increase over the previous year when 4,957
requisitions were received. These requisitions were completed at a cost to the
" free vote " of $768,542.19, an increase in cost of 35 per cent. This increase is
the result of revisions and changes of textbooks prescribed for use in the elementary
grades, which will also be reflected in the value of purchase orders, where 24,010
orders were received and serviced, an increase over last year of 8 per cent. The
value of these orders amounted to $1,288,280.70, an increase of 22 per cent.
Collections for textbook rental fees, books lost or damaged and paid for by
students, and remittances covering fire losses amounted to $873,798.28, an increase
of 6.4 per cent over the previous year's collections.
Refunds of rental fees to students who left the British Columbia school system
was $11,196.75, an increase of 7.75 per cent.
Collections for lost and damaged books, including collections for fire loss was
$53,482.56, an increase of 20.40 per cent over the previous year. This large
increase is somewhat inflated by $6,260.17, School District No. 66 fire loss.
The Library Service Division received and serviced 656 purchase orders for
17,039 library books, supplementary reading material, wall maps, and globes, all of
which were received from school districts throughout the Province and necessitated
the placing of 1,901 separate orders with publishing houses throughout Canada and
the United States. To carry out this part of the operations of the Textbook Branch,
four people are employed on a permanent basis, assisted from time to time when
needed by other members of the staff.
Four stockmen are employed on a permanent basis in our shipping-room, and
were assisted during the peak periods by a maximum of 25 university and secondary-
school students.
Below is a tabulation showing monthly weights and the number of pieces
shipped during the year via various shipping agencies:—
Freight
Express
Mail
Cost
Pieces
Weight
(Lb.)
Pieces
Weight
(Lb.)
Pieces
Weight
(Lb.)
July
10,316
14,785
5,659
2,516
1,215
293
724
238
346
191
543
681
556,890
733,290
258,290
114,620
29,500
8,360
27,950
10,830
10,640
8,000
32,060
30,240
9
23
61
86
54
10
38
17
18
14
23
10
312
671
1,687
2,321
3,783
350
964
457
407
437
484
268
1,195
1,277
4,508
6,803
4,356
1,794
2,120
3,210
3,342
1,808
1,599
2,505
3,030
3,862
16,730
21,305
9,813
4.789  '
5.757
4,762
6,270
3,088
3,232
4,103
$437.20
August  	
569.38
2,509.52
3,195.77
1,471.59
December  	
January 	
February    .
March—-   	
April  .    ._ _	
May .     _	
718.33
863.68
714.61
940.52
463.26
485.03
615.94
Totals	
37.507 |  1,820.670
363 |       12,141
34.517
86,741
$12,984.83
Recapitulation:   Total pieces, 72,387;  total weight, 1,919,553;   total cost of mail, $12,984.83.
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH
D 71
Again this year an extensive repair programme was carried out, and during
the year books to the value of $285,570.75 were recovered at a cost of $128,106.92.
These books were then reissued to schools.
On June 1, 1965, the operations of the Textbook Branch were moved from
our old and inadequate quarters on Menzies Street to new and modern quarters
at 519 Esquimalt Road in Victoria, and it is hoped that we will soon be in a position
to continue to give service equal to, if not better than, that which we have been
proud to offer in past years. However, a move of this magnitude will require considerable reorganization, and it is hoped that our many friends will bear with us
for the next few months until the necessary reorganization has been completed.
Balance-sheet, March 31, 1965
Assets
Imprest Account—Cash on hand-
Inventory—Stock on hand.__.
Consigned textbooks.
Less depreciation1.
$2,555,187.73
1,232,986.29
$100.00
685,451.56
Accounts receivable	
Outstanding publishers' credit notes_
1,322,201.44
14,743.77
13,464.07
$2,035,960.84
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $1,117.77
Outstanding publishers' invoices  20.24
Treasury advances for Petty Cash Imprest Account  100.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund  2,034,722.83
$2,035,960.84
i Third-year depreciation on 1962/63 inventory, $377,428.89.
Second-year depreciation on 1963/64 inventory, $388,913.39.
First-year depreciation on 1964/65 inventory, $466,644.01.
 D 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31, 1965
Textbook Branch Operations—Sales
Revenue—Sales  $1,603,729.56
Less discount        305,258.34
Net sales  $1,298,471.22
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31, 1964      $744,939.03
Purchases    for    year    (cost,
freight, duty)      1,071,717.85
  $1,816,656.88
Inventory, March 31, 1965        685,451.56
Cost of sales     1,131,205.32
Gross profit      $167,265.90
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages        $46,119.35
Packing and general expense  4,528.96
Freight and delivery  13,458.14
Sundry expense  222.93
64,329.38
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1965      $102,936.52
 TEXTBOOK BRANCH
D 73
Textbook Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected      $855,434.50
Opening rental inventory at March 31, 1964  $1,155,255.69
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty)     1,399,932.04
$2,555,187.73
1964/65
Depreciation
Inventory,   March
31, 1963  $1,132,286.65
Less three years' depreciation at 33_t
per cent per annum     1,132,286.65     $377,428.89
Inventory,   March
31, 1964  $1,166,740.19
Less two years' depreciation at 33i
per cent per annum        777,826.78       388,913.39
$388,913.41
Inventory,  March
31, 1965  $1,399,932.04
Less one year's depreciation at 33i
per cent per annum         466,644.01       466,644.01
$933,288.03
Closing rental inventory, March 31, 1965     1,322,201.44
Total  depreciation  for
year 1964/65  $1,232,986.29 $1,232,986.29
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages
Packing and general expense
Freight and delivery	
Sundry expense	
$56,368.09
5,535.40
16,448.84
272.47
78,624.80
1,311,611.09
Excess of expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year
ended March 31, 1965      $456,176.59
 D 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT BY W. D. REID, B.A., M.Ed., CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The school-year 1964/65 was one of interesting and far-reaching developments,
most of which were related to preparation for the introduction of new programmes
of study at the senior secondary level. The introduction of these programmes in
September of 1965 will mark the beginning of the new curriculum at the senior level,
which has followed the introduction of new courses and programmes in the junior
secondary schools.
This report has distinct limitations because it attempts to summarize the work
of 56 District Superintendents of Schools and that of the Superintendent of Schools
and his staff in Vancouver City, as well as to outline trends and developments noted
in the work of more than 15,000 teachers. Clearly, a report of this length can do
no more than select highlights which are noted in the reports of the District Superintendents and those items with which the writer has been directly concerned.
Organization and Staff
The total of 56 District Superintendents and the Vancouver City officials represented an increase of one District Superintendent over the previous year. Three
new Superintendents were appointed and assigned to superintendencies as shown in
the listing of transfers and appointments, below.
The other changes shown in the listing resulted from the return of Mr. G. W.
Graham, Assistant Superintendent (Administration), and Mr. E. E. Hyndman,
Chief Inspector of Schools, from Department headquarters to the field. Additionally,
the retirement of Lieut.-Col. J. N. Burnett made for yet other changes.
As in the past, School Boards were participants in the selection of the District
Superintendent who would serve in their areas. All District Superintendents in the
Province were appointed executive officers by their School Boards, and in accordance
with sections 10 and 11 of the Public Schools Act received the administrative allowance provided.
The newly appointed District Superintendents were Mr. P. C. Grant, principal,
Cranbrook Secondary School; Mr. D. L. Feir, principal, Grand Forks Secondary
School; and Mr. J. L. Canty, principal, North Delta Secondary School.
Transfers and Appointments
The following transfers and appointments have been made and were effective
on August 1, 1964:—
(1) Dr. W. A. Plenderleith has been appointed Assistant Superintendent
(Administration).
(2) Mr. J. Phillipson has replaced Dr. Plenderleith as Co-ordinator of Special
Services.
(3) Mr. W. D. Reid has taken over as Chief Inspector of Schools.
(4) Mr. G. W. Graham has been transferred to Richmond in place of Lieut.-
Col. J. N. Burnett, who retired on September 30th.
(5) Dr. J. I. Macdougall is District Superintendent of Schools in Chilliwack.
(6) Mr. R. F. Thorstenson has been named to the superintendency in Ladner,
which includes Delta and the University Hill School Districts.
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
D 75
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
(ID
(12)
(13)
(14)
(15)
Mr. D. P. Todd replaced Mr. Phillipson in Prince George.
Mr. W. H. Gurney has his headquarters in the school administration office
in Alberni.
Mr. F. A. McLellan has moved to the School Board office in Saanich and
has included the Gulf Islands in his revised superintendency.
Mr. D. G. Chamberlain has been transferred to Hope and has included
the Fraser Canyon, Princeton, and Keremeos School Districts.
Mr. D. N. Weicker has retained his same headquarters in Fort St. John,
but he is attached to School District No. 60 (Peace River North) in place
of Mr. D. P. Todd.
Mr. R. R. Hanna has been transferred to the Merritt superintendency with
School Districts No. 31 (Merritt) and No. 30 (South Cariboo).
Mr. P. C. Grant, who was principal of the Cranbrook Secondary School,
has taken up headquarters as District Superintendent of Schools in Qualicum. He includes in his superintendency School Districts No. 69 (Qualicum), No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino), and unattached school districts at Amai,
Esperanza, Fair Harbour, Muchalat, Tahsis, and Zeballos.
Mr. D. Feir, who was principal of the Grand Forks Secondary School, has
made his headquarters in Quesnel, where he has served as District Superintendent of Schools for School Districts No. 28 (Quesnel) and No. 82
(Chilcotin).
Mr. J. L. Canty replaced Mr. D. N. Weicker as District Superintendent of
Schools for School Districts No. 81 (Fort Nelson) and No. 83 (Portage
Mountain) and the unattached schools at Atlin, Good Hope Lake,
Haines, Lower Post, McDame Creek, and Telegraph Creek. In addition, Mr. Canty has been a relieving Superintendent in the northern
superintendencies.
Mr. E. E. Hyndman has undertaken the duties of District Superintendent
of Schools for School District No. 62 (Sooke) and unattached Belmont
Park.
Mr. R. M. Hall, District Superintendent of Schools, School District No. 27
(Williams Lake) submitted his resignation, to be effective July 31, 1965.   Mr. Hall
joined the Department in 1958 and served all of his career from 1959 in the Williams
Lake district.   He will be missed.
During the school-year both the headquarters and field staff were saddened by
the sudden death of Mr. L. A. Matheson, District Superintendent of Schools, School
District No. 15 (Penticton). Mr. Matheson's long and meritorious service to
education in the Province was well known and appreciated.
During the school-year, District Superintendents and their senior supervisory
staff members made 12,985 supervisory visits to classrooms and wrote 3,883 reports
on the work of teachers. It must be noted that as districts have become larger, and
as supervisory staff in districts have increased, the work of the District Superintendent of Schools has changed to a degree. A lessening of the inspectoral function
is to be detected.
In-service Education
Zone Meetings of District Superintendents of Schools
This Division has continued the pattern which was set by the previous Chief
Inspector: that of having zone meetings of Superintendents in six zones in the
Province held twice annually—once in the fall and once in the spring. During the
past year these conferences were held in Prince George, Penticton, Castlegar, Na-
(16)
 D 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
naimo, Langley, New Westminster, Vernon, Cranbrook, Haney, and Burnaby.
Three of the meetings were attended by Mr. F. P. Levirs, Assistant Superintendent
(Instruction).
As previously, a different Superintendent in each zone acts as chairman for
each of the meetings, and the Chief Inspector of Schools and other headquarters
staff attend to bring information from headquarters and to attempt to find areas in
which clarification and study should be made. There can be no doubt that the
meetings are of value, particularly in providing explanations for new developments
in education and in the provision of opportunities for discussion of local problems.
From discussion with individual Superintendents who attended the zone conferences,
it is found these are looked forward to despite the fact they do add to the District
Superintendents' very busy schedules.
Department Conference
The Annual Department Conference was held for three days during the Easter
week, in Victoria. This year the conference devoted itself to a discussion of problems concerning the new curriculum, which had been submitted in advance by District Superintendents. The conference, of which a full report was filed earlier, was
divided into sections, with various Superintendents acting as chairmen and recorders
of the sessions concerned.
The conference was honoured by the appearance of the Minister, who spoke
briefly to the group, outlining major changes which might be expected in education
in British Columbia. The conference was indebted heavily to Mr. F. P. Levirs, who
undertook the answering of a great number of the questions put. Other headquarters
staff who contributed significantly to the conference were Dr. J. F. K. English, Mr.
J. R. Meredith, Mr. P. J. Kitley, Mr. J. Jupp, Dr. W. A. Plenderleith, Mr. J. Phillipson, Mr. J. S. White, Mr. V. E. Rickard, Mr. R. Smith, Mr. H. M. Evans, Mr.
B. Barr, Mr. J. H. Panton, and Mr. A. L. Cartier.
Visitors to the conference were Mr. John Porteous, Chairman of the Board of
Trustees for the Greater Victoria School District; Dr. A. R. MacKinnon, Dean of
Education, Simon Fraser University; Dr. F. H. Johnson, representing the University
of British Columbia; Mr. H. C. Gilliland, Dean of Education, Victoria University;
and Mr. G. Brand, Director of Student Teaching at the University of Victoria. Mr.
F. N. Rowell represented the British Columbia School Trustees Association and
Mr. J. Church represented the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.
As the organizer of the conference, the writer is loathe to claim it was an
unqualified success, but personal opinions obtained from District Superintendents
who attended indicated it was timely and of value.
Invitational Counsellors' Conference
In the late winter and early spring a team of officials from the Department
headquarters, comprised of Mr. F. P. Levirs, Mr. J. R. Meredith, Mr. P. J. Kitley,
Mr. J. Phillipson, Mr. J. Jupp, and the writer, visited eight centres in the Province
and met with counsellors of senior secondary schools. The purpose of these visits
was to permit senior counsellors to put questions which could be answered directly
with respect to new programmes, which would begin in the secondary schools in
September of 1965. These conferences were particularly well attended, and no
doubt a full report of the numbers present will be made by the Director of Counselling, Mr. P. J. Kitley. Conferences were held in Nanaimo, Victoria, Vancouver,
Burnaby, Abbotsford, Prince George, Penticton, and Cranbrook.    These one-day
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES D 77
conferences were attended by senior secondary-school principals and counsellors,
and it appeared the reaction to the conferences was favourable.
In-service Training for Senior Secondary Specialist Teachers
With the co-operation of the Division of Industrial Education, under the chairmanship of Mr. J. Jupp, five workshops for teachers of senior commerce, community services, and industrial education were held in the vocational schools at Nanaimo, Burnaby, Nelson, Prince George, and Kelowna in the period June 16 to
19, 1965. The purpose of these workshops was to provide concrete information
for the teachers who would be introducing new courses in the senior secondary
school, in the fields outlined above, in September, 1965. In order to make the
workshops functional, experienced and outstanding teachers in these three fields
were chosen to act as instructors at the conference. The expense and honoraria
paid to these teachers were made available from funds of the Industrial Education
Division.
Approximately 360 teachers attended the conferences and were released from
their duties and had their expenses to the conferences paid by their Boards. Appreciation is extended to the Boards who released instructors and teachers to attend
the workshops.
Each conference was opened by a resident District Superintendent, who represented the Department at each of the sessions. In addition, Mr. J. Jupp, of the
Industrial Education Division, attended each of the conferences for at least one-half
day and contributed much to the programme. In each instance the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation was represented at the conferences by Mr. W. V. Allester or
by members of the In-service Education Committee of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. It might be well to mention at this time that the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation has done much significant work in the development of in-
service training programmes in many areas in the Province. Many fine in-service
programmes have additionally been in operation in school districts in the Province
under the direction of District Superintendents of Schools. These are often brief
and are usually very practical and valuable in the assisting of teachers to remain
abreast of current developments in the many areas of education which are currently
being revised.
In view of the fine acceptance which this programme had, it is recommended
that some consideration be given to an extension of the programme, and that in the
year 1966 it be placed in the Easter week in order that teachers may be free to attend
in a professional manner. Listed below are the instructors in the field in which
they instructed:—
Commerce:   Mr. C. J. Whiles, Mr. George Arthur, Mr. Vernor Jones,
Mr. Art Halleran, and Mr. Jack Waters.
Industrial:  Mr. R. L. Rahlstrom, Mr. B. Campbell, Mr. A. MacGregor,
Mr. David Powell, Mr. Arthur Benzer, and Mr. A. J. Saunders.
Community Services: Mrs. Marjory Cade, Mrs. Muriel Fraser, Miss Ruby
Schaffer, Mrs. Anne Lowe, Mrs. Margaret Meagher, Miss Maud
Bailley, Miss Lola Jackson, Miss Glenys Dawson, Miss Muriel Johnston, and Miss Jean Campbell.
The 360 teachers who attended were in attendance for the full four days.   In
addition, many principals and other teachers dropped into the various centres during
the programme but were not recorded as attending.
 D 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Western Zone Conference
In February a two-day conference of Chief Inspectors and Assistant Deputy
Ministers responsible for instruction was held in the headquarters of the Department
of Education in the Department library in Victoria.
Those attending the conference were Dr. T. C. Byrne and Dr. R. E. Rees,
Alberta; Mr. C. D. Peters and Mr. L. H. Bergstrom, Saskatchewan; Mr. J. K.
MacKay and Mr. R. W. Lightly, Manitoba; Mr. F. P. Levirs and Mr. W. D. Reid,
British Columbia.
The conference took the form of a frank discussion of the problems of instruction and was of value as an interchange of ideas and suggested solutions to problems
that Western Provinces face. The programme for the conference was organized
by the writer. It is conceivable that one of the other Western Provinces may act as
host this coming year.
General Orservations from a Survey of District Superintendents'
Reports
Most districts in the Province of British Columbia reported continuing growth;
those which did not or which reported little growth were few in number. From the
survey of the District Superintendents' reports it is clear that adult education services
in our school districts are growing at an accelerated rate; it is also to be noted that
there is an increase in the percentage of students in adult education who are taking
purely academic courses for credit.
Two districts reported experimentation and beginnings in the use of educational
television. All districts, and notably the larger districts, reported an increase in
in-service programmes of short and long duration which were particularly concerned
with the introduction of the new curricular offerings. There is an indication from
reports that additional kindergartens have become operative in several districts in
the Province under School Board jurisdiction. Considerable time and effort have
been spent in school districts in the extension of special classes for students, ranging
from slow learners, those with audio or visual losses, those which may be classed
as retarded, New Canadians, general remedial instruction, remedial reading, and
gifted students.
Many districts in the Province have reported the institution and operation of
summer-school classes for students who have had some difficulty in school work during the year. These have generally been of five weeks in duration, and fees have been
charged of the students who attended. These might be viewed in some degree as
an extension of the school-year for children who have had difficulties in various
subject areas. These schools have operated in British Columbia in several school
districts at both the elementary and the secondary levels of instruction.
Comments concerning third-year classes in the Occupational Programme indicate that these have generally proven to be successful. One Superintendent commented that all students who had completed the third year were successful in gaining
employment; those who dropped out had less success.
Two districts in the Province have reported the use of the Initial Teaching
Alphabet, and work in these areas is continuing in the coming school-year. There
is some indication, too, that School Boards are presenting newsletters to the parents
in the districts in which they live, explaining what is happening in the schools.
These are generally acting as a link in the public relations programme.
School District Number 39 (Vancouver) reported for 1964/65 an enrolment
in kindergarten of 5,612, which is the largest enrolment since the institution of
 INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES D 79
the kindergarten programme there in 1954. In the same report it is to be noted
that there were 38,245 students engaged in part-time courses at the adult level.
This also is a record.
Throughout the reports there has been an indication that library services in
school districts, particularly at the elementary level, have been increasing and that
district librarians and school district libraries are becoming common throughout the
Province.
Conclusion
In bringing this report to a close and having completed one year in the office
of Chief Inspector of Schools, I wish to record my appreciation of the exceUent
co-operation, advice, and guidance which I have received from the Deputy Minister
and other officials in the headquarters of the Department of Education, from the
District Superintendents who comprise the field staff of the Department of Education, and from the many School Boards with whom I have had some association.
I should also like to express my appreciation for the many personal courtesies
that I have received from officials and from School Board members throughout the
Province of British Columbia.
 D 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
TEACHER RECRUITMENT
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., CO-ORDINATOR
Branch Responsibility
The responsibilities of this Branch as far as teacher recruitment is concerned
may be summed up as follows:—
(1) Surveys and studies of teacher potential, supply, and certification.
(2) Representation on groups concerned with the problem of teacher supply.
(3) Informational services, including distribution of material and answering
of questions regarding teacher preparation and employment.
(4) Promotional  activities,  including  assistance to  interested  groups,   and
development of promotional programmes.
(5) General Departmental sponsorship of and service to Future Teachers
Clubs.
(6) As required, co-ordination of teacher recruitment activities by school
trustees, teacher groups, faculties of education, parent-teacher groups, etc.
Teacher Supply
During July and August of 1964, surveys were undertaken to determine the
comparative extent of district teacher needs. A preliminary survey was also made
in June of 1965. These indicated a fairly static situation, but one in which there
is a continuing critical shortage of certificated people, particularly in some of the
rural areas of the Province and in some specialized fields such as commerce, home
economics, French, etc.
The survey of teacher certification made in December revealed a steady
improvement in levels of professional training of teachers. In summary these
are comparative proportions over the past four years, as follows:—
Certificate
Percentage of Total Active Teachers
1961/62
1                         1
1962/63          1963/64    1     1964/65
PA -
14.9
21.2
6.8
12.1
36.3
7.3
1.4
13.7
22.3
7.5
12.8
35.4
6.7
2.0
1
12.9        |        12.3
PB (SB)                                               -	
23 7                  24.4
PC (SC)      - _    	
8.3        1          9.5
EA   _ 	
EB    	
EC                 -     	
13.8        |         15.4
33.7                  31.6
4.9         |          4.0
2.1         !          2.1
1
It will be seen from the above that with the single exception of the PA
category the proportion of more highly certificated teachers has steadily increased
and the proportion of the less well qualified teachers has steadily decreased.
The committee which during the past year was investigating the Provincial
supply of potential teachers with suitable university degrees completed its findings,
with the general conclusion that for a good many suitable persons the chief obstacles
were those of time and money. Committee Chairman N. V. Scarfe, Dean of the
Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia, advised that for the rather
large proportion of interested people living within reach of the University of British
Columbia it was possible to arrange a teacher-education programme such that the
student would be able to spread a year's work over more than one year.   This would
 TEACHER RECRUITMENT D 81
be of help to women with young families. The Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment sent full material describing available student assistance to approximately
100 of the most likely persons who had been approached during the survey.
Future Teachers Clubs
There were 119 active clubs reporting during the year in the senior secondary
schools of the Province. The clubs are made up chiefly of students in Grades XI
and XII. Total club membership reported was 1,998, about the same as the previous year. Club membership averaged 18 members, meeting on the average about
15 times a year, usually during the noon hour. Over 70 per cent of the membership
has made definite plans to enter teacher education.
Central to the club programme is the opportunity to visit classrooms for observation and some participation in the duties of a teacher. All but five clubs reported
school visits, and members of all but 13 had the opportunity to engage in some
classroom activity.
This Branch maintains contacts with all clubs and supplies them with books,
pamphlets, and other suitable programme material. A periodical newsletter goes
to all members, five issues having been sent out this year.
In each school the club is under the direction of a suitable teacher who acts as
sponsor. A kit of materials is prepared for the use of sponsors, and other assistance
is given as opportunity provides. For some years it has been the practice for the
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment to meet with club sponsors at the time of the
annual Future Teachers Clubs conference at the University of British Columbia.
The Co-ordinator also assisted with the organization of the Future Teachers Clubs
Conference of the Greater Victoria schools, held at the University of Victoria.
Informational and Promotional Services
General inquiries regarding teacher-education programmes and teaching positions are dealt with by this office. In addition, the 1964 university summer sessions
provided an opportunity for personal interviews with 98 teachers regarding questions
of certification, programme planning, or placement. During the winter session,
addresses were given to nine groups of students at the University of Victoria and the
University of British Columbia outlining the requirements and advantages of teaching
as a profession. Materials were supplied in several cases to those planning career
days in secondary schools, and several articles on teaching were prepared and
published.
Teacher Recruitment Advisory Committee
This is a committee chaired by the Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment and
representative of the faculties of education at the universities, the British Columbia
School Trustees Association, the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, and the
Department of Education. It meets regularly, serving as a clearing-house for suggestions and a source of appropriate recommendation for action. Notable among
the year's activities was a greater interest on the part of school trustees in active
recruitment policies.
United Kingdom Teacher Recruitment
As in previous years, announcements regarding teaching opportunities in this
Province appeared in nine United Kingdom newspapers and journals and were a
charge against this branch.
Mr. D. P. Todd, District Superintendent of Schools for District No. 57 (Prince
George), represented the Department of Education as United Kingdom recruitment
 D 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
officer during March. Although it is not possible to give exact figures at this time,
it would be reasonable to suppose that approximately 70 United Kingdom teachers
were recruited.
Teachers' Scholarships
The following were awarded scholarships by the Minister of Education for their
outstanding contribution as classroom teachers: Mrs. S. D. Thompson, Delbrook
Senior Secondary, North Vancouver; Mr. H. Dahlie, West Vancouver Senior Secondary, West Vancouver; Miss M. G. Rice, Esquimalt Junior Secondary, Victoria;
and Mr. R. Martin, Vernon Senior Secondary, Vernon.
Guidance Services
The policy of collecting and sending to schools occupational and other guidance
information was continued this year. Altogether 78 pieces of separate informational
material were sent out to each school, as well as three issues of a guidance bulletin.
In several instances, assistance was given to business and professional organizations
preparing occupational information for school distribution.
As in previous years, a summer course for guidance teachers was conducted at
the University of Victoria.
This was notably a year of addresses and conferences, assistance being given
to various teacher organizations, the Vancouver Board of Trade in its continuing
business-education project, the British Columbia Vocational Association, the National Employment Service, and the Registered Nurses' Association, as well as school
and parent-teacher groups. An educational television conference was also attended
and addressed.
Outstanding among the year's activities were the eight one-day Regional Invitational Counselling Conferences, to which were invited District Superintendents,
school principals, and representative school counsellors. The general topic for discussion was the implications of the revised secondary-school curriculum. Under the
direction of the Chief Inspector of Schools, this Branch organized the conferences
and also supplied the chairman. The conferences provided opportunity for questioning of a panel of Departmental officials including the Assistant Superintendent
of Education (Instruction), the Director of Curriculum, the Chief Inspector of
Schools, and on one or two occasions the Co-ordinator of Special Services and the
Co-ordinator of Industrial Education. The clarification and amplification of a large
number of details relative to the philosophy and implementation of the revised curriculum were testimony to the value of this enterprise.
The conferences were held at Nanaimo, Victoria, Abbotsford, Burnaby, Vancouver, Penticton, Cranbrook, and Prince George.
During the year the groundwork was laid for the formation of an informal
guidance committee which could bring together views of school principals, counsellors, and teachers, as well as the university and the Department of Education.
In an effort to link more closely the work of the regional vocational schools
and the secondary schools, a programme of visits to vocational schools was instituted.
Centennial Youth Travel
The co-ordination of the Centennial Youth Travel Programme for British Columbia was entrusted to this Branch. Committees were set up in 10 Provincial centres to arrange for both sending and receiving students under the terms of the programme. This Branch acted as a channel of communication between these and the
Federal and Provincial Committees, and served to direct the British Columbia programmes.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
D 83
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN
VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
Another extremely busy year in the field of adult technical and vocational education included
(a) the formal opening of British Columbia's first Institute of Technology at
Burnaby;
(b) a survey of the need of vocational training facilities in the Kamloops area,
resulting in a decision to construct a vocational school in Kamloops;
(c) the advancement of plans for building vocational schools at Terrace, Dawson Creek, and Victoria;
(d) the implementation of the Chant Commission Report in so far as it affects
vocational education within the secondary schools.
Training facilities as a whole were enlarged in order to cater to increasing
demands both for existing courses and new ones.
The Technical and Vocational Training Assistance Agreement between the
Federal Government and the Province, in addition to making funds available for
capital expansion, provides for the operation of the whole field of adult education
embraced within 10 different programmes.
Programme 1
This programme provides for approved technical and vocational programmes
in technical, industrial, commercial, agricultural, community services, visual and
performing arts, and other occupational fields.
Construction
The acceptance of the new curriculum for British Columbia secondary schools
has permitted 34 school districts to qualify for Federal assistance to provide buildings and equipment under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Act. Seventy-eight
projects in 67 schools are scheduled for completion to a gross total of $30,500,000,
providing facilities for technical, commercial, industrial, community services, visual
and performing arts fields, and programmes for particular occupations.
The Vocational Schools' Assistance Act Amendment Act, 1965, requires that
the School Board provides 10 per cent, the Province 22.5 per cent, and the Federal
Government 67.5 per cent of the capital cost. Progress of capital projects to date
is as follows:—
Projects completed  14
Projects under construction     4
Projects approved and in planning  44
Projects negotiating for Provincial and Federal approval  16
Total
78
The school-year, 1964/65, was marked by considerable expansion as the
revised Grade IX and X courses have been taught in the industrial education shops.
New and improved facilities have been provided in the following school districts:
 Broadcast Technology, British Columbia Institute of Technology
Student operating a video tape recorder in the Broadcast Communications Department.
Food Processing, British Columbia Institute of Technology
Microkjeldahl digester unit for protein analysis of foods in small quantities used in
the Food Processing Laboratory.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
D 85
Saanich, Revelstoke, Golden, Windermere, Cranbrook, Vancouver, Surrey, Ladner,
Nakusp, Castlegar, Barriere, Slocan, Maple Ridge, Sechelt, Powell River, Enderby,
Quesnel, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Terrace, Prince George,
Peace River South, Peace River North, Nanaimo, Alberni, Vancouver Island North,
Pemberton, and Southern Okanagan.
During the year the course content for the new technical-vocational courses
for Grades XI and XII have been completed and will be offered in Grade XI this
coming September. The amount of work involved in preparation of courses, preparation of equipment lists for each new course, and combination of courses has been
a strain on the two Inspectors for Technical Classes.
The number of industrial education teachers required to staff our schools in
1964/65 was 583.
Enrolments
Teacher-training
(fl)
(b)
Secondary-school students (day):
Commercial
Industrial	
Agricultural
Totals 	
IS
1963/64
1964/65
  515
583
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
6,973
6,938
7,628
1,103
1,068
843
76
81
51
8,891
8,087
8,522
Programme 2—Technician-training
This programme provides post-secondary education in the technical field but
excluding University Programmes.
These programmes require secondary-school graduation in English, mathematics, and science for entry and requiring a minimum of 2,400 hours of instruction
extending over a period of two years. The resulting Diploma in Technology can
be acquired either through full- or part-time day or evening classes.
In our British Columbia Institute of Technology the 2,400 hours can be covered in a two-year programme of 10 months' duration in each year.
Training, with Federal financial participation, may be given in engineering, scientific, medical, business, or other fields requiring advanced theoretical studies directly related to and run concurrently with practical application, except where such
instruction is designed for university credits. British Columbia Institute of Technology has 17 such programmes at the present time.
British Columbia Institute of Technology enrolment in the first year of operation is approximately 617 students. By September, 1965, by virtue of the first year
continuing on to second year and a new first-year class commencing, the enrolment
will be 1,234 approximately.
Enrolment at British Columbia Institute of Technology
Broadcast Communications  32
Building  29
Business Management  64
Chemical and Metallurgical  31
Civil and Structural  32
Electrical and Electronics  61
Food Processing  21
Forest Products  3 3
Forestry  34
 D 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Gas and Oil  13
Hotel, Motel and Restaurant Management  30
Instrumentation and Control  31
Mechanical   44
Mining  13
Surveying  30
Medical Laboratory  96
Medical Radiography  50
Total  644
Programme 3
This programme provides trade and occupational training covering pre-employment, apprenticeship, and upgrading programmes at the adult level in the British
Columbia regional vocational schools at Nanaimo, Burnaby, Prince George, Kelowna, Nelson, Victoria, and the Vancouver Vocational Institute. Vocational night-
school classes both in regional and school districts are included in this programme.
These schools also provide training for the unemployed and the handicapped
so as to keep all workers and potential workers up to date with modern-day skills.
The development of vocational and technical curricula forms part of this programme, and the following report indicates the type of work being performed in
this field.
The work of the Division during 1964/65 was directed primarily toward the
development of examinations for tradesmen's qualifications and interprovincial
standards, course outlines, and instructional materials.
Course Outlines
The development of course outlines was undertaken in the following fields:
Pastry and bread baking, millwright (pre-apprenticeship training), bricklaying (revision), electrical (pre-apprenticeship training), mechanical maintenance and repair,
machine-shop, carpentry (revision), timekeeping (revision), retail meat processing,
cook trade extension, instrument mechanics (commencement of draft course only),
electrical appliance repair, sheet metal (revision), log-scaling, automotive partsman,
diesel truck operation, commercial general and secretarial (drafts only).
The Division also assisted with the development of certain industrial specific
courses for the senior secondary schools—namely, automotive, carpentry, sheet
metal, machine-shop, and electricity-electronics—and produced the drafts of the
" Curriculum Organization for British Columbia Senior Secondary Schools " and the
" Equipment and Space Requirements for Commercial, Industrial, Community Services and the Visual and Performing Arts Programmes."
Instructional Materials
A catalogue of vocational instructional materials, listing various instructional
aids for use by vocational instructors, was completed and released.
During the year the Division developed and produced instructional materials
in the following trade areas: Carpentry, welding, aeronautics, millwork, automotive,
sheet metal, electronics, heavy-duty mechanics, parks gardening, iron-workers,
draughting, pile-driving, plumbing, physics (for the British Columbia Institute of
Technology), practical nursing, bricklaying, painting and decorating, sign-painting,
and steamfitting and plumbing, the latter for distribution throughout Canada by the
Federal Government.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION D 87
Comprehensive manuals were developed in the following areas: Millwright
(two manuals) and food training (four manuals).
Examinations
In co-operation with the Apprenticeship Branch, the Division played a very
active role in the development of examinations for tradesmen's qualifications and
interprovincial standards. The following were developed: Automotive (revision),
heavy-duty mechanics (revision), radio and television, millwright, bricklaying (revision in preparation), instrument mechanic (in preparation only).
Publicity Materials
Publicity materials produced by this Division are distributed to District Superintendents, principals, counsellors, and industrial education instructors throughout the
Province.  The mailing list comprises over 2,000 names.
The Division developed and produced a " Prospectus for Vocational Schools
(1965/66)" and a booklet entitled "Vocational Schools Announcement." Over
20,000 copies of each were printed for distribution.
Booklets entitled " Pre-apprenticeship Vocational School Training for Skilled
Trades " and " The British Columbia Apprenticeship Training Programme " were
prepared.
In addition to the development of publicity booklets, single-sheet flyers were
developed for all courses. These were produced in large quantities for general
distribution.
Library
The library facilities continued to expand. They were used extensively by
persons preparing course outlines as well as instructors and students who attend
the British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby. A revised library catalogue
was prepared and released in June, 1965.
Enrolments at Regional Vocational Schools (Including Vancouver
Vocational Institute and School of Art)
Aeronautics   40
Auto Mechanics  524
Boat-building  33
Boilermaker  10
Bricklaying   66
Building Service Workers  199
Carpentry  339
Chef, General  206
Chef, Patissier  14
Commercial, General  589
Commercial, Secretarial  340
Draughting   115
Electrical   265
Electrical Appliance Repair  13
Electronics  137
Heavy-duty Mechanics  515
Iron-workers  64
Lathing  27
Meat-cutting   22
 Heavy-duty Operators' Course, Nanaimo Vocational School
Student operating a crawler tractor with hydraulic blade building a road grade.
Heavy-duty Mechanics' Course, Nanaimo Vocational School
Students jacking up a TD-24 Caterpillar on final drives to remove the swing frames
and sprockets.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION D 89
Mechanical Maintenance  18
Millwright  33
Millwork and Joinery  46
Painting and Decorating  58
Plastering  28
Plumbing   138
Pile-driving  6
Retail Lumber Salesman  12
Service-station Attendants  61
Sheet Metal  73
Sign-painting  34
Sprinkler Fitting  26
Taxi-driver  155
Welding, General  351
Welding, Other  173
Auto-body Repair  117
Machinery Repair  19
Practical Nursing  650
Basic Training for Skill Development  357
Room Maid  3 9
Waitress-training   228
Beauty Culture  360
Bookkeeping and Accounting  24
Diamond Drilling  31
Heavy-equipment Operators  57
Log-loading   32
Log-scaling  42
Timekeeping and First Aid  68
Tire Repair  13
Art  307
Heavy-equipment Mechanics  12
Parks Gardening  18
Barbering  41
Dental Office Assistant  17
Engineering  715
Graphic Arts  29
Machine-shop   51
Medical Office Assistants  46
Navigation   258
Power Sewing  5 6
Radio Telecommunications  121
Shoe-repairing  29
Family Aides  13
Hydraulics for Towboats  64
Total  8,544
 Welding Course, Burnaby Vocational School
A demonstration of tungsten inert gas aluminum-pipe welding.
Aeronautics Course, Burnaby Vocational School
Examining an Orenda engine for a CF-100, used for training purposes in the
aeronautics training programme.
 r
TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Enrolment at Night Schools (Regional Schools)
D 91
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
British Columbia Vocational School—
Burnaby   _    	
Nanaimo   _.
1,468
213
46
2,622
2,237
289
264
63
3,405
554
2,526
448
512
Kelowna     _ _ 	
175
127
4,251
900
Totals  _	
4,349
6,812
8,939
Enrolment at Night School in School Districts
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
5,741
3,481
38
4,970
5,290
26
6,782
Industrial _ _  	
Agricultural _ _._ 	
8,935
474
Totals    _
9,260
10,286
16,191
Programme 4
This provides training in co-operation with industry and includes fundamentals
of management in such subjects as communications, human relations, cost and quantity control, job safety, and work study.
This programme also provides for training in the accommodation and hospitality field as well as small-business management.
Management Training—Industry
The programme, The Fundamentals of Management, offered to management
supervisors in industry continued to gain popularity during this period. The larger
corporations have now established regular schedules for the attendance and participation of their supervisors. Smaller companies have enrolled their management and
supervisors in increasing numbers in both the Communications and Human Relations and Work Study Courses. Government departments continue to take advantage of this training for their management people.
Reports on the application of work study techniques brought about by our
Work Study Courses have all been good; in fact, some are exceptional.
It should be noted that during this year the fruit-growers of British Columbia
have taken their first important steps toward training of management people, and
we are pleased to report that they have found this programme ideal for their needs.
Continued expansion of this programme has been requested for the next two-year
period. We continue to offer training in the Conference Room facilities at Burnaby,
and it should be noted that this same training was expanded throughout the Province
to northerly points as well as the Okanagan. Registrations for the period were as
follows:—
 D 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Conducted by—
Communications
Human
Relations
Work
Study
1                     1
211                211                  62
Industrial-conference leaders (10-hour programme). 	
197                  54       J          40
Tntfils
408         1         165
102
Food Trades and Accommodation Industries
Mr. E. A. Schmutz entered the Technical Branch as Co-ordinator of Tourist
Services in October, 1964, with a wealth of experience acquired over a number of
years in several different countries.
Extensive trips were made throughout British Columbia to obtain an over-all
picture of conditions and requirements in this field. Curricula material for waitress,
room-maid, and cook training was prepared, and day and night courses were initiated
and supervised over a wide area embracing some 15 different places, whilst the
groundwork for future courses was prepared at a number of other centres.
Conference and talks were held with and given to various interested groups,
such as National Employment Service, Kiwanis, and School Boards.
The day courses were conducted in the spring, whilst night classes were held
in conjunction with school district night-school programmes. Special courses in
Advanced Cooking and Travel Counsellors were also held.
Placement of Trainees
Close to 100 per cent placement has been reported by the National Employment Service offices and by the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
The industry is in favour of this pre-employment training for additional help
for the summer season. The examination-writing time in schools has to be taken
into consideration when planning the spring training programme. Courses had to
be cancelled in Nelson and Prince George due to inconvenient starting date, June
7th. Requests from other places for courses (Port Alberni and Hope) could not be
considered due to lack of qualified instructors.
Advertising Campaign
A plan for an advertising campaign, with the object of (a) increasing public
appreciation for the service and standards of the industry and (b) increasing interest
in entering the industry as a career, was accepted by a meeting of the Food and
Accommodation Advisory Committee. This office's participation is to compile a
"Career Opportunity" booklet, indicating the variety of courses available. This
booklet is planned to be ready for distribution to counsellors in schools, etc., by
October, 1965.
Room-maid Training Course
This course of five days' duration was reviewed, rewritten, and extended to a
two-week full-day course in the spring training programme. The more elaborated
lectures are on sanitation, preventive safety and security, standards, equipment, etc.
A new lecture is on fire prevention, with lecture and practical demonstration given
by the Fire Chief, including a lecture on basic first aid.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION D 93
Cooking Trade Extension Course
(Pilot Programme, Vernon, February 8 to April 2, 1965)
This eight-week course was designed to upgrade people with a basic cooking
knowledge. The course was held during the industry's slack season, with the intention of drawing people from the industry for further training, but it was found that
these people could not get an extended leave of absence. The enrolled students were
mostly unemployed, and only one operator attended the course. The course was
very well designed, with a great variety of guest lecturers from industry and different
government departments. While there is a great need and demand for courses of
this nature, especially to train additional help for the summer season, it is very hard
to find a training-place with practical cooking which offers an outlet for the produced meals.
Total number of persons trained: Waiters and waitresses, 271; room maids,
57; total, 328.
Small-business Management
Business-management programmes offered in the night schools throughout the
Province almost doubled last year. There were 1,967 persons enrolled in 114
classes. This growth was largely due to the interest being taken in this programme
by managers of small businesses.
The following table indicates the subject areas and extent of the programme:—-
Number of Number of
Students, Students,
Name of Course 1963/64 1964/65
Management Accounting  47 529
Record-keeping  195 957
Retail Management  132 179
Marketing of Services  48 90
Purchasing    162
Marketing for Manufacturers    50
Totals  422 1,967
Programme 5—Training the Unemployed
This programme provides financial assistance of varying degrees to persons
registered as unemployed and may include tuition fees, books and supplies, and
(or) a subsistence allowance. Each application is assessed on an individual basis
of need
Training is carried out in all regional schools, plus a number of approved
private schools throughout the Province.
A programme for the training or retraining of unemployed persons to improve
employment opportunities and increase their trade or occupational competency.
Effective February 1, 1964, the Federal Government now contributes 90 per
cent of approved Provincial training allowances paid to unemployed persons while
training.   Previously the Federal contribution was 75 per cent.
Another new ruling was that 90 per cent sharing in such allowances may only
apply to eligible unemployed persons, who have previously been gainfully employed
or seeking work, and if under 20 years of age have been out of the regular school
system for at least 12 months, where such training is considered necessary to enable
the individual to participate effectively in the labour force. Applicants must be
registered for employment with the National Employment Service and recommended
by the National Employment Service to the Province for training.
 D 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
The training may be either of a refresher nature or for employment in an
occupation not previously followed. Basic courses in such subjects as mathematics,
science, English, or French, which are necessary to prepare an individual for entry
into an occupation, may be included.
To enter training the person must be counselled, assessed vocationally, approved
and directed by the National Employment Service to one of our Provincial schools
or to one of the private trade schools approved by the Technical and Vocational
Education Division. The school may reject the applicant if, in its opinion, the
person is not considered suitable.
Programmes of over 12 months' duration are not acceptable for financial aid
under Programme 5.
Enrolment
1961/62   1,915      1963/64   2,633
1962/63   2,005      1964/65   2,956
Programme 6
This programme provides training of adults having a continuing disability and
who require retraining in order to fit them for work. It covers costs of vocational
assessment, fees, books, subsistence allowance, and travelling, the amount being
determined according to individual need.
Persons requesting training make application through the National Employment
Service. The Provincial Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation arranges through the Health
Branch for medical assessment to make sure that the continuing disability is not
" active " nor will mitigate against the type of vocational training being considered.
Enrolment
1961/62   48 1963/64   97
1962/63   62 1964/65   91
Programme 7—Technical and Vocational Teacher Training
(Canada contributes 50 per cent.)
1. Teacher-training for Provincial Adult Vocational Schools
Vocational-teacher training for the British Columbia vocational schools, the
Vancouver Vocational Institute, the Haney Correctional Institution, and the White-
horse Vocational School is offered in summer sessions at the University of British
Columbia.
There are two separate programmes offered, each requiring three to four summers of work to achieve the 18 units of credit to qualify for a vocational teacher's
certificate. Acceptance into each complex of courses is contingent upon an appointment to an adult vocational school.
Option 1 consists of a series of seven individual courses of five weeks' duration,
the completion of which entitles the student to a vocational instructor's certificate.
Option 2 consists of a series of seven courses of seven weeks' duration, the
completion of which not only entitles the student to his or her vocational instructor's
certificate, but also 15 of the 18 credits obtained may be applied toward a Bachelor
of Education degree at the University of British Columbia.
In 1964 a total of 83 students attended summer session courses leading toward
a vocational teacher's certificate.
 TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION D 95
2. Teacher-training for Vocational and Industrial Education Instructors
for Secondary Schools
Teacher-training in this category is offered under the auspices of the University
of British Columbia and leads toward the Bachelor of Education degree with a
double major in industrial education. The technical portion of this programme is
carried out by five teachers as an emergency measure in the British Columbia Vocational School—Burnaby, and consists of one 14-month day programme followed by
placement in September of each year in a secondary school. Each summer thereafter the partially trained teacher returns to a summer teacher-training course put
on by the Department and the College of Education until the Bachelor of Education
degree is earned.
During the school-year 1964/65, 51 students were enrolled in this programme.
Programme 8
This programme provides training for Federal departments and agencies. It
covers civilian instructors at the Army Engineers' School (Chilliwack) and at
H.M.C.S. "Naden" (Esquimalt).
The Department of Education assumes responsibility for the recruiting and
inspection of academic and vocational training instructors and class inspection at
these two centres.
Number of teachers in this programme is 19.
Programme 9—Student Aid
This programme covers financial assistance to university students and nurses
in training, with a maximum Federal grant of $30,000 to the Province.
Programme 10
Covers research into manpower requirements and training needs. Under Programme 10, Dr. J. T. Montague, Associate Professor of Economics and Director
of the Institute of Industrial Relations at the University of British Columbia, has
been commissioned to make a study in depth of present and future manpower needs
in this Province.
 D 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
J. H. PANTON, M.Sc, DIRECTOR
The Community Programmes Branch progress for the 1964/65 fiscal year was
most evident in the higher standard of leadership activities, including clinics, workshops, schools, and conferences. Much of this was due to the development of better
procedures for service through the Sports and Fitness and Adult Education offices,
which were originally established in 1962.
Field services increased, even though the Community Programmes Branch was
given the responsibility of officially representing the Canadian Confederation Centennial Committee of British Columbia; in this capacity all unincorporated community Centennial Committees were organized through the field offices of the
Branch. The Centennial work greatly increased the responsibilities of the field staff,
and this will continue until 1968.
Recreation is entering a period of rapid expansion in British Columbia. It will
be a great challenge to all levels of government to provide the necessary leadership
and service to take care of this inevitable growth. More citizens are becoming more
cognizant of the importance of this aspect of community living and its answer to
leisure problems. We must accept the challenge and provide services commensurate
with the importance of the work.
Growth chart for Recreation Commissions in British Columbia to March 31,
1965, follows:—
1954      86 1960   281
1955   140 1961   307
1956   183 1962   332
1957   216 1963   351
1958   250 1964   359
1959   266 1965   375
Services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to British Columbia
communities are as follows:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional recreation consultants.
(2) Fitness and Amateur Sports Division, which provides special service to
sports organizations, communities, and schools.
(3) Adult Education Division, which provides grants, consultation, clinics,
and conferences to School Board adult education divisions.
(4) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs, organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(5) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(6) Drama library—materials and advisory services.
(7) Leadership  training  through  workshops,   conferencs,   clinics,   regional
schools, and a Provincial summer school.
(8) Grants-in-aid to Recreation Commissions on behalf of full-time recreation
directors and to aid with the expenses of public recreation programmes.
(9) Responsible for educational sessions and resource personnel at annual
British Columbia Recreation Conference.
(10)  Special grants to those Recreation Commissions which conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
D 97
Recreation Commissions
The following is a list of Recreation Commissions in British Columbia and the
annual Provincial Government grant allocated for the year:—
* Commissions receiving grants for directors' salaries.
t Inactive Commissions.
Recreation Commission
Abbotsford 	
Annual
Grant
___     $120.00
Recreation Commission
Chilliwhack	
tChristian Valley	
Annual
Grant
_____      $600.00
Adams Lake  	
300.00
Ainsworth    .
300.00
150.00
Christina Lake 	
300.00
Alberni          	
Clearwater 	
300.00
Alert Bay 	
720.00
Clinton 	
300.00
Alexandria   	
300.00
240.00
Columbia Valley 	
240.00
Alexis Creek    .
*Comox Village	
Connaught Heights     . _
900.00
Argenta-Johnsons Landing
300.00
180.00
Armstrong 	
tArrowhead-Sidmouth 	
600.00
Coombs	
*Courtenay   	
240.00
_.___    1,800.00
Arrow Park West .
180.00
Cowichan Indian Band
540.00
Ashcroft ___ 	
300.00
240.00
540.00
420.00
*Cranbrook 	
Crawford Bay 	
.     2,100.00
Avola   	
300.00
Balfour _ _     _   ___   .___      ,
Crescent Valley	
360.00
Bamfleld   __
Creston   .__
Cultus Lake 	
Cumberland 	
tDawson Creek	
Decker Lake	
600.00
Barnhart Vale	
240.00
480.00
tBarnston Island	
600.00
Barriere _ _
240.00
240.00
Bear Creek 	
300.00
Beaver Creek   _
480.00
Deep Cove	
300.00
tBeaverdell     	
*Delta	
Denman Island	
_. _.    1,500.00
Bessborough   _   _ _ _   _____   _
240.00
240.00
420.00
Birch Island	
Departure Bay .___
Deroche  __
540.00
Black Creek ___ 	
480.00
360.00
Blue River ._ _   	
144.00
240.00
Dewdney     ___
420.00
Bonnington-Corra Linn
*District of Coquitlam 	
District of Matsqui	
District of Mission __	
1,800.00
Boston Bar  .
300.00
600.00
Boswell __ __     -   -
420.00
480.00
Bouchie Lake —- —   .
360.00
District of Salmon Arm	
600.00
tBowen Island   _._
*District of Surrey _____
1,500.00
Bralorne-Pioneer _
600.00
240.00
240.00
480.00
Doe River             __
240.00
Bridesville   	
tDragon Lake  	
Brisco 	
Britannia Beach
Duhammel	
Eagle Valley  ..
180.00
240.00
Brocklehurst   	
300.00
East Kelowna 	
420.00
Brookmere  .... _
*Burnaby   	
Burns Lake       ____ _
240.00
3,600.00
480.00
240.00
1,800.00
No grant
East Wellington 	
Edgewater	
Elko 	
Elk Valley _____
420.00
420.00
180.00
Burton
240.00
*CampbelI River	
Emerald Mines	
Enderby 	
Erickson
600.00
Canal Flats   	
300.00
Canyon
300.00
420.00
420.00
Cape Mudge    ______   _ _ _
Errington 	
*Esquimalt 	
Falkland 	
Fanny Bay 	
300.00
tCawston __ _     _
900.00
Cedar 	
Central Saanich _ -
420.00
480.00
300.00
480.00
Chapman Camp  ___ __
120.00
Farmington	
Ferndale 	
Field	
Forest Grove  ____   _ 	
240.00
Chase     .
300.00
300.00
Chehalis Crossing 	
420.00
600.00
Chehalis Reserve       ..
240.00
300.00
Cherry Creek
540.00
Fort Fraser _      _______
300.00
Cherryville  __      . __ 	
480.00
240.00
Fort Nelson     __    	
120.00
Cheslatta District —_
Fort St. lohn	
Francois Lake
420.00
Chetwynd
300.00
600.00
300.00
Chilliwack 	
Franklin River 	
300.00
 D 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
tFraser Lake     	
Fruitvale  $480.00
Gabriola Island  360.00
Galloway   600.00
Genelle   540.00
Gibsons   420.00
Gillies Bay   420.00
tGiscombe    	
tGlenmore     	
Glenora  420.00
Golata Creek   180.00
Golden   600.00
Grand Forks  600.00
Great Central  300.00
Greenwood   420.00
Gray Creek  240.00
Grindrod  300.00
Groundbirch   300.00
tHaida Masset      	
Halfmoon Bay  No grant
Happy Valley-Glen Lake  420.00
Harrison Hot Springs  480.00
tHarrop   	
Hatzic Prairie  300.00
Hazelton   300.00
Hedley   240.00
Hixon   420.00
Holberg  300.00
Hope   600.00
Hornby Island  300.00
Horsefly   300.00
Houston   300.00
Inonoaklin   600.00
Invermere   600.00
loco   480.00
leune Landing  300.00
Jordan River  480.00
Justportel   216.00
Kaleden  420.00
Kaslo  420.00
*Kelowna   2,100.00
Kent   480.00
tKeremeos    	
Kersley  300.00
Kettle Valley  240.00
Kilkerran   240.00
*Kimberley   1,500.00
Kingfisher   300.00
Kitwanga Valley   300.00
tKootenay Bay    	
Kyuquot  360.00
Lac la Hache  300.00
Ladysmith  540.00
La France  240.00
tLaidlaw     	
Lakeview Heights  300.00
Langford  480.00
*Langley   1,200.00
Lantzville  600.00
Recreation Commission
Lardeau    _    .         	
Annual
Grant
$180.00
Lavington-Coldstream 	
600.00
Lillooet _     —_   _
240.00
Lister _ _    _   	
480.00
Little Fort	
300.00
tLone Butte         	
Lumby      _            .           _ __
300.00
Lund   —_     _   	
420.00
Lytton __.    . 	
420.00
Mahatta River	
300.00
Mahood Falls
180.00
Malaspina 	
Maple Ridge	
Mara    _ _   __    _..   _ _ ____ __ _
300.00
600.00
240.00
Marysville	
Mayne Island 	
300.00
60.00
tMerritt                           . .
Merville                       _    __.
300.00
Metchosin 	
Michel	
480.00
240.00
Midway    __                      ..
300.00
tMinstrel Island
Minto ______	
420.00
Montney  	
300.00
Montrose   	
Moose Heights   _
150.00
180.00
Mount Currie
360.00
tMud River  	
McConnell Creek
240.00
tMcBride          _ .
McLeese Lake
300.00
Nakusp        _ _. 	
600.00
*Nanaimo       „ _ 	
2,100.00
Nanoose _ _                       _   __ 	
420.00
Naramata
300.00
tNarcosli Creek
Natal                      	
360.00
Nazko     _____                    _
240.00
*Nelson      	
New Denver       _     _ __
1,500.00
240.00
New Hazelton ._ _
360.00
tNew Masset _ _.
New Westminster	
No grant
Nicomen Island ___ 	
Noralee-Clemretta-Colleymount
North Bend                  	
360.00
360.00
480.00
North Cowichan	
600.00
Northfield 	
North Kamloops                  _ 	
420.00
600.00
North Shore (Nelson)	
North Shuswap    ...     __ 	
600.00
360.00
tNorth Vancouver . rt   	
Oak Bay                -   ____
600.00
tOkanagan Centre             ...   	
Okanagan Falls _             _ _ 	
240.00
Okanagan Indian Band
300.00
tOkanaean Mission
tOliver                        ..   	
tlOO Mile House      	
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
D 99
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
1150 Mile House     	
tOsoyoos     	
Oyama  $300.00
Palling   360.00
Parksville   600.00
tPaul Creek     	
Peace Canyon  120.00
Peachland   300.00
Pemberton Valley  300.00
Pender Harbour  360.00
Pendleton Bay  180.00
Penticton  600.00
tPitt Meadows     	
Pleasant Valley  420.00
Popkum  360.00
*Port Alberni  1,800.00
Port Alice  420.00
Port Coquitlam  600.00
Port Hardy  180.00
Port Mellon  600.00
Port Moody  600.00
Port McNeill  540.00
Port Renfrew   420.00
Pouce Coupe  300.00
Powell River  480.00
*Prince George   1,500.00
*Prince Rupert  3,300.00
Princeton  420.00
Procter   480.00
Progress   300.00
Quadra Island   480.00
Qualicum Beach   300.00
Queen Charlotte  180.00
tQuesnel     	
Radium Junction   360.00
Red Bluff  300.00
tRedwell      	
tReid Lake    	
Revelstoke   480.00
*Richmond   2,700.00
Riondel   300.00
Riske Creek  300.00
Riverside   300.00
Roberts Creek  300.00
Robson   600.00
Rock Creek   240.00
Roe Lake  360.00
Rose Lake  300.00
Round Lake   240.00
Royston  360.00
Rutland   300.00
Saanich Indian   600.00
Salmo   300.00
Salmon Arm  1,200.00
Saltspring Island  600.00
Saltair   420.00
Sandspit   180.00
Savona  300.00
Sayward   480.00
Annual
Recreation Commission Grant
Sechelt  $300.00
t70 Mile House and Watch Lake    	
tShalalth	
Shawnigan Lake   480.00
Shirley  240.00
Sidney   540.00
Silver Creek (1)   300.00
Silver Creek (2)   240.00
Silverton   No grant
Skidegate Mission  240.00
Slocan   360.00
tSmithers     	
Soda Creek   240.00
Songhees Indian Band  480.00
Sooke   540.00
Sorrento   300.00
South Cortez  420.00
South Hazelton  360.00
tSouth Kelowna     	
Southside  360.00
South Slocan  420.00
South Taylor  240.00
South Wellington  360.00
Sparwood   240.00
Spences Bridge  180.00
Sproat Lake   420.00
Squamish   600.00
tSquamish Indian Band     	
tSticking (Telegraph Creek)    	
Straiton   360.00
Sumas   600.00
Summerland   480.00
Sunnybrae  180.00
Sunrise-Two Rivers   180.00
Sunrise Valley   180.00
Sunset Prairie  240.00
tTappen      	
Tarrys and District  300.00
Tatla   420.00
Tatlayoko Lake  120.00
Tchesinkut Lake  300.00
tTelkwa      	
Texada   300.00
Terrace   600.00
Tofino   540.00
Topley   240.00
Tower Lake  240.00
*Trail-Tadanac  3,000.00
Tulameen   300.00
Ucluelet  600.00
Union Bay  480.00
tUniversity Hill    	
Valemount   360.00
Valleyview    360.00
*Vancouver Board of Parks  7,800.00
Vanderhoof   360.00
Vavenby   240.00
Vernon   600.00
View Royal  540.00
 D  100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
Recreation Commission
Village of Mission       ... ___ _
Annual
Grant
       $600.00
Recreation Commission
White Lake 	
Annual
Grant
_____       $300.00
*Wallace Gardens 	
732.00
Williams Lake __     	
540.00
Wardner   __    _        ______
300.00
600.00
180.00
Willow Point
480.00
Warfield
tWillow River 	
Wilson Creek _     ...   ...
Wasa Lake 	
300.00
Wellington    __    _    __       __ ...
420.00
Windermere  	
Winfield          _     	
300.00
Wells 	
90.00
300.00
Westbank 	
West Bench     ,
420.00
_   .       300.00
Winlaw  	
Wistaria                        __    _ 	
360.00
240.00
Westbridge
300.00
180.00
Woodfibre                     _ _ 	
480.00
West Creston  ...   .... —_ 	
Wynndel	
Yale	
300.00
Westsyde 	
*West Vancouver
240.00
2,400.00
45.00
300.00
Whaletown	
360.00
Zeballos 	
420.00
During the year 49 Recreation Commissions were inactive or not receiving a
grant. This was an increase of six over the preceding year. Inactive Recreation
Commissions are of serious concern as they become this way through poor leadership and community disinterest. In the case of an incorporated community, lack
of interest of the local government is the principal reason.
Information provided by quarterly reports from Recreation Commission reveals
many interesting aspects of community recreation in British Columbia. The reports
do not include areas of recreation such as private agencies, clubs, commercial recreation, and many activities not associated with Recreation Commissions. However,
during the past year a total of 7,766 activities was reported and 1,646,930 participants were listed; the participation does not mean different people, as many people
take part in many community activities. Vancouver is not included in this number
because of a different reporting system.
Recreation Commission expenditures and receipts totalled about $lVi million
for each.
A true report picture is difficult to obtain due to many discrepancies and
misunderstandings in reporting. The reports do indicate a growing interest and
enthusiasm for community recreation; they serve as useful guides to regional consultants and provide a record for the Victoria office.
Staff
No staff changes were made during the year.
Three full staff meetings were called to discuss Branch problems and policies.
The meetings were convened in July, 1964; October, 1964; and February, 1965.
1964/65 was the first full year of Centennial work, and it necessitated some
curtailment of Branch work in order to fulfil heavy Centennial commitments during
the organizational stage. Due to Centennial work, staff travel was increased by
24,000 miles. Centennial work required 49,450 miles and Branch business 42,353
miles.
1964/65 was a very heavy load year with added Centennial work. The field
staff made 1,831 visits to communities.
Two members of the staff were granted leave of absence to attend summer
school in 1964. Mr. M. E. Gordon is doing postgraduate work in recreation, and
Mr. D. M. McCooey is working on a degree majoring in drama and social science.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
D 101
The Community Programmes Branch staff and then locations are as follows:—
A. L. Cartier, Victoria—Adult Education.
K. K. Maltman, Vancouver—Sports and Fitness.
T. Ruben, Abbotsford—Fraser-Sechelt.
E. W. Mayers, Kamloops—Central British Columbia.
G. J. Pynn, Victoria—Vancouver Island.
D. M. McCooey, Smithers—North-west British Columbia.
J. M. MacKinnon, Kelowna—Okanagan-Similkameen.
R. C. Davis, Quesnel—North-east British Columbia.
M. E. Gordon, Nelson—Kootenays.
Miss A. F. Adamson, Victoria—Drama.
Leadership
Leadership services are of paramount importance if we are to develop an
effective and adequate total recreation programme in British Columbia. In this
respect the Branch is continually endeavouring to develop and promote more opportunity for all categories of recreation leaders to increase their knowledge and skills.
Local clinics, zone meetings, regional conferences and workshops, and Provincial conferences, workshops, and clinics are sponsored by the Branch. Leadership
aid was also given to many Provincial organizations to conduct their own Provincial
training and conference programmes.
The 1964 Provincial Leadership School was in session in Kelowna from July
13th to 18th, inclusive. The school provided learning opportunity in recreation
leadership and was designed to encourage enthusiasm and stimulate interest in a
better approach to community organization problems in sports, fitness, and aquatics.
A Provincial Sports Conference was held in New Westminster and referred to
later in the report.
Leadership services of prominent resource people in all areas of recreation are
made available for many communities throughout the Province. The growing interest and continuing increase in requests for aid in this aspect of Branch service is
indicative of the increasing interest in community recreation.
Financial assistance was given to the Okanagan School of Fine Arts and the
Terrace Summer School of the Arts. This assistance is provided to encourage the
development of leadership in the areas of recreation which can best be served in
this manner.
In conjunction with the Leadership School, all community recreation directors
were invited to Kelowna to participate in a seminar for the exchange of ideas, and
to establish a professional association in British Columbia.
Clinics	
Leadership Statistics
Provincial
Number
  7
Attendance
1,773
Conferences	
  1
130
Clinics         - _   -_
Regional
Number
110
10
Attendance
3,932
798
Commissions
302
Conferences 	
171
 D 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Workshops
Attendance      Commissions
Cranbrook           126            11
Courses
6
11
7
4
6
orkshops
Attendance
37
Cost
$368.90
Kelowna  141            28
Smithers     __ _                       125            12
816.69
809.75
Fort St. John     62             10
Williams Lake                           81            16
285.74
859.54
Elementary-school Physical Education W
Kitimat 	
Miscellaneous Activities
Okanagan School of Fine Arts  __.
Cost
$192.45
Cost
$300.00
Terrace Summer School of the Arts       _
100.00
Parks and Leisure Conference  __      	
400.00
Provincial Leadership School
Community Leadership _            _ 	
At
endan
16
19
15
24
18
ce       Instructors
3
Sports _ _ _ _                   _ _     _
8
Fitness       	
3
Aquatics ,.          .    _ ___      _ 	
14
Directors' Seminar	
2
Special grants to communities conducting playground programmes and swimming instruction and water safety totalled $7,415. One hundred and fifteen
communities received this aid. One hundred and six aquatic and 42 playground
programmes were assisted. These grants are provided to encourage community
activity in these extremely important aspects of recreation.
The Annual Provincial Recreation Conference is also a major project for the
Community Programmes Branch. The Branch is responsible for the educational
sessions and the resource personnel. The conference is also part of the B.C.R.A.
annual meeting and provides excellent learning opportunity for professional people,
Recreation Commission personnel, and municipal councillors with recreation responsibilities. The 1964 conference was held in Prince George and was attended by
130 people representing 56 Recreation Commissions and communities.
Library Services
The film library is located in Vancouver and maintained by the Visual Education Division.  The book library was kept up to date with 118 new additions.
Library Statistics
New books purchased  118
New films purchased  12
Number of books circulated  559
Number of films circulated  540
Publications
The Community Programmes Branch bulletin continued publication on a quarterly basis, with 650 copies mailed out at each mailing. The bulletin is designed as
a reference book for Recreation Commissions.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH D  103
Provincial Advisory Board
Members of the Provincial Advisory Board on Adult Education and Recreation
are as follows: Mr. B. M. Baker, Kelowna (Chairman); Dr. B. E. Wales, Vancouver; Mr. A. T. Alsbury, Vancouver; Mrs. W. Saxton, Ucluelet; Dr. A. W.
Mooney, Vanderhoof; Mr. P. F. Mclntyre, Victoria; Mr. L. J. Wallace, Victoria;
Prof. R. F. Osborne, Vancouver; Dr. J. F. K. English, Victoria; Mr. J. E. Fletcher,
Trail; Mr. D. L. Cunnings, Vancouver.
The Board met twice during the fiscal year—September 24, 1964, and May 5,
1965.
The Board was appointed to act in an advisory capacity to the Department of
Education concerning policy and procedure as related to the Community Programmes Branch. The Board meets periodically to hear reports from the Community Programmes Branch, which outline problems and requirements. The Board
then discusses any aspect of the Branch it deems necessary and submits recommendations to the Deputy Minister.
Drama
Interest in the theatre in British Columbia continues to grow apace with our
rapidly increasing population. This is stimulated in part by the universities, television, radio, professional groups, and touring companies, as well as summer stock
and festivals.
Teachers and others interested are taking advantage of summer schools and
winter night-school courses, as well as week-end and month-long workshops. With
highly trained instructors available, a better standard of production is noticeable.
Festivals continue to dominate the spring picture. Thirty festivals of drama,
speech arts, dance, and music were held this spring. Of these, 9 included entries
from school groups only, 11 were primarily for adult drama clubs, and the remaining 10 included music and dancing as well as drama and speech arts and were open
to all age-groups. Specialists in the field of adjudication were appointed by this
Branch to give a critical appraisal of drama and speech arts entries.
The Provincial One-act Festival, which concludes the season for Little Theatre
groups, was held in the new Metro Theatre in Vancouver with Mr. Jack McCreath,
Drama Supervisor for the Province of Alberta, as adjudicator. Prince Rupert Little
Theatre's presentation of " The Three Cuckolds " received the trophy for best production. Mr. Owen Erwin, a teacher at Prince Rupert Secondary School, received
the best director award. Runner-up Victoria's "A Resounding Tinkle " was also
directed by a teacher, Mr. Bert Farr, of the Victoria secondary-school staff.
This Branch works closely with the British Columbia Drama Association, the
parent body of over 300 drama groups scattered over the Province, and gives material aid as well as other assistance to the organization. Over 5,000 individuals
comprise the membership.
The drama library continues to serve the needs of the community. Over 8,000
books, pamphlets, magazines, etc., were mailed free of charge to teachers, students,
groups, etc., requesting assistance. This service is much appreciated, as is the loan
of free lighting and other stage equipment.
Adult Education
(A. L. Cartier, M.A.)
Night Schools
The enrolment in public-school adult education programmes continues to increase by about 20 per cent per year.   In the past three years the enrolment has all
 D 104 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
but doubled. At the same time there is a growing depth of seriousness in the scope
of the programmes. This development is the result of the fact that in most large
centres full-time Directors have been put in charge of the programmes.
Adult Day Schools
The first of our adult day schools, the King Edward Centre, has now evolved
into the Vancouver City College.
Other day schools or day programmes for adults have recently been established
in Terrace, Prince Rupert, Vernon, Victoria, Kamloops, Penticton, and Port Alberni.
In-service Training Programmes for Directors and Instructors
An Easter conference for Adult Education Directors was held in the Vancouver Public Library. Forty Directors devoted then Easter holidays to a study of
ways and means of improving their programmes. In addition, workshops for instructors of adults were held in Vancouver, Victoria, the Fraser Valley, the Okanagan, and the Peace River area.
The Directors of Adult Education this year formed their own professional Provincial organization with local chapters in the North, the Fraser Valley, the Lower
Mainland, and Vancouver Island.
Community Leadership Training
Courses or workshops to develop leadership skills for community leaders are
growing in popularity. The week-long workshop in Kelowna was one of the most
successful parts of the summer school operated by the Branch.
Similar workshops were held in the Cariboo and Peace River area, and others
are being planned for Terrace and the Prince Rupert area.
There is a growing demand by community leaders for more workshops to
develop leadership skills in such areas as communications, human relations, and
programme planning.
Programmes for Indians—Leadership and Community Development
The Adult Education Division has continued to collaborate with the U.B.C.
Extension Department in helping with a leadership training programme for Indian
chiefs and councillors in various areas of the Province. A central feature of many
of these workshops concerns how Indian leaders may help their people to make
better use of the educational resources available to them. As a result, more classes
are being started for Indians and more Indians are attending the regular night classes.
The Community Programmes Branch and the Director, Indian Advisory Act,
are collaborating in a pilot project in community development with the Port Simpson Band at Port Simpson. The purpose of this project is to help the Port Simpson
Indians to diagnose their own social and economic problems, to use all resources
available to improve their community life, and to develop the kinds of community
organizations necessary to ensure the endurance of whatever changes may be brought
about by the project. This programme is being financed jointly by the Federal and
Provincial Governments and the Indians at Port Simpson.
Business-management Programme
The business-management programme developed by the Federal Labour Department has expanded in the night schools. Last year there were 2,867 businessmen enrolled in 149 classes. New programmes will begin this year in business
finance, personnel management, and retail selling.
New programmes in distributive education are being developed for the employees of small business enterprises.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
D  105
Summary Showing Trends in Enrolment, Number of Classes, Number of Instructors,
and Number of School Districts Participating
Year
Number
of School
Districts
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
19S0/fin
58
64
65
68
70
40,867
40,917
46,548
70,405
78,461
1,796
1,945
2,273
2,949
3,454
3,828
1,578
10fin/fii
2,220
1961/62                    _.   .
2,219
1962/63         	
3,070
1963/64                         	
3,964
1964/65 _ _	
70
91,579
4,261
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Year
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
1959/60    _	
13,539
12,530
9,783
14,317
17,510
21,393
540
552
518
685
880
1,029
322
1960/61  	
552
1961/62.                    	
512
1962/63           _               	
681
1963/64
910
1964/65              	
1,116
NON-VOCATIONAL programme
1959/60..
1960/61-
1961/62..
1962/63-
1963/64-
1964/65.
27,328
28,387
36,765
56,008
60,951
70,186
1,256
1,393
1,755
2,264
2,574
2,799
1,256
1,648
1,707
2,389
3,054
3,145
 D 106
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Classification of Courses and Enrolment
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Course
Number of
Enrollees
Number of
Instructors
Number of
Courses
2,867
6,082
1,398
1,048
1,123
1,767
1,243
940
931
564
419
3,011
135
269
74
62
63
77
46
50
56
33
25
139
149
320
74
68
69
78
48
46
58
33
27
Miscellaneous   ,......,„	
146
Totals             —        _
21,393
1,029
1,116
NON-VOCATIONAL PROGRAMME
Academic (for credit).
16,499
2,342
7,071
5,320
9,187
6,975
3,860
8,318
10,614
538
115
257
260
475
341
107
338
368
584
123
265
328
569
412
113
359
392
Totals
70,186
2,799
3,145
The phenomenal growth in the enrolment and scope of Adult Education in
British Columbia is due largely to the initiative of local School Boards. Whereas
three years ago there were only two School Districts with full-time Directors of
Adult Education, there are now eighteen with full-time Directors and an additional
sixteen with half-time Directors. In addition, there are eight full-time assistants.
This is a sign that Adult Education is rapidly shifting from a marginal concern to
become an integral part of the local educational system.
AMATEUR SPORTS AND FITNESS DIVISION
(K. K. Maltman, B.P.E., Co-ordinator)
The Community Programmes Branch was unable to proceed with projects
through the Sports and Fitness Division until September of 1964 when the Federal-
Provincial agreements were signed, which became effective until March 31, 1967.
However, as soon as agreements were signed, a crash programme enabled the Division to provide extensive aid to many groups in the Province.
The signing of Federal-Provincial agreements enabled the Division to plan for
two years ahead, and before the end of the 1964/65 fiscal year many projects were
planned and submitted for approval for the succeeding year.
The Sports and Fitness Division has become a very important factor in the
Provincial sports picture. A great increase in projects (see list) provided much
vital leadership aid to a wide variety of sports organizations. The Division has
stimulated interest in physical recreation groups, has encouraged them to use available assistance, and has been instrumental in the formation of the British Columbia
Sports Federation, which was inaugurated February 6, 1965.
 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH D 107
Communications
The policy of providing clerical aid for sports groups has caused the Division
to be taxed to the limit. Many groups have had constitutions, minutes, brochures,
reports, briefs, etc., done through the Vancouver office. This is a service which is
of invaluable assistance to many groups, and very greatly appreciated.
Bursaries and Scholarships
A total of $7,700 was made available to 16 individuals enrolled in Physical
Education or Recreation Courses at Canadian universities.
Conference
Two hundred recreation people attended the Third Annual Sports and Fitness
Conference in New Westminster. The feature of the conference was the inaugural
meeting of the British Columbia Sports Federation. This was a Federal-Provincial
project, and the total cost of the conference was $1,545.30.
Physical Education Workshops
The provision of Federal money to aid school activities has been deleted as a
Federal-Provincial project; however, a workshop in Parksville was assisted. In the
future this assistance will be provided through Provincial grants.
Miscellaneous
The development of policies which will provide maximum service to sports and
fitness groups, through this Division, will require considerable time and study. Many
meetings and discussions have been held with individual sports organizations to
familiarize them with procedure and to encourage them to submit an annual request
outlining what assistance, particularly leadership training, is needed throughout the
Province for the improvement of leadership and the development of the sport.
Projects
The following projects were approved by Federal and Provincial Governments.
In several cases the money was not all spent due to incomplete projects and the time
factor. Most of the problems encountered were caused by lack of knowledge on
the part of the sports groups and the lateness of agreement signing.
Federal-Provincial Projects, 1964/65
1. Girls' Leadership Workshop in Physical Education and
Recreation  $300.00
2. Elementary School Physical Education Workshop
(Parksville)   227.25
3. Judges' Clinic and Coaches' Workshop (Gymnastic)   250.00
4. Tennis Clinic   78.00
5. Judges' and Coaches' Clinic (Gymnastic)   104.00
6. Officials' Clinic (Boxing)   300.00
7. Gymnastic Clinic  150.00
8. B.C. Amateur Wrestling Association Clinic  50.00
9. Recreation Survey (Penticton)  1,000.00
10. Junior Counsellors-in-training Programme (Y.W.C.A.) 476.80
11. Training Clinic for Coaches, Trainers, Managers, and
Referees (B.C. Bantam Football)   200.00
12. B.C. Women's Field Hockey Clinic and Seminar  600.00
 D 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
13. B.C. Cricket Association Coaching Clinics   $600.00
14. Coaching Clinic and Judges' Workshop (Gymnastic) __ 300.00
15. Summer School  6,997.35
16. Canadian Legion Clinic  36.00
17. Canadian Legion Clinic  35.00
18. Canadian Legion Clinic  60.00
19. Synchronized Swimming Association Teaching and
Judging Clinic  300.00
20. Scholarships and Bursaries  10,000.00
21. Professional Staff Workshop (Boys' Clubs of Vancouver)   260.80
22. Track and Field Championships (Officials'Clinic)  150.00
23. Judo Clinic combined with Olympic Trials and Canadian Judo Championship  300.00
24. B.C. BasketbaU Referees' Association Clinic for Education Leaders  460.30
25. Training Conference for Volunteer Leaders of Youth
Groups (Y.M.C.A.)  600.00
26. Volleyball Coaching Clinic  300.00
27. Trail Making and Marking (Mountain Access Committee)    400.00
28. Administrative costs of Vancouver Office  18,071.00
29. Sechelt Project Experiment  10,000.00
30. Leadership Training (B.C. Volleyball Association)   1,500.00
31. Springboard Diving Clinic  300.00
32. Tennis Coaches' Clinic  446.87
33. Community Leadership Workshop  675.00
34. Expenses of two delegates and president of the
B.C.A.A.U. to the National convention  660.00
35. Athletic and Fitness Specialist (Vancouver)  7,000.00
36. Specific Provincial Hiking Trail (Stage 1)   700.00
37. Instructional Programmes for Ski-ing  2,000.00
38. Provincial Clinic (B.C. Women's Field Hockey Association)   174.00
39. Gymnastic Equipment for Community Programmes
Branch  8,000.00
40. Administrative grant (B.C.R.A.)   2,000.00
41. B.C. Amateur Wrestling Association Coaches' School
and 10 clinics  2,400.00
42. Sports and Fitness Conference  2,400.00
43. Camp Leadership Conference (B.C. Camping Association)   500.00
44. B.C. Minor Baseball Association Conference  125.00
Total  $81,487.37
During the past three years the Sports and Fitness Division has become a very
important factor in the development of all aspects of sport and physical recreation
in British Columbia. With continued support from all concerned, the Community
Programmes Branch should be able to make an increasingly significant contribution
to physical recreation in the Province.
 IERICHO HILL SCHOOL
D  109
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MacDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., Litt.D.,
SUPERINTENDENT
The net enrolment for the 1964/65 school
year was as fo'
lows:—
Day
Resident
Total
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Blind or partial sighted _   	
1
25      |      25
53            48
_      |        1
34
68
31
64
115
233
1
Totals         _          	
78       1       74
102
95
349
Of the total, 16 blind pupils were enrolled from the Province of Alberta, 2 deaf
pupils came from Yukon Territory, and 2 Eskimos were from the Northwest Territories.
Mrs. Nancy Person was transferred from Essondale to the staff as housekeeper.
Mr. William Alcombrack was appointed head cook to succeed Mr. William Curtis,
who retired after many years of service. Miss Elizabeth Layton replaced Miss A.
G. Pert as nurse-matron. There were also a few replacements on the teacher and
resident instructor staff.
Mr. J. Phillipson succeeded Dr. W. A. Plenderleith as Chairman of the
Advisory Committee at the beginning of the school-year. Other members of this
Committee were Col. J. N. Burnett, Mr. F. M. Wallace, Mrs. W. Chilton, Dr. J. L.
Robinson, Capt. M. C. Robinson, and Dr. C. E. MacDonald.
Plans to construct a separate vocational school for handicapped persons in
Burnaby were set aside in favour of establishing classes in existing buildings, to
ensure more effective integration. While it was agreed that a counsellor be appointed for persons under Programme 6, who would work in close co-operation
with Mr. Clarence Bradbury's rehabilitation department, such appointment has not
yet been made.
Father Edward Hamel supervised a religious programme for our Roman
Catholic pupils, along with the adult deaf to whom he ministers. Rev. W. Bottlinger
provided instruction for our Lutheran children, and the Pacific Deaf Fellowship
assisted with children of other denominations.
Representation was made to Mr. Frank Levirs, Assistant Superintendent of
Education (Instruction), with regard to geometry content in certain courses as
applied to blind pupils. While some pupils may progress satisfactorily on an individual instructional basis, it is not being realistic to expect such goals to be
generally achievable in large public-school settings with teachers relatively inexperienced in dealing with blind.
The Board of Examiners authorized Mr. Levirs to accept on behalf of any
individual student a statement from his instructor at the end of a year that he has
completed successfully all those portions of a mathematics course that he is physically capabe of completing. On receipt of the statement, the Division of Examinations will then accept this as completion of the minimum requirements in the
 D 110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
particular mathematics course involved. This was an important decision, since it
enabled continuance of our integrated programme in sighted secondary schools.
Through the courtesy of Dr. Edward Waterhouse, president of Perkin's Institute in Massachusetts, arrangements were made to have the head of the deaf-blind
department, Mr. Noel Hoff, stop off here en route to California. This was done for
the purposes of evaluating our deaf-blind programme.
Mr. Hoff commented favourably on the results thus far achieved with our two
deaf-blind children, and offered a number of valuable suggestions for subsequent
programming for these children.
An understanding was reached with Mr. R. Purse, superintendent of the
Canadian National Institute for the Blind, on matters pertaining to travel training
for the blind, which is of extreme importance.
Agreement was reached with regard to the following:—
(a) An instructress from the Canadian National Institute for the Blind will
review travel techniques with our teachers and other staff members from
time to time.
(b) Jericho Hill School staff will concentrate on campus mobility.
(c) The Canadian National Institute for the Blind will endeavour to provide
community travel training where practical.
(ci) The Canadian National Institute for the Blind will provide mobility training for pupils leaving Jericho Hill School for vocational training and (or)
employment.
At a meeting held in January at Burnaby Vocational School to conisder vocational training programmes for deaf and blind, it was agreed that standing committees consider applicants for training on an individual basis.
To consider deaf applicants, the following committee was named: Mr. C.
Bradbury (Chairman), Col. J. Inglis, Mr. D. Goard, Mr. S. Clarke, Dr. C. E.
MacDonald, and Mr. M. White.
The following committee was selected to consider blind applicants: Mr. C.
Bradbury (Chairman), Col. J. Inglis, Mr. D. Goard, Mr. S. Clarke, Mr. R. Purse,
Miss I. Beveridge, Dr. C. E. MacDonald, and Mr. G. Carson.
Conniston Construction Company was awarded a $74,000 contract for landscaping and planting around Tyler House (boys' dormitory), the new classroom
unit, and the play areas along Eighth Avenue. A scented garden is also to be
developed between the blind classroom building and the recreational unit.
A poll conducted by the Deaf Department Parent-Teacher Association strongly
favoured continuance of off-campus classes. Three have been in operation in city
schools for a number of years past.
Sixteen swimmers from Jericho Hill School were on the first Canadian team
to participate in the 10th International Games for the Deaf in Washington, D.C.,
June 28th to July 1st. There were about 1,000 men and women from 30 countries
taking part in the competitions.
Jo-Anne Robinson was the leading individual gold medal winner of the games.
The girls of the Jericho Hill team won a total of 10 gold and 3 bronze medals in
swimming events, placing Canada as one of the top winners in the Olympic Games
for 1965.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Heatley, of the school for the deaf in Perth, West Australia,
stopped here for a two-day visit en route to Great Britain for a holiday.
Two students, Sandra Pratt and Ruth Ratzlaff, successfully passed the Gallaudet
College entrance examinations and will be enrolled there this fall.
Before the close of school, we were most happy to entertain Mme Vanier. She
expressed genuine interest in the demonstrations and band numbers arranged for her.
 JERICHO HILL SCHOOL D 111
Gallaudet College in Washington, D.C., conferred on me an honorary Doctor
of Letters degree at its 101st commencement exercises. Gallaudet College is the
only college for the deaf in the world, and I am pleased to be the first educator of
the deaf in Canada to be so honoured by this college.
I wish to acknowledge with grateful thanks the co-operation of the Advisory
Committee and loyal support of the staff during the year.
 D 112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1964/65
OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF
EXAMINATIONS
REPORT OF HARRY M. EVANS, B.A., REGISTRAR
For reference convenience this report includes data covering a number of years.
Teacher Registration and Certification
I. Each teacher employed in the public schools must hold a valid certificate,
and this office must establish certification and classification, maintaining an individual record for each person, including teaching service. The following chart shows
developments in the past 10 years, and indicates that the number of individual
service records to be maintained has increased by 87 per cent in this period.
1 _	
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
2a	
2b	
2c	
2d 	
8,223
229
663
8.8
974
12.9
1637
21.7
8,757
176
534
6.5
(?)
(?)
287
(?)
(?)
9,482
221
725
8.3
1,135
13.0
310
1,860
21.2
10,119
297
637
6.7
1,165
12.3
313
1,802
19.0
10,856
332
737
7.3
1,270
12.6
348
2,007
19.8
11,547
369
691
6.4
1,357
12.5
388
2,048
19.0
12,148
327
601
5.2
1,356
11.7
317
1,957
16.9
12,815
254
667
5.5
1,503
12.4
385
2,170
17.9
13,624
336
809
6.3
1,562
12.2
418
2,371
18.5
14,470
376
846
6.2
1,715
12.6
404
2,561
18.8
15,359
389
889
6.1
3a	
1,757
3b	
12.1
4._	
5a
350
2,646
5b ...
18.3
1. School-year.
2a. Teachers employed, as at October, from district nominal rolls. Includes regular staff of Vancouver
Vocational Institute, Vancouver School of Art, and, up to 1955/56, a portion of Victoria College. Includes
supervisors, consultants, relieving teachers, etc.
2b. Numbers with temporary certificates or letters of permission for lack of qualifications, or qualified but
over age, included in 2a.   A change in age regulations occurred for 1955/56 and continued thereafter.
2c. Increase in teachers employed.
2d. Percentage increase in teachers employed.
3a. Numbers who were teaching as at June 30th in previous school-year, not teaching in November of year
shown; that is, drop-outs.
3b. Drop-outs as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
4. Numbers who left positions during the school-year shown.
5a. Numbers of teachers needed in September of year shown to staff new positions and replace drop-outs
from June previous; that is, teacher demand. This does not include replacements for staff changes during the
school-year.
5b. Teacher demand for September as a percentage of numbers employed in previous year.
In 1964/65 there was a slight increase in the number of temporary certificates
or letters of permission issued, reaching its highest point in numbers, but with a
percentage of teachers employed less than in some years. Many of these persons
so employed had undertaken a year of teacher-training but had not qualified fully
for certification. The number of teachers employed continued to rise, as did the
number of drop-outs, but the percentage drop-outs was lower than average. The
number who left positions during the year was lower than in recent years.
II. Letters of permission and temporary certificates, 1959/60 to 1964/65,
were as follows:—
Year
Total
In
Public
Schools
Year
Total
In
Public
Schools
1959/60- ..-	
1960/61    _	
369
327
335
285
1962/63  	
1963/64	
336
376
312
345
1961/62          	
254   !   228
1964/65
389   !   359
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
D  113
In 1963/64, of the 345 in regular public schools, 10 were temporary elementary
certificates (E-C) because of age and 6 were temporary secondary certificates (P-C),
leaving 329 letters of permission. In 1964/65, of the 359 in regular public schools,
7 were temporary elementary certificates and 5 were temporary secondary certificates,
leaving 347 letters of permission, of which 216 were E-T and 131 were S-T with
degree qualifications. As at September, 1963, the employment of those in public
schools on letters of permission was as follows:—
Elementary Grades
No
Teacher-
training
Partial
Teacher-
training
Plus University Year Standing
Total
U.E.
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
Special
E-T	
ST __	
45
20
79
3
88
30
1
2
1
2
124
23
Totals -.
65
82
—
.....
--
147
Secondary Grades
E-T....
S-T	
Totals -
62
73
28
19
33
—
16
14
24
3
1
....      j       90
92
135
47
—
—
182
Total Elementary and Secondary
E-T	
107
93
107
22
121
46
15
-
26
4
2
—
214
S-T	
115
Totals _
200
129
--
....
....
....
329
!
ANALYSIS BY TYPE OF WORK—SECONDARY GRADES
No
Teacher-
training
Partial
Teacher-
training
LA.
Comm.
Music
Art
P.E.
Occ.
H. Ec.
General
E-T	
S-T	
10
8
1
9
3
1
30
4
4
9
3
53
4
1
2
6
2
13
....
3
16
4
11
8
4
3
....
....
15
12
5
3
....
....
i
	
......
	
43
69
Totals _
135
47
4
15
12
3
27
8
i
112
III. During the period up to the end of 1955/56, teacher-training was carried
out in normal schools or in the one-year course for graduates at the university.
Enrolments, therefore, in such one-year courses were easy to determine. Since
1956/57 such training has been in the faculties of education of the universities, and
enrolment figures are more difficult to relate to completion of a basic teacher-training
programme as enrolments cover all years of training. The following charts, however,
covering some 15 years, permit of useful comparisons.
 D 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
1949/50
M. F.' T.
1950/51
M. F.   T.
1951/52
M. F.' T.
1952/53
M. F.'T.
1953/54
M. F.' T,
1954/55
M. F.' T,
1955/56
M. F.'   T.
la..
lb-
lC_
ld_
2a_
2b._
2c...
2d-
3a_
3b..
3c...
3d.
4____
175| 36
1091259
54 128
33814231767
32
249
117
398
184
345
161
690
35
251
162
448
30
10 239
149
418
2
2
6
10
408
170
124
79
473
137
1
66
313
9
2
2
13
300
205
375
241
821
167
349
215
757
11
4
8
23
708
102 39
108 228
33|136
2431403
35
96
24
208
13
10
214
124
373
2
12
1
15
358
77
116
48
241
67
102
44
213
5
3
1
9
204
35
284
156
475
35
271
149
455
1
6
3
10
445
112
400
204
776
102
373
193
668
6
9
4
79
649
86
114
40
240
71
100
37
208
S
5
1
14
194
22
219
125
366|<506
20
206
119
345
13
4
17
328
91
306
156
553
8
18
5
37
522
91
204
90
385
74
185
83
342
2
2
22
342
155
519
17
322
150
489
113
546
245
904
91
507
233
831
2
10
3
75
816
50
393
228
367 671
44
369
222
635
2
11
6
19
616
122
589
327
1,038
99
546
315
960
5
23
12
40
920
References:   M.-=male;  F.=female;  T.=total;   a=University of British Columbia;  b=Vancouver Normal;
c=Victoria Normal.
1. Enrolments in teacher-training as at October.
2. Number graduating as at June of the school-year, available for September following.
3. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were not teaching in November following.    Some
entered teaching in later years.
4. Number graduating as at June of the school-year who were teaching in November following;   that is,
supply from training institutions.
1959/60
M.  F.    T,
1960/61
M. F.    T.
1961/62
M. F.    T.
1962/63
M. F. | T.
I       1
1963/64
M. F.    T
1964/65
M.| F.    T,
la	
lb	
lc	
2a	
2b __
2c	
3a	
3b	
3c	
4a	
4b	
4c	
5a	
5b	
5c	
766
378
1,144
549
131
680
487
120
607
(?)
(?)
525
(?)
(?)
(?)
985
410
1,395
716
135
851
657
119
776
589
16
605
46
125
171
1,353
523
1,876
967
177
1,144
835
199
1,034
787
46
833
99
114
213
1,635
666
2,301
1,149
200
1,349
1,026
216
1,242
893
47
940
145
186
331
617
28
645
97
236
333
2,006
798
2,804
1,416
257
1,673
1,258
266
1,524
1,009
57
1,066
154
326
480
401
28
429
70
136
206
2,127
855
2,982
1,506
266
1,772
1,371
284
1,6551
1,019
63
1,082
181
421
602
645
32
677,
114
348
462
2,021
957
2,978
1,451
285
1,736
1,417
316
1,733
1,056
40
1,096
193
473
666
412
15
427
61
168
229
2,234
1,172
3,406
1,664
328
1,992
1,594
329
1,923
1,085
35
1,120
179
651
830
2,429
1,297
3,726
1,793
409
2,192
References:   M._=male;  F._=female;  T=total.
1. Teacher-training enrolments, in all years;   (a) elementary training, (b) secondary training, (c) total.
2. Enrolled in training programmes likely leading to a certificate at end of year.
3. Listed by training-college at close of year, and teaching considered likely (includes those who may be
considered for temporary certificates, but not those who failed the year or failed practice teaching and a limited
number of special cases)—prior to summer session and supplemental.
4. Number of those listed in 3 who were teaching as at November in school-year following training;
(a) numbers with regular certificates, (b) numbers with temporary certificates, (c) total—after summer session
and supplemental.
5. Numbers of those listed in 3; (a) not teaching as at November but certificates issued, (b) not teaching
and no certificate issued or requested, (c) total not teaching.
Note.—The above do not include those taking emergency Industrial Arts and summer session Home
Economics training programme. The discrepancy between the total of 3c and totals of 4c plus 5c arise from the
fact that some not included in 3c passed further work to be included in 4c plus 5c.
All University of Victoria were included in elementary training above, although some were secondary. The
distortion is relatively small.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
D  115
IV. The following table shows the certificate classifications awarded those in
the training-college in the year shown, who were teaching in November of the year
following; that is, actual supply from the training-college. Note that EC supply
dropped from 211 in 1959 to 73 in 1964, whereas EB and EA supply rose respectively from 292 and 68 to 300 and 271. Similarly, PC and PB supply rose from
58 and 155 to 138 and 285 respectively. (It should be noted that these figures
include certificated teachers who may have left teaching to return for further winter-
session training in the Faculty of Education in the year shown.)
OV
00
in
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
*__
O
H
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M. 1 F. 1 T.
1    1
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
E-T
E-C 	
45
211
292
68
1
58
155
3
10
58
92
56
2
15
109
8
34
128
295
45
1
40
46
1
44
186
387
101
3
55
155
9
21
64
111
37
8
38
138
4
27
123
327
42
1
54
68
3
48
187
438
79
9
92
206
7
21
34
117
46
7
40
161
3
32
95
318
86
3
44
73
2
53
129
435
132
10
84
234
5
8
30
87
63
2
48
171
6
32
69
270
136
2
85
81
2
40
99
357
199
4
133
256
8
9
20
73
75
7
45
196
2
19
53
237
196
1
93
89
5
28
73
E-B	
E-A	
300
271
S-T
P-C	
P-B
8
138
285
P-A	
7
Totals ..
833
350
590
940
421
645
1,066
429
653
1,082
419
677
1,096
427
693
1,120
V. The following chart shows the certificate classification of those in the
training-college in the year shown who were not teaching in November following.
E-T and S-T indicate that had the individual taught, a letter of permission would
have been required. The figures do not include those who would not have received
a certificate or been considered for a letter of permission, nor those in programmes
not normally leading to certification; for example, first year elementary, various
years secondary. Note that the numbers of persons eligible for a certificate who
did not enter teaching the September following rose from 201 in 1959 to 673 in
1964, and that in the same period the level of certificate classification of these individuals rose significantly. The figures reflect the decision of trainees to undertake
extended training for higher qualifications before commencing teaching, evident in
other figures available. The process, temporarily at least, is aggravating numerical
supply in terms of demand, but fortunately is creating a pool of longer-trained
persons who may be expected to enter teaching within the next year or two, thereby
increasing numerical supply and quality supply.
CT*
•n
^-.
CT,
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
i_
O
_-
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F. 1 T.
M.
1
F.  T.
M.
F. 1 T.
1
E-T   	
E-C	
E-B  	
E-A_ _    	
11
56
81
30
1
10
23
1
26
17
25
16
3
2
7
1
69
41
58
33
1
16
16
95
58
83
49
4
18
23
1
31
34
49
12
4
6
11
97
64
108
36
3
10
15
128
98
157
48
7
16
26
56
46
59
14
6
8
17
85
84
137
59
3
11
17
141
130
196
73
9
19
34
28
52
47
40
1
13
23
102 [130
89 141
178 225
65 105
6 | 7
15 1 28
6 1 29
-1-
42
52
54
31
8
14
27
1
102
117
246
84
144
169
300
115
S-T     . . .
P-C   - -      	
5
26
71
13
40
P-B	
48
P-A—  	
.... | ....
1
Totals 	
Total eligible for certificate..
213
201
97
68
234
164
331
232
147
112
333
233
480
345
206 1396 |602
144 1308 |452
204 |462 1666
175 |354 |529
229 1601 |830
179 |494 |673
Totals, E-T, S-T	
12
29
70
99
35
100 |135
1
62
88 |150
I
29 |108 |137
1   1
50
107 |157
1
 D 116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
VI. From the preceding tables can be calculated supply from the training-
colleges as a percentage of demand:—
^t-
m
IO
t-
CO
CT\
o
-N.
\
SO
t-
oo
c\
CTv
On
Os
Os
Os
ON
SO
*
SO
so
>&
rn
*■*
*""'
*-'
r-
*"*
la ._ _	
668
553
831
960
607
776
1,034
1,242
1,524
1,655
1,733
1,923
lb  	
649
522
816
920
525
605
833 i
940
1,066
1,082
1,096
1,120
2    _
1,409
1,637
(?)
1,860
1,802
2,007
2,048
1,957
2,170
2,371
2,561
2,646
3a --	
47.4
33.8
(?)
51.6
33.7
38.7
50.5
63.5
70.2
69.8
67.7
65.5
3b 	
46.1
31.9
(?)
49.5
29.1
29.9
40.7
48.0
49.1 ,
45.6
42.8
42.3
la. Numbers in training-college listed in June previous as likely available to teach in September of school-
year shown.
lb. Numbers in training-college in June previous actually teaching in October of school-year shown.
2. Numbers needed in September to staff new positions and replace drop-outs from June previous; that is,
teacher demand.   This does not include further replacements required during the school-year.
3a. Numbers listed in training-college in June as a percentage of demand;  that is, la as a percentage of 2.
3b. Numbers from training-college who taught as a percentage of demand; that is, lb as a percentage of 2—
actual training-college supply as a percentage of demand.
VII. Since 1955 the Department of Education has co-operated with School
Boards to obtain teachers from the United Kingdom, and from 1955 to 1960,
inclusive, sent an interviewing officer in the early spring to select and recommend
individuals for appointments. The procedure changed in 1961, and no interviewing
officer proceeded overseas. An extensive file of material was provided to each
applicant, with information concerning specific vacancies. Since 1964 an interviewing officer has again proceeded overseas. Certification and experience are
recorded and assistance given to applicants and Boards to assist in appointments.
The numbers who have arrived under the immigration plan have been as follows:—
School-year
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
Elementary ... 	
Secondary    -— _
21
41
30
35
48
33
61
30
33
35
35
27
20
9
19
15
32
14
41
28
Totals	
62
65
81
91
68
62
29
34
46
69
VIII. Teacher-exchange applications proceed through this office. The numbers of applications from British Columbia teachers annually exceed the exchange
positions available.   Exchanges in recent years were as shown:—
School-year
1955/56
195-6/57
1957/58
1958/59
1959/60
1
1960/6111961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
United Kingdom	
Interprovincial _    _.
Elsewhere _	
22
4
3
22
4
5
23
1
1
26
2
1
26
2
28
1
1
23
1
1
22
1
22
1
23
Totals  	
29
31
25
29
28
30
25    I      23
23
23
IX. Annually several thousand teachers' certificates have been issued to new
teachers and to those who have qualified for permanent certification or for higher
certification. Evaluations are completed for many teachers from other Provinces
or countries who have submitted credentials for this purpose; a goodly number do
not arrive.   General inquiries are considered from outside teachers, numbering in
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
D  117
the thousands. In addition, there are many inquiries from British Columbia teachers
for evaluations, certification or experience changes, and assistance in learning of
specific requirements or suitable training programmes.
Division of Examinations
I. There has been a significant increase in examinations over the years. This
Division has arranged for the preparation, printing, and distribution of the June
University Programme (Grade XI to XII) and for the June and August Grade XIII
examinations. Considerable administrative time is involved. It is also responsible
for arrangements for marking, tabulating, and releasing results, appeals, and maintenance of records.   The following tables give significant data:—
Number of Markers
1954/55
1955/56
1956/57
1957/58
1958/59 1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
June 	
August	
220
42
234
39
243
41
1               1
246]         290          301
441          48|          50
343
61
395
61
439
19
511
16
562
15
Totals-
262|         273|         284
290]         338|         3511        404
456
458
527
577
Approx.
costs	
$90,000   $96,000 $113,000
$123,000 $153,000 $168,000]$179,000
$212,500
$210,000
$251,500
$297,0001
1 Salary increase.
Number of Candidates (June)
University
Entrance -
Grade XIII.
9,159
1,653
9,418
1,765
10,924
1,565
13,014
1,797
14,933
2,204
16,786
2,673
19,113
3,253
20,103
3,597
22,411     25,793     28,246
4,044|      4,157]      4,792
Totals -
10,8121    11,I83|    12,489
1               1
14,811
17,137
19,459
22,366
23,700]    26,4551    29,950]    33,038
Number Completed in June
University
Entrance-
Grade XIII
3,139
399
3,160
410
3,433
383
4,025
341
4,215
464|
4,720
587
5,651
620
5,779
659
6,827
840]
7,840
809
9,490
936
Totals...
3,538
3,570
3,816
4,366
4,679]
1
5,307
6,271
6,438
7,6671
8,649
10,426
Papers Marked in June
University
Entrance -
Grade XIII-
20,311
5.669
21,042
6,028
24,024
5,647
29,765
6.388
36,236
8,055
41,963     46,227
9.751]    11,974
49,318     54,488     62,654     60,3331
13,812]    15,649]    15,995]    18,825
Totals-
25,980
27,070
29,671
36,153
44,291
51,714
58,201
63,130
70,137
78,649
79,158
1 Single English 40.
Papers Marked in A ugust
University
6,844
1,727
8,931
1.869
9,236
2,489
8,569
2,192
Grade XIII
	
 |
1,943
2,018
2,181
Totals....
4,914
5,185,
5.789
7,031
8,571
10,800
11,725
10,761
1,943
2,018
2,181
 D 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
Number of Candidates (August)
School-year
1958/59
1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
4,178
1.164
5,985
1.262
6,245
1,537
5,878
1,434
1~315
1,352
Grade XIII. _     	
1,556
Totals
5,342
7,247
7,782
7,312
1,315
1,352
1,556
Number Completed
in August
534
132
882
161
993
210
in
172     ■
~m
219
Orai.* XIII
267
Totals
666
1,043
1,203
884
189
219
267
Total University Programme and Grade XIII papers for June and August,
1953/54 to 1963/64, were as follows: 1953/54, 27,943; 1954/55, 30,894;
1955/56, 32,255; 1956/57, 35,460; 1957/58, 43,184; 1958/59, 52,862;
1959/60, 62,514; 1960/61, 69,926; 1961/62, 73,891; 1962/63, 72,080 (with
University Programme August examinations discontinued); 1963/64, 80,667;
1964/65, 81,339 (with reduction resulting from only a single paper in English 40).
II. For 1964/65, examinations were prepared for June in 22 University Programme subjects and for June and August in 20 Grade XIII subjects. In June,
1965, 186 regular and 22 special examination centres were established in the Province and 52 outside British Columbia, with the farthest-removed centres being in
Finland, Kenya, and Nigeria.
III. There has been a very heavy increase in the number of requests for evaluations of academic standing from those who wish to enrol in British Columbia
secondary schools or to take night-school or private-study courses to complete
requirement, as well as from those who wish to undertake nurse's training or enter
similar professional courses. A very large number of persons has sought evaluations and permission to follow the Interrupted Programme for Adult Students.
These numbers are increasing rapidly every year with expansion in the number of
areas offering academic courses through night schools.
IV. Scholarship Awards, 1964.—For many years the Department of Education announced, on behalf of the University of British Columbia, the names of
winners of the 15 General Proficiency Scholarships for University Entrance awarded
jointly by the University and Christ Spencer Foundation. It also announced the
winners of the six Royal Institution Scholarships for Grade XIII. Since 1964 such
announcements are made by the University of British Columbia.
The top-ranking scholarship candidates for 1964/65 on Departmental examinations appear below in academic order:—•
Name
School
Per Cent
University Programme
Susan J. Mackenzie  (winner of the Governor-
General's Silver Medal)	
Katharine L.  Keen  (winner of the Governor-
General's Bronze Medal)	
William R. Green	
Jacqueline J. Kennedy 	
Donald C. Carlgren	
Nanaimo District-
Crofton House	
Chemainus  	
St. Ann's Academy..
Prince Charles	
95.250
94.000
93.500
93.500
93.250
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
D 119
Name
School
Per Cent
University Programme—Continued
Susan R. Henricksen	
Ronald R. Tetreault _  	
Diana M. Belshaw	
Judith A. Farrell—	
Mark Home	
Jennifer E. Rodgers _
Daniel R. Worsley	
Eileen L. Cavers	
Julie Goodwin	
Roswitha A. Herke .__
Frances O. Swank	
Susan Bates	
Alan B. Hughes	
Edward C. Richmond..
Alice J. Siddall	
Margaret M. Simons	
Alison P. Bunning	
David A. Knox	
Janet M. Wood	
Jonathan C. O'Grady	
Stephen N. Sullivan	
Theo Q. Dombrowski	
Christa H. Weitemeyer..
Nina J. Hunter	
Susan Laubenstein	
Alan J. Ballard	
Penelope K. Pollard..
Barrie D. Turnham...
Grade XIII
Robert A. Jones	
Linda J. Allison	
Terryl R. Collins	
Margaret A. Balf	
John W. Knodel	
Heather E. Hudson _
Richard F. Randall...
Evelyn D. Gehrke	
Sandra M. Irvine	
Munroe F. C. Green-
Lilias K. Bull	
Susan J. Rowley	
Ann C. Tribe 	
Magee	
Templeton	
Crofton House.-
Handsworth	
Oak Bay _
South Peace River_
Esquimalt	
Alberni District	
Victoria	
John Oliver	
Como Lake	
Alberni District..
Esquimalt.
Vancouver Technical-
Alberni District	
David Thompson	
West Vancouver	
Chilliwack	
University Hill..
Vancouver College—
Esquimalt	
Alberni District	
St. Ann's Academy-
Queen Elizabeth	
Victoria	
Semiahmoo	
George Elliot	
Mount View	
West Vancouver-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Kamloops.
Southern Okanagan..
West Vancouver	
Penticton	
Magee 	
J. Lloyd Crowe	
West Vancouver	
Lester Pearson	
Magee	
Como Lake 	
93.250
93.250
92.250
92.250
92.000
92.000
92.000
91.750
91.500
91.500
91.500
91.250
91.250
91.250
91.250
91.250
91.000
91.000
91.000
90.750
90.750
90.500
90.500
90.250
90.250
90.000
90.000
90.000
90.700
89.200
89.100
88.800
88.000
87.900
87.500
87.400
87.200
85.900
85.700
85.400
85.000
Financial Assistance
I. In 1959, for the first time in British Columbia, the Government entered the
field of extensive scholarship awards to secondary-school graduates, Grade XIII
students, and to students of the University of British Columbia and Victoria College.
To qualify to receive an award in 1965, candidates must be domiciled in the Province, are required to apply, and must undertake a full-year winter-session undergraduate programme at the University of British Columbia or University of Victoria
or Simon Fraser University or in Grade XIII in public secondary schools of the
Province, or approved full-year winter-session undergraduate programmes at the
Notre Dame University at Nelson or at the British Columbia Institute of Technology or at the Vancouver City College. Selection of winners is made on the
basis of the final examinations of Grade XII or Grade XIII or of the Universities of
British Columbia or Victoria or Notre Dame or the British Columbia Institute of
Technology. There are two awards—first class, for all students who obtain an
average of 80 per cent or higher based on a full year's programme, and second class,
available for up to 2,750 top-ranking students with high second-class standing. The
second-class awards are divided among Grade XII (University Programme), Grade
XIII, Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Notre Dame undergraduate stu-
 D 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
dents, British Columbia Institute of Technology students, and among the various
faculties and groups roughly proportionate to enrolment. First-class awards
amount to one-half the tuition fee of the next year of undergraduate study, and
second-class awards similarly to one-third the tuition fee. An average of at least
70 per cent, subject to minimum adjustment for certain groups, is required for a
second-class award. Awards vary in amount, depending on the institution and
faculty attended.
The plan commenced with those writing examinations at the end of 1958/59,
with awards being made to those who would undertake training in 1959/60, and
has continued similarly annually with an increase in 1963 from 2,000 to 2,500 for
second-class awards, in 1965 from 2,500 to 2,750, and with broader provision made
this year for awards for study to be taken at Simon Fraser University and the
Vancouver City College.
Candidates writing University Programme or Grade XIII examinations apply
through the Division of Examinations and university students through then respective universities. All applications are then considered by the Scholarship Selection
Committee, representative of the public universities of British Columbia and the
Department of Education, chaired by the Registrar. Notification to all candidates
is made from the Registrar's office, with cheques issued through the Departmental
Comptroller.
Figures covering Government of British Columbia scholarships follow, based
on applications received:—
Original Applications
Final Awards
Examination Year
Number
Received
Eligible
First
Class
Second
Class
Total
First
Class
Second
Class
Amount
1958/59—	
1959/60 	
1960/61	
1961/62-.   	
1962/63	
1963 /64 	
1964/65
2,703
3,466
4,223
4,488
4,929
5,647
6,008
1,860   i
2,300
2,557
2,871
3,210
3,464
3,893
552
635
703
771
896
931
1,064
1,308
1,665
1,854
2,100
2,314
2,533
2,829
1,782
2,192
2,437
2,727
3,067
3,339
531
612
677
739
870
898
1,251
1,580
1,760
1,988
2,197
2,441
$229,175.16
276,513.32
304,117.00
336,472.00
383,479.00
474,513.00
UNIVERSITY PROGRAMME EXAMINATIONS
1958/59,   1959/60
1960/61
1961/62
1962/63
1963/64
1964/65
First class (80 to 100 per cent) 	
Second class (70 to 79.9 per cent)  	
268            298
337    1       492   ,
271    |       403
313
554
506
354
550
383
399
557
458
393
631
539
552
636
595
876    |    1,193
1
1,373
1,287
1,414
1,563
1,783
GRADE XIII EXAMINATIONS
First class (80 to 100 per cent)	
26
104
100
37
133
170
33
169
271
37
213
279
51
173
261
54
186
297
46
207
Ineligible     	
347
230
340
473
529
485
537
600
To assist local school authorities, complete tabulations showing schools concerned and final academic averages obtained by all Provincial Grade XII and Grade
XIII scholarship candidates were provided to the District Superintendents of Schools.
In 1965, using I.B.M. tabulations, lists were distributed showing all scholarship
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
D 121
candidates in the school district, arranged by schools. Successful candidates were
arranged in academic rank and non-successful candidates alphabetically.
II. The Provincial Government, with some assistance from the Federal Government, annually provides Government bursaries to assist students to undertake further
training. An average of 65 per cent is required, together with evidence of financial
need. Assessment is based on the last academic studies undertaken. Awards vary
from $50 to $300, depending on academic standing and need, with most awards in
the range $70 to $120. These awards may be made available to those undertaking
undergraduate university studies within the Province (Universities of British Columbia, Victoria, Simon Fraser, and Notre Dame), recognized nurse's training in the
Province, and for recognized university study outside British Columbia in undergraduate courses of training not available in this Province; for example, veterinary
science.
All bursary applications proceed through the Registrar's office, and Bursary
Selection Committees, representative of the universities and chaired by the Registrar,
determine awards. Notification to all candidates is made from this office, with
cheques issued through the Departmental Comptroller.
Figures covering Government bursaries follow, based on applications received
by the deadline. A relatively large number of applications cannot be considered
because of late submission.
Year
Original Applications
Final Awards
Number           t_i;„.-u._.
Received           Ellglble
Number
Amount
1959            	
1
821                   693
1,071        1           904
1,395                1,171
1,426                1,199
1,886        |        1,619
2,411                 1,966
3,057                2,501
653
865
1,125
1,168
1,574
1,924
$82,650
I960. -       .    _	
1961
113,465
133,145
1962      	
1963                          	
140,285
152,680
1964            	
190,725
1965
III. In 1959 a significant change was made in respect of loan assistance, with
a further significant change for 1964/65 with the introduction of the Canada Student
Loans Plan. In 1959, by amendment to the British Columbia University Act,
authority was given for establishment of the Student Aid Loan Fund of up to
$2,000,000. A joint committee composed of two representatives of the University
and two representatives of the Department of Education (at present the Registrar
and the Departmental Comptroller) authorizes loans. The Department of Education no longer provides loans. Loan assistance may be provided to undertake undergraduate training at the University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, the
Vancouver School of Art, or recognized university undergraduate training outside
the Province when such training is not available in British Columbia. Loan awards
from this plan have been as follows:—
For Year Number of Awards
1959/60  843
1960/61   842
1961 /62   875
1962/63   694
1963/64   844
1964/65  6
Amount
$397,570
435,130
475,186
389,378
457,239
2,650
Totals
4,104
$2,157,153
 D 122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
IV. The Canada Student Loans Plan was introduced for 1964/65 by the
Federal Government in co-operation with the Provincial Governments. Each
participating Province appoints a Provincial authority responsible for issuing a
certificate of eligibility to any student who is authorized to receive a loan. The
British Columbia Student Aid Loan committee acts for this Province, authorizing
such certificate for students with acceptable qualifications to undertake approved
post-secondary training at institutions designated by this Province as specified educational institutions for the purposes of the plan. Students must be undertaking a
minimum 26-week year of training to qualify. Amounts of loan authorized are
dependent upon need. The British Columbia committee considers applications of
bona fide British Columbia students, although training, both undergraduate or
graduate, may be undertaken within or outside the Province at specified institutions.
Loans are interest-free to students during training, but become interest-bearing after
completion or cessation of training. In any loan year a maximum of $1,000 may be
authorized to a maximum of $5,000 over total training. On receipt of a certificate
of eligibility a student may commence negotiation for a loan from any chartered
bank or approved lending institution of his choice, with loan to be made when the
student is duly registered and in attendance at the educational institution.
Annually the Federal Government determines the maximum dollar amount
which is available for loan awards for that loan year for each Province, generally
based on the number of persons aged 18 to 24 years, inclusive, in the Province as
compared with the same age-group for the country as a whole. In 1964/65, 5,074
awards were made, amounting to $3,110,751.
Strathcona Trust
For many years the Province has participated in the Strathcona Trust. An
annual grant has been received, in recent years approximating $1,600, with the
moneys to be utilized to encourage physical fitness in the schools and cadet-training
and rifle shooting. Cadet awards have been made to the four leading corps for proficiency, to the National Cadet Camp, to the annual Cadet Trades Training Camp
at Vernon, for cadet rifle-shooting competition, and to British Columbia cadets attending Bisley.
Physical Education Shield awards have been provided for each district superintendency, with four in Vancouver and two in Victoria, for presentation to the
schools showing the greatest proficiency or the most significant improvement. These
awards were discontinued at the end of 1959/60, with the shield to be retained by
the winning school and utilized for internal competition within the school.
To recognize and encourage physical education, Strathcona Trust bursaries
have been provided in recent years to teachers wishing to undertake further undergraduate course work in physical education. These bursaries recently have been
$125 in value. Five awards were made on 1958/59 standings, five on 1959/60,
six on 1960/61, five on 1961/62, five on 1962/63, five on 1963/64, and six on
1964/65.
The Local Committee, Strathcona Trust for British Columbia, administers the
moneys received, and consists of military representatives and representatives of the
Department of Education. The Registrar has continued as Secretary, Local Committee, for some years and is British Columbia representative on the Executive Council, Strathcona Trust Fund.
 OFFICE OF REGISTRAR AND DIVISION OF EXAMINATIONS
Certification of Professional Librarians
D 123
New regulations for the certification of professional librarians became effective
in November, 1954. The Registrar acts as Secretary, Board of Examiners for Certification of Professional Librarians, maintains records, and issues certificates authorized. Since new regulations were introduced, the numbers of certificates issued
were as follows: 1955,57; 1956,62; 1957,16; 1958,18; 1959,10; 1960,17;
1961, 10; 1962, 40;  1963, 7;  1964, 30.
 D 124 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1964/65
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. VERNA KINGSLEY, SECRETARY
TO THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1964/65 a total of 422 applications were considered
by the Commission. Of these, 77 were turned down, the chief reason being that
family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes. Three
hundred and forty-five applications were approved for grants, an increase of nine
over the previous year.
The students for whom assistance was granted were distributed by grades as
follows: Grade IX, 78; Grade X, 96; Grade XI, 92; Grade XII, 75; Occupational II and III, 4. During the year 11 students dropped out and grants were discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $84 for the year; the balance received $69.
In the school-year 1964/65 the Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children
Grant was made in two payments; previously the grant had been paid in three
instalments.
 STATISTICAL RETURNS
  STATISTICAL RETURNS
D 127
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Junior-Senior Secondary—
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0
 EXAMINATION PAPERS
Separate booklets of examination papers for University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation, including complete sets of papers for each year, may be
obtained from the Director, Textbook Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
B.C.
Prices for booklets that are STILL AVAILABLE are
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1952.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1960.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1961.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1962.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1963.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1964.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1965.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1952.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1953.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1960.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1961.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1962.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1963.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1964.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1965.
Note.—The above prices include the 5-per-cent social
as follows:—
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 74 cents.
Price, 37 cents.
Price, 37 cents.
Price, 37 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 53 cents.
Price, 32 cents.
Price, 32 cents.
Price, 32 cents.
services tax.
Printed by A. Sutton, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1966
4,600-1065-8705

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