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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-sixth Annual Report 1956/57 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1958

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-sixth Annual Report
1956/57
By the Superintendent of Education
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
in right of the Province of British Columbia.
1958  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-sixth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
LESLIE RAYMOND PETERSON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1958.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1957
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, LL.B.
Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., LL.D.
Assistant Deputy
Minister of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., Ed.D.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Municipal Inspectors, Assistant Municipal Inspectors, and
Superintendents of Schools
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc., B.Ed., Prince George.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Richmond.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
Iohn Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Trail.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
R. C. Grant, B.A., Assistant, Burnaby.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Kelowna.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.P_ed., North Vancouver.
D. B. Mackenzie, B.A., M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
E. Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
R. F. Sharp, B.A., D.Pasd., Superintendent,
Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., Coquitlam.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Assistant,
Greater Victoria.
F. M. Wallace, B.A., M.A., Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schools in School Districts:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Creston.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Nelson.
J. E. Beech, B.A., Kamloops.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Mission.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
E. J. Dunn, M.A., Cranbrook.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Alberni.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
The late B. H. Harford, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
H. S. Hurn, B.A., Powell River.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., Penticton.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Dawson Creek.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Chilliwack.
The late H. P. Johns, Ph.D., M.A., Victoria.
A. D. W. Jones, B.A., Kitimat.
J. G. Kirk, B.A., M.A., Kimberley.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., Duncan.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Psed., Victoria.
L. A. Matheson, B.A., Smithers.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Salmon Arm.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Quesnel.
W. D. Reid, B.A., M.Ed., Campbell River.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Hope.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Prince Rupert.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A., Powell
River.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Services: W. A. Plenderleith, MA., D.Pasd., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Comptroller: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk: M. J. Davis.
Director of Administration: G. W. Graham, B.A.
Supervisor of School Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: T. Quayle and C. J. Strong, M.A.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A.
5 X 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
Inspectors of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S., amd Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec).
Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance: The late H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Director of Community Programmes: L. J. Wallace, B.A., M.Ed.
Director of Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts:  P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pasd.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., L.L.D.
Assistant Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A., B.Ed. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  11
Report of the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education  34
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools  39
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  42
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  48
Report of the Director of Night-schools  53
Report of the Director of Home Economics  55
Report of the Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind (Jericho Hill School) 57
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  59
Elementary School Correspondence  63
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  64
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  68
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  69
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  71
Report of the Director of Visual Education  73
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act"  74
Statistical Returns  75
Information re Examination Papers Inside Back Cover X 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools  12
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  13
Number of School Districts  14
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District ... 14
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  15
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District   16
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  16
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  17
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  17
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District   18
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  20
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  21
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School  22
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  23
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  24
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1956  24
Costs per Pupil, Various Bases, Calendar Year 1956  25
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1956 by School District  26
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1956 by School District  29
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  77
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades 112 -Illip-.liiiill^.»
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson> ^ Minister ^ ^^  Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1956/57
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1958.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-sixth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1957.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 240,674
to 260,069, and the average daily attendance increased from 218,303 to 235,396.
The percentage of the regular attendance was 90.51.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—■
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large
Rural
Rural
Total
7,161
15,747
5,852
12,653
17,832
15,368
770
2,848
1,547
83,955
451
5,969
315
2,043
9,414
1,140
18,104
20,265
216
39,764
21,535
61
2,874
588
1,954
54,169
12,850
679
1,233
5,320
157,461
Totals                        	
85,471
134,973
37,436
2,189
260,069
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 4,619 officially registered in
high,  superior, or elementary schools)  2,047
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular
students    1,405
Under section 13 (g) of the " Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction  31
6,552
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  1,324!
Night-schools   33,565
Vancouver School of Art  141
Vancouver Vocational Institute  2,027
High School Correspondence (adults only)  5,295
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  241
Carried forward
49,145
1 Does not include apprentice training, now operated by the Department of Labour.
11 X 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
Brought forward ___
Adult Education—Continued
49,145
Recreational and Physical Education Classes  180,0002
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training  196
Victoria College, regular credit courses—
Arts, Science, Commerce  344
College of Education  231
Evening      91
  6663
University of British Columbia       4,0744
234,081
2 This figure is a total course enrolment, rather than a total of the adults in this category.
3 This figure does not include an enrolment of 752 in the special evening classes.
4This figure does not include the following enrolments:    1956  summer session,   1,810;    1956/57  extra  sessional
classes, 1,068;   correspondence courses, 581.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1956/57:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
1,360
15,892
14,851
14,584
14,272
12,532
11,329
11,268
10,660
9,381
7,590
5,603
4,034
556
1,320
14,317
13,618
13,398
13,522
12,020
10,285
10,315
10,346
9,361
7,806
5,687
3,904
258
2,680
Grade I
30 209
Grade II                                                            _ _   _
28 469
Cirpdp ITT
27 982
Grade IV     -                                               _	
27 794
Grade V                              ,,,„,„,
24 552
Grade VI    - _.  ...             	
21,614
21 583
(-.rndi. VTT
Grade VIII _ _                	
21 006
Grade IX   _ _	
18,742
15 396
Grade X     	
Grade XT
11 290
rjrnrlf. XTT
7,938
814
Grade VTTT
Totals    _  ...
133,912
126,157
260,069
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Type of School
Senior high schools 	
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools	
Superior schools _
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools _.
Unclassified	
Totals-
Number of Teachers
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
652
1,272
657
115
446
153
4,693
1
7,989
255
487
257
64
31
252
139
Total
907
1,759
914
115
510
184
4,945
140
1,485 9,474
I
Total
Enrolment
20,265
39,764
21,535
2,874
12,850
5,320
157,461
260,069
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
7.79
15.29
8.28
1.11
4.94
2.04
60.55
100.00
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
31.08
31.26
32.78
25.00
28.81
34.77
33.55
32.55 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
X 13
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
727
1,244
592
15
169
48
386
36
180
515
322
100
341
136
4,559
104
907
1,759
914
115
510
184
4,945
140
Totals                   .                     -                —         	
3.217         ]         6.257
9,474
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for the various years since 1877/78
and also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877/78...
1882/83...
1887/88-
1892/93...
1897/98-
1902/03...
1907/08...
1912/13-
1913/14-
1917/18-
1922/23...
1927/28..
1928/29-
1929/30_
1930/31...
1931/32.
1932/33..
1933/34..
1934/35-
1935/36..
1936/37 .
1937/38-
1938/39-
1939/40-
1940/41-
1941/42...
1942/43-
1943/44...
1944/45-
1945/46.-
1946/47...
1947/48...
1948/49-
1949/50.
1950/51-
1951/52..
1952/53...
1953/54-
1954/55...
1955/56 ..
1956/57-
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
,597
859
246
118
668
,784
,854
,948
,959
912
873
942
956
,025
,092
194
220
,248
,224
,055
,162
,354
,512
833
116
496
873
,272
,598
,105
,574
185
,690
,474
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
102
103
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
240,674
260,069
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
218,303
235,396
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
90.70
90.51
$48
60
113
174
290
473
544,
1,663
1,885
1,653
3,176
3,532
3,765
3,743
3,834
4,015
2,849
2,611
2,835
2,972
3,277
3,524
3,630
3,585
3,963.
4,028
3,924
4,244
5,022
5,765
9,398.
12,468.
17,363,
22,809,
25,830
26,885
26,555
24,060.
34,279.
41,067
43,989
.411.141
.758.751
,679.361
1,775.43
1,255.26
,802.29
,671.60
,003.34
,654.11
,796.60
,686.283
,518.953
,920.693
,317.08s
,727.193
,074.373
,972.02s
,937.80s
,040.743
,385.043
,660.233
,962.693
,670.783
,769.00s
848.24s
,397.883
,243.53s
,898.82s
,534.593
,205.50s
,473.46s
,653.18s
,430.94s
,631.23 s
,076.883
,980.43 3
,080.243
,233.15s
,302.273
,740.34*
,524.32B
$215
425
604
1,220
4,658
4,634,
3,519,
7,630,
9,261,
11,149,
10,008.
10,061,
9,719,
8,941,
8,213,
8,458,
8,775.
9,593,
10,193.
10,640,
10,521,
10,982.
11,120,
11,502,
12,231,
13,683,
14,818,
20,176,
25,768.
35,538.
47,726.
54,195,
57,881,
58,401,
70,791,
80,823.
69,314.
77.653,
056.222
555.10
,357.86
,509.85
,894.97
,877.56
,014.61
,009.543
,094.98s
,996.27s
,255.66s
387.993
333.813
,497.343
,369.04s
,156.003
,353.78s
,562.643
367.083
740.473
,684.923
,364.49s
,801.94s
,291.353
,029.353
,538.18s
,625.81s
,930.53s
392.09s
079.88s
750.37s
133.953
,559.483
121.15s
844.253
263.71s
181.24*
192.32s
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
* This amount on calendar year 1955, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds.
5 This amount on calendar year 1956, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds. X  14 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1956/57:—
Municipal school districts       7
Large municipal school districts     38
Large rural school districts     37
Rural school districts (unattached)     21
Total number of districts
103
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 20,265; of this
number, 10,208 were boys and 10,057 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school year 1956/57 in each
district are shown in the following table: —
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7. Nelson-
11. TraiL	
22. Vernon_
23. Kelowna	
33. Chilliwack—
34. Abbotsford-
36. Surrey	
38. Richmond-
39. Vancouver-
40. New Westminster-
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge.	
43. Coquitlam..
44. North Vancouver	
45. West Vancouver	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South..
61. Greater Victoria	
68. Nanaimo	
71. Courtenay....
Totals ,
13
24
19
18
30
18
64
24
98
35
69
20
18
33
32
14
14
70
23
16
652
19
36
26
25
41
28
92
32
138
46
87
27
28
40
39
20
21
103
34
25
907
386
738
567
545
850
575
2,124
774
3,372
1,075
2,085
677
532
952
930
405
451
2,121
657
449
20,265 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
X 15
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 39,764; of
this number, 20,078 were boys and 19,686 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1956/57 in each
district are shown in the following:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
14.
15.
16.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
27.
28.
31.
35.
37.
39.
43.
46.
47.
48.
52.
53.
54.
55.
60.
61.
62.
63.
65.
66.
67.
70.
71.
75.
77.
78.
80.
Fernie	
Cranbrook-
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar 	
Arrow Lakes —
Trail	
Grand Forks._
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton  	
Keremeos	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen._
Vernon 	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Williams Lake~
Quesnel 	
Merritt	
Langley	
Delta	
Vancouver	
Coquitlam	
Sechelt..
Powell River-
Howe Sound-
Prince Rupert-
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Mission	
Summerland-
Enderby	
Kitimat	
Unattached districts ..
Totals	
6
24
24
6
21
10
13
22
6
18
14
20
39
8
14
20
13
7
23
50
13
14
7
46
17
428
15
15
27
10
23
12
8
5
11
16
21
28
30
17
16
47
9
30
15
7
18
9
30
35
6
29
13
13
29
6
25
19
27
50
11
19
27
17
10
31
68
17
22
9
65
23
612
21
18
42
13
33
16
10
5
14
29
28
40
38
24
23
61
11
42
19
13
26
12
63
I  1,272   I
I I
1,759
172
745
806
145
648
264
275
611
139
513
389
593
1,214
216
379
572
338
179
657
1,516
407
446
194
1,381
457
14,877
501
371
891
270
735
365
220
143
315
521
597
825
971
483
466
1,470
244
926
434
254
413
216
39,764 X 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 21,535; of this
number, 11,067 were boys and 10,468 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1956/57 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7. Nelson	
11. Trail	
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
33. Chilliwack _
34. Abbotsford-
38. Richmond.-.
39. Vancouver...
40. New Westminster-
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitfam.
44. North Vancouver.—
45. West Vancouver	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South-
61. Greater Victoria	
65. Cowichan	
67. Ladysmith-
68. Nanaimo	
Totals-
32
20
25
27
24
37
26
38
32
43
88
17
12
54
26
23
10
111
3
6
35
657
27
34
37
30
48
35
52
45
61
121
22
15
77
31
32
15
170
5
8
49
914
588
753
824
747
1,133
854
1,240
1,023
1,519
2,871
562
447
1,804
718
776
315
3,996
91
186
1,088
21,535
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,874; of this number,
1,483 were boys and 1,391 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions,
number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1956/57 in each district are
shown in the folowing table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
4. Windermere	
5. Creston	
6. Kootenay Lake ..
13. Kettle Valley	
19. Revelstoke	
20. Salmon Arm	
22. Vernon	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake—
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
48. Howe Sound	
51. Portland Canal-
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George..
58. McBride	
62. Sooke	
72. Campbell River..
81. Fort Nelson	
Unattached districts _
Totals	
2
5
2
10
3
4
3
3
13
3
3
3
3
2
7
4
8
9
4
3
12
6
3
Til"
2
5
2
10
3
4
3
3
13
3
3
3
3
2
7
4
8
9
4
3
12
6
 3_
115
43
137
29
264
49
110
54
56
361
84
45
43
66
44
205
134
193
264
99
65
328
140
61
2,874" REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
X 17
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 12,850;
of this number, 6,563 were boys and 6,287 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1956/57 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
4.
6.
10.
13.
17.
18.
20.
24.
25.
26.
28.
29.
30.
32.
39.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
53.
54.
56.
58.
64.
69.
71.
72.
73.
74.
76.
79.
Fernie 	
Windermere-	
Kootenay Lake-
Arrow Lakes	
Kettle Valley	
Princeton	
Golden —
Salmon Arm	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo—
Fraser Canyon-
Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River-
Howe Sound-
Ocean Falls.—
Queen Charlotte-
Terrace 	
Smithers	
Vanderhoof	
McBride 	
Saltspring	
Qualicum-
Courtenay	
Campbell River-
Alert Bay	
Quatsino	
Agassiz-
Ucuelet-Tofino.
Totals	
28
9
14
6
9
20
17
7
7
7
8
6
23
28
19
19
8
5
6
25
9
7
7
14
11
14
16
13
31
19
11
14
9
33
9
16
6
9
25
18
7
7
7
8
7
27
32
23
22
9
5
6
30
9
8
7
16
13
15
20
16
39
22
11
18
10
49
446
510
845
223
348
139
269
638
493
201
206
170
206
147
665
845
565
588
210
99
126
805
238
226
171
466
332
356
389
423
1,034
443
295
457
232
12,850
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 5,320;
of this number, 2,728 were boys and 2,592 girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-vear 1956/57 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
11. Trail..
14. Southern Okanagan..
28. Quesnel —
33. Chilliwack	
41. Burnaby-
43. Coquitlam..
69. Qualicum..
Unattached districts-
Totals	
20
15
10
9
58
18
12
18
160
22
17
12
9
68
22
13
21
184
649
512
310
290
1,954
608
318
679
5,320 X 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 157,461; of this
number, 81,785 were boys and 75,676 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1956/57 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
6
5
7
7
6
2
13
11
13
3
12
2
3
2
6
3
5
1
6
15
1
9
18
28
7
5
22
16
3
4
4
8
14
22
18
37
10
9
53
6
24
13
13
14
9
12
12
12
6
2
1
7
10
5
13
4
41
9
31
21
31
8
12
4
15
32
40
11
29
2
56
25
33
10
82
17
5
19
46
12
11
2
22
40
12
55
86
92
9
6
43
40
4
5
14
20
83
77
61
239
38
114
1,057
81
255
55
78
174
75
28
54
25
11
4
1
40
32
15
27
6
98
13
78
39
310
36
44
5
15
34
41
12
32
2
57
26
33
11
88
17
5
20
47
12
11
2
22
43
13
58
87
92
9
6
44
40
4
5
16
21
84
78
70
247
40
115
1,203
86
261
55
79
181
84
30
54
25
11
4
1
40
33
15
27
6
99
13
80
40
318
36
43
5
447
2. Cranbrook       _ 	
1,119
1,246
355
963
47
1,743
540
9. Castlegar   — 	
912
300
11. Trail                                                                   -  _—
2,586
596
13. Kettle Valley                       _  	
102
14. Southern Okanagan    	
630
1,748
370
17. Princeton  _ _ - 	
18. Golden                        -       	
208
52
683
1,200
436
1,928
2,855
2,753
146
89
1,099
28. Quesnel— _   —	
29. Lillooet...      	
30. South Cariboo       _ - __
1,255
64
104
31. Merr'tt—   -         —   	
460
590
3,035
34. Abbotsford           _ -	
2,551
35. Langley.   —       -  _ _	
2,065
8,912
37. Delta                                                      	
1,283
3,927
39. Vancouver      _ -  - —
40. New Westminster  — — —	
35,761
3,192
9,430
42. Maple Ridge	
1,967
2,867
6,568
2,680
46. Sechelt  _    	
785
1,704
520
49. Ocean Falls           - _   _	
240
50,   Duepn rharlnttf.                                                                                             	
83
9
1,464
988
54. Smithers           	
55. Burns Lake _ _ -  	
451
727
142
2,954
58. McBride                                                              	
211
2,328
968
12,005
62, Sooke      —   ~  _	
1,129
1,408
64. Saltspring       _   _
110 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
X 19
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan..
67. Ladysmith _..
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay 	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz-
77. Summerland-
78. Enderby-
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson-
82. Chilcotin	
Unattached districts..
Totals-
6
20
7
11
15
11
5
7
15
3
2
7
1
4
2
4
19
"900~
55
27
27
87
12
70
60
24
6
8
38
5
16
14
2
35
5
4
45
4,688
56
28
27
92
12
72
61
24
6
8
40
5
17
14
2
38
5
4
46
4,945
1,736
832
982
2,922
323
2,669
2,039
677
78
101
1,371
137
552
366
47
1,088
164
54
1,233
"157,461 1
X 20
d:
Distric
2.
3.
5.
11.
19.
20.
24.
28.
30.
33.
34.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
[STRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
4 Number and Name                                                                                                Number of Teachers
Cranbrook        2
Kimberley     _— 	
.___      2
Creston 	
.___      1
Trail	
—      2
Revelstoke _ —   	
1
Salmon Arm ,„ „     ______
1
Kamloops 	
.___      4
Quesnel   	
.___      2
South Cariboo	
1
Chilliwack 	
Abbotsford	
Surrey _     ___    	
___      2
3
___    10
Delta 	
Richmond ___ _   	
—      2
.___      4
Vancouver 	
—    23
New Westminster	
____      3
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
47.
52.
54.
55.
57.
59.
61.
62.
63.
70.
75.
80.
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge
Coquitlam
North Vancouver __
West Vancouver —
Powell River	
Prince Rupert	
Smithers 	
Bunrs Lake 	
Prince George	
Peace River South
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich 	
Alberni	
Mission 	
Kitimat	
15
2
4
4
2
3
2
1
1
2
2
28
3
3
2
2
1
Total
140 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
X 21
The following table is a summary of all schools showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers1
Number of
Pupils
Fernie-	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes-
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton 	
Keremeos—	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm._
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon. ___ - 	
Kelowna  	
Kamloops.. 	
Barnere  	
Birch Island 	
Williams Lake— 	
Quesnel 	
Lillooet  —
South Cariboo..
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
8. Slocan..
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39,
40.
41,
42.
43.
44.
45,
46.
47,
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
Richmond...
. Vancouver-
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—
Sechelt 	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace- 	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George.
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring-
Cowichan-
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo 	
Qualicum..
5
16
14
14
6
16
3
7
4
7
4
6
4
8
18
2
13
22
31
8
7
26
20
6
7
5
10
18
25
19
42
11
12
67
8
32
15
17
17
11
14
15
15
8
4
2
8
13
8
15
7
45
11
33
22
41
11
15
5
19
9
8
23
9
49
56
64
28
55
18
99
38
55
22
169
31
24
54
85
20
31
19
39
71
25
111
151
149
16
17
69
73
30
33
21
39
159
121
107
303
55
176
1,634
159
470
92
141
261
133
51
86
44
36
13
4
63
53
37
36
28
144
28
102
50
507
60
72
19
88
44
49
145
40
56
66
78
29
67
20
116
39
62
23
207
36
24
64
97
23
36
20
45
82
30
134
173
171
16
17
74
86
34
38
25
44
184
144
135
349
65
203
2,043
196
552
106
169
302
156
57
104
47
41
13
4
75
59
40
37
30
162
30
118
54
648
70
86
20
99
52
58
175
45
1,464
1,864
2,052
766
1,748
424
2,981
815
1,523
578
5,239
985
635
1,735
2,962
586
846
545
1,111
2,083
774
3,552
4,804
4,475
316
351
1,867
2,242
774
949
654
1,155
5,308
3,980
3,446
11,036
1,740
5,941
55,621
5,786
16,340
3,206
4,955
9,324
4,328
1,366
2,694
959
1,045
321
75
2,199
1,623
1,047
1,004
801
4,399
642
3,094
1,283
18,643
1,791
2,233
466
2,798
1,315
1,634
4,667
1,030 X 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of    Number of
Divisions     Teachers1
Number of
Pupils
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission 	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby..
79. Ucluelet-Tofino-
80. Kit-mat	
81. FortNelson..
82. Chilcotin	
Unattached districts .
Totals _.
12
18
15
9
9
16
4
3
8
2
5
3
4
22
117
98
67
25
19
68
19
31
21
11
53
11
4
75
1,115
7,990
135
113
75
28
19
84
23
36
27
12
65
11
4
82
4,139
3,155
2,039
521
396
2,297
594
986
620
279
1,501
304
54
2,189
9.4741
260,069
1 Includes 140 district supervisors, relieving and visiting teachers.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE EST EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in
each type of school for the school-year 1956/57:—
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Total
Male
Female
Attendance
31
63
32
31
49
9
900
907
1,759
914
115
510
184
4,945
140
20,265
39,764
21,535
2,874
12,850
5,320
157,461
10,208
20,078
11,067
1,483
6,563
2,728
81,785
	
10,057
19,686
10,468
1,391
6,287
2,592
75,676
	
17,757.48
35,587.34
19,685.90
2,569.63
11,492.13
4,843.86
143,460.01
Totals           -          _
1,115
9,474
260,069
133,912
126,157
235,396.35 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
X 23
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100
are excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Teachers
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
652
1,272
657
115
446
153
4,693
$1,200
1,264
1,381
1,400
1,350
1,364
1,101
$6,841
6,968
7.007
6,525
7,139
6,575
7,848
$5,068
4,677
4,319
3,500
3,887
3,717
3,546
Supervising Principals
31
52
30
19
9
105
$6,651
5,850
6,184
4,646
6,382
4,718
$10,170
9,760
8,590
8,755
8,888
8,370
$7,931
7,690
7,697
6,867
7,483
7,098
Special Instructors
224
435
227
45
22
147
139
$1,391
1,180
1,445
1,495
2,551
1,227
1,637
$8,334
8,140
8,524
6,975
7,950
7,501
8,334
$5,131
4,967
4,560
4,429
4,718
3,859
5,391 X 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers,
teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and
teachers earning less than $1,900 per annum:—
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
11,900-$ 1,999  20
2,000- 2,099  25
2,100- 2,199  101
2,200- 2,299  107
2,300- 2,399  195
2,400- 2,499  309
2,500- 2,599  234
2,600- 2,699  227
2,700- 2,799  229
2,899  236
2,999  226
  280
  243
  258
  283
  299
  236
  222
  267
  201
2,800-
2,900-
3,000-
3,100-
3,200-
3,300-
3,400-
3,500-
3,600-
3,700-
3,800-
3,900- 3,999.__    _ 21.
3,099_
3,199
3,299-
3,399_
3,499-
3,599-
3,699-
3,799
3,899-
4,000- 4,099_
4,100- 4,199
4,200- 4,299-
4,300- 4,399_
4,400- 4,499
4,500- 4,599-
4,600- 4,699-
355
303
272
263
212
205
344
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
$4,700-$4,799  164
4,800- 4,899  280
4,900- 4,999  145
5,000- 5,099  138
5,100- 5,199  121
5,200- 5,299  111
5,300- 5,399  121
5,400- 5,499  175
5,500- 5,599—   116
  98
  133
  95
  109
6,199__
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5,600-
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5,800-
5,900-
6,000-
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6,500- 6,599
6,600- 6,699
6,700- 6,799
6,800-
6,900-
7,000-
7,100-
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5,699	
5,799	
5,899	
5,999	
6,099  106
  48
  120
  156
  53
  183
  25
  26
  23
  23
7,099  25
7,199  25
7,299  26
6,899.
6,999-
7,300- 7,399
24
7,400 and over  161 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT X 25
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1956
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts  $69,234,423.00
Add Department of Education expenditures for—
Administration, grants to University of British Columbia, services, etc  $5,800,793.66
Teachers' Pension Fund 6%     2,135,623.08
Free text-books, maps, etc        482,352.58
 8,418,769.32
Total expenditure  $77,653,192.32
COST PER PUPIL, VARIOUS BASES, CALENDAR YEAR 1956
Grand total cost of education  $77,653,192.32
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue  $3,177,061.00
Debt charges on school district debt     8,310,856.00
Grant to University of British Columbia     3,539,865.00
Grant to Victoria College        118,500.00
Normal School, Vancouver  89,213.52
Normal School, Victoria  52,368.77
High Correspondence School        161,454.96
Elementary Correspondence School  67,195.87
Night-schools   55,443.28
Adult education        265,436.32
15,837,394.72
Net total operating costs  $61,815,797.60
Net operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
235,396  262.60
Net operating cost per pupil per school-day on average daily attendance
of 235,396  1.35
Net operating cost per pupil to Provincial Government for year on
average daily attendance of 2 3 5,3 9 6  186.87 X 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
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PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS,  1957
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225,
generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C.-
2nd in B.C...
Area 1	
Area 2	
Area 3	
Area 4	
Area 5	
Area 6	
Area 7	
.. Area 8	
Area 9	
Area 10	
Area 11	
Area 12	
Catherine Ann Batten„
Ronald Milne Lees.	
Ruth Shewchuk 	
Marnie Jean Rogers.
Merritt Junior-Senior High School-
Lord Byng Junior-Senior High School..
Georgina Margaret Hobbs..
Catherine Rita Penner	
Garry James Home	
Valentine Sawadsky 	
Norman Camerman	
Margaret Ruth Leroux	
Jean Mary Michalec 	
Peter Allan Trojan-
Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High School-
J. Lloyd Crowe Senior High School	
Revelstoke Junior-Senior High School	
Chilliwack Senior High School-
Richmond Junior-Senior High School	
John Oliver Junior-Senior High School-
King Edward High School-
Lord Byng Junior-Senior High School..
St. Ann's Academy (privates-
Area 13 (tie)_.
Donna Margaret Forsyth..
Robert Michael Taylor	
f Robert Michael Blake—
| -Catherine Joan Casper-
North Vancouver Senior High School..
Nechako Valley Elementary-Senior High School	
Oak Bay High School-
Smith Memorial School (private) _
Nanaimo Senior High School—	
94.8
93.3
88.9
87.5
85.1
90.8
89.4
88.1
93.0
90.6
88.5
88.8
84.3
91.6
89.5
89.5
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance Examinations was won by Catherine Ann Batten. The Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for the second highest standing in the University Entrance Examinations
was won by Ronald Milne Lees.
GRADE XIII
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University of
British Columbia for general proficiency, were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Myrna Lorene Skapple...
Pauline Annette Peters..
Koit Teng_
Gilbert Ernest Mervyn Kirker..
Ernest Raymond Seaquist	
Grace Hiroko Watanabe	
Erin Haywood Moore.	
L. V. Rogers High School 	
Abbotsford Senior High School	
Maple Ridge Senior High School	
J. Lloyd Crowe Senior High School	
North Surrey Junior-Senior High School..
Kamloops Junior-Senior High School	
Chilliwack Senior High School	
89.41
89.1
88.7
86.9
86.6
86.2
1 Tie
GENERAL REVIEW
New Appointments to the Inspectorial Staff
The following outstanding school principals were appointed during the year as
Inspectors of Schools: Mr. R. F. Thorstenson, B.A., Qualicum Beach Junior-Senior
High School; Mr. J. A. Thomas, B.A., Mission Junior-Senior High School; Mr. W. A.
Marchbank, B.A., B.Ed., Prince Charles Junior-Senior High School, Creston; Mr. C. S.
McKenzie, B.A., Abbotsford Senior High School; and Mr. R. S. Price, B.A., B.Comm.,
Royal Oak Junior-Senior High School, Victoria.
Staff Retirements
After forty-four years of service to education in British Columbia, thirty-seven of
which were in New Westminster, Mr. Roy S. Shields, B.A., Municipal Inspector of
Schools for New Westminster, retired in June last.   During his tenure of office in New REPORT of superintendent
X 33
Westminster that school district has made great strides educationally, and there are few
school districts in the Province where the children are provided with better educational
facilities.
Deaths
During the year this Department suffered a serious loss in the untimely death at an
early age of Dr. Harold P. Johns, Inspector of Schools and Provincial Director of
Guidance. Dr. Johns was an efficient and capable official who did much to establish
guidance as an important part of the educational system of this Province.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. L. CAMPBELL,
Superintendent of Education. X 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. F. K- ENGLISH, M.A., Ed.D., ASSISTANT DEPUTY
MINISTER OF EDUCATION
A.  Division of Curriculum
There are few educators who would not agree that the schools should be concerned,
above everything else, with the kind of person they are helping to produce. This is
reflected in the pronounced trend in recent years toward universal education at the
secondary-school level, which has made necessary a curriculum designed not exclusively
for entrance to the university or professions, but to meet a great variety of needs and
interests.
This Department regards curriculum development as a process, the sole purpose
of which is to improve the quality of education each child receives. In this process
four things have to be considered. First is the changing nature of society. A curriculum
which is to prepare young people to live in the world of to-morrow must take into
account the changes that are going on to-day. Second is the need for stability. Schools
have traditionally had the important function of inculcating basic, permanent values,
ideals, and standards. These are more than ever necessary for living in times of change.
The third factor which must be considered concerns the resources available. It has been
generaly recognized that what is educationally desirable should be made financially
possible, but it must also be recognized that there are practical limitations to this ideal.
Curriculum development as well as other phases of education must proceed as economically and efficiently as possible. Finally, there is the importance of taking into account
the fact that public schools are public responsibilities, not the prerogatives of a few
individuals. Curriculum in general must reflect the best of public opinion, and curriculum
planning can proceed no further than public opinion will support.
All of these factors, change, stability, resources, and public opinion have been taken
into account in the developments recorded below. These developments were undertaken
with the single aim of improving the education which all children are entitled to receive
to the limit of their capabilities. In particular, they involved the following subjects and
courses:—
(a)  Revision of Present Courses:—■
(1) Arithmetic.—A revision of the arithmetic programme for
Grades I and II was completed and will be introduced in all schools commencing in September, 1957. The revision of the mathematics programme for junior high schools was completed with the introduction of
a revised course and a new text for Grade IX.
(2) English.—To assist in developing an appreciation of reading
and English literature, a number of small supplementary texts were
authorized for the junior high-school English programme and suggestions
were prepared for teaching them. A study of courses and texts for Grade
XIII was begun.
(3) Science.—Revision of the programme in elementary science
was completed for the primary grades.
(4) Social Studies.—Revision of the programme for primary grades
was completed. An appraisal was made of the course and text for Grade
IX.   Revision will be undertaken during the forthcoming year.
(5) Industrial Arts.—An appraisal and revision of all Industrial
Arts courses was completed. CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES X 35
(6) Farm Mechanics and Agriculture.—Farm Mechanics and Agriculture are so interwoven as to defy separation. A tentative revision of
the Farm Mechanics courses has been made and will be tried out during
the next two years before being set up in permanent form.
(7) Health and Personal Development.—An appraisal study of the
complete programme was begun. This study will be continued and
revisions will be made where necessary.
(8) French.—The programme developed last year was taught
experimentally to 742 Grade V pupils in seven selected schools in Vancouver and Victoria. In the opinion of parents, principals, and teachers,
the results achieved were excellent. Revisions were made in the experimental course for Grade V, and a tentative course was prepared for Grade
VI. The programme will be expanded to include Grade V and VI classes
in the schools previously selected. A special word of acknowledgment
is due to the Boards of School Trustees, the principals, and the teachers
for their assistance and co-operation in this project.
(b) Selection  of New  Text-books.—The  following  new  text-books  were
authorized for use in the public schools for the subjects indicated:—
Arithmetic:   Up the Number Ladder, Books I, IIa, and IIb, Grades
I and II.
Language:   Language Journeys, Grade V.
Science:   Discovering with Science, Grade IV.
Commerce:   The Junior Clerk, Record-keeping II.
English (Literature):
A Christmas Carol, English 7.
Jean Val Jean, English 7.
Moonfleet, English 8.
The Kon-Tiki Expedition, English 8.
Ivanhoe, English 8.
Lady of the Lake, English 8.
Home Economics:
Foods and Home Management, Home Economics 7, 20, and 30.
Clothing Construction and Wardrobe Planning, Home Economics 20 and 30.
Mathematics:   Functional Mathematics, Mathematics 10.
In keeping with the established policy, preference continues to be
given to books written or edited by Canadian or British authors.   All books
recommended have been subject to a process of critical evaluation by
representative committees.    Final selections represent a concensus of
findings and opinions as to the most suitable texts in terms of the purpose
they are expected to serve.
The Departmental Library and Library Service
As noted previously, procedures for evaluating school library and reference books
were reorganized. During the year under review, close to 1,000 books were reported
on by two committees of teachers and school librarians. The Department recommended
583 of these and prepared six annotated lists for the guidance of those concerned. These
lists were issued quarterly to 1,148 public schools, 111 private schools, 82 Indian schools,
and 116 associations and education officials. This involved a total mailing of 8,742
copies to date. This procedure is proving valuable in helping to ensure that school
libraries and classrooms are equipped with good books.   Special acknowledgment should X 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
be made of the professional assistance conscientiously given by teachers and librarians
in providing this service.
Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
In the three years since its inception the Advisory Board has rendered valuable
assistance to the Honourable the Minister of Education on a number of problems.
During the year 1956/57 the Board met on five occasions. Their attention was directed
mainly to an examination of the secondary-school programme. Considerable attention
was also paid to special education, extra-curricular activities at the high-school level, and
the teacher-training programme at the College of Education. In addition to its deliberations, the Board has found time since it was established to visit the Vancouver Vocational
Institute, British Columbia Building at the Pacific National Exhibition, the Department
of Education at Victoria, and the Jericho Hill School for the deaf and the blind at
Vancouver.
Professional Committee on Curriculum Development
The function of this Committee is primarily to advise on the technical problems
connected with improving and administering the curriculum. The Committee meets at
the call of the Chair to consider such matters as required courses, time allotments, credits,
and to raise curriculum problems that have occurred in particular situations. During the
school-year 1956/57 the Committee met twice to deal with a number of questions involving curriculum policy.
Acknowledgments
Working out the details of revised courses and examining large numbers of potential
text-books is an arduous job for Revision Committees, with little prospect of finding the
ideal and having it acceptable to everyone. A total of 117 teachers and University professors were members of one or more of the fifteen Revision Committees at work during
the year. An additional thirty-seven persons were members of standing Advisory Comit-
tees. The advice and assistance given was invaluable and reflects great credit upon the
teaching profession.
In addition to the formal committees appointed by the Department, there were
countless local committees and study groups at work seeking ways and means of improving the curriculum in the classroom. The advice received from such groups and the
improved teaching practices which follow such study make them worthy of recognition
and encouragement.
Mr. John Meredith, Assistant Director of Curriculum, deserves much of the credit
for the successful performance of these committees and for the splendid editorial work in
connection with the various course bulletins. I also wish to thank Mr. Bruce Barr and
the office staff for very efficient service during the year.
B.  General Educational Services
Certain general areas of education come within the jurisdiction of the Assistant
Deputy Minister. Since detailed statements may appear elsewhere, either in this or some
other Annual Report, a passing reference is made here to the most important activities,
as follows:—
Jericho Hill School
This school, formerly known as the School for the Deaf and the Blind, is located in
the 4100 block, West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver, and is under the jurisdiction of the
Provincial Government. A detailed account of the work of the school for the year is
found elsewhere in this Report, but reference is made here on behalf of the Advisory curriculum and general educational SERVICES X 37
Committee of the School to certain developments which have occurred during the past
year.
A new separate classroom-dormitory building for blind students at Jericho Hill
School was officially opened by Premier W. A. C. Bennett on February 3rd, 1957. At
the same time a new recreation building for the use of both deaf and blind children
officially came into being. In September, 1956, by special arrangement with the Lower
Mainland School Boards and the Department of Education, eighty-six day-pupils from
surrounding areas received transportation assistance allowance. This allowance was
given in lieu of residence in the School. It has enabled some pupils to live at home and
to participate in the community activities.. Finally, a documentary film on the educational programme in operation for the aurally handicapped at Jericho Hill School is near
completion. Copies of the film will be made available ultimately for circulation throughout the Province by the Division of Visual Education, Department of Education.
Provincial Junior Red Cross
The Junior Red Cross movement in both elementary and secondary schools of the
Province continued to expand under the very competent direction of Miss Olivia Dann,
Provincial Director.   Statistics for enrolments are as follows:—
Grades I to VIII 104,384 pupils in 2,725 branches
Grades IX to XIII  15,055 pupils in      52 branches
Totals  119,439 pupils in 2,777 branches
During the school-year six workshops for teacher-sponsors were held in various
centres of the Province. In June, 1957, for the first time a Junior Red Cross leadership
training centre was held at the University of British Columbia for high-school students
active in Junior Red Cross work.
(The detailed annual report of the Junior Red Cross activities may be found in the
Thirty-eighth Annual Report, 1956, Canadian Red Cross Society, British Columbia
Division.)
Departmental Conferences
Two conferences under the auspices of the Department of Education were held
during the year 1956/57. The first of these was a conference of secondary-school principals in July in Victoria. Seventy-four principals participated, along with representatives
from the College of Education, Inspectors of Schools, and the staff of the Department
of Education. The theme of the conference was " Provision for Individual Differences at
the Secondary School Level."
The second conference was of a Departmental nature, involving Inspectors of
Schools and members of the Department of Education. This was held in December to
review and to discuss Departmental policies in their various aspects.
Provincial Education Committee
The Provincial Education Committee, representative of the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation, the British Columbia School Trustees Association, and the Parent-
Teacher Federation, along with the Department, continued its objective of finding ways
and means of better informing the public about the schools. For the second year a series
of broadcasts on education was given over C.B.C. The schedule from January to March,
1957, included: " Problems in Education in B.C. Today " (Dr. H. L. Campbell); " The
Curriculum under Continuous Study " (Dr. J. F. K. English); " How Our Schools Teach
Reading " (Miss Jean Bailey, Intermediate Supervisor, Burnaby School Board); " Our
Counselling and Guidance Programme " (Mr. J. Inkster, Principal, West Vancouver High
School);  "Individual Differences in Theory and Practice" (Mr. C. Taylor, Inspector X 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
of Schools, Courtenay);   and " The Teacher Education Programme "   (Dean N. V.
Scarfe, College of Education, University of British Columbia).
It is the hope of the Provincial Education Committee that local Education Committees will, over a period of time, become established in every school district of the Province
and that such Committees, by a co-ordinated effort, will stimulate a greater public interest
in the Provincial educational system.
Miscellaneous
Once again successful teacher tours of industry were arranged by the Department
in co-operation with The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada Limited
at Trail and with MacMillan & Bloedel Limited at Port Alberni. During the past five
years approximately 100 teachers throughout the Province have been the guests of the
company at Trail to observe at first hand the operation of this industrial enterprise.
Similarly, for a second year, groups of interested teachers have witnessed the operations
of our largest forest industry.
The Department of Education appreciates the interest shown by these industrial
firms in making it possible for members of the Provincial teaching force to gain first-hand
knowledge of these important industries.
» INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES X 39
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL  SERVICES
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The year 1956/57 was marred by the loss through death of Dr. H. P. Johns, Inspector for Saanich and Saltspring and Director of Vocational and Educational Guidance.
Dr. Johns was a pioneer and a leader in the field of guidance work in Canada and had
served in the Department for over twelve years. He will be missed greatly by his former
colleagues and the teachers whom he served.
At the end of the school-year, Mr. R. S. Shields, Municipal Inspector of Schools for
New Westminster, retired after many years of devoted service. The esteem in which he
was held was demonstrated by a number of events held in his honour both by the citizens
of New Westminster and his colleagues in the Department.
During the year three new Inspectors were appointed—Mr. W. D. Reid, Mr. L. A.
Matheson, and Mr. J. E. Beech. One new inspectorate was created, comprising School
Districts No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch Island), No. 31 (Merritt), and No. 58 (Mc-
Bride). One Inspector had specially assigned duties within the Department during the
year, so that the staff available for field duties was forty-four. Services lost through the
decease of incumbents reduced this to forty-three.
These Inspectors were responsible for the general supervision of 7,491 teachers in
public and Indian day-schools outside of the City of Vancouver, the average number of
teachers for each of forty-five Inspectors being 166, as compared with 156 in the previous year. On a basis of forty-three Inspectors, the average number of teachers was 174.
Inspectors reported making a total of 12,804 classroom visits and issuing 3,290 formal
reports. In addition, Inspectors of Home Economics and Industrial Arts issued 330
reports, while twenty-two reports were issued on teachers at the Jericho Hill School by
the Chief Inspector. Inspectors also attended a total of 1,681 School Board meetings,
692 staff meetings, and 252 attendance area meetings.
In September, 1956, a total of 192 classes were reported as being on shift. This
was reduced to 108 classes by June. Two schools were closed for lack of teachers, the
pupils being conveyed to extisting schools.
District supervisory staffs, employed by local Boards and working under the direction of Inspectors, included thirty-six supervisors and directors of instruction and forty-
five teacher-consultants. There were 229 supervising principals in larger schools and
sixty-one relieving teachers used to give some time for administrative and supervisory
duties to principals of smaller schools.
During the year the Chief Inspector's normal visits to Provincial inspectorates were
somewhat curtailed by additional duties in regard to vocational and educational guidance
and the recruitment of teachers. Nevertheless, visits were made to various inspectorates
in the Peace River, the North Central Interior, the Cariboo, the West Kootenay, portions
of the Lower Mainland area, the Fraser Canyon, and Princeton, with shorter visits to
other areas.
In the field of special education, the schools under the direction of local chapters
of the Association for Retarded Children of British Columbia increased in number and
enrolment. In February, 1957, there were 317 children enrolled in twenty-two schools.
Of these, 292 were eligible for grants as being of school age. This service continues to
expand after its remarkable strides in its first year of operation. X 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
Special classes within the public school system were as follows in January, 1957: —
Type of Class
Slow learners      _            _          	
Number of
Teachers
     74
Number of
Pupils
1,123
Remedial training
11
180
Home instruction                     —_ _
           3
37
New Canadians _	
     15
268
Rehabilitation centres
__ __            4
43
Hospital   _   _        _
       8
       2
250
Physically handicapped _     	
11
Cerebral-palsied _
       2
13
Detention home _                    	
       2
28
Preventorium
            2
22
Sight-saving __                 	
       3
33
Totals	
Totals for January, 1956	
'  126
  103
2,008
1,663
The Accrediting Committee considered seventy-five schools enrolling Grade XII
for accrediting during the year. Of these, thirty were accredited, five for the first time.
With the fifty-nine schools previously accredited, this made a total of eighty-nine accredited high schools. Comments on possible improvements that could be made were
furnished to all schools considered.
The Registrar and the Chief Inspector were constituted as a special committee to
deal with matters of teacher recruitment, especially in relation to Future Teachers' Clubs.
The number of these clubs reported in April, 1957, was seventy-seven, enrolling 1,330
members.
The entitlement of teachers was reviewed as usual in fall term, in accordance with
the rules and regulations of the Council of Public Instruction.
A survey of instruction at the Grade VI level in the fields of language and arithmetic
was made in January. Through the co-operation of the local school districts, six subtests, previously used in a general survey in 1947, were administered under the same
conditions and at the same time of year to all Grade VI pupils in forty-one large school
districts. It was possible to compare results in 1947 and 1957 in. thirty-three of these
districts. Eight of the districts had not been in existence in 1947. Results of the 6,371
pupils tested in the thirty-three comparable districts (as compared with 3,606 in 1947)
showed gains in all fields except spelling. The gains were most significant in achievement
in paragraph meaning (reading comprehension).    Comparable mean scores follow:—
1947 1957
Sub-test Mean Score        Mean Score
Paragraph Meaning  26.2 28.1
Word Meaning   32.5 32.8
Language Usage  63.7 65.8
Spelling   45.8 45.5
Arithmetic Computation  28.5 29.3
Arithmetic Reasoning  21.1 21.6
Other activities of this office included the following:—
(1) A survey of promotional policies and letter-grade distributions in Grades
IX to XII throughout the secondary schools of the Province, with the aim
of improving present practices, was made.
(2) A report on the developmental education of slow learners in special classes
based on a survey made in 1955/56 was printed and distributed.
(3) Preparation of other reports included the following topics: " Precis of an
Interim Report on Accelerated Classes," " Summary of Information on INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
X 41
Teacher Entitlement," " Register of Special Classes in British Columbia
Schools," "Retention by Districts through Grade VII to Grade XII,
1950/51 to 1955/56," " Tendencies in Retention through Grade VII to
Grade XII, 1950/51 to 1955/56," "Report on Certain Statistics in
Form K."
(4) Four special investigations were carried out to assist local Boards.
(5) Unit tests in Grade VI science were prepared by a group of teachers under
the direction of one of the Inspectors of Schools and distributed to other
areas.
(6) The usual participation in general and special Departmental committees
was maintained.
(7) Advisory and other duties were carried out in regard to the Association
for Retarded Children, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, the
Welfare Institutions Licensing Board, the Joint Board of the College of
education, etc.
(8) Instruction at the Jericho Hill School was inspected throughout the year,
with twenty-two reports on teachers issued.
(9) Talks were given to a number of teachers' conventions, teachers' organizations, and others in a number of centres throughout the Province.
(10) The essential work of the Division of Vocational and Educational Guidance was maintained in the period following the death of the Director,
Dr. Harold Johns.
(11) During the summer months, efforts were made to locate and assist in
remedying teacher shortages in local districts. A number of districts
carried out short refresher courses for teachers likely to return to teaching
after some years' absence from the profession. Victoria College assisted
greatly by providing a refresher course of two weeks' duration during the
summer, attended by over fifty persons. X 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR FOR CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING.
The Technical and Vocational Education Branch during this fiscal year was under
pressure from many angles to provide additional as well as increase the training programmes in the technical and vocational schools to meet the skilled man-power needs
of our Province.
To assist each Province in meeting these needs, the Federal Government, under the
provisions of the Vocational Training Co-ordination Act of 1942/43, negotiated a new
agreement with each Province for a five-year period beginning April 1st, 1957. This
agreement, known at the " Vocational and Technical Training Agreement No. 2 "
(V.T.T.A. No. 2) provides a percentage not in excess of the percentage contributed by
the Province for the " Development of Special Facilities for Trades and Occupational
Training and for Training at the Advanced Technical Level." In British Columbia,
capital for buildings and equipment is shareable on a 50-50 basis up to a total Federal
contribution of $1,891,900, whilst the operating costs are shareable on a 50-50 basis to
a total Federal contribution of approximately $200,000 per year to a total of $1,156,300
over the five-year period of the Agreement.
The growth of pre-employment training demands, the need of up-grading programmes for skilled workers, and the rapid increase in the numbers in the apprenticeship
training programme have taxed the present facilities now in existence at the Federal-
Provincial Vocational School in Nanaimo and the Vancouver Vocational Institute beyond
their ability to cope with the situation. In the Vancouver area alone, the day training
programmes for apprentices and for the pre-employment and up-grading classes have
overflowed from the Vancouver Vocational Institute into rented quarters at the Pacific
National Exhibition. In this current fiscal year, Federal and Provincial moneys amounting to a gross total of approximately $225,000 was set aside and spent under the terms of
the V.T.T.A. No. 2 to provide equipment for these temporary training quarters at the
Pacific National Exhibition.
Because of this pressing need in the Vancouver area, the first project to be undertaken under the V.T.T.A. No. 2 is the building of a new Federal-Provincial trades and
technical institute in the Municipality of Burnaby, where the Provincial Government has
set aside a 40-acre block of Crown land adjacent to the intersection of Grandview Highway and Willington Avenue. Schedules have been drawn up so that the first four workshops and four adjacent classroom wings will be completed by the summer of 1958.
This will enable us to transfer most of the equipment and training programmes now centred in the rented P.N.E. quarters into the new buildings of the Burnaby school. The
growth in vocational training is such that some of the training programmes may have to
remain in the Pacific National Exhibition until further buildings are provided in the
Burnaby school in the following fiscal year. Classes now in existence at the Pacific
National Exhibition are General Welding, Sheet Metal, Steel Erection and Fabrication,
Carpentry, Bricklaying, Metal Lathing, Plastering, Painting, Plumbing and Steam-fitting,
Aero Engine and Air Frame Mechanics, Boat-building. Industrial Electricity, Industrial
Electronics, Heavy-duty Mechanics (Gas and Diesel), and Automotive must be planned
and provided for in the new Burnaby school.
Further, additional planning in the very near future must take care of additional
skilled-trades training and for programmes at the advanced technical level or what might
be termed the " sub-engineering " or " technician " level. A recent nation-wide survey
pointed to the urgency of investigating the need of technicians in our major industries, INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION X 43
and the type of training which should be set up to meet these needs in such fields as
mechanical, electrical, architectural, and civil engineering; technicians for the chemical-
analysis laboratories of fishing, pulp and paper, oil, mining; and other like areas requiring
training programmes of two years or more beyond'the Grade XII level of education.
The ground set aside in Burnaby is large enough to accommodate this and further
expansion. Through the mutual efforts of the Apprenticeship Branch of the Department
of Labour, the Architectural Branch of the Department of Public Works, and our own
Department of Education, we have planned for space and building arrangements for
these additional units or buildings as time and need dictates. Our plans are flexible, and
the proposed buildings are of such a type as to provide changes of courses and programmes within them. Workshop and classroom areas are free of pillars and fixed partitions, with all services, such as electricity, heat, water, air, and gas lines, arranged in
the open so that they may be tapped into as required. False partitions can be built and
moved about at will.
The present and proposed vocational and technical training facilities are not intended
or designed to replace the schooling within our high schools. Rather, it is preferable that
the enrolment in our vocational schools, be made up of young men and women who have
completed their formal education and who require training for entry into a skilled occupation. Experience to date points to a competitive system for enrolment and acceptance
into one of these specialized and skilled occupations based on the high-school report re
attitude, aptitude, willingness to work, and the grades and marks acquired in Grade or
Grades X, XI, and XII. The reason our Pre-employment Training Programme students
are so well accepted is that the employer is learning that by accepting a graduate from
one of these courses he knows that the school has accomplished two things for him of
major importance, namely:—
(a) By selection and training, the school has removed those types who have
not an ardent interest and a sincere desire to learn this occupation;  and
(b) By teaching both practical skills under realistic conditions and the related
theoretical knowledge, the trainee has sufficient hand skills and knowledge
of a practical nature which the employer can put into immediate use.
Curriculum Development
The Department of Education, in co-operation with the Department of Labour, has
established a curriculum-development section with a full-time staff to develop and detail
courses of study in the various trades and skilled occupations. As these courses are completed, they become the basis of training for that trade or occupation in all schools of the
Province. Extensive use of advisory committees from industry is made in developing
these courses. Curriculum development will be on a continuous basis in order to keep
all courses up to date and in line with advances and changes in industry. At the present
time, curriculum development is crowded into the apprenticeship offices in Vancouver
and will be transferred into properly designed quarters in the first classroom unit to be
erected in the Burnaby vocational school in August of 1958.
Over-all courses of study completed to date are as follows: Auto Mechanics, Plastering, Metal Lathing, Welding, Steel Erection, and Machine-shop. In addition, work is
now in progress on over-all courses of study in the following trades: Carpentry, Sheet
Metal, Boat-building, Electricity, and Steam-fitting.
Federal-Provincial Vocational School, Nanaimo
This school operates in a war-time army camp. The school consists of the original
heavy-duty diesel and automotive workshop, with one H-type dormitory for sleeping, a
dining-house, and four classrooms.   Between 1955 and 1957 the Provincial Government X 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
added four additional sleeping-houses, a recreation-room, and a large welding workshop.
To-day this school is crowded with the following classes: Heavy-duty Mechanics (Gas
and Diesel), Welding, and Bulldozing.
This school can only sleep a total of 114 persons at any one time. There are peak-
load times when sleeping accommodation is arranged for in the recreation areas of the
school rather than turn down a man's opportunity to train and become employed.
Federal-Provincial Vocational Training Agreements
The following schedules are administered by the Regional Director on behalf of
the Federal and Provincial Governments under the provisions of the Vocational Training
Co-ordination Act of 1942/43:—
Schedule M (Training of Unemployed Persons)
The Federal Government shares equally with the Province in providing training for
unemployed persons registered with the National Employment Service for whom no
suitable work is available but who could be placed after short-term intensive training in
a suitable occupation. All applicants must be accepted by a Selection Committee consisting of the Regional Director, the Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation, and the Special
Placement Officer of the National Employment Service. Subsistence allowances and
training fees are paid on a sliding scale, depending upon the need of the individual
student.   Comparative enrolments are as follows:— Men women
1955/56   152 41
1956/57   295 78
Schedule R (Training of Disabled Persons)
The Federal Government shares equally with the Provincial Government in the cost
of individual training programmes deemed necessary for the rehabilitation of civilians.
All applicants must be approved by a Selection Committee consisting of the Regional
Director, the Co-ordinator of Rehabilitation, and the Special Placement Officer of the
National Employment Service. Training is restricted to persons who are handicapped
because of a continuing disability and who require special training to lit them for suitable
self-supporting employment.
It is most gratifying to realize that the persons who have been trained and who are
now employed are earning wages which make them self-supporting and independent
citizens and thereby are removed from the social welfare ranks and are now paying taxes
instead of receiving money from the Provincial Treasury. Comparative enrolments are as
follows:— Men        Women
1955/56  30 22
1956/57  44 34
Schedule O (Youth Training)
This schedule was originally designed to provide training needs of young persons
between the ages of 16 and 30 years who, because of the depression in the early thirties,
had never been permanently employed and who required a period of readjustment, including specialized training to fit them for gainful employment in a suitable occupation.
Under this schedule we have three sub-schedules operating, namely:—
Sub-schedule C (Urban Occupational Training).—Young men and women who have
never been to work and who are in need of financial assistance are able to have their
training fees paid from this source. Training costs are shared equally between the Federal
and Provincial Governments.   Comparative enrolments are as follows:— INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION X 45
i Men Women
1955/56     52 36
1956/57   195 27
Sub-schedule E (Rural Occupational Training). — Designed to give occupational
training for boys in the fields of agriculture and commercial fishing and homemaking for
girls. The course is conducted at the Youth Training Centre at the University of British
Columbia during January and February of each year. It is financed jointly by the
Federal and Provincial Governments.    Comparative enrolments are as follows:—
Men Women
1955/56  27 11
1956/57 -'_   30 14
Sub-schedule H (Student Aid).—Special provision is made for the Federal and Provincial Governments to share in the cost of bursaries to University students and nurses-
in-training. Assistance is limited to worthy needy students registered in approved training courses for professional nurses and for students in degree-granting courses other than
Theology. Students assisted under this programme are as follows: 1955/56, 540;
1956/57, 607.
Schedule K (Training for the Armed Forces)
Designed for the training of army cadets, mechanics, and technical personnel for the
Army and Air Force. The full cost is borne by the Federal Government. At the present
time we have six full-time academic civilian teachers assigned to the army cadet-training
programme at the R.C.S.M.E., Camp Chilliwack, Vedder Crossing, B.C.
Schedule Q (Supervisory Training)
The Federal Government shares equally with the Province in the training of supervisors, department heads, foremen, and others, in industries, hospitals, government offices,
commercial firms, etc., on such subjects as Job Instruction, Job Safety, Job Relations,
Job Methods, etc. Courses consist of ten persons participating at a time in either a ten-
hour instructional course, which makes the trainee better able to pass along training
information and to understand some of the difficulties apparent in the communication of
ideas, or a forty-hour course, which enables the supervisor to return to his or her firm
as a licensed trainee who can organize his own training programme within his own
organization. We were indeed fortunate to obtain the full-time services of an experienced
and respected institute conductor right out of industry to offer these much-needed and
sought-after courses.
Teacher-training
Industrial Arts and vocational teacher training programmes are conducted on a full-
time basis at the Vancouver Vocational Institute. All costs of the Industrial Arts teacher
training are borne by the Provincial Government. The programme is affiliated, as an
emergency training programme, with the College of Education at the University of British
Columbia.
The vocational-teacher training programme, on the other hand, relies on the obtaining of instructors having occupational competency before permitting them to take the 15
units of teacher-training to qualify them as vocational instructors. The vocational-
teacher training programmes are financed on an equal sharing basis by the Federal and
Provincial Governments.
Vocational Training, Senior High-school Level
The high-school programme provides vocational courses in Grades X, XI, and XII
in three broad areas of training—(a)  commercial, (b) agricultural, and (c) industrial. X 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
Federal funds are made available by way of annual allotments to the Province under
the new V.T.T.A. No. 2 and may be used at the discretion of the Province to meet the
costs of operating vocational and technical training programmes in approved schools. In
all approved vocational courses, students must spend a minimum of half of their time
in training in the occupational field of his or her choice.
Under the V.T.T.A. No. 2, forty-six high schools have been approved by the Federal
Government to conduct vocational courses. In these forty-six high schools there are
forty-six commercial programmes taught, nine industrial programmes, and seven agricultural programmes.   Comparative enrolments are as follows:—
Commercial	
Day-school
1955/56
____ 4,325
1956/57
4,013
Agricultural- _ _
147
122
IndustriaL __ _
2,329
2,702
Totals
___. 6,801
6,837
Commercial— 	
Night-school
1955/56
__-   3,177
1956/57
3,974
Agricultural	
44
106
Industrial.__   _ __
5,819
7,502
Totals
Industrial Arts
__ 9,040
11,582
(Report prepared by T. A. Quayle and C. J. Strong, M.A., Inspectors
of Technical Classes)
During the year new accommodation to teach Industrial Arts was provided in
Burnaby, Dawson Creek, Nakusp, Nanaimo, Prince George, Sardis, Steveston, Vancouver, Victoria, West Vancouver, and Westview, in addition to the expansion of facilities in
several other centres.
Forty-one new Industrial Arts teachers were required to staff the new accommodation and to replace the several teachers leaving the profession. To meet this need, day
and evening Industrial Arts teacher training classes were held at the teacher-training unit
operated by the Technical Branch of the Department of Education in the Vancouver
Vocational Institute.
With the College of Education of the University of British Columbia taking over all
teacher-training, a significant change has occurred in the Industrial Arts teacher training
programme. From now on all trainees will work toward the Bachelor of Education
degree with either a single or double major in Industrial Arts. However, until the College
of Education can provide facilities for technical training, the Technical Branch of the
Department of Education will continue to provide this aspect of teacher-training, with
all courses being offered carrying university credits.
During the past summer the facilities of the Vancouver Technical School were again
used to carry on the Industrial Arts teacher training programme. A total of 196 Industrial Arts teachers participated in an extensive list of courses providing a transition from
the Department of Education programme to the College of Education programme. In
addition to the transition courses, a good offering of practical courses, such as Small-boat
Building, Pattern-making and Foundry Practice, Auto Mechanics, Oxy-acetylene and Arc
Welding, was conducted for Secondary Advanced Certificate credits. The willing cooperation of the officials of the Vancouver School Board in connection with the use of the
facilities of the Vancouver Technical School is very much appreciated by this Branch.
Without this very welcome co-operation, the task of conducting a summer session for
Industrial Arts teachers would indeed be a most difficult one. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION X 47
The total number of Industrial Arts teachers, now 364, continues to show a steady
growth in fine with the increased needs. The total number of pupils participating in the
Industrial Arts programmes in the schools of British Columbia is as follows:—
Junior high schools  20,862
Senior high schools     6,865
Total  27,727
High School Correspondence
(Report prepared by Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.)
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1956/57 was 11,961. Of this number, 19 per cent or 2,266 were between the ages
of 18 and 20 and 44.8 per cent or 5,313 were 21 years or over. Thus 63.4 per cent of
our students can be classified as adults. This is a decrease of 0.3 per cent over the figures
of 1955/56. There was an increase of 1,030 students in the number of students over 21
years of age and an increase of ten in the number of students between the ages of 18 and
20 years.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:-—
Apprentices      130
Army, Navy, Air Force        97
Civil Servants        54
Police        30
Domestic workers      101
Farming and ranching        72
Firemen, engineers      295
Forestry      109
Housewives      200
Lumbering      181
Merchants        29
Mining        42
Office-workers      698
Professional—
Teachers      3 09
Nurses      121
Miscellaneous        23
Railroad        35
Skilled labour      573
Unskilled labour      337
Miscellaneous        31
Total  3,467 X 48
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1956/57
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
The growth in the number of local Recreation Commissions served by the Community Programmes Branch has continued at a rapid rate during the past year. To date
the Community Programmes Branch extends its services to 216 local Recreation Commissions, as compared with 160 at this time last year.
Tens of thousands of persons participated in community recreation programmes
directly assisted financially and otherwise by the Community Programmes Branch during
the year 1956/57. These recreational activities include almost all leisure-time endeavours. Games and sports attract the greatest number of participants, but arts, crafts,
drama, dancing, music, outing, and social activities all account for a large number of
participants.
The recreational assistance that the Community Programmes Branch offers communities is thereby being extended and reaching a far greater percentage of the total population. It is safe to assume, considering the present trend in growth, that the services of
the Community Programmes Branch will continue to reach an ever-increasing number
of communities and persons in British Columbia in the years to come.
The increase in number of local Recreation Commissions is a reflection of the awareness for more co-ordination and planning in community recreation programmes. More
and more communities are beginning to realize the importance of adequate planning for
recreation. Not only has the programme expanded on the Provincial level, but also on
the community level. Communities are continually adding to their existing recreation
activities, and by doing this our services are not only being felt in more communities, but
by potentially more people in the communities.
One of the services administered by the Community Programmes Branch is the
recreational grant system. The grants are designed to be of assistance only and are to
encourage communities to establish Recreation Commissions and employ professional
recreation help.
The following 216 communities have Recreation Commissions which have been
elected or appointed in accordance with the " Municipal Act ":—
tAbbotsford.
tAinsworth.
*Alert Bay.
tAlexandria.
tArgenta.
t Arrow Park.
Barnston Island.
tBear Creek.
tBlue River.
tBonnington-Corra Linn.
tBoston Bar.
tBoswell.
tBouchie Lake.
tBowen Island.
tBralorne.
tBridesville.
tBritannia Beach.
tBrocklehurst.
♦Burnaby.
tBurton.
♦Campbell Rixer.
tCanal Flats.
tCanoe.
tCanyon.
tCedar.
tCentral Saanich.
tChase.
tCherry Creek.
tChristina Lake.
♦Coquitlam.
*Courtenay.
♦Cranbrook.
tCrawford Bay.
tCrescent Valley.
♦Creston.
1'Cultus Lake.
tDecker Lake.
tDeep Cove.
tDelta.
tDeroche.
tDewdney.
tDragon Lake,
t Eagle Valley.
tEdgewater.
tEmerald Mines.
tEnderby.
tFerndale.
tFort Fraser.
Fort St. John.
tFrancois Lake.
tFraser Lake.
tFruitvale.
tGabriola Island.
tGalloway.
tGenelle.
tGiant Mascot Mines.
tGibsons.
♦Giscome.
tGlenmore.
tGolden.
tGrand Forks.
tGray Creek.
tGreat Central.
tGreenwood.
tGrindrod.
tGroundbirch.
* Receiving grants for full- or part-time Recreation Directors.
t Receiving grants for recreational expenses. COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
X 49
tHaida Massett.
tHalfmoon Bay.
tHarrison Hot Springs.
tHarrop and District.
tHatzic Prairie.
tHazelton.
tHedley.
tHorsefly.
tHouston.
tlnvermere.
tloco.
tJordan River.
tKaleden.
tKaslo.
♦Kelowna.
tKettle Valley.
♦Kimberley.
tKitwanga Valley.
tKootenay Bay.
tKyuquot.
tLac la Hache.
tLa France.
Laidlaw.
tLakeview Heights.
tLangley.
tLantzville.
tLavington.
tLillooet.
tLister.
tLittle Fort.
tLone Butte.
tLumby.
tLytton.
tMcConnell Creek.
tMahood Falls.
tMalaspina.
tMara.
tMarysville.
tMerritt.
tMetchosin.
tMidway.
tMinto.
tMission City,
tMoose Heights.
tMount Sheer.
tNakusp.
♦Nanaimo.
tNanoose.
tNaramata.
tNarcosli Creek.
tNatal.
♦Nelson.
tNew Hazelton.
tNew Masset.
♦New Westminster.
tNoralee-Clemretta-
Colleymount.
tNorth Bend.
♦North Cowichan.
tNorth Kamloops.
♦North Vancouver.
tOak Bay.
tOkanagan Centre.
tOkanagan Falls.
t Oliver.
tOsoyoos.
tOyama.
trailing.
tParksville.
tPeachland.
tPemberton District.
tPendelton Bay.
tPender Harbour.
♦Penticton.
Pitt Meadows.
tPopkum.
tPort Clements.
tPort Coquitlam.
tPort McNeill.
tPort Mellon.
tPort Moody.
tPouce Coupe.
Powell River.
♦Prince George.
♦Prince Rupert.
tProcter.
tProgress.
tQuadra.
tQualicum Beach.
tQueen Charlotte.
tQuesnel.
tQuick, Round Lake, Wood-
mere, and Walcott.
tRed Bluff.
tRedroofs.
tRevelstoke.
♦Richmond.
tRiondel.
tRoberts Creek.
tRoe Lake.
tRose Lake.
tSalmo.
tSalmon Arm.
tSandspit.
tSavona District.
tSayward.
tSechelt.
tShawnigan Lake.
tSidney.
tSkidegate Mission.
tSlocan City.
tSmithers.
tSoda Creek.
tSooke.
tSouthbank.
tSouth Hazelton.
South Saltspring Island.
tSouth Slocan.
tSouth Taylor.
tSpences Bridge.
Squamish Indian Band.
tSquamish.
tStraiton.
tSummerland.
tSunnybrae.
t Surrey.
tTarrys and District.
tTatla Lake.
tTatlayoko Lake.
tTchesinkut Lake.
tTelkwa.
tTerrace.
tTopley.
♦Trail-Tadanac.
University Hill.
♦Vancouver.
tVernon.
tWardner.
tWarfield.
tWestbank.
tWest Vancouver.
tWillow Point.
tWilson Creek.
tWindermere.
tWinfield.
tWoodfibre.
tWynndel.
tYale.
tYmir.
tZeballos.
* Receiving grants for full- or part-time Recreation Directors.
t Receiving grants for recreational expenses.
Consultants
The Recreation Consultants of the Community Programmes Branch continue to
serve communities in practically all recreation matters. This specialized advisory and
counselling service on all matters related to public community recreation has been very
effective in standardizing recreation aims, objectives, and procedures throughout the
Province.
Basically the Recreation Consultants are responsible for:—
(a) Stimulating and encouraging the development of community recreation
and leisure-time education. X 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
(b) Providing advice and assistance to communities related to their problems
in developing leisure activities,
(c) Channelling special Branch services to communities.
(d) Assisting in the organization and administration of area leadership courses.
(e) Making the services of the Branch known to organizations, agencies, and
interested citizens.
(/)   Stimulating the establishment of local Recreation Commissions in accordance with the " Municipal Act," to serve as an administrative authority for
public recreation.
The following are the Recreation Consultants, with their addresses and areas of
responsibility:—
Consultant
Headquarters
Area
K. K. Maltman                    	
J. B. Ostrom __          -
T H, Pant^n
Kelowna
G. J. Pynn	
T. Ruben   	
Vancouver.  	
For the second consecutive year the Department of Education lost one of its most
capable workers. Mr. A. W. Thiessen, Recreation Consultant for the Greater Vancouver
region, left the Community Programmes Branch for the position of Superintendent of
Recreation at New Westminster. Mr. Thiessen's loss will be felt by all in the Branch, but
we know he will continue his good work for recreation at New Westminster.
At the present time, Mr. J. Mathisen, Recreation Consultant in New Westminster,
has assumed Mr. Thiessen's area on a temporary basis.
During the past year the Consultants, serving as representatives of the British Columbia Centennial Committee, have completed the vast job of organizing over 300 local
Centennial Committees. Not only have the Consultants been called upon to perform this
important organizational aspect of the Centenary, but also to serve in an advisory capacity
to the local Centennial Committees.
The work with the British Columbia Centennial Committee is blending well with
continued promotion of Recreation Commissions in the Province. The general levels of
recreation and community activities are being raised as a result of the Centenary, and the
additional facilities developed as a result of Centennial projects will assist the communities
in their everyday living.
Mr. Joseph Lewis, Director of Recreation for the Blind Citizens of the Province and
an employee of the Branch, continues to do outstanding work in this field. Mr. Lewis
has given talks at many outstanding recreation gatherings during the past year and continues to organize more recreation activities for increasing numbers of blind citizens.
Leadership training in recreation is of the utmost importance in British Columbia.
In the field of recreation where human relationship and values are so important, intelligently trained leaders are absolutely essential. Recreation leadership is the heart of
recreation service, even as education administration and instruction are the chief aspects
of a school department's service.
Recognizing this need for adequately trained leaders, the Community Programmes
Branch promotes and assists in training recreation leaders in a variety of activities. This
is done through clinics, conferences, workshops organized in communities, and also the
annual Provincial Recreation Leadership School. The people who are trained for recreation leadership must be acceptable to and chosen by the community which they serve. COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH X 51
The Fourth Annual Provincial Recreation Leadership School was held in the Oak
Bay Junior High School in Victoria from January 15th to 26th. Well over 100 recreation
leaders from all parts of British Columbia attended the two-week school. The courses
offered included Recreation Objectives and History, Recreation Leadership and Programmes, Recreation Administration Organization, Recreation Administration Business
Functions, Ballroom Dancing, Sports Organization, Copper Tooling, Leatherwork, Square
Dance Calling, Senior Citizens and Recreation Programming, Elementary Square Dancing,
Playground Operation and Programming, Organization and Administration of Community Centres, Folk Dancing, Keep Fit (Women), Physical Recreation (Men), Drama
(Play Production), Social Recreation, Community Crafts, Metal Etching, How to Instruct
in Volleyball and Badminton, Swimming and Life-saving.
A special feature of this year's school was a daily lecture session where outstanding
personalities in specific fields of recreation spoke to the delegates. One such speaker
was Mr. W. Shumard, National Recreation Association representative for the Pacific
Northwest.
Approximately seventy instructional clinics or workshops were held in British Columbia communities last year. Included in this total was a special series of baseball
clinics arranged and sponsored jointly by the Community Programmes Branch and the
Vancouver Mounties professional baseball team.
For the first time in history the National Recreation Association held a regional
conference in Canada. The north-west region of the National Recreation Association
held its annual conference in Vancouver and was hosted by the Vancouver Park and
Public Recreation Commission. The conference was attended by over 500 recreation
leaders from British Columbia, Alberta, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana.
The Director was responsible for organizing many of the sessions at the conference,
and along with the Consultants took an active part in the conference. This conference
was of great assistance to the recreation movement in British Columbia, and all recreation-workers in the Province derived much benefit from the various sessions.
Type of Leadership Training Number Attending
Regional conferences  6 360
National Recreation Association Conference  1 500
Clinics and workshops  70 2,800
Provincial Recreation Leadership School  1 110
Totals  78 3,770
Again the Community Programmes Branch assisted several communities with special
recreation projects. These projects included swimming, life-saving, playgrounds, basketball recreation activity, and resulted from recommendations of School Boards, School
Inspectors, Recreation Consultants, and Recreation Commissions.
By assisting communities with their swimming and life-saving programmes the
Community Programmes Branch is performing a great community service. Particularly
in British Columbia, where swimming areas are so abundant, programmes such as these
are highly essential. During 1956/57, over sixty communities received this aid for programmes with 16,000 persons.
The Branch again co-operated with the Red Cross Water Safety Division in the
sponsoring of Water Safety Week early in June. This is a very important function to help
educate the general population on matters of water-safety procedure.
Drama
Drama activities, aided and assisted by the Community Programmes Branch, continue to fluorish throughout the Province. X 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
The services offered by this Branch to drama groups are as follows:—
(a) Advisory services are made available to communities on subjects related
to drama development.
(b) Assistance is provided in training local leaders in the skills and techniques
of the theatre.
(c) A drama library service is maintained to lend technical books or plays to
persons or community drama groups.
(_i) A limited supply of stage equipment is available for loan.
(_?)  Grants are provided to assist local and school groups in the staging of
various festivals.
During the past year twenty-five drama festivals were held throughout the Province
for both school groups and adult groups. Eleven of these festivals were for adult groups
and nine festivals were for school groups. Also included in the total were five festivals
for both students and adults.
Winners of the ten regional one-act drama festivals converged on Vernon for the
Provincial One-act Drama Festival. The following drama groups were regional winners
and participated in the British Columbia festival: Vernon Little Theatre, Okanagan
Mission Drama group, Trail Little Theatre, Prince George Players, Burnaby Little
Theatre, Yellow Point Drama group, Duncan Little Theatre Guild, Terrace Little
Theatre, Dawson Creek Drama group, Lake Windermere Players. The Yellow Point
Drama Group was the winner of this year's festival after being runner-up for the past
three years.
In conjunction with the festival, the annual meeting of the British Columbia Drama
Association was held. The Honourable L. R. Peterson, Dr. H. L. Campbell, and Mr.
H. S. Hum were named honorary presidents. Mrs. Gerald Rushton was returned as
president of the association.
Many persons, both students and adults, were afforded the opportunity to study
further through the awarding of several drama scholarships during the past year. Scholarships were awarded by the University of British Columbia Summer School of the Theatre
and the Banff School of Fine Arts, as well as by the British Columbia Drama Association
and local festival committees. NIGHT-SCHOOLS
NIGHT-SCHOOLS
X 53
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
Night-schools, operated by the local School Boards, are of two types, namely:
(1) Courses which are vocational, technical, or industrial, operating under Dominion-
Provincial agreements; and (2) courses which are cultural or recreational, or fall into
the field of general adult education.
All night-school classes which are approved by the Department of Education receive
grants on behalf of the instructors' salaries. Grants are provided also for the salaries
of night-school directors or principals.
Most School Boards in British Columbia are offering a large variety of courses and
opportunities to the citizens of this Province. Both the variety of courses offered and
the number of students enrolled in the night-schools of British Columbia have steadily
increased.
The number of School Boards conducting night-school classes has increased to
sixty in 1956/57, as compared with fifty-three in 1955/56.
The following school Boards conducted night-school classes during the academic
year 1956/57:—
Kimberley.
Kitimat.
Kootenay Lake.
Lake Cowichan.
Langley.
Lillooet.
McBride.
Maple Ridge.
Mission.
Nanaimo.
Nelson.
New Westminster.
North Vancouver.
Ocean Falls.
Peace River North.
Peace River South.
Penticton.
Powell River.
Prince George.
Prince Rupert.
Abbotsford.
Alberni.
Alert Bay.
Burnaby.
Campbell River.
Castlegar.
Chilliwack.
Coquitlam.
Courtenay.
Cowichan.
Cranbrook.
Creston.
Delta.
Fernie.
Fraser Canyon.
Grand Forks.
Howe Sound.
Kamloops.
Kelowna.
Keremeos.
Princeton.
Qualicum.
Quesnel.
Revelstoke.
Richmond.
Saanich.
Salmon Arm.
Smithers.
Southern Okanagan.
Summerland.
Surrey.
Tahsis River.
Terrace.
Trail.
Vancouver.
Vanderhoof.
Vernon.
Victoria.
West Vancouver.
Windermere.
Students Enrolled in British Columbia Night-schools
1953/54  19,969
1954/55  22,280
1955/56  29,331
1956/57  33,565
Night-school Statistics
Vocational—
1955/56	
1956/57	
Non-vocational—
1955/56 J_      829
1956/57	
Number of
Instructors
__     357
__     440
Vocational, 1956/57	
Non-vocational, 1956/57.
440
Number of
Students
9,040
11,582
20,291
21,983
11,582
21,983
Totals
1,328
33,565 X 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
In addition to the above, several hundred persons received apprenticeship training
throughout the Province. These apprenticeship classes were under the jurisdiction of
the Director of Apprenticeship Branch, Department of Labour.
In an emergency measure, many Hungarians were assisted financially by the
Department so that they might take English for New Canadians courses under the night-
school programme. This assistance covered the fees that they would ordinarily be
required to pay for the course.
The night-school programme conducted by the various School Boards is an ever-
increasing one, intended to meet the needs and wishes of the general adult population.
It continues to offer, and expand, training in vocational and leisure-time pursuits which
are essential aspects of our modern society. HOME ECONOMICS X 55
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools     2,224
Junior high schools  20,323
22,547
In Grade VII  8,844
In Grade VIII  9,446
In Grade IX _'_  4,246
Boys   11
22,547
Jericho Hill School  24
Senior high schools   10,098
Technical students  33
High-school boys  175
Private schools  644
Indian schools      60
        704
In elementary grades (Grades VII and VIII)._ 253
In high school (senior grades)  451
704
Correspondence courses taken under supervision of teacher
who is not qualified to teach senior Home Economics
courses         279
33,685
Throughout the Province there are 166 Home Economics centres, including eleven
in private schools and three in Indian schools, and shows an increase of eleven over the
1955/56 total. ,
One-room centres 	
Two-room centres	
Three-room centres	
Four-room centres 	
Five-room centres 	
Six-room centres 	
Seven-room centres _•_	
166 313
Two Home Economics centres were closed during the current year, as Home
Economics teachers were not available. However, some students in these schools continued their Home Economics courses by Correspondence instruction.
During the 1956/57 session, new Home Economics centres were opened at
McBride, Merritt, and Nakusp, and additional rooms provided at New Westminster
and Vernon.
73
73
61
122
22
66
2
8
5
25
2
12
1
7 X 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1956/57
New schools with Home Economics centres were opened in the following districts:—
Burnaby:  Kensington Junior High School, Moscrop Junior High School.
Coquitlam:   Winslow Junior High School.
Kamloops:   North Kamloops Junior-Senior High School.
Richmond:  Steveston Junior High School.
Sardis:   Sardis Junior High School.
Surrey:  K. B. Woodward Elementary School, White Rock Elementary School.
Vancouver:  Churchill Senior High School.
Victoria:  Colquitz Junior High School.
West Vancouver:  West Vancouver Senior High School.
Westview:  Max Cameron Junior-Senior High School.
Four Home Economics centres were closed and replaced by new centres at Burnaby
and Nanaimo.
There are 306 Home Economics teachers throughout the Province, showing an
increase of twenty-eight over the total for last year.
This year Home Economics Summer School classes were held at the University of
British Columbia. Sixty-four persons, among whom were many elementary certificated
teachers, registered for courses Home Economics 105 and Home Economics 106. Both
of these courses may be credited on the Bachelor of Home Economics or Bachelor of
Education (five-year) programme. Education 404 and Education 409, sponsored by
the Department of Education, were offered, on the University of British Columbia
campus, for university graduates on the temporary Home Economics training programme.
Twenty-seven teachers enrolled in Education 404, and seventeen in Education 409.
Three special Saturday morning sessions were conducted by Miss Bertha Rogers
and Miss Jean Irvine. These sessions were held at the University Hill School and were
made available to elementary certificated teachers who were enrolled in Home Economics
105 and Home Economics 106, and who were accepting Home Economics teaching
positions for the first time in September, 1957. These sessions, at which attendance
was voluntary, had an average attendance of twenty-five.
The number of university graduates in Home Economics continues to be inadequate
to supply the needs of the schools. Many married teachers are helping to staff the Home
Economics centres in the schools, in cases where such teachers cannot teach full time,
two or three teachers are sharing a one-teacher load. JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
X 57
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
The enrolment for the year 1956/57 was 203, divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
28
59
22
94
50
153
Totals _               .              -                                         	
87
116
203
Of the total enrolment, 103 were boys from 5 to 19 years, and 100 were girls within
the same age-limits. Eight pre-school deaf children between the ages of 3 and 5 were
given speech and acoustic training once a week. Pre-school blind children received
home training through the co-operation of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind.
Thirty partial-sighted children throughout the Province were supplied with available
magna-type texts, and four from out of town were provided with room and board while
attending the Kitsilano High School special class for partial-sighted students.
General Remarks
Some alterations were made in the Industrial Arts shop and a classroom adjacent
to it to accommodate new equipment which has been purchased to meet the requirements
of a revised general shop programme. Consideration is presently being given to the
possibility of constructing a separate unit in the fall for this purpose, since the present
area remains inadequate.
The last six classrooms of the Deaf Department were equipped with new multiple
hearing aids, and a special wall-type microphone has been purchased for summer installation in all classrooms. Special equipment was also purchased and installed in the auditory
training room in Lawrence Hall.
The resident instructor in-service training programme was revised and approved by
the Advisory Committee for implementation with the beginning of the next school-year.
It is designed to more adequately meet present needs from all desirable points of view.
Arrangements were completed whereby the training and screening of pre-school
deaf and hard-of-hearing children will all be undertaken at the Health Centre for Children,
beginning this fall. Our responsibility for those eligible will begin at 5, instead of 2 or
3 years as heretofore.
On Saturday afternoon, February 23rd, the Premier of British Columbia, the
Honourable W. A. C. Bennett, officially opened our new school for the blind and recreational unit. The opening ceremonies, chaired by the Minister of Education, the Honourable Leslie Peterson, attracted an estimated 300 guests to our campus. We were also
honoured by the presence of a number of Cabinet Ministers and members of the Legislative Assembly. Also present were a number of superintendents, inspectors, and principals
from neighbouring school districts. We were pleased, too, to host the superintendents of
the Washington and Oregon Schools for the Blind.
Following a brief but impressive opening ceremony, visitors were conducted through
the lovely new buildings by members of the staff. It was a great day in the history of
this school.
For the last three months of the school-year, an orientation class was conducted by
Mrs. Anne Auld for blind children being enrolled for the September beginner group.
This was a very worthwhile undertaking and much enjoyed by the children themselves. X 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955/57
I wish to express my thanks for the excellent co-operation received from the Department of Education, the sympathetic understanding and valuable guidance of our Advisory
Committee, and the loyal support of all members of the School staff. These factors have
contributed richly to make the 1956/57 school-year a very successful one. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS X 59
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1956/57 was 11,961.   This figure shows an increase of 1,702 over 1955/56.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in school— Per Cent
1. School-age students registered in high and superior schools (throughout this report the term
" school-age " refers to students under 18 years
of age)      3,334
2. School-age students registered in elementary
schools          159
Total number of school-age students _,_    3,493
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years registered in
their local schools     1,108
4. Students of 21 years or over registered in their
local schools   18
Total number of students registered in
their local schools taking one or
more correspondence courses     4,619 38.6
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because of physical disability  90
2. School-age students gainfully employed        206
3. School-age students studying courses at home
because of the distance factor        251
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary __.__        118
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons        224
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered
in their local schools     1,158
Total number of students under 21 years
not registered in their local schools
and obtaining their education by
correspondence      2,047 17.1
7. Adult students (21 years and over)      5,295 44.3
Total number of students  11,961       100.0
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age     4,382 36.6
2. Pupils 18, 19, and 20 years of age     2,266 19.0
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over     5,313 44.4
Totals     11,961       100.0 X 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1956/57
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses.   Others
registered for only one or two courses.   The number of students who enrolled in each
of the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 10a, 20, 30, 40  1,496
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 40  1,637
English 91   122
English 99   38
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 33  1,110
History 91   124
Science 10, 20  582
Mathematics 10, 20, 30, 91  2,570
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92  356
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92  199
French 10, 20, 91, 92  613
German 10, 20, 91  167
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30  593
Agriculture 10, 30, 38, 39  249
Geography 91   116
Economics 92   26
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91   716
Art 10, 20  385
Record-keeping 11  533
Business Fundamentals   172
Book-keeping 34, 91, 95  514
Mathematics 12   266
Shorthand 21, 31   289
Typewriting 10, 20   1,006
Secretarial Practice 92  33
English 93 (Business English)  65
English 32 (Journalism)   17
Biology 91   178
Chemistry 91  1  154
Physics 91   132
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  45
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20 .  340
Sheet-metal Work 20  4
Metal-mining   14
Auto Mechanics 91, 92  339
Diesel Engines 91   46
Electricity 20  194
Radio and Wireless 30  185
Elementary Geology 29  127
Forestry 30  137
Art 39   69
Frame-house Construction 20  69
Home Furnishing 23   47
Extramural Music 11, 21  18
Total   16,092
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS X 61
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature 100  193
English Composition 101   165
Mathematics 101   190
Mathematics 100  56
French 120   30
French 110  66
Latin 120  1
Latin 110  16
Spanish 110  9
Agriculture 100   8
History 101   63
History 102   118
Chemistry 101  59
Physics 101   52
German 90  144
Total   1,170
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also be
classified in the following table:—
Steam Engineering, 4th, 3rd, and 2nd Class  395
House Painting and Decorating  14
Aviation I  12
Industrial Mathematics   131
Practical Design  26
Glove-making   3
Air Navigation I, II  20
Mathematics for Steam Engineering, 2nd Class  18
Accountancy for Credit Unions  19
Spherical Trigonometry   13
English 19   707
Dressmaking   43
Preparation for Citizenship  I  456
Steam Heating for Plant Operators  64
Electricity for Building Trades  79
Total _  2,000
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates of
public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students
of 16 years or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students
living outside this Province.
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 905 students the fees
were paid by their School Boards.
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1. Hospital cases   337
2. British Columbia Penitentiary  135
3. Oakalla Prison  283
4. Girls' Industrial School     19 X 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
5. Provincial Industrial School for Boys  57
6. New Haven   58
7. On relief or equivalent  3
8. Disabled students at home  30
9. Students needed at home  20
Total   942
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations. The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers   786
Nurses    582
Medicine   150
Science   49
Law   50
Art   80
Theology  35
Pharmacy  42
Miscellaneous   143
Commercial   889
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 443
Police   3 7
Aviation   81
Her Majesty's Forces  81
Civil Service  3
Agriculture and farming  87
Forestry   156
Mining   19
Journalism   74
Diesel and steam engineering  766
Radio   65
Miscellaneous   8 8
Not given  7,245
Total   11,961
Completion of Courses
A total of 138,368 papers were marked during the year, which is an increase of
14,337 over the number of papers marked in the preceding year. We have five-, ten-,
twelve-, eighteen-, and twenty-paper courses.
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of sixty-three instructors
were employed during the year.
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 6,725 students with material from our course
in English I for New Canadians, 1,211 students were supplied with material from the
English II for New Canadians, and 707 students took the course in English II (English
19) by correspondence. In addition, 456 students were enrolled in the course " Preparation for Citizenship." We also supplied 1,270 courses for use in the Hungarian refugee
camp at Abbotsford.    Classes in English were held in fifty-eight night-school centres, CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
X 63
and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in 133 small isolated places
throughout the Province.
New and Revised Courses
Agriculture 20, Chemistry 101, English 101, German 91, History 102, House Painting and Decorating, Social Studies 20, Social Studies 30, Spanish 10, Spanish 20, and
Steam Heating for Plant Operators were the new and revised courses offered during the
year.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1956/57 there were 1,405 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
Correspondence School—1,280 in Victoria and the remainder, 125, at Pouce Coupe in
the Peace River District. The tables below show the enrolment by month and grade
for each centre.
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
September 	
115
117
98
84
72
69
60
52
667
October   ...
155
144
111
101
92
79
85
74
841
November 	
172
157
120
119
100
78
98
85
929
December	
181
164
128
123
106
87
107
91
987
January 	
192
177
142
138
117
94
113
100
1,073
February 	
203
189
153
144
125
96
121
106
1,137
March  	
216
198
163
147
127
103
124
120
1,198
April 	
218
196
169
154
129
107
127
126
1,226
May.. 	
219
203
170
160
134
112
133
133
1,264
June	
215
211
168
160
141
117
130
138
1,280
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September	
13
5
11
10
6
5
6
5
61
October	
18
9
16
12
7
5
8
5
80
November	
18
11
18
13
8
5
9
6
88
December 	
19
13
18
14
9
5
10
6
94
January	
24
16
22
18
11
7
10
6
114
February..	
26
19
22
17
12
8
8
8
120
March  _. _
26
19
22
18
12
8
8
9
122
April 	
26
19
22
18
12
8
9
9
123
May	
27
19
22
18
12
8
10
9
125
June   	
27
19
22
18
12
8
10
9
125
The number of papers marked in the two centres was as follows: Victoria, 145,251;
Pouce Coupe, 11,066; total, 156,317.
The staff in Victoria consisted of the Director, fourteen full-time instructors, and
an office staff of five members; in Pouce Coupe, one full-time instructor in charge and
one full-time assistant.
During the year new courses were written in Mathematics for Grades VII and VIII
and in Language for Grades IV and V. These courses were devised and written by staff
instructors at the Victoria centre.
In addition to the numbers shown above, adult students enrolled for courses from
Grades I to VIII as follows:—
September      48
October      99
November   116
December  138
January   159
February   170
March   196
April   217
May   228
June   241
A total of 5,247 papers were marked in the adult section during the year. X 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1956/57
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
Through excellent staff teamwork, another big year is completed to the general
satisfaction of our many clients. The Text-book Rental Plan is continuing to fulfil all
the better predictions made for it, and, on the whole, excellent co-operation is received
by us from the various school officials connected with its operation.
In recent years we have experienced some unnecessary difficulties when new schools
are being occupied, with the resultant transfer of pupils. We must be made familiar
with the proposed transfer of books and pupils while the move is in the planning stage.
When this procedure is followed, there are no difficulties.
The Text-book Branch supplied the required free and Rental Plan text-books and
the various forms, etc., to schools and School Boards as and when required. Curriculum
and other bulletins were distributed to schools, and orders for books from the various
dealers throughout the Province were processed and completed in a satisfactory manner.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies during the school-year 1956/57 to
public and private schools and to correspondence students required an expenditure of
$475,834.37; 4,785 free requisitions were received and filled. This is an increase over
the previous year of $135,134.59 and 468 orders.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached a total of 20,326. From these orders,
the sum of $830,356.95 was collected and deposited in the Treasury, an increase over
the previous year of $159,489.39 and 1,552 orders.
A total of 2,703 Rental Plan requisitions were received, checked, and completed,
and $401,013.72 in rental fees and remittances for lost and damaged books was collected
and deposited in the Treasury, an increase of $31,810.40 over last year. During the
school-year $5,140.45 was refunded to pupils who left the school system prior to March
31st.
To properly carry out all of the detail involved in the above requires the willing
co-operation of a loyal and efficient staff and school officials, particularly secretary-
treasurers. For this assistance and co-operation, I am happy to officially record my
thanks.
The accompanying financial statements, presented in the form required by the Audit
Branch, include the eighth covering the Text-book Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $386,600.94, is valued at publisher's price
plus incoming freight. The rental stock in the various schools, $550,166.38, is valued
on the same basis, less depreciation. No allowance is made for the costs involved in
moving the stock from the text-book warehouse to the several schools.
Sales
The sales to dealers, etc., amounted to $989,296.47, less discount of $190,741.77,
and our revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year is $53,083.66, after deducting
salaries, wages, and other overhead.
Rentals
We received $391,445.75, an increase of 9.8 per cent over the previous year. It
will be noted that the deficit for the year is $175,482.47. In spite of increasing costs,
transportation, etc., the excess of expenditure over revenue is less than was estimated in
this susbsidized scheme. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH X 65
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1957
Sales
Revenue—
Sales  $989,296.47
Less discount     190,741.77
Net sales  $798,554.70
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1956  $322,089.54
Purchases for year (cost, freight,
duty)      753,341.68
  $1,075,431.22
Inventory, March 31st, 1957        386,600.94
Cost of sales     688,830.28
Gross profit	
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages	
Packing and general expenses	
Freight and delivery	
Sundry expenses	
$109,724.42
$41,655.16
4,966.53
9,654.98
364.09
56,640.76
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1957     $53,083.66 X 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
Text-book Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected  $391,445.75
Opening rental inventory, March 31st, 1956      $508,401.06
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and S.S. tax)        564,764.78
$1,073,165.84
1956/57
Depreciation1
Inventory, March 31st, 1955- $483,264.03
Less three years' depreciation at
331/,. per cent per annum    483,264.03
  $161,088.01
Inventory, March 31st, 1956___ $520,969.57
Less two years' depreciation at
33x/3 per cent per annum    347,313.04
     173,656.52
$173,656.53
Inventory, March 31st, 1957___ $564,764.78
Less one year's depreciation at
33^ per cent per annum    188,254.93
     188,254.93
$376,509.85
Closing rental inventory at March 31st, 1957        550,166.38
Total depreciation for year 1956/
57  $522,999.46     $522,999.46
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages     $32,306.42
Packing and general expenses  3,851.88
Freight and delivery         7,488.09
Sundry expenses   282.37
  43,928.76
     566,928.22
Excess expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1957  $175,482.47
1 See footnote to balance-sheet. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
X 67
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1957
Assets
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand-
Cash in bank.__
Inventory—
Stock on hand-
Consigned text-books
Less depreciation1 	
Accounts receivable	
Outstanding publishers' credit notes_.
1 Third year depreciation on 1954/55 inventory-
Second year depreciation on 1955/56 inventory-
First year depreciation on 1956/57 inventory	
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders,	
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account-
Outstanding publishers' invoices	
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund	
$100.00
750.00
$1,073,165.84
522,999.46
$161,088.01
. 173,656.52
. 188,254.93
$522,999.46
$850.00
386,600.94
550,166.38
13,807.01
30.05
$951,454.38
$1,288.36
850.00
63.64
949,252.38
$951,454.38 X 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), CHIEF
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The sudden death of Dr. Harold Johns deprived the people of this Province of the
services of an outstanding man in the field of educational and vocational guidance. As
Director of the Division, he first organized and then maintained it at a high level recognized throughout Canada. Dr. Johns was recognized as eminent in his field and was
called on many times to address groups of educationists and lay persons in other Provinces
as well as in our own. As a teacher, his services were enlisted summer after summer by
universities in Canada and the United States. In 1957 the University of Michigan had
asked him to give a course in counselling at its summer school, and arrangements had
been completed a few weeks before his death. As Director of Guidance, as principal of
the Summer School of Education, as Inspector of Schools, as teacher and lecturer, he was
held in esteem by his colleagues and students.   His place will be a difficult one to fill.
It was in April that I took over, on an interim and acting basis, some of the essential
duties in the Division.   This report is, therefore, incomplete.
The Division carried out its usual policy of supplying secondary schools with new
issues of guidance monographs. Schools were also supplied with lists of other materials
that might be purchased.
In addition, occupational studies on British Columbia industries were prepared by
active counsellors under the direction of Dr. Johns and with the assistance of the industries concerned.   These were mimeographed and distributed to schools.
A total of 20,137 job studies were submitted in connection with the Annual Job
Study Competition sponsored by the Vancouver Board of Trade and the Pacific National
Exhibition, in co-operation with the Department of Education. The sponsors are considering at present a means of recognizing the best job study in each individual school,
while continuing the bursary awards of previous years to Provincial winners.
Winners of the bursary awards for 1957 were as follows:—
(1) Grand award (senior high schools, for the study of a single vocation):
Anne Hassen, Oak Bay Senior High School, Victoria. Subject, " The
Marine Biologist."
(2) Second award (senior high schools, for the study of a single vocation):
Margaret Obana, Vernon Senior High School, Vernon. Subject " Pharmacists Help Promote B.C.'s Public Health."
(3) First award (junior high schools, for the study of jobs in an industry, or
a general field of employment): Elizabeth Tarlton, Cowichan Junior-
Senior High School, Duncan.   Subject, " The B.C. Fisheries." DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS X 69
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR OF
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
Programming
During the year a total of 243 radio programmes were broadcast to schools over a
period of thirty weeks.
In so far as it is possible to allocate a school broadcast to a specific school subject
on the basis of number of programmes rather than time allotment, distribution was as
follows:-
Music	
Per Cent
  36
Social Studies	
  22
Current Events  __           _        _   	
  14
Literature, Language, and Reading
9
Health and Personal Development	
     8
Science	
4
Art	
     3
French	
     3
Special	
     1
On a time basis the order remains virtually the same, except that Literature and
Current Events change places.
The total of programmes for the year was made up of 51 half-hour broadcasts, 43
twenty-minute broadcasts, 106 fifteen-minute broadcasts, and 43 broadcasts of ten
minutes or less.
Because school broadcasts fit into a wide variety of situations, including a large
proportion of ungraded classrooms, it is seldom that a programme is scheduled for a
single grade. Taking this into consideration, the programmes available to each school
grade during the year are shown in the following table:—
Grade
VI	
Number of
Programmes
Available
  121
Grade
x	
Number of
Programmes
Available
  58
IV	
   106
  106
XI	
  48
V	
XII
44
VIII	
86
in	
i	
ii	
43
VII	
           83
30
IX	
     77
  30
From school reports, frequency of use of programmes indicates that primary music
still heads the list, followed by the intermediate music programmes, the art series, " Pictures in the Air," and the wildlife series, " Voices of the Wild." Least used were an
English series on word usage originating in Winnipeg, " Hamlet" which was presented
by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a National School Broadcast, a single-
occasion programme on physical fitness, and a vocational guidance series. It is significant
that several one-occasion holiday-type broadcasts were among the most used.
Schools are asked to grade programmes as to their value, on a four-point scale. On
the basis of the number of A's and B's given relative to the number reporting the programmes rated of most value were " Voices of the Wild " and " What's in the News,"
both National School Broadcast series; " Ecoutez "; " Children of the Waves," a series
of Indian stories; and " Pictures in the Air."   Of interest is the fact that from all schools X 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1956/57
reporting on all broadcasts, less than one-third of the ratings were A's, a little better than
half were B's, less than one-eighth were C's, and a negligible number were D's.
This year, B.C. school broadcasts followed a pattern set over a number of years in
winning an international award at the Exhibition of School Broadcasts, Columbus, Ohio.
Printed Aids
The amount of printed guide material for teachers and classes continues to increase
rapidly with the increasing school population. This year, for the first time, mimeographed
teaching notes to accompany " teaching " songs in the series " Let's Sing Together " were
sent to schools on request.
School Listening
The annual report form sent out by the school broadcasts office met with a response
of 88.62 per cent. Of the schools reporting, 62.84 per cent used school broadcasts.
This is 55.70 per cent of the total schools of the Province. During the year at least 2,590
classrooms, 73,570 pupils, made use of school broadcasts.
Considerable variation in school listening is shown district by district. In thirty districts more than 75 per cent of the schools used school broadcasts; in seventeen districts,
51 to 75 per cent of the schools used broadcasts; in fourteen districts 26 to 50 per cent
of the schools used broadcasts; in twenty-one districts, 25 per cent or less of the schools
listened. The distribution of these figures shows that the most predominant factor in the
distribution of B.C. school listening is still a geographical one. Many schools are still
beyond the effective radius of a broadcasting-station during school-hours.
Provision of Broadcasting Services
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation undertakes to provide air time and technical personnel for school broadcasts. Adequate programme coverage can be secured
only through the assistance of the private stations. Special tribute is due the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation and the affiliated private stations for their co-operation.
Private stations in British Columbia carrying school broadcasts during the past year were:
CFJC (Kamloops), CJAT (Trail), CJDC (Dawson Creek), CJIB (Vernon), CKOK
(Penticton), CKLN (Nelson), CKOV (Kelowna), and CKPG (Prince George). In
addition, broadcasts were carried by the two C.B.C. outlets at Vancouver and Prince
Rupert, and by thirty-one low-power repeater transmitters. It is unfortunate that important parts of the Province, among them South-western Vancouver Island, are still
beyond the reach of good reception because other private stations do not find it possible
to carry the broadcasts.
During this year the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation appointed Mr. Oliver
Henry as school broadcasts producer for British Columbia. This appointment brings
C.B.C. policy in this Province into line with that in other Provinces of Canada.
In conclusion, I should like to express my sincere thanks to Miss Margaret Mussel-
man for her able supervision of the school broadcasts office during my absence in 1956,
and to Miss Margaret Rhodes, the office secretary, for the willing support she gave. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH X 71
DIVISION OF TESTS,  STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ed., DIRECTOR
The Division established several new records in testing in 1956/57, although a staff
shortage during the summer resulted in work running considerably behind schedule.
Almost 62,000 tests were administered, 1,360 original items were produced, and 174,000
scores were reported. This involved the hand-scoring of over 5V4 million items during
the year. The problem of increasing enrolments is now seriously affecting the coverage
that can be obtained. This year, Grade IX Social Studies, French, and Mathematics
tests could be given only to alternate schools, and although the sampling was quite
adequate for standardization, only half the teachers in each subject obtained the pupil
information that the surveys could provide. The distribution of standardized tests to
teachers for their own use has, however, increased more rapidly than the enrolment, and
approximately half a million tests, worth $40,052, were shipped in addition to those
used for standardization and other Departmental purposes.
Surveys were conducted during the year as follows:—
Field Tested
Level
Tests Administered
Scores Scores
per Test     Reported
Ability to Read in Social Studies-
Ability to Read in Mathematics —
French 10	
Mathematical Fundamentals-
Commerce 20 (Typing)	
Commerce 21 (Shorthand)—.
English 40 Language1	
English 40 Literature 	
IX-2
IX-2
1X9
IX-9
X, XI
X, XI
XII
XII
8,500
8,950
5,130
27,000
3,700
2,265
3,226
3,128
17,000
17,900
25,650
67,450
14,800
9,000
9,600
12,500
I
1 The same tests were administered as Parts A of the University Entrance Examinations to 3,107 and 3,167 additional candidates in June, and two parallel forms were prepared for administration to smaller numbers of candidates
in August.
It will be noticed that the test surveys of 1956/57 were located entirely at secondary
levels. That was the result of a deliberate attempt to concentrate the year's work in
grades in which the need for standardized tests and comparable standards was greatest.
The tests of ability to read in the specific fields of social studies and mathematics
gave scores in general comprehension and vocabulary. No definite bases of comparison
are available, but the results indicate that in both cases general comprehension—that is,
paragraph meaning—is stronger than vocabulary—that is, word meaning. It is recommended that social studies and mathematics texts should include glossaries and that
teachers should pay particular attention to the terminology of their subjects. Reading
references are full of such words as " epoch," " legate," " verdant," " reciprocal," and
" equivalent," which have only vague meaning to many of the students.
Testing in French 10 in 1956 and 1957 indicates that the subject is well taught,
although course enrolments indicate an increasing percentage of drop-outs at the end of
the first and second years. Form A of the test is now standardized and provides norms
for aural comprehension, civilization, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and grammar,
which teachers may use with subsequent French 10 classes.
The Mathematics Fundamentals test was based on elementary-school rather than
Grade IX mathematics. It points up the problem of mathematics as a universal subject.
As retardation has decreased and holding power has increased, an increasing number of
students have entered Grade IX who formerly were stalled for two or three years and
finally dropped at the VI to VIII level. They are having a serious effect on the junior
and senior high-school norms.   Special classes, special schools, remedial instruction have X 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1956/57
all been advocated and tried, and all are effective. But they are all expensive in terms of
teacher time and effort. Such students are handicapped most when specific vocabulary
and abstract mathematical thinking are required.
The Commerce 20 (Typing) and Commerce 21 (Shorthand) tests differed from
those usually produced in the Division by being production-type tests which must be
marked by qualified Commerce teachers. They have provided the first Province-wide
norms for Commerce teachers, and whilst wide variations were noted from school to
school, considerable improvement should result from the publication of the norms.
The tests in English 40 Language and Literature were experimental tests designed
to demonstrate the feasibility of objective measurement in the non-creative aspects of
English. They were administered as part of the University Entrance Examination to all
those required to write, and as terminal course tests to General Programme students and
those who had been recommended. The results point up two situations: the overlapping
of recommended and non-recommended students and the difficulty of maintaining standards in the small non-accredited high schools.
Among other miscellaneous studies conducted during the year, the following data
are noteworthy. The table indicates how both the holding power of the schools and
graduation ratios vary directly with the density of population. Although it has been
possible for any student in British Columbia to obtain a complete high-school education
since the Cameron reorganization, it is not always convenient to do so. Moreover, it is
notable how the more thickly populated areas, which have made greater provision for
individual differences in terms of course offerings and special classes, not only retain but
graduate larger numbers of students. The proportion graduating is, however, lower than
many educators had expected, and the availability of jobs to those who have insufficient
credits for graduation may be an important factor.
High School Graduation, 19561
S.D. Enrolment, Grade XII
Number
of S.D.s
Total
Grade XII
Enrolment
Total
H.S.
Graduates
Graduates
as Percentage of
XII
XII as
Percentage
of VII
('56/'5D2
Graduates
as Percentage of VII
C56/'51)a
1,600-3,199               _ _	
1
0
2
5
11
16
17
31
2,059
941
1,081
1,526
1,136
586
380
1,463
703
746
1,008
712
354
210
71.1
74.7
69.0
66.1
62.7
60.4
55.3
62.5
57.7
51.9
53.0
46.0
42.5
42.0
44.4
800-1,599                                           	
400-799  	
200-399 	
100-199     -	
50-99    	
25-49                     	
0-24        	
43.1
35.8
35.0
28.8
25.7
23.0
Totals    _ 	
83
7,709
5,196
67.4
52.6
35.5
1 Sum of University Programme and General Programme certificates issued by schools, reported to Registrar, September to December, 1956.
2 Not corrected for immigration.
The immigration of children is still being followed carefully, and periodic adjustments of enrolment forecasts are being made. Unfortunately these are always in an
upward direction, and net immigration of school-children in 1956/57 was the highest
since 1947/48. Pressure on accommodation and teaching staff will be greatest at the
junior high-school level from 1958 to 1961, overlapped by another four-year wave front
entering the primary grades from 1959 to 1962. In September of the latter year total
enrolment will be at least 300 per cent of that of 1942. DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
X 73
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
The following is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education covering
the period September 1st, 1956, to August 31st, 1957:—
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Fernie_	
Cranbrook—.
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake..
Nelson	
8. Slocan..
Castlegar..
Arrow Lakes-
Trail _ 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan _
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton 	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong	
Vernon 	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops 	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo..
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford _
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
. Richmond _
Vancouver-
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam 	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls... 	
Queen Charlotte	
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert __.
Terrace 	
Smithers..	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Victoria 	
Sooke_	
566
203
321
325
18
241
818
249
338
279
695
613
167
294
151
212
128
339
582
493
436
345
1,095
1,242
20
39
42
170
52
188
580
374
639
864
996
399
1,128
2,743
583
3,163
1,187
1,679
764
426
676
822
439
730
249
323
309
83
357
495
66
470
164
5,747
583
301
115
227
138
4
110
399
98
153
151
376
239
77
151
122
114
74
191
261
265
192
201
633
716
24
20
80
20
88
321
217
396
420
480
193
■531
1,863
383
1,542
543
797
484
190
294
407
182
378
171
152
37
163
218
19
255
68
3,343
338
222
41
154
196
228
437
122
8
30
244
32
25
49
38
48
149
347
351
207
79
732
523
492
3
23
4
4
21
169
357
531
109
266
446
402
144
961
547
62
401
433
1,480
127
82
472
406
148
216
38
100
23
76
46
48
39
57
350
7
264
183
24
126
149
146
301
99
6
28
213
25
19
28
30
12
114
254
237
151
65
497
363
356
2
19
3
3
13
117
236
388
97
202
302
330
95
675
435
57
272
274
1,047
94
71
342
269
109
144
29
72
9
54
24
27
35
20
263
6
225 X 74                                          PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1956/57
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
365
178
378
219
6
636
533
765
248
715
123
455
1,187
103
128
291
427
33
885
809
158
85
170
110
3
449
271
485
112
331
52
215
861
68
69
192
271
19
481
7.1
328
44
1,170
151
247
257
94
18
119
75
250
650
132
38
48
32
299
12
234
220
219
32
837
76
196
209
70. Alberni   _	
73
16
72. Campbell River      	
92
73. Alert Bay                   _	
50
196
543
108
30
78. Enderby                                    	
36
79. Ucluelet-Tofino        _ _	
22
sn   Kitimat
180
81. Fort Nelson
8
82. Chilcotin                    _ __     	
176
215
Totals
46,183
25,154
18,034
13,100
This division supplied on schedule visual aids to 697 schools during the term.
On the shelves of the library were 2,546 motion pictures, 3,993 filmstrips, 844
picture sets, 73 dioramas.
A loan service of stereographs is maintained for rural schools having no projection
facilities.
"EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT"
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA
KINSMAN, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1956/57 a total of 153 applications were considered by the
Commission.    Of these, twelve were turned down, the chief reason being that family
income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes.
One hundred and forty-one applications were approved for grants, fifty-six receiving
assistance for the first time, thirty-seven for the second year, forty-one for the third year,
and seven for the fourth year.   Students were distributed by grades as follows:  Grade
IX, 29; Grade X, 40; Grade XI, 39; Grade XII, 33.   During the year fourteen students
dropped out and grants were discontinued.   Of the Grade XII students, eighteen graduated—nine on the University Programme and nine on the General Programme—and two
gained partial standing.
The students in the greatest financial need received $118.40 for the year;   the
balance received $103.40. STATISTICAL RETURNS  STATISTICAL RETURNS
X 77
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