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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-seventh Annual Report 1957/58 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1959

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 r
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-seventh Annual Report
1957/ 58
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-seventh Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1959.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1958
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, LL.B.
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D.
Assistant Superintendent (Administration):
G. W. Graham, B.A.
Assistant Superintendent (Instructional):
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.).
Chief Inspector of Schools:
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pasd.
District Superintendents, Superintendents, and Inspectors of Schools:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Creston.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Prince George.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Nelson.
J. E. Beech, B.A., Kamloops.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Richmond.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
D. H. Campbell, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. lohn.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
J. Chell, M.A., Mission.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Penticton.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Port Alberni.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
J. Gough, M.A., Victoria.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Trail.
I. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
R. C. Grant, B.A., Assistant, Burnaby.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
R. M. Hall, B.A., B.Ed., Victoria.
A. E. Henderson, B.A., B.Ed., Inspector, Vancouver.
H. S. Hurn, B.A., Duncan.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Vernon.
I. H. R. Ieffery, B.A., Powell River.
G. E. Iohnson, B.A., B.Ed., Kelowna.
A. D. W. Jones, B.A., Kitimat.
J. G. Kirk, B.A., M.A., Chilliwack.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., North Vancouver.
C. S. McKenzie, B.A., Castlegar.
D. B. McKenzie, B.A., M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., New Westminster.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Victoria.
W. A. Marchbank, A.B., B.Ed., Dawson Creek.
E. Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
L. A. Matheson, B.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Salmon Arm.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Quesnel.
F. I. Orme, B.A., B.Pa.d., Cranbrook.
J. Phillipson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince Rupert.
R. S. Price, B.A., B.Com., Hope.
D. L. Pritchard, M.A., Inspector, Vancouver.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed., Campbell River.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Courtenay.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Oliver.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., B.Pasd., Superintendent, Vancouver.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., New Westminster.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., West Vancouver.
J. A. Thomas, B.A., Smithers.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A., Victoria.
R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Ocean Falls.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Assistant, Victoria.
F. M. Wallace, B.A., M.A, Inspector, Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Pasd., Cloverdale.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Special Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D. Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment: L. J. Wallace, B.A., M.Ed.
Comptroller of Expenditure: S. E. Espley.
Supervisor of School Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: I. S. White.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: T. Quayle and C. J. Strong, M.A.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Ed.
5 W 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A.
Inspectors of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S., and Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec).
Director of Community Programmes: J. H. Panton, B.A., M.Sc.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D. Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., B.Ed. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Report of the Superintendent of Education
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools	
Report of the Director of Curriculum	
Page
  11
  35
  3 8
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  40
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  49
Report of the Director of Night-schools  54
Report of the Director of Home Economics  56
Report of the Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (Deaf and Blind School)  58
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  60
Elementary Correspondence School  63
Report of the Director of the Text-book Branch  65
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  68
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  71
Report of the Director of Visual Education  73
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "____ 74
Statistical Returns  75
Information re Examination Papers Inside back cover W 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools  12
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  13
Number of School Districts  14
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District— 14
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  15
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  16
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  16
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  17
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District  17
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District— 18
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  20
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  21
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School  22
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  23
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  24
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1957  25
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1957  25
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1957 by School District  26
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1957 by School District  29
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  77
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  114 The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, LL.B., Minister of Education.  Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1957/58
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1959.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-seventh Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1958.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 260,069
to 277,070, and the average daily attendance increased from 235,396 to 252,490. The
percentage of the regular attendance was 91.13.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Rural
Total
22,171
42,675
23,897
2,636
9,694
7,605
160,360
1,025
132
3,075
147
3,653
22,171
43,700
23,897
Superior schools  —-    .-	
2,768
12,769
7,752
164,013
Totals         	
269,038          1          8,032                    277,070
1                            1
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 6,072 officially registered in
high, superior, or elementary schools)       2,167
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular
students         1,344
Under section 20 of the " Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction  22
3,533
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  2,698
Night-schools  36,611
Vancouver School of Art  236
Vancouver Vocational Institute  2,164
High School Correspondence (adults only)   6,290
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  252
Carried forward  51,784
11 W 12 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Brought forward     51,784
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education classes  194,000*
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training 	
Victoria College, regular credit courses—-
Arts, Science, Commerce  407
College of Education  265
Evening   171
98
8432
University of British Columbia        5,6063
252,331
1 This figure is a total course enrolment, rather than a total of the adults in this category.
2 This figure does not include an enrolment of 815 in the special evening classes.
3 This figure does not include the following enrolments:    1957 summer session,  3,507;    1957/58 extra sessional
classes, 1,649;   correspondence courses, 757.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1957/58:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
1,816
16,516
15,376
14,904
14,566
14,340
12,692
11,850
11,113
10,237
8,194
6,176
4,682
569
1,706
14,690
14,017
13,833
13,572
13,776
12,186
10,521
10,368
10,191
8,358
6,224
4,330
267
3,522
31,206
Grade II               _                                -	
29,393
Grade III                                           .                  	
28,737
Grade IV                            - -
28,138
Grade V               __          .                     ■          -   	
28,116
Grade VI            - _	
24,878
Grade VII                                             - -     -
22,371
Grade VIII                                               —	
21,481
Grade IX                              __	
20,428
nrarli. ~X
16,552
12,400
9,012
Grade XI                                               —   -	
Grade XII
Grade XIII                                                                             	
836
Totals
143,031
134,039
277,070
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
Total
Senior high schools...	
Junior-senior high schools	
707
1,418
747
106
444
231
4,903
273
526
276
2
57
36
279
166
980
1,944
1,023
108
501
267
5,182
166
22,171
43,700
23,897
2,768
12,769
7,752
164,013
8.00
15.77
8.62
1.00
4.61
2.80
59.20
31.36
30.81
31.99
26.11
Elementary-senior high schools	
Elementary-junior high schools....
28.76
33.56
33.45
Totals	
8,556
1,615
10,171
277,070
100.00
32.38 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
W 13
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
786
1,328
625
14
142
64
426
35
194
616
398
94
359
203
4,756
131
980
1,944
1,023
108
Elementary-senior high schools..  	
501
267
5,182
166
Totals.                                                      	
3 490          1          f. 751
10,171
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE
FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since 1877/78
and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877/78....
1882/83.-.
1887/88....
1892/93 —
1897/98-...
1902/03.....
1907/08	
1912/13	
1913/14.....
1917/18...
1922/23.....
1927/28—
1928/29—
1929/30.-..
1930/31	
1931/32	
1932/33	
1933/34...
1934/35	
1935/36...
1936/37	
1937/38	
1938/39 ...
1939/40...
1940/41.....
1941/42	
1942/43—
1943/44—
1944/45—
1945/46—
1946/47—
1947/48 —
1948/49	
1949/50—
1950/51	
1951/52	
1952/53—
1953/54	
1954/55—
1955/56 —
1956/57—
1957/58	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
,597
,859
246
,118
,668
,784
,854
948
959
.912
,873
,942
,956
025
,092
194
,220
,248
,224
,055
,162
354
512
833
116
,496
,873
272
598
105
574
185
,690
,474
,171
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
102
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
277,070
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
252,490
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
91.13
$48
60
113
174.
290,
473
544
1,663
1,885
1,653
3,176
3,532
3,765
3,743.
3,834.
4,015,
2,849
2,611,
2,835
2,972,
3,277,
3,524,
3,630,
3,585,
3,963,
4,028
3,924.
4,244.
5,022.
5,765,
9,398.
12,468.
17,363,
22,809,
25,830,
26,885,
26,555,
24,060,
34,279,
41,067,
43,989,
50,861.
,411.14*
,758.751
,679.361
,775.43
,255.26
,802.29
,671.60
003.34
654.11
796.60
,686.28s
,518.95s
,920.69s
317.08s
727.19s
074.37s
972.02s
937.80s
040.74s
385.04s
660.23s
962.69s
670.78s
769.00s
848.24s
397.88s
243.53s
,898.82s
,534.59s
,205.50s
,473.46s
,653.18s
,430.94s
,631.23s
,076.88s
,980.43s
,080.24s
,233.15s
,302.27s
,740.344
,524.325
.473.63'
$215
425
604
1,220
4,658
4,634
3,519
7,630
9,261
11,149
10,008
10,061,
9,719,
8,941
8,213
8,458
8,775
9,593
10,193
10,640
10,521
10,982,
11,120
11,502,
12,231
13,683
14,818
20,176
25,768
35,538
47,726
54,195
57,881
58,401
70,791
80,823
69,314,
77,653
90,483
,056.22s
,555.10
,357.86
,509.85
,894.97
,877.56
,014.61
,009.54s
,094.98s
,996.27s
,255.66s
,387.99s
,333.81s
,497.34s
,369.04s
,156.00s
,353.78s
,562.64s
,367.08s
,740.47s
,684.92s
,364.49s
,801.94s
,291.35s
,029.35s
,538.18s
,625.81s
,930.53s
,392.09s
,079.88s
,750.37s
,133.95s
,559.48s
,121.15s
,844.25 s
,263.71s
,181.24*
,192.326
,765.630
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
4 This amount on calendar year 1955, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
5 This amount on calendar year 1956, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
6 This amount on calendar year 1957, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds. W 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1957/58:—
Municipal school districts     73
Rural school districts     29
Total number of districts
102
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 22,171; of this
number, 11,191 were boys and 10,980 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1957/58 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
4
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
12
15
25
20
19
30
18
68
26
102
38
71
22
60
38
15
11
78
23
15
18
22
39
28
27
40
27
97
34
144
49
91
29
74
49
23
16
114
35
24
369
483
11, Trail
764
600
600
33. Chilliwack   ~                 .....               -	
839
34. Abbotsford            	
612
2,376
873
3,415
1,116
2,221
707
1,726
1,142
459
59. Peace River South „	
326
2,410
697
436
Totals	
32
706
980
22,171 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
W 15
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 43,700; of
this number, 22,344 were boys and 21,356 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1957/58 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
9
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
24
6
23
10
13
23
6
18
14
21
42
9
14
21
11
23
54
14
14
8
46
27
479
49
19
31
11
25
13
8
6
14
19
22
32
38
18
24
35
9
21
30
16
7
24
9
12
30
7
31
13
13
29
6
25
19
28
54
12
18
28
16
11
33
73
19
21
10
66
36
675
70
24
46
15
34
18
11
6
19
30
30
42
49
24
32
47
11
29
42
22
13
33
12
251
716
165
688
258
8   Slocan
273
624
132
11. Trail	
534
12. Grand Forks         	
425
14. Southern Okanagan 	
596
1,297
16. Keremeos     ~     -
251
397
643
317
190
689
1,670
378
455
V   Merritt
207
1,496
37. Delta                                  _._        . .. .
713
39. Vancouver       —
16,196
1,572
46. Sechelt                     ~ .     	
525
920
265
751
403
223
150
453
641
654
908
1,129
503
666
70. Alberni	
1,047
233
628
992
462
78. Enderby. .          	
245
SO    Kitimat
530
239
Totals  	
71
1,418
1,944
43,700 W  16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/5.
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 23,897; of this
number, 12,386 were boys and 11,511 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1957/58 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
5
2
1
1
14
26
21
30
26
38
26
19
41
34
43
108
19
50
27
25
16
118
39
19
8
19
28
31
40
34
49
35
20
59
49
60
149
24
69
33
33
24
179
54
23
11
436
7. Nelson            _ _	
604
11. Trail
618
22. Vernon   _ _	
896
785
33. Chilliwack               . _ _                  	
1,170
883
36. Surrey	
715
1,379
1,140
1,543
3,305
603
1,655
749
788
544
4,087
68. Nanaimo      — 	
70. Alberni                       -   .
1,186
532
279
Totals	
33
747
1,023
23,897
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,768; of this
number, 1,446 were boys and 1,322 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1957/58 in each
district are shown in the following table:-—■
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5. Creston  	
6. Kootenay Lake	
13. Kettle Valley	
22. Vernon 	
26. Birch Island 	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel _ 	
29. Lillooet.. - 	
48. Howe Sound 	
51. Portland Canal	
53. Terrace 	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof-	
57. Prince George..	
58. McBride  	
72. Campbell River	
.  Unattached districts-
Totals	
5
2
10
3
3
14
8
4
4
3
2
7
8
5
9
4
12
3
6
2
10
3
3
14
9
4
4
3
2
7
8
5
9
4
12
3
106
108
137
37
276
34
63
432
231
91
73
52
33
210
191
116
275
105
343
69
2,768 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
W  17
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 12,769;
of this number, 6,550 were boys and 6,219 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1957/58 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
2
2
2
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
2
2    ■
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
2t
15
6
10
20
19
12
9
7
8
24
30
18
19
7
6
28
11
8
7
14
11
12
17
14
16
12
14
8
8
19
29
9
15
6
10
26
20
13
10
7
8
28
33
22
22
7
6
32
11
9
7
16
14
15
20
17
20
12
18
9
8
22
785
4. Windermere	
241
353
135
13. Kettle Valley	
284
689
18,   rinlrlen
537
329
224
170
96.  Birr.h Island
219
79    T illnnef
710
30. South Cariboo                                     	
874
507
609
47. Powell River                       	
165
115
49. Ocean Falls _    .
787
50. Queen Charlotte   	
285
250
201
509
58   MrBriHe
340
356
405
430
73. Alert Bay	
427
74. Quatsino ..	
309
485
79    TTrlnelPt-TnUnn
225
81. Fort Nelson                       	
217
597
47
442
501
12 769
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 7,752;
of this number, 4,050 were boys and 3,702 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1957/58 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
11. Trail ._.
14. Southern Okanagan.
28. Quesnel 	
33. Chilliwack	
36. Surrey __
39. Vancouver.	
41. Burnaby..
43. Coquitlam  	
45. West Vancouver	
50. Queen Charlotte	
69. Qualicum 	
71. Courtenay	
— Unattached districts-
Totals	
16
34
16
10
9
17
39
42
20
11
3
12
14
4
231
38
18
12
10
19
47
51
24
12
3
14
15
4
267
1,117
522
304
302
660
1,427
1,414
673
354
80
338
494
67
7,752 W  18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 164,013; of this
number, 85,064 were boys and 78,949 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1957/58 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
6
5
7
7
6
2
12
11
12
3
10
1
4
2
7
3
3
1
7
14
1
9
22
31
7
5
25
16
3
5
4
8
16
23
17
38
10
17
52
6
26
13
13
15
8
12
12
11
6
1
1
6
11
5
11
5
44
9
30
22
31
9
12
4
18
8
15
35
42
13
29
2
55
24
34
10
73
15
6
20
50
12
3
1
24
41
12
56
91
104
9
7
48
43
5
7
15
26
89
79
66
242
44
125
1,064
84
296
58
90
186
72
32
54
26
11
1
1
42
35
16
22
8
106
12
85
42
324
38
48
5
60
28
15
37
43
13
32
2
59
25
34
10
78
15
6
21
53
12
3
1
24
42
13
60
93
107
9
7
49
44
5
7
17
27
91
80
75
247
44
127
1,213
90
307
58
91
196
80
32
54
26
11
1
1
44
36
17
22
8
107
12
87
43
335
41
48
5
61
30
475
1,214
1,295
383
982
37
1,852
529
972
324
11. Trail	
2,326
12. Grand Forks    .                                     	
558
13. Kettle Valley                     —      .   —   „  .
127
640
1,865
386
44
16
714
1,237
459
2,027
2,987
24. Kamloops            — —
2,947
158
101
1,189
1,321
81
122
485
762
3,232
2,645
2,284
8,763
1,409
4,388
35,918
3,261
10,752
2,144
3,215
7,005
2,574
887
1,711
500
259
16
8
1,543
53. Terrace     .      	
1,006
511
616
205
3,180
58   McBride                  ....	
206
2,531
1,174
12,512
1,284
1,505
103
65. Cowichan  — 	
1,865
859 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
W  19
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum 	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay 	
72. Campbell River.. ~
73. Alert Bay _
74. Quatsino 	
75. Mission  	
76. Agassiz 	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby 	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
80. Kitimat 	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
  Unattached districts-
Totals 	
6
20
7
11
12
13
6
7
16
3
2
7
2
4
2
4
16
919
29
97
12
80
43
38
42
5
16
14
3
39
4
4
41
31
102
12
83
43
39
42
5
17
14
3
42
4
4
42
1,054
3,137
333
2,742
1,395
1,173
117
119
1,505
133
589
407
52
1,246
127
57
1,141
4,901
5,182
164,013 W 20 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
Number of
District Number and Name Teachers
1. Fernie   1
3. Kimberley   2
7. Nelson  1
11. Trail   1
19. Revelstoke   2
20. Salmon Arm   1
23. Kelowna  1
24. Kamloops  3
28. Quesnel  2
30. South Cariboo  1
33. Chilliwack  1
34. Abbotsford  2
35. Langley   3
36. Surrey   9
37. Delta   3
38. Richmond   6
39. Vancouver   30
40. New Westminster  2
41. Burnaby   18
42. Maple Ridge  2
' 43. Coquitlam   6
44. North Vancouver  11
45. West Vancouver   1
47. Powell River   4
48. Howe Sound  1
55. Burns Lake  2
57. Prince George  3
58. McBride  1
59. Peace River South  3
60. Peace River North  1
61. Greater Victoria  26
63. Saanich   4
68. Nanaimo     2
70. Alberni  3
71. Courtenay   2
72. Campbell River  2
75. Mission  2
80. Kitimat   1
Total   166 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
W 21
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
10
6
10
10
8
5
16
14
13
6
16
2
8
4
8
4
4
4
9
18
2
13
27
35
8
7
29
21
6
9
5
10
21
27
20
46
13
21
70
9
34
16
17
20
12
14
16
15
8
4
2
7
14
8
15
7
49
12
33
24
42
11
16
5
20
9
8
24
9
49
59
68
28
57
19
106
37
57
22
171
29
26
57
92
21
23
20
38
74
23
117
159
167
16
18
76
75
33
37
23
44
166
123
112
346
71
192
1,737
165
517
99
159
296
148
51
92
47
39
15
4
67
58
38
36
27
155
27
112
56
539
60
80
17
98
46
53
159
41
57
67
82
29
69
19
123
38
63
22
212
34
26
67
107
24
29
21
44
84
29
142
188
193
16
18
82
88
37
41
27
49
191
144
144
392
83
226
2,180
201
616
113
191
350
175
56
111
52
43
15
4
78
65
42
38
29
175
31
130
63
684
71
94
20
110
54
63
193
46
1,511
1,930
2,100
789
1,807
427
3,197
8. Slocan. 	
9. Castlegar   	
802
1,596
591
11. Trail 	
5,359
983
13. Kettle Valley 	
687
1,758
3,162
637
15. Penticton    _	
733
18. Golden	
553
1,111
2,209
776
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna  	
3,747
5,061
4,841
328
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island	
383
1,999
28. Quesnel.	
2,311
882
29. Lillooet    -
30. South Cariboo 	
996
31. Merritt	
692
1 ">69
33. Chilliwack	
5 543
34. Abbotsford—	
35. Langley	
4,140
3,780
12,514
2,122
6,640
58,705
36. Surrey	
37. Delta      	
38. Richmond
39. Vancouver   	
41. Burnaby...	
17,692
3,454
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam 	
44. North Vancouver	
10,386
4,819
1,412
2,796
45. West Vancouver-	
46. Sechelt     _	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound 	
49. Ocean Falls	
1,046
381
50. Queen Charlotte.	
51. Portland Canal	
60
2,294
1,692
1,145
957
830
4,702
651
3,401
1,627
19,650
1,938
2,413
459
2,994
1,362
1,720
5,020
1,076
52. Prince Rupert  _ 	
53. Terrace 	
54. Smithers —     .
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof 	
57. Prince George.	
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich	
64. Saltspring.	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	 W 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1957/58
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
70. Alberni	
14
18
18
9
9
18
4
3
8
3
6
3
4
21
134
103
71
24
20
72
19
32
21
11
63
12
4
76
156
123
82
28
20
86
23
39
27
12
76
12
4
83
4,321
3,267
2,144
544
73. Alert Bay                       ...   ...   .     	
74. Quatsino _	
428
2,497
618
1,051
78. Enderby                	
652
79. Ucluelet-Tofino.. 	
277
80    Uitimat
1,776
81. Fort Nelson	
344
82. Chilcotin    ~                             	
57
2,113
Totals	
1,183
8,551
lO.ni1
277,070
1 Includes 166 district supervisors, relieving and visiting teachers.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in
each type of school for the school-year 1957/58:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Daily
Attendance
Total
Male
Female
32
71
33
27
47
16
919
980
1,944
1,023
108
501
267
5,182
166
22,171
43,700
23,897
2,768
12,769
7,752
164,013
11,191
22,344
12,386
1,446
6,550
4,050
85,064
10,980
21,356
11,511
1,322
6,219
3,702
78,949
20,584.50
39,379.20
21,743.88
2,450.89
11,520.78
7,009.83
149,801.25
Totals
1,145
10,171
277,070
143,031
134,039
252,490.33 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
W 23
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals,
and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100 are excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Teachers
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
707
1,418
747
106
444
231
4,903
$1,980
1,100
1,248
1,112
1,350
1,800
1,100
$8,221
7,960
7,554
7,520
8,336
7,802
8,580
$5,643
5,199
4,761
3,937
4,207
4,049
3,889
Supervising Principals
Special Instructors
32
62
30
2
21
11
127
$7,547
5,664
5,295
6,566
4,392
7,122
5,085
$10,330
11,010
9,570
7,682
9,650
9,790
9,150
$8,765
8,488
8,756
Superior schools   	
7,120
7,064
8,084
7,869
241
464
246
36
25
152
166
$1,965
1,113
1,100
1,715
1,278
1,100
1,350
$9,145
8,875
8,639
7,755
8,750
11,352
19,000
$5,756
5,629
5,188
Elementary-senior high schools.  	
5,013
5,114
3,813
Unclassified   ..
5,751 W 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers,
teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and
teachers earning less than $1,900 per annum:—
Number of Number of
Salary Range                               Teachers Salary Range                               Teachers
$1,900-$ 1,999  24      $4,700-$4,799  264
2,000- 2,099  19      4,800- 4,899  271
2,100- 2,199  18      4,900- 4,999  408
2,200- 2,299  31      5,000- 5,099  183
2,300- 2,399  _____ 49      5,100- 5,199  229
2,400- 2,499  79      5,200- 5,299  220
2,500- 2,599  113      5,300- 5,399  151
2,600- 2,699  157      5,400- 5,499  139
2,700- 2,799  182      5,500- 5,599  145
2,800- 2,899  199      5,600- 5,699  132
2,900- 2,999  255      5,700- 5,799  91
3,000- 3,099  227      5,800- 5,899  147
3,100- 3,199  291      5,900- 5,999  163
3,200- 3,299  256      6,000- 6,099  103
3,300- 3,399  270      6,100- 6,199  101
3,400- 3,499  246      6,200- 6,299  134
3,500- 3,599  291      6,300- 6,399  81
3,600- 3,699  206      6,400- 6,499  157
3,700- 3,799  250      6,500- 6,599  171
3,800- 3,899  265      6,600- 6,699  89
3,900- 3,999  289      6,700- 6,799  84
4,000- 4,099  250      6,800- 6,899  166
4,100- 4,199  232      6,900- 6,999  40
4,200- 4,299  244      7,000- 7,099  162
4,300- 4,399  332      7,100- 7,199  77
4,400- 4,499  271      7,200- 7,299  43
4,500- 4,599  274      7,300- 7,399  58
4,600- 4,699  218      7,400 and over  398 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT W 25
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1957
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by schools districts  $80,966,873.00
Add Department of Education expenditures for—
Administration, grants to University of British Columbia, services, etc  $6,429,736.91
Teachers' Pension Fund 6%     2,542,861.31
Free text-books, maps, etc        544,294.41
 •      9,516,892.63
Total expenditure  $90,483,765.63
COST PER PUPIL, VARIOUS BASES, CALENDAR YEAR 1957
Grand total cost of education  $90,483,765.63
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue  $3,795,419.00
Debt charges on school district debt     9,374,879.00
Grant to University of British Columbia     4,120,458.93
Grant to Victoria College        278,000.00
High Correspondence School        154,634.97
Elementary Correspondence School  72,304.74
Night-schools  -  48,915.24
Adult Education        407,808.18
—     18,252,420.06
Net total operating costs  $72,231,345.57
Net operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
252,490   286.08
Net operating cost per pupil per school-day on average daily attendance
of 252,490  1.47
Net operating cost per pupil to Provincial Government for year on average daily attendance of 252,490  157.36 W 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1957/58
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EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS,  1958
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225,
generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C..
2nd in B.C.
Area 1	
Area 2—	
Area 3	
Area 4	
Area 5	
Area 6	
Area 7	
Area 8	
Area 9	
Area 10.	
Area 11	
Area 12	
Area 13	
George Stephen Pond.—	
Catherine Vool 	
Terence Michael Gordon..	
Michael Stephen Mepham	
Joan Anita Meger 	
Otto Wallace Gugenheimer	
Edelgard Elsbeth Petzelt.	
Gerald Edward Tripard.	
Terence John Wales 	
John Keith Fawcett	
Patrxia Jane Susan Tanchyk...
Allen Ross Kirkpatrick 	
David Bruce Forsyth 	
Geoffrey Wyndham Arundell..
Robert Christopher R. Malkin
John Oliver High School 	
Lake Cowichan Junior-Senior High School..
Salmo Junior-Senior High School-
Southern Okanagan Junior-Senior High School..
Vernon Senior High School  	
Mennonite Educational Institute _ 	
Langley Junior-Senior High School	
John Oliver High School	
Kitsilano Secondary School-
Lord Byng Junior-Senior High School..
Burnaby North High School  _.
North Vancouver High School..
Nechako Valley Elementary-Senior High School-
Victoria High School.   	
Shawnigan Lake School... 	
1.75
1.38
,88
75
38
88
25
00
00
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance Examinations was won by George Stephen Pond. The Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for the second highest standing in the University Entrance Examinations
was won by Catherine Vool.
Grade XIII
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University of
British Columbia for general proficiency, were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Allan Anthony Offenberger.
Allen Arthur Robinson	
Peter Bergen  	
SiegbertWolf _	
Hazel Evelyn Annie Dawe._
Thomas Grant John.	
Penticton Senior High School	
Stanley Humphries High School
Abbotsford Senior High School..
Vernon Senior High School	
Kamloops High School.—.	
J. Lloyd Crowe High School	
87.9
87.8
85.9
85.7
85.3
85.2
GENERAL REVIEW
Royal Commission on Education
In January, 1958, the Government appointed a Royal Commission to inquire into,
assess, and report upon the Provincial educational system up to university level. In the
terms of reference, the Commission was given wide powers to look into all aspects of
education. It is hoped that the Commission will provide the Department with an impartial evaluation of the existing school system and make recommendations, where necessary,
for improvement in the years that lie ahead.
Revision of the " Public Schools Act " and of the Rules of the Council
of Public Instruction
For the past year and a half the " Public Schools Act " and the Rules of the Council
of Public Instruction have been closely studied and revised to bring them up to date and
in line with current practice. Although numerous amendments have been made over
the years to the " Public Schools Act," no complete and far-reaching revision had taken REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT W 33
place since the first " Public Schools Act " of 1872. In February, 1958, Bill No. 66 was
passed by the Provincial Legislature and immediately became effective. The Rules of the
Council of Public Instruction were also amended and completely revised by Order in
Council. These were approved and became effective as from August 1st. Mr. Bergie
Thorsteinsson, District Superintendent of Schools at Powell River, was brought into the
Department in August, 1956, to undertake the momentous task of reorganizing and
rewriting the " Public Schools Act." Much credit is due Mr. Thorsteinsson and the
various members of the Department who co-operated with him in this task. I would take
this opportunity also to thank the Departments of the Attorney-General, Public Health,
and Finance for their generous assistance when called upon for advice.
Retirements
Dr. Harold Lane Campbell, formerly Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, retired in the early summer of 1958. He began his teaching career in 1910, and
after three years overseas in the First World War was principal at Prince Rupert and
subsequently at Esquimalt Elementary Schools. In 1928 he joined the Department of
Education as a Provincial Inspector of Schools. After a short time in the field, he was
appointed to the Victoria Normal School staff, where he was also, for a time, director
of the Summer School of Education. In 1941 he became Municipal Inspector of Schools
for Victoria. Four years later he was appointed Chief Inspector of Schools and Director
of Curriculum for the Province. In 1946 he was promoted to the position of Assistant
Superintendent of Education, which position he held until 1953, when he became Deputy
Minister and Superintendent of Education. In 1954 the University of British Columbia
conferred upon him the degree of LL.D., Honoris Causa.
Few men in Canadian education have had a greater influence on educational thought
and practice than Dr. Campbell, for he was known throughout the country for his work
in curriculum as well as in the methodology and philosophy of education. A signal
honour was conferred upon him when, in 1949, he was selected to give the Quance Lectures at Saskatoon. During his last year of office he has been the president of the Canadian Education Association. One can truly say of Harold Lane Campbell that he has
left an indelible mark on the school system of British Columbia.
Albert Seymour Towell retired in June after a long and successful period as teacher,
principal, and District Superintendent of Schools. In his earlier years he taught in small
ungraded schools, finally terminating his teaching career as principal of the Nanaimo
Junior-Senior High School. In 1936 he was appointed Inspector of Schools and served
in the Peace River, Abbotsford, and Vernon inspectorates until his retirement. Over the
years, Mr. Towell made a lasting contribution to education in this Province.
Obituary
Eric Dunn, formerly District Superintendent of Schools at Cranbrook, suddenly
passed away at his home in that city on April 6th, 1958. Mr. Dunn was widely known
and respected in the educational circles in the Province. For many years he was principal
of the Alberni Junior-Senior High School. In 1955 he was appointed a Provincial
Inspector of Schools with headquarters at Cranbrook. Mr. Dunn, besides being a keen
participant in community affairs, was an efficient and popular member of the Department
of Education.
Reorganization of the Department of Education
Although a statement regarding the reorganization of the Department would normally appear in the Report of 1958/59, some reference will be made to it here. In order
to provide for the continuing expansion of the Department and with a view to giving the
best possible service to the public of the Province, some reorganization has occurred W 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
and a reallocation of duties and responsibilities will be made gradually for greater
efficiency. Changes in title and personnel have been made as follows: Mr. G. W.
Graham, Director of Administration, has become Assistant Superintendent in Charge
of Administration; Mr. F. P. Levirs, formerly Chief Inspector of Schools, has become
Assistant Superintendent in Charge of Instruction; Mr. L. J. Wallace, Director of Community Programmes, has become Co-ordinator of Teacher Recruitment; Mr. E. E.
Hyndman, District Superintendent of Schools at Penticton, has been appointed Chief
Inspector of Schools. Mr. J. R. Meredith, Assistant Director of Curriculum, has been
promoted to Director of Curriculum. Mr. J. H. Panton, formerly Regional Consultant,
Community Programmes Branch at Kelowna, has become Director of Community
Programmes.
New Appointments to the Staff of District Superintendents
The following school principals have been appointed as District Superintendents
of Schools: Mr. C. D. Campbell, Rutland Junior-Senior High School; Mr. J. Phillipson,
Campbell River Junior-Senior High School; and Mr. J. R. Hall, Chilliwack Junior High
School.
Acknowledgments
The Department of Education acknowledges the special services during the year
of Mr. C. B. Wood and Mr. W. Gray. The former was Registrar of the University of
British Columbia for many years, while Mr. Gray was formerly Municipal Inspector for
North Vancouver. Both of these gentlemen, subsequent to retirement, have assisted
the Department in the recruitment of teachers abroad and in numerous other ways.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. F. K. ENGLISH,
Superintendent of Education. INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES W 35
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
For the third time in eighteen months, a member of the inspectional staff of the
Department died in harness. On April 6th, 1958, Mr. E. J. Dunn, District Superintendent of Schools for School Districts No. 1 (Fernie) and No. 2 (Cranbrook), died
suddenly at his home. His many years of service as principal of the Alberni District
High School and as Inspector of Schools in the East Kootenay had contributed greatly
to the educational growth of this Province.
In March of 1958, Mr. A. S. Towell, District Superintendent at Vernon, retired
from the Civil Service, but his experience and knowledge were retained for more months
of public service by his appointment as secretary to the Royal Commission on Education.
The vacancies at Cranbrook and Vernon were temporarily filled by recalling two
former Inspectors of Schools, Mr. William Gray and Dr. D. C. Smith.
In August of 1958 a new inspectorate was created, comprising School Districts
No. 49 (Ocean Falls), No. 73 (Alert Bay), and No. 74 (Quatsino). The inspectorate
of North and West Vancouver was divided into its two former components, with an
Inspector stationed in each district. Other rearrangements of areas were necessitated
by these changes.
Additions to the staff brought the total of Inspectors of Schools to forty-seven, three
over the number for the previous year. With the necessary replacements, this called for
five new appointments, as follows: Mr. C. S. McKenzie, former principal of Abbotsford
Senior High School; Mr. W. A. Marchbank, former principal of Prince Charles Junior-
Senior High School at Creston; Mr. R. S. Price, former principal of Royal Oak Junior-
Senior High School; Mr. J. A. Thomas, former principal of Mission Junior-Senior High
School; and Mr. R. F. Thorstenson, former principal of Qualicum Beach Junior-Senior
High School.
One of the changes brought about by the new " Public Schools Act " was the change
of title from " Inspector of Schools " to " District Superintendent of Schools," to conform
with the duties discharged by those officials since 1946. The passing of a time-honoured
designation must be viewed with some regret, but it had long since represented only one
segment of the responsibilities involved in the office.
District Superintendents were responsible for the supervision of 8,063 teachers in
public and Indian day schools outside of the City of Vancouver, the average number for
each District Superintendent being 172, as contrasted with 166 in the previous year.
Superintendents reported making a total of 12,810 classroom visits and issuing 3,722
formal reports. In addition, Inspectors of Industrial Arts and of Home Economics
issued a total of 231 formal reports, while the Chief Inspector issued twenty-seven reports
on teachers at the Jericho Hill School. District Superintendents also reported attendance
at a total of 1,790 School Board meetings, 780 staff meetings, and 225 attendance area
meetings.
A maximum number of 175 classes was reported as on shift during the year. This
number was steadily reduced as more classrooms became available, and by June was
down to eighty-one classes. Seven classes were reported at varying times throughout the
year as temporarily closed for lack of teachers. In all cases the closings were for short
periods, all schools being fully staffed during the greater part of the year. The maximum
number of closed classrooms at any one time was three.
The shortage of fully qualified teachers continues, especially at the secondary level.
This creates some hardship on schools in the Interior of the Province, for there is a natural
tendency for the metropolitan centres to attract many of those best trained. The shortage is not, therefore, felt to the same extent by all schools. W 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
A survey made in September, 1957, showed that 3.1 per cent of all elementary
teachers had less than regular qualifications, while 22.3 per cent of all secondary teachers
had less than the regular qualifications. Of this latter group, only 2.8 per cent of
the total number had no teacher-training, the majority being teachers with elementary
certification.
On the brighter side, the number of teachers with qualifications in advance of those
required grows steadily. The survey showed that 19.0 per cent of all elementary and
21.3 per cent of all secondary positions were held by teachers with higher certification
than was required. A later supplementary survey showed that these figures had climbed
to 22.9 and 29.6 per cent respectively as teachers who had completed work during the
summer applied for and received higher certification than that held in September.
District supervisory staffs, employed by local Boards and working under the direction of District Superintendents, included thirty-eight supervisors and directors of instruction and forty-two teacher consultants. Nineteen other persons were employed as
special counsellors or in similar capacities. There were 248 full-time supervising principals and sixty-six district-employed relieving teachers to assist principals of smaller
schools.
The field of special education continues to expand. As at September 30th, 1957,
the following special classes were to be found within the public school system: —
Number of Number of
Type of Class Teachers Pupils
Slow learners   103 1,613
Remedial training   18 287
Home instruction   4 (x)
New Canadians  26 476
Rehabilitation centres   4 44
Hospital   11 176
Sight-saving  3 23
Preventorium   2 18
Detention home  1 27
Totals    172 2,664
Totals for 1956/57   126 2,008
1 Varying.
In addition, there were 321 children enrolled in thirty-three schools operated by
chapters of the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia. Of these, 309
were of school age and eligible for the grant payable on their behalf.
The Accrediting Committee considered ninety-three secondary schools for accrediting. Of these, forty-six were accredited, seven for the first time. As forty-seven schools
were on continued accrediting, the full total of accredited schools totalled ninety-three.
The maximum period for which a school may be accredited without reapplying is three
years.
The choice of advanced electives by senior students in high school shows some
interesting facts. The most frequently chosen advanced electives are Chemistry, Mathematics, Biology, English, Physics, Geography, and History. Since 1953, however,
although the general increase in Grade XII enrolment has been approximately 47 per
cent only, there has been a much greater percentage increase in all of the above subjects
except History, especially in the sciences. Study of the foreign languages at the fourth-
year level has shown a decline, a situation which does not seem desirable in a world where
intercommunication is increasing steadily.
The usual activities of this office were maintained during the year. These included
such matters as the following:— INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
W 37
(1) Analyses of the results of both University Entrance and test-survey results
were distributed to District Superintendents for their use.
(2) Reports on a variety of topics were prepared throughout the year for use
within the Department.
(3) The Chief Inspector's circular was issued monthly to all District Superintendents and to all schools.
(4) Visits were made to a number of district superintendencies through the
year.
(5) A test in spelling at the Grade VII level was prepared and distributed.
The results were analysed for the use of those schools participating in the
survey.
(6) Results of Departmental survey tests and of Departmental examinations
were studied and comments furnished to the district superintendencies
concerned.
(7) Duties in regard to Departmental and other committees and boards were
maintained.
(8) A number of investigations of special problems were made in local areas.
(9) Inspection of the instructional staff at the Jericho Hill School was carried
out.
(10) A programme for orienting newly appointed District Superintendents was
organized. W 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES,
DIVISION OF CURRICULUM
REPORT OF J. R. MEREDITH, B.A., B.Ed., DIRECTOR
Major emphasis in curriculum development work during the past year has been
placed on appraising or assessing the prescribed curriculum. It has been pointed out
that an established curriculum should be considered satisfactory unless it can be shown
otherwise. There is no value in changing simply for the sake of change. Revisions must
be preceded by a thorough analysis of existing courses and text-books. What are their
aims or purposes? Are these significant in the light of present-day demands? Is their
content, skills, and knowledge educationally valuable to pupils and society? Is it accurate,
comprehensive, and challenging? Are these courses and texts well organized for teaching
and learning? Such questions as these must be studied carefully and thoroughly in order
that a sound basis can be established for making improvements in the future.
Attention was given to the organization of the high-school programme. Eight years
ago a reorganization was made of courses leading to high-school graduation. Two programmes were instituted—a University Entrance Programme and a General Programme.
Last year it was considered advisable to appraise this organization to determine its
effectiveness in providing a good secondary education for all pupils. Findings from the
study indicated the advisability of improving and strengthening the General Programme
by increasing requirements in the fields of mathematics, science, and in one of a limited
number of elective practical subjects. It was also considered wise to give greater emphasis
in both programmes to the importance of reaching a higher standard of achievement for
credit in subsequent courses. All students whose achievement has been low throughout
the year will be required to write final examinations. There is reason to believe that
these changes will have the effect of improving the quality and standards of high-school
education in all schools of the Province.
Specific curriculum development work was undertaken as follows:—
A. Elementary Schools
1. Administration.—An Administrative Bulletin for elementary schools was prepared.
2. Arithmetic.—An appraisal of the courses and texts for Grades III to VI was
begun.
3. Elementary French.—This experimental project was continued for the second
year and expanded to include Grades V and VI classes in selected schools. A programme
for Grades V and VI was completed, and a start was made on developing a programme
for those who continue with the study in Grade VII. It is not considered advisable at
present to extend the programme to schools other than those selected for the experimental
project.
4. Music.—A study of suitable texts for Grades V and VI was made.
5. Reading.—An appraisal of the courses and texts for Grades I to VI was begun.
6. Science.—A new text for Grade V was selected.
B. Secondary Schools
1. English.—Revision of the Grade XIII Composition Course was completed and
a start was made on revising the Literature Course.
2. Social Studies.—The Grade IX course was revised.
3. Mathematics.—An appraisal of courses and texts in mathematics for Grades VII
to XIII was begun. CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES W 39
4. Health and Personal Development and Physical Education.—Revision of these
programmes was begun.
5. German.—The Grade XII course was revised and new texts were selected.
6. Sciences.—Laboratory requirements were revised.
7. History.—The Grade XII Modern History Course was revised and a new text
was selected.
8. Home Economics.—New texts were selected for senior high-school courses.
C. Selection of New Text-books
The following new text-books were authorized for use in the public schools:—
(1) Science, Grade V:  Adventuring in Science (Ginn).
(2) Language, Grade VI:   Language Journeys, Grade VI (Macmillan).
(3) English 101:   Writing with a Purpose (Nelson).
(4) Home Economics 8, 22, 26:   Foods and Home Management (Department of Education).
(5) Home Economics 21:    Clothing Construction and Wardrobe Planning
(Brett-Macmillan).
(6) Home Economics 91:   Clothing for Moderns,  revised edition  (Brett-
Macmillan).
(7) German 90:   Elementary German (Gage) and Meyer's Graded Readers
(Nelson):—
Book I: Ein Briefwechsel.
Book III:  Goslar.
(8) Social Studies 10:   World Geography, revised edition (Ginn).
(9) History 101:   This Age of Conflict, revised edition (Gage).
Acknowledgment
Acknowledgment is due to many teachers and others who participated in the
developments as members of advisory and revision committees. It is not generally recognized that members of revision committees give unstintingly of their time and professional
judgment in the interests of education. They do so with no thought of reward and their
actions reflect great credit on the teaching profession, besides making a significant conrti-
bution to educational progress in this Province.
Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
As noted in previous reports, this Board is composed of some twenty-five members,
ten of whom are community and business leaders. Four regular meetings and one special
meeting were held during the year. Matters dealt with included: The High School
Graduation Programme, Technical and Vocational Education, An Assessment of Secondary Schools by Business and Industry, The Question of the Use of Television in the
Schools, The Provincial Examination System, The High School Correspondence Programme of Instruction, and Physical Education. The Board rendered valuable service
by advising on these matters. W 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
Federal-Provincial Trades and Technical Institute, Burnaby
The ever-pressing need for additional vocational and technical training facilities to
meet the skilled man-power training needs of our Province was such that the Provincial
Government began construction of the first four prefabricated workshops and the first
four prefabricated classroom blocks of the Federal-Provincial Trades and Technical
Institute on the 40-acre Burnaby site at the corner of Willingdon Avenue and Grandview
Highway. As our first objective is to care for the needs of the skilled trades, these first
eight buildings will eventually house some of the training programmes now in progress
in rented quarters at the Pacific National Exhibition Grounds, Hastings Park, Vancouver.
Construction and equipment costs of the new institute are shareable on a 50-50
basis with the Federal Government under the terms of the new five-year agreement
effective April 1st, 1957. The first eight buildings are expected to cost $725,000 to
build, with an additional $600,000 for equipment.
On April 1st, 1958, the Technical Branch of the Department of Education took over
from the Vancouver School Board the operation of the pre-employment, pre-apprentice-
ship, apprenticeship, journeyman up-grading, and tradesmen's qualifying programmes
centred in the Pacific National Exhibition Buildings at Hastings Park in Vancouver. In
the summer of 1959 the following programmes and equipment will be transferred from
Hastings Park to the new buildings in Burnaby: Prefabricated Workshop No. 1—to
house General and Specialized Welding, and Steel Erection and Fabrication; Prefabricated Workshop No. 2—to house Automotive and Heavy Duty Mechanics (Diesel and
Gas), now wholly in operation in the Federal-Provincial Vocational Training School in
Nanaimo; Prefabricated Workshop No. 3—to house the building-construction trades of
General Carpentry, Bricklaying, Metal Lathing, Plastering, and Painting and Decorating;
Prefabricated Workshop No. 4—to house Wooden-boat Building, and Mill Cabinet and
Interior Finishing; four prefabricated classroom blocks—one of these will be used to
house Administration and the Vocational Curriculum Development Section, while the
remaining three will be subdivided to meet our classroom needs. To consolidate our
training in one specific area, it is imperative that additional construction be undertaken
on the Burnaby site during the fiscal year 1959/60 to enable us to move the remaining
programmes out of the rented quarters at the Pacific National Exhibition. Requirements
are as follows: Prefabricated Workshop No. 5—required to accommodate existing Sheet
Metal, Plumbing and Steam-fitting, and Refrigeration and Oil-Gas Burner Controls;
Prefabricated Workshop No. 6—required to house Aero Engine and Air Frame Engineers' Mechanical Courses; concrete three-floor structure—required to house Cafeteria,
Industrial Electrical and Electronics Courses; four prefabricated classroom blocks—to
provide needed classroom space for day and night apprentices, pre-employment, unemployed, and journeymen up-grading classes.
Further, planning in the very near future must take care of training programmes
at the advanced technical or " technician " level. A recent nation-wide survey pointed
to the urgency of investigating the need of technicians in our major industries, and the
type of training which should be set up to meet these needs in such fields as mechanical,
electrical, architectural, and civil engineering; technicians for the chemical-analysis
laboratories of fishing, pulp and paper, oil, mining; and other like areas requiring
training programmes of two years or more beyond the University Entrance (Grade XII)
level of education. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION W 41
The ground set aside in Burnaby is large enough to accommodate this and further
expansion. Through the mutual efforts of the Apprenticeship Branch of the Department
of Labour, the Architectural Branch of the Department of Public Works, and our own
Department of Education, we have planned for space and building arrangements for these
additional units or buildings as time and need dictates. Our plans are flexible, and the
proposed buildings are of such a type as to provide changes of courses and programmes
within them. Workshop and classroom areas are free of pillars and fixed partitions, with
all services such as electricity, heat, water, air, and gas lines arranged in the open so that
they may be tapped into as required. False partitions can be built and moved about
at will.
The present and proposed vocational and technical training facilities are not intended
or designed to replace the schooling within our high schools. Rather, it is preferable
that the enrolment in our Provincial vocational schools be made up of young men and
women who have completed their formal education and who require training for entry
into a skilled occupation. Experience to date points to a competitive system for enrolment and acceptance into one of these specialized and skilled occupations based on
written reports re attitude, aptitude, maturity, willingness to work, desire to learn the
occupation, and grades or marks acquired while in school. The reason our Pre-employment Training Programme students are so well accepted is that the employer is learning
that by accepting a graduate from one of these courses he knows that the school has
accomplished two things for him of major importance, namely: (a) By selection and
training, the school has removed those types who have not an ardent interest and a sincere
desire to learn this occupation, and (b) by teaching both practical skills under the realistic
conditions and the related theoretical knowledge, the trainee has sufficient hand skills and
knowledge of a practical nature which the employer can put to immediate use.
Vocational Curriculum Development
The Technical Branch, Department of Education, in co-operation with the Apprenticeship Branch, Department of Labour, and shared equally with the Federal Government
on a 50-50 basis, established in August of 1957 a vocational and technical curriculum
development branch with a full-time staff under Mr. V. E. Rickard to develop and detail
courses of instruction, training information sheets, tradesmen's qualification examinations,
etc., for the various designated trades and skilled occupations training programmes in
both day- and night-school operations in our Provincial training establishments, the
Vancouver Vocational Institute, and the approved vocational programmes in our senior
high schools. This Curriculum Branch works in close harmony with the Canadian
Vocational Training Branch in Ottawa, which is giving leadership to producing trade
analysis for each of the skilled trades so that we may eventually have trade standards and
qualifications which are acceptable to all Provinces in Canada. Further, extensive use
of advisory committees from industry is made in developing courses of study and in
giving advice, recommending changes, and finally giving approval to the trade analysis
being prepared by the Federal authorities. Curriculum development must be considered
a very vital link in the over-all scheme of vocational and technical training, and must
therefore be on a continuous basis in order that we may catch up with the tremendous
backlog of work in which we are now giving instruction and for which there is no proper
guide in the form of an up-to-date course of study. Further, present courses of study
need revising in order to keep our instruction up to date and in line with the advances
and changes in industry.
Tentative course of study outlines for pre-indentured apprenticeship and pre-
employment training courses have been written and duplicated for the following trades:
1, Bricklaying; 2, lathing; 3, electronics; 4, plumbing; 5, sheet metal; 6, general welding. Similar courses of study for the following are prepared and awaiting duplication:
1, Plastering;  2, boat-building;  3, electrical;  4, structural-steel erection. W 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Tentative course outlines for apprentice training (return years) are completed for
the following trades: 1, Bricklaying; 2, lathing. Similar outlines are awaiting duplication
or further work for: 1, Structural-steel erection; 2, boat-building; 3, plumbing; 4, sheet
metal; 5, plastering. Metallurgy and welding portion of the Aeronautics Course is
completed, and course outline for airframe section is in progress.
Student manual "Transit and Level" printed (500 copies); student manual for
" Mathematics Related to Survey " under production and approximately 75 or 80 per
cent complete; student manuals for the following trades under production: 1, Lathing;
2, bricklaying; 3, reinforcing-rod placing.
Several projects, such as Vocational Training Announcements, Prospectus for
Federal-Provincial Trades and Technical Institute, a series of drawings for Sheet Metal
Courses, and National Automotive Examinations, have been prepared and printed.
Federal-Provincial Vocational Training School, Nanaimo
This school is situated on 14 acres of land which was formerly an army trade school
under the Department of National Defence. This year the Provincial Department of
Public Works purchased the land for approximately $4,000.
At the conclusion of World War II the Provincial Government purchased the
original heavy-duty diesel and automotive workshop, with one H-type dormitory for
sleeping, a dining-room and kitchen combination, and four classrooms. Between 1955
and 1957 the Provincial Government added four additional dormitories, a recreation-
room, and a large welding-shop. To-day this school is crowded with trainees, and as
sleeping accommodation is designed for 114 persons at any one time, the peak loads are
accommodated by setting up sleeping-berths in the recreation areas of the school rather
than turn down a man's opportunity to train and become employed.
Enrolment figures for 1957/58 are as follows:—
Automotive Pre-apprentice Programme (ten months).     26
Automotive Pre-employment Programme (ten months)       6
Automotive Apprenticeship Training Programme (one-month
groups)      66
Heavy Duty Gas and Diesel Pre-apprentice Programme     38
Heavy Duty Gas and Diesel Pre-employment Programme     19
Bulldozing Pre-employment Programme (ten-week groups) __„    47
General Welding     11
Up-grading Welding    120
Pipe-line Welding (trained and certificated)     66
Total  409
It is of interest to note that Mr. R. Roddie, instructor in heavy-duty mechanics, was
lent to the Province of Prince Edward Island for a six months' period to assist their
Government in setting up a similar training programme to what we have in Nanaimo.
This was arranged only after the Director of Canadian Vocational Training in Ottawa
had travelled to all the Provinces in looking for an outstanding training programme.
New Courses
Appraisal Institute
In February and May of 1958 two two-week classes were organized to train and
qualify Government Land Inspectors, Finance Assessors, Timber and Improvement
Assessors, Highways and P.G.E. Right-of-Way Agents, Municipal Assessors, Mortgage
Company Evaluators, etc., for full accreditation in the nationally accepted Appraisal
Institute of Canada. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION W 43
Two objectives were paramount, namely: (a) To acquaint those people engaged
in the valuation and appraisal of land and improvements with the best accepted appraisal
methods, and (b) to train the participants to a standard that will instil confidence in
those who are purchasing their services.
An excellent Advisory Committee, consisting of representatives from the Civil
Service Commission, the Department of Municipal Affairs, the Commissioner of the
Equalization Assessment Branch, Parks Service, Lands Service, Highways, Surveyor of
Taxes, and Finance, gave their approval and unstinting help in promoting and guiding
this programme.
This programme of training was approved on a cost-sharing 50-50 basis as a higher
technical training programme and as such was attached to our Federal-Provincial Vocational School in Nanaimo. However, as room was not available in the school, excellent
accommodation for both sleeping and training was rented at the Island Hall in Parksville.
Enrolments were as follows: February, 33; May, 35; total 68.
Survey and Map Draughting
A Survey and Map Draughting Course to train eighteen new entrants to meet the
shortage of cartographic draughtsmen was initiated in the summer of 1958 by an
Advisory Committee consisting of senior officials of the Personnel Branch of the Civil
Service, the Forest Service, and Air Survey, etc., who selected the students, arranged
the programme of training, loaned the instructors and specialized equipment, and
arranged for the hiring of the eighteen graduates on the completion of the course.
Aero Engine and Airframe Mechanics
In October of 1957 an Aero Engine and Airframe Mechanics' Training Programme
of fifteen trainees, leading to the licensed air engineer's ticket under the Department of
Transport, was started in the basement of the British Columbia Building at Hastings
Park. This was initiated by an Advisory Committee consisting of representatives from
the major air-line companies at the Vancouver Airport, who considered this training
essential to meet not only the present needs, but the anticipated growth of additional
repair depots on Sea Island.
This course is based on the principle of eight months in school working on aero
engines, followed by four months' work experience as a " learner " in the aircraft industry, plus a further eight months on airframes and basic metallurgy, electronics, and
hydraulics.
Federal-provincial Vocational Training Agreements
The following schedules are administered by the Regional Director on behalf of the
Federal and Provincial Governments under the provisions of the " Vocational Training
Co-ordination Act."
Schedule M (Training of Unemployed Persons)
The Federal Government shares equally with the Province in providing training for
unemployed persons registered with the National Employment Service for whom no
suitable work is available but who could be placed after short-term intensive training
in a suitable occupation. All applicants must be accepted by a Selection Committee consisting of the Regional Director, the Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation, and the Special
Placement Officer of the National Employment Service. Subsistence allowances and
training fees are paid on a sliding scale, depending upon the need of the individual student.
Comparative enrolments are as follows:—
Men Women
1956/57  295    78
1957/58  301    171 W 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Schedule R (Training of Disabled Persons)
The Federal Government shares equally with the Provincial Government in the cost
of individual training programmes deemed necessary for the rehabilitation of citizens
who are disabled. All applicants must be approved by a Selection Committee consisting
of the Regional Director, the Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation, and the Special Placement
Officer of the National Employment Service. Training is restricted to persons who are
handicapped because of a continuing disability and who require special training to fit
them for suitable self-supporting employment.
It is most gratifying to realize that the persons who have been trained and who are
now employed are earning wages which make them self-supporting and independent
citizens, and thereby are removed from the social welfare ranks and are now paying taxes
instead of receiving money from the Provincial Treasury. Comparative enrolments are
as follows:—
Men Women
1956/57  44 34
1957/58  51 38
Schedule O (Youth Training)
This schedule was originally designed to provide training needs of young persons
between the ages of 16 and 30 years who, because of the depression years, had never
been permanently employed and who required a period of readjustment, including specialized training, to fit them for gainful employment in a suitable occupation. Under
this schedule we have three sub-schedules operating, namely:—
Sub-schedule C (Urban Occupational Training).—Young men and women who
have never been to work and who are in need of financial assistance are able to have
their training fees paid from this source. Training costs are shared equally between the
Federal and Provincial Governments.   Comparative enrolments are as follows:—
Men Women
1956/57  195 27
1957/58     98 30
Sub-schedule E (Rural Occupational Training).—Designed to give occupational
training for boys in the fields of agriculture and commercial fishing, and homemaking for
girls. The course is conducted at the Youth Training Centre at the University of British
Columbia during January and February of each year. It is financed jointly by the Federal and Provincial Governments.   Comparative enrolments are as follows:—
Men Women
1956/57  30 14
1957/58  58 12
Sub-schedule H (Student Aid).—Special provision is made for the Federal and
Provincial Governments to share in the cost of bursaries to university students and
nurses-in-training. Assistance is limited to worthy needy students registered in approved
training courses for professional nurses and for students in degree-granting courses other
than theology. Students assisted under this programme are as follows: 1956/57, 607;
1957/58, 640.
Schedule K (Training for the Armed Forces)
Designed for the training of army cadets, mechanics, and technical personnel for
the Army and Air Force. The full cost is borne by the Federal Government. At the
present time we have six full-time academic civilian teachers assigned to the army cadet-
training programme at the R.C.S.M.E., Camp Chilliwack, Vedder Crossing, B.C. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION W 45
Schedule Q (Supervisory Training)
Management Training for Supervision, sponsored by the Federal Department of
Labour and the British Columbia Department of Education, was offered to industry and
government groups during the period of September 1st, 1957, to June 30th, 1958. Public
and privately owned companies, associations, institutions, and government departments
were the main participants of this service, which includes all of the "J" series programmes.
Most of the training took place in the conference room, 728 Vancouver Block, 736
Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C. However, some of the programmes were offered on
the premises of the groups concerned. An example of this was the Haney Correctional
Institution, where the entire instructional and correctional staff were trained.
The following statistics will show how many were trained and in which programmes:—
Conference leaders qualified in the forty-hour programme—
Job instruction training  103
Job relations training     50
Job methods training     10
Total  163
Other:  Forty-hour Consulting and Training Services in Industry.
Conference leaders qualified in the ten-hour programme—
Job instruction training  484
Job relations training  133
Job methods training  21
Job safety training  21
Total  659
Other:
Ten-hour Job Instruction Follow-up sessions for instructors.
Fifteen appreciation sessions in the " J " series general.
The results of this training have been encouraging. Eighteen industrial training
programmes have been well established in privately and publicly owned companies.
These show good promise of continuing on a permanent basis. Six programmes have
been established in Government departments. Most extensive of these are the Haney
Correctional Institution Instructional Training Programme, the Customs and Excise
Department Supervisory Training Programme, the Treasury Department of the National
Employment Service Training Programme, the Department of Veterans' Affairs Training
Programme, and the Workmen's Compensation Board Rehabilitation Training for Supervisors and Key Men.
Two of our largest bridge-building companies are successfully operating a Supervisory Leadership Training Programme.
Four of the building and heavy construction companies have started Management
Training Programmes for their supervisors. Our largest sugar-refining company has
used this means to train its entire top management and supervisory group.
Some outstanding results from these programmes include that of a head tool-maker
promoted to foreman following two forty-hour programmes and subsequently promoted
to methods engineer shortly after completing the Methods Programme. Another foreman who was enthusiastic during two of the forty-hour conferences was subsequently
promoted to manager.
Prospects for the 1958/59 training term are excellent. All openings in conferences scheduled to December 19th, 1958, have been filled. More applications have
been received than our schedule permits. W 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Teacher-training
Industrial Arts and vocational teacher training programmes are conducted on a
full-time basis at the Vancouver Vocational Institute. All costs of the Industrial Arts
teacher training are borne by the Provincial Government. The programme is affiliated,
as an emergency training programme, with the College of Education at the University
of British Columbia.
The vocational-teacher training programme, on the other hand, relies on the obtaining of instructors having occupational competency before permitting them to take the
15 units of teacher-training to qualify them as vocational instructors. The vocational-
teacher training programmes are financed on an equal sharing basis by the Federal and
Provincial Governments.
Instructors participating in the teacher-training programme were as follows:—
(1) Industrial Arts—
Day emergency programme  16
Night emergency programme  27
(2) Vocational—
University of Toronto summer session     5
Evening classes  50
Vocational Training, Senior High-school Level
The high-school programme provides vocational courses in Grades X, XI, and XII
in three broad areas of training—(a) commercial, (b) agricultural, and (c) industrial.
Federal funds are made available by way of annual allotments to the Province under
the Vocational Technical Training Agreement No. 2 and may be used at the discretion
of the Province to meet the costs of operating vocational and technical training programmes in approved schools. In all approved vocational courses, students must spend
a minimum of half of their time in training in the occupational field of his or her choice.
Under the Vocational Technical Training Agreement No. 2 (V.T.T.A. No. 2) forty-nine
high schools have been approved by the Federal Government to conduct vocational
courses. In these high schools there are forty-nine commercial programmes taught,
twenty-eight industrial programmes, and seven agricultural programmes. Comparative
enrolments are as follows:—
Day-school
1956/57 1957/58
Commercial      4,013 4,527
Agricultural         122 55
Industrial      2,702 2,607
Totals     6,837 7,189
Night-school
1956/57 1957/58
Commercial      3,974 4,061
Agricultural         106 70
Industrial      7,502 6,987
Totals  11,582 11,118 industrial education w 47
Industrial Arts
(Report prepared by T. A. Quayle and C. J. Strong, M.A.,
Inspectors of Technical Classes.)
During the year new accommodation to teach Industrial Arts was provided in
Alberni, Burnaby, Courtenay, Kimberley, Ladner, McBride, North Vancouver, and
Vancouver, in addition to the expansion of facilities in other centres.
Forty-four new Industrial Arts teachers were required to staff the new accommodation and to replace teachers leaving the profession. To meet this need, day and evening emergency Industrial Arts classes were held at the teacher-training unit located in
the Vancouver Vocational Institute. These emergency classes are operated by the Technical Branch of the Department of Education under the auspices of the College of Education of the University of British Columbia. The courses completed under these programmes carry university credit.
During the past summer the facilities of the Vancouver Technical School were
again used to carry on the Industrial Arts teacher training programme. It is significant
that a goodly number of Industrial Arts teachers also participated in courses offered on
the University campus. Indications are that many Industrial Arts teachers already holding the Secondary Basic teaching certificate will proceed with their training to complete
the Bachelor of Education degree requirements.
This Branch again wishes to express its appreciation to the Vancouver Board of
School Trustees for their kind co-operation in the use of the facilities at the Vancouver
Technical School.
A revised programme of studies was introduced into the Industrial Arts programme
in September of 1957. Two major changes were the elimination of the Farm Mechanics
courses from the Industrial Arts programme and the addition of an optional course in
LA. 91 to include small-boat building. The Farm Mechanics courses are now an integral
part of Vocational Agriculture.
The total number of Industrial Arts teachers, now 385, continues to show a steady
growth to meet the increased needs. The total number of pupils participating in the
Industrial Arts programmes in the schools in British Columbia is as follows: At junior
high-school level, 27,661; at senior high-school level, 12,262; total, 39,923.
High School Correspondence
(Report prepared by Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.)
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1957/58 was 14,427. Of this number, 18.6 per cent or 2,677 were between the
ages of 18 and 20, and 43.6 per cent or 6,290 were 21 years or over. Thus 62.2 per
cent of our students can be classified as adults. This is a decrease of 1.2 per cent over
the figures of 1956/57. There was an increase of 977 students in the number of students
over 21 years and an increase of 411 in the number of students between the ages of 18
and 20 years.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices      129
Army, Navy, Air Force      121
Civil Servants       142
Police         28
Domestic workers        79
Farming and ranching        56 W 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Firemen, engineers   	
    . ._           244
Forestry     	
         49
Housewives  __         __
           164
Lumbering   _ __ _   	
.__           83
Merchants      _ _ -          _ _               ■
         33
Mining -_   _ _   _ —      -   - -
.__             29
Office-workers   ___
       708
Professional—
Teachers   _       —           	
...          147
Nurses
136
Miscellaneous -   -    ,  •
          33
Railroad  -        _     - 	
.__           62
Skilled labour
           592
Unskilled labour
366
Miscellaneous
__           448
Total 	
  3,649 COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH W 49
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
The services of the Community Programmes Branch continued to reach an ever-
increasing number of local Recreation Commissions. To date the Community Programmes Branch extends its services to 250 local Recreation Commissions in all areas
of the Province. This shows a steady growth in the number of Commissions since the
inception of the Branch in 1954, as follows:—
Number of Number of
Year Commissions Year Commissions
1954  86      1957  216
1955  140      1958  250
1956  183
The services extended by the Community Programmes Branch to the Recreation
Commissions are:—
(1) Advice to public agencies and individuals on recreational matters by a
staff of regional Recreation Consultants.
(2) Aid in recreation to the blind through White Cane Clubs organized by
staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis.
(3) Large and comprehensive library of books, booklets, films, and filmstrips
on innumerable recreation topics.
(4) Drama library and materials.
(5) Leadership  training  through  workshops,  conferences,  clinics,   and  an
annual recreation summer school.
(6) Night-school grants for regularly organized night-school classes.
(7) Regular grants to Recreation Commissions to assist communities with
paid recreation help and expenses.
(8) Special grants to those Recreation Commissions who conduct summer
swimming and playground programmes.
In addition to the above, the Community Programmes Branch mails out thousands
of information bulletins and recreation news bulletins to individual members of the
various Recreation Commissions. This service helps keep recreation personnel in the
Province informed on the latest developments in recreation, not only in British Columbia,
but also the developments in the rest of Canada and the United States. This Branch
maintains a catalogue of all the recreational books and films. Recently, supplements to
our Catalogue of Recreation Resource Material were distributed and a new catalogue of
available films and filmstrips will be distributed to all Recreation Commissions and other
agencies in the Province.
During the year the Community Programmes Branch answers many inquiries on all
recreational topics from persons throughout the Province. By maintaining these services,
the Branch is providing an excellent reference source for all recreation-minded individuals and agencies in British Columbia.
Community recreation, along with all other forms of recreation, is on the increase
in British Columbia. More and more communities are beginning to recognize their
responsibility in providing adequate recreational opportunities and facilities for their
citizens.
The following are the 250 Recreation Commissions in British Columbia which are
eligible for these services:—
♦Abbotsford. *Alexandria. *Arrowhead-Sidmouth.
*Ainsworth. *Argenta-Johnsons Landing. *Arrow Park.
tAlert Bay. * Armstrong. Barnston Island.
* Receiving grants for recreational expenses.
t Receiving grants for full-time or part-time Directors. W 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
*Bear Creek.
*Blue River.
*Bonnington-Corra Linn.
♦Boston Bar.
♦Boswell.
*Bouchie Lake.
*Bowen Island.
tBralorne.
♦Bridesville.
*Brocklehurst.
tBurnaby.
♦Burton.
tCampbell River.
♦Canal Flats.
♦Canoe.
♦Canyon.
♦Cedar.
♦Central Saanich.
♦Chase.
♦Chehalis Crossing.
♦Cherry Creek.
♦Christina Lake.
♦Connaught Heights.
♦Coombs.
tCoquitlam.
tCourtenay.
t Cranbrook.
♦Crawford Bay.
♦Crescent Valley.
tCreston.
♦Decker Lake.
♦Deep Cove.
♦Delta.
♦Deroche.
♦Dewdney.
♦District of Mission.
♦Dragon Lake.
♦Eagle Valley.
♦Edgewater.
♦Elko.
♦Emerald Mines.
♦Ferndale.
♦Forest Grove.
♦Fort Fraser.
Fort St. John.
♦Francois Lake.
♦Fraser Lake.
♦Fruitvale.
♦Gabriola Island.
♦Galloway.
♦Genelle.
♦Gibsons.
tGiscome.
♦Glenmore.
♦Golden.
♦Grand Forks.
♦Gray Creek.
♦Great Central.
♦Greenwood.
♦Grindrod.
♦Groundbirch.
♦Haida Masset.
♦Halfmoon Bay.
♦Harrison Hot Springs.
♦Harrop and District.
♦Hatzic Prairie.
♦Hazelton.
♦Hedley.
♦Hixon.
♦Hope.
♦Horsefly.
♦Houston.
♦Inonoaklin.
♦Invermere.
♦loco.
♦Jordan River.
♦Kaleden.
♦Kaslo.
tKelowna.
♦Keremeos.
♦Kettle Valley,
t Kimberley.
♦Kingfisher.
♦Kitwanga Valley.
♦Kootenay Bay.
♦Kyuquot.
♦Lac la Hache.
♦La France.
Laidlaw.
♦Lakeview Heights.
♦Langford.
♦Langley.
♦Lantzville.
♦Lardeau District.
♦Lavington.
♦Lillooet.
♦Lister.
♦Little Fort.
♦Lone Butte.
♦Lumby.
♦Lund.
♦Lytton.
♦McConnell Creek.
♦Mahood Falls.
♦Malaspina.
♦Mara.
♦Marysville.
♦Merritt.
♦Metchosin.
♦Midway.
♦Minto.
♦Moose Heights.
♦Mount Sheer.
♦Mud River.
♦Nakusp.
tNanaimo.
♦Nanoose.
♦Naramata.
♦Narcosli Creek.
♦Natal.
tNelson.
♦New Hazelton.
♦New Masset.
'.New Westminster.
♦Nicomen Island.
♦Noralee-Clemretta-
Colleymount.
♦North Bend,
tNorth Cowichan.
Northfield.
♦North Kamloops.
♦North Shore (Nelson).
tNorth Vancouver.
♦Oak Bay.
♦Okanagan Centre.
♦Okanagan Falls.
♦Oliver.
♦100 Mile House.
♦Osoyoos.
♦Oyama.
♦Palling.
♦Parksville.
♦Peachland.
♦Pemberton and District.
♦Pendelton Bay.
♦Pender Harbour.
tPenticton.
Pitt Meadows.
♦Popkum.
♦Port Clements.
♦Port Coquitlam.
♦Port McNeill.
♦Port Mellon.
♦Port Moody.
♦Pouce Coupe.
Powell River.
tPrince George.
tPrince Rupert.
♦Procter.
♦Progress.
♦Quadra.
♦Qualicum Beach.
♦Queen Charlotte.
♦Quesnel.
♦Quick, Round Lake,
Woodmere, and
Walcott.
♦Red Bluff.
♦Redrooffs.
♦Revelstoke.
■.Richmond.
♦Riondel.
♦Riske Creek.
♦Riverside.
♦Roberts Creek.
♦Robson.
♦Rock Creek.
♦Roe Lake.
♦Rose Lake.
♦Rutland.
♦Salmo.
♦Salmon Arm.
♦Sandspit.
♦Savona District.
♦Say ward.
♦Sechelt.
* Receiving grants for recreational expenses.
t Receiving grants for full-time or part-time Directors. COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
W 51
♦70 Mile and
Watch Lake.
♦Shalalth.
♦Shawnigan Lake.
♦Sidney.
♦Skidegate Mission.
♦Slocan.
♦Smithers.
♦Soda Creek.
♦Sooke.
♦Southbank.
♦Southern Cortez.
♦South Hazelton.
♦South Saltspring Island.
♦South Slocan.
♦South Taylor.
♦Spences Bridge.
Squamish Indian Band.
♦Squamish.
♦Straiton.
♦Sumas Municipality.
♦Summerland.
♦Sunnybrae.
♦Tahsis.
♦Tarrys and District.
♦Tatla Lake.
♦Tatlayoko Lake.
♦Tchesinkut Lake.
♦Telkwa.
♦Terrace.
♦Topley.
tTrail-Tadanac.
♦Ucluelet.
University Hill.
♦Valemount.
tVancouver.
♦Vernon.
♦Village of Mission.
♦Wardner.
♦Warfield.
♦Westbank.
♦West Bench.
♦Westbridge.
♦West Creston.
♦Whaletown Community.
♦Willow Point.
♦Willow River.
♦Wilson Creek.
♦Windermere.
♦Winfield.
♦Wistaria.
♦Woodfibre.
♦Wynndel.
♦Yale.
♦Ymir.
♦Zeballos.
* Receiving grants for recreational expenses.
t Receiving grants for full-time or part-time Directors.
Consultants
Recreation Consultants for the Community Programmes Branch are:-
Consultant
Headquarters
Area
K. K. Maltman	
Quesnel	
Northern British Columbia.
and District, West Coast.
J. H. Panton	
G. J. Pynn	
Nelson    	
The Recreation Consultants continue to:—
(a) Stimulate and encourage the development of community recreation.
(b) Provide advice and assistance to communities in developing recreational
activities.
(c) Assist in the organization and administration of leadership programmes.
(d) Make the services of the Community Programmes Branch known to
organizations, agencies, and individuals.
(e) Stimulate the establishment of local Recreation Commissions in accordance with enabling legislation, to serve as an administrative authority for
public recreation.
The Recreation Consultants have also continued to act as representatives of the
British Columbia Centennial Committee during the year 1957/58. The increase in the
number of recreational activities as a result of the Centennial celebrations has added
additional incentive to recreation programming in British Columbia, and this impetus
is certain to carry over into succeeding years.
Staff member Mr. Joseph Lewis, Director of Recreation for the Blind, continues
his excellent work in organizing recreational activities for our blind citizens. Through
the White Cane Clubs, organized by Mr. Lewis, many of these extremely handicapped
individuals receive their only form of recreational activity. W 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Leadership
The Community Programmes Branch, recognizing the continual need for adequately
trained recreation leaders, continues to place great emphasis on leadership training in
all fields of recreation.
Several clinics, workshops, and conferences were held throughout British Columbia
during 1957/58. Clinics and workshops cover various recreation skills, including all
sports, crafts, hobbies, art, dancing, drama, and playgrounds. Many individuals received
the benefit of this training, and many areas of the Province make good use of this very
valuable service.
The year 1958 also marked the inauguration of the British Columbia Recreation
Association. One hundred and fifty recreation personnel from all corners of the Province met in Vernon on May 9th and 10th for the purpose of forming a British Columbia
Recreation Association. The formation of such an association culminates the efforts
of the Community Programmes Branch, which has organized 250 Recreation Commissions over the past five years. Membership in this association is open to all recreation
agencies and all interested individuals. The British Columbia Recreation Association
will provide much-needed co-ordination for the Recreation Commissions and all other
recreation agencies in British Columbia.
Professor R. Osborne, Director of the School of Physical Education at the University of British Columbia, was elected first president of the association. Professor Osborne
has had great experience in this type of work and is an excellent choice for the position.
The remainder of the executive is as follows: W. D. McArthur, Kimberley; A. W.
Thiessen, New Westminster; R. Ramsay, Essondale; H. Thornton, Vernon; Dr. M.
Wayman, Prince Rupert; R. Gould, Trail; D. Russell, New Westminster; Mrs. M.
Milne, Vancouver; and Mr. L. J. Wallace, Victoria.
Attendance at leadership training courses was as follows:—
Type Number        Attendance
Regional conferences     1 400
British Columbia Recreation Association conference    1 150
Clinics and workshops  45 2,251
Totals  53 2,801
Special Programmes
Swimming and playground programmes are becoming more and more popular in
British Columbia. The Community Programmes Branch assists communities that sponsor such programmes with special grants, and during the year fifty Recreation Commissions conducted playground or swimming programmes for 13,073 individuals.
Swimming and playground programmes are carried out during the months of July
and August and are extremely valuable additions to a community recreation programme,
serving a very vital function. In many instances, many youngsters and even young adults
are taught how to swim or how to improve their swimming skill. Life-saving classes are
scheduled for the more advanced swimmers to help fill the need in this aspect of water
safety.
Drama
Dramatic activities continue to be one of the most popular forms of recreation.
There are approximately 225 drama groups in the Province that provide hundreds of
individuals an opportunity to participate in this activity.
During the past year twenty-eight one-act drama festivals were held throughout the
Province for both school groups and adult groups.   Twelve of the festivals were for school
J COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH W 53
groups and ten of the festivals were for adult groups, with six festivals for both school
and adult groups.
Regional winners of the adult one-act drama festivals competed in Burnaby in the
British Columbia One-act Drama Festival finals. The following groups competed:
Burnaby Little Theatre, Comox Valley Drama Club, Victoria Theatre Guild, West Vancouver Little Theatre Guild, Prince George Players, Vernon Little Theatre, Lake Cowichan Drama Club, The Kitimat Players, The Lake Windermere Players, The Grand
Forks Players, and The Mutual Improvement Association of Dawson Creek. Vernon
Little Theatre was the winning group, with Victoria Theatre Guild second and West
Vancouver Little Theatre Guild third. The adjudicators for this year's Provincial finals
were Miss J. Stevenson and Mr. A. Broughton, of Vancouver.
At the annual meeting of the British Columbia Drama Association held in conjunction with the festival, Mrs. G. Rushton, of Vancouver, was returned as president. Trail
was chosen as the location for next year's Provincial finals.
The Community Programmes Branch is fortunate in having highly qualified and
enthusiastic persons co-operating with it to further dramatic activities in the Province.
These individuals act as adjudicators at the many festivals and conduct clinics, classes,
and workshops throughout the Province to further drama. The Extension Department
of the University of British Columbia also co-operates with this Branch in this most
important aspect of drama development.
Drama services available from the Community Programmes Branch include:—
(1) Advisory services are made available to communities on all aspects of
drama development.
(2) Assistance is provided in training local leaders in the skills and techniques
of the theatre.
(3) A drama library service is maintained to lend technical books or plays to
persons or community drama groups. These materials are listed in the
Drama Catalogue, which is available to all groups.
(4) A limited supply of stage equipment is available for loan.
(5) Grants are provided to assist local and school groups in the staging of
various festivals. W 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
NIGHT-SCHOOLS
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
The night-school programme, operated by the local School Boards, continues to be
a very popular aspect of community adult education.
The courses which are offered are of two types, namely:—
(1) Vocational, technical, or industrial courses operating under Dominion-
Provincial agreements. These courses include such subjects as Typing,
Book-keeping, Engineering, Mechanics, Commercial Art, Carpentry, or
any subject an individual takes to increase his ability in his vocation.
(2) Cultural, recreational, or academic courses which fall into the general
field of adult education. Courses in this category include almost all
academic subjects, all sports, hobbies, crafts, arts, and other leisure-time
pursuits.
All night-school classes which are approved by the Department of Education receive
grants on behalf of instructors' salaries. Grants are also provided for the salaries of night-
school directors or principals. Under the Dominion-Provincial agreement, additional
grants are provided for instructors' salaries and equipment for vocational courses only.
Many local School Boards are offering a good variety of courses and opportunities
to the citizens of their respective areas. The following local School Boards conducted
night-school programmes, either vocational or non-vocational, during the academic year
1957/58;—
Abbotsford.
Agassiz.
Alert Bay.
Armstrong.
Burnaby.
Campbell River.
Castlegar.
Chilliwack.
Coquitlam.
Courtenay.
Cowichan.
Cranbrook.
Creston.
Delta.
Fernie.
Fraser Canyon.
Grand Forks.
Howe Sound.
Kamloops.
Kelowna.
Keremeos.
Kettle Valley.
Kimberley.
Kitimat.
Kootenay Lake.
Lake Cowichan.
Langley.
McBride.
Maple Ridge.
Merritt.
Mission.
Nanaimo.
Nelson.
New Westminster.
North Vancouver.
Ocean Falls.
Peace River North.
Peace River South.
Penticton.
Powell River.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Qualicum.
Revelstoke.
Richmond.
Saanich.
Salmon Arm.
Sechelt.
South Cariboo.
Southern Okanagan
Summerland.
Surrey.
Tahsis River.
Terrace.
Trail.
Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Victoria.
West Vancouver.
Windermere.
Growth in Night-school Programme
Number of Number of Number of
Year                                                           School Districts Enrollees Instructors
1953/54  49 19,969 842
1954/55  55 22,280 948
1955/56  57 29,335 1,186
1956/57  60 33,565 1,328
1957/58  62 36,611 1,401 NIGHT-SCHOOLS
W 55
Vocational
Year
Number of
Instructors
1955/56  357
1956/57  440
1957/58  477
Non-vocational
Year
Number of
Instructors
1955/56  829
1956/57  888
1957/58  924
Number of
Enrollees
9,040
11,582
11,118
Number of
Enrollees
20,291
21,983
25,493
Approximately 140 different subjects were offered in the night-school programme
in British Columbia. Most popular classes—that is, those which attract the largest
enrolment—are:—
Vocational—
1. Typing.
2. Carpentry.
Non-vocational—
1. Physical and Social Recreation.
2. Craft courses.
3. Homemaking.
4. Academic courses.
English for New Canadians had the highest attendance of all night-school classes.
Approximately 3,400 students attended 110 classes in English for New Canadians.
The night-school programme conducted by the various School Boards is an ever-
expanding one, intending to meet the needs and wishes of the general adult population.
The growth that is evident is a reflection on the desire of the general adult population to
either advance themselves academically and vocationally or an awareness of the value in
leisure-time and recreational pursuits. Night-school classes serve all these functions, and
the popularity of the night-school programme is because it continues to offer and expand
training in vocational, academic, and recreational activities, which are essential aspects
of our modern society. W 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools     1,941
Junior high schools  21,950
  23,891
In Grade VII     9,551
In Grade VIII     9,397
In Grade IX     4,910
Special class (boys and girls)   15
Boys  18
23,891
Jericho Hill School  37
Senior high schools  11,047
Technical students  36
High-school boys   160
Private schools  678
Indian schools  100
        778
In elementary grades (Grades VII and VIII)  229
In high school (senior grades)  549
778
Correspondence courses, taken under supervision of teacher
who is not qualified to teach senior Home Economics
courses  -        496
36,285
There are 162 Home Economics centres in the public schools of the Province, 11
in private schools, and 3 in Indian schools. This makes a total of 176 schools offering
Home Economics and shows an increase of 10 over the total of last year.
One-room centre	
Two-room centre	
Three-room centre	
Four-room centre	
Five-room centre	
Seven-room centre	
Centres
Roorr
71
71
66
132
27
81
6
24
4
20
2
14
Totals  176 342
Two Home Economics centres were reopened, after being closed for the preceding
year, due to the shortage of trained teachers.
During the 1957/58 session a new Home Economics centre was opened at George
Bonner High School, Cobble Hill.
New schools including Home Economics centres were opened at A. W. Neill Junior
High School, Alberni;  Aldergrove Junior-Senior High School, Aldergrove;  Lake Trail HOME ECONOMICS
W 57
Junior High School, Courtenay; Selkirk Senior High School, Kimberley; North Delta
Junior-Senior High School, Ladner; Delbrook Senior High School, North Vancouver;
Cariboo Elementary-Junior High School, Quesnel; Belmont Junior-Senior High School,
Sooke;  and Lord Tweedsmuir Senior High School, Surrey.
Additional Home Economics rooms were built in the following schools: Burnaby
South Senior High School, Edmonds Junior High School, Kensington Junior High School,
and Moscrop Junior High School, Burnaby; Elphinstone Junior-Senior High School,
Gibsons; Kelowna Junior High School, Kelowna; New Westminster Junior High School,
New Westminster; and Summerland Junior-Senior High School, Summerland.
The Home Economics centre at the Revelstoke Junior High School, Revelstoke,
was renovated and two additional rooms added.
At Campbell River Junior-Senior High School a third room was partially completed
and utilized by classes for the clothing part of the courses.
The wing containing the Home Economics rooms at the Alpha Junior High School,
Burnaby, was rebuilt and the centre reopened.
During the session there were 339 Home Economics teachers throughout the Province, showing an increase of thirty-three over the total for last year.
With the assistance and co-operation of the District Superintendents of Schools in
the Lower Mainland area, the first extra-sessional course in Home Economics was organized by the University of British Columbia. Mrs. F. C. Leroux was the instructor for
the course, which carried credit toward the Bachelor of Education degree or the Bachelor
of Home Economics degree. It is hoped that the extra-sessional Home Economics classes
may be continued in the future. W 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D.,
SUPERINTENDENT
The enrolment for the year 1957/58 was 224, divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
23
72
34
95
57
167
Totals
95
129
224
The total enrolment was evenly divided between boys and girls—112 each. As
heretofore, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind co-operated with the school in
providing home training and counseling for pre-school blind children and parents.
Magna-type text-books were sent on loan to fourteen partial-sighted children throughout
the Province.
General Remarks
A plan was presented to and approved by the Advisory Committee for the selection
and securing of suitable braille text-books through all the grades to high-school completion. Certain prescribed texts, such as those for geography and history, will be transcribed in sufficient quantity to issue one set to each pupil at the various levels, with
additional copies in reserve for future requirements.
A sound documentary film on the programme of our Deaf Department was completed by the Visual Aids Department. The Committee and all who saw it then and
since agree that the composition and narration are excellent. Several prints are available
for loan to schools, P.-T.A. groups, and other interested organizations and should serve
a very useful purpose.
A definite policy was adopted with regard to the training programme for blind pupils
on the senior high-school level. On the recommendation of the principal and vice-
principal, the Advisory Committee agreed that we continue to offer a senior high-school
programme, but that capable students wishing to attend sighted senior high schools be
permitted to do so, as heretofore, on their own. It was also agreed that a reader
assistance allowance of approximately $250 a year be made available to each such student
if and when funds for the purpose become available.
Representation was made to the Vancouver School Board by the Department of
Education for continued use of three classrooms in Vancouver public schools for the
1958/59 school-year. These are located in Lord Kitchener, Model, and Sir William
Dawson Schools and accommodate three of our intermediate deaf classes of day and
resident pupils.
Due to pressure of business, it became necessary around the mid-year for Dr. J. F. K.
English to transfer the chairmanship of the Advisory Committee over to Dr. W. A.
Plenderleith, Co-ordinator of Services, Department of Education. The Superintendent
of Richmond Schools, Col. J. N. Burnett, continues to serve as deputy chairman.
An accident insurance plan was approved and presented to all the parents of children
enrolled in the school. The yearly premium for day-pupils was set at $3 and $7 for
resident pupils. The opportunity to obtain low-cost insurance coverage was well received
by the parents.
Efforts were made to secure a piece of Crown land on Howe Sound for a camp-site
for our children.   The move was strongly supported by both our P.-T.A. groups.   How- IERICHO HILL SCHOOL W 59
ever, it developed that the area in which we were interested was required for Pacific Great
Eastern Railway purposes and could not be made available to us.
A summer school loan scholarship was made available to teachers and resident
instructors of our Blind Department, limited to $500 a year. This provides financial
assistance of $100 each to five persons, with 75 per cent repayable within a year. Similar
consideration may be given for a year's training course. This is a new scholarship offered
to members of our staff by the local chapter of the Pi Beta Phi Sorority.
Before the close of the school term, the teachers' salary committee submitted a
proposed salary schedule for 1958, designed to bring their salaries into line with those
of the nine Lower Mainland districts. This procedure had been accepted by the Civil
Service Commission several years ago, and as a consequence our teachers' salaries are
reviewed from year to year.
In reviewing the accomplishments of this past year, I am deeply conscious and most
appreciative of the loyal support received from my devoted staff and the very splendid
co-operation afforded me by the Advisory Committee and officials of the Department of
Education. W 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1957/58 was 14,427. This figure shows an increase of 2,466 over 1956/57.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in school— per Cent
1. School-age students registered in high and
superior schools (throughout this report the
term " school-age " refers to students under 18
years of age)     4,393
2. School-age students registered in elementary
schools  11
Total number of school-age students  4,404
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years registered in
their local schools  1,566
4. Students of 21 years or over registered in their
local schools  102
Total number of students registered in
their local schools taking one or
more correspondence courses     6,072 42.1
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school
because of physical disability        107
2. School-age students gainfully employed         140
3. School-age students in institutions — Girls'
Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School,
Oakalla Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary, Haney Correctional Institution        169
4. School-age students not registered in schools
for other reasons        640
5. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered
in their local schools     1,111
Total number of students under 21 years
not registered in their local schools and obtaining their education by correspondence     2,167 15.0
6. Adult students (21 years and over)      6,188 42.9
Total number of students  14,427        100.0
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age     5,460 37.8
2. Pupils 18, 19, and 20 years     2,677 18.6
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over     6,290 43.6
Totals    14,427        100.0 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS W 61
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses.    Others
registered for only one or two courses.   The number of students who enrolled in each
of the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 10a, 20, 30, 40  1,903
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 31, 40  2,138
English 91  154
English 99  35
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 32, 33  1,311
History 91  130
Science 10, 20  655
Mathematics 10, 20, 30, 91  3,032
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92  393
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92  247
French 10, 20, 91, 92  728
German 10, 20, 91, 92  251
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30  689
Agriculture 10, 20, 38, 39  227
Geography 91  165
Economics 92  49
Law 93  51
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91  982
Art 10, 20   194
Record-keeping 11  612
Business Fundamentals 24  204
Book-keeping 34, 91, 95  491
Mathematics 12  391
Shorthand 21, 31   314
Typewriting 10, 20  1,126
Secretarial Practice 92  28
English 93 (Business English)  65
English 32 (Journalism)   21
Biology 91  159
Chemistry 91  153
Physics 91   158
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  88
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20  353
Sheet-metal Work 20  2
Metal-mining  16
Auto Mechanics 91, 92  500
Diesel Engines 91   77
Electricity 20  229
Radio and Wireless 30  215
Elementary Geology 29  103
Forestry 30  238
Art 39  89
Frame-house Construction 20  75
Home Furnishing 23  46
Extramural Music 11, 21  29
Total   19,116
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course. W 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1957/58
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature 100  222
English Composition 101  186
Mathematics 101  203
Mathematics 100  67
French 120  39
French 110  66
Latin 120  5
Latin 110  29
Spanish 110  9
Agriculture 100  5
History 101  69
History 102  128
Chemistry 101   54
Physics 101  67
German 90  132
Total  1,281
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also
be classified in the following table:—
Steam Engineering, 4th, 3rd, and 2nd Class  348
House Painting and Decorating  25
Aviation  11
Industrial Mathematics  132
Practical Design  5
Glove-making   4
Air Navigation I, II  20
Mathematics for Steam Engineering, 2nd Class  13
Accountancy for Credit Unions  19
Spherical Trigonometry  24
English 19  607
Dressmaking   30
Preparation for Citizenship  469
Steam Heating for Plant Operators  84
Electricity for Building Trades  88
Total  1,879
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates of
public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have the
privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students of
16 years or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students living
outside this Province.
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 1,296 students the fees
were paid by their School Boards.
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1. Hospital cases      216
2. British Columbia Penitentiary      125
3. Oakalla Prison       393
4. Girls' Industrial Home        21 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS W 63
5. Provincial Industrial School for Boys  71
6. New Haven  56
7. Haney Correctional Institution  144
8. On relief or equivalent  2
9. Disabled students at home  5
10. Students needed at home  22
Total  1,055
Completion of Papers
A total of 166,913 papers were marked during the year, which is an increase of
28,545 over the number of papers marked in the preceding year. We have five-, ten-,
twelve-, eighteen-, and twenty-paper courses.
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of sixty-six instructors
were employed during the year.
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 9,593 students with material from our course
in English I for New Canadians, 2,401 students were supplied with material from the
English II for New Canadians, and 607 students took the course in English II (English
19) by correspondence. In addition, 469 students were enrolled in the course " Preparation for Citizenship." We also supplied 686 courses for use in the Hungarian refugee
camp at Abbotsford, which closed at the end of March. Classes in English were held in
fifty-two night-school centres, and material was supplied for other classes and individuals
in 103 small isolated places throughout the Province.
New and Revised Courses
Agriculture 38 (Fruit-growing), Commerce 91 (Book-keeping), English Language
20, English Language 31, French 91, French 92, German 92, Law 93, Mathematics 10,
Social Studies 32, Steam Engineering 4th Class, and Typewriting 10 were the new and
revised courses offered during the year.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1957/58 there were 1,344 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
Correspondence School. Of these, 1,242 were enrolled at Victoria and the remaining
102 were enrolled at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tables below show
the enrolment by months and grades for each locality. W 64
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
I
II
III
rv
V
VI
VII
VIII
September	
121
117
116
101
77
69
58
68
727
October	
142
140
133
108
95
97
79
85
879
November 	
158
146
151
115
108
100
90
101
969
December. 	
171
150
163
118
116
104
94
112
1,028
January .   ..
175
159
168
125
125
108
113
121
1,084
February  ... ~ ...
182
164
171
139
129
113
108
134
1,140
March
187
171
177
141
132
118
115
138
1,179
April...  - _
186
172
178
144
136
121
119
145
1,201
May 	
193
174
182
146
141
120
121
151
1,228
June    .
193
170
187
149
144
121
123
155
1,242
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September 	
6
10
8
8
3
5
4
5
49
11
11
10
14
10
10
9
11
4
4
5
5
5
8
7
8
61
November  	
71
December	
12
14
11
11
4
6
10
9
77
January.  	
12
15
11
11
4
6
10
9
78
February.  	
14
16
14
11
5
6
10
9
85
March 	
14
17
15
12
5
7
12
11
93
April 	
14
18
16
12
7
7
13
11
98
May    ..
14
18
16
13
8
7
13
12
101
June	
14
19
15
13
8
7
13
13
102
The number of papers marked in the two centres were as follows: Victoria, 136,552;
Pouce Coupe, 11,126; total, 147,678.
In addition to the numbers of pupils shown above, adult students enrolled for various
courses from Grades I to VIII as follows:—
September   61
October   95
November   118
December  134
January   153
February    174
March    208
April    230
May   244
June   252
A total of 5,176 papers were marked in the adult section during the year.
As an additional service, kindergarten courses and kits were sent to seventy-five
5-year-old children who will be enrolling in our Grade I course in 1958/59.
During the year the arithmetic courses for Grades I and II were revised and the
Grade VIII section of the Senior Art Course was produced. These courses were devised,
written, and illustrated by instructors on the Victoria staff.
The Victoria staff consisted of the Director, thirteen instructors, and a clerical staff
of five; in Pouce Coupe, one instructor in charge and one assistant. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH W 65
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
The Text-book Branch has supplied the free and Rental Plan text-books, various
forms, and Programmes of Study to the schools and School Boards as and when required.
Orders for books from the various dealers throughout the Province were completed
promptly.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies during the school-year 1957/58 to
public and private schools and to correspondence students required an expenditure of
$548,451.70; 4,764 free requisitions were received and filled. This is an increase over
the previous year of $72,617.33, although the actual number of requisitions shows
a decrease of twenty-one orders. The combined orders, free and saleable, reached a total
of 20,423. From these orders a total of $885,434.28 was collected and deposited in the
Treasury, an increase from the previous year of $55,077.33 and ninety-seven orders.
A total of 2,695 Rental Plan requisitions were received, checked, and completed,
and $434,076.59 in rental fees and remittances for lost and damaged books was collected and deposited in the Treasury. This was an increase of $33,062.87 over last year.
During the year $4,904.20 was refunded to the pupils who left the school system prior
to March 31st.   This represents a decrease of $236.25 for the year.
The proper carrying-out of all of the detail involved in the above required the
willing co-operation of an efficient staff and school officials and, particularly, of secretary-
treasurers of the various School Boards. For this splendid co-operation, we are happy
to officially record our thanks.
The combined financial statement, presented in the form required by the Audit
Branch, includes the ninth covering covering the Text-book Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $527,698.92, is valued at the publisher's price
plus incoming freight. The rental stock in the various schools, $583,537.48, is valued
on the same basis, less depreciation. No allowance is made for the costs involved in
moving the stock from the text-book warehouse to the various schools.
Sales
The sales amounted to $1,074,904.76, less a discount of $208,196.25. Our revenue
over expenditure for the fiscal year is $61,487.39 after deducting salaries and other
overhead expenses.
Rentals
We received $422,932.60 in rental fees, which was an increase of 8.04 per cent over
the previous year. It will be noticed that the deficit for the year is $180,603.17. In spite
of increasing costs in transportation, etc., the excess of expenditure over revenue is less
than estimated in this subsidized scheme.
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand
Cash in bank
$850.00
Balance-sheet, March 31st,
1958
Assets
$100.00
750.00 W 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Inventory—
Stock on hand      $527,698.92
Consigned text-books  $1,143,090.23
Less depreciation1         559,552.75
 583,537.48
Accounts receivable  11,730.42
Outstanding publishers' credit notes   493.09
$1,124,309.91
1 Third year depreciation on 1955/56 inventory      $173,656.53
Second year depreciation on 1956/57 inventory  _      188,254.93
First year depreciation on 1957/58 inventory       197,641.29
$559,552.75
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders  $395.73
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account  850.00
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund     1,123,064.18
$1,124,309.91
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 3 1st, 1958
Sales
Revenue—
Sales    $ 1,074,904.76
Less discount        208,196.25
Net sales      $866,708.51
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1957.  $386,600.94
Purchases for year (cost, freight,
duty)       888,016.35
  $1,274,617.29
Inventory, March 31st, 1958        527,698.92
Cost of sales        746,918.3 7
Gross profit       $119,790.14
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages        $42,659.21
Packing and general expenses  4,570.63
Freight and delivery  10,932.10
Sundry expenses   140.81
  58,302.75
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1958         $61,487.39 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH W 67
Text-book Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected  $422,932.60
Opening rental inventory, March 31st, 1957      $550,166.38
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and S.S. Tax)..       592,923.85
$1,143,090.23
1957/58
Depreciation1
Inventory, March 31st, 1956- $520,969.57
Less three years' depreciation
at 33V& per cent per annum      520,969.57
  $173,656.53
Inventory, March 31st, 1957- $564,764.78
Less two years' depreciation at
33V3 per cent per annum__    376,509.86
     188,254.93
$188,254.92
Inventory, March 31st, 1958- $592,923.85
Less one year's depreciation at
33% per cent per annum-    197,641.29
     197,641.29
$395,282.56
Closing rental inventory at March 31st, 1958        583,537.48
Total depreciation for year 1957/
58   $559,552.75     $559,552.75
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages     $32,181.68
Packing and general expenses         3,448.07
Freight and delivery         8,247.04
Sundry expenses  106.23
  43,983.02
 603,535.77
Excess expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1958   $180,603.17
1 See footnote to balance-sheet. W 68
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1957/58
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR OF
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
A school broadcast supplements the work of the classroom teacher. It can add
point and vitality to routine teaching material, and it frequently helps fill in gaps in the
teacher's own ability and training, as in the case of music, English literature, or French.
Organization
In Canada, school broadcasts are a joint responsibility of each Provincial Department of Education and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The latter provides air
time and all the services and advice necessary to produce the broadcasts. The Department of Education pays all talent costs and provides a staff to take care of programme
planning, to maintain contact with schools, and to supervise the broadcast production.
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation assumes full responsibility for the Canada-wide
" National School Broadcasts," which are heard on Fridays. These are prepared with
the advice of the National Advisory Council on School Broadcasting, of which the Director for British Columbia is a member.
Programme Distribution
This year, school broadcasts were on the air from 2 to 2.30 p.m. each school-day
from September 30th to May 30th, a total of thirty weeks. The half-hour a day provided
by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is generally considered too long for one broadcast and is usually broken into ten,- fifteen-, or twenty-minute parts. In all, 253 programmes were broadcast during the year, distributed by subject-matter as follows:—
Subject
10-minute
Programmes
15-minute
Programmes
20-minute
Programmes
30-minute
Programmes
Per Cent of
Total Time
Music  	
51
64
13
18
2
7
4
31
5
15
28
1
5
7
2
40.5
31.5
English
Science
Art                                                     	
11.7
7.4
4.7
French
Health
Other  —    —   -  —.	
2.4
1.4
1.4
Totals..                         	
51
108
51
43
By grade level the proportion of broadcasts was primary, 23 per cent; intermediate,
78 per cent; junior high, 55 per cent; and senior high, 20 per cent. Overlapping from
one level to another will explain why these percentages total more than 100.
Coverage
Programmes were broadcast by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation over its
Vancouver and Prince Rupert stations and a network of thirty-one low-power " repeater "
stations. In addition, school broadcasts were carried by eight private stations affiliated
with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Radio coverage is more difficult in British
Columbia than in any other Canadian Province because of its rugged, highly mineralized
land-mass. It is estimated that from 20 to 25 per cent of the schools of the Province are
denied school broadcasts because of difficult reception. If all possible radio stations were
carrying school broadcasts, this situation would be considerably alleviated.
J DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS W 69
Just under 70 per cent of the schools of the Province have returned an annual report,
and just over 75 per cent of them report use of school broadcasts. From this it can be
seen that at least 52.5 per cent of the schools are known to have used broadcasts. Of the
total student enrolment, reports show that just under 100,000 or 40 per cent used school
broadcasts.
School districts reporting no use of broadcasts were Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 16, 51, 74,
76, 79, and 81. All the schools in Districts Nos. 11, 12, 14, and 21 used broadcasts.
A sampling of the larger districts shows these percentages of schools using broadcasts:—
istrict No.
23	
Percentage of
Schools Using
Broadcasts
  25
District No.
41	
Percentage of
Schools Using
Broadcasts
  84
24	
  58
57	
  36
27	
     7
59	
  36
36	
  51
61	
  85
39	
  78
From this the influence of geography can be easily seen, although there are other
factors at work. Continual school visiting is of vital importance, and it is regretted that
pressure of work at present makes this the least well performed of all the duties of this
branch.
Teacher-training and Assistance
The usual printed aids were circulated to teachers—The Teachers' Bulletin, song
sheets for both primary and intermediate grades, Pictures in the Air (art), and Ecoutez!
(French). In addition, teaching notes for one music series were duplicated and sent to
teachers on request. The increase in the amount of printed material requested keeps
pace with the increasing school population of the Province.
Discussions were held with classes of the College of Education both in Vancouver
and Victoria and at the summer sessions in both centres. In the latter case an attempt
was made to give the discussions a subject-matter emphasis. Valuable suggestions came
from most summer-session groups.
Evaluation
Throughout the year nearly 300 teachers reported on selected broadcasts, so that
opinions were received daily on such details as clarity of the programme, speed, content
value, suitability of maturity level, and so on. These are most effective in making day-today adjustments to production, and the co-operation of the evaluating teachers is much
appreciated.
Annual returns reveal statistics of coverage as mentioned above, and also assist in
evaluation of the year's programmes. For example, approximately a thousand Grade I
and II classrooms listened to " Song Time," the most popular broadcast series. The music
programmes for Grades III and IV were next in popularity, followed by the art series
" Pictures in the Air," one of the intermediate music series, and the special Centennial
series, " The Tale the Rivers Tell." The popularity of the French series " Ecoutez "
may be judged by the fact that it ranked eleventh in popularity, although it naturally caters
to a much more restricted audience than most. Least in popularity were a National school
series in music which proved to be too mature, a sports series which had been repeatedly
requested by a number of teachers, two short high-school programmes on the Geophysical
Year, and an English series originating outside the Province.
Teachers were asked to rate broadcasts on a four-point scale. In total, reports
showed 37 per cent A's, 51 per cent B's, 11 per cent Cs, and 86 per cent D's.
	 w 70 public schools report, 1957/58
Relations with Other Organizations
Throughout the year the continued co-operation of schools, School Boards, District
Superintendents, P.-T.A. groups, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and the private
radio stations once more point up the fact that this Division owes its success to the
interests of many diversified groups.   Our sincere thanks go to each of them.
Television
Although no school television programmes were released in this Province during the
year, the Director was asked to keep a watching brief on school television developments
in the rest of Canada and elsewhere. In connection with this, he acted as adviser to the
television sub-committee set up under the Curriculum Revision Advisory Board. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH W 71
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.Vjed., DIRECTOR
The work of the Division was largely concentrated on the production and final
release of new standardized tests during the school-year 1957/58.   Those added to the
series for which B.C. norms are available were:—
B.C. English 40, Language, Form A.
B.C. English 40, Literature, Form A.
B.C. Commerce 20 (Typewriting).
B.C. Commerce 21 (Shorthand).
B.C. French 10, Form A.
B.C. Ability to Read in the Fields of:
Social Studies, Form A.
Mathematics, Form A.
Ability to Read in Natural Sciences (Iowa Test of Educational Development)
Y-2.
With the exception of the latter test, which was available commercially, all of the
above have been developed from original items in the Division.   In most cases they have
undergone several revisions, extending back for several years.   The B.C. test series now
contains twenty-five locally developed achievement tests in addition to seventeen achievement and eleven scholastic aptitude tests of commercial origin.   Including terminal course
tests, Province-wide standardization has been completed for fifty-seven tests.
Two surveys previously conducted in 1950 and 1954 were repeated in 1958.
Readministration of the B.C. High School French test permitted comparisons to be made
between 7,016 French 20 students and 3,143 who took the former French II course.
Improvements were noted in the French Vocabulary, Grammar, and Civilization sub-tests
and a drop in Reading Comprehension. These probably are due to changes in the
curriculum, and text-book emphasis on an aural approach to the subject. Analyses and
comparisons are now under way of scholastic aptitude scores of students enrolled in the
great variety of electives in high school. These have been the basis of matriculation
standards since 1953/54, and a revision of scales will be undertaken to correspond to
any changes that may have occurred during the four-year period.
Comparisons have been made of the difficulties of similar arithmetic computation
items administered over a thirteen-year period and a wide range of grades.   They show
Gross Foreign and Net Interprovincial Migration of Children to British Columbia
Number of Foreign Children,
British Columbia
Destination
Net*
Canadian
Interprovincial
Approximate
Net
Age, 0-5.9
Age, 6-15.9
Gross, 0-15.9
0-15.9
1958 (nine months) 	
4,047
1,863
1,133
1,290
1,549
1,931
1,534
637
5,068
2,324
1,441
1,495
1,762
2,085
1,692
805
9,115
4,187
2,574
2,785
3,311
4,016
3,226
1,442
1,719
—288
5,344
9,831
5,857
2,039
1,929
3,676
3,069
-227
2,154
3,5003
1957  _	
14,400
1956
14,000
1955  . .. ...
8,400
1954
4,800
1953   ...
5,200
1952	
7,600
1951
6,200
1950	
1,200
1949	
763          |             956
3,800
Average, 1949-57. __ 	
1,639                    1,959
1
3,597
3,741
7,300
1 " Transfers in " minus " Transfers out " of Family-Allowance-receiving children.
2 Figures for the emigration of children to foreign countries are not available.
3 Estimate. W 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
remarkable stability and indicate the necessity of review and reteaching for a considerable
time after the items originally are taught.
Assistance is currently being given to the Royal Commission on Education in the
analysis of population, immigration, holding power, standards, and any other matters
involving statistical treatment. In connection with immigration, it is notable that although
British Columbia's net gain of children under the age of 16 exceeded 14,000 in each of
the previous two years, it will be the lowest in eight years in 1958.
Information obtained from the Registrar's office over a ten-year period shows trends
in certification of teachers and principals. It also shows the effect of the classification of
teachers for grant purposes, which was an outgrowth of the Cameron Report of 1945 and
was one of the first jobs undertaken while the formation of this Division was being considered. The table shows that the number of teachers with advanced certificates increased
from 470 in 1948/49 to 1,935 in 1957/58, and in terms of total teaching staff there was
an improvement from 9 to 19 per cent. That has largely been the result of summer-
school attendance. The improvement in the total proportion of those with basic or higher
certificates, however, has been very small (79.2 to 81.1 per cent), undoubtedly because
of the teacher shortage. The sudden increase in teacher-training enrolments forecast on
the basis of economic conditions in January, 1958, has materialized, but it is expected
that the shortage of fully qualified teachers will continue for some time.
Trends in Certification of British Columbia Teachers
1948/49
1949/50
1951/52
1954/55
1957/58
Type of Certificate
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
S A,
324
6.2
462
1,548
219
63
162
2,268
915
144
8.0
26.8
3.8
1.1
2.8
39.2
15.8
2.5
479
1,776
128
39
194
2,815
853
88
7.5
27.9
2.0
0.6
3.0
44.2
13.4
1.4
776 |      9.8
2,131  |    26.9
268 |      3.4
48 |      0.6
401  |      5.1
3,197 j    40.4
910 |    11.5
99 |      1.3
79 j      1.0
1,175
2,316
397
55
760
3,890
1,214
153
871
11.7
S.B    ..   .
1.426 1    27.3
23.1
S.C.
170
52
146
2,242
728
134
3.3
1.0
2.8
42.9
13.9
2.6
4.0
ST.
0.5
FA.
7.6
E.B.    ....                     .               	
38.7
vc.
12.1
E.T.                                         	
1.5
0.9
Totals	
5,222
79.2
5,781
76.8
6,372
82.6
7,909  |
1     R2.7.
10,047
81.1
1 Includes " doubtful " in 1957/58. DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
W 73
Education
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual
covering the period September 1st, 1957, to August 31st, 1958:—
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1                        I
339                     198                     266
200
34
204
92
5
245
589
168
236
151
234
34
35
337
37
116
58
532
474
233
285
809
707
770
76
1
79
16
68
179
341
504
78
233
342
499
432
741
827
363
619
761
918
160
456
271
505
130
179
34
	
3
16
87
9
207
74
30
359
69
	
300
281
182
245
252
18
261
831
278
191
212
439
390
248
361
138
105
54
203
604
561
101
183
136
10
135
463
148
101
117
261
208
156
217
128
83
30
161
331
306
39
267
135
8
453
860
271
331
198
306
43
59
492
40
161
73
721
717
332
4. Windermere	
5. Creston  	
7. Nelson 	
11. Trail                                 	
1?,   riranrt Forks
13. Kettle Valley	
18. Golden	
422                       154                      444
318
947
1,255
65
368
462
367
181
520
984
39
208
248
224
1,131
1,126
1,084
122
1
106
35
89
301
514
768
86
349
491
715
669
1,019
1,102
700
874
1,178
1,413
222
538
374
774
174
266
38
3
16
144
36
392
109
47
517
94
388
434
23. Kelowna 	
26. Birch Island   _
29. Lillooet  	
30,   Smith rafihnn
144                         80
31. Merritt     	
324
733
411
473
1,069
526
520
888
3,252
712
2,898
1,197
924
675
532
333
822
291
722
393
179
181
200
111
205
535
82
663
217
6,283
332
289
157
360
246
248
549
320
237
472
2,229
467
1,689
647
475
462
329
136
494
181
370
197
96
69
106
30
69
233
50
365
158
3,527
215
173
33. Chilliwack  	
34. Abbotsford   _
35. Langley  	
36. Surrey  	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River.	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte	
51. Portland Canal    „     ..
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers.	
57. Prince George _
58. McBride	
59. South Dawson _	
60. North Peace               ..   .
61. Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich 	 W 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1957/58
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
127
616
93
90
780
372
762
201
961
136
496
1,116
125
362
204
87
371
66
1,403
1,026
62
318
52
48
535
201
460
112
535
59
201
883
73
207
140
70
238
33
873
678
103
1,328
150
78
224
275
439
72
283
146
317
735
143
69
25
7
252
23
358
584
83
936
93
51
203
193
70. Alberni           	
300
71. Courtenay.                      ....                                             	
37
208
73. Alert Bay               .   .   .  .           	
85
221
75. Mission.     	
624
106
60
78. Enderby ...	
21
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
3
80. Kitimat      	
81. Fort Nelson             	
182
16
82. Chilcotin 	
199
Miscellaneous	
510
Totals              	
46.626         1       27.245
30.266         1       70.963
Requested
Picture sets   506
Dioramas   186
Stereos   812
Supplied
449
181
764
There were 791 schools registered with the Division for regular loan service.
Approximately 50,000 items of donated material were distributed to the schools.
The British Columbia Centennial Committee sponsored the production of the following filmstrips: B.C. History, Part 1, 1858; B.C. History, Part 2, 1858-1958; Then
and Now. A total of 2,700 copies of these filmstrips was produced by the Division for
distribution to the schools.
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT "
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1957/58 a total of 204 applications were considered by the
Commission. Of these, twenty-eight were turned down, the chief reason being that family
income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes.
One hundred and seventy-six applications were approved for grants, an increase of
thirty-five over the previous year. Students were distributed by grades as follows: Grade
IX, 43; Grade X, 50; Grade XI, 50; and Grade XII, 33. During the year thirteen
students dropped out and grants were discontinued.
The students in the greatest financial need received $127.40 for the year; the balance
received $112.40. In addition, thirteen students who showed outstanding ability were
granted a bonus of $20. STATISTICAL RETURNS  STATISTICAL RETURNS
W 77
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