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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST 1958 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1959

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1958
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1958
is herewith respectfully submitted.
LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
February, 1959. The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Forty-first Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1958.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1959. Department of Labour
OFFICIALS
Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. G. Murray, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. A. Little, Administrative Assistant, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. M. Purdie, Chief Inspector of Factories, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
V. S. Hurrell, Director of Apprenticeship, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
W. Fraser, Chief Conciliation Officer, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Francis C. Dickins, Compensation Counsellor, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Director, Equal Pay Act and Fair Employment Practices Act,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C. Court-house, Kelowna, B.C.
523 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C. P.O. Box 820, Terrace, B.C.
Court-house, Nanaimo, B.C. P.O. Box 1317, Cranbrook, B.C.
301, 1411 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C. Court-house, Nelson, B.C.
Goodchild Building, Mission City, B.C. P.O. Box 1032, Dawson Creek, B.C.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters:   Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
E. Campbell, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters:   Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
E. Campbell, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. Coton, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
C. E. Gerhart, Chairman, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W. H. Welsh, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. S. Beck, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
M. L. Barr, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOL REGULATIONS OFFICERS
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton. V. S. Hurrell. C. E. Gerhart.
5 F 6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDIAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Professor E. H. Morrow, B.A., M.B.A., F.C.I., LL.D., Chairman, 2275 West Thirty-ninth Avenue,
Vancouver 13, B.C.
Chief William Scow, Vice-Chairman, Box 177, Alert Bay, B.C.
Edward Bolton, Member, Port Essington, B.C.
Capt. Charles W. Cates, Member, 266 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver, B.C.
Mrs. J. O. Decker, Member, Pemberton, B.C.
L. P. Guichon, D.Sc, Member, Quilchena, B.C.
Chief Edison White, Member, No. 1 Indian Reserve, Nanaimo, B.C.
Miss J. R. Wright, Director, Indian Advisory Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Summary of Contents
Page
List of Acts Affecting Labour Inside front cover
Highlights of 1957 Report  9
Statistics of Trades and Industries  11
Employers' Returns  11
Payroll  12
Previous Provincial Payrolls  12
Comparison of Payrolls  13
Census Divisions  14
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries  16
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings  17
Industrial Wage  18
Firms with Large Payrolls  20
Employment  21
Statistical Tables  26
Summary of All Tables  39
" Hours of Work Act "  40
Average Weekly Hours  41
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers  43
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour  45
Board of Industrial Relations  46
Meetings and Delegations  46
Orders and Regulations Made during 1958  47
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees  48
Summary of All Occupations  54
Comparison of 1956 Earnings to Legal Minimum  55
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)  55
Statistics for Male Employees  58
Investigations and Wage Adjustments  60
Court Cases  60
Special Licences  61
Change in Board Membership  61
Conclusion  61
" Labour Relations Act "—Report of Labour Relations Branch  62
Settlements by Conciliation Officers  63
Arbitration Boards  63
Table I.—Analysis of Certificates Issued in 1958  63
Table II.—Summary of Cases Dealt With, 1953-58  64
Table III.—Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant
Cause  64
Strikes and Lockouts in British Columbia, 1958  64
Table IV.—Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1958  65
7 F 8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Page
" Labour Relations Act "—Continued
Table V.—Industrial Disputes Occurring in British Columbia during 1958 but
not within Scope of " Labour Relations Act"  67
Table VI.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1948-58  68
Table VII.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1958  68
Legal Proceedings Involving Labour Relations Board  68
Annual Survey of Organized Labour  69
Table VIII.—Number of Labour Organizations Reported, etc  70
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial Classifications, 1958  70
Organizations of Employees  71
Organizations of Employers  8 8
Control of Employment of Children  90
" Equal Pay Act"  91
" Fair Employment Practices Act"  92
Inspection of Factories  93
Factories  93
Industrial Homework  93
Elevators  93
Factory Inspections  95
Conclusion  95
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch  96
Trade-schools Regulation Administrative Office  100 Highlights of the 1957 Statistical Report
on Trades and Industries*
This statistical report for the year 1957, the fortieth issued by the Department, marks
a period of adjustment from the "boom" conditions of the previous year, a pause for
readjustment in the face of adverse circumstances affecting some sections of the general
economy.
A surge of widespread expansion, new development, and heavy construction, which
had featured the 1956 era, continued apace. The engineering and development of electric-power sources and transportation facilities again received priority in the programme
for progress in 1957, with urgent demands for additional power for industry and the needs
of a growing population hastening expansion schedules in most instances.
Problems of marketing and declines in world metal prices continued to beset the
forest and mining industries, creating uncertain and hazardous situations for many operators. Difficulties in the lumber industries increased, with some slackening in the rate of
domestic building during the year, the general situation being further complicated by
heavy stock-piling, due to lower price structures, and a reduced demand for some
products.
While the number of domestic housing units completed was somewhat lower than
during the previous year, the decrease in this direction was offset by considerable increase
in other phases of the industry, including commercial construction, and the completion of
many new public buildings and facilities.
The downward trend of world prices for base metals was responsible for a further
decline in the mining industry, with many operations suspended or curtailed, due largely
to the uncertainty of the price structures.
Despite unfavourable trends in world markets, and labour troubles during the latter
portion of the year, the pulp and paper industry continued an extensive programme of
expansion, and preparation for increased production in the future. Development of new
plants and the completion of additions to existing facilities rounded out a busy year in
this section.
Earnings continued higher for industrial workers, the rate of increase being a little
slower than noted during the previous year.
The average industrial-wage figure computed for all male wage-earners included in
the coverage of the 1957 survey was $76.52, an increase of $2.90 above the previous high
of $73.62 reported in 1956.
Industrial payroll totals continued higher in eighteen of the twenty-five classifications
mentioned in the statistical section, which follows in this Report for 1957.
Greatest increase during the year was again in the heavy construction industries,
with payrolls increased a further $25,900,000 from the 1956 total. Second largest increase was noted in public utilities, where payroll totals were higher by some $10,500,000-
Metal-trades industries reported payrolls advanced by $7,400,000, while the food-products manufacturing industries recorded payroll increases of over $4,600,000. Cartage,
trucking, and warehousing operations increased, with payrolls up over $3,500,000, while
ship-building and boat-building also recorded a similar advance, with payrolls up in
excess of $3,500,000. Payrolls in coast shipping increased by some $3,000,000, while
oil refining and distributing was higher by $2,800,000 and printing and publishing pay-
* Due to the time entailed obtaining returns, it is not possible to include in the 1958 Report statistics of trades
and industries for that year.   Satisfies relating to 1958 will be included in the 1959 Annual Report of the Department. F 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
rolls showed a gain of $2,700,000. For others in order of increase see "Comparison of
Payrolls " in the Report data.
Employment was noticeably higher during the first portion of the year, with monthly
totals increasing to a peak during the month of August, when the summary total of industrial workers employed stood at 224,130, as compared with 221,732 noted for the same
month in 1956. Most significant increases in employment appeared in public utilities,
pulp and paper manufacturing, printing and publishing, oil refining and distribution, food-
products manufacturing, construction, and others in lesser degree. Major employment
losses occurred in the forest and mining industries, due to adverse conditions experienced
during the year.
The trend toward a shorter industrial work-week continued in 1957, the average
working-hours for all wage-earners in the 1957 survey being recorded at a new low of
41.06 hours, down from 41.36 hours for an average week during the previous year. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F  11
Statistics of Trades and Industries
The 1957 statistical section presents a cross-section of our industrial economy
with respect to payrolls, employment, earnings, and hours of labour, and sets out in
review the various elements of change and fluctuation which occurred during the past
twelve months, and their general effects on the working force.
Employers' Returns Total 9,424
Total number of industrial firms reported in active operation during 1957 was a
little below the 1956 high, while compared with the previous year a considerable increase
was noted in the number of firms reporting no operation, or out of business during the
survey period.
Survey figures were based on returns from 9,424 industrial firms in 1957, as against
a high of 9,570 reporting in time for tabulation in 1956.
Since many firms when reporting file returns in more than one industrial classification, the term " number of firms reporting " where mentioned in the text has reference
actually to the number of returns tabulated.
Industrial Payroll Totals, 1952-57
$1,000,000,000
900,000,000
800,000,000 F 12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Payroll
Total expenditure for salaries and wages as reported by the 9,424 industrial firms
filing returns in time for classification in the 1957 Report was $903,235,994, this amount
being considered as representing the British Columbia industrial payroll for that year.
An approximation of the entire Provincial estimated payroll, however, may be approached
by the addition of supplementary figures as noted below, comprising other items of labour
expenditure not already included in the industrial total. This accumulative figure, comprising the industrial summary together with supplementary items as listed, was estimated
at $1,500,000,000 for 1957.
Payrolls of 9,424 firms making returns to Department of Labour      $903,235,994
Returns received too late to be included in above
summary  1,033,515
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll).  58,721,726
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers
covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the
tables—namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)         537,008,765
Total  $ 1,500,000,000
Previous Provincial Payrolls
1943     $394,953,031
        388,100,000
      383,700,000
        432,919,727
      557,075,508
      639,995,979
      671,980,815
      718,202,028
—       815,173,090
       979,364,603
 _   1,066,979,019
   1,107,897,363
— _ _  1,216,605,269
   1,417,409,982!
 _  1,500,000,0002
1 1956 total revised since 1956 Report.
2 1957 preliminary total subject to revision.
In reference to the above sequence of annual payroll totals, it should be noted that
at the publication date of each year's Report and for the following twelve months the
new figure is considered as strictly a preliminary estimate. As additional data become
available, the current total is revised and subject to reprint in the Report issue for the
following year.
A distribution of the annual industrial payroll total into three main classifications
of expenditure is obtained from the survey summaries, which divide the salaries and
wages into three portions involving executive, clerical, and wage-earner groups. A percentage figure representing the proportion of total expended in each group is shown in
the table following, with comparative figures for previous years:—
1928  	
  $183,097,781
1943
1929 	
  192,092,249
1944
1930
_  167,133,813
1945
1931 	
131,941,008
1946
1937
102,957,074
1947
1933 	
99,T26,fi53
1948
1934  	
. .   113,567,953
1949
1935  	
125,812,140
1950
1936  ...
_    142,349,591
1951
1937 	
162,654,234
1952
1938 	
158,026,375
1953
1939  	
165,683,460
1954
1940   	
   188,325,766
1955
1941  	
  239,525,459
1956
1942	
321,981,489
1957 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 13
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers —
Per Cent
9.90
12.92
77.18
Per Cent
10.85
13.20
75.95
Per Cent
10.99
12.88
76.13
Per Cent
10.56
13.30
76.14
Per Cent
11.22
13.95
74.83
Totals	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
Comparison of Payrolls
Although heavy set-backs occurred in some basic industries, industrial payrolls
were generally higher in 1957, and decreases, where noted, were easily offset by gains
in other sections of the economy. Pressures of continued expansion in new industrial
and commercial development pushed the over-all annual payroll total to a new high,
some $52,901,595 above the 1956 figure, and representing a gain of 6.2 per cent.
Most sizeable increase was again in the construction industries, where payrolls advanced a further $25,906,605 from the record high established during the previous year.
Public utilities gained rapidly during 1957, with payrolls increased by $10,529,152,
while the metal-trades industries was third in line, with payroll increases amounting to
$7,423,349. Labour costs in the manufacturing of food products increased by
$4,653,526, followed by cartage, trucking, and warehousing operations, with payrolls
up $3,581,655. Ship-building and boat-building payrolls showed an increase of
$3,555,224; coast shipping, a gain of $3,049,384; oil refining and distributing, up
$2,828,220; and printing and publishing payrolls, an increase of $2,778,678. Miscellaneous trades and industries were ahead by $2,595,511, followed by smelting and concentrating, with payroll totals increased by $2,538,165, and pulp and paper manufacturing up $1,914,432. Builders' materials registered a gain of $1,363,558 in payroll
totals; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, an increase of $801,569; laundries, cleaning
and dyeing increased by $397,964; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, a gain of $322,866; jewellery manufacturing and repair increased by $138,696;
and leather- and fur-goods manufacturing, an increase of $23,617.
Major decrease in labour expenditures occurred in the lumber industries, where
payrolls dropped by $16,373,224, due to curtailment of production in the face of
uncertain market conditions and weakening price structures. Whereas in 1956 wood-
manufacturing (N.E.S.) had recorded a gain in excess of $4,700,000, 1957 payrolls in
this section were lower by some $2,313,792. Lower base-metal prices throughout the
world resulted in shut-down or closure of many operations in the mining industry, with
a loss of annual payroll amounting to $2,120,250 in this direction. Minor decreases
were also noted in the payrolls of coast shipping, house furnishings, and garment-
manufacturing in comparison with 1956 figures. F  14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
1955
1956
1957
Industry
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
Breweries, "distilleries, and aerated-water
46
190
506
12
140
2,067
40
582
86
144
33
157
80
2,329
1,776
115
551
96
19
181
15
77
10
109
176
$6,457,296
12,959,818
14,664,293
4,685,181
30,113,737
104,687,077
8,912,460
48,466,195
4,049,382
5,389,426
992,141
7,047,830
1,960,155
162,695,375
74,813,385
24,010,841
36,805,107
15,490,704
2,149,905
17,047,391
34,861,760
15,191,667
28,208,052
45,734,807
24,421,792
45
196
535
16
129
2,156
50
563
79
143
36
152
69
2,302
1,782
116
539
87
17
175
14
79
9
108
173
$7,144,882
15,824,549
18,115,390
4,952,625
31,571,633
148,371,033
8,844,126
52,311,577
4,158,479
7,059,603
1,088,502
7,865,948
2,245,291
170,078,997
91,255,832
27,015,162
43,212,059
17,316,146
2,202,984
17,864,032
36,066,110
20,898,498
32,441,552
53,238,701
29,190,688
44
209
587
14
121
2,189
52
554
73
132
35
145
68
2,084
1,860
90
513
93
15
176
15
79
6
104
166
$7,467,748
17,188,107
21,697,045
Coal-mining    	
4,548,221
34,621,017
Construction 	
174,277,638
9,645,695
56,965,103
4,047,484
House furnishings  	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair 	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing  	
6,885,649
1,227,198
8,263,912
2,268,908
Lumber industries. 	
153,705,773
98,679,181
Metal-mining  	
Miscellaneous trades and industries ..
24,894,912
45,807,570
20,144,366
2,199,027
20,642,710
37,980,542
24,453,722
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones,
etc _	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) ~	
34,979,717
63,767,853
26,876,896
Totals	
9,537
$731,815,777
9,570
$850,334,399
9,424
$903,235,994
Census Divisions
Reflecting the phenomenal growth which has occurred during recent years, industrial payroll figures recorded for the ten British Columbia census areas reveal the far-
reaching effect of expansion and new development in those areas particularly affected.
Broadening of our industrial horizons northward in the exploitation of additional
sources of hydro-electric power, and the widening search for mineral wealth, natural gas,
and oil reserves has hastened the development of additional roads and transportation
facilities, and continues to present a challenge and an invitation to future ventures of
new enterprise and industry.
Payrolls of the larger metropolitan areas continue to show a growing concentration
of business and industry in rapidly expanding centralized sectors. With the rate of growth
in these areas, the gradual merging of urban areas with close-lying municipal and inter-
urban districts creates considerable difficulty in the matter of payroll segregation, and
for statistical purposes these composite sectors are therefore shown under heading of
" Census Metropolitan Areas."
Separate industrial payroll totals are shown in the following section for the " Census
Metropolitan Area of Vancouver " and the " Census Metropolitan Area of Victoria," with
mention of the municipalities and districts included in the totals and comparative figures
for the previous year. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F  15
CENSUS
DIVISION
British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the Comparative
Years 1954 to 1957
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1954
1955
1956
1957
No. 1   	
No. 2                       	
$17,125,372
32,519,954
20,790,437
389,154,398
117,023,841
12,487,726
22,351,967
18,012,903
23,458,261
3,387,399
5,224,932
$18,197,303
35,044,981
25,599,069
417,102,635
127,543,124
15,313,185
26,336,337
23,336,723
36,329,470
4,591,602
2,421,348
$20,519,964
39,484,744
25,595,831
489,455,851
142,538,408
19,244,778
31,397,256
27,477,359
47,205,898
5,286,187
2,128,123
$19,351,672
41,231,542
24,471,475
541,413,422
144,072,303
16,560,167
35,770,167
23,406,971
No. 3	
No. 4 	
No. 5 	
No. 6 	
No. 7       	
No. 8      _ 	
No. 9   	
No. 10	
41,978,977
13,504,050
1,475,248
Totals	
$661,537,190
$731,815,777
$850,334,399
$903,235,994 F 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industrial Payroll Totals Reported for the Census Metropolitan Areas of
Vancouver and Victoria, 1956 and 1957
Area
Payroll (Salaries and Wages)
1956
1957
Census Metropolitan Area of Vancouver, including Vancouver City, North Vancouver City and District, West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Fraser
Mills, Richmond, Surrey, Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam, and Port Moody 	
Census Metropolitan Area of Victoria, including Victoria City, Esquimau, Oak
Bay, and Saanich	
$438,319,529
55,182,266
$485,783,691
61,269,565
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries
The percentage gain in weekly earnings for industrial workers during 1957 was not
quite as high as for the preceding year, although increases were substantial in most industries. The over-all increase in average weekly earnings for all industrial wage-earners
included in the survey amounted to 3.94 per cent, compared with a gain of 4.47 per cent
in 1956.
Average weekly earnings were higher in twenty-one of the twenty-five industrial
classifications relating to the wage-earner group, the minor exceptions, where noted, representing fractional decreases in the averages due to fluctuations in employment rather than
to a lowering of the actual wage rate.
Shown in the table immediately following are the average weekly earnings for male
wage-earners, based on one week of greatest employment in each industry under survey
for the years 1950 to 1957.
Average Weekly Earnings in Each Industry (Male Wage-earners)
Industry
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers  	
Builders' materials —_	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing
$46.86
50.90
49.52
54.22
46.43
53.57
51.72
47.17
44.51
41.93
45.71
42.70
40.21
55.49
47.94
56.25
43.95
57.47
43.17
53.18
56.34
52.68
54.29
50.83
48.82
$51.42
54.34
55.10
58.86
53.29
61.57
59.50
53.82
47.49
46.78
54.88
47.57
44.18
61.89
53.77
63.58
48.14
63.88
47.31
58.87
63.74
62.51
63.76
56.88
54.85
$57.75
60.19
58.20
62.97
54.05
65.16
61.92
56.23
52.69
51.71
54.37
50.75
47.63
64.70
57.82
67.29
51.05
64.00
50.36
61.94
65.79
66.03
64.95
60.72
59.29
$61.11
64.33
64.09
66.11
58.46
70.62
66.86
58.71
54.531
53.94
56.54
51.35
48.98
67.68
61.40
71.35
54.71
70.23
52.511
68.33
71.22
70.64
69.32
66.36
60.96
$63.41
67.77
66.55
66.89
60.39
74.06
69.44
61.10
56.56
54.46
59.85
54.88
51.26
71.08
63.68
70.15
56.48
74.98
56.40
73.26
77.38
76.72
72.88
73.10
63.26
$68.43
68.34
69.34
66.53
61.63
74.96
71.77
62.62
57.55
58.97
62.11
56.44
54.82
72.50
65.54
73.62
60.89
79.36
60.38
74.72
78.99
77.51
76.11
74.67
65.56
$69.53
70.42
70.03
71.99
64.43
78.41
76.82
65.94
62.70
64.67
69.35
63.13
55.79
74.62
70.22
78.04
65.00
80.99
60.53
77.51
81.18
82.89
79.19
76.34
67.85
$71.70
77.08
73.45
71.29
Coast shipping  	
Construction     —	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals
69.38
81.64
79.79
68.52
62.68
66.05
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
69.32
64.31
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing...
59.37
76.87
72.43
Metal-mining   	
Miscellaneous trades and industries   .
81.48
66.28
84.17
64.10
79.52
84.09
84.44
83.23
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
75.95
70.28
1 Revised since 1953 Report. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 17
Increases and decreases noted in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners
in the 1957 survey are as follows:—
Increases
Breweries, distilleries,
manufacturers 	
Builders' materials 	
and aerated-water
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing 	
Coast shipping 	
Construction    	
$2.17
6.66
3.42
4.95
3.23
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals     2.97
Food-products manufacturing     2.58
House furnishings      1.38
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing      1.18
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing      3.58
Lumber industries 	
Metal trades ._	
Metal-mining
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing 	
Paint manufacturing 	
Printing and publishing
Pulp and paper manufacturing ..
Ship-building and boat-building
Smelting and concentrating
Wood-manufacturing   (N.E.S.)   	
$2.25
2.21
3.44
1.28
3.18
3.57
2.01
2.91
1.55
4.04
2.43
Decreases
Coal-mining   	
Street-railways, gas,  water,  power,  telephones, etc 	
$0.70
0.39
Jewellery manufacturing and repair   $0.03
Garment-manufacturing      0.02
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings
Earnings for clerical workers were generally higher in 1957 than during the previous
year, although the average increase was not as great as in 1956.
The inclusion of sales personnel in the totals of clerical workers used in this section
is responsible to some extent for fluctuations which may be noted from year to year in
some instances, where the effect of an exceptionally good year or a poor business cycle
may tend to be reflected in the earnings of this class of employee.
Higher earnings were generally shared by both male and female workers in the
clerical section, the average for this group in all industries showing an advance of 3.2
per cent for males and a rise of 4.6 per cent for females, in comparison with previous
levels.
Average weekly earnings for male clerical workers in all industries under survey
increased to $80.88 in 1957, up from $78.35 reported in 1956. The 1957 weekly
average for female employees in this category was recorded at $50.42, increased from
$48.20 previously noted.
Comparative average weekly earnings for male and female clerical workers in the
various industries under survey are shown in the following table for the years 1956
and 1957:— F  18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industry
1956
1957
Males
Females
Males
Females
$75.72
74.09
70.94
78.75
71.44
76.39
86.42
71.62
61.54
72.80
65.42
72.26
67.65
83.23
73.94
89.97
70.33
79.87
70.65
74.83
88.85
81.50
92.47
80.76
82.32
$48.95
45.09
42.16
43.00
48.13
47.28
48.76
45.60
49.17
47.49
47.32
40.93
43.49
50.40
46.54
52.37
49.64
54.09
44.39
44.56
53.38
43.25
55.01
50.29
51.39
$75.98
80.72
72.58
79.08
74.91
79.43
89.15
75.98
59.51
74.36
66.86
72.88
75.79
85.52
76.66
92.37
74.42
83.04
74.65
77.88
91.50
84.16
92.66
81.97
84.64
$50.44
46.85
44.06
Coal-mining      	
42.33
50.85
50.47
52.95
47.92
48.55
48.35
43.27
42.40
45.84
52.70
48.67
52.52
51.43
58.83
51.78
Printing and publishing _ _   	
47.70
55.50
46.37
55.39
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc  	
52.01
51.81
$78.35
$48.20
$80.88
$50.42
Industrial Wage
Income from wages and salaries in the industrial field continued to gain during 1957,
supporting a high rate of consumer spending, in spite of further increases in retail price
levels.
Representing weekly earnings for male wage-earners in all industrial occupations, the
1957 average climbed to a new high of $76.52, an increase of $2.90 above the previous
record mark of $73.62 set in 1956.
Similar figures computed as the average weekly earnings of industrial workers for the
comparative years 1918 to 1957 are as follows:—
1918...
1919
1920.
1921__
1922..
1923.
1924..
1925...
1926__
1927-
1928...
1929..
1930_.
1931_
1932...
1933..
1934_.
1935_
1936.
1937..
$27.97
1938.
29.11
1939
31.51
1940
27.62
1941.
27.29
1942
28.05
1943
28.39
1944
27.82
1945.
27.99
1946
28.29
1947.
28 96
1948
29.20
1949.
28.64
1950
26.17
1951
23.62
1952
22.30
1953
23.57
1954
24.09
1955.
26.36
1956
26.64
1957
$26.70
26.80
28.11
30.67
35.24
37.19
38.70
38.50
39.87
43.49
47.30
49.21
51.88
58.67
61.78
65.61
68.70
70.47
73.62
. 76.52 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 19
Based on the computed average figures previously noted for each year, the chart
shows the trend of average weekly earnings for all male wage-earners during the period
1918 to 1957.
Average Weekly Earnings of Male Wage-earners, 1918—57
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
EARNINGS
TEAR
me
J9F9 |f920
HI
.922
1923
1924
1925
F926
m
!?23
1929
[-330
I9_i
1932
1933
193.
i.35
1936
1937
1938
1939 19*0
1941
1942
1943
I9W
1945
1946
1947
:'•■>:
1949
I9K-
195)
!952
1953
1954
■753
■756
957
76.00
75.00
74,00
71.00
72.00
71.00
70.00
69.00
6B.00
67.00
66.00
65.00
64.00
63.00
62.00
61.00
60.00
59.00
58.00
57.00
56.00
55.00
54.00
53.00
52.00
51.00
50.00
49.00
48.00
47.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
/
f
>
'
/
/
i
/
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t
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f
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JZ_
|lto
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r-T-T-f-
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—
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41.00
40.00
39.00
38.00
37.00
36,00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
™
:,
,.| 1 1
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.:':;
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■1  '    !
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 1_
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to.4
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(1957 figure, $76.52.) F 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Wage Distribution
1956                            1957
30/S
£0'°
°n" .  .                                                                                                                                                      1
OJSo '
15%                                          -  -                                                           -  -1-      -
10%                                                        1-
K%
___-                                    _k                                                                                                     ■-
I-l                                                             1                                       1
1           .    I    111                                                             1           _,    .    Ill
1    ■IIIII                                                             1    llllll
&    Kl_"loio»/".s©r--©a.o..n©rt\©
<$     800.©CSO\rtO\C^SOcnOVOCS
©    SO    CS   Tr
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M     H    rt     rH     H
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The above bar diagrams indicate the varying percentages of male wage-earners in
a series of fixed wage classifications through the years 1956 and 1957.
Firms with Large Payrolls
Inspired confidence in the future of British Columbia's industrial growth is graphically portrayed in the annual survey of firms reporting in the higher payroll brackets.
The 1957 study of industrial firms with payrolls of $100,000 and over showed a continuation of the trend established during the previous year, with further emphasis on heavy
capital investment in new industrial and commercial construction, and a continuing programme of expansion and development in power and transportation facilities. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES F 21
A proportionate distribution of the larger firms throughout the industrial coverage
and a close look at the concentration of labour force in certain basic industries may be
obtained in the following section, the figures, however, excluding payrolls in wholesale
or retail trade, transcontinental railways, and public authorities (Federal, Provincial, or
municipal).
Compared with the previous year, a further increase was apparent in the number of
industrial firms reporting in the upper brackets, a total of 1,241 firms showing payrolls
of $100,000 or over in the 1957 survey, compared with 1,189 reported in 1956, an
increase of 52.
While for some years the lumber industries had maintained the lead with the greatest
number of firms in the larger payroll group, the construction industry was first in 1957,
with a total of 253 firms reporting in this category, an increase of 27 above the figure
for the previous year. Although the lumber industry was in second place, and still high
with a total of 238 firms reporting in the large payroll category, this figure represented a
decrease of 33 from the previous year's high mark of 271 for this section.
Metal trades followed in third position, with a total of 193 firms with larger payrolls, increased by 20 from the figure for 1956. Food-products manufacturing remained
fourth in order of greatest number, with 101 firms reporting in the upper brackets during
1957, an increase of 6 from the previous year. Miscellaneous trades and industries
reported 81 firms in the higher payroll classification, an increase of 2; coast shipping, 41,
a decrease of 2; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), 38, a gain of 3; printing and publishing,
36, an increase of 9; cartage, trucking, and warehousing, 34, increased by 2; builders'
materials, 30, an increase of 4; metal-mining, 24, a drop of 2; public utilities section, 22,
increased by 1; house furnishings, 20, an increase of 6; ship-building and boat-building,
20, increased by 4; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 18, unchanged from the previous
year, oil refining and distribution, 16, also unchanged; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-
water manufacturers, 14, a drop of 1; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, 14, an
increase of 6; pulp and paper manufacturing, 13, increased by 1; garment-manufacturing, 11, a decrease of 2; leather and fur goods, 6, no change from the previous figure;
paint-manufacturing, 6, also unchanged; smelting and concentrating, 5, up 1; and coalmining and jewellery manufacturing and repair, 4 and 3 respectively, both showing no
change from figures for the previous year.
The 1957 industrial survey showed a total of 122 firms with payrolls of over
$1,000,000, as compared with 117 firms noted in this group during 1956. In this special
classification the returns showed 25 firms exceeding $5,000,000, 6 between $4,000,000
and $5,000,000, 9 between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, 11 between $2,000,000 and
$3,000,000, and 71 between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000.
Employment
Employment summaries mounted rapidly during the first few months of 1957,
passing the high point reached during the previous year in the month of August, when
the monthly summary total for all industries reporting was 1.8 per cent higher than the
1956 figure for the same month.
Further growth in population, together with the continuing high rate of new construction and industrial expansion during the first half of the year, created record employment totals in those industries affected, with increases ranging as high as 17.3 per cent
during the month of greatest employment.
Twelve of the twenty-five industrial classifications reported higher employment totals
than previously recorded, the most important increases showing in public utilities, pulp
and paper manufacturing, printing and publishing, oil refining and distribution, food-
products manufacturing, construction, and others in lesser degree. F 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Heaviest losses in employment were noted in the lumber and mining industries,
where curtailment in production and termination of many operations due to marketing
and price difficulties brought lower figures in these classifications, which normally
account for a greater proportion of the total labour-supply.
Of the thirteen industries recording decreases, the lumber industries reported a drop
of 15.6 per cent during the month of greatest employment in 1957. Others noted were
house furnishings, down 11.8 per cent; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), a decrease of 11.2
per cent; metal-mining, down 10.1 per cent; coal-mining, a decrease of 8.1 per cent;
garment-manufacturing, off 6.8 per cent; while minor decreases also occurred in the
miscellaneous trades and industries section, jewellery manufacturing and repair, smelting
and concentrating, leather- and fur-goods manufacturing, and various industries in smaller
degree.
The high and low monthly totals noted in each industry during 1957 are shown in
the following table, together with comparative data for 1956. Also following in this
section are charts dealing with the over-all trends of employment for clerical workers, the
wage-earner group, and total industrial employment for 1957 and previous years.
Table Showing the Amount or Variation of Employment in Each Industry
in the Last Two Years1
1956
1957
Industry
°    i,
°    i,
•a
°    &
u 4>
_=    o
£ o
.fi      o
% 0
s:    o
2 °
Mont
Most
Emp:
ment
Eft
c Sja-g
Pa
C "O-c
Ea
Ea
ZW
ogES
S_iu£
zl
oopg
SSwE
Zw
2 JU E
IN
Zui
Breweries,   distilleries,   and   aerated-
Aug	
1,956
Feb	
1,563
July...	
1,986
Feb	
1,501
July	
3,968
Feb	
3,403
Aug..	
3,977
Jan	
3,265
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Sept	
5,048
Jan.
3,916
July	
5,361
Feb	
4,707
1,476
Sept	
1,277
Feb.
1,366
1,240
Aug	
8,817
Oct	
7,712
8.847
7,417
Aug	
36,796
26,205
July	
39,735
Dec	
27,105
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals.—
Apr	
2,104
July...
1,978
Aug	
2,191
Feb....
2,046
20,404
Feb	
12,024
22,183
12,267
Garment-manufacturing _	
Feb	
1,584
June	
1,418
Mar	
1,483
Nov	
1,295
Nov	
2,147
1,864
1,921
May
Apr	
1,702
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
462
Feb	
371
Dec.  .. .
450
389
Laundries, cleaning, and dyeing..	
Aug	
3,326
Jan	
2,892
July	
3,308
Jan.   .
2,949
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing
Lumber industries 	
739
658
May	
July	
728
625
43,236
Dec. .
33,106
37,397
Dec.
27,931
Oct	
22,285
Jan	
19,006
July
May	
23,311
19,203
Metal-mining   -	
July	
5,967
TSpc.
5,287
5,419
Dec	
4,224
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Aug	
12,179
Feb	
9,630
Aug	
11,657
Jan.    . ..
9,504
Oil refining and distributing	
Dec	
3,429
Apr.
2,964
Sept	
3,776
Mar	
3,439
549
Dec...
493
July
June	
543
467
Printing and publishing .__	
4,194
Jan 	
3,983
4,679
Jan	
4,448
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
July	
7,268
Jan	
6,764
July	
8,268
Dec	
7,041
Ship-building and boat-building _	
Dec.
5,403
Jan	
4,241
May	
5,397
Dec	
4,153
Smelting and concentrating	
Sept	
7,566
6,423
July.. .  .
7,422
Dec.	
6,652
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
telephones, etc.	
Nov	
14,692
Feb	
12,896
Aug	
17,235
14,568
Oct....
8,335
7,135
July	
Aug....
7,496
5,872
221,732
179,194
224,130
Dec.
176,828
1 Industrial employment totals include clerical and sales staffs in addition to wage-earners, and are based on the
number of employees reported on the payrolls on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Employment of Clerical Workers in Industry, 1956 and 19571
F 23
35,000
34,500
34,000
33,500
33,000
32,500
32,000
31,500
31,000
30,500
30,000
29,500
29,000
28,500
28,000
27,500
27,000
26,500
26,000
1,500
1,000
500
(1957)
(1956)
^
y
/
^
'/
f
r-v^.
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc, but not
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
January —
February
March .	
April 	
31,072
31,124
31,553
31,766
Clerical Workers, 1957
(Male and Female)
May .	
June 	
July .....
August
32,668
33,195
33,666
33,451
September
October 	
November
December
_ 32,931
... 32,514
_ 32,453
... 31,957 Average Monthly Number of Wage-earners (Male and Female)
1941, 1945, 1949, 1954, 1955, 1956,and 1957
|jan.   j Feb.   [Mar. JApr.   j May   ] June   j July   ] Aug.  |s
ept. | Oct. j Nov. | Dec.
195,000
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165, 000
160,000
155,000
150,000
145,000
140,000
135, 000
130, 000
125,000
120,000
115,000
110,000
105, 00"0
100,000
95,000
90,000
85, 000
1956
1955
1957
1954
1949
1945
1941
J,
)
/
^^^
\   \
\    \
A
i
\
//
•
.•
A
I
/
\\-
/
/
/
c
//     c
V
)
/
,/
\
\ X
f
.*
/
/
s<
\
\
\    \
..•*
/
^^
/
\
\\
y   /
\
\
/
/
/'
/
Jf
^
/
^
-^
~
'-*-
-*~
X
^
\
\
/
/
/
\
/
\
/
1
,-"-"     —   REFERENCE
mployment in —
1945        	
1954       "          "
1955
1956 "          "
1957 "          >
•"
3	
	
1957
January     154,897
February   156,549
March   164,524
April __  169,709
May 	
June 	
July  .....
August
177,549
181,528
188,131
190,679
September
October   —
..... 184,012
...__ 173,934
November   159,985
December   144,871 250,000
245,000
240,000
235,000
230,000
225,000
220,000
215,000
210,000
205,000
200,000
195,000
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Total Employment in Industry, 1956 and 19571
F 25
._____, _■_____ «______pvbv       k *
wBmmwB.*\ZM. u,
35l?__k
(1956)
(1957;
staff.
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.   Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial
Monthly Totals of Industrial Employment, 1957
(Male and Female)
January
February
185,969
187,673
March    196,077
April   201,475
  210,217
  214,723
  221,797
August    224,130
May
June
July
September
October   ...
November
December
216,943
206,448
192,438
176,828 F 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CONTENTS OF TABLES
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in
or incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing, shipping, and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mlnlng.—This group contains also the operation of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both
general and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not
include the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood- and sanitary-floor layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products. Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies, fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee, ketchup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery, and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. Houso Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments  (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and holts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No.  16.  Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead
corroders and varnish-manufactnrers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Shlp-bulldlng and Boat-building.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small "raft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and
undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS
Returns Covering 44 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers  -  $1,099,635
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.         820,388
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      5,547,725
Total _  $7,467,748
Employment
Month
January	
February	
March_	
April	
May	
June	
July 	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
Wage-earners
Males    Females
1,146
1,126
1,201
1,265
1,338
1,403
1,426
1,366
1,312
1,236
1,227
1,301
248
149
252
235
254
262
309
220
247
358
218
216
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
143
142
148
149
156
161
161
161
159
149
167
172
86
84
82
82
87
93
90
91
90
88
87
87
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
|
Males
Females
Males  I Females
1
Under $25.00	
50
6
3
2
$25.00 to $29.99	
14
4
30.00 to   34.99...	
12
10
	
6
35.00 to   39.99.	
30
14
1
1
40.00 to   44.99	
14
10
1
14
45.00 to   49.99	
31
26
10
25
50.00 to   54.99	
35
33
8
19
55.00 to   59.99	
56
211
8
8
60.00 to   69.99...	
240
18
32
7
70.00 to   79.99	
594
2
16
3
80.00 to   89.99	
242
1
39
3
90.00 to   99.99...	
97
24
	
100 and over	
61
18 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 27
Table No. 2
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF
Returns Covering 209 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $2,352,820
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      2,713,253
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     12,122,034
Total.
$17,188,107
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males    Females
January	
February-
March -
April...	
May..	
June	
July	
August	
September
October.—
November.
December.
2,589
2,714
2,948
3,059
3,061
3,112
3,230
3,266
3,208
3,119
2,949
2,649
13
11
16
18
18
21
28
20
24
23
22
18
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
388
382
388
393
397
392
397
391
390
392
401
384
275
274
275
279
284
299
294
300
291
285
282
277
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00 _
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99.
45.00 to   49.99.
50.00 to   54.99
55.00 to   59.99.
60.00 to   69.99.
70.00 to   79.99.
80.00 to   89.99.
90.00 to 99.99.
100 and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
97
34
33
29
60
61
141
113
618
882
627
569
609
2
3
10
4
4
1
2
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
10
12
56
73
94
77
68
16
7
10
17
60
93
48
23
22
2
3
Table No. 3
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING
Returns Covering 587 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $2,498,063
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      2,356,876
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      16,842,106
Total.
$21,697,045
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
1
Males   1 Females
January  _—
3,975
3,963
4,066
4,079
4,252
4,451
4,500
4,506
4,506
4,496
4,277
3,942
16
16
16
15
17
18
19
24
19
17
15
16
338
331
343
367
409
411
414
406
397
395
397
396
389
397
388
April 	
May	
394
418
428
July	
August.  _
September _—
428
415
426
424
November.	
December 	
423
414
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00 _-
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99.
45.00 to 49.99.
50.00 to 54.99.
55.00 to 59.99.
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99.
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to 99.99.
100 and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
282
45
49
86
95
114
185
209
777
1,562
759
499
801
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males     Females
14
1
2
2
3
12
38
4
14
6
32
7
98
13
82
14
86
21
48
35
23
62
25
89
6
99
3
42
. :
41
11 F 28
Table No. 4
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 5
COAL-MINING
Returns Covering 14 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers .
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. 	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)
Total.
$576,397
85,555
3,886,269
$4,548,221
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males    Females
January	
February..
March	
April—	
May	
June...	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
1,318
1,332
1,319
1,294
1,285
1,241
1,245
1,207
1,219
1,230
1,255
1,249
9
9
20
20
20
11
12
12
12
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99—
30.00 to 34.99—
35.00 to   39.99—
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99—
50.00 to   54.99	
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to   69.99	
70.00 to   79.99	
80.00 to   89.99	
90.00 to   99.99	
100 and over	
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
I
Males    Females    Males   I Females
5
1
10
12
14
59
363
648
88
50
COAST SHIPPING
Returns Covering 121 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $3,395,653
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.      2,150,385
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    29,074,979
Total.
$34,621,017
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
1
Males  1 Females
!
January- 	
7,023
102
370
215
February	
7,039
103
369
223
March	
6,723
98
374
222
April-	
7,137
120
369
221
May _	
7,396
157
367
22"6
June..	
7,474
172
368
245
July	
7,615
208
375
255
8,017
200
374
256
September	
7,671
172
365
233
October
7,485
130
358
230
November	
7,054
122
356
226
December
6,843
112
346
211
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99-	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
50.00 to   54.99	
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to   69.99	
70.00 to   79.99	
80.00 to   89.99	
90.00 to   99.99	
100 and over	
Wage-earners
Males   I Females
I  	
448
78
255
80
190
289
782
2,065
822
550
634
1,573
1,268
3
15
2
12
11
102
39
14
3
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
5
3
4
2
10
11
25
23
51
75
44
47
55
11
2
2
1
48
59
52
27
31
6
4 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 29
Table No. 6
CONSTRUCTION
Returns Covering 2,189 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $18,065,406
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. -       16,688,198
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      139,524,034
Total.
$174,277,638
Employment
Month
January	
February
March	
April—	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September
October	
November
December
Wage-earners
Males    Females
25,088
26,180
29,008
30,623
32,495
33,719
34,887
34,859
33,259
30,657
27,278
22,492
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
218
234
241
219
267
281
297
289
250
256
251
236
2,556
2,631
2,699
2,742
2,862
2,872
2,892
2,912
2,856
2,809
2,716
2,621
1,512
1,540
1,542
1,562
1,603
1,625
1,659
1,652
1,628
1,632
1,803
1,756
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
50.00 to   54.99	
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to   69.99	
70.00 to   79.99	
80.00 to   89.99	
90.00 to   99.99	
100 and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
1,137
313
371
382
622
680
1,094
1,538
5,721
7,328
5,574
6,839
15,107
69
24
32
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
43
18
25
23
36
26
69
56
102
25
97
14
141
53
365
10
380
4
477
1
357
1
808
92
36
80
146
230
275
265
234
223
100
38
10
Table No. 7
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS
Returns Covering 52 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers   $1,116,119
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc    2,637,139
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,892,437
Total   $9,645,695
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January _
February	
March _
1,415
1,409
1,442
1,456
1,478
1,501
1,478
1,522
1,481
1,472
1,440
1,403
44
45
46
47
46
43
43
42
41
44
46
41
438
431
422
425
439
440
447
456
448
447
447
165
161
164
165
May  —	
168
172
July    _ 	
172
171
September
171
December... _	
446
166
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99.
45.00 to 49.99.
50.00 to 54.99.
55.00 to 59.99.
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to 99.99.
100 and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
12
6
8
9
14
15
35
45
226
325
440
230
194
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
4
9
12
6
3
5
2
6
3
1
1
5
3
5
9
32
60
61
57
225
5
9
18
33
39
29
26
2
4
2 F 30
Table No. 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 9
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 554 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)	
Total.
.    $7,005,357
8,195,396
.   41,764,350
. $56,965,103
Employment
Month
January-
February..
March	
April.	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December—
Wage-earners
Males    Females
7,674
7,701
7,944
8,696
9,242
9,964
11,189
11,997
11,159
9,615
8,483
7,655
2,347
2,366
2,592
2,856
3,042
3,899
6,523
7,822
7,277
5,479
3,949
2,453
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1,236
1,233
1,234
1,229
1,255
1,262
1,259
1,255
1,259
1,226
1,211
1,201
1,010
1,004
1,007
1,017
1,034
1,082
1,106
1,109
1,091
1,078
1,058
1,038
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00 —
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to   34.99.
35.00 to   39.99.
40.00 to   44.99.
45.00 to   49.99.
50.00 to   54.99
55.00 to   59.99.
60.00 to   69.99.
70.00 to   79.99.
80.00 to   89.99.
90.00 to 99.99.
100 and over—
Wage-earners
Males    Females
750
189
226
237
292
356
685
976
3,316
2,815
1,634
834
1,405
1,804
621
863
935
1,439
1,095
1,093
768
655
365
234
86
143
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   I Females
I
10
2
7
12
21
42
54
78
245
230
228
137
180
33
30
65
114
206
242
178
113
108
33
7
2
2
GARMENT-MAKING
Returns Covering 73 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendens, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)	
Total,
$522,349
534,175
2,990,960
$4,047,484
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
295
1,076
1,094
42
54
February 	
284
39
55
292
1,095
39
57
April.   —   -   	
295
1,094
37
54
May-  .	
280
985
37
56
June 	
284
1,003
37
56
July  	
292
1,006
39
55
August	
283
1,034
40
54
September    	
285
1,033
39
54
October 	
286
1,044
40
54
November—	
271
929
40
55
December-	
278
933
41
55
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99.
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
11
5
11
20
30
14
28
18
71
45
35
16
19
100
172
225
150
217
143
95
53
64
22
12
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
5
2
4
5
8
4
10
4
8
3 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 31
Table No. 10
HOUSE FURNISHINGS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 132 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendens, and managers—- — $1,016,165
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen,  etc       747,301
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,122,183
Total..
$6,885,649
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January. 	
February 	
1,273
1,242
1,196
1,148
1,119
1,170
1,224
1,239
1,260
1,269
1,282
1,232
397
394
374
354
344
355
359
372
402
402
396
366
78
75
78
78
78
79
79
80
82
81
80
78
159
166
163
April —
May  	
163
161
159
July.  ._         _    	
157
162
September	
October	
November  	
December 	
153
157
163
159
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
55
12
26
50
93
79
130
124
292
250
193
105
100
23
22
42
54
84
61
92
30
39
13
6
1
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   Females
1
4
7
6
13
10
12
9
15
14
2
8
16
24
21
26
28
20
5
1
2
Table No. 11
JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING AND
REPAIR
Returns Covering 35 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendens, and managers      $188,677
Clerks,   stenographers, salesmen,  etc          205,600
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       832,921
Total-
51,227,198
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
168
162
10
72
February -	
165
155
10
70
March	
165
154
10
69
April -  -
165
149
10
65
May 	
167
150
10
67
170
156
10
68
Tilly	
170
164
10
69
167
163
11
71
September	
171
158
11
69
October — 	
166
156
11
77
November— 	
177
177
11
81
December	
178
180
11
81
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 ...
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-eamers
Males    Females
5
20
10
6
2
35
7
90
6
32
6
8
9
3
8
1
22
2
58
1
23
1
11
21
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
4
2
11
16
26
13
6
5
4
2
1 F 32
Table No. 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING
Returns Covering 145 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
$853,510
894,781
6,515,621
Table No. 13
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 68 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen,  etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers).
$401,816
289,468
1,577,624
Total 	
  $8,263,912
Total...	
--  $2,268,908
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January— _	
767
1,862
84
236
January 	
338
276
35
46
February— 	
771
1,862
86
236
February	
332
267
35
46
787
782
1,910
1,988
84
87
239
243
335
344
276
283
36
36
45
44
May	
785
2,019
86
245
May  	
348
300
36
44
June   _	
792
2,055
93
246
June	
342
293
37
41
July - _	
821
2,128
102
257
July   	
357
285
38
42
August	
821
2,128
92
257
August  	
356
286
37
44
September 	
806
2,088
91
251
338
294
39
46
791
2,001
86
250
October   	
343
286
40
46
November	
782
1,952
84
247
November ._	
340   |      265
42
45
December	
782
1,929
83
240
December	
313    |      230
1
39
43
Classil
led Weekly Ean
tiings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00	
26
196
2
12
Under $25.00   	
25
13
2
1
$25.00 to $29.99	
8
126
17
$25.00 to $29.99	
4
39
2
30.00 to   34.99	
23
232
2
22
30.00 to   34.99	
13
54
2
35.00 to   39.99	
28
469
	
54
35.00 to   39.99	
8
86
1
5
40.00 to   44.99	
52
601
2
70
40.00 to   44.99	
18
67
6
45.00 to   49.99	
38
288
4
34
45.00 to   49.99	
22
45
21
50.00 to   54.99	
87
164
7
21
50.00 to   54.99	
74
31
3
3
55.00 to   59.99 .,
93
55
4
8
55.00 to   59.99—
42
11
3
2
60.00 to   69.99	
187
42
11
15
60.00 to   69.99	
83
2
5
4
70.00 to   79.99	
136
25
17    |          5
70.00 to   79.99	
49
3
2
80.00 to   89.99	
75
5
13     |           1
80.00 to   89.99	
17
2
8
 .
90.00 to   99.99	
44
3
12    |    	
90.00 to   99.99	
6
........
5
	
100.00 and over
56
7    |
100.00 and over
25
1
7
	 Table No. 14
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 15
F  33
LUMBER INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 2,084 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $15,701,705
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc         8,430,361
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) _    129,573,707
Total..
$153,705,773
Employment
Clerks,
Month
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
27,547
250
1,171
835
February. _ _
28,493
263
1,176
835
March	
31,371
286
1,189
843
32,433
261
1,170
861
May  -
34,730
313
1,182
863
June 	
34,899
333
1,192
868
July	
34,977
348
1,192
880
August	
34,570
344
1,198
888
September	
33,446
339
1,178
871
October 	
32,217
391
1,156
866
November	
29,087
302
1,136
857
December   	
25,758
218
1,124
831
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
I
Males  I Females
Males  I Females
I
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
752
30
251
18
290
17
319
31
519
76
541
87
899
32
1,811
39
8,778
99
10,622
60
6,490
31
4,036
8
7,478
14
20
7
5
8
18
23
8
36
78
132
179    |
226    j
436    I
49
8
23
63
100
177
143
107
145
67
24
9
10
METAL TRADES
Returns Covering 1,860 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers  $16,309,900
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     18,153,904
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    64,215,377
Total    $98,679,181
Employment
Month
January	
February—.
March	
April	
May...	
June	
July	
August	
September .
October—
November.
December..
Wage-earners
Males    Females
16,131
15,804
16,088
16,273
17,075
17,388
17,713
17,675
17,126
16,452
15,751
14,146
608
604
579
597
612
613
632
630
616
578
548
505
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2,820
2,763
2,800
2,805
2,837
2,875
2,873
2,864
2,792
2,741
2,715
2,639
2,038
2,045
2,060
2,052
2,074
2,102
2,093
2,063
1,998
1,983
1,949
1,913
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males  i Females
I
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 -
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
677
35
53    |
252
38
14    |
343
64
23    |
315
122
42    |
706
81
81     |
690
71
126    [
960
65
109    |
1,106
36
167    |
3,020
106
460    |
3,716
41
390    |
3,940
19
398    j
1,713
322    |
2,660
27
671    |
125
38
90
181
357
442
384
250
207
71
42
4
10 F 34
Table No. 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
METAL-MINING
Returns Covering 90 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,811,385
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc _      3,013,809
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    20,069,718
Total.
$24,894,912
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
4,626
78
505
104
February 	
4,610
77
503
102
March— 	
4,663
77
503
98
4,594
79
499
101
May '	
4,748
75
496
100
June -	
4,635
79
485
99
July 	
4,558
75
480
93
August- -	
4,445
76
463
93
September _
4,215
76
439
88
4,081
71
422
82
November	
3,942
70
429
81
December	
3,659
56
434
75
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99.
to 89.99
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
37
16
16
40
33
63
74
241
952
914
1,096
812
1,293
11
2
5
11
15
1
8
6
24
6
4
3
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
7
28
48
72
77
307
9
22
14
18
16
6
3
Table No. 17
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 513 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers  —    $7,159,802
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. -     10,177,136
Wage earners (including piece-workers) —-     28,470,632
Total -
$45,807,570
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January-  	
5,784
1,162
1,322
1,236
February —	
5,810
1,148
1,324
1,233
March-   -
6,032
1,155
1,354
1,255
6,127
1,198
1,361
1,265
May —	
6,432
1,382
1,385
1,288
June   -	
6,534
1,401
1,381
1,320
July- -	
6,639
1,429
1,385
1,335
7,395
1,538
1,388
1,336
September  -
6,554
1,331
1,398
1,319
October - 	
6,190
1,219
1,384
1,307
November -	
5,963
1,236
1,393
1,293
December -	
5,774
1,139
1,376
1,283
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25 	
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to 99.99
100.00 and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
489
115
146
230
358
373
576
637
1,435
1,393
939
537
788
171
112
197
193
233
189
238
194
222
53
23
7
5
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
43
4
8
19
47
49
71
88
220
198
195
179
228
42
19
43
85
230
284
225
152
144
86
49 Table No. 18
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 19
F 35
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING
Returns Covering 93 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $3,843,314
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      6,266,470
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     10,034,582
Total   $20,144,366
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Males
Females
Males   1 Females
1
January-	
2,052
14
895
484
February 	
2,043
16
881
520
March      	
2,004
19
897
519
2.050
19
913
525
May  	
2,105
19
969
545
June— 	
2,106
19
1,004
563
July-  	
2,114
22
1,022
572
2,110
26
1,013
552
September. 	
2,196
26
1,000
554
October- 	
2,034
19
991
567
November.—	
2,012
16
990
554
December- -	
1,905
16
1,000
541
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25	
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to   99.99
100.00 and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
16
8
5
6
19
26
32
74
314
447
429
468
728
11
7
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
11
25
53
64
117
105
160
171
321
5
4
7
10
23
71
126
125
129
60
18
11
6
PAINT-MANUFACTURING
Returns Covering 15 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers       $547,624
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc,        637,412
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) —     1,013,991
Total _ _  $2,199,027
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
261
52
115
69
February 	
265
54
116
71
March __	
274
55
117
70
April  	
280
57
117
69
May	
285
63
112
67
June  	
298
64
110
69
July—  	
296
62
112
73
296
56
112
72
September	
278
58
111
73
October	
272
54
114
72
November	
242
53
114
70
December..	
239
52
111
65
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25	
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to   99.99
100.00 and over_
Wage-earners
Males    Females
5
2
2
9
28
13
16
27
65
61
30
10
4
2
1
1
4
18
10
14
10
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
12
8
24
23
16
20
7
1
3
6
5
17
17
8
6
5
1 F 36
Table No. 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 21
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING
Returns Covering 176 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $2,582,022
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc _      6,759,313
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      11,301,375
Total.
$20,642,710
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
2,287
410
963
788
February	
2,321
417
969
798
2,299
399
976
804
April— — -
2,298
412
996
815
2,347
450
998
833
2,366
439
1,029
845
July..         ...
2,371
433
970
818
August -	
2,364
444
969
829
September 	
2,375
435
977
824
October-  	
2,357
434
976
822
November     .
2,373
432
976
825
December 	
2,361
427
980
794
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males   | Females
Under $25	
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to 99.99
100.00 and over
97
50
67
70
91
85
68
69
145
185
248
495
892
114
35
43
51
46
42
43
91
30
7
8
5
6
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males  I Females
17
10
29
29
21
40
48
66
107
107
97
117
342
43
22
65
126
148
129
107
56
70
25
15
6
21
PULP AND PAPER-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 15 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $4,202,945
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen,  etc       5,412,724
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    28,364,873
Total-
$37,980,542
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
6,428
6,327
6,609
6,474
6,695
6,535
6,794
6,669
6,556
6,572
5,706
5,640
302
314
307
262
294
305
303
317
335
329
244
265
753
757
771
780
786
787
789
790
773
780
784
783
350
February	
351
358
April	
355
366
June  _	
July- 	
August	
September	
375
382
380
360
364
November 	
December-	
361
353
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 ___.
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males  | Females
64
45
31
31
50
41
78
85
617
1,673
1,473
1,226
1,921
16
5
2
5
13
22
26
69
66
69
11
9
4
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males  i Females
4
4
3
4
5
36
87
113
135
414
3
1
2
24
39
77
81
50
87
27
10
5
1 Table No. 22
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 23
F  37
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING
Returns Covering 79 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers-
Clerks, stenographers,  salesmen, etc	
$893,055
1,764,601
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)    21,796,066
Total-
$24,453,722
Employment
Month
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August —
September-
October	
November...
December—
Wage-earners
Males    Females
4,669
4,666
4,864
4,830
4,957
4,912
4,726
4,639
4,841
4,601
4,150
3,721
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
258
169
249
168
254
167
258
165
262
171
261
175
270
182
273
180
268
173
270
165
265
168
265
162
Classified Weekly Earnings
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING
Returns Covering 6 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers-
Clerks, stenographers,  salesmen,  etc	
$2,456,026
6,427,161
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     26,096,530
Total-
$34,979,717
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males    Females
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June 	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November..
December-
5,654
5,688
5,745
5,925
5,804
5,839
5,973
5,922
5,733
5,662
5,392
5,295
57
62
62
62
62
60
62
61
61
60
59
51
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1,012
1,016
1,023
1,027
1,059
1,066
1,084
1,077
1,038
1,029
1,031
1,033
272
278
280
279
287
293
303
295
285
279
277
273
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
:
I
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00 -
67
3
3
6
Under $25.00   	
59
16
7
$25.00 to $29.99	
18
1
3
2
$25.00 to $29.99	
20
28
1
30.00 to   34.99	
33
1
2
2
30.00 to   34.99	
13
	
	
35.00 to   39.99	
59
1
25
35.00 to   39.99-	
29
1
9
40.00 to   44.99	
46
2
56
40.00 to   44.99	
81
2
3              34
45.00 to   49.99	
75
1
4
36
45.00 to   49.99	
39
3
1
54
50.00 to   54.99—
83
	
12
14
50.00 to   54.99	
39
4
45'
55.00 to   59.99	
77
4
10
55.00 to   59.99	
69
3
4
53 .
60.00 to   69.99	
187
27
18
60.00 to   69.99	
384
9
22
49
70.00 to   79.99	
870
33
1
70.00 to   79.99	
1,390
2
115
33
80.00 to   89.99...	
1,594
	
28
1
80.00 to   89.99	
1,970
186
5.
90.00 to   99.99	
1,330
42
1
90.00 to   99.99	
1,043
150
"-..t".
100.00 and over	
1,057
100
100.00 and over
1,039
	
581
1 F 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 24
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns Covering 104 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers-
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (piece-workers) 	
Total-
$4,375,926
18,599,321
40,792,606
$63,767,853
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
6,834
6,871
7,217
7,588
7,782
8,171
8,201
8,240
8,250
8,178
7,741
7,504
3,253
3,281
3,346
3,433
3,485
3,525
3,592
3,707
3,690
3,661
3,682
3,689
2,399
2,377
2,490
2,512
2,715
2,754
2,885
2,854
2,821
2,737
2,737
2,697
2,082
2,079
2,118
April
May
June	
July
2,127
2,235
2,347
2,549
August	
September.  	
October	
November..  ._    —
2,434
2,425
2,358
2,336
2,373
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00_ _.
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
50.00 to   54.99	
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to   69.99	
70.00 to   79.99	
80.00 to   89.99	
90.00 to   99.99	
100.00 and over	
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males    Females
96
41
31
28
79
307
165
418
1,858
2,249
1,339
1,279
797
126
4
786
853
573
471
628
171
29
31
8
4
3
7
1
7
35
15
25
70
221
433
382
492
380
827
11
3
43
155
466
558
299
432
361
95
23
5
3
Table No. 25
WOOD-MANUFACTURING  (N.E.S.)
Returns Covering 166 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. 	
$2,369,005
2,037,265
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    22,470,626
Total -
$26,876,896
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
5,763
835
270
196
5,604
847
270
193
5,758
809
271
198
April.. -	
5,903
824
275
198
May	
6,130
849
282
202
June  	
5,986
830
287
203
July  	
6,138
860
293
205
August 	
6,109
830
296
205
September	
5,973
812
294
203
October	
5,357
775
286
205
5,123
696
283
201
December	
4,748
648
279
197
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00—
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99.
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99.
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99.
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to 99.99
100 and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
230
49
40
48
76
72 |
116
212
1,970
2,480
640
342
240
22
9
9
9
17
18
34
38
465
212
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
3
4
3
5
4
28
35
54
47
99
4
4
11
5
35
36
34
33
27
14
2 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 39
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES
Returns Covering 9,424 Firms
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months Ended
December 31st, 1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers .
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. —
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)
$101,344,676
125,997,992
675,893,326
Returns received too late to be included in above summary
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing
returns, and additional services not included in the tables — namely, Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)  	
$1,033,515
58,721,726
537,008,765
$903,235,994
596,764,006
Total.
$1,500,000,000
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
January	
February.	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
141,105
142,760
150,350
155,118
162,336
165,292
168,934
170,040
164,218
156,138
144,297
131,067
13,792
13,789
14,174
14,591
15,213
16,236
19,197
20,639
19,794
17,796
15,688
13,804
18,219
18,183
18,518
18,653
19,233
19,411
19,586
19,531
19,244
18,940
18,825
18,559
12,853
12,941
13,035
13,113
13,435
13,784
14,080
13,920
13,687
13,574
13,628
13,398
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00        .
5,492
1,593
2,051
2,151
3,582
4,042
6,405
10,172
32,463
41,242
30,529
24,164
38,563
2,803
1,295
2,637
3,124
3,580
2,748
2,680
1,832
1,941
927
374
129
209
244
72
127
206
334
502
634
995
2,462
2,617
3,078
2,637
5,767
530
$25.00 to $29.99                               .     -
217
30.00 to   34.99...     .             	
542
35.00 to   39.99 __	
1,181
40.00 to   44.99                                           -
2,297
2,811
45 no tn   40,09
50.00 to   54.99-                   _   ..
2,206
55 00 to   59 09
1,799
60 OOtn   69,09
1,752
70.00 to   79.99                    	
657
80.00 to   89.99            	
258
90.00 to   99.99   	
68
100 00 and nv«r
78
Totals
202,449
24,279
19,675
14,396 F 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"Hours of Work Act"
The trend toward a shorter working-week was again in evidence during 1957, the
summary of all returns received in the annual survey indicating the average working-time
for industrial workers at the lowest point yet recorded in this section of the Report.
The single figure reported below is representative of an average work-week in all
industries covered by the survey, and is considered as a reliable indicator of the fluctuation
in hours of work from year to year.
Based on a week of normal employment in each industry during 1957, the average
industrial work-week for all wage-earners reported was computed at 41.06 hours, well
below the 1956 figure of 41.36, and the previous record low of 41.34 hours noted in
1955.   Comparative average figures for the years 1930 to 1957 were as follows:—
1930-
1931-
1932-
1933..
1934..
1935-
1936-
1937..
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941..
1942-
1943-
48.62
47.37
47.69
47.35
47.32
47.17
47.63
47.25
46.84
47.80
46.91
46.90
48.12
47.19
1944-  ...
 46.02
1945 -
                  45.59
1946	
43.63
1947	
       42.24
1948 .           	
             . 42.21
1949 „
     42.24
1950 ..
41.80
1951 ..               -
 42.01
1952
                42.00
1953                  	
_     41.60
1954 	
 41.37
1955 .
  41.34
1956 -
            41.36
1957—	
  . 41.06
Including the years 1947 to 1957, the following table shows the total number of
firms covered in the hours-of-work survey, together with the number of wage-earners
reported each year, the proportion of the reported total at or below the legal maximum
of 44 hours, and the percentage still remaining in excess of this limit.
Comparative Figures, 1947 to 1957
(Wage-earners)
Year
Firms
Reporting
Wage-earners
Reported
44 Hours or
Less per
Week
In Excess of
44 Hours
1947-   ....
1948  —     	
1949  ...  _	
1950....    .    „
1951.                                           —                    —.         -     .   —
8,410
8,736
9,020
9,509
9.635
9,200
9,008
9,076
9,537
9.570
9,424
159,300
165,411
161,945
169,342
178,909
180,107
172,174
169,757
177,025
189,578
189,258
Per Cent
80.63
81.59
81.86
83.06
82.24
83.20
85.56
85.93
84.75
84.68
86.02
Per Cent
19.37
18.41
18.14
16.94
17.76
1952  	
1953                       .	
16.80
14.44
1954       	
1955	
14.07
15.25
1956       	
1957               .   .  -                  	
15.32
13.98
In reference to the question concerning hours of work, a study of the completed
returns showed a total of 189,258 wage-earners reported in this section, a little below
the high of 189,578 shown for 1956, although more firms filed returns during that year.
Fractional decreases in working-time were noted in most instances, with approximately 65 per cent of all industrial classifications covered reporting shorter hours for both
wage-earners and clerical employees.
The 1957 average work-week for wage-earners was shorter in nineteen of the twenty-
nine industrial classifications included in the survey, while the average working-time for
clerical employees decreased in twenty of the industries covered.
Increases in the working-week were noted in the construction industries, builders'
materials, explosives and chemicals, smelting and concentrating, metal-mining, wood-
manufacturing, and others in lesser degree, but were offset by shorter hours in a majority { HOURS OF WORK ACT '
F 41
of the industries reporting. Compared with previous figures, decreases were most marked
in the ship-building and boat-building section, oil refining and distributing, coast shipping,
metal trades, pulp and paper manufacturing, the forest industries, coal-mining, and
various manufacturing industries.
Less overtime was apparent in the fact that the proportion of total wage-earners
reported at hours in excess of the 44-hour week was further reduced to 13.98 per cent,
while some 86.02 per cent of the total were shown as working at or below the legal limit.
Compared with the previous year, an increase was noted in the number of clerical
workers reported in the section dealing with hours of work, the 1957 summary showing
an over-all total of 33,280 in this classification, as against 29,811 reported in 1956.
Shorter hours were apparent for most clerical employees, the average week for this entire
group being computed at 37.36 hours in 1957, down from 37.75 hours shown for a
similar week during the previous year.
'•  t     . ■ ' j".''i
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries
In the tables which follow, the 1957 figures relating to average hours of work in
each of the various industrial classifications under survey are shown separately for wage-
earners and clerical workers, in comparison with similar averages for previous years.
Average Weekly Hours of Work
Wage-earners
Industry
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
40.50
42.26
44.78
39.97
42.84
41.86
41.56
43.05
39.391
40.03
37.57
40.72
40.76
42.11
42.59
42.29
41.05
39.68
42.10
43.88
40.39
43.88
40.711
37.36
41.75
41.08
40.89
39.98
40.04
40.21
41.59
43.79
36.26
43.28
41.25
40.52
42.91
39.15
40.10
38.20
39.21
40.39
42.09
42.23
42.30
41.06
40.08
41.15
43.49
40.39
43.90
40.79
37.91
42.74
42.08
41.79
38.46
40.21
40.28
41.00
42.92
40.08
42.60
41.51
40.75
42.65
38.75
40.45
37.58
39.32
40.68
42.05
42.49
41.26
40.99
39.82
40.97
44.23
40.48
44.14
39.87
37.07
42.42
41.16
41.61
38.63
40.87
40.61
41.76
43.19
40.33
41.72
42.09
40.91
41.78
39.27
39.81
36.10
39.62
40.22
42.20
41.81
40.97
40.68
39.84
41.45
42.93
40.58
44.74
39.97
37.08
42.67
42.85
41.56
38.74
39.64
39.92
41.97
42.92
39.68
40.93
42.35
41.39
41.26
38.72
39.88
36 28
38 93
39 94
Lumber industries—
41 72
Planing-mills   	
40.99
40 08
Shingle-mills    	
39.89
43 12
37.05
41.93
Pulp and paper manufacturing — 	
41.86
38.62
39 83
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc 	 F 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Average Weekly Hours of Work—Continued
Clerical Workers
Industry
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers-
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing..
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping-
Construction—
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals-.
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings-
Jewellery manufacturing and repair-
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing-
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries—
Logging-.
Lumber-dealers-
Planing-mills	
Sawmills	
Shingle-mills-
Metal trades	
Metal-mining..
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing_
Pulp and paper manufacturing—
Ship-building and boat-building..
Smelting and concentrating-
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.-
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) 	
37.80
36.80
40.07
39.68
38.37
39.08
39.09
40.45
39.221
39.04
37.09
41.22
36.46
41.04
39.89
40.46
38.51
37.24
39.39
42.17
38.73
36.81
38.281
36.42
38.50
37.47
40.41
35.93
37.69
38.30
36.43
39.71
39.81
37.82
38.07
38.46
39.33
39.06
38.23
37.05
40.23
38.43
40.32
39.66
41.42
37.55
36.04
39.02
41.75
38.15
36.90
37.83
36.45
37.67
37.16
40.71
35.89
37.11
38.04
36.64
39.38
39.82
38.00
37.77
38.64
39.04
38.59
38.13
37.54
39.62
37.87
39.51
39.71
40.96
36.91
37.13
38.73
41.97
38.05
37.20
36.99
38.39
38.07
36.92
39.60
35.87
36.12
37.91
37.09
38.52
40.00
37.32
38.04
38.45
39.07
38.57
37.84
37.13
40.17
35.78
39.10
38.27
39.56
36.80
37.81
38.59
41.18
37.95
36.62
37.29
36.25
37.08
37.11
40.42
35.41
36.34
36.22
36.88
37.99
39.68
36.89
38.01
38.44
38.17
38.62
38.43
36.00
40.20
36.51
40.09
38.27
40.34
36.29
37.54
37.95
41.01
37.72
37.32
37.44
35.74
36.81
36.28
39.53
35.34
36.12
1 Revised since 1953 Report. STATISTICS OF CIVIC AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS
F 43
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers
The annual industrial survey is also inclusive of reports from cities and municipalities, the returns in this case concerning workers employed in public works, the generation
and distribution of light and power, and similar operations owned and operated by the
city or municipality reporting.
As a portion of the total Provincial payroll, the figures which appear in this section
have been included with related industrial classifications mentioned elsewhere in this
Report, but are here shown separately in order to obtain a comparison with similar data
for previous years.
Returns were received from some 147 civic and municipal administrations in time
for tabulation in the 1957 summaries, the reports showing labour costs for that year
amounting to $28,163,594, an increase of $4,782,021 from the payroU total of
$23,381,573 noted in 1956.
Separate payroll totals covering the supervisory staff, clerical workers, and the wage-
earner group are shown in the table following, together with comparative data for the two
previous years 1955 and 1956:—
1955
1956
1957
Officers, superintendents, and managers-
Clerks, stenographers, etc	
Wage-earners  	
$2,169,471
2,613,945
16,574,939
$2,595,703
3,512,842
17,273,028
$2,766,596
4,590,136
20,806,862
Totals-
$21,358,355
I
$23,381,573
$28,163,594
Considerable increase was noted in the number of persons on civic and municipal
payrolls during 1957, with employment totals rising sharply in both the wage-earner
classification and the clerical group.
The total workers reported in all departments reached a new high of 7,697 during
the peak employment month of August in 1957, this figure representing an over-all
increase of 11.2 per cent when compared with the total of 6,919 recorded for the high
month in 1956.
Monthly employment totals for both classifications of civic and municipal employees
are shown in the following table, with comparative figures for the previous year:— F 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Employment'Totals1 of Civic and Municipal Workers, 1956 and 1957
1956
1957
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks, Stenographers, etc.
Wage-earners
Clerks, Stenographers, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
4,624
4,547
4,754
4,987
5,262
5,424
5,570
5,514
5,447
5,173
5,065
4,869
63
57
63
63
114
166
187
157
67
66
67
67
658
682
683
685
706
736
746
750
752
746
753
760
379
373
370
375
392
408
416
410
410
419
420
416
4,953
4,923
5,082
5,440
5,837
6,076
6,165
6,187
6,059
5,887
5,704
5,500
79
75
91
75
132
147
169
159
87
98
92
86
796
806
813
816
857
867
873
875
876
871
869
876
422
430
424
429
451
462
July  	
469
476
September  .
462
472
480
December	
481
1 Totals represent the number of employees on payroll on the last day of each month or nearest working-date.
In the wage distribution reported below, varying percentages of the total number of
male wage-earners on civic and municipal payrolls are shown in their respective salary
groups for the years 1955, 1956, and 1957:—
Weekly Earnings
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 -
to $29.99-
to 34.99..
to 39.99..
to 44.99-
to 49.99-
to 54.99..
to 59.99-
to 69.99-
to 79.99-
to 89.99..
to 99.99..
and over—
The percentage distribution in the various wage classifications again shows an increasing concentration of workers in the higher brackets, the 1957 segregation indicating
an additional 8 per cent of the total in the groups ranging from $60 to $90 per week.
For civic and municipal workers in the wage-earner classification, average weekly
earnings reached a new high of $68.06 in 1957, well above the previous record of $64.08
noted for this group in 1956.
Clerical staffs also benefited by increased earnings in 1957, the average figure representing weekly earnings in this section, rising to $72.42 for males during the year, in
comparison with an average salary of $69.26 weekly in 1956. For female employees in
clerical occupations, earnings were computed at $49.09 for an average week in 1957, up
from $46.52 reported as the weekly average during the previous year.
The average work-week for civic and municipal employees was a little shorter in the
case of clerical employees but a fraction longer for the wage-earner group in 1957. For
the group comprising some 5,951 wage-earners reported in the hours-of-work survey,
average working-time was computed at 40.14 hours for the week under review, a slight
advance from the record low of 39.95 hours set during the previous year.
Working-time for the 1,361 employees reported in clerical occupations was a little
less than previously reported, the average week being recorded at 35.66 hours, down from
36.07 hours for a similar week in 1956. SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR
F 45
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1958)
" Hairdressers Act Amendment Act, 1958 "
This Act increased the fee for membership in the association from $10 to $15 and
the fee for special certificates from $10 to $15. It also clarified the status of persons
holding non-operative certificates. Renewal fees formerly fixed by the association are
now fixed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
"Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act"
Section 8 of this Act was amended by section 24 of the " Statute Law Amendment
Act, 1958," to make it possible for the lustice to levy distress in default of payment of
wages where an order is made under subsection (2) of section 8. F 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Members of the Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands, Deputy
Minister of Labour -    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Members:
Fraudena Eaton
G. A. Little    -
H. J. Young
C. Murdoch
P. Baskin   -
E. Campbell    -
Secretary:
C. R. Margison
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
- Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Offices
- Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Department of Labour, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Terrace.
Department of Labour, Cranbrook.
Department of Labour, Mission.
Department of Labour, Dawson Creek.
Head office -      -      -      -
Branch Office     -
Regional Offices:
Court-house, Nanaimo.
Court-house, Kelowna.
Court-house, Nelson.
523 Columbia Street,
Kamloops.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the twenty-fifth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
The activities of the Board include those formerly directed by the Minimum Wage
Board, which functioned for sixteen years prior to 1934. The original Board dealt with
minimum wages, hours of labour, and conditions of employment for women and girls,
so this report, in so far as it relates to women workers, is the forty-first annual record
of labour laws and their results in that sphere.
Meetings and Delegations
During the year the Board held fifty-one meetings, fifty of which were held in the
City of Vancouver and the other in the City of Victoria.
Hearings were held by the Board in Vancouver, B.C., in connection with the revision
of Minimum Wage Orders applying to employers and employees in the laundry, cleaning
and dyeing industries and employers and employees in the occupation of hairdressing.
The Board heard representations from the Amalgamated Association of Street,
Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, who requested that the
occupation of bus operator be added to the Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act." This
request of the trade-union was not opposed by the employers.
A survey was conducted by the Board to determine if the scope of Minimum Wage
Order No. 15 (1949), applicable to the undertaking business, should be extended to
J BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS F 47
additional areas of the Province. The survey indicated that there was no necessity at this
time to extend the application of the Order beyond its present scope, and accordingly no
action was taken in this connection.
Following representations from the Federation of Fruit and Vegetable Workers'
Unions, which organization requested that the annual regulation extending the hours of
work in the fresh fruit and vegetable industry should not be made, the Board held several
hearings regarding the hours of work in the industry. Having regard to all the circumstances, the Board did not accede to the request for a reduction in the hours of work
during the fruit season, and accordingly made the annual regulation, which is outlined
in another section of this Report.
Orders and Regulations Made during 1958
Minimum Wage Orders
1. Occupation of Hairdressing—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 27
(1958).—This Minimum Wage Order increased the minimum wage applicable to
employees in the occupation of hairdressing from $25 to $35 per week for full-time
employees and from 65 to 90 cents per hour for part-time employees.
2. Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries—Male and Female Minimum Wage
Order No. 30 (1958).—This Order, which cancelled Order No. 74 (1946), increased
the minimum wage from 40 to 75 cents per hour. Learners' rates were also increased
from a range of 31 to 40 cents per hour to a range of 55 to 65 cents per hour. It reduces
the learning period from six months to six weeks.
3. Radio-broadcast Technicians—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 8
(1948).—As it had been established that jurisdiction with respect to these employees lay
with the Federal rather than Provincial authority, the Board made an Order cancelling
Minimum Wage Order No. 8 (1948).
Regulations Made pursuant to the " Hours of Work Act"
Regulation No. 42 (1958).—This annual regulation of the Board exempted persons
employed in the pipe-line construction industry from the operation of the "Hours of
Work Act" from March 20th, 1958, to December 31st, 1958.
Regulation No. 1 (1958).—This regulation added the occupation of bus operator
to the Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act."
Regulation No. 1a (1958).—This regulation permits bus operators to work such
hours as may be necessary to meet the requirements of public transportation.
Regulation No. 21 (1958).—This regulation exempted the fresh fruit and vegetable industry from the operation of the "Hours of Work Act" from June 1st, 1958, to
November 30th, 1958.
Christmas Regulation.—This regulation permitted employees in retail establishments in the mercantile industry to work up to ten hours in the day on any two days
during the two-week period ending December 27th, 1958.
A regulation was made by the Board cancelling Regulation No. 36a, which had been
applicable to the donkey-engine fireman employed at the Gordon River Camp of Western
Forest Industries Limited.
(A summary of the above-mentioned orders and regulations, together with existing
and new orders and regulations, may be obtained from the Department of Labour free
of charge upon request.) F 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees
Since its earliest inception, the dedicated purpose of the British Columbia Department of Labour has been to foster and develop the welfare of the worker, and in the
pursuit of this ideal the well-being and material progress of female employment in industry and business has become an item of increasing importance and constant concern.
The mark of successful achievement in the promotion of labour legislation is pictured in the annual record of significant changes which have occurred throughout the
years, and in the gradual decrease in working-hours, the betterment of working conditions, increased wages, and improved standards of living may be seen the end result of
continued vigilance on the part of this Provincial authority.
For each basic classification covered in the yearly survey of women workers in occupations subject to minimum-wage legislation, a five-year summary is presented in the
section which follows, the tables being based on comparative information for each year,
in regard to employment and firms reporting, weekly payroll totals, average weekly earnings, and hours of work.
Covering the period of greatest employment, a total of 8,430 firms completed returns
in the 1957 survey, the reports indicating a sum total of 73,414 women workers on
payroll during one week of that year, a considerable increase in comparison with previous
surveys.
Mercantile Industry (Female)
1957
1956
I
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week-
1,709
13,420
$490,241.00
$36.53
35.06
1,694
13,088
$442,336.00
$33.80
34.04
1,698
14,374
$488,771.00
$34.00
36.05
1,717
13,728
$464,712.00
$33.85
37.08
1,813
12,206
$384,169.00
$31.47
36.31
Representing the second largest classification of female employment, the mercantile
section accounted for some 13,420 female workers in 1957, the total being based on
returns from some 1,709 firms in all types of retail and wholesale trade. Compared with
the previous year, increased employment was apparent, although the reported total was
still below the high figure noted during the years 1954 and 1955 in this section.
Weekly earnings were higher for employees of mercantile establishments during the
year under review, the average weekly figure showing at $36.53, compared with $33.80
previously noted.
Working-hours for female employees in this classification showed a slight increase
over the previous year, although some fluctuation is not unusual in the averages for this
section, due to the effect of peak employment cycles occurring in many establishments
during the Christmas week. The average working-time during the survey week in 1957
was 35.06 hours, up from a low of 34.04 hours during a similar week in 1956. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female)
F 49
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of etnployees-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week-
260
2,741
$104,208.00
$38.02
36.55
234
2,682
$95,712.00
$35.69
37.34
236
2,797
$97,185.00
$34.75
37.69
248
2,604
$90,153.00
$34.62
37.46
235
2,739
$90,398.00
$33.00
38.07
A total of 260 firms submitted reports in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industries,
the returns showing some 2,741 female workers employed during the period of the survey.
While the 1957 totals of employment and firms reporting constituted an increase over the
previous year, the employment figure did not reach the high of 2,797 recorded in 1955.
Wages showed a marked increase in this classification, the average weekly earnings
for females employed in laundry occupations rising to $38.02 in 1957, up from $35.69
noted in the previous survey.
Shorter hours were also apparent in this section, the average work-week during the
period under review being reported at 36.55 hours, a further decrease from the 1956
average of 37.34 hours, and 37.69 recorded in 1955.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female)
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
1,315
12,137
$398,162.00
$32.81
35.04
1,241
11,765
$364,994.00
$31.02
35.11
1,237
11,197
$340,848.00
$30.44
36.10
1,276
11,328
$335,405.00
$29.61
36.55
1,296
10,807
$313,723.00
$29.03
37.22
Third largest group of female employment was again in the hotel and catering section,
with increases noted both in the number of firms reporting and also in total employment
reported. Summary total of female workers reported by the 1,315 firms fifing returns in
the 1957 inquiry was 12,137, as compared with a 1956 total of 11,765 women and girls
in similar occupations during 1956, when fewer returns were received.
Higher earnings and shorter hours were apparent in the hotel and catering business,
the average figure representing weekly individual earnings for the 12,137 workers shown
in the 1957 returns being computed at $32.81, increased from $31.02 recorded in 1956,
and an average take-home pay of $30.44 in this group during 1955.
A fractional decrease was noted in the average hours of work, the 1957 figure showing at 35.04, down from 35.11 hours previously mentioned for this group in 1956.
Office Occupation (Female)
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
3,683
24,157
$1,165,312.00
$48.24
36.89
3,519
23,050
$1,059,939.00
$45.98
37.50
3,538
21,214
$924,867.00
$43.60
37.30
3,483
20,069
$856,551.00
$42.68
37.66
3 588
19,143
$781,343 00
$40.82
37 65
The office occupation continues to provide employment for the greatest number of
women workers in industry and business, and increases were again apparent in the 1957
totals in comparison with previous years.  The number of firms reporting office-workers F 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
increased from a 1956 total of 3,519 to 3,683 in 1957, the returns indicating a total
employment of 24,157 females in clerical occupations, considerably increased from the
figure of 23,050 reported for the previous year.
Higher salaries and shorter hours were prevalent in this section, the average individual weekly salary for office personnel increasing to $48.24 in 1957, from $45.98
previously recorded. A further decline in average hours of work was noted, the average
work-week for female clerical workers showing at 36.89 hours in 1957, compared with
an average of 37.50 hours during the survey period in 1956.
Hairdressing Occupation (Female)
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
97
409
$18,780.00
$45.92
38.56
92
380
$17,834.00
$46.93
38.78
95
375
$16,025.00
$42.73
38.74
97
345
$13,844.00
$40.13
38.02
97
283
$10,447.00
Average weekly earnings...
$36.92
38.83
The above table relating to hairdressing and beauty-parlour establishments has been
restricted to include only those establishments employing staff. Since many shops in this
type of business are maintained by the individual proprietress who is the sole operator,
the group of workers in the above table remains a comparatively small one and represents
a sampling, rather than a total coverage of all operators in the business.
While a gradual increase continued in the total employment reported in this occupation, per capita weekly earnings were not quite as high as noted during the previous year,
with a corresponding relationship being apparent in the hours worked, which were also a
little below the level of 1956.
Average weekly earnings in the group of 409 operators during the survey was
$45.92 in 1957, compared with individual average earnings of $46.93 computed for a
week in 1956.
A fractional decrease was noted in the work-week, the 1957 average declining to
38.56 hours, from 38.78 hours for an average week during the previous year.
Fishing Industry (Female)
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting	
20
1,748
$81,224.00
$46.47
31.33
20
1,629
$70,579.00
$43.33
30.92
21
2,108
$68,449.00
$32.47
26.63
38
2,291
$106,559.00
$46.51
38.67
30
2,424
$99,940.00
$41.23
38.72
Due to conditions affecting the business from year to year, employment and earnings
in the fishing industry are subject to considerable variation, and are dependent largely on
the amount of fish taken, the time factor in handling and processing procedures, and
various emergent situations which must be expected due to the seasonal nature of the
industry.
Employment for female workers in the industry showed improvement over the
previous year, although the 1957 total did not approach the high figures noted for some of
the previous years mentioned in the table. While the number of firms reporting was the
same as in 1956, the total employment of female workers in 1957 increased to 1,748,
from 1,629 previously reported. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
F 51
The extensive use of piece-workers in addition to full-time employees during processing operations in this industry is responsible to some degree for higher figures noted
occasionally in regard to average weekly earnings. Average earnings during the week
under survey in 1957 increased to $46.47, considerably advanced from $43.33 recorded
in 1956, and just short of the high mark of $46.51 established in this industry during
1954.
Working-time during an average week in 1957 was a little above the previous year,
the average week under survey being reported at 31.33 hours, up from 30.92 hours noted
in 1956.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting. _
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week..
333
4,656
$201,219.00
$43.22
37.78
318
4,233
$180,335.00
$42.60
37.47
310
4,194
$175,661.00
$41.88
37.87
264
4,507
$186,712.00
$41.43
37.73
253
4,523
$184,752.00
$40.85
38.06
Opportunities continue to increase for female employment in telephone and telegraph occupations, the 1957 tabulations relating to this group showing the highest totals
yet recorded for this section. While female staff engaged in switchboard occupations is
now subject to coverage of the legislation which applies to all other office personnel, for
purposes of comparison regarding earnings and hours of work the above table has been
continued, to include this group in addition to firms in the actual business of communication.
Some 333 firms reported female employees in occupations relating to the telephone
and telegraph industry, the total employment reported in the 1957 returns increasing to
a new high of 4,656 workers, up from 4,233 noted in 1956, and well above the previous
high employment totals of 1953 and 1954.
Average weekly earnings reached their highest figure for this group in 1957, the
current survey showing an increase in the weekly average to a high of $43.22, advanced
from $42.60 recorded in 1956 and $41.88 in 1955.
Little change was apparent in the working-hours for employees in telephone, telegraph, and switchboard occupations, the 1957 average week showing only a fractional
increase to 37.78 hours, in comparison with 37.47 hours listed for a similar week during
the previous year.
Manufacturing Industry (Female)
1957
1956
1955
1953
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week-
732
8,237
$383,437.00
$46.55
38.12
703
7,916
$348,400.00
$44.01  |
37.91
747
7,779
$331,754.00
$42.65
38.41
746
7,468
$302,609.00
$40.52
38.24
750
7,758
$306,103.00
$39.46
38.72
The upward trend established in the manufacturing industries during the past few
years was more pronounced in 1957, with employment totals reaching their highest point
since 1951. Returns from 732 firms in this classification showed an over-all total of
8,237 female workers employed, increased from 7,916 shown for the previous year.
For the week of the survey the payroll for the 732 firms reporting amounted to
$383,437, or a per capita average weekly salary of $46.55 for the 8,237 female workers F 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
employed.   Compared with the previous year, the 1957 average represented an increase
of $2.54.
A fractional increase was, however, apparent in the work-week, which advanced
slightly in 1957 to 38.12 hours, from 37.91 hours previously noted.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female)
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
72
5,047
$204,684.00
$40.56
41.46
86
4,685
$184,402.00
$39.36
42.61
79
5,703
$216,078.00
$37.89
41.73
85
4,992
$183,278.00
$36.71
42.11
87
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
	
5,533
$198,886.00
$35.95
Considerable variance may be noted in the annual totals relating to the fruit and
vegetable industry, the employment figures reflecting to some extent the seasonal influence of good crop conditions, or the adverse effects of weather damage, and similar
deterrent factors. While the number of returns received in time for tabulation was not
as high as in previous years, employment showed considerable improvement from the
previous year, the returns indicating a total of 5,047 women and girls employed in the
processing establishments, compared with 4,685 reported in 1956.
Average earnings for fruit and vegetable workers were higher in 1957, the weekly
pay-cheque increasing to $40.56 during the current survey, in comparison with $39.36
shown for the average week in 1956.
Reported working-hours during the survey week averaged 41.46 in 1957, representing a shorter week in this industry than was experienced in 1956, when the average
was 42.61 hours.
Transportation Industry (Female)
I
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings._
Average hours worked per week~
58
167
$6,770.00
$40.54
38.11
61
159
$6,288.00
$39.55
38.19
57
128
$4,560.00
$35.63
38.64
58
135
$4,689.00
$34.73
37.39
I
48
122
$3,970.00
$32.54
38.11
Women workers engaged in delivery, trucking, messenger work, and occupations of
a similar nature relating to the transportation industry are included in the above totals,
and while this classification remains a comparatively small one, employment continues to
show a gradual increase, and a general improvement has been apparent in wages and
working conditions.
A further increase was noted in average earnings for women employed in transportation occupations, the average weekly salary for 1957 rising to $40.54 in this group, up
from $39.55 reported for the previous year.
Little change was noted in working-time for transportation-workers, the average
hours worked per week showing at 38.11 for the year under review, down slightly from
the average of 38.19 hours recorded in 1956. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Public Places of Amusement (Female)
F 53
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
97
523
$11,411.00
$21.82
24.45
103
540
$13,427.00
$24.86
27.40
108
709
$19,447.00
$27.43
31.27
107
606
$13,258.00
$21.88
27.14
108
646
$14,336.00
Average weekly earnings 	
$22.19
28.41
In the classification dealing with public places of amusement, a total of ninety-seven
firms completed returns in time for tabulation in the 1957 summaries, the employment of
female workers in this group totalling some 523 persons for the week of the survey, a little
below the total of 540 reported in similar occupations during the 1956 inquiry, when the
number of firms reporting was 103.
Employment totals tabulated in this section are inclusive of various occupations,
such as theatre ushers, attendants of swimming-pools, sports centres, bowling-alleys,
dance-halls, and workers in all such establishments providing a service to the public for
which an admission charge is made. Due to the casual and part-time nature of such
occupations, it should be noted that the weekly averages of earnings and hours of work
as shown in the above table are representative only of a partial week, and should not be
considered as full-time employment or comparable to other types of work.
On the basis of a part-time week amounting to an average of 24.45 hours, the
1957 figure representing individual weekly earnings for females in this classification was
$21.82, considerably below the 1956 figure of $24.86, when the average was higher, due
to a somewhat longer work-week, amounting to 27.40 hours.
Personal-service Occupations (Female)
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of empIoyees._
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week_.
54
172
$8,347.00
$48.53
35.15
36
172
1,295.00
$48.23
34.79
44
198
1,689.00
$43.88
37.22
32
166
$7,150.00
$43.07
39.11
26
66
$2,793.00
$42.32
36.98
A total of fifty-four firms reporting in the above classification submitted payroll
information concerning 172 female workers engaged in various personal-service occupations, such as physiotherapy, massage, chiropody, chiropractic, general and specialized
therapeutics, electrical treatments, and work of a similar nature.
Where such employment occurs in medical offices, some difficulty in proper classification of this occupation may arise due to the employee sometimes being engaged in
clerical duties in addition to personal service. For this reason the above data should be
defined as a sampling where possible from the returns submitted, rather than an entire
coverage of this type of work.
Average weekly earnings for female workers in personal-service occupations gained
slightly over the previous year, the 1957 average being computed at $48.53, a slight
increase from $48.23 in this category during 1956.
Average working-time was a little above the previous level, the 1957 average week
showing at 35.15 hours, up from a low of 34.79 hours recorded for the week of the
survey during the previous year. F 54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Summary of All Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act")
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
8,430
73,414
$3,073,795.00
$41.87
36.53
8,107
70,299
$2,792,541.00
$39.72
36.61
8,170
70,776
$2,692,334.00
$38.04
37.02
8,151
68,239
$2,564,920.00
$37.59
37.69
8,331
Total number of employees.	
66,250
$2,390,860.00
$36.09
Average hours worked per week -	
37.82
Coverage of the 1957 survey increased appreciably from the previous year, with
returns received from a total of 8,430 firms reporting employment of some 73,414 women
workers in all occupations within the scope of the inquiry.
In comparison with the 1956 summary, increases were general in 1957, with
employment and earnings well ahead of previous figures. The average work-week was
also somewhat shorter for most female workers in occupations covered by minimum-
wage legislation, as set by the Board.
The total payroll for the survey week in 1957 amounted to $3,073,795, representing
wages and salaries paid to some 73,414 female staff employed, compared with a payroll
of $2,792,541 for the 70,299 women employees shown on the returns during a similar
week in 1956.
A new high in average weekly earnings was apparent in the current figure representing the per capita weekly wage for female workers in all occupations included by the
survey, the 1957 average being computed at $41.87, the highest yet recorded in the
summary data for this section of the Report.
During 1957 the basic range of weekly salaries established by Minimum Wage
Orders for female workers was from a low of $17.60 to a high of $33 in one instance.
As the 1957 average figure (mentioned above as representing weekly earnings for all
occupations under survey) was recorded at $41.87, it is evident that the actual earnings
of female workers in British Columbia continue at a much higher level than the legal
minima set by the Board.
A further decline in the average work-week was apparent in the summary of hours
worked by all female employees listed in the survey, the 1957 figure decreasing to an
average 36.53 hours for the period of the survey, the lowest figure yet recorded for hours
of work in the summary table.
The 73,414 female workers reported in the summary for 1957 are inclusive only
of those workers in occupations and industries subject to minimum-wage legislation as
set by the Board, and the totals therefore do not include farm labour, fruit-pickers, or
domestic servants, these occupations being exempt from the provisions of the " Female
Minimum Wage Act." Bank employees and Federal workers are also excluded from
coverage under the Provincial legislation. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
F 55
Table Showing Comparative Relation of 1957 Earnings to Legal Minimum
Industry or Occupation
Number
of
Firms
Reporting
Number
of
Employees
Reported
Total
Weekly
Payroll
1957
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Full-time
Employees
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Percentage
by Which
1957 Average
Earnings Exceed Legal
Minimum
Mercantile..
Laundry..
Hotel and catering-
Office	
Hair dressing-
Fishing	
Telephone and telegraph-
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
Transportation-
Public places of amusement _
Personal service	
1,709
260
1,315
3,683
97
20
333
732
72
58
97
54
13,420
2,741
12,137
24,157
409
1,748
4,656
8,237
5,047
167
523
172
All occupations..
$490,241
104,208
398,162
1,165,312
18,780
81,224
201,219
383,437
204,684
6,770
11,411
8,347
8,430
i
73,414
$3,073,795
$28.60!
17.601
28.601
33.001
25.003
19.20*
CO
26.401
26.401
(0)
18.002
20.002
$36.53
38.02
32.81
48.24
45.92
46.47
43.22
46.55
40.56
40.54
21.82'
48.53
41.87
27.7
116.0
14.7
46.2
83.7
142.0
31.0
76.3
53.6
CO
21.2
142.7
137.9
1 Forty-four hours per week.
2 Forty to forty-four hours per week.
3 Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
4 Forty-eight hours per week.
5 Switchboard occupations covered by Office Order.
8 In the transportation industry it is impracticable to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in
the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycle, by motor-cycle, or other types of motor-vehicles.
7 Earnings represent partial week only.
Average weekly earnings in each occupational classification of female workers for
1957 are shown in the above table, in relation to the established legal minimum rate in
effect during that year. A percentage column also shows the extent by which the 1957
actual earnings exceed the basic minimum in each case. With reference to the average
earnings for all occupations within the coverage of the 1957 survey, it is worthy of note
that the actual figure of $41.87 as shown in the summary was 137.9 per cent above the
lowest legal minimum then in effect.
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)
The operation and maintenance of British Columbia's hospitals and institutions
continues to provide an abundant source of vocational opportunities for female workers.
In addition to regular staff requirements with respect to professional help, these establishments must also employ large numbers of workers in various supplementary occupations, many of which by the very nature of the work itself are most suited to female
employment.
The progressive development of health and welfare services in keeping with our
growing population and the need for additional facilities, space, and accommodation in
hospitals and institutions have created new jobs and increased employment opportunities
for women in this line of endeavour.
I. F 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Subsequent to the annual survey of women in industry and business, an inquiry was
completed relating to the employment, hours of work, and weekly earnings of female
workers on hospital payrolls, the returns requesting information based on a week of peak
employment during 1957, and coverage of the survey extending to public and private
hospitals, nursing and rest homes, solariums, homes for the aged and infirm, and like
institutions.
A summary of the occupational classifications resulting from this survey is shown
in the following table, together with payroll information relating to employment totals,
earnings, and hours of work for each individual group. Although nursing staffs are not
included in the inquiry, all other female workers were classified where possible from the
returns, and are shown according to the nature of their work:—
Occupational Classification
Number
Employed
Total
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Hours
Laundry  	
Housekeeping and catering-
Office    	
Hairdressing 	
Telephone and telegraph-
Manufacturing- 	
Personal service	
Transportation 	
Technicians, X-ray-
Technicians, laboratory	
Technicians, miscellaneous-
Technicians' helpers— _
Pharmacists .	
Dieticians.   	
Physiotherapists-
Therapists, occupational-
Nurses' aides 	
All occupations-
734
2,427
945
1
102
31
72
1
98
158
22
28
5
45
8
4
1,625
$26,336
83,754
43,838
62
4,471
1,196
3,862
46
6,141
8,514
1,006
1,054
315
.2,688
467
212
60,379
$35.88
34.51
46.39
62.00
43.83
38.58
53.64
46.00
62.66
53.89
45.73
37.64
63.00
59.73
58.38
53.00
37.16
6,306
$244,341
$38.75
36.5
36.7
37.2
40.0
37.3
39.7
37.1
40.0
36.8
38.0
36.3
35.6
31.0
37.3
33.8
39.3
36.7
36.8
Returns were received from 138 establishments in the 1957 survey, this total including public and private hospitals, nursing and rest homes, solariums, homes for the
aged and infirm, and all such institutions.
Employment in hospital occupations showed a marked increase for female workers
in 1957, the survey showing a total of 6,306 women employed in all classifications (exclusive of nursing staff), as compared with 5,895 reported during the previous year.
With the increase in employment, some reduction in working-time was apparent, although
average earnings were generally higher than in 1956, due to increased wage rates in
some classifications.
While the greatest single employment group continues to appear in housekeeping
and catering occupations, employment in this classification and also in the laundry section was a little below the high level of the previous year. Earnings for laundry-workers,
however, increased to an average of $35.88 per week in 1957, up from $33.44 reported
in 1956, while the average for housekeeping and catering occupations was $34.51, a
little below the previous year's high, as a result of shorter working-time apparent in this
section. Office and clerical occupations showed a considerable increase during 1957,
the hospital returns reporting a total of 945 women in this category, up from 826 shown
for the previous year. Average weekly earnings for female office-workers climbed to
$46.39, as compared with $42.75 weekly in 1956, while the working-hours in this section remained almost at the level previously noted. One institution reported a female
worker in the hairdressing occupation, this employee being employed at $62 for a 40-
hour week, and unchanged from the previous year. An increase was again noted in
switchboard occupations relating to the telephone and telegraph classification, a total of
102 women being reported in this type of work, increased from ninety-three shown in BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS F 57
1956. With slightly longer hours in this section, average weekly earnings for switchboard operators were computed at $43.83, up from $43.13 recorded during the previous
survey. Little change was apparent in a small group of female employees engaged in
manufacturing occupations, the working-hours in this section remaining the same as in
1956, while average earnings increased a fraction to $38.58 per week, from $38.44 previously noted. One female worker employed in transportation work for the hospitals
was reported as earning $46 for a 40-hour week.
In actual occupations closely related to the work of hospitalization, separate tabulations were completed where possible from the reports, and are noted in the following
text. Personal-service workers in a small group of various specialized occupations averaged $53.64 per week in 1957, compared with earnings of $42.09 weekly in 1956.
The number of technicians shown in most hospital returns again increased considerably
over the previous year, the total reported in all departments increasing to 278, from 260
previously reported. Of this number, ninety-eight were shown as X-ray technicians,
with average weekly earnings of $62.66 for the week under review, compared with $55.86
weekly in this department during 1956. Laboratory technicians increased in number,
but average earnings in this group were a fraction below the high of 1956, showing at
$53.89 weekly, compared with $54.21 previously recorded. Technicians comprising a
small group of twenty-two workers in miscellaneous specialized departments were shown
as averaging $45.73 per week, while technicians' helpers were earning an average of
$37.64 weekly during the same period. A small sampling of five women employed in
pharmacy work were reported as averaging $63 each for the week of the survey. A total
of forty-five dieticians were reported in the returns, the average weekly figure for earnings in this occupation being computed at $59.73 in 1957, a little below the high of
$60.68 for this group in 1956, due to shorter average working-time. Average weekly
hours in this section were computed at 37.3 in 1957, down from 39.0 hours previously
reported. Separate classification in the case of therapy-workers was difficult from the
returns, as many workers in this category are included in the composite personal-service
group mentioned elsewhere in the text. A sampling of eight physiotherapists, however,
showed average earnings for this occupation almost at the level of the previous year, the
average figure being recorded at $58.38, a fraction down from the $58.45 computed for
this group during 1956, although a considerable drop was also noted in the average
working-time during the week of the survey in 1957. Occupational therapists earned an
average of $53 weekly during the period under review, a considerable increase from the
average of $47.25 noted for this small group in 1956, although a corresponding increase
was also apparent in the average work-week for this section. Second largest employment group in hospital work continues to be the nurses' aides, the number employed
under this heading increasing to 1,625 in 1957, up from a total of 1,265 shown during
the previous year. The increase in employment was effective in reducing the average
work-week for this occupation, although wages continued higher. Compared with the
1956 figure of $34.52, average weekly earnings for nurses' aides increased to $37.16
in 1957, to set a new high for this group. Average working-time for nurses' aides during the survey week in 1957 was 36.7 hours, a further slight decrease from the figure
of 37.7 hours computed in 1956 and 39.1 hours noted for 1955.
Average individual weekly earnings for the 6,306 female employees in all hospital
occupations during 1957 increased to $38.75, up from an average figure of $37.28 recorded in 1956, when total coverage was 5,895 workers.
The average work-week for all hospital-workers in 1957 was computed at 36.8
hours, representing a further decrease in working-time from the figure of 37.3 hours
noted as the average for a similar week in 1956. F 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Statistics for Male Employees
Several of the industrial tables in this Report are of a composite nature, embracing
many industrial classifications under one common heading, such as "Construction,"
" Lumber Industries," etc. A further breakdown of such composite figures is sometimes
necessary in order to examine separately some of the more important sections of labour,
with specific reference to the male wage-earner group in various trades and industries,
and in such a way that a comparison may be made from year to year regarding totals
employed, average earnings, and hours of work.
The tables which follow give a comparative yearly summary for each of the industrial classifications indicated, based on payroll information reported during a representative week of peak employment.
Baking Industry (Male)
1957
1956
1955
1954
152
1,619
$118,982.00
$73.49
38.61
156
1,433
$100,266.00
$69.97
39.12
156
1,336
$93,249.50
$69.80
39.83
158
1,457
$97,052.50
$66.61
39.75
Construction (Male)
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week~
2,189    |
46,706    |
$3,812,878.50    |
$81.64    I
42.35    I
2,156
40,592
$3,182,719.50
$78.41
42.09
2,067
33,006
$2,474,233.50
$74.96
41.51
1,856
31,118
$2,304,695.50
$74.06
41.25
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week..
91
2,810
$165,073.50
$58.75
47.57
96
3,264
$181,050.00
$55.47
47.15
91
3,052
$161,527.00
$52.92
45.80
House Furnishings (Male)
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week..
132
143
144
140
1,509
1,645
1,279
1,432
$99,672.50
$106,385.00
$75,420.00
$77,990.00
$66.05
$64.67
$58.97
$54.46
39.88
39.81
40.45
40.10
Logging (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
1,112
16,724
$1,403,550.50
$83.92
41.72
1,238
19,606
$1,616,816.00
$82.47
42.20
1,225
18,806
$1,511,815.50
$80.39
42.05
1,106
17,354
$1,358,691.50
$78.29
42.09 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male)
F 59
1957
1956
1955
1954
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
180
1,124
$92,731.00
$82.50
39.47
174
1,038
$80,490.50
$77.54
40.07
182
1,111
$84,760.00
$76.29
40.04
169
953
$70,112.00
$73.57
39.94
Plumbing and Heating Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week..
302
2,614
$205,569.50
$78.64
40.76
277
2,156
$166,244.50
$77.11
40.84
270
1,872
$134,731.50
$71.97
40.32
254
1,654
$120,680.00
$72.96
40.68
Sheet-metal Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked peT week~
78
1,363
$102,679.00
$75.33
40.63
84
1,310
$95,788.50
$73.12
40.42
75
1,091
$76,685.00
$70.29
40.01
80
1,037
$72,755.50
$70.16
39.76
Sawmills (Male)
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
726
21,365
$1,544,176.50
$72.28
40.08
811
23,628
$1,632,921.50
$69.11
40.68
854
23,890
$1,601,877.00
$67.05
40.99
798
23,030
$1,525,404.50
$66.24
41.06
Shingle-mills (Male)
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week..
56
1,627
$130,663.00
$80.31
39.89
60
1,860
$141,411.50
$76.03
39.84
56
2,397
$181,458.50
$75.70
39.82
46
2,140
$158,069.00
$73.86
40.08
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male)
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
79
5,496
$464,066.00 I
$84.44 |
40.95 |
79
5,319
$440,880.50
$82.89
42.85
77
4,510
$349,565.00
$77.51
41.16
75
4,253
$326,272.00
$76.72
42.08
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings
Average hours worked per week-
166
6,515
$457,882.50
$70.28
39.83
173
7,519
$510,196.00
$67.85
39.64
176
6,342
$415,793.50
$65.56
40.87
178
5,779
$365,586.00
$63.26
40.21 F 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Investigations and Wage Adjustments
During the year 1958 the Industrial Relations Officers of the Department made
27,108 investigations, and through the efforts of the Department and the co-operation of
the employers, adjustments made during 1958 amounted to $162,060.82. Department
cars travelled 165,856 miles in connection with the administration of the legislation.
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Department, it may be
presumed that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation administered by this Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the following
table:—
Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments, 1957 and 1958
Number of investigations	
Number of Industrial Relations Officers1
" Male Minimum Wage Act "—
Firms involved	
Employees affected	
Arrears paid 	
" Female Minimum Wage Act "—
Firms involved	
Employees affected
Arrears paid
" Annual Holidays Act"—
Firms involved	
Employees affected
Arrears paid	
1957
20,186
24
158
560
$26,628.85
48
151
$2,933.92
541
1,221
$22,033.20
1958
27,108
25
124
443
$17,797.87
47
151
$3,191.03
892
2,622
$61,575.43
Total adjustments
$51,595,972  $82,564.332
1 Average.
2 In addition to the adjustments made under the Minimum Wage and Holidays Acts, 681 firms paid 1,062 employees
$79,496.49 under the provisions of the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Total adjustments for 1958 were
therefore $162,060.82.   Total adjustments for 1957 were $123,185.65.
Court Cases
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the matter of compliance
with the provisions of the orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to resort to
the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained.
A summary of Court cases during the year 1958 follows:—
Court Cases for the Year 1958
Name of Act
Number of
Employers
Charges
Convictions
Charges
Dismissed
or
Withdrawn
" Annual Holidays Act "	
" Control of Employment of Children Act ".
" Hours of Work Act "	
" Male Minimum Wage Act "	
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "..
Totals   	
14
1
4
7
29
55
37
2
5
16
90
150
35
2
5
9
81
132
1 dismissal
1 withdrawn
6 dismissals
1 withdrawn
9 dismissals
16 dismissals
2 withdrawals BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS F 61
Special Licences, 1958
Provision is made in a few of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale of wages
to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in writing have been obtained
from the Board. The following table shows the number of licences issued in the various
lines of work in 1958:—
Male
Female
Totals
Hospitals (practical-nurse students)       	
Laundry  .   	
6
2
2
88
5
9
10
83
88
5
15
12
Office 	
85
Totals-    ...	
10
195
205
Change in Board Membership
On February 7th, 1958, Mr. E. Campbell was appointed to the Board, replacing
Mr. D. J. Baldwin, who had retired for personal reasons. Mr. Baldwin's broad experience as Chairman of the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) under the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" had been an invaluable asset, and the Board
was therefore most fortunate to have as a replacement Mr. Campbell, whose years of
experience in executive positions in the field of industrial relations well qualified him
for the appointment.
Conclusion
At this time the Board would like to thank employers, trade-unions, other organizations, and employees for the co-operation extended to its officials during the year 1958
in the administration of the various labour laws.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.
Fraudena Eaton.
G. A. Little.
H. J. Young.
C. Murdoch.   J
P. Baskin.
E. Campbell. F 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Personnel
Labour        Chief Executive Officer:
Relations B. H. E. Goult    -
Branch
Chief Conciliation Officer:
William Fraser   -
Conciliation Officers:
R. G. Clements -
Robert Forgie
George Carmichael
J. A. Laffling
E. P. Fisher -
John Sherlock
W. T. McLaughlin
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Court-house, Kelowna.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Labour        Chairman:
Relations \y. H. Sands  -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Board
Members:
Fraudena Eaton -     ... 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Penrod Baskin     - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
E.Campbell-      -      -      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
G. A. Little -      ...      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Charles Murdoch      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
H.J.Young ----- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Secretary:
C. R. Margison    - Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Registrar:
D. W. Coton -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Assistant Registrar:
G. B. Harvey -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the annual report of the Labour Relations
Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
The Labour Relations Board met during the year on fifty-one occasions, authorized
the issuance of 522 certificates, and rejected 180 applications for certification. Thirty-
three applications were withdrawn.
The Board entertained fifty-eight applications for decertification; twenty-five were
rejected and thirty-three authorized.
Administrative personnel conducted thirty-two representation votes.
The Board granted applicants permission to prosecute upon thirty-eight occasions.
There were 374 disputes referred to Conciliation Officers during the year. Forty-
two cases, unterminated on December 31st, 1957, were carried over from the preceding
year. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 63
Settlements by Conciliation Officers
Of these, Conciliation Officers settled 161, and 151 cases were referred to Conciliation Boards. In fourteen cases the application for the appointment of a Conciliation
Officer was withdrawn or the appointment cancelled, and in forty-nine cases Conciliation
Officers did not recommend Conciliation Boards. There were forty-one cases unter-
minated at the year's end.
In accordance with the provisions of the " Labour Relations Act," chairmen were
named by the Minister for ninety-seven Conciliation Boards. The nominees of the
disputant parties selected chairmen on thirty-five occasions.
Of the 151 cases referred to Conciliation Boards, 129 Boards were appointed as the
result of the recommendations of Conciliation Officers, and three Boards were appointed
without prior reference to Conciliation Officers. In nine instances the dispute was
settled before the Board was appointed, two applications were withdrawn, and in three
instances the proceedings were terminated by the parties. In the remaining eight cases,
Boards had been recommended but not appointed at December 31st, 1958.
Administrative personnel conducted 369 strike votes.
Arbitration Boards
On the joint application of both parties, in cases where grievance procedure under
collective agreements had been invoked, chairmen were named to thirty Arbitration
Boards.
Various tables descriptive of the work of the Branch follow.
B. H. E. Goult,
Chief Executive Officer,
Labour Relations Branch.
Table I.—Analysis of Certificates Issued in 1958
Number of
Industry or Occupation Certificates
Construction   212
Manufacturing      66
Mercantile     46
Transportation and warehousing     41
Logging and sawmill     31
Hotel, restaurant, and catering     28
Automotive
Printing trades 	
Civil administration
Office employees
Building maintenance
Miscellaneous 	
Food-processing 	
Hospitals	
Mining 	
Ship-building	
Laundry 	
16
16
14
9
9
8
6
6
6
6
2
Total Number
of Employees
Affected by
Certificates Issued
2,144
1,528
592
453
1,709
607
821
274
278
107
65
111
101
161
253
86
5
Totals
522
9,295 F 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table II.—Summary of Cases Dealt With, 1953-58
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
467
119
78
467
133
47
486
180
40
493
119
51
573
128
46
522
Applications—
180
Withdrawn  	
33
Total number of applications for certification dealt
664
36
48
667
44
49
706
15
40
663
16
30
747
47
35
735
38
32
Totals...	
748
343
129
6
221
2
760
333
103
6
75
761
268
91
2
61
709
333
116
6
76
1
829
367
164
3
458
805
374
Conciliation Boards established-  	
132
4
369
4
Totals 	
701
517
422
532
992
883
Summary of Cases Dealt With in 1958, Showing Comparison for 1957
Certificates granted
Applications—
Rejected  	
Withdrawn  	
1957
573
128
46
Number of applications for certification dealt with 747
Permission to prosecute granted  47
Representation votes conducted  35
Conciliation Officers appointed  367
Conciliation Boards established  164
Grievance procedure provided  3
Strike votes supervised  458
Industrial Inquiry Commissioners appointed    	
Totals  1,821
1958
522
180
33
735
38
32
374
132
4
369
4
1,688
Table III.—Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards Appointed
during 1958 by Predominant Cause
Wages and other causes  50
Wages only  27
All terms of collective agreement  41
Hours of work and other causes  11
Union security and other causes  3
Total .  13 2
Strikes and Lockouts in British Columbia, 1958
In the tables which follow, strikes and lockouts are recorded together. The term
" dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all industrial disputes which have come to the
attention of the Department. Methods taken to procure this information preclude the
possibility of serious omission, but revisions may sometimes be made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time-loss are computed by multiplying the number of days a stoppage
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. Summaries include
only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
Disputes are listed by industrial classifications and in the order of their date of
commencement. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 65
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Table VI.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, T948-581
Year
Total Paid
Workers in
B.C. Labour
Force2
Number of
Disputes
Beginning
during
Year3
Number of
Disputes
during
Year
Approximate
Number of
Employers
Affected
Approximate
Number of
Workers
Affected
Time-loss in
Working-
days
Time-loss as
Percentage
of Estimated
Total
Working-
time of Wage
and Salary
Earners
1948-
1949_.
1950
1951..
1952-
1953-
1954..
1955-
1956.
1957.
1958
338,000
340,000
335,000
343,000
362,000
368,000
370,000
390,000
421,000
439,000
435,000
I
20
26
31
32
21
24
34
35
27
9
10
20
26
32
34
24
25
35
35
29
62
30
36
120
339
94
119
62
69
98
188
3,199
707
3,220
3,326
37,206
6,432
12,622
3,367
3,197
8,914
11,709
150,992
15,592
26,913
74,722
1,132,120
34,485
140,958
27,588
39,211
225,869
325,211
0.192
0.020
0.035
0.094
1.326
0.040
0.163
0.030
0.040
0.222
0.325
1 Does not include disputes not within scope of " Labour Relations Act."
2 Does not include persons without jobs; persons who operated their own business, farm, or profession, or persons
who worked without pay on a farm or in a business owned and operated by a member of a household to whom they
were related.   Figures revised 1958, from 1951 to 1958 by Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
3 In this table, figures for disputes extending over the year are counted more than once.
Source: British Columbia Department of Labour Annual Reports. Working-force data obtained from reports of
Dominion Bureau of Statistics by Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
Table VII.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 19581
Industry or Occupation
Number of
Disputes
Approximate Number
Involved
Employers       Workers
Approximate
Time-loss
in Man
Working-days
Construction 	
Logging and lumbering-
Manufacturing  	
Service 	
Transportation	
Totals 	
154
12
11
9
2
1,899
2,064
5,751
1,786
209
119,370
34,822
140,122
30,068
829
11,709
325,211
1 Does not include disputes not within scope of " Labour Relations Act "   {see Table V, " Industrial Disputes
Occurring in British Columbia during 1958 but Not within Scope of "Labour Relations Act," ante).
Legal Proceedings Involving the Labour Relations Board
Traders' Service Limited vs. Labour Relations Board (Retail, Wholesale and
Department Store Union, No. 580)
On November 6th, 1957, the Labour Relations Board certified the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, No. 580, for employees employed in the distributing
warehouse at 343 Railway Street, Vancouver, by Traders' Service Limited.
Application was made by the company for a writ of certiorari to set aside the Order
of the Board and the certificate of bargaining authority issued pursuant thereto. The
applicant claimed, inter alia, that the Board had declined jurisdiction in that it failed to
give all interested parties adequate chance to present evidence and make representation.
The case came on for hearing before Mr. Justice Mclnnes of the Supreme Court of British
Columbia, who found for the applicant and set the Order of the Board aside.
An appeal by the Board to the Court of Appeal was dismissed.
The Board appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada.
Judgment of the Court was rendered by the Honourable Mr. Justice Judson. Mr.
Justice Rand and Mr. Justice Abbott concurred and Mr. Justice Cartwright and Mr.
Justice Locke dissented. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH F 69
The Court found that there was " no departure by the Board from the complete
fulfilment of its statutory duty . . . the respondent . . . had ample opportunity
to present evidence and make any representations that it wished."
The appeal was allowed with costs throughout.
Applications to Prosecute
The Board considered applications for permission to prosecute forty-one charges.
It granted thirty-eight and rejected three.
Annual Survey of Organized Labour
Certain information is required annually from associations of industrial workers or
trade-unions pursuant to the provisions of section 5 (a) of the " Department of Labour
Act." This return requires the name and address of the organization, its affiliation
(if any), and its total paid-up membership, in this instance, to January 1st, 1958.
Members over three months in arrears are not included.
The inclusion of the name of any organization in the listing " Organizations of
Employees (Labour Organizations) " does not necessarily constitute its recognition as a
trade-union within the meaning of the " Labour Relations Act."
The survey of organized labour in British Columbia was again conducted in cooperation with the Federal Department of Labour. The results of that survey are
summarized in following table.
Labour Membership Gains
Organized labour membership expressed as a percentage of the total paid workers
in the British Columbia labour force now stands at 60.93 per cent, up 5.75 percentage
points from last year.
The chart shows the distribution of organized labour membership by major industrial groups, each local having been classified into the group in which the majority of its
members are employed. It indicates those industrial fields which have the greatest
number of union members. It does not, however, show which groups are most highly
organized, as comparable total employment data are not available for the various
categories.
Services Group Retains Highest Membership
The industrial distribution of total organized labour membership shows little basic
change from the previous year. The Services group (public and personal) again retained
the leadership of all groups with its share of membership. Public Services, consisting
largely of government and municipal employees, is the largest single item, with 23.6
per cent of the total membership. The Wood and Wood Products group is next in
importance to Services and accounts for approximately 15 per cent of the total membership. The larger organizations in the group are the International Woodworkers of
America, the International Brotherhood of Paper Makers, and the International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Makers. Third in size is the Foods group, followed
closely by Construction. Large unions represented in these divisions are the Packinghouse Workers and Carpenters and Joiners respectively.
The Transportation group is made up of two categories, one of which is the Railway
Transportation group, which includes three large independent railway unions in the running trades and the large membership of the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees
and Other Transport Workers. The other group consists of all trades and occupations
connected with transportation other than railway. It includes air services, seamen, longshoremen, teamsters, chauffeurs, and warehousemen.
The Metals group contains such unions as the International Association of Machinists
and the Shipyard General Workers Federation. F 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table VIII.—Number of Labour Organizations Reported, Membership and Percentage Increases, and Membership as a Percentage of Paid Workers in Non-
agricultural Industries as of January 1st of Each Year, 1940-58.
1 Almost exclusively workers in non-agricultural industries.
2 Canadian Labour Force Estimates, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
Year
Number
of
Organizations
Total
Membership
Percentage
Increase
over 1945
Percentage
Increase
Yearly
Total1 Paid
Workers
in B.C.
Labour
Forces2
Organized
Labour
Membership
as a Percentage of Total
Paid Workers
1940 	
380
617
636
642
715
745
761
770
772
766
795
865
869
907
952
44,867
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,326
142,989
146,259
157,287
170,036
174,894
178,533
186,951
191,952
216,070
233,972
— 1.77
8.37
22.98
29.94
32.43
42.93
54.51
58.20
62.23
69.88
74.43
96.30
112.61
— 1.77
10.30
13.47
5.67
2.29
7.54
8.10
2.86
2.08
4.71
2.68
12.56
8.28
1945                                      	
1946                   	
238,000
322,250
339,800
338,250
332,250
343,000
362,000
368,000
370,000
390,000
421,000
439,000
435,000
38.20
1947    .	
35.89
1948	
39.82
1949 _	
1950- -    .
1951    .	
42.27
44.02
45.9
1952 —  - 	
1953 —           	
47.0
47.5
1954   ..                 	
48.3
1955	
47.9
1956 	
1957  	
1958 -..             -                  	
45.6
49.2
53.8
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by
Industrial Classifications, 1958
Personal Services
Construction
Services
Public Services
Metals
Mining and Quarrying
Communications,
'     Clothing and
v^Footwear
Railway
^^Transportation
Other
Transportation
Wood and Wood Products
Light, Heat and Power
All Other
Printing and
Publishing LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 71
Organizations of Employees (Labour Organizations)
The list of British Columbia labour organizations, which follows, is arranged alphabetically, according to location. It shows the post-office addresses of those who have
furnished the Bureau of Economics and Statistics with the required data. Names and
addresses of officers have been revised to the date of publication in all cases where such
information was submitted. Organizations which have come into existence subsequent
to January 1st, 1958, are not included in the list, but will be shown in the next publication.
Each year the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, in conjunction with the Labour
Relations Branch, Department of Labour, compiles a listing of employer organizations
in British Columbia which have for one of their purposes the regulation of relations
between employers and employees.   Organizations reporting this year total fifty-five.
The list of employer organizations follows that of the labour organizations.
All addresses are in British Columbia, except where otherwise indicated.
Abbotsford
Brick and Clay Workers of America, Abbotsford Local
No. 629.—Secretary, M. R. Tribe, R.R. 1, Abbotsford.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Recording Secretary, H. Mybeden, Abbotsford.
Packing House Workers of America, Local No. 432.—Secretary, John Klein, R.R. 5, Jackson Road, Abbotsford.
Postal Employees' Association, Abbotsford Branch.—Secretary, C. C. Waite, Box 746, Abbotsford.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 34.—
Secretary, Linda F. Wolfe, Box 1119, Abbotsford.
Albion
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Albion Branch,
Local No. 3.—Secretary, Tarmo Puska, Websters Corners.
Agassiz
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 76.—
Secretary, Miss A. Fowler, c/o F. Kay, R.R. 1, Agassiz.
Alberni
Government Employees' Association of  B.C.—Secretary,
V. Belkings, 715 Sixteenth Avenue North, Port Alberni.
Teachers' Federation of B.C.—Recording Secretary, J. E.
Lansdowne, 407 Anderson Avenue, Port Alberni.
Albert Canyon
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Local No.  208.—Secretary,  D.  Peresini,  P.O.
Box 8, Revelstoke.
Alert Bay
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 30.—
Secretary, Gordon McNeil, Alert Bay.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 73.—
Secretary, Mrs. C. Smith Barker, Box 191, Alert Bay.
Alice Arm
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' International Union,
Local No. 906.—Secretary, William J. Margach, Alice
Arm.
Annieville
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Annieville Local
No. 10.—Secretary, Leo Larsen, Millar Road, R.R. 7,
New Westminster.
Armstrong
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 21.—
President, Paul Yuzwa, Armstrong.
Avola
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.N.R.
System, Local No. 15.—Secretary, M. Kurylowich, Chu
Chua.
Bamberton
Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers' International Union,
Local No. 277.—Secretary, Neil Kelly, R.R. 1, Cobble
Hill.
Bankeir
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1023.—Secretary, E. J. Loutard, Box 845, Princeton.
Barriere
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 19.—
Secretary, Mrs. Marcelle Eumpf, Box 38, Barriere.
Beaton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' International Union,
Local No. 920.—Secretary, Ronald G. Shorthouse,
Beaton.
Belmont Park
Teachers' Federation of B.C.—Secretary, Mrs. E. M. Bird,
1955 Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria.
Bella Bella
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 20.—
Secretary, Allan Newman, Bella Bella.
Beaverdell
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' International Union,
Local No. 900.—Secretary, Ken Worrall, Beaverdell.
Bella Coola
Fishermens' and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 27.—
Secretary, George C. Robson, Bella Coola.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 49.—
Secretary, J. K. Schunaman, Bella Coola.
Birch Island
Teachers' Federation of B.C.—Secretary, Miss Margaret
R. Morris, Birch Island.
Blubber Bay
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' International Union,
Local No. 882.—Secretary, J. H. McConnell, Blubber
Bay.
Blue River
Railroad Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 143.—Secretary, William
Haluk, Blue River.
Bonnington Falls
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 999.—Secretary, E. A. Jones, P.O. Box 12, Bonnington Falls. F 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Bralorne
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' International Union,
Local No. 1000.—Secretary, W. G. Osborne, Box 24,
Bralorne.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 29 —
Secretary, J. O. Kunze, Box 177, Bralorne.
Burnaby
Civic Employees, Burnaby Association of, Local No. 23.—
Secretary, John Knight, 6565 Wiltshire Street, Vancouver 14.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of, Local No.
82.—Secretary, H. C. McKichen, 4633 Elmwood Street,
South Burnaby.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Burnaby Local
No. 323.—Secretary, H. D. Anderson, 38 North Fell
Avenue, Burnaby.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Burnaby Local
No. 379.—Secretary, G. J. McCrea, 3309 Lane Street,
Burnaby 1.
Steel Workers, United, of America, Local No. 5432.—
Secretary, R. C. Stewart, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver
10.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Burnaby School District No.
41.—President, James Goldie, 250 Willingdon Avenue,
Burnaby 2.
Teachers' Federation Administrators.—Association secretary, A. E. Evans, 2097 Nelson Avenue, Burnaby.
Trainmen's Union, Canadian, Burnaby Local No. 1.—
Secretary, C. W. Young, 4751 Union Street, North
Burnaby.
Burns Lake
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.  872.—Secretary, John Gilgan, P.O. Box
271, Burns Lake.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Burns Lake
Branch.—Secretary, Miss S. A. Nobles, Southbank.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 55.—
Secretary, Mrs. Doreen Woodall, Burns Lake.
Campbell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1882.—Secretary, J. H. Welsh, 996 Greenwood Street, Campbell River.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Quathiaski Cove
Local   No.   17.—Secretary,   John   Hewison,   Campbell
River.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood  of, Local No.
630.—Secretary, N. Campbell, Box 269, Campbell River.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian.—Secretary,
Charles F. Wood, 160 Tenth Avenue, Campbell River.
Pulp and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood
of, Campbell River Association.—Secretary,  W. Luck,
P.O. Box 291, Campbell River.
School   Board   Employees'   Association,   Local  No.   723,
School District No. 72.—Secretary, Ralph Smith, 1170
Cedar Street, Campbell River.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 72.—
Secretary, Mrs. E. Walter, Box 1048, Campbell River.
Cassiar
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Cassiar Local No. 927.—Secretary, J. Barfoot, Cassiar.
Castlegar
Carpenters and Joiners of America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 2300.— Secretary, C. B. Roberts,
P.O. Box 187, Kinnaird.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 9.—Secretary, Mrs. E. Murray, Box 636, Castlegar.
Chemainus
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 508.—Secretary, H. E. Irving, Box 332, Chemainus.
Office Employees' Association, North Cowichan Local No.
724.—Secretary, A. Younger, General Delivery, Duncan.
Chilliwack
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,   Local   No.   1843.—Secretary,   G.   N.   Norlen,   520
Young Street North, Chilliwack.
Civic Employees' Association, Local No. 712.—Secretary,
Dorothy M. Davis, 325 Edward Street, Chilliwack.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Local Council.—
Secretary,  K.  S.  Henderson,  227  Wellington  Avenue,
Chilliwack.
Employees  of School  District  No.  33,  Branch  of  N.P.
Union   No.   411.—Secretary,   Harley   G.   Palmer,   660
Trans-Canada Highway, R.R. 1, Rosedale.
Fire   Fighters,   International   Association   of.—Secretary,
P. R. Werk, R.C.S.M.E., 204 Third Avenue, Chilliwack.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Chilliwack
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. E. King, 126 Yale Road East,
Chilliwack.
Hospital Employees' Union, Chilliwack Local No. 180.—
Secretary, A. M. Short, 724 First Avenue, Chilliwack.
Municipal Employees' Association, Chilliwack Local No.
458.—Secretary,  C. M.  English,  119 Hocking Avenue,
Chilliwack.
Packinghouse   Workers   of America,   United,   Chilliwack
Local No. 430.—Business agent, William Lynch, Room
3, 45 Kingsway, Vancouver.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian,   Local   No.
110.—Secretary, Gordon H. Piers, Chilliwack.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 33.—
Secretary,  Mrs.   May  Colclough,  433   North  Williams
Street, Chilliwack.
Unemployment Insurance Staff Association.—Secretary, V.
Rempel, 2 Windsor Street, Chilliwack.
Clinton
Teachers' Federation of B.C., South Cariboo District No.
30.—Secretary, Miss M. Norton, Clinton.
Cloverdale
Municipal Employees' Association, Surrey Local No. 402.
—Secretary, Mrs. Verna King, Box 700, Cloverdale.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian.—Secretary,
R. Beauchamp, 18734 Reid Road, R.R. 2, Cloverdale.
Colquitz
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Colquitz
Mental Home.—Secretary, E. B. Hilton, 3936 Helen
Road, Victoria.
Comox
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Comox District.—Secretary, T. Tams, Box 789, Courtenay.
Copper Mountain
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 649.—Secretary, John J. O. Neill, Allenby.
Coquitlam
Municipal Employees' Union, Coquitlam District, Local
No. 16.—Secretary, Mrs. V. Ostnikoff, 1325 Ewen
Avenue, New Westminster.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 43.—
Secretary, G. F. Borkes, 1010 Austin Road, New Westminster.
Courtenay
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1638.—Secretary, L. E. Paisley, P. O. Box
515, Courtenay.
Civic Employees, Courtenay District, Local No. 156.—Secretary, H. Sharpe, Box 461, Courtenay.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, J. L.
Avent, R.R. 2, Courtenay.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Courtenay
Branch.—Secretary, G. F. Harrison, P.O. Box 597,
Courtenay.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Courtenay School District
No. 71.—Secretary, J. R. Hindle, Box 442, Courtenay.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No.
1-363.—Secretary, J. Mack, Courtenay. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 73
Cranbrook
Carpenters and Joiners of America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 1719.—Secretary, Fred Jensen, Box
1558, Cranbrook.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Cran-
brook-Kimberley.—Secretary, J. W. Broadhurst, Box
403, Kimberley.
General Workers' Union, Kimberley Local No. 212.—Secretary, O. G. Wile, Box 1082, Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Cranbrook
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. Mary Griffiths, Box 1105,
Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Cranbrook Lodge
No. 563.—Secretary, C. W. Morris, Box 399, Cranbrook.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Cranbrook Local No. 559.—Secretary, J. Huxtable, Box
262, Cranbrook.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Branch of the
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Local No. 2833.—
Secretary, A. Sutherland, Box 237, Cranbrook.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 229.—Secretary, A. Downey, Box 162, Cranbrook.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Cranbrook
Branch.—President, Marvin Fennessy, Post Office, Cranbrook.
Public Employees' Association, Cranbrook, Local No.
729.—Secretary, W. R. Thacker, P.O. Box 582, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Cranbrook Lodge
No. 585.—Secretary, H. I. Conroy, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Local No. 1325.—Secretary,
H. A. Haynes, Box 386, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Cranbrook
Lodge No. 173.—Secretary, F. G. Dillon, General Delivery, Cranbrook.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 2.—
Secretary, Miss J. Slade, Box 1546, Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No.
1-405.—Secretary, Len Lancaster, Newgate; Business
agent, A. Damstrom, P.O. Box 1779, Cranbrook.
Creston
Carpenters and Joiners of America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 2318, Secretary, Harry Fofonoff,
P.O. Box 34, Creston.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Federated Union, Local No.
7.—Secretary, Mrs. Frances E. Clarke, Box 532, Creston.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Creston
Branch.—Secretary, Miss P. Laktin, Box 39, Creston.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Cranbrook
Branch.—Secretary, Miss Kaye Irving, Post Office, Creston.
School Employees' General Union, Local No. 435.— Secretary, George H. Ronaghan, Box 881, Creston.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 5.—Secretary, Roy I. McLoughlin, Creston.
Crofton
Pulp and Paper Mill Workers, International Brotherhood
of, Local No. 883.—Secretary, R. F. Hodgins, Crofton.
Crowsnest
Lime Product Workers, Canadian Union of.—Secretary,
Joseph Waverecan, P.O. Box 110, Coleman, Alta.
Cumberland
Jack
Firebosses'   Union,   Vancouver   Island.—Secretary,
Thomson, P.O. Box 77, Cumberland.
Mine  Workers  of  America,   United,   Cumberland  Local
No. 7293.—Secretary, H. Westfield, Cumberland.
Dawson Creek
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1237.—Secretary, Fred Kwasney, Box
1635, Dawson Creek.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 16-703.—Secretary, Howard Wright, General Delivery, Dawson Creek.
Painters,   Decorators   and   Paperhangers   of   America,
Brotherhood  of,   Local  No.   1820.—Secretary,  Jean  P.
Lozeron, General Delivery, Dawson Creek.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Dawson Creek
Branch.—Secretary, Harold Bowman, Dawson Creek.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Local
No.   293.—Secretary,   Malcolm   Nicholson,   Box   1142,
Dawson Creek.
Teachers'   Federation   of  B.C.,   School  District  No.   59,
Peace River South.—Secretary, Clayton Williams,  Box
1289, Dawson Creek.
Dewdney
Government  Employees'  Association  of  B.C.,  Dewdney
Branch.—Secretary, L. Slasbury, Mission City.
Duncan
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1812.—Secretary, Douglas Chandler, P.O.
Box 1532, Duncan.
Civic and Municipal Employees' Union, Local No. 358.—
Secretary, F. L. Schiller, Box 1956, Duncan.
Government   Employees'   Association   of   B.C.,   Duncan
Branch.—Secretary, Miss E. Melvin, Box 1779, Duncan.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Duncan Branch.
—Secretary, R. W. Smillie, Post Office, Duncan.
Municipal Office Employees' Association.—Secretary, Miss
A. Younger, General Delivery, Duncan.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 65.—
Secretary, Miss M. Herriges, Box 1344, Duncan.
Unemployment Insurance Staff Association, Upper Island
Branch.—Secretary,    H.   McLean,    162   View   Street,
Duncan.
Woodworkers   of   America,   International,   Local   No.
1-80.—Secretary, Edwin Linder, Box 430, Duncan.
Endako
Railroad Signalmen of America, Brotherhood of.—Secretary, A. I. Gregory, Birch Island.
Enderby
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 78.—
Secretary, Mrs. Enid Hardman, Box 191, Enderby.
Engen
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1870.—Secretary, J. Wall, Engen.
Esquimalt
Fire Fighters' Association of B.C., Local F.F.F.—Secretary, J. Taylor, 1552 Morley Street, Victoria.
Graving Dock (Esquimalt) Employees' Association.—Secretary, R. Narracott, 451 Admirals Road, Victoria.
Marine Engineers' National Association, Esquimalt Council, Local No. 20.—Business Agent, J. Ashcroft, 2346
Arbutus Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Union, Esquimalt, Local No. 333.—
Secretary, T. Bennett, 489 Nelson Street, Esquimalt.
Peace Officers' Association.—Secretary, Robert Duncan,
1099 Lockley Road, Esquimalt.
Treasury Staff Association, Branch of Civil Service Federation.—Secretary, Miss H. Whittaker, 565 Marifleld
Avenue, Victoria.
Essondale
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Essondale
Branch.—Secretary, Willam R. Low, 355 Mundy Road,
R.R. 2, New Westminster.
Fernie
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers,
International Union of, Local No. 308.—Secretary, J.
Savage, Box 1071, Fernie.
Civic Workers' Union, Fernie and District, Local Council
No. 316.—Secretary, Albert Harold, Fernie.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 921.—Secretary, R. Battersby, Box 399, Fernie.
Government Employees' Association of B.C.—Secretary,
S. J. Tognela, Box 1172, Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, District No. 18, Local
No.   7310.—Secretary,   Robert   Lilley,   P.O.   Box   486,
Fernie.
I F 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, Miss
Elizabeth Payne, Post Office, Fernie.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Fernie Sub-local.—Secretary, Miss Elizabeth Bachlet, Box 1067, Fernie.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 1.—Secretary, Miss Evelyn Tomkins, Jaffray.
Fort Nelson
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Fort Nelson Branch, School
District No. 81.—Secretary, Mrs. W. T. Gutteridge, Fort
Nelson.
Fort St. John
Civl Servants of Canada,  Amalgamated,  Department of
Transport  Branch.—Secretary,   J.  H.  Cheeseman,  Box
172, Fort St. John.
Government  Employees'  Association  of  B.C.,  Fort   St.
John Branch.—Secretary, D. Schu, Fort St. John.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Peace River North, School
District No. 60.—Secretary, Miss Mildred Hazlett, Fort
St. John.
Gibsons-Pender
Government  Employees' Association of B.C.—Secretary,
J. W. Blatchford, Wilson Creek.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 21.—
Secretary, Dal Triggs, Box 84, Gibsons.
Golden
Government   Employees'   Association   of   B.C.,   Golden
Branch.—Secretary,   Robert   G.   Higginson,   Box   254,
Golden.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.,
Local No. 165.—Secretary, E. H. Dillon, Golden.
Teachers' Federation of B.C.,  School District No. 18.—
Secretary, Wm. A. De Coste, Box 131, Golden.
Grand Forks
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 3214.—Secretary, A. Negroff, P.O. Box
269, Grand Forks.
Civic Employees' National Union, Grand Forks Local No.
453.—Secretary, Frank Hartinger, Grand Forks.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Grand Forks-
Greenwood Branch.—Secretary, E. A. Johnson, Box 425,
Greenwood.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 12.—
Secretary, Angus Campbell, Grand Forks.
Greenwood
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Kettle Valley Association,
School District No. 13.—Secretary, Mrs. E. Gee, Greenwood.
Haney
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 3.—
Secretary, Tarmo Poska, Websters Corners.
Government   Employees'   Association   of   B.C.,   Haney
Branch.—Secretary, G. Yusko, AUco Infirmary, Haney.
Municipal Employees' Federal Union,  District of Maple
Ridge, Local No. 622.—Secretary, C. Schu, Haney.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Haney Branch.—
Secretary, R. J. Franklin, Post Office, Haney.
Public Employees, Maple Ridge School District No. 703.—
Secretary,   Mrs.   Jean   Grevelling,   General   Delivery,
Haney.
Woodworkers   of   America,   International,   Local   No.
1-367.—Secretary, A. S. Corey, Box 80, Haney.
Hope
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Allison Pass
Branch.—Secretary,   W.   E.   Howe,   c/o   Pine   Woods
Lodge, Manning Park.
Teachers' Federation of B.C.,  Fraser Canyon Teachers'
Association, School District No. 32.—Secretary, Mrs. M.
Anderson, Box 736, Hope.
Invermere
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Invermere School District
No. 4.—Secretary, Mrs. Joanne Bradford, Invermere.
Kaleden
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.   1696.—Secretary,  T.  C. Hawtree,  P.O.
Box 29, Kaleden.
Fruit   and   Vegetable   Workers'   Union,   District   No.   4,
Local No. 48, Secretary, Miss Ann Bolen, Kaleden.
Kamloops
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1640.—Secretary, J. F. Mobley, 717 Nicola
Street, Kamloops.
Civil Servants, Amalgamated, R.C.N. Ammunition Magazine.—Secretary, W. D. Schall, General Delivery, Kamloops.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 993. — Secretary, E. Pritchett, Windbreak Road,
R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
913.—Secretary, A. L. Miner, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Kamloops
Branch.—Secretary, Al Norberg, 845 Nicola Street,
Kamloops.
Letter Carriers' Federation, Local No. 80.—Secretary,
J. A. Reeves, 688 Leigh Road, North Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Kamloops Lodge
No. 821.—Secretary, J. Waugh, 543 Seymour Street,
Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, North Thompson
Branch, Lodge No. 885.—Secretary, L. P. Martin, 753
Pleasant Street, Kamloops.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Kamloops Lodge No. 930.—Secretary, Ed W. Dowhan-
iuk, 1307 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 748.—
Secretary, J. McDonald, 829 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Kamloops Local No. 31.—Secretary, G. Werenko, Kamloops
Junction.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Kamloops Local No. 1332.—Secretary, W. J. Mooney, 838
Pleasant Street, Kamloops.
Municipal Employees' Association, Kamloops City
Branch.—Secretary, G. Waite, Poplar Street, North
Kamloops.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 16-675.—Secretary, J. W. Silver, P.O. Box
74, Kamloops.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Kamloops
Branch.—Secretary, F. B. Tedder, R.R. 2, Kamloops.
Railway Association, Canadian.—Secretary, D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Kamloops
Lodge. — Secretary, Art Lubin, 448 Linden Avenue,
North Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Kamloops Lodge No.
519.—Secretary, Vernon Mott, 521 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 24.—
Secretary, James L. Barker, 752 Pine Street, Kamloops.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 8,
Kamloops Plant.—Secretary, A. D. Millman, 515 McGowan Avenue, North Kamloops.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 8.—
Secretary, Miss S. Gottfriedsen, 403 Alexander Avenue,
North Kamloops.
Kaslo
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 6, Kootenay Lake.—Secretary, Mrs. Rose Dortman, Riondel.
Kelowna
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union,
Local   No.   335.—Secretary,   S.   Beardmore,   R.R.   2,
Kelowna.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.  1370.—Secretary, H. Downey, P.O. Box
370, Kelowna.
City Hall Employees' Union, Kelowna Local No. 472.—
Secretary, D. B. Herbert, 1435 Water Street, Kelowna. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 75
Civic Employees' Union, Kelowna Local No. 338.—Secretary, Stan Chatham, 690 Cambridge Avenue, Kelowna.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, C. R.
Arnold, 2054 Ethel Street, Kelowna.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Kelowna
Local No. 1409.—Secretary, M. Scheer, 434 Bernard
Avenue, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District No. 48,
Local No. 5.—Secretary, D. R. Leckie, 190 Vimy Avenue, Kelowna.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Kelowna
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. P. Lynch, R.R. 1, Kelowna.
Hospital Employees' Association, Kelowna Hospital.—
Secretary, Miss Irene Williams, Box 208, Kelowna.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers, Kelowna Local No. 2771.—
Secretary, E. Rieger, Box 167, Rutland.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Kelowna
Branch.—Secretary, F. J. Munro, R.R. 1, Kelowna.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' International Union,
Local No. 445, Okanagan Branch.—Secretary, E. J. W.
Adkin, 563 Central Avenue, Kelowna.
School Employees' Union, School District No. 23.—Secretary, T. R. Prior, 419 Royal Avenue, Kelowna.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 23.—
Secretary, Miss G. Perron, 6299 Birch Avenue, Kelowna.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers, International Union of, Local No. 48.—Secretary, W. E.
Darroch, 434 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Unemployment Insurance Staff Association, Okanagan
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. J. Horn, 536 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Woodworkers of America, International, Kelowna Branch,
Local No. 1-423.—Secretary, John Wilderman, 1139 Ellis
Street, Kelowna.
Keremeos
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 16.—
Secretary, Miss Yvonne Wiens, Keremeos.
Kimberley
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1675.—Secretary, J. W. Broadhurst, Box 1103, Kimberley.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
1253.—Secretary, M. L. Ringheim, P.O. Box 1125, Kimberley.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 651.—Secretary, W. Evans, General Delivery,
Kimberley.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 3.—Secretary, Miss Rita McCullough, Box 1456, Kimberley.
Kitimat
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers, International Union
of, Local No. 5.—Secretary, M. Schoenewald, Box 4536,
Riverside P.O., Kitimat.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1081.—Secretary, E. P. Rodda, P.O. Box
248, Nechako Centre, Kitimat.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, Local No.
384.—Secretary, N. E. Norris, General Delivery, Anderson Creek P.O., Kitimat.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1661.—Secretary, Jim Donlon, Box 548, Nechako
P.O., Kitimat.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
218.—Secretary, W. J. Maximuk, Box 420, Nechako
P.O., Kitimat.
Painters, Decorators, and Paperhangers of America,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 1802.—Secretary, R. Austen,
47 Partridge Street, Kitimat.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Kitimat Branch.
—Secretary, Nick Chobotar, Main Post Office, Kitimat.
Public Employees and School Board Employees, School
District No. 80.—Secretary, R. B. Hyde, Box 759,
Nechako P.O., Kitimat.
Sheet Metal Workers' Association, Local No. 561.—Secretary, Clem Peppel, Box 4561, Riverside P.O., Kitimat.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 5115.—Secretary, Ron Freeman, Box 2379, Smeltersite, Kitimat.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 80.—
Secretary, E. Hampson, Box 443, Nechako P.O.,
Kitimat.
Lac la Hache
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 221.—Secretary, V. J. Cardin, R.R. 1, Lac la Hache.
Ladner
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Ladner Branch.
—Secretary, Dick Robie, P.O. Box 209, Ladner.
Fire   Fighters'   Association,   Federal   Union,   Vancouver
Wireless Station.—Secretary, H. A. Feather, 6120 Sandal
Road, R.R. 6, North Surrey.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 4.—
Secretary, Nick Spilchen, R.R. 1, Ladner.
Municipal Employees' Union, Delta Branch No. 23.—Secretary, A. R. Pockett, 1584 Forty-fifth Avenue, Ladner.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Ladner Branch.
—Secretary, D. A. Roberston, 4871 Forty-fifth Avenue,
Ladner.
Teachers' Federation of B.C.,  School District No. 37.—
Secretary, Miss Margaret Hoffman, Box 154, Ladner.
Ladysmith
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System,  Local No. 533.—Secretary, A. E. Costin, Box
408, Ladysmith.
Public Employees' Union, Ladysmith, Local No. 237.—
Secretary, William Orr, Box 243, Ladysmith.
Teachers' Federation of B.C.,  School District No. 67.—
Secretary, Miss Alice Drew, Box 363, Chemainus.
Lake Cowichan
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 905.—Secretary, George Mackus, Box 81,
Lake Cowichan.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 66.—
Secretary, J. Thygesen, Box 230, Lake Cowichan.
Langford
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Langford
Branch.—Secretary, William H. Sluggett, 3477 Saanich
Road, Victoria.
Langley
Municipal Employees' Association, National Union of
Public Employees, Local No. 403.—Secretary, S. J.
Hardy, R.R. 6, Langley.
Langley Prairie
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 32.—
Secretary, Eric Burnell, R.R. 5, Langley Prairie.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Fraser Valley Branch.—Secretary, C. F. Seelhuber, Box 473,
Cloverdale.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Langley Branch.
—Secretary, Susan Inkster, Post Office, Langley.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 35.—
Secretary, Mrs. Merle Wiscynski, 20160 Norris Road,
R.R. 4, Langley.
Lillooet
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Lillooet
Branch.—Secretary, W. E. Swainsburg, Box 274, Lillooet.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, Lillooet Branch
No. 85.—Secretary, Frank E. C. Smith, Box 128, Lillooet.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 248.—
Secretary, Mrs. J. Johanssen, Box 248, Lillooet.
Maple Ridge
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Maple Ridge
Branch.—Secretary, F. Pearson, 9894 Twenty-fifth Avenue, Whonock.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 42.—
Secretary, Miss J. Mooney, 21385 Metcalfe Road, R.R.
1, Hammond. F 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Masset
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 43.—
Secretary, Bill Duffus, Masset.
Matsqui
Packinghouse  Workers  of  America,   United,   Local  No.
501.—Secretary, Don Friesen, Matsqui.
McBride
Government Employees' Association of B.C., McBride
Branch.—Secretary, William Elliot,  Box  39, McBride.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 247.—Secretary, J. A.
Carstairs, P.O. Box, McBride.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 58.—
Secretary, C. A. Gordon, P.O. Box 53, McBride.
Merritt
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Merritt
Branch.—Secretary, J. H. Goldie, Box 1601, Merritt.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 31.—
Secretary, H. C. Farr, Box 378, Merritt.
Mission City
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2213.—Secretary, H. B. Foote, P.O. Box
425, Mission City.
Civic Employees' Union, Branch of N.U.P. Employees.—
Secretary, R. Pennington, Mission City.
School Board Employees, Mission School District No. 75.
—Secretary, G. B. Monds, 216 Second Avenue, Mission.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 75.—
Secretary, G. G. F. Adams, Box 1137, Mission City.
Mount Sheer
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 663.—Secretary, H. Bjursen, Britannia Beach.
Nakusp
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Arrow Lakes School District
No. 10.—Secretary, S. G. Bryant, James Street, Nakusp.
Namu
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 29.—
Secretary, Ray Giesel, Namu.
Nanaimo
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,  Local  No.   527.—Secretary,   P.   A.  Houlihan,   523
Sterling Avenue, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' Union, Branch of N.U.P. Employees.—
Secretary, Robert Browne, R.R. 1, Wellington.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Nanaimo Local.
—Secretary, John C. Zasburg, West Road, Northfield.
Dry Cleaning and Laundry Workers' Union, Local No. 1.
—Secretary,   Hazel   Rogers,   480   St.   George   Street,
Nanaimo.
Fire  Fighters,  International  Association  of,  Local  No.
905.—Secretary, T. MacDonald, 50 Giggleswick Place,
Nanaimo.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 15.—
Secretary,   Frank   Meabry,   1630   Waddington  Avenue,
Nanaimo.
Government  Employees'  Association  of  B.C.,  Nanaimo
Branch.—Secretary,   H.   W.   R.   Heard,   532   Kennedy
Street, Nanaimo.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees and  Bartenders' International Union,  Local No. 619.—Secretary,  Oscar Le
Pas, 324 Wallace Street, Nanaimo.
Lathers'   International   Union,  Wood,   Wire   and   Metal,
Local No. 546.—Secretary, J. M. Berger, Cedar P.O.
Letter Carriers' Federation, Nanaimo Branch.—Secretary,
A. Gorton, R.R. 3, Nanaimo.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 501.—
Secretary, Austen Craven, 305 Wentworth Street, Nanaimo.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7355.—Secretary, George Bryce, 60 Rainer Street, Nanaimo.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Union of, Local No. 28.—Secretary, Henry S. Hack-
wood, 218 Haliburton Street, Nanaimo.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
J. E. Campbell, Post Office, Nanaimo.
Public Employees, School Board, Local No. 606.—Secretary, Michael Krall, 644 Haliburton Street, Nanaimo.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 695.—Secretary, S. V. Simpson, 350 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1187.—Secretary, C. D. Barrie, 625 Chestnut Street, Nanaimo.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 68.—
Secretary, W. E. Sones, 130 Rosehill Street, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 3.—
Secretary, C. L. Tallman, 507 Bradley Street, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 12.—
Secretary, Mrs. F. Waugh, 618 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 337.—Secretary, A. R. Glen, Box 166, Nanaimo.
Unemployment Insurance Staff Association, Upper Vancouver Island Branch.—Secretary, Robert H. McLean,
162 View Street, Nanaimo.
Naramata
Fruit  and   Vegetable  Workers'  Union,   District  No.   11,
Local  No.  48.—Secretary,  Helen  H.  Vaughan,   Naramata.
Natal
Mine Workers of America, United, District No. 18, Local
No. 7292.—Secretary, J. Katrichak, Drawer 6, Natal.
Nelson
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers' International Union, Local No. 292.—Secretary,
Lawrence Choluk, 714 Silica Street, Nelson.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2458.—Secretary, Frank Tough, P.O. Box
206, Nelson.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1003.—Secretary, A. A. Pagdin, 714 Hall Street,
Nelson.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1900.—Secretary, T. Skelton, 511 Gore Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Oilers' International Union, Local No. 1141.
—Secretary, W. E. Rusnack, R.R. 1, Nelson.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Nelson
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. R. Mosti, General Delivery,
Nelson.
Hospital General Workers' Union, Local No. 180.—Secretary, Mrs. A. Huekmer, 519 Carbonate Street, Nelson.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 707.—Secretary, J. F. Brin-
ley, 615 Nelson Avenue, Nelson.
Locomotive Engineers, International Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 579.—Secretary, R. C. Wright, 110 Houston
Street, Nelson.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, International Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 631.—Secretary, E. D. Floren, 908
Sixth Street, Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 633.—
Secretary, J. E. Baldock, 300 Kerr Block, Nelson.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 181.—Secretary, T. H. Imming, 513 Latimer Street,
Nelson.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Nelson Branch.
—Secretary, W. S. Bailey, 1702 Falls Street, Nelson.
Public Employees, Nelson Civic, Local No. 339.—Secretary, Miss K. Maras, Box 144, Nelson.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 558.—
Secretary, Fred H. Lowe, R.R. 1, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
98.—Secretary, G. M. Scales, 24 View Street, Nelson. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 77
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Local No. 2318.—Secretary,
B. J. Monteolone, 314 Hart Street, Nelson.
Trainmen's Canadian Union, Local No. 4:—Secretary,
W. C. Chapman, Box 343, Nelson.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 7.—Secretary, Mrs. Delia Irwin, 408 Mill Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 4.—
Secretary, W. Ludlow, 609 Cedar Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 13.—
Secretary, Mrs. P. Scott, 521 Silica Street, Nelson.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 340.—
Secretary, D. G. Marshall, 1123 Front Street, Nelson.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Staff Association,
Nelson Branch.—Secretary, B. E. Latremouille, Gray
Building, Nelson.
New Denver
Government Employees' Association of B.C., New Denver
Branch.—Secretary, Miss A. J. Black, New Denver.
New Hazelton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 898.—Secretary, R. Ingram, Hazelton.
New Westminster
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.   1251.—Business Agent,  Roy West, 732
Royal Avenue, New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2534.—Business Agent, S. Sowden, 1836
Kingsway, South Burnaby.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,   Local   No.   2736.—Secretary,   Roy  Fitzgerald,   732
Royal Avenue, New Westminster.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, New Westminster
Branch.—Secretary,   H.   A.   Derby,   381   Darby   Road,
R.R. 8, New Westminster.
Cordage,  Industrial  Rope  and  Twine  Workers'  Union,
Local No. 1.—Secretary, Miss Iris Patrick, 1034, Fifth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Distillery, Rectifying,  Wine  and Allied Workers'  International Union, Local No. 69.—Business Agent, Russel
A. Cyr, 1890 Second Avenue, New Westminster.
Fire  Fighters,   International   Association  of,   Local  No.
256.—Secretary, Lloyd C. Bussey, 47 Seventh Avenue,
New Westminster.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 5.—■
Secretary, Harold Wilcox, 138 Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., New Westminster Branch.—Secretary, N. H. Person, 350 Fifteenth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union,
Local No. 1070.—Secretary, Thomas Porter, 1505 Sixth
Street, New Westminster.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 835.—Secretary,  Edwin O.
Carlson, 70 Eighth Street, New Westminster.
Letter Carriers' Federated Association, Local No. 32.—
Secretary, Arthur Broughton,  9125 One Hundred and
Sixtieth Street, North Surrey.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 502.—Secretary, Roland R. Cope, 71 Tenth
Street, New Westminster.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 511.—Secretary, J. M. Kendrick, 2019 Eighth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 151.—
Secretary, L. W. Perkins, 8871 Harvie Road, Port Kells.
Marine Engineers' National Association, New Westminster
Council No. 7.—Secretary, F. E. MacLeod,  201,  319
West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Millwrights Local, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and
Joiners of America, Local No. 2736.—Secretary, G. R.
Bengough, 108, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Local No. 220.—Secretary, Mrs. Muriel
Snelgrove, 2209 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Joint Council
No. 180.—Secretary, George Baxter, 375 Keary Street,
New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Joint Council
No. 412.—Secretary, W. A. Sim, 908 Burnaby Street,
New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United Joint Council
No. 499.—Secretary, Mrs. B. Wright, 918 Fourteenth
Avenue, New Westminster.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
456.—Secretary, Elmer Young, 1595 Grandview Highway, Douglas Road, Burnaby.
Peace Officers Federation of B.C., New Westminster Local
No. 295.—Secretary, T. F. Taphouse, 6781 One Hundred
and Fiftieth Street, R.R. 14, North Surrey.
Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Apprentices of the Pipefitting
Industry, C.N.R., C.P.R., P.G.E., Local No. 571.—Secretary, J. Reid, 906 Fifth Street, New Westminster.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, New Westminster Branch.—Secretary, Frank J. Walden, 10440,
One Hundred and Fifty-seventh Street, R.R. 3, North
Surrey.
Public Employees' National Union, New Westminster
Local No. 287.—Secretary, Miss Jan Nutchey, 1404
Tenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
280.—Secretary, Kenneth C. Wright, 449 Garret Street,
New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 226.—Secretary, L.
Donelan, 1605 Tenth Avenue, New Westminster.
School Board Employees, School District No. 43, Local
No. 561.—Secretary, Mrs. M. Spill, 647 Rochester Road,
New Westminster.
School Maintenance Union, Local No. 409.—Secretary,
J. L. Bodner, P.O. Box 433, New Westminster.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 5432.—Secretary, Roy C. Stewart, Box 336 New Westminster.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3495.—Secretary, E. S. McKenzie, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated, Association of, Local No. 134.
—Business Agent, R. C. Lawrence, Room 20, 774 Columbia Street, New Westminster.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No. 111.—
Secretary, John Brotherton, 1711 Nanaimo Street, New
Westminster.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Elementary Teachers' Association, School District No. 40.—Secretary, Miss Jean
Drummond, 7257 One Hundred and Fortieth Street,
R.R. 1, North Surrey.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Secondary Schools Association, School District No. 40.—Secretary, L. G. Sanderson, 670 Seventeenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Principals' Association,
School District No. 40.—Secretary, R. F. Hine, 1115
Sixteenth Avenue, Burnaby.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 7.—
Secretary, J. Ferguson, Eightieth Avenue, R.R. 6, North
Surrey.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 632.—Secretary, W. J. Calhoun, Suite 6, Carlton Court, 317 Third
Avenue, New Westminster.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Staff Association,
New Westminster Branch.—Secretary, Miss N. MacKinnon, 216 Purvis Street, New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No.
1-357.—Business Agent, Rae Eddie, 656 Eleventh Avenue, New Westminster.
North Burnaby
Packinghouse Workers  of America,  United, Local No.
162.—Secretary,   J.   Longmuir,   3727   Douglas   Road,
North Burnaby.
Public Employees, Lower Mainland Council.—Secretary,
A. W. Hopen, 3450 Sunset Boulevard, North Vancouver.
Terrazo Workers, Tile and Marble Setters' International
Association, Local No. 3.—Secretary, D. P. Evans, 41£
Dominion Street, North Burnaby. F 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
North Kamloops
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 258.—Secretary, R. J. Perry, 265 Perry Avenue, North Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 150.—Secretary, R.
Lombard, 156 Williams Street, North Kamloops.
North Surrey
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths and Forgers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 194.—Secretary, A. V. Delcourt, 13561 Seventieth Avenue, R.R. 4,
North Surrey.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 36.—
President, F. B. Fitroe, 314 Ninth Avenue, New Westminster.
North Vancouver
Civic  Employees'  Association,   North   Vancouver,   Local
No. 389.—Secretary, A. W. Hopen, 3450 Sunset Boulevard, North Vancouver.
Employees' Union of the University of B.C.—Secretary,
A. Leathern, 518 East Eighth Street, North Vancouver.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 914.
—Secretary, R.  J. Hallaway,  645  St.  Davids Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Fire   Fighters,   International  Association   of,   Local  No.
1183.—Secretary, Larry Larsen, 3 Church Road, North
Vancouver.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 30.—Secretary, W. B. Ramsay, 1692 Peters Road,
North Vancouver.
Pulp,   Sulphite   and   Paper   Mill   Workers,   International
Brotherhood of, Norvan Association, Local No. 880.—-
Secretary, Frank Jennings,  1358  Brian Lynn Crescent,
North Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 404.
—Secretary,   A.   E.   Lawton,   1140  West   Keith  Road,
North Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 44.—
Secretary,   Mrs.  N.   A.  Reed,  2750  Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Ocean Falls
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
880.—Secretary, Archie M. Lamb, Box 455, Ocean Falls.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
360.—Secretary, J. W. Scott, Box 250, Ocean Falls.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 312.—Secretary, G. D. Meldrum, Box 264, Ocean Falls.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 49.—
Secretary, S. Price, Box 747, Ocean Falls.
Okanagan Centre
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Federated, District
No. 48, Local No. 8.—Secretary, Evelyn Cooney, Okanagan Centre.
Oliver
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Oliver District,
Local No. 2.—Secretary, Mary Kelly, R.R. 2, Oliver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 14.—
Secretary , Mrs. L. P. Carter, General Delivery, Oliver.
Osoyoos
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District No. 48,
Local No. 3.—Secretary, Miss Sophie Townrow, R.R. 1,
Osoyoos.
Pender Harbour
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 16.—
Secretary, James C. Cameron, Madeira Park P.O.
Penticton
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 116.—Secretary, T. C. Hawtree, Box 29,
Kaleden.
Civic Employees' Union, Branch of N.U.P. Employees,
Local No. 308.—Secretary, Mrs. June Bray, 101 Main
Street, Penticton.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District No. 48,
Local No. 1.—Secretary, F. Arlitt, 284 Main Street,
Penticton.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Penticton
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. Ivy Baston, Suite 4, 498 Ellis
Street, Penticton.
Hospital Employees' Union, Penticton, Local No. 180.—
Secretary, T. Battiste, 371 Townley Street, Penticton.
Letter Carriers' Federated Association, Branch No. 95.—
Secretary, D. R. Harvey, 565 Nelson Avenue, Penticton.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 866.—
Secretary, A. R. Furtheson, 978 Argylle Street, Penticton.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 884.—Secretary, R. F. MacKinnon, 385
Douglas Avenue, Penticton.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Penticton
Local.—Secretary, H. Chamberlain, Box 20, Penticton.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
A. Williamson, 1127 Kilwinning Street, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 914.—Secretary, S. D. Marshall, 259 Nelson Avenue, Penticton.
Railroad Employees and Other Transport Workers, Lodge
No. 303.—Secretary, Lawrence Nelson, 252 Conklin
Avenue, Penticton.
Taxation Division Staff Association, Department of National Revenue.—Secretary, T. R. Steele, 304 Martin
Street, Penticton.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 15.—
Secretary, Mrs. Odette Mathias, Box 552, R.R. 1, Penticton.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Okanagan Plant,
Local No. 6.—Secretary, F. Tams, 412 Bennett Avenue,
Penticton.
Typograhpical Union, International, Local No. 541.—
Secretary, N. L. Duncan, 130 Jermyn Avenue, Penticton.
Pioneer Mines
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 693.—Secretary, W. W. Ashley, Pioneer
Mines.
Port Alberni
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 513.—Secretary, J. V. Fehr, Box 26, Port
Alberni.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees', and Beverage Dispensers' Union, Local No. 697.—Secretary, G. S. Deugan,
722 Hilton Avenue, Port Alberni.
Letter Carriers' Federation, Local No. 100.—Secretary,
J. Buker, 700 Sixteenth Avenue, Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 503.—Secretary, C. E Anderson, 101 First
Avenue North, Port Alberni.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1642.—Secretary, Don Mcintosh,
211 Seventh Avenue North, Port Alberni.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
686.—Secretary, John E. Perry, Beaver Creek Road,
Alberni.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
S. Stocken, 714 Fifteenth Avenue South, Port Alberni.
Public Employees' Civic Union, Port Alberni and District.
—Secretary, L. E. Martin, 706 Fourteenth Avenue
North, Port Alberni.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 592.—Secretary, H. Harris,
809 Taylor Road, Alberni.
School Employees, School District No. 70.—Secretary,
Cora Lawson, 924 Johnson Street, Alberni.
Technical Employees' Association, Port Alberni.—Secretary, Stewart Young, Campbell River.
Port Alice
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 514.—Secretary, J. A. Dickson, P.O. Box 374, Port Alice.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 74.—
Secretary, G. M. Downing, Port Alice. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 79
Port Coquitlam
Public Employees' National Union, Port Coquitlam
Branch, Local No. 498.—Secretary, G. F. Bracewell,
Poit Coquitlam.
Port Hardy
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Port Hardy
Branch.—Secretary, J. S. Fenton, Airport, Port Hardy.
Port McNeill
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 1016.—Secretary, F. Ross Knowles,
Port McNeill.
Port Mellon
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 297.—Secretary, Arthur
Lockwood, P.O. Box 97, Port Mellon.
Port Moody
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 5404.—Secretary, J. H. Cuddeford, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Pouce Coupe
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Pouce Coupe
Branch.—Secretary, D. M. Geddes, P.O. Box 212, Pouce
Coupe.
Powell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,   Local   No.   2068.—Secretary,   R.   B.   Lawson,   Box
1700, Campbell River.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Powell River
Branch.—Secretary,   H.   B.   Moore,   Box   730,   Powell
River.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
142.—Secretary, H. B. Moore, Box 730, Powell River.
Pulp,   Sulphite   and   Paper   Mill  Workers,   International
Brotherhood  of,  Local No.  76.—Secretary,  R.   Bryce,
Box 810, Powell River.
School Board Employees, School District No. 47.—John
W. Bagnall, Box 762, Powell River.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 47.—
Secretary, James B. Strang, Box 346, Powell River.
Prince George
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, United, Local No. 359.—Secretary, M. F.
Rickbal, 390 Gillette Street, Prince George.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.  1998.—Secretary, E.  Shaw,  503 Alward
Street, Prince George.
Civic Employees' Local Union, Local No. 399.—Secretary,
M. Sakamato, General Delivery, Prince George.
Government   Employees'   Association   of   B.C.,   Prince
George Branch.—Secretary,  A.  Lemacher,   1411  Third
Avenue, Prince George.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 843.—
Secretary, R. T. MacKenrot, 1674 Oak Street,  Prince
George.
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Lodge No. 827.—Secretary, R. M. Walker, 582 Winnipeg Street, Prince George.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Lodge
No. 202.—Secretary, W. Hows, Hutton Mills.
Operating Engineers,  International Union of, Local No.
115.—Secretary, W. J. McCrea, 10, 1331 Fourth Avenue,
Box 424, Prince George.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Local No. 127.
—Secretary, Miss Marie Grosjian,  1375 Third Avenue,
Prince George.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of Canada, Local No.
238.—Secretary, M.  G.  Sandberg, 643  Burden Street,
Prince George.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 869.—Secretary, A. A.  Clapperton, 711  Burden Street,  Prince
George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 28.—Secretary, J. A.
Collins, 1268 Fifth Avenue, Prince George.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 57.—
Secretary, Miss Margaret Layne, 2234 Laurier Avenue,
Prince George.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 868.—Secretary, M. M. George, 2126 Spruce Street, Prince
George.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Staff Association.—
Secretary, Audrey Kaye-Cunningham, 1294 Third Avenue, Prince George.
Woodworkers of America, International, Lodge No. 1-424.
—Secretary, Werner Rudeloff, 1331 Fourth Avenue,
Prince George.
Prince Rupert
Bakery and Confectionery Workers, International Union
of, Prince Rupert Local.—Secretary, 337 Third Avenue
West, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1549.—Secretary, Jack Rennie, P.O. Box
94, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.   1735.—Secretary, J.  S.  Black,  Box  94,
Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Union, Prince Rupert, Local No. 5.—
Secretary, E. A. Evans, Box 83, Prince Rupert.
Civil Servants' Federal Association, Prince Rupert Branch.
—President,   Walter   Graham,   Miller  Bay   Hospital,
Prince Rupert.
Civil Servants, Amalgamated, Local Council.—Secretary
A. Davis, 1028 Second Avenue West, Prince Rupert.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union, Local No.  80.—Secretary,
W. H. Butt, P.O. Box 249, Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers,  International Brotherhood  of, Local
No.   344.—Secretary,   Douglas   Hague,   P.O.   Box   15,
Prince Rupert.
Engineers, Operating, International Union of, Local No.
510.—Secretary, M. B. O'Toole, 330 Fifth Avenue West,
Prince Rupert.
Fire   Fighters   International   Association   of,   Local   No.
559.—Secretary, J. Furness, 1512 Overlook Street, Prince
Rupert.
Fishermen's  and Allied Workers' Union,   Shoreworkers,
Local  No.  31.—Secretary,  Mrs.  Florence  Greenwood,
1219 Prince Rupert Boulevard, Prince Rupert.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 37.'—
Secretary, R. L. Gardiner,  315  Third Avenue, Prince
Rupert.
Government   Employees'   Association   of   B.C.,   Prince
Rupert Branch.—President, D. Kidd, Court-house, Prince
Rupert.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' Union,
Local No. 636.—Secretary, Barney Fehr, P.O. Box 144,
Prince Rupert.
Laundry Workers' International Union, Local No. 336.—
Secretary, J. S. Black, 800 Block, Fraser Street, Prince
Rupert.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 505.—Secretary, W. Stein, 636 Third Avenue
West, Prince Rupert.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 505.—
Secretary, P. A. Bond, 741 Fifth Avenue West, Prince
Rupert.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No.   335.—Secretary,   A.   F.   Skattebol,   1425   Graham
Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States
and Canada, Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local
No. 180.—Business Agent, C. F. Silversides, 667 Hayes
Cove Circle, Prince Rupert.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian.—Secretary,
A. G. Clibbett, Post Office, Prince Rupert.
Pulp,   Sulphite   and   Paper  Mill   Workers,   International
Brotherhood   of,   Local   No.   708.—Secretary,   E.   P.
O'Neill, Box 294, Prince Rupert.
Railway   Carmen   of   North   America,   Brotherhood   of,
Lodge No. 426.—Secretary, R. Pollock, 252 Eighth Avenue West, Prince Rupert. F 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 154.—Secretary, Miss
G. A. Eastburn, 1216 Beech Place, Prince Rupert.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 52.—
Secretary, Miss Y. Lepine, Box 382, Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 413.—Secretary, J. D. Standring, P.O. Box 53, Prince Rupert.
Princeton
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, United, Local No. 367.—Secretary, David
H. Ovington, Box 745, Princeton.
Government Employees' Association, Princeton Branch.—
Secretary, Louis Schulli, Box 301, Princeton.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1023.—E. J. Loutard, Box 845, Princeton.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 17.—
Secretary, Mrs. V. A. Van Stockum, P.O. Box 2, Princeton.
Qualicum Beach
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2412.—Secretary, Roger Whitnee, P.O.
Box 44, Qualicum.
School Board Employees, School District No. 69.—Secretary, Mrs. E. Lessard, Qualicum Beach.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 69.—
Secretary, Margaret Kiddo, Crescent Motel, Qualicum
Beach.
Queen Charlotte City
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 50.—
Secretary, Mrs. Lucille E. Richardson, Port Clement.
Quesnel
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2493.—Secretary, Guy C. Manning, P.O.
Box 304, Quesnel.
Government  Employees'  Association  of B.C.,   Quesnel
Branch.—Secretary,    F.    J.   Rolfe-Martin,   Box    1854,
Quesnel.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian.—Secretary,
Margaret H. Duncan, Box 1335, Quesnel.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 28.—
Secretary, Miss B. L. Marchant, Box 357, Quesnel.
Radium Hot Springs
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary,
G. R. H. Cameron, Radium Hot Springs.
Revelstoke
Boilermakers,   Iron Ship  Builders,  Blacksmiths,  Forgers,
Welders   and   Helpers,   International   Brotherhood   of,
Local  No.  466.—Secretary,  George  Barnes,  P.O.  Box
585, Revelstoke.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, United, Local No. 352.—Secretary, Frank
Jolly, 1101 First Street West, Revelstoke.
Civic Employees'  Union,   Revelstoke,   Local  No.   363.—
Secretary, Frank P. Muzzilo, 325 Downie Street, Revelstoke.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 213.—Secretary, P. J. Beresini, Box 450, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No.  381.—Secretary,   G.  W. Parker,  313  First  Street,
Revelstoke.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Revelstoke
Branch.—Secretary,    R.   L.   de   Pfyffer,   Court-house,
Revelstoke.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 657.—
Secretary, V. J. Crosby, Box 286, Revelstoke.
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Lodge No. 341.—Secretary, W. S. King, Box 389, Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 258.—
Secretary, Guy Micieli, Box 209, 720 Railway Avenue
East, Revelstoke.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian,   Revelstoke
Branch.—Secretary,   Ronald   Belton,   307   First   Street
West, Revelstoke.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 51.—Secretary, S. A. Webster, 412 First Avenue West, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
481.—Secretary, S. J. Parker, Box 322, Revelstoke.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 19.—
Secretary, Mrs. Rowena Mechan, Box 503, 203 Fourth
Street East, Revelstoke.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 16.—
Secretary, Miss A. Devlin, 400 Second Street West,
Revelstoke.
Richmond
Civic Employees' Association, Richmond, Local No. 718.
—Secretary, Violet H. Solmunson, 779 Bennett Road,
Richmond.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Richmond
Branch, Local No. 1286.—Secretary, W. A. Cairns, 696
No. 3 Road, Richmond.
Public Employees' Federal Union, Richmond, Local No.
394.—Secretary, J. Van Iteson, 1064 Westminster Highway, Richmond.
Public Employees' Federal Union, Richmond, Local No.
116.—Secretary, L. T. Funnell, 842 Francis Road, Richmond.
School Board Employees' Union, School District No. 38,
Local No. 716.—Secretary, C. H. Delves, 683 Tynas
Road, Richmond.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Shop Teachers of B.C.—
Secretary, Herb Maissey, 837 Cambie Road, Richmond.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 38.—
Secretary, L. Wickson, 819 Jones Road, Richmond.
Rossland
Government Employees Association of B.C., Rossland
Branch.—Secretary, C. Rindle, Box 294, Rossland.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
E. L'Ecluse, Rossland.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union, International,
Local No. 658.—Secretary, Albert Brown, Rossland.
Rutland
Timber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Rutland Branch of
the Woodworkers of America, Local No. 2771.—Secretary, Edward Rieger, Box 167, Rutland.
Saanich
Peace Officers' Association of B.C., Saanich Police Department.—Secretary, Edward C. Owens, 280 Homer Road,
Saanich.
School Board Employees, Federal Union, Local No. 441.
—Secretary, J. H. Nunn, Box 42, Sidney.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 63.—
Secretary, Ida L. Reid, 3340 Shelbourne Street, Victoria.
Salmo
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 901.—Secretary, L. Jacobsen, Remac.
Salmon Arm
Government Employees Association of B.C., Salmon Arm
Branch.—Secretary, J. Pullin, General Delivery, Salmon
Arm.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian.—Secretary,
J. E. Delaville, Post Office, Salmon Arm.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 20.—
Secretary, J. Kucher, Box 42, Salmon Arm.
Woodworkers   of   America,   International,   Local   No.
1-417.—Secretary, Tom Shepherd, Box 880, Salmon Arm.
Saltspring Island
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 64.—
Secretary, Miss Jean De Macedo, R.R. 1, Ganges. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 81
Sandspit
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Sandspit Local
Council.—Secretary, P. H. Pennefather, Radio Range,
Sandspit.
Saudis
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Army Camp,
R.C.E., Sardis.—Secretary, P. R. Herk, 679 Vedder
Mountain Road, R.R. 3, Sardis.
Sechelt
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Halfmoon Bay School District No. 64.—Secretary, Mrs. C. Day, Sechelt.
Sidney
Airline Traffic Employees, Trans-Canada Air Lines.—Secretary, Barara A. Heim, S.E.A. Victoria Unit, 1980
Haley Road, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Patricia Bay
Branch.—Secretary, D. R. Cook, Bazan Bay Road,
R.R. 1, Saanichton.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 23.—
Secretary, Gordon J. Reid, Swartz Bay Road, R.R. 1,
Sidney.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 456.—
Secretary, J. Edwards, 821 Seven Oaks Road, Victoria.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Sidney Post
Office.—Secretary, Mrs. R. M. Storey, Post Office, Sidney.
Skidegate
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No.
Secretary, Ed Regnery, Skidegate.
28.-
Slocan
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 8.—Secretary, Mrs. Jean Patterson, Slocan.
Smithers
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Omineca-
Smithers Branch.—Secretary, D. Heyink, Box 201,
Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 111.—
Secretary, C. H. Duke, Box 132, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
1415.—Secretary, K. A. Robinson, Box 733, Smithers.
Railway and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 93.—Secretary, P. B. Emerson, Box
247, Smithers.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 54.—
Secretary, Miss H. Trapp,  General Delivery, Smithers.
Sointula
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 26.—
Secretary, Gary Cadorin, Sointula.
Sooke
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 24.—
Secretary, Pat Maddigan, Sooke.
School Board Employees' Association, School District No.
62, Local No. 459.—Secretary, C. Rayment, 4011 Blen-
kinsop Road, Victoria.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 62.—
Secretary, R. Pauvvels, 3110 Rutledge Street, Victoria.
South Burnaby
Automotive, Aircraft and Agriculture Implement Workers
of America, United, Local No. 432.—Secretary, R. W.
Fakeley, 2315 Frederick Avenue, South Burnaby.
Employees Association of Kelly, Douglas, Inc.—Secretary,
William G. Young, 3631 Neville Street, South Burnaby.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Lodge
No. 289.—Secretary, J. E. Fairbaim, 3520 Pioneer Avenue, South Burnaby.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
350.—Secretary, B. Moran, 7750 McKay Avenue, South
Burnaby.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' International Union,
Local No. 427.—Secretary, T. Williams, 1041 Holly
Street, South Burnaby.
Stone Cutters of North America, Journeymen, Association
of, South Burnaby Local.—Secretary, Frank Hall, 2148
Randolph Avenue, South Burnaby.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Vancouver Clerical, Local No. 20.—Secretary, L. Mitchell, 3637 Portland Street, South Burnaby.
Squamish
Locomotive   Firemen  and  Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Lodge No. 972.—Secretary, H. Hodsmyth, Squamish.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 861.—
Secretary, J. E. Aldridge, Box 477, Squamish.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 215.—Secretary, G. M. Comber, Squamish.
Railroad Trainmen,  Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 1080.—
Secretary,  G.   E.  Belair,  4,   150 West Twelfth  Street,
North Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
1419.—Secretary, W. T. Curran, Squamish.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 48.—
Secretary, Sylvia E. Salo, Box 566, Squamish.
Steveston
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 7.—
Secretary, James L. Ross, Box 653, Steveston.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 8.—
Secretary, T. Foort, 138 East Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Stewart
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Portland Canal School District No. 51.—Secretary, Charles G. Powell, Stewart.
Summerland
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary,
F. W. L. Keane, Experimental Farm, Summerland.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Federated Union, District
No. 48, Local No. 12.—Secretary, Mrs. Eva McDonald,
Box 566, West Summerland.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Summerland, Local
No. 2472.—Secretary, T. F. Reid, Box 145, West Summerland.
Sunbury
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 9.—
Secretary, Hideo Onotera, 8655 River Road, New Westminster.
Tahsis
Teachers' Federation of B.C., West Coast Local Association.—Secretary, Mrs. E. Garden, Tahsis.
Terrace
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Terrace
Branch.—Secretary, R. Bowlby, Box 940, Terrace.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 53.—
Secretary, E. C. Cameron, Terrace.
Thetis Island
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 13.—
Secretary, T. E. Lestrange, Thetis Island.
Trail
Civic Workers' Union, Trail and District, Local No. 343.
—Secretary, A. Ward, 2267 Sixth Avenue, Trail.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 871.
—Secretary, S. J. Krewski, 105 Haig Street, Trail.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 941.
—Secretary, C. N. Bogyo, 1573 Fourth Avenue, Trail.
General Workers' Union, Trail District, Local No. 931,
Branch of the Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers International Union. — Secretary, Al King, 910 Portland
Street, Trail.
. F 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Letter Carriers' Federation, Local No. 76.—Secretary, Syd
T. Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 480.—Secretary, Rema Morandini, 910 Portland Street, Trail.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Trail Branch.—
Secretary, Mrs. L. A. Landucci, 1149 Nelson Avenue,
Trail.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 11.—
Secretary, Hazel Hall, 925 Celia Crescent, Trail.
Tranquille
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Tranquille
Branch.—Secretary, W. A. Phillip, 805 Victoria Street
West, Kamloops.
Ucluelet
Teachers' Federation of B.C., Ucluelet-Tofino Branch,
School District No. 79.—President, C. R. Goodwin,
Ucluelet.
Vananda
Quarry and Mine Workers' Union, Branch of the Mine,
Mill and Smelter Workers International Union, Local
No. 816.—Secretary, J. Brennan, Vananda.
Vancouver
Air Line Dispatchers' Association, Canadian, Local No. 1.
—Secretary, D. L. Carnegie, 2312 Oliver Crescent, Vancouver.
Air Line Flight Attendants' Association.—Secretary, D. F.
Pleinds, 448 Davie Street, Vancouver.
Air Line Navigators' Association, Vancouver Branch.—
Chairman, D. M. Cliffe, 4021 West Twenty-ninth Avenue, Vancouver.
Air Line Pilots' Association, Canadian, Vancouver
Branch.—Secretary, H. T. Wells, 7276 Carrington Street,
Vancouver.
Air Line Pilots' Association, Vancouver Council No. 2.—■
Chairman, D. Harland, 450 Eastcot Road, West Vancouver.
Air Line Pilots' Association, Vancouver Council No. 4.—
Secretary, J. K. Potter, 4632 Clinton Street, South
Burnaby.
Air Services Association, Canadian, Meteorological Branch,
Vancouver, Local No. 1.—President, B. J. Bowerbank,
231 Fifteenth Avenue, New Westminster.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 468.—Secretary, Thomas Annal, 2843
West Thirty-sixth Avenue, Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, Vancouver, Local No. 189.—
Secretary, C. Wooding, 968 Eighth Avenue, West Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors
International Union of America, Local No. 120.—Secretary, Allan Coleman, 109, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, Local No. 676.—Secretary,
Robert Beddome, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
359.—Secretary, W. G. Blackball, 1774 East Thirty-third
Avenue, Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 105.
—Secretary, Richard Nightingale, 495 West Twenty-first
Street, Vancouver.
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505.—Secretary, J. P. Roddy, 2771 East Forty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Brewery Workers' Union, Local No. 300.—Secretary, J.
Humphreys, 2460 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver.
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers, International Union
of, Local No. 1.—Business Agent, C. F. Ingham, 4286
Balkan Street, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, Machinery Movers and Riggers, International Association of,
Local No. 97.—Secretary, Raymond Larkin, 5260 Chester Street, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, Machinery Movers and Riggers, International Association of,
Local No. 712.—Secretary, Allister M. Livingstone, 2306
Willingdon Avenue, South Burnaby.
Brush Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 564.—Secretary, Clara C. Linden, 2395 East Forty-first Avenue,
Vancouver.
Building Materials, Construction and Fuel Truck Drivers'
Union, Local No. 213.—Secretary, H. J. Bell, 490 East
Broadway, Vancouver.
Building Service Employees' International Union, Local
No. 244.—Secretary, Ben R. Morley, 216, 603 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 452.—Secretary, A. H. Zimmer, 100, 307
West Broadway, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1928.—Secretary, N. R. Cox, 105, 307
West Broadway, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2802.—Secretary, J. E. Hird, 1524 West
Sixty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver.
Chemical Workers' International Union, Local No. 511.—
Secretary, George Hygh, 4007 Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, Vancouver, Local No.
15.—Secretary, H. Lewis, 204, 1645 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver.
Civic Employees, Branch of N.P.U. Employees, Vancouver, Local No. 407.—Secretary, James Buchanan, 2757
East Fifty-third Avenue, Vancouver.
Civic Employees Outside Workers' Union, Vancouver
Local.—Secretary, Jack Phillips, 339 Pender Street East,
Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Vancouver
Branch.—Secretary, T. P. Dunik, 3236 Spruce Street,
Vancouver.
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated, Local No.
178.—Secretary, George M. Dronuk, 2475 Manitoba
Street, Vancouver.
Club, Cabaret and Camp Construction Culinary and Service Employees' Union, Local No. 740.—Secretary,
G. W. Faulkner, 504, 402 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Communications Association of Canada, Local No. 4.—
Secretary, G. L. Gordon, 2146 York Street, Vancouver.
Department of Veterans' Affairs Employees' Association,
Shaughnessy Branch.—Secretary, Miss E. K. Fedden,
Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver.
Department of Veterans' Affairs Employees' Association,
Vancouver District Branch.—Secretary, W. C. Gamble,
P.O. Box 1059, Vancouver.
Diamond Drillers' (Western District) Union, Local No.
1005.—Secretary, Lance McPhee, 2414 Main Street,
Vancouver.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union, Local No. 92.—Secretary, Hugh McDougall, 120 Harvey Street, Vancouver.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union, Local No. 153.—Secretary, W. J. Tremblay, 1765 East Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Electric Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
213.—Secretary, Ramsay McCulloch, 111 Dunsmuir
Street, Vancouver.
Enamel Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
291.—Secretary, L. Summers, 2886 Eton Street, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees, Vancouver, Local B-71.—Secretary, G. Hislop, 2186 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 18.
—Secretary, Frank Bain, 4559 Belmont Avenue, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, University
Area, Local No. 901.—Secretary, W. R. Darlington,
3 Acadia Circle, Vancouver.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 134.—Secretary, R. Scheiber, 223 West Thirteenth
Avenue, Vancouver. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 83
First Aid Attendants' Industrial Association, Vancouver
Branch.—Secretary, H. W. Mahler, 130 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union (Headquarters).
—Secretary, H. Stevens, Fishermen's Hall, 138 East
Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 1.—
Secretary, Waldemar Paulik, 138 East Cordova Street,
Vancouver.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 2.—
Secretary, H. Stevens, 138 East Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No: 9.—
Secretary, George Murakami, R.R. 1, New Westminster.
Garment Workers of America, International Union of,
Local No. 190.—Secretary, Annie Fast, 1238 East Sixty-
fifth Avenue, Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, International Union of,
Local No. 276.—Secretary, Mrs. Ann Marshall, 113, 119
West Pender Street, Vancouver.
General Workers' Union of B.C., Mainland Branch, Local
No. 307.—Secretary, Mrs. Freda Fordyce, 3, 2475 Manitoba Street, Vancouver.
Glaziers' and Glassworkers' Union, Local No. 1527.—
Secretary, A. Allen, 510 East Fifth Avenue, Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 582.—Secretary, Eileen Gaston, 2134 East Fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association of B.C. (Headquarters).—Assistant General Secretary, A. C. Bennett,
2090 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., New Westminster Branch.—Secretary, Eric P. Fox, 8, 407 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Grain Workers' Union, Local No. 333.—Secretary, G. H.
Frank, 1575 Dansey Avenue, New Westminster.
Granite Cutters of America, International Association of,
Vancouver Local.—Secretary, Allen Forbes, 712 East
Sixty-second Street, Vancouver.
Harbour Employees' Association, National Harbour
Board.—Secretary, John D. Martin, Ballyntyne Pier,
foot of Heatley Avenue, Vancouver.
Heat and Frost Insulators, International Association of,
Local No. 118.—Secretary, F. Neville, 3615 Pioneer Avenue, South Burnaby.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union,
Local No. 602.—Secretary, A. Hird, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Union, Vancouver, Local No. 180.—
Secretary, A. Paterson, 116, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees of St. Paul's, Vancouver.—Secretary,
Mrs. T. Downey, 34, 2649 Quebec Street, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 28.—Secretary, C. Waddell,
406, 402 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
lewellery Workers' International Union, Local No. 42.—
Secretary, R. MacLean, 2458 Yale Street, Vancouver.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire and Metal,
Local No. 207.—Secretary, M. G. Finlayson, 5551 Nelson Avenue, South Burnaby.
Laundry and Dry Cleaning Drivers' Union, Local No. 129.
—Secretary, B. McLeod, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Laundry and Dry Cleaning Salesmen's Union, Local No.
334.—Secretary, E. N. Matheson, 3040 East Third Avenue, Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' International Union, Local No. 292.—
Secretary, J. H. Irving, 2660 East Twenty-sixth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of. Local No. 12.—
Secretary, Frank Anselmo, 1009 East Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Line Drivers', Warehousemen's, Pick Up Men's and Dockers' Union, Local No. 605.—Secretary, A. C. Brown,
5381 Frances Street, North Burnaby.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local No. 44.—
Secretary, Earl Kinney, 5, 199 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 320.—
Secretary, William Perfonic, 1450 Cypress Street, Vancouver.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 907.—
Secretary, R. S. Smith, 2614 East Third Avenue, Vancouver.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 656.—Secretary, M. Geluch, 4230 Price Crescent, South Burnaby.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 939.—Secretary, L. Sallows, 4947 Elgin
Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 501.—Secretary, Watson Jones, 3250 Mahon
Avenue, North Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 507.—Secretary, J. Urquhart, 792 Powell
Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 509.—Secretary, Hugh Gillies, 45 Dunlevy
Avenue, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 510.—Secretary, J. B. Browne, 3677 Nineteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 512. — Secretary, John Perry, 792 Powell
Street, Vancouver.
Lumber Inspectors' Union, Local No. 1.—Secretary, E. E.
Smith, 7855 Fraser Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 151.—
Secretary, L. Perkins, 1844 Towline Road, R.R. 1, Port
Kells.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 182.—
Secretary, W. M. Mitchell, 2038 William Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 692.—
Secretary, H. Fishman, 17a, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 764.—
Secretary, H. B. Anderson, 1039 Gilmore Crescent,
Richmond.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 876.—
Secretary, A. J. Bradford, 5362 Westminster Avenue,
Ladner.
Machinists, International Association of (B.C. Auto Workers), Local No. 1857.—Secretary, A. Jackson, 3210 Clive
Street, Vancouver.
Mailers' International Union, Local No. 70.—Secretary,
D. R. Durno, 4323 Valley Drive, Vancouver.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Local No. 167.—Secretary, P. J. Doyle, 2638
West Thirty-first Avenue, Vancouver.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Local No. 210.—Secretary, R. Halliday, 3449
Turner Street, Vancouver.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1734.—Secretary, John Roscow, 14 West Fourteenth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Marble Polishers and Rubbers, Sawers and Helpers, Local
No. 179.—Secretary, W. A. McDonald, 5050 Joyce
Street, Vancouver.
Marine Checkers' and Weighers' Association, International
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local No.
506.—Secretary, A. G. Smith, 878 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Marine Engineers of Canada, National Association of,
Branch No. 7.—Secretary, R. C. Greaves, 202, 319
Pender Street, Vancouver.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial Union,
Local No. 1.—Secretary, J. Lawson, 339 West Pender
Street, Vancouver.
Meat Cutters' and Butcher Workmen's Union of North
America, Local No. 212.—Room 203, Labour Temple,
307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Merchant Service Guild, Inc., Canadian Masters, Mates
and Pilots, Vancouver Branch.—Secretary, G. F. Bullock, 673 Homer Street, Vancouver.
Milk Sales Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union, Local
No. 464.—Secretary, Ben McCrone, 1653 East Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver. F 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Chemical Workers Branch, Local No. 289.—Secretary,
C. F. Wood, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver.
Miscellaneous Workers', Wholesale and Retail Delivery
Drivers' Union, Local No. 351.—Secretary, C. E.
Youngs, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Molders' and Foundry Workers' International Union,
Local No. 281.—Business Agent, M. Bjornson, 119, 307
West Broadway, Vancouver.
Municipal Foremen's Union, Vancouver and District,
Local No. 349.—Secretary, Leonard T. Emmery, 1920
West Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, Local No. 145.—
Secretary, Ray Tyldesley, 315, 402 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia (Fraternal),
Headquarters in Vancouver, with fifty-five locals in
British Columbia.—Business Manager, Ed Nahanee, P.O.
Box 182, North Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, American, Local No. 115.—Secretary,
Dan Illingworth, 102-103 Shelley Building, 119 West
Pender Street, Vancouver.
Office Employees' Association of the B.C. Electric, Local
No. 378.—Secretary, Miss S. Brown, 949 Hornby Street,
Vancouver.
Office Employees' Association International, Local No.
15.—Business Manager, Pat Lansdley, 3066 Clarke
Drive, Vancouver.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 16-601.—Secretary, B. E. Leggett, 4737
East Hastings Street, North Burnaby.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
115.—Secretary, E. W. Smith, 5804 Fraser Street, Vancouver.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
882.—Secretary, G. Good, 9, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
963.—Secretary, F. J. Schultz, 2825 West Thirteenth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
249.—Secretary, J. Atkinson, 335 Windsor Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
283.—Secretary, Eric Taylor, 1146 East Sixty-first
Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
445.—Secretary, S. Mitchell, 5093 Highgate Street, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
453.—Secretary, L. A. Jordan, 3334 Clive Avenue, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
472.—Secretary, George F. Bason, 836 West Twenty-
seventh Avenue, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
541.—Business Manager, E. Quinnell, Room 3, 45 Kings-
way, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, United
Brotherhood of, Local No. 1527.—Secretary, A. Allen,
200, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 138.—Business Agent, H. Mac-
aulay, 337 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 726.—Secretary, J. A. Middleton,
6339 Kitchener Street, North Burnaby.
Paint and Varnish Workers' Union, Local No. 1550.—Secretary, Otto Tiedje, 3756 Ontario Street, Vancouver.
Pattern Makers' Association, Vancouver and District,
Local No. 1260.—Secretary, H. E. Oliver, 93 Aber-
crombie Drive, Sea Island.
Photo Engravers' International Union of North America,
Local No. 54.—Secretary, Douglas Cox, 7034 Malibu
Drive, Burnaby.
Pile Drivers', Bridge, Dock and Wharf Builders' Union.—
Secretary, Walter McLellan, 105, 307 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 779.—Secretary, W. E. Mc-
Mynn, 4860 Eton Street, North Burnaby.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 919.—Secretary, Ralph Baker,
212, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Journeymen and Apprentices,
United, Local No. 170.—Secretary, James R. Baxter,
1148 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Policemen's Federal Union, Local No. 12.—Secretary, John
Thomas, 208, 193 East Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Porters, International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car.—Secretary, Emest Lawrence, 3696 East Georgia Street,
Vancouver.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Vancouver
Branch.—Secretary, A. Dawson, 2134 Mannering Avenue, Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union, International,
Local No. 25.—Secretary, V. W. Griffiths, 2614 Ottawa
Street, West Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union, International,
Vancouver Local No. 578.—Secretary, A. M. Kearns,
2336 Waverley Street, Vancouver.
Printing Specialties and Paper Products Union, Local No.
598.—Secretary, Dale Lamont, 3260 East Fourteenth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Projectionists' Union, International Alliance of the Theatrical and Stage Employees, Local No. 348.—Secretary,
D. Ferguson, 76 West Forty-third Avenue, Vancouver.
Public Employees' National Union, Local No. 395.—Secretary, K. J. Naylor, 2111 Bellevue Avenue, West Vancouver.
Public Library Staff Association, Vancouver Main Library, Local No. 391.—Secretary, Miss Joy Scudamore,
750 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Public Works Employees' Association, Federal Union,
Vancouver Branch.—President, S. A. Flatt, 1411 Eleventh Avenue, New Westminster.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 433.—Secretary, Agnes
Nickel, 525 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 655.— Secretary, Miss Kay
Gibson, 7021 East Hastings Street, North Burnaby.
Pursers' and Chief Stewards' Association, Local No. 608.
—Secretary, Albert W. Attewell, 309 East Woodstock,
Vancouver.
Radio and Television Employees' Association, Vancouver
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth Summers, 2528 York
Street, Vancouver.
Radio and Television Artists' Association, Vancouver
Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. Jean Carter, Suite 2, 2480
Laurel Street, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 144.—Secretary, R. Wright, 3603 Franklin Street, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 987.—Secretary, William Basil, 200, 1298 West Tenth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lodge No. 1040.—
Secretary, Frank Doyle, 2915 Waterloo Street, Vancouver.
Railway Association, Canadian, Vancouver Branch.—Business Agent, George Labelle, 1, 538 Place St. Henri,
Montreal, Que.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
58.—Secretary, H. Holmes, 2510 West Twenty-first
Street, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
733.—Secretary, E. Fourn, 332 Venables Street, Vancouver.
Railway Conductors and Brakemen, Order of, Pacific
Lodge No. 267.—Secretary, W. J. Boston, 1841 Whyte
Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 59.—Secretary, D. W.
Jacques, 3034 East Fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 82.—Secretary, William
C. Bradley, 3433 West Twenty-second Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 162.—Secretary, H.
Adamson, 36 North Hythe Street, North Burnaby. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 85
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 221.—Secretary, R. Gallagher, P.O. Box 964, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 275.—Secretary, Frank
F. Fellner, 3175 West Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association, Vancouver Branch.—
Secretary, J. Gibson, 6655 Argylle Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
46.—Secretary, Leonard Ramsey, 2761 Brighton Avenue,
R.R. 8, New Westminster.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
526.—Secretary, J. H. Vallance, 4497 Quebec Street,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
630.—Secretary, L. M. Zachariasis, 4464 Forest Street,
South Burnaby.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1241.—Secretary, Arthur F. Greeling, 2222 Cornwall
Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1321.—Secretary, Mrs. A. Baker, 2771 East Twenty-
fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1322.—Secretary, B. L. Hanson, 1163 Nanton Avenue,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1370.—Secretary, J. Dornan, 4384 Eton Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
2315.—Secretary, R. G. Austin, 1265 East Nineteenth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Refrigeration Service and Installation Workers, Local No.
516.—Secretary, L. R. Wintle, 137 West Fortieth Avenue, Vancouver.
Registered Nurses' Association of B.C.—Secretary, Miss
Alice Wright, 2524 Cypress Street, Vancouver.
Retail Food and Drug Clerks' Union, Local No. 1518.—
Secretary, John Munro, 2846 West Twelfth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Clerks' Union,
Local No. 535.—Business Agent, H. B. Hodgins, 1, 49
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Clerks' Union,
Local No. 580.—Business Agent, H. B. Hodgins, 1, 49
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
School Service Employees, Local No. 392.—Secretary,
Mrs. E. C. Begg, 5246 Rhodes Street, Vancouver.
Seamen's International Union, Vancouver Branch.—Business Agent, N. G. Cunningham, 298 Main Street, Vancouver.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 280.—Secretary, Ralph Dambert, 133 West Windsor
Road, North Vancouver.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 314.—Secretary, T. R. Owen, 920 East Fifty-fifth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Shipwrights', Boat Builders', Joiners' and Caulkers' Union,
Local No. 506.—Secretary, J. T. Best, 2076 East Forty-
first Avenue, Vancouver.
Shipwrights', Boat Builders', Joiners' and Caulkers' Union,
Local No. 1541 (Floorlayers Branch).—Secretary, B. C.
Robson, 108, 307 West Burnaby, Vancouver.
Sign and Pictorial Painters' Union. Local No. 726.—Secretary, J. A. Middleton, 6339 Kitchener Street, North
Burnaby.
Stage Employees' and Motion Picture Distributor Employees' Union, Local No. CE-71.—Secretary, Miss Diane
Overbo, c/o Warners Bros. Distributing Co., 2180 West
Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver.
Stage Employees' and Motion Picture Distributor Employees' Union, Local No. B-71.—Secretary, G. Hislop, 2186
West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver.
Standards Division Inspectors, Vancouver Association,
Department of Trade and Commerce.—Secretary, W. M.
Pura, 305, 326 Howe Street, Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 2655.—
Secretary J. Thomas, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 2821.—
Secretary, A. E. Whitaker, 1837 East Third Avenue,
Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 2952.—
Secretary, E. H. Cooke, 3617 West Fourth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3229.—
Secretary, R. D. Summers, 4217 West Sixteenth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3253.—
Secretary, N. Canavor, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3302.—
Secretary, F. Horton, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3376.—
Secretary, D. R. Alexander, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3452.—
Secretary, R. L. Symons, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3456.—
Secretary, W. Koehler, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 3910.—
Secretary, F. Carroll, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Steel Workers of America, United, Local No. 5688.—
Secretary, E. L. Summers, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Stereotypers' International Union, Local No. 88.—Secretary, Harry C. Glover, 163 East Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Local No. 101.
—Secretary, Charles Stewart, 2605 East Twenty-third
Avenue, Vancouver.
Structural Draftsmen's Association, Branch of the Marine
Workers' Industrial Union.—Secretary, W. Smirfitt,
2735 West Eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Sugar Workers, Branch of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Clerks' Union, Local No. 517.—Secretary, O. Plumbley, 1, 49 West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Taxation Division Employees' Canadian Association,
Department of National Revenue.—Secretary, Mrs.
J. A. R. Olson, 1110 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Taxicab, Stage, Bus Drivers and Dispatchers, Local No.
151.—Secretary, C. E. Youngs, 42 East Thirty-ninth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 39a,
Elementary Schools.—Secretary, Miss Jean Fraser, 4762
Joyce Street, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 39,
School Administrators.—Secretary, R. R. Found, 3007
West Thirty-third Avenue, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 39b,
Secondary Schools.—Secretary, William Alsbury, 2772
East Fifth Avenue, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School Supervisors.—Secretary, Miss M. McGregor, 1595 West Tenth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., University Hill Association.
—Secretary, H. Kent, 2346 West Forty-third Avenue,
Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School of Art Instructors.—
Secretary, D. Boyd, 985 Duchess Avenue, West Vancouver.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 189.
—Secretary, H. Wylie, 942 Sixteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 464.—
Secretary, B. McCrone, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 1.—
Secretary, W. Millar, 206, 1549 St. Georges Avenue,
North Vancouver. F 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Building Services,
Local No. 5.—Secretary, W. Hamilton, 2, 1879 Barclay
Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Cafeteria, Local
No. 14.—Secretary Miss Lorena Asher, 326 East Fifty-
sixth Avenue, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Vancouver Traffic,
Local No. 10.—Secretary, Miss R. Buntain, 23, 1915
West Broadway, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Headquarters
Office.—Secretary, Miss M. Burton, 415, 543 Granville
Street, Vancouver.
Textile Workers' Union, Local No. 12.—Secretary, Mrs.
Annie Armstrong. 3535 Vimy Crescent, Vancouver.
Textile Workers' Union, Local No. 221.—Secretary, W.
Skurjat, 4275 Lynn Valley, North Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Operators,
International Alliance of, Vancouver Association, Local
No. B-72.—Secretary, Mrs. Catherine Dunbar, 3281 West
King Edward Avenue, Vancouver.
Theatrical and Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Operators, International Alliance of, Vancouver Association, Local No. 118.—Secretary, J. Pearson, P.O. Box
2381, Vancouver.
Theatrical and Stage Employees and Moving Picture
Operators, International Alliance of, Vancouver Association, Local No. 348.—Secretary, D. Callandine, 6692
Laburnum Street, Vancouver.
Tile and Marble Setters and Terrazo Workers, International Association of, Local No. 78.—Secretary,
George Tedsbury, 430 Blundell Street, Richmond.
Traffic Sales Employees' Association, Trans-Canada Air
Lines Branch.—Secretary, J. E. McManus, 2931 West
Fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Treasury Staff Association, Vancouver Branch.—Secretary,
Miss S. Hallwas, 1337 Comox Street, Vancouver.
Trunk and Bag Manufacturers' Workers' Association,
Local No. 1.—Secretary, Ethel Asher, 2945 Clarke Drive,
Vancouver.
Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, Local No. 31.—Secretary, A. B. Lund, 1976 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Tunnel and Rock Workers' Union, Branch of the International Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union, Local No. 168.—Secretary, William Slew-
idge, 337 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 226.—Secretary, Peter Campbell, 212, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Staff Association,
Vancouver Branch.—Secretary, C. T. Emery, 2235 Nelson Avenue, West Vancouver.
Upholsterers' Industrial Union, Local No. 1.—Secretary,
Mrs. Anita Paushe, 1617 Parker Street, Vancouver.
Warehousemen's General Union, Local No. 842.—Secretary, P. Hansen, 4148 Yale Street, North Burnaby.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No.
1-71.—Secretary, Fred Fisher, 309, 119 West Pender
Street, Vancouver.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No.
1-217.—Secretary, C. P. Neale, 4375 Suncrest Avenue,
Burnaby.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No.
1-252.—Secretary, Hector McLean, 200 McKay Avenue,
North Vancouver.
Vanderhoof
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Vanderhoof
Branch.—Secretary, R. Morrow, Box 350, Vanderhoof,
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 56.—
President, C. A. Klassen, Vanderhoof.
Vedder Crossing
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
G. D. Burgess, Postmaster, Vedder Crossing
Vernon
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 1346.—Secretary, W. J. Forsythe, P.O. Box
926, Vernon.
Civic   Employees'   Federal   Union,   Vernon   Branch  No.
326.—Secretary, S. F.  Bickert, 3908 Thirty-first Street,
Vernon.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, D. H.
Ruppel, 3401 Fifteenth Street, Vernon.
Electrical  Workers,  International  Brotherhood of, Local
No. 821.—Secretary, A. G. Smith, 4100 Kamloops Road,
Vesaon.
Fire Fighters  (Okanagan Valley), International Association of, Local No. 953.—Secretary, K. M. Little, 3005
Thirtieth Street, Vernon.
Government   Employees'   Association   of   B.C.,   Vernon
Branch.—Secretary,   G.   A.   Bromfield,   3208   Fifteenth
Street, Vernon.
Hospital   Employees'   Association   Vernon   Branch   No.
180.—Secretary,   J.   E.   Holmwood,   3101   Thirty-fourth
Avenue, Vernon.
Letter Carriers' Federation, Canadian, Vernon Branch.—
Secretary, T. Harper, 3401 Eighteenth Street,  Vernon.
Postal    Employees'    Association,     Canadian,    Vernon
Branch.—Secretary, W. C. Millar, Post Office, Vernon.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 22.—
Secretary,   W.   D.   Seaton,   3905   Twenty-sixth   Street,
Vernon.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Clerical Division,
Local   No.  22.—Secretary,  Clara Schram,   1610  Forty-
Third Avenue, Vernon.
Victoria
Automotive   Maintenance   Workers'   Union,   Local   No.
151.—Secretary,   James   C.   McDonald,   4423   Torquay
Avenue, Victoria.
Bartenders' and Beverage Dispensers' International Union,
Local   No.   513.—Secretary,   A.   Horn,   615   Pandora
Avenue, Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union,
Local No. 267.—Secretary, Fred Litster,  1324 Hillside
Avenue, Victoria.
Barbers',  Hairdressers',  Cosmetologists'  and Proprietors'
Union,  Local No.  372.—Secretary, W. J.  Singer,   545
Dunedin Street, Victoria.
Boilermakers,   Iron   Ship   Builders,   Blacksmiths,   Drop
Forgers   and   Helpers,   International   Brotherhood   of,
Local No. 191.—Secretary, S. H. Cambell, 5038 Wesley
Road, R.R. 2, Royal Oak.
Bookbinders,    International   Brotherhood   of,   Local   No.
147.—Secretary, R. Foster, 2021 Carnarvon Street, Victoria.
Brewery,  Flour,  Malt,  Yeast,   Soft  Drink and  Distillery
Workers of America, Local No. 280.—Secretary, G. H.
Parkes, 908 Cowichan Street, Victoria.
Bricklayers,  Masons and Plasterers,  International Union
of, Local No. 2.—Secretary, J. W. Cooper, 2933 Kings
Road, Victoria.
Building Service Workers' International Union, Local No.
379.—Secretary,  James   Richardson,   1818  Julia  Street,
Victoria.
Burial  Park  Employees,   Royal Oak  Branch No. 479.—
Secretary, L. E. Jones, 3850 Rowland Avenue, Victoria.
Carpenters  and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of  Local No. 1598.—Secretary, J. A. Moffatt, 3170 Rut-
ledge Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United  Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2415.—Secretary, C. A. Bellhouse,   101,
615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2527.—Secretary, M. Harris, 615 Pandora
Avenue, Victoria.
Chemical   and   Explosive   Workers'   Union,   Local   No.
128.—Secretary, C. R. Nunn, Saanichton.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, Local No. 50.—
Secretary,   Robert   Johnston,   2721   Belmont   Avenue,
Victoria.
Civilian Workers of National Defence Federal Union.—
Secretary, George Portingale, 214 Suzanne Place, Victoria.
Civil    Servants    of    Canada,    Amalgamated,     Victoria
Branch.—Secretary, Miss Lily B. Northam, 2644 Rose
Street, Victoria. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 87
Construction and General Labourers' Union, Local No.
1093.—Secretary, Earl B. Allen, 105, 615 Pandora
Avenue, Victoria.
Department of Veterans' Affairs Employees' Association,
Victoria Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. Gladys Scott, 617
Belmont Building, Government Street, Victoria.
Dominion and Astrophysical Staff Association.—Secretary,
A. R. Salonen, 560 Baxter Avenue, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 230.—Secretary, L. G. Trickett, 1636 Hillside
Avenue, Victoria.
Employees' Association of the City of Victoria, Local
No. 388.—Secretary, Roy Stewart, c/o City Hall, Victoria.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
730.—Secretary, William Hamilton, 626 Cormorant
Street, Victoria.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
967.—Secretary, R. A. Slater, 4414 Patricia Bay Highway, Royal Oak.
Fire Fighters' Federation, Department of National Defence.—Secretary, W. Paterson, 1055 Nicholson Street,
Saanich.
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 19.—
Secretary, F. J. Smele,  1852 Chestnut Street, Victoria.
Fuel Distributors' Union, Local No. 150.—Secretary,
Barton E. Alexander, 1324 Balmoral Avenue, Victoria.
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Victoria
Branch.—Secretary, H. Carney, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union,
Local No. 1093.—Secretary, Dan Sutherland, 259 Atkins
Road, Victoria.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union,
Local No. 1204.—Secretary, W. Prosky, 920 Russell
Street, Victoria.
Hospital Employees' Association, Royal Jubilee Hospital.—Secretary, Miss Shiel Fleming, 1122 View Street,
Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 835.—Business Agent, G.
Bellevance, 107, 615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Hydrographic Survey, Pacific Coast Association.—Secretary, Mrs. L. S. Thompson, 1298 Dallas Road, Victoria.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire and Metal,
Local No. 332.—Secretary, C. Wescott, 2849 Shelbourne
Street, Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, Local No. 1.—Secretary, Mrs.
Rose Edwards, 2875 Rowland Avenue, Victoria.
Letter Carriers' Federated Association, Victoria Branch
No. 11.—Secretary, J. Conn, 953 Dunn Avenue, Victoria.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Lodge No. 609.—Secretary, J. E. Wilkinson, Walter
Street, Victoria.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 504.—Secretary, W. Norman Scott, 613
Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Machinists', Fitters' and Helpers' Union, Local No. 3.—
Business Agent, E. Orchin, 715 Johnson Street, Victoria.
Mailers' Union, Local No. 121.—Secretary, G. A. Bishop,
1324 Tryall Street, Victoria.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Local No. 493.—Secretary, George Hardy, 3920
Prestwood Drive, Victoria.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 2824.—Secretary, F. S. Paulin, Metchosin P.O.,
Victoria.
Marine Engineers of Canada, Inc., Victoria Branch No.
6.—Secretary, J. Ashcroft, 2346 Arbutus Road, R.R. 5,
Victoria.
Molders' and Foundry Workers' International Union,
Local No. 144.—Secretary, Sam Emery, 864 Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Oak Bay Municipality,
Local No. 311.—Secretary, H. Maloney, 1314 Hampshire Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Saanich Municipality.—Secretary, T. Bennett, 489 Nelson Street, Esquimalt.
Musicians'  Mutual  Protective  Union,  Local  No.  247.—
Secretary,   William   F.   Tickle,   1021   Pentrelew  Place,
Victoria.
Newspaper Guild of Victoria, Local No. 219.—Secretary,
David A. Brown, 2359 Beach Drive, Victoria.
Office Employees' Association, B.C. Electric, Local No.
300—Secretary, D. Stewart, 713 Oliver Street, Victoria.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
918.—Secretary, L. Gerrath, 555 Davida Street, Victoria.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of Ameria, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1163.—Secretary, D. Bushell, 101,
615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Paper Makers' Union, Local No. 367.—Secretary, J. F.
Tait, 276 Crease Avenue, Victoria.
Peace Officers' Union, Oak Bay Association.—Secretary,
J. E. Groves, 1703 Monterey Avenue, Victoria.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 78.—Secretary, John F.
Crooks, 2, 1168 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 450.—Secretary, Frank Williams, 1814 Belmont Avenue, Victoria.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, Journeymen and
Apprentices of, Local No. 324.—Business Agent, F. G.
Appleton, 617'/. Cormorant Street, Victoria.
Policemen's Union of the City of Victoria.—Secretary,
James Banter, 625 Fisgard Street, Victoria.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Victoria
Branch. — Secretary, W. H. Jenner, 2728 Doncaster
Avenue, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union, International,
Local No. 72.—Secretary, F. H. Larsen, 1236 McKenzie Street, Victoria.
Public Employees' National Union, Local No. 50.—Secretary, R. Johnston, 2721 Belmont Avenue, Victoria.
Public Library Staff Association, Local No. 410.—Secretary, Miss D. Herget, 2826 Blackwood Avenue, Victoria.
Public Works Employees, Victoria Local.—Secretary, J.
Wilson, 521 Linden Avenue, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 613.—
Secretary, A. E. Mummery, 853 Queens Avenue, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Lodge No.
50.—Secretary, J. Davidson, 721 Pine Street, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
2230.—Secretary, A. Knott, 1250 Rockland Avenue,
Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1137.—Secretary, A. Knott, 1250 Rockland Avenue,
Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 222.—Secretary, R. E.
Tebo,   1480 Thurlow Road, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 234.—Secretary, D. G.
Davidson, 715 Johnson Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 276.—Secretary, D. M.
Bean, 540 Dumeresque Street, Victoria.
Retail Clerks, International Association of, Local No.
279.—Secretary, John Nicol, 512 Simcoe Street, Victoria.
Retail Food & Drug Clerks' Union, Local No. 1518.—
Secretary, R. Humber, 616 Gorge Road, Victoria.
School Board Employees' Association, Greater Victoria
School Board.—Secretary, A. L. Grover, P.O. Box 395,
Victoria.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 276.—Secretary, H. Weydert, 2371 Lansdowne
Road, Victoria.
Shipwrights', Joiners' and Caulkers' Industrial Union,
Local No. 9.—Secretary, Don Douglas, 1338 Wood
Street, Victoria.
Shipyard General Workers' Union, Local No. 3.—Secretary, Jack Bath, 1725 Carrick Street, Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Local No.
109.—Secretary, J. F. Belton, 2575 MacDonald Drive,
Victoria. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Structural Iron Workers, Bridge and Ornamental, Shipyard Workers, Riggers, Benchmen and Helpers, International Association of, Local No. 643.—Secretary,
Andrew Manson, 3981 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Taxation Division (Canadian) Staff Association, Department of National Revenue.—Secretary, Miss Carta Ellis,
Belmont Building, Government Street, Victoria.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 61.—
Secretary, Miss K. M. Thompson, 832 Linkless Avenue,
Victoria.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
885.—Secretary, J. Pennack, 116 Menzies Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 2.—
Secretary, B. H. Johns, R.R. 2, Royal Oak.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Traffic Division,
Local No. 11.—Secretary, Miss M. Munn, 3, 2658
Quadra Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Clerical Division,
Local No. 21.—Secretary, G. Robbins, 2533 Margate
Street, Victoria.
Transport Department, Employees' Association, Victoria
District.—Secretary, Donald H. Horsman, 835 Villance
Street, Victoria.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 201.—
Secretary, H. Warren, P.O. Box 741, Victoria.
Treasury Staff Association, Branch of the Civil Service
Federation.—Secretary, Miss P. Griffin, 1102 Empress
Street, Victoria.
Unemployment Insurance Staff Association, Local No.
101.—Secretary, Mrs. G. Dowling, 1424 St. Patrick
Street, Victoria.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Local No. 504.—Secretary, J. Richards, 981 Cloverdale Avenue, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No.
1-118.—Secretary, D. Hall, 2647 Shelbourne Street, Victoria.
Walcott
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 340.—Secretary, J. A. Mould, Walcott.
Wells
Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 685.—Secretary, Angus MacLean, P.O. Box
8, Wells.
Westview
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 42.—
Secretary, C. Miettinen, Lund.
West Vancouver
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver, Local
No.   395.—Secretary,   J.   M.   Smeal,   2676   Haywood
Avenue, West Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 45.—
Secretary, T. Taylor, 222 West Twenty-second Avenue,
North Vancouver.
White Rock
Civil   Servants   of   Canada,   Amalgamated,   White   Rock
Branch.—Secretary, George S. Hill, 2788 Stayte Road,
R.R. 4, White Rock.
Fire Fighters' Association of B.C., Local 1271.—Secretary,
A. Powell, 15265 North Bluff Road, White Rock.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian,   White   Rock
Branch.—Secretary, John Dilworth, White Rock P.O.
Whonock
Gillnetters' Association of B.C., Whonock Branch.-
tary, F. Rolley, Whonock.
-Secre-
Williams Lake
Government  Employees'   Association   of  B.C.,   Williams
Lake Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. J. Lee, Williams Lake.
Teachers' Federation of B.C., School District No. 27.—
Secretary, Mrs. Betty Mandell, Box 175, Williams Lake.
Windermere
Government Employees' Association of B.C., Windermere
Branch.—Secretary, Robin C. Hickson, Windermere.
Woodfibre
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 494.—Secretary, B. C. Walton, Woodfibre.
Woodward Slough
Fishermen's and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 11.—
Secretary, Jack Hill, 947 Finn Road, R.R. 3, Richmond.
Organizations of Employers
Calgary
Coal Operators' Association of Western Canada.—President, F. J. Harquail; Secretary, S. W. Foss, 204 Alberta
Block, Calgary, Alta.
Creston
Milk Producers' Association, Creston Co-operative.—
President, F. Charman; Secretary, H. W. Michalke,
Creston.
Kelowna
Fruit Growers' Association, British Columbia.—President,
A. R. Garrish; Secretary. J. Maclennan, Okanagan
Mission.
Shippers' Association, Inc., Okanagan Federated.—President, K. W. Kinnard; Secretary, L. R. Stephens, 1485
Water Street, Kelowna.
Langley
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—President,
D. R. Nicholson;   Secretary, H. S. Berry, Langley.
Penticton
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior.—Secretary,
A. D. Macdonald, 109, 304 Martin Street, Penticton.
Prince George
Lumberman's Association, Northern Interior.—President,
A. W. Strom; Secretary, R. J. Gallagher, 263 Dominion Street, Prince George.
Vancouver
Automotive Retailers' Association.—President, J. O. Betts;
Secretary, J. L. Kinneard, 1687 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Automotive Transport Association of B.C.—President,
D. A. Chapman; Secretary, W. J. Morris, 810, 207
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Building and Construction Industries Exchange of British
Columbia.—President, L. J. Bennett; Secretary, H.
Cole, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Contractors' Association, General.—President, W. Douglas; Secretary, H. Cole, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, E. Van
Balkom; Secretary, F. Moore, 4368 Price Crescent,
South Burnaby.
Electrical Service League of B.C.—President, S. V. Gris-
dale; Secretary, J. Nairn, 1090 Homer Street, Vancouver. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 89
Fisheries Association of B.C.—President, J, M. Buchanan;
Secretary, J. Macdonald, 510, 119 West Pender Street,
Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of B.C.—President,
C. Clarke; Secretary, H. A. Christenson, 7160 Kitchener Street, North Burnaby.
Forest Industrial Relations Ltd.—President, J. M. Billings,
675 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 1.
Grain Exporters' Association, Vancouver.—President,
B. H. Stewart; Secretary, W. A. Sankey, 355 Burrard
Street, Vancouver.
Hairdressers' Association of B.C.—President, J. Joli;
Secretary, G. R. Matthews, 605 Province Building, Vancouver.
Heating and Sheet Metal Association of B.C.—President,
K. H. Meadow; Secretary, M. L. Tucker, 2446 West
Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Heavy Construction Association of B.C.—President, C. P.
Baker; Secretary, J. D. Layden, 8, 1161 Melville Street,
Vancouver.
Hospitals' Association, British Columbia.—President,
L. F. C. Kirby; Secretary, P. Ward, 129 Osborne Road
East, North Vancouver.
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—President, J. J.
Custock;   Secretary, E. V. Ely, 948 Howe Street, Vancouver.
House Builders' Association, Vancouver Metropolitan.—
President, J. S. Don; Secretary, C. E. Ross, 969 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Industrial Association of B.C.—President, J. H. Cates;
Secretary, J. R. Edgett, 1024 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).—President, C. F. Webb; Secretary, R. S. Deacon, 106, 1425
West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners and Linen Supply Association,
Vancouver.—President, W. G. Rathie; Secretary, J. R.
Taylor, 300, 1111 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Lithographers' Association, British Columbia.—President,
M. Collins; Secretary, R. A. Mahoney, 1644 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Loggers' Association (Inc.), British Columbia.—President,
S. A. Mowat; Secretary, J. N. Burke, 401, 550 Burrard
Street, Vancouver.
Manufacturers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Division).—
President, M. J. Foley; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
608 Marine Building, Vancouver.
Master Plumbers and Heating Contractors of Canada,
National Association of.—President, M. J. Griffin;
Secretary, C. M. Doyle, 4829 Willow Street, Vancouver.
Merchants Exchange Ltd., Vancouver.—President, J.
Donnell; Secretary, W. A. Sankey, 355 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
Metal Trades Association, British Columbia.—President,
L. Mitten; Secretary, R. A. Mahoney 1644 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Millwork Institute, Mainland.—President, J. F. Sigurdson;
Secretary, H. F. Fleming, 75 Peveril Avenue, Vancouver.
Millwork Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver.—President, G. Clark; Secretary, R. H. Poole, 5920 Joyce
Street,  Vancouver.
Mining Association of B.C.—President, L. T. Postle;
Secretary, C. H. Mitchell, 622, 837 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver.
Motor Transport Labour  Relations  Council.—President,
E. D. Charles;   Secretary, W. J. Morris, 810, 207 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Morticians,   British  Columbia   Society  of.—President,  J.
Irving;    Secretary,   H.   O.   Brown,   1349   Commercial
Drive, Vancouver.
Pulp and Paper Association, Canadian.—President, T. N.
Beaupre;  Secretary, L. Manley, 402, 550 Burrard Street,
Vancouver.
Red  Cedar Shingle Association  of British  Columbia.—
President,  J.   R.  Gray;    Secretary M.  E.  Welte, 202,
550 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Restaurant   Association,    Canadian.—President,    R.    C.
Brown;   Secretary, P. H. Edgcumbe, 130 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver.
Retail   Lumbermen's   Council   of   Canada,   National.—
President, L. G. Power;   Secretary, W. J. Andrew, 9,
1490 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Shipping   Federation   of   British   Columbia.—President,
H. F. Jones;  Secretary, W. L. Hurford, Anglo-Canadian
Shipping Co. Ltd., Metropolitan Building, Vancouver.
Towboat Owners' Association, British Columbia.—President,   C.   S.  Cosulich,   Secretary,   W.  A.   Sankey,  355
Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Truck and Construction Equipment Operators of British
Columbia.—President, R. H. Werk;   Secretary, A. Bas-
kell, 1496 East Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Truck  Loggers'  Association.—President,  L.  S.  Eckardt;
Secretary,  C. J. Bennett, 701-705,  837 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver.
Retail   Hardware  Association,   British   Columbia.—President,   J.   Sarginson;    Secretary,   R.   Kline,   539   Front
Street, New Westminster.
Vernon
Dairy Industries Co-operative Association, Shuswap-
Okanagan.—President, E. C. Stickland; Secretary, T. E.
Clarke, 3204 Twenty-seventh Avenue, Vernon.
Victoria
Automobile Dealers' Association, Victoria.—President,
R. H. Riddle; Secretary, T Lougheed, 816 Wharf Street,
Victoria.
Building Industries Exchange, Victoria.—President, G. L.
Brown; Secretary, R. T. Lougheed, 816 Wharf Street,
Victoria.
Contractors' Association, Victoria.—President, B. A.
Cooke; Secretary, W. H. McMurray, 1677 Hollywood
Crescent, Victoria.
Electrical Contractors' Association (B.C.), Victoria.—
President, G. Langdon; Secretary, A. M. Downie,
3255 Rutledge Street, Victoria.
Hotels' Association, Greater Victoria.—President, A.
Mawer; Secretary, W. L. Gouge, 156 View Royal
Avenue, Victoria.
Jewellers' Association, Victoria.—President, R. H. Rose;
Secretary, A. R. C. Hebden, 1006 Blanshard Street,
Victoria.
Manufacturers' Association, Canadian (Victoria and Vancouver Island Branch).—President, R. H. Bose; Secretary, A. W. Reid, 316 Wharf Street, Victoria.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.—President, C. Rawlings; Secretary, A. N. Westwood, 629
Broughton Street, Victoria. F 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Control of Employment of Children
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour or a
person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of children under
15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is prohibited by the
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
In order that the health and scholastic standing of the children will not be adversely
affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in close co-operation
with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the children. Permits are
issued only when it has been established that the child's health will not suffer, and that
the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere with their
standing at school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for
which permits are required; these include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
(12) Laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry.
Summary of Permits Issued for Year 1958
District
Cranbrook
Dawson
Creek
Kamloops
Kelowna
Mission
City
Nelson
Prince
George
Terrace
Vancouver
Victoria
Boys	
Girls	
Totals	
Amusements-—
Catering  _
Construction—
Laundry	
Logging	
Manufacturing
Mercantile _
Service-station.
Ship-building—
Shoe-shine _
Transportation
Total issued
99
13
112
32
7
39
112      |
39
147
26
173
.-.
7
24
8
2
....
2
1
—
1
2
2
4
1
94
12
....
....
1
—
—
31
14
2
1
1
8
112
2
|    173 "EQUAL PAY ACT'
F 91
11
Equal Pay Act
11
This Act, which was proclaimed December 31st, 1953, prohibits discrimination
between male and female employees with respect to rates of pay in any case where a
female does the same work as a male for the same employer in the same establishment.
A difference in the rate of pay between a female and a male employee based on any
factor other than sex is not a violation of the Act.
Summary of Proceedings under the " Equal Pay Act"
1958
Complaints
Totals 1954 to 1958,
Inclusive
S*SS     Complaints
Employers
Involved
Complaints received   	
Complaints referred to Industrial Relations Officers
Complaints settled by Industrial Relations Officers-
Complaints referred to the Board 	
Complaints withdrawn	
I
361
33
16
17
1
10
7
5
2
1
1 In the case of one complaint the Act did not apply   In another case the wage differential was based on a factor
other than sex and was therefore not a violation of the Act. F 92 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"Fair Employment Practices Act"
This Act is designed to prevent discrimination in regard to employment and membership in trade-unions by reason of race, religion, colour, nationality, ancestry, or place
of origin. The use or circulation of application for employment forms or advertisements
in connection with employment which express directly or indirectly any limitation or
preference as to the race, etc., of any person is prohibited, unless the preference or
limitation is based upon a bona fide occupational qualification.
The principle underlying section 5 of the Act is that a person's race, religion, colour,
nationality, ancestry, or place of origin rarely affect his work performance and normally
should not be the subject for employment inquiries which he is expected or required to
answer. Reduced to its minima terms, the " application for employment" form would
only show the individual merits and qualifications of prospective employees with regard
to the jobs to be filled.
The Act does not apply to an employer who employs less than five employees, or
to any exclusively charitable, philanthropic, educational, fraternal, religious, or social
organization that is not operated for profit, or to any organization that is operated primarily to foster the welfare of a religious or racial group and is not operated for profit.
Institutions operating under the provisions of the " Public Schools Act" are, however,
subject to the legislation.
During 1958 five complaints under section 5 of the Act regarding employment applications and advertisements were investigated and processed, all of which were satisfactorily settled with the assistance of an Industrial Relations Officer. No complaint was
received alleging that any person had been discriminated against in regard to employment
contrary to section 3 of the Act. Neither was any complaint received under section 4
regarding membership in a trade-union.
In addition to processing specific complaints, advice was given to employers who
voluntarily requested consideration of their application for employment forms to> satisfy
them that the forms contained no discriminatory questions.
The nature of the legislation is such that persuasion and education are more desirable
than compulsion. It is therefore gratifying to record the co-operation that employers,
newspapers, and individuals have extended to officials of this Department in order to
correct unintentional violations of the Act. REPORT OF FACTORIES INSPECTION BRANCH F 93
Report of the Factories Inspection Branch
Administrative Office    -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Robert M. Purdie    - Chief Inspector of Factories.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection
Branch for the year 1958.
Factories
In 1958, while the number of new factories decreased, a greater number of major
plants were built. This was observed in the pulp and paper industry and refineries.
Another noticeable trend was the increase in the number of industrial estates, all of which
are of considerable size for this Province. They are being developed mostly for light
and medium industries, which would indicate an expected increase in the construction
of these factories to offset the present volume of major plant construction. Industry
is increasingly becoming aware of the service rendered by the Factories Branch in the
examination of plans prior to construction. In view of the better quality of buildings
being erected for industrialists, they are vitally interested in knowing that the factory is
going to meet with health requirements for its acceptance at the design stage rather than
after occupancy.
To keep industry informed of our requirements before the construction period, we
have developed and distributed for their guidance a booklet called "Rules Relating to
Acceptable Standards in Factory Construction and Industrial Health."
It deals with basic items that are common to most factories, in reference to the
physical features of factory design that affect the working conditions of the occupants.
These factory standards have been well received by industrial firms, architects, and engineers, thus giving a great deal of satisfaction to this Branch
A considerable amount of engineering data has been correlated to the standards,
and plates have been made consolidating pertinent data and basic designs for the use of
those in the air-conditioning field.
Definite progress has been made in the past year in the factory-construction field as
a result of the use of these standards.
Industrial Homework
Permits authorizing industrial homework to be performed in the home showed a
slight increase during the year.
Elevators
The elevator field continues to expand yearly, new installations providing the bulk
of this expansion. While several group installations have been made, the majority of the
elevators have been single units in apartment buildings. These apartments are located in
many areas, with the West End of Vancouver predominating; new apartments, however,
have also appeared in the Kerrisdale and Kitsilano districts, also in New Westminster and
Victoria, thus providing a wide area to be covered in initial safety tests, and then consolidating these new installations into our regular inspection groups. The volume of work F 94 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
in examination of plans, compiling records, performing initial safety tests, and accepting
these new installations increases year by year.
During the year 1958 the Department was authorized to inspect and apply Provincial regulations to all elevator equipment under the jurisdiction of the Federal Department of Public Works and the Department of Veterans' Affairs. While the majority of
this equipment was inspected before the end of the year, it was not possible to complete
the whole of this group of inspections with our present staff.
Nothing of a spectacular nature has appeared in new design during the past year;
the type of elevator being installed in nearly all cases leans toward the operatorless type,
and with all the modern safety devices available—roller guides, self-levelling, power-
operated doors, and smooth operation—this equipment proves to be both a time and
money saver to the owners. Toward the end of the year, a shaft failure, due to metal
fatigue, caused an automatic elevator to drop in a hospital in an outlying district; however, all the safety devices on this elevator operated as required and no person was
injured. We are again proud to report that no fatal or serious accident pertaining to
elevator equipment under our jurisdiction was recorded during the past year.
Elevator Inspections
Passenger-elevators   710
Escalators   63
;                Freight-elevators  802
Hand-power elevators  65
Dumb-waiters   210
Man-lifts   44
V              Reinspections    210
Total  2,104
New Elevator Installations Plans Received
Passenger-elevators   52
Freight-elevators   14
Dumb-waiters   28
Escalators   6
Total      100
Of the above, eight were replacements.
Federal Government Equipment
r
Passenger-elevators   25
Freight-elevators   19
Dumb-waiters  .  9
Escalators   14
Total  67
Elevator Operators' Licences
Temporary   468
Permanent   399
Renewals   1,226 REPORT OF FACTORIES INSPECTION BRANCH F 95
Factory Inspections
Factory inspections totalled 1,300; child employment investigations, 5; homework
investigations, 24; and office and field interviews, 380.
Conclusion
We take this opportunity to acknowledge the assistance given our Branch by other
Governmental departments and the continued co-operation of members of the staff.
Also, we wish to thank all officials and employees connected with industry for their
co-operation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. M. Purdie,
Chief Inspector of Factories. F 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Apprenticeship and
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch
Head office       -----    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Branch office    -   Department of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
C. E. Gerhart -     -     - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Members:
M. Lyle Barr - ... 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. S. Beck      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
T. McGibbon - -      -      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W. H. Welsh - -      -      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Officials of the Branch
Victor S. Hurrell -------   Director of Apprenticeship.
John Melville       -----  Assistant Director of Apprenticeship.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I am pleased to submit this report of the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's
Qualification Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
Apprentices in Training
On December 31st, 1958, the number of indentured apprentices registered with the
Branch was 2,779, and the number of pre-apprenticeship students being trained through
the auspices of the Department of Labour was 231.
There were 726 new apprenticeship contracts registered, and 464 apprentices completed training during the year.
The following table illustrates the distribution of apprentices by trades and term of
apprenticeship:— APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH
F 97
Term
in
Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Completed
in
1958
Trade or Occupation
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Prob.
Reg.
4
2
4
4
4
2
4-5
3
4
2
5
3
2-6
5
4
4
3
5
4
4
4
5
4
4
4
2
69
38
1
5
86
7
92
9
2
35
4
12
2
72
4
3
14
1
15
115
3
32
9
3
26
10
3
57
36
5
4
69
50
6
36
4
6
10
1
3
16
3
12
42
3
35
22
2
10
22
6
101
5
4
48
85
5
1
13
6
10
31
3
9
8
2
2
56
3
38
4
5
17
39
5
80
9
4
108
100
1
2
1
5
5
51
1
5
7
1
16
95
1
37
8
1
21
3
96
8
3
101
94
1
1
52
2
4
1
20
70
6
35
9
3
1
3
13
3
38
21
403
74
28
20
412
7
434
15
11
84
9
27
24
254
11
24
45
8
65
378
16
198
52
14
75
71
20
66
Bartering— 	
Boilermaking	
56
1
6
60
44
7
Glassworking  	
Hairdressing -      	
3
33
10
5
39
4
4
10
3
8
48
3
30
Ship and boat building	
3
9
8
Miscellaneoustrades  	
4
Totals	
.-.-      |    672
460
500
562
510    j      75
2,779
464
Geographically, contracts of apprenticeship were
following locations in the Province:—
Abbotsford.
Agassiz.
Alberni.
Aldergrove.
Armstrong.
Ashcroft.
Burns Lake.
Campbell River.
Canoe.
Castlegar.
Chemainus.
Chilliwack.
Cloverdale.
Cobble Hill.
Courtenay.
Cranbrook.
Creston.
Dawson Creek.
Duncan.
Essondale.
Fernie.
Fort St. John.
Fruitvale.
Gibsons.
Glenlake.
Golden.
Grand Forks.
Grindrod.
Hammond.
Haney.
Harrison Lake.
Hope.
Kamloops.
Kelowna.
Kimberley.
Kinnaird.
Kitimat.
Langford.
Ladner.
Langley Prairie.
Lillooet.
Maillardville.
Merritt.
Mission.
Murrayville.
Nakusp.
Nanaimo.
Nelson.
100 Mile House.
Penticton.
Port Alberni.
Port Coquitlam.
Port Mellon.
registered for employers in the
Powell River.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Princeton.
Quesnel.
Revelstoke.
Rossland.
Salmo.
Salmon Arm.
Sardis.
Sechelt.
Shawnigan Lake.
Sidney.
Smithers.
Squamish.
Terrace.
Sullivan Station.
Tofino.
Trail.
Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Westview.
West Summerland.
White Rock.
Wildwood.
Yarrow. F 98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Pre-apprenticeship Training
Pre-apprenticeship training classes had first been established in the previous year
(1957). One hundred and seventeen students who had started training in 1957 completed their pre-apprenticeship school training in 1958. Two hundred and thirty-one new
trainees were in training in these classes at December 31st, 1958, in the trades of automotive mechanic, boat-building, carpentry, electronics, electrical work, lathing, machinist,
plastering, plumbing, sheet-metal work, and structural-steel erection.
Apprenticeship Technical Training
Technical training in schools was conducted to supplement the training supplied on
the job by employers. Two hundred and fifty-eight separate evening classes provided a
total of 155,616 student-hours. Daytime class instruction provided 309.770 student-
hours of instruction to 1,121 apprenticeship students. Of these, 773 were indentured
apprentices and 348 were pre-apprenticeship trainees.
Evening classes obviously can only be operated in centres where a substantial
number of apprentices are permanently located, and it is for this reason that apprenticeship school facilities exist mainly in the southern section of the Province. The main
training load is in Vancouver and Victoria, and there are also special apprenticeship
evening classes in Kitimat and Trail. Generally, each apprentice assigned to an evening
class attends school for an average of six hours a week for seven months during the fall
and winter season. The classes are held outside of working-hours and so do not interfere
with the employment of the apprentice.
Daytime training classes are operated for several categories of students. Some
trades do not lend themselves to short periods of evening training, and so daytime classes
are conducted for continuous periods of from four to eight weeks. In this category are
the trades of bricklaying, lathing, painting, plastering, and steel erection work. Apprentices from various parts of the Province were brought to Vancouver for training in these
trades.
Daytime classes were also conducted in Vancouver and Nanaimo for apprentices
from areas in which, because of the small number of apprentices, evening classes could
not be established. These apprentices were brought to the training centre to receive
training in trade theory and practice. In this way they received the same training advantages as the apprentices from the larger centres.
Special daytime school training was also made available to indentured apprentices
who became unemployed because of business conditions and labour disputes. In some
cases individual apprentices, when unemployed, were accommodated in existing apprenticeship classes. In other instances new classes were set up to provide training for
apprentices who became idle because of work stoppage resulting from a labour dispute.
This flexible programme enabled the apprentice to improve his trade knowledge while idle.
School Training Facilities
As in the past, the apprenticeship technical training classes were conducted for the
Department of Labour by various School Boards and the Department of Education.
In Kitimat, Trail, Vancouver, and Victoria the local School Boards operated special
apprentice-training classes, while the Department of Education operated special classes
in Nanaimo and Vancouver. All of this training was paid for by the Department of
Labour.
The apprenticeship school programme has continued to expand each year until it
has reached a size that has caused the Government to start building a new trade-school
in Burnaby.   Construction of buildings at the Burnaby site proceeded during 1958 and, APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH
F 99
pending completion of the permanent buildings, classes were again held in quarters
rented from the Pacific National Exhibition Board. These temporary quarters were first
obtained in 1955, and since then, until 1958, apprenticeship classes were operated there
for the Department of Labour by the Vancouver School Board. In anticipation of
moving those classes to the new trade-school in Burnaby, which will be administered by
the Department of Education, the Exhibition Park classes were transferred from the
administration of the Vancouver School Board to that of the Department of Education.
Since April 1st, 1958, the Department of Labour has been reimbursing the Department
of Education for the operation of apprenticeship classes there.
Qualification of Tradesmen
Voluntary examination of refrigeration tradesmen resulted in six men being issued
certificates of proficiency.
The trade advisory committee for the radio and television trade devoted a great deal
of effort toward producing a satisfactory examination for men in that field. The progress
that has been made indicates that voluntary examinations will be available very soon.
Conclusion
Mr. Edmund L. Allen, who had been Director of Apprenticeship since 1951, transferred to the Department of Education during the year. In his new capacity, Mr. Allen
continues to be associated with our Department through the training classes operated at
the Burnaby trade school.
Mr. Hamilton Crisford, who was the first Director of Apprenticeship, and who, on
retirement, was appointed as Chairman of the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee,
resigned from the Committee because of protracted illness and will be missed by many
who have known him since our apprenticeship programme began.
Mr. C. E. Gerhart was appointed to replace Mr. Crisford as Chairman of the Committee. Mr. Gerhart has been active in public and government affairs for many years,
and I consider that we are fortunate in obtaining his services.
Finally, I wish to report that trade-unions, employers, local School Boards, and
officials of the Department of Education have shown fine co-operation in our activities
during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
Victor S. Hurrell,
Director of Apprenticeship. F  100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Trade-schools
Regulation Administrative Office
Administrative Offices   -   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Officers:
Mrs. Rex Eaton.      C. E. Gerhart.      Victor S. Hurrell.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I am pleased to submit this report of the administration of the " Trade-schools
Regulation Act " for the year ended December 31st, 1958.
Changes in administrative officers were made during the year, and Mrs. Rex Eaton
is now the only one of the original administrative officers still serving.
Mr. Hamilton Crisford, one of the original administrative officers, resigned during
the year because of a protracted illness. His wisdom and judgment, which had been
useful throughout the years, will be missed, and many people in the Province will remember the courteous manner in which he dealt with them.
Mr. C. E. Gerhart was appointed to take the place of Mr. Crisford. The wide
extent of public and government service which Mr. Gerhart has experienced has now
been made available to the Department of Labour in connection with trade-schools
regulation work.
Mr. Edmund L. Allen, one of the administrative officers since 1951, resigned his
position to enter the service of the Department of Education. He was succeeded by
Mr. Victor S. Hurrell.
During the year there were eighty-three schools registered to conduct business in
British Columbia. Of these there were seventy-six which were reregistered after operating in the previous year. There were seven schools registered which had not been
registered in 1957. No certificates of registration were cancelled for infraction of the
Act and regulations during the year.
The following list indicates the schools which were registered to operate in British
Columbia during the year and the subjects which they undertook to offer to the public:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont.:   Modern
business course, special elective course.
American School of Correspondence, Drexel Avenue at East Fifty-eighth Street,
Chicago 37, 111.:  Engineering and commerce subjects as covered by the school
bulletin.
Art Instruction, Inc., 500 South Fourth Street, Minneapolis 15, Minn.:  Illustrating
and cartooning, commercial art and design.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.:  Civil, mechanical, electrical, radio, and aeronautical engineering, and other groups as per school bulletin " Engineering Opportunities."
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 Sixteenth Street North-west, Washington 10, D.C.:   Radio-electronics engineering technology.
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second
Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.:  Diesel, welding, refrigeration and air-conditioning,
draughting.
The Creative School of Art Limited, 935 Weston Road, Toronto 9, Ont.:  Showcard-
writing.
_J TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE F 101
The School of Creative Photography, 935 Weston Road, Toronto 9, Ont.: Photography.
Columbia Business Institute, 617 Dekum Building, 519 South-west Third Avenue,
Portland, Ore.:  Railroad telegraphy.
DeVry Technical Institute, Inc., 4141 Belmont Avenue, Chicago 41, 111.: Television, radio, and electronic training.
Famous Artists Schools, Canada (Institute of Commercial Art), 106 Adelaide Street
West, Toronto, Ont.:  Commercial art (basic and advanced).
Greer Shop Training, Inc., 2230 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111.: Diesel
engines, welding.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
111.:   Accounting.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian Limited, 7475 Sherbrooke Street
West, Montreal, Que.: Architecture, art, business training, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, general education, mechanical
engineering, mining, railroading, domestic engineering, navigation, pulp and
paper making, textile-manufacturing, and other courses as listed in prospectus.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, 111.: Business
management, foremanship and production methods, higher accountancy (all
sections), stenographic-secretarial training, La Salle salesmanship, practical
accounting, traffic management, law, stenotypy (less machine), and other
courses as per prospectus.
National Schools, 4000 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles 37, Calif, (correspondence and resident training): Straight extension—radio, television, electronics
servicing and communications course, advanced television and industrial electronics course, consolidated training programme comprising Course No. 1 and
No. 2 in one master course, auto mechanics and diesel; combination courses—
radio, television, electronics servicing and communications course (Course
No. 1) with three months resident, consolidated training programme (Course
Nos. 1 and 2), auto mechanics and diesel (three months resident); resident
department—radio, television, and allied electronics, advanced television, automotive and allied mechanics, automotive, allied mechanics, and diesel.
Northwest Schools, 1221 North-west Twenty-first Avenue, Portland 9, Ore.: Radio
and television service and maintenance.
National Radio Institute, 3939 Wisconsin Avenue North-west, Washington 16,
D.C.: Radio servicing and communications, professional television servicing,
servicing electrical appliances.
Primary School of Drafting, 134 Combe Avenue, Downsview, Ont.: Engineering
draughting, blue-print reading for the mechanical trades, blue-print reading
for the building and construction trades.
Radio College of Canada, 86 Bathurst Street, Toronto 2b, Ont.: Radio-television-
electronic technology, communications, electrical technology.
Shaw Schools Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial business
courses, short-story writing, stationary engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Radio School Ltd., 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Radio
and television servicing.
Technical Training Institute, 5018 North-east Union Street, Portland 11, Ore.
(combined practical and correspondence instruction): Radio, television, and
electronics.
Television-Electronics Institute Ltd., 935a Weston Road, Toronto 9, Ont.: Television and radio service and repair, advanced television servicing course.
Tractor Training Service, 3339a Bloor Street West, Toronto 18, Ont.: Tractor and
equipment training. F 102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
M.C.C. Schools, 303 Mitchell-Copp Building, Winnipeg, Man.: Kindergarten,
commercial home study.
Utilities Engineering Institute, 2525 North Sheffield Avenue, Chicago 14, 111.:
Mechanical refrigeration, air-conditioning, refrigeration and heating, auto body
and fender and scientific motor tune-up, welding, diesel and scientific motor
tune-up.
Academy of Ballroom Dancing, 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.: Personal
development and modelling.
Autolec National Educational Master and Group Program, 1025 Howe Street,
Vancouver 1, B.C.:   Automotive electrical and carburettor service.
Barbara's School of Fashion Modelling, 652 Fisgard Street, Victoria, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
Barbara's School of Fashion Ltd., 2431 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
Barclay's Dance Studios Ltd., 720 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Professional dancing.
Bell-Parker Business College, 1574 West Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
B.C. School of Floral Design, 2523 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.:
Floristry.
B.C. Tree Fruits Ltd., Kelowna, B.C.:   Fruit-packing.
Carlyle Schools Ltd., 640 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Physicians' office
assistants.
Club, Cabaret and Construction Camp Culinary and Service Employees' Union,
Local No. 740, Bar-tending School, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3,
B.C.:  Bar-tending.
Chez Renee Modelling and Personal Development, 543 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Personal development and modelling.
The Comptometer School, 308 Randall Building, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:   Comptometer operation.
David's Academy of Advanced Hair Design, 627 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.:  Advanced hair styling, contest preparation.
Duffus School of Business Ltd., 522 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
Ella's Advanced Hairdressing School, 5685 West Boulevard, Vancouver 13, B.C.:
Advanced hairdressing (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers' Association certificate).
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Dressmaking,
designing and pattern-making, tailoring, millinery, leathercraft.
General Business School Limited, 602 Broughton Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Harold Giles Advanced Hair Design School, 3073 West Broadway, Vancouver 8,
B.C.: Advanced hairdressing (limited to persons holding a B.C. Hairdressers'
Association certificate).
Gondo's Sewing School, 779 Cadder Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Herbert Business College, 435 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Island School of,Hairdressing, 210 Third Avenue South, Port Alberni, B.C.: Hairdressing. TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE F 103
Institute of Electronic Technology, 2029 Ninth Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.:
Colour television.
Peter Johnson's Hair Styling for Men, 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.:  Barbering.
Kinman Business University, South 110 Howard Street, Spokane 4, Wash.: Business education, including accountancy and business administration, secretarial science, stenographic, office-machines training.
The Lorraine Marie Charm School, 3234 Patrick Street, South Burnaby, B.C.:
Personal development and modelling.
Lownds School of Commerce Limited, 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Marvelle Beauty School, Baker Street, Cranbrook, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 303 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 1104 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Moler School of Barbering, 615 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.:  Barbering.
Mount Royal College, 1135 Seventh Avenue, Calgary, Alta.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Arthur Murray School of Dancing, 166 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.:
Professional dancing.
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, 2904 Thirty-first Avenue, Vernon, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nanaimo School of Hairdressing, Suite 1, 195 Commercial Street, Nanaimo, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
National Charm and Modelling School, 1314 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Personal development and modelling.
Nelson Commercial Training School, 701 Front Street, Nelson, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster School of Hairdressing, 228 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
Olga's School of Hairdressing, 3205 Thirty-first Avenue, Vernon, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Penticton Business School, Suites 12, 18, 19, Craig Building, 221 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.:   Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College Ltd., 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw (Victoria) Business Institute Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Schools (Vancouver) Limited, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), radio and television servicing.
St. Ann's Convent, Nanaimo, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sun Electric Corporation Automotive Testing School, 9732 King George Highway,
North Surrey, B.C.:   Automotive testing.
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations.
Ruth Uecker Modelling and Charm School, 768 Granville Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.:  Personal development and modelling.
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.:
Stationary, marine, and diesel engineering. F 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Victoria Hairdressing School, 738 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Welding Construction School, 148 East First Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Welding.
Weldor Training Centre, 1368 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Welding.
Western Radio Academy, 2077 Comox Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Radio broadcasting, including voice production and reception on instruments.
Western Radio Electronic Television Schools Ltd., 1065 Howe Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.:   Radio, electronics, television, advanced electronics.
Western Radio Electronic Television Schools Ltd., 2014 Douglas Street, Victoria,
B.C.:   Radio, electronics, and television.
Western School of Commerce, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
It is worthy of note that the general public has become increasingly aware of the
fact that the Government requires the registration of correspondence and practical
courses offered in the Province. The number of inquiries regarding schools and courses
and the volume of correspondence in this connection has become large. The Better
Business Bureau has done much to inform inquirers about the function of our administration, and a great many persons have been referred to the office for information.
In conclusion, it should be reported that very few complaints were received concerning schools registered under the " Trade-schools Regulation Act " and that the complaints were satisfactorily adjudicated.
Victor S. Hurrell,
Administrative Officer.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1959
1,(.'60 958 6111
J

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