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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT for the YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST 1957 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1958

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
for the
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1957
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
• Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1957
is herewith respectfully submitted.
LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
February, 1958.
.
_____ The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Fortieth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1957.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1958. Department of Labour
OFFICIALS
Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. G. Murray, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. A. Little, Administrative Assistant, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. M. Purdie, Chief Inspector of Factories, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
E. L. Allen, Director of Apprenticeship, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
W. Fraser, Chief Conciliation Officer, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Francis C. Dickins, Compensation Counsellor, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Director, Equal Pay Act and Fair Employment Practices Act, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C. Court-house, Kelowna, B.C.
523 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C. P.O. Box 820, Terrace, B.C.
Court-house, Nanaimo, B.C. P.O. Box 1317, Cranbrook, B.C.
301, 1411 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C. Court-house, Nelson, B.C.
Goodchild Building, Mission City, B.C. P.O. Box 1032, Dawson Creek, B.C.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J. Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J. Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
N. deW. Lyons, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
z C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters:   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
W. H. Welsh, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. S. Beck, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
M. L. Barr, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOL REGULATIONS OFFICERS
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
Fraudena Eaton. E. L. Allen. Hamilton Crisford.
5 CC 6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
BRITISH COLUMBIA INDIAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Professor E. H. Morrow B.A., M.B.A., F.C.I., LL.D., Chairman, 2275 West Thirty-ninth Avenue,
Vancouver 13, B.C.
Chief William Scow, Vice-Chairman, Box 177, Alert Bay, B.C.
Edward Bolton, Member, Port Essington, B.C.
Capt. Charles W. Cates, Member, 266 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver, B.C.
Mrs. J. O. Decker, Member, Pemberton, B.C.
L. P. Guichon, D.Sc, Member, Quilchena, B.C*
Miss J. R. Wright, Director, Indian Advisory Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Summary of Contents
List of Acts Affecting Labour	
Board of Industrial Relations	
Meetings and Delegations	
Page
Inside front cover
Orders and Regulations Made during 1957_
Investigations and Wage Adjustments	
Court Cases 	
Special Licences	
Conclusion 	
"Labour Relations Act"—Report of Labour Relations Branch
Summary of Cases Dealt With, 1952-57_
Analysis of Disputes Before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause-
Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1957.
Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1939-57.
Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1957_
Legal Proceedings Involving Labour Relations Board
Control of Employment of Children	
" Equal Pay Act"	
"Fair Employment Practices Act".
Inspection of Factories	
Factories 	
Industrial Homework
Elevators 	
Elevator Inspections 	
New Elevator Installations	
Elevator Operators' Licences-
Factory Inspections	
Conclusion 	
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch
Trade-schools Regulation Branch.
9
9
10
11
11
12
12
13
15
15
17
20
20
20
22
23
24
25
25
25
25
26
26
26
26
26  Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Members of the Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands, Deputy
Minister of Labour
Members:
Fraudena Eaton -
G. A. Little -
H. J. Young -
C. Murdoch -
P. Baskin
D. J. Baldwin
Secretary:
C. R. Margison _ -
Head office -
Branch office
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
- Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Offices
- Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Regional offices:
Court-house, Nanaimo.
Court-house, Kelowna.
Court-house, Nelson.
523 Columbia St., Kamloops.
Department of Labour, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Terrace.
Department of Labour, Cranbrook.
Department of Labour, Mission.
Department of Labour, Dawson Creek.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the twenty-fourth annual report of the Board
of Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1957.
Meetings and Delegations
During the year the Board held fifty-four meetings, fifty-two of which were held in
the City of Vancouver and two in the City of Victoria.
Public hearings were held by the Board in Vancouver, B.C., in connection with the
revision of Minimum Wage Orders applying to employees in the hotel and catering
industry, janitors and janitresses in apartment buildings and other buildings, truck-drivers,
and barbers.
Following numerous requests from trade-unions representing employees in the construction industry, the Honourable the Minister directed the Board to hold an inquiry,
or such inquiries as it deemed necessary, to investigate the merits of establishing a stamp
system applicable to employers and employees in the construction industry for the
accumulation of holiday credits. The Board held hearings in Vancouver and Victoria,
B.C., to hear representations with respect to this matter. CC 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Orders and Regulations Made during 1957
Minimum Wage Orders
1. Hotel and Catering Industry—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52
(1957).—Following a public hearing the Board increased the minimum wage applicable
to employees in this industry from 55 to 65 cents per hour.
2. Bus Operators—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 17 (1957).—
After considering oral and written representations submitted by interested parties at a
public hearing, and after permitting representatives of employers and employees in the
industry to comment on several recommendations of the Board, Order No. 17 (1957)
went into effect on May 6th, 1957. This Order is Province-wide in application, and
supersedes two Orders of the Board which had effect only in the City of Vancouver and
Vancouver Island. It establishes a minimum wage of $1 per hour for employees in this
classification. Bus operators " while engaged transporting persons to and from schools
and churches exclusively " are not subject to the Order while so employed.
3. Occupation of Janitor—Male and Female Minimum Order No. 43 (1957).—
This Order consolidates Orders Nos. 43 (1952) and 44 (1950), and increases the minimum wage for janitors from 50 to 75 cents per hour, and for resident janitors from a
range of $39 to $197 per month to a range of $50 to $265 per month. The definition of
" janitor " is broadened to include the occupation of window-cleaner.
4. Occupation of Barbering—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 42
(1957).—Following representations from the lourneymen Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors' International Union of America and the Barbers' Association of British Columbia, the minimum wage for employees in this occupation was
increased to $50 per week for full-time employees and to $1.25 per hour for part-time
employees.   The Order was also made applicable to female employees.
Regulations Made pursuant to the " Hours of Work Act "
Regulation No. 44 (1957).—This regulation exempts from the operation of the
" Hours of Work Act" any employee who is entitled to practise a profession or calling
under the "Architectural Profession Act," " Chartered Accountants Act," " Chiropody
Act," " Chiropractic Act," " Dentistry Act," " Engineering Profession Act, 1955," " Insurance Act," "Land Surveyors Act," "Legal Professions Act, 1955," "Medical Act,"
" Naturopathic Physicians Act," " Optometry Act," " Real-estate Agents' Licensing Act,"
" Securities Act," or " Veterinary Act," and who as such employee is engaged in the
practice of such profession or calling. Enrolled students under any of the aforementioned
Acts are also exempt- This regulation is complementary to Regulation No. 5 made under
the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts.
Regulation No. 21 (1957)—Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—This regulation
exempted the industry from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" for the period
June 1st, 1957, to November 30th, 1957, inclusive.
Christmas Regulation.—This regulation permitted employees in retail establishments in the mercantile industry to work up to ten hours in the day on any two days
during the two-week period ended December 28th, 1957.
Regulation Made pursuant to the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts
Regulation No. 5.—For the purpose of the efficient administration of the " Male
Minimum Wage Act " and the " Female Minimum Wage Act," the Board has exempted
from the operation of the said Acts any employee who is entitled to practise a profession
or calling under the "Architectural Profession Act," " Chartered Accountants Act,"
" Chiropody Act," " Chiropractic Act," " Dentistry Act," " Engineering Profession Act,
1955," "Insurance Act," "Land Surveyors Act," "Legal Professions Act, 1955,"
" Medical Act," " Naturopathic Physicians Act," " Optometry Act," " Real-estate Agents' BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
CC 11
Licensing Act," " Securities Act," or " Veterinary Act," and who as such employee is
engaged in the practice of such profession or calling. Enrolled students under any of the
aforementioned Acts are also exempt. This regulation is complementary to Regulation
No. 44 (1957) made under the " Hours of Work Act."
(A summary of the above-mentioned orders and regulations, together with existing
and new orders and regulations may be obtained from the Department of Labour free of
charge upon request.)
Investigations and Wage Adjustments
During the year 1957 the Industrial Relations Officers of the Department made
20,186 investigations, and through the efforts of the Department and the co-operation
of the employers, adjustments made during 1957 amounted to $123,185.65. Department
cars travelled 148,450 miles in connection with the administration of the legislation.
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Department, it may be
presumed that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation administered by this Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the following
table:—
Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
17,413
20
71
148
$10,194.54
123
208
$4,332.57
694
1,911
$17,540.88
16,542
20
36
76
$2,074.92
52
68
$1,246.08
500
1,470
$14,817.02
18,860
22
70
298
$9,911.02
19
56
$841.34
529
1,242
$16,270.82
18,670
21
78
441
$11,178.85
11
27
$549.56
453
1,129
$11,361.02
18,332
22
123
648
$17,813.00
32
168
$2,121.02
480
1,210
$15,175.20
20,186
Number of Industrial Relations Officers1	
" Male Minimum Wage Act "—
24
158
Employees affected-    	
560
$26,628.85
" Female Minimum Wage Act "—
48
151
$2,933.92
"Annual Holidays Act "—
541
Employees affected .._„    j	
1,221
$22,033.20
$32,067.99
$18,138.06
$27,023.18
$23,089.43
$35,109.22
$51,595.972
1 Average.
2 In addition to the adjustments made under the Minimum Wage and Holidays Acts, 642 firms paid 1,103 employees
$71,589.68 under the provisions of the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Total adjustments for 1957 were
therefore $123,185.65.   Total adjustments for 1956 were $100,162.06.
Court Cases
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the matter of compliance
with the provisions of the orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to resort
to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained.
A summary of Court cases during the year 1957 follows:—
Court Cases for the Year 1957
Name of Act
Number of
Employers
Charges
Convictions
Charges Dismissed or
Withdrawn
8
4
5
30
22
15
16
85
16
15
11
71
Totals   	
47
138
113 CC 12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Special Licences
Provision is made in a few of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale of
wages to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in writing have been
obtained from the Board. The following table shows the number of licences issued in
the various lines of work in 1954, 1955, 1956, and 1957:—
1954
1955
1956
1957
12
2
66
2
2
1
2
61
2
2
16
1
89
49
21
Office   _ _	
106
Practical nurse (students)       -   .   _.
75
40
Totals
85
67
155
242
During the year 1957 one part-time employment permit was issued.
Conclusion
At this time the Board would like to acknowledge its appreciation of the co-operation extended during the year 1957 to its officials in the administration of the various
labour laws by the employers, trade-unions, and employees of the Province.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.
Fraudena Eaton.
G. A. Little.
H. J. Young.
C. Murdoch.
P. Baskin.
D. J. Baldwin. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
CC 13
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Personnel
Labour
Relations
Branch
Chief Executive Officer:
B. H. E. Goult -
Chief Conciliation Officer:
William Fraser
Conciliation Officers:
R. G. Clements,
Robert Forgie,
George Carmichael,
J. A. Laffling,
E. P. Fisher
Iohn Sherlock -
W. T. McLaughlin   -
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Court-house, Kelowna.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Labour Chairman:
Relations W. H. Sands      -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Board ,.     ,
Members:
Mrs. Fraudena Eaton    ... Dollarton.
D. J. Baldwin    ----- Vancouver.
Penrod Baskin ----- Dollarton.
G. A. Little      ----- Vancouver.
Charles Murdoch   - Vancouver.
H. J. Young      - Vancouver.
Registrar:
N. deW. Lyons -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Assistant Registrar:
David Coton     -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Secretary:
C. R. Margison -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the annual report of the Labour Relations Branch
for the year ended December 31st, 1957.
More business was dealt with in 1957 than in any year in the history of the Branch.
The Labour Relations Board met during the year on fifty-five occasions, authorized
the issuance of 573 certificates, and rejected 128 applications for certification. Forty-six
applications were withdrawn.
The Board entertained forty-four applications for decertification. Fifteen were
rejected and twenty-nine authorized.
Administrative personnel conducted thirty-five representation votes.
The Board granted applicants permission to prosecute on forty-seven occasions. CC 14 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
There were 367 disputes referred to Conciliation Officers during the year. Forty-
four cases, unterminated on December 31st, 1956, were carried over from the preceding
year.
Settlements by Conciliation Officers
Of these, Conciliation Officers settled 173. One hundred and seventy cases were
referred to Conciliation Boards. In two cases the appointments of the Conciliation
Officers were cancelled, and in twenty-one cases Conciliation Officers did not recommend
Conciliation Boards. In one instance the dispute was settled before the Board was appointed; one application was withdrawn; and in one instance the proceedings were terminated by the parties.   There were forty-two cases unterminated at the year's end.
In accordance with the provisions of the " Labour Relations Act," chairmen were
named by the Minister for 121 Conciliation Boards. The nominees of the disputant
parties selected chairmen on forty-three occasions.
Of the 170 cases referred to Conciliation Boards during the year, 163 were appointed as the result of recommendations of Conciliation Officers. One Board was
appointed without prior reference to a Conciliation Officer. In the remaining six cases,
Boards had been recommended but not appointed at December 31st, 1957.
Administrative personnel supervised 458 strike votes.
Arbitration Boards
On the joint application of both parties, in cases where grievance procedure under
collective agreements had been invoked, chairmen were named to twenty-one Arbitration Boards.
B. H. E. Goult,
Chief Executive Officer, Labour
Relations Branch.
Analysis of Certificates Issued in 1957
Total Number
of Employees
Affected by
Number of Certificates
Industry or Occupation Certificates Issued
Construction   194 2,256
Logging  27 485
Manufacturing   123 2,974
Transportation and warehousing  43 315
Hotel, restaurant, and catering  27 690
Mercantile  42 464
Office employees  11 230
Civic administration  13 229
Automotive   11 229
Hospitals  6 171
Food-processing  22 417
Miscellaneous  11 86
Printing trades  13 494
Building maintenance  3 9
Mining1  23 700
Laundry   4 40
.  .
Totals  573 9,789
Includes diamond drilling. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
Summary of Cases Dealt With, 1952-57
CC 15
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
640
93
83
467
119
78
467
133
47
486
180
40
493
119
51
573
Applications—
128
46
Total number of applications for certification dealt
816
14
53
664
36
48
667
44
49
706
15
40
663
16
30
747
47
Representation votes conducted— 	
35
Totals 	
883
748
760
761
709
829
414
176
3
229
343
129
6
221
2
333
103
6
75
268
91
2
61
333
116
6
76
1
367
164
3
458
Totals	
882
701
517
422
532
992
Summary of Cases Dealt With in 1957, Showing
Comparison for 1956
1956 1957
  493 573
  119 128
Withdrawn      51 46
Certificates granted
Applications—
Rejected 	
1956
1957
Number of applications for certification dealt with 663
Permission to prosecute granted  16
Representation votes conducted  30
Conciliation Officers appointed  333
Conciliation Boards established  116
Grievance procedure provided  6
Strike votes supervised  76
Industrial Inquiry Commissioners appointed  1
Totals.
1,241
747
47
35
367
164
3
458
1,821
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards Appointed
During 1957, by Predominant Cause
Wages and other causes  98
Wages only  18
All terms of collective agreement  36
Hours of work and other causes  9
Union security and other causes  3
Total.
164
Strikes and Lockouts in British Columbia, 1957
A lockout or an industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout is rarely encountered, and lockouts and strikes are therefore recorded together in the statistical tables.
The term " dispute " refers to either strike or lockout. CC 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The figures shown are inclusive of all industrial disputes which have come to the
attention of the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude
the possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time-loss are computed by multiplying the number of days a stoppage
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
Disputes are listed by industrial classifications and in order of their date of commencement. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
CC  17
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.'     ■- ' CC 20 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1939—57
Year
Total Paid
Workers in
B.C. Labour
Force1
Number of
Disputes
Beginning
during
Year2
Number of
Disputes
during
Year
Number of
Employers
Affected
Number of
Employees
Affected
Time-loss
in
Working-
days
Time-loss as
Percentage
of Estimated
Total
Working-
time of Wage
and Salary
Earners8
1939 _.__
1940 	
1941
194?
180,000
187,000
218,000
265,000
304,000
298,000
282,000
322,000
334,000
338,000
340,000
335,000
341,000
356,000
356,000
351,000
368,000
392,000
402,000*
4
1
7
50
24
15
15
21
25
8
9
22
26
35
34
21
23
34
35
4
2
8
50
43
15
18
21
25
10
11
23
26
36
36
24
24
35
35
4
2
8
82
43
15
18
524
65
63
44
46
120
381
113
119
63
69
98
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
6,386
3,216
3,007
13,579
3,326
46,806
8,207
12,622
3,695
3,197
13,803
8,510
7,594
35,024
75,129
4,510
69,595
1,294,202
153,168
106,230
31,692
105,792
74,722
1,234,120
260,335
140,958
44,020
39,211
0.028
0.016
0.012
0.046
1943   .
1944
0.088
0.006
1945.
1946
1947
1948. .
1949. .   __
1950        	
1951             	
105?
0.093
1.870
0.202
0.138
0.042
0.138
0.093
1.496
1953     .       ...
1954
1955   .
1956
0.314
0.172
0.051
0.043
1957 	
8,914
225,869E
0.241
1 Does not include persons without jobs; persons who operated their own business, farm, or profession; or persons
who worked without pay on a farm or in a business owned and operated by a member of the household to whom they
were related.
2 In this table, figures for disputes extending over the year are counted more than once.
3 Figures in this column revised in 1953 as a result of revised estimates of total working-time of wage and salary
earners.
4 Estimate only.
6 Does not include five disputes not within scope of " Labour Relations Act " (see table on " Industrial Disputes in
British Columbia, 1957," ante).
Source: British Columbia Department of Labour Annual Reports. Working-force data obtained from reports of the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, by Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1957
1
Industry or Occupation
Number of
Disputes
Number Involved
Time-loss in
Man Working-
days
Employers
Workers
10
1
15
1
3
4
1
52
1
24
1
15
4
1
1,773
130
6,687
36
187
73
28
7,877
1,040
208,621
1,260
Service  	
1,419
5,372
280
Total s
35
98
8,914
225,869
1 Does not include five disputes not within scope of " Labour Relations Act'
British Columbia, 1957," ante).
(see table on " Industrial Disputes in
Legal Proceedings Involving the Labour Relations Board
Traders' Service Limited vs. Labour Relations Board (Retail, Wholesale
and Department Store Union, No. 580)
On November 6th, 1957, the Labour Relations Board certified the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, No. 580, for employees employed in the distributing
warehouse at 343 Railway Street, Vancouver, by Traders' Service Limited. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
CC 21
Application was made by the company for a writ of certiorari to set aside the Order
of the Board and the certificate of bargaining authority issued pursuant thereto. The
applicant claimed, inter alia, that the Board had declined jurisdiction in that it failed to
give all interested parties adequate chance to present evidence and make representation.
The case came on for hearing before Mr. Justice Mclnnes of the Supreme Court of
British Columbia, who found for the applicant, and set the Order of the Board aside.
An appeal by the Board to the Court of Appeal was dismissed.
An application has been made by the Board for consent to appeal to the Supreme
Court of Canada.
The Canada Rice Mills Employees' Association vs. Labour Relations Board
(Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, No. 580)
On June 28th, 1957, Mr. Justice Manson granted an order in favour of the applicant, The Canada Rice Mills Employees' Association, of Vancouver, requiring the Labour
Relations Board to show cause why a writ of certiorari should not issue prohibiting the
Board from dealing in any manner with the application for certification made by the
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, No. 580, to be certified as bargaining
authority for the employees of The Canada Rice Mills.
The matter came before Mr. Justice Mclnnes in August, to determine whether or
not the prohibition requested should be issued.
Counsel for the Board areued that because material information had not been disclosed, or alternatively withheld from Mr. Justice Manson at the time he granted his
order of June 28, 1957, that the prohibition should be refused.
His lordship gave effect to the objection raised by the Board, and dismissed the
application with costs. The dismissal, however, was without prejudice to the right of the
applicant to bring a further application based upon proper material.
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local No. 1661, vs. Labour
Relations Board (Aluminum Company of Canada Limited, Kitimat)
On July 11th, 1956, the Labour Relations Board ruled or decided that the application of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local No. 1661, to be certified for certain employees of the Aluminum Company of Canada Limited at Kitimat
and Kemano be rejected for the reason that the unit is not appropriate for collective
bargaining.
The union applied to the Supreme Court of British Columbia to have the decision
of the Board quashed. It was claimed that the Board acted without jurisdiction, or in
excess of its jurisdiction, in ruling that the unit applied for was not appropriate for collective bargaining.
On April 4th, 1957, Mr. Justice Lett, in denying the application, found that the
applicant had not established that the Board acted without jurisdiction, or in excess of
its jurisdiction, or was influenced by some extraneous consideration which would render
its decision invalid in law, nor had it been shown that its decision was made arbitrarily
or capriciously.
Applications to Prosecute
The Board considered applications for permission to prosecute sixty-nine charges.
It granted forty-seven and rejected twenty-two. CC 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Control of Employment of Children
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour or a
person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of children under
15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is prohibited by the
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
In order that the health and scholastic standing of the children will not be adversely
affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in close co-operation with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the children. Permits
are issued only when it has been established that the child's health will not suffer, and
that the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere with their
standing at school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for which
permits are required; these include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
(12) Laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry (added August 26th, 1955).
The following table contains a summary of permits issued from January 1st to
December 31st, 1957, inclusive:—
Summary of Permits Issued for Year 1957
District
Vancouver
Victoria
Cranbrook
Kamloops
Kelowna
Mission
City
Prince
George
Terrace
Total
Boys                             	
Girls             .   ._	
133
31
61
14
....
4
4
4
4
1
4
6
2
4
4
218
63
Totals                .   .
164
75
5
8
8
5
8
8
281
15
2
18
21
104
3
1
4
12
21
34
3
1
2
1
2
1
3
3
1
1
5
2
1
3
i
1
1
5
1
....
-_
5
1
2
27
3
2
40
42
154
8
Transportation
3
1
1
164
75
5
8
8
5
8
8
281 " EQUAL PAY ACT "
CC 23
«
Equal Pay Act"
This Act, which was proclaimed December 31st, 1953, prohibits discrimination
between male and female employees with respect to rates of pay under certain
circumstances.
Section 4 of the Act provides that the Minister of Labour may, on the recommendation of the Director, designate an Industrial Relations Officer to inquire into the
complaint of a person that she has been discriminated against in that she has been paid
at a rate of pay less than that paid to a male employee employed by her employer for
the same work done in the same establishment.
Only one complaint was received by the Director during the year 1957. It was
found that the complaint was not justified because the difference in the rate of pay
between the male and the female employees was based on a factor other than sex.
Summary of Proceedings under the " Equal Pay Act "
during T954, 1955, 1956, and 1957
1954
1955
1956
1957
C.
E.I.
C.
E.I.
C.
E.I.
C.
E.I.
271
25
8
17
1
5
3
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
5
5
5
1
1
1
1
Complaints referred to Industrial Rela-
Complaints  settled  by  Industrial Rela-
1
1 In the case of one complaint the Act did not apply.
C.=CompIaints. E.I._=Employers involved. CC 24 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"Fair Employment Practices Act
tt
This Act is to prevent discrimination in regard to employment and membership in
trade-unions by reason of race, religion, colour, nationality, ancestry, or place of origin.
The use or circulation of application for employment forms or advertisements in connection with employment which express directly or indirectly any limitation or preference as to the race, etc., of any person is prohibited, unless the preference or limitation
is based upon a bona fide occupational qualification.
The Act does not apply to an employer who employs less than five employees, or
to any exclusively charitable, philanthropic, educational, fraternal, religious, or social
organization that is not operated for profit, or to any organization that is operated primarily to foster the welfare of a religious or racial group and is not operated for profit.
Institutions operating under the provisions of the " Public Schools Act" are, however,
subject to the legislation.
During 1957 twelve complaints regarding employment applications and advertisements were investigated, and five complaints in connection with alleged discrimination
in employment practices were processed. All of the complaints were satisfactorily settled
with the assistance of an Industrial Relations Officer.
The nature of the legislation is such that persuasion and education are more desirable than compulsion. It is therefore gratifying to record the co-operation that employers, newspapers, and individuals have extended to officials of this Department in order
to correct unintentional violations of the Act, which in all cases resulted from lack of
familiarity with the requirements of the Statute. INSPECTION OF FACTORIES CC 25
Report of the Factories Inspection Branch
Administrative office    -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Robert M. Purdie     -■■-_.■-     Chief Inspector of Factories.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection
Branch for the year 1957.
Factories
Early in 1957 a situation developed in the Province which caused much time and
effort to be spent on the part of the Inspectors to correct and finalize. A number of
firms started selling sewing-machines and knitting-machines under a system that was a
direct contravention of the section of the " Factories Act" pertaining to homework.
A very thorough investigation had to be made and numerous directives issued before
this matter was finally cleared up in a satisfactory manner without legal action being
necessary.
Factory construction, though at a lesser pace, continued throughout the Province,
and many new plans were examined. It is gratifying to the Branch to note that engineers
and architects are becoming more conversant with factory standards, and very few corrections are necessary in the plans submitted.
Factory-inspection work increased so much during the last few years that it was
necessary to add to this part of the staff to keep up with the expanding field and thus
provide adequate service to the public in general.
Industrial Homework
As no permits were issued in connection with sewing- and knitting-machine sales,
the number of permits authorizing industrial homework remained approximately the same
as the previous year.
Elevators
Steady expansion continued in the elevator field, with new installations predominating. The instalment and modernization of old equipment continues throughout the
Province. The trend now is to operatorless passenger-elevators, and many installations
that were thought to be the latest in elevator equipment are now being converted to full
automatic operation.
For some years it has been considered desirable to have a universal code pertaining
to elevating equipment which would be acceptable to all Provinces, and with this in view
a special committee has been rewriting the C.S.A. B.44 Elevator Safety Code.
A meeting of this committee was held in Winnipeg from November 18th to November 22nd to review the last sections of the proposed code. Those attending were W. G.
Ferrier, Chief Engineer, Otis Elevator Company; F. S. Harwood, Chief Engineer and
Vice-President, Turnbull Elevator Company; J. D. Whiteley, Chief Inspector of Factories, Nova Scotia; F. Roy, Elevator Inspector, Quebec; F. W. Ehmke, Chief Elevator
Inspector, Ontario; M. Del Begio, Chief Inspector of Labour, Manitoba; J. Taylor,
Chief Inspector of Labour, Saskatchewan; W. E. Sutton, Chief Inspector of Factories,
Alberta; W. Collins, Chief Inspector of Elevators, City of Toronto; and R. Purdie, Chief
Inspector of Factories for British Columbia. CC 26 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Considerable progress has been made by this committee in the matter of consolidating a workable safety code acceptable to all the Provinces and in the matter of establishing uniformity in the reporting of accidents by the adoption of a revised accident
report form.
On March 13th, 1957, a regrettable fatal accident occurred in a building owned
and operated by the Federal Government. This building and elevator equipment does
not come under the jurisdiction of this Department. We are again pleased to report
that no fatal or serious accident pertaining to elevator equipment under our jurisdiction
was recorded in the Province during the past year.
Elevator Inspections
Passenger-elevators   706
Escalators  53
Freight-elevators   775
Hand-power elevators  70
Dumb-waiters  204
Man-lifts   44
Reinspections  220
Total   2,072
New Elevator Installations
Plans Received
Passenger-elevators   60
Freight-elevators   22
Dumb-waiters  22
Escalators 1      	
Total :      104
Of- the above, eight were replacements.
Elevator Operators' Licences
Temporary      429
Permanent ■__._     327
Renewals  1,193
Total  1,949
Factory Inspections
Factory inspections totalled 1,400, child employment investigations 2, and office
and field interviews 250.
Conclusion
We take this opportunity to acknowledge the assistance given our Branch by other
Governmental departments and the continued co-operation of members of the staff.
Also, we wish to thank all officials and employees connected with industry for their cooperation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. M. Purdie,
Chief Inspector of Factories. Edmund L. Allen     -
Victor S. Hurrell   ...     -
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Director of Apprenticeship.
Assistant Director of Apprenticeship.
APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH CC 27
Report of the Apprenticeship and
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch
Head office     -----      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.   _..
Branch office  -      Department of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
Hamilton Crisford   -      -      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Members:
M. Lyle Barr     - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. S. Beck    - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
T. McGibbon      -      -      -      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J. Tucker (retired during the year)
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W. H. Welsh       -      -      -      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Officials of the Branch
Sir,—I am pleased to tender this report of the activities of the Apprenticeship and
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1957.
Apprentices in Training
On December 31st, 1957, the number of apprentices registered with the Branch was
2,753, an increase of 17.8 per cent. It is worthy of note that 994 new apprenticeships
were registered during the year and that 387 persons completed training.
The following table records the distribution of apprentices by trades and term of
apprenticeship:— CC 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Term
in
Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Complete
in
Trade or Occupation
First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Prob.
Reg.
1957
4
2
4
4
4
2
4-5
3
4
2
5
3
2-6
5
4
4
3
5
4
4
4
5
4
4
4
2
100
25
9
70
14
157
4
4
37
1
4
21
1
2
5
1
14
48
1
37
6
3
4
16
1
108
51
10
3
66
122
2
31
2
9
15
45
3
13
8
3
8
68
3
48
19
5
34
19
9
81
9
3
97
61
8
4
20
1
3
3
56
2
5
12
1
9
80
1
39
8
3
16
18
9
93
7
4
98
44
1
1
1
15
3
29
3
7
6
1
24
58
7
32
11
2
5
2
75
4
9
81
54
3
1
1
49
3
2
2
13
56
3
14
6
6
2
6
1
32
2
36
457
76
30
28
412
14
444
13
14
88
6
31
23
232
12
29
31
10
68
310
15
206
50
13
65
53
23
59
59
8
4
47
Cooking.. ..	
36
22
Lathing 	
Lithography ~   .
8
6
31
Moulding      	
1
3
4
2
9
43
Refrigeration 	
1
21
7
3
10
Structural-iron workers
3
Totals	
585
704
549
454
384
77
2,753
387
Geographically, contracts of apprenticeship were registered for employers in the
following locations in the Province: Abbotsford, Agassiz, Alberni, Aldergrove, Armstrong, Burns Lake, Campbell River, Canoe, Castlegar, Chemainus, Chilliwack, Clover-
dale, Cobble Hill, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Creston, Dawson Creek, Duncan, Essondale,
Fernie, Fort St. John, Fruitvale, Gibsons, Glenlake, Grand Forks, Grindrod, Hammond,
Haney, Hope, Invermere, loco, Kamloops, Kelowna, Kimberley, Kitimat, Langford,
Ladner, Langley Prairie, Lillooet, Mission, Murrayville, Nanaimo, Nelson, Penticton,
Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Mellon, Powell River, Prince George, Prince Rupert,
Princeton, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Sardis, Savona, Sechelt, Shaw-
nigan Lake, Sidney, Smithers, Spillimacheen, Squamish, Terrace, Sullivan Station, Tofino,
Trail, Union Bay, Vanderhoof, Vernon, Westview, Westholme, West Summerland, White
Rock, Wildwood, Yarrow.
Apprenticeship Technical Training
To supplement the practical training provided on the job by employers, our programme of apprenticeship class instruction continued. The amount and scope of this
training was expanded in an effort to keep abreast of the needs of the trades.
Training needs expanded to such an extent that the facilities of the local School
Boards were overtaxed, particularly in Vancouver and Victoria, where classes were held
in several different schools. It was necessary to house a considerable amount of training
temporarily in quarters rented from the Pacific National Exhibition Board. These quarters, while the best available additional space, are not altogether satisfactory in nature
and inadequate in size to properly accommodate the classes. APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH CC 29
A total of 247 separate evening classes were conducted in Kitimat, Trail, Nanaimo,
Victoria, and Vancouver and provided a total of 137,724 student-hours of instruction
to apprentices employed in those areas. This is nearly one-third more evening instruction than was provided last year.
Daytime apprenticeship classes were set up primarily for two categories. The first
accommodated apprentices from areas in which no suitable evening classes were available. These apprentices were brought to one of the training centres for basic periods of
from four to eight weeks to receive instruction in trade theory and practice. The second
category was for trades in which evening classes are not suitable because the manual
nature of the instruction requires longer class sessions. In this category we had classes
for bricklaying, lathing, painting, and plastering. Apprentices from the whole Province
were included in this group. Daytime training classes were conducted at Nanaimo, Victoria, and Vancouver and provided a total of 149,537 student-hours of instruction to
745 apprentices. This is about two and one-third times last year's figure, and it is of
interest to note that this is the first year that the amount of daytime instruction exceeded
the evening instruction.
School training for apprentices was supplied as a Government service, with no financial charge to apprentices and employers. The apprentices who attended daytime classes
and as a consequence were required to be away from work received a subsistence allowance to help maintain them in room and board. Married apprentices were given an
allowance of $74 a month. Unmarried apprentices residing and employed away from
the training city received $56 a month, while those whose residence was in the training
city received $40 a month. Return transportation payment was made to those who had
to leave home to attend school.
Pre-apprenticeship Training Classes
The activities of the Branch this year were marked by the inception of several pre-
apprenticeship classes. This programme provides school trade instruction to selected
boys for a period of about five months before they enter employment in the trade as
apprentices. Students from these classes will be of initial value to employers and, with
continuing annual training periods, are expected to become competent journeymen more
rapidly and eventually to be superior tradesmen. These students receive a subsistence
allowance on the same basis as apprentices and are not charged for their tuition.
The pre-apprenticeship courses started actual operation late in the year, and no
classes have graduated yet. Classes are being conducted for the trades of automotive
mechanic, bricklaying, carpentry, boat-building, lathing, plastering, plumbing and steam-
fitting, and sheet-metal work. The classes are held in Vancouver for all these trades
except automotive, which is at Nanaimo.
Development of Courses of Training
A great deal of progress was made during the year on the preparation of new courses
of training and the revision of existing courses. In this connection it is pointed out that
in the early stages of Government-sponsored apprenticeship the number of students and
classes was small, and consequently only a few instructors were needed and these men
were usually available each year. Under those conditions, outlines of courses were drawn
up by the instructors, and in many instances were not committed to paper in a very satisfactory form.
As the programme expanded and the number of classes increased, the turnover in
the large number of instructors became a definite problem, and so steps were taken to
set down course outlines in a proper form. Because of the large expansion in the technical training introduced this year, this work was accelerated. CC 30 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
During this year experienced tradesmen were hired to draw up courses of training
for their trades. The courses were then referred to trade committees for addition, deletion, or rearrangement of the subject-matter. Courses have been completed for automotive mechanics, bricklaying, lathing, machinist, arc welding, and wooden-boat building.
Work is proceeding on courses for other trades, notably acetylene welding, benchwork
and joinery, carpentry, electrical work, sheet metal, pipe-fitting, and steel fabrication.
Qualification of Tradesmen
Preparation of examinations for the refrigeration trade continued, and examinations
were held for twenty-seven men. Twenty-three certificates of proficiency were issued
for the refrigeration trade.
Examinations for the electronics trade were not conducted this year. A great deal
of progress has been made toward eventual examination, but final arrangements will
depend upon suitable training and examining facilities becoming available. Further,
experience gathered in examining the refrigeration tradesmen, which was our first experience in this fine, prompted some changes in the approach to the matter.
Examinations have not yet been established for the automotive trade, but the preparation of an over-all course of study for automotive mechanics has brought the situation much closer to realization.
■■
Committee Meetings
The Provincial Apprenticeship Committee held seven meetings during the year and
approved 994 new contracts of apprenticeship. The Committee also gave consideration
to and recommended the issuing of certificates to persons who completed their training,
transfer of apprentices between employers, extension and cancellation of apprenticeship
contracts.
The Chairman of the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee held a public hearing
which was widely publicized in advance. Representation was invited from individuals
and organizations. More than sixty persons, representing employers and employees,
attended the hearing. Fifteen organizations submitted written briefs, and nine of those
offered additional oral comment at the hearing. In addition, there were twenty-four oral
presentations. Following formal presentation of the briefs, a general discussion was
held, which indicated general agreement on many points.
Representation was made concerning expanding the training programme, increasing
the technical training facilities, enlarging the counselling staff of the Branch, instituting
pre-apprenticeship training, revising the minimum-wage schedules for apprentices, subsistence allowance rates, and other matters relating to apprenticeship.
After the public hearing all material submitted was carefully considered by the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee and recommendations referred to the Honourable the
Minister of Labour.
The Director and members of the staff met with Trade Advisory Committees
throughout the year to discuss the operation of training programmes for various trades.
In this connection, appreciation is expressed for the voluntary effort of the members
from employers and employee groups during the meetings and at home in checking and
amending courses of study.
Conclusion
It is with regret that I report the retirement of Mr. John Tucker from the Committee after many years of devoted service to the welfare of apprenticeship. His activities were not confined to the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, but for many years APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH
CC 31
extended to apprenticeship training in industry.    He has been an active chairman of
the Construction Trades Advisory Committee, an activity which he is continuing.
I am pleased to report the appointment of Mr. M. Lyle Barr to the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee. Mr. Barr, a past president of the Building and Construction
Industries Exchange, is managing director of a large plumbing and steam-fitting firm and
has long been an active advocate of apprenticeship training in British Columbia.
In concluding this report, I wish to commend the trade-unions, employers, and local
School Boards and Department of Education officials who co-operated with us in our
training programme. Their support did much to ease the burden through a very active
year.
Edmund L. Allen,
Director of Apprenticeship.
..   ...
'■'''.. .    ■•■■
.
-
_
..
'    .
■ CC 32 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the
Trade-schools Regulation Branch
Administrative offices   -   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Officers
Hamilton Crisford.      Mrs. Rex Eaton.      Edmund L. Allen.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch
for the calendar year 1957.
The majority of schools were contacted this year and made conversant with our
Act and regulations, and the number of complaints dealt with was small.
The following is the list of registered schools:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Modern
business course, special elective course.
American School of Correspondence, Drexel Avenue at East Fifty-eighth Street,
Chicago 37, 111.: Engineering and commerce subjects as covered by the school
bulletin.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.: Civil, mechanical, electrical, radio, and aeronautical engineering, and other groups as per school bulletin " Engineering Opportunities."
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 Sixteenth Street North-west, Washington 5, D.C.:   Radio-electronic engineering.
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second
Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.: Diesel and auto mechanics, refrigeration and air-
conditioning, oxy-acetylene and electric welding.
School of Creative Photography Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second Avenue,
Edmonton, Alta.:  Photography.
Columbia Business Institute, 617 Dekum Building, 519 South-west Third Avenue,
Portland 4, Ore.:  Railroad telegraphy.
DeVry Technical Institute, Inc., 4141 Belmont Avenue, Chicago 41, 111.: Television,
radio, and electronic training.
Greer Shop Training, Inc., 2230 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111.: Diesel
engines, welding.
Institute of Commercial Art (Famous Artists School), 106 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.:  Commercial art.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian Limited, 7475 Sherbrooke Street
West, Montreal, Que.: Art, architecture, business training, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, general education, mechanical
engineering, mining, railroading, domestic engineering, navigation, pulp and
paper making, textile-manufacture, and other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
111.: Accountancy.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, 111.: Business
management, higher accountancy, La Salle salesmanship, practical book-keeping, traffic management, law, stenotypy (less machine), foremanship and
production methods, industrial management, stenographic-secretarial training,
and other courses as per prospectus. TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH
CC 33
M.C.C. Schools, 303 Mitchell-Copp Building, Winnipeg, Man.: Kindergarten,
commercial home study.
National Radio Institute, Inc., Sixteenth and U Streets North-west, Washington,
D.C.: Practical radio and television servicing, professional television servicing,
electrical appliances servicing, communications.
National Schools, 4000 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles 37, Calif.: Diesel,
automotive, and allied mechanics; radio, television, and electronics; advanced
television.
Northwest Schools, 1221 North-west Twenty-first Avenue, Portland 9, Ore.: Radio
and television service and maintenance, television broadcasting—principles and
practices course.
Primary School of Drafting, 134 Combe Avenue, Downsview, Ont.: Engineering
drafting, blue-print reading.
Radio College of Canada, 86 Bathurst Street, Toronto 2b, Ont.: Radio and television technology, radio operating, electronic communications, radio engineering, television servicing, colour television.
Shaw Schools Ltd., 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial course, short-story
writing, stationary engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: radio and
television servicing.
Technical Training Institute, 5018 North-east Union, Portland 11, Ore.: Electricity,
radio, television, electronics.
Television-Electronics Institute Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second Avenue,
Edmonton, Alta.:  Television and radio service and repair.
Tractor Training Service Ltd., 406 Panama Building, Portland, Ore.: Tractor and
equipment training.
Utilities Engineering Institute, 2525 West Sheffield Avenue, Chicago 14, 111.: Auto
body and fender, diesel, mechanical refrigeration, air-conditioning, refrigeration and heating, and scientific motor tune-up, diesel and scientific motor
tune-up, welding.
Autolec National Educational Master and Group Program, 1025 Howe Street,
Vancouver 1, B.C.:   Automotive electricity, carburetion, and tune-up.
Barbara's School of Fashion Modelling, 2509 Estevan Avenue, Oak Bay, B.C.:
Personal development and modelling.
The Barclay's Dance Studio, 720 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Professional
dancing.
Bel-Parker Business College, 1574 West Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
B.C. School of Floral Design, 2523 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Floristry.
B.C. Tree Fruits Limited, Kelowna, B.C.:   Fruit-packing.
Carlyle Schools Limited, 640 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Physicians' office
assistants.
Chilliwack Business College, 142 Yale Road East, Chilliwack, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Club, Cabaret and Construction Camp Culinary and Service Employees' Union,
Local No. 740, Bar-tending School, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3,
B.C.:  Bar-tending.
The Comptometer School, 308 Randall Building, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Comptometer operation.
David's Academy of Advance Hair Design, 627 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Advanced hair styling, contest preparation. CC 34 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Duffus School of Business Ltd., 522 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Dressmaking,
designing, and pattern-making, tailoring, millinery.
General Business School Ltd., 602 Broughton Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Gondo's Sewing School, 779 Cadder Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Herbert Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Peter Johnson Hair Styling, 510 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Barbering.
Kinman Business University, Howard Street at First Avenue, Spokane, Wash.:
Business education.
Lee Hodgson Modelling and Charm School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.: Modelling and charm.
The Lorrain Marie Charm School, 3234 Patrick Street, South Burnaby, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
Lownds School of Commerce Ltd., 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Marvelle Beauty School, 25 Eighth Avenue, Cranbrook, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Moler Barber School, 615 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.:   Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Hair-
dressing.
Moler School of Hairdressing, 1104 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Arthur Murray Studios (Canada) Ltd., 646 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:
Professional dancing.
Mechanical and Aircraft Institute of Drafting, 119 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.:  Drafting.
Mount Royal College, 1135 Seventh Avenue, Calgary, Alta.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, 3300 Thirty-first Street, Vernon, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
James C. McNeill, 283 Hastings Avenue, Penticton, B.C.:  Book-keeping.
Nelson Commercial Training School, 701 Front Street, Nelson, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster School of Hairdressing, 228 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
O.K.Valley Hairdressing School, 453 Lawrence Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Olga's School of Hairdressing, 3201 Tronson Avenue, Vernon, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Penticton Business School, Suites 12, 18, 19, Craig Building, 221 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.:  Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College Ltd., 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Prince George Business College, 1330 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental). TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH CC 35
Sprott-Shaw Schools (Vancouver) Ltd., 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), radio and television servicing.
Sprott-Shaw Schools (Victoria) Business Institute Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street,
Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental), Elmer
Wheeler sales course.
St. Ann's Convent, Commercial Department, Nanaimo, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
St. Paul's School of Dressmaking and Designing, 255 Dunlevy Street, Vancouver 4,
B.C.:  Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Sun Electric Technician's Course, 9732 King George VI Highway, R.R. 4, North
Surrey, B.C.:   Automotive testing.
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Ruth Uecker Modelling and Charm School, 768 Granville Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.:  Personal development and modelling.
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.:
Stationary, marine, and diesel engineering.
Vancouver Sales and Merchandising Institute, 3104 West Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.:   Sales training.
Victoria Hairdressing School, 738 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Welding Construction School, 148 East First Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.:   Welding.
Weldor Training Centre, 1368 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Welding.
Western Radio Academy, 1356 Haro Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Radio broadcasting.
Western Radio Electronic Television Schools Ltd., 1065 Howe Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.:  Radio, electronics, television.
Western School of Commerce, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Edmund L. Allen,
Administrative Officer.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958
1,260-258-3896 

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