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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1955 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1957

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1955
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor, of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1955
is herewith respectfully submitted.
LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1956. The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-eighth Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1955.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1956. Department of Labour
OFFICIALS
Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. G. Murray, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. A. Little, Administrative Assistant, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. M. Purdie, Chief Inspector of Factories, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
E. L. Allen, Director of Apprenticeship, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
W. Fraser, Chief Conciliation Officer, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Francis C. Dickins, Compensation Counsellor, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Director, Equal Pay Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
515 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
301, 1411 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Goodchild Building, Mission City, B.C.
Court-house, Kelowna, B.C.
Court-house, Smithers, B.C.
P.O. Box 1317, Cranbrook, B.C.
Court-house, Nelson, B.C.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters:   Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J. Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters:  Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J. Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
N. deW. Lyons, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
W. H. Welsh, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
James Walker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
John Tucker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Clifford A. Mason, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOL REGULATIONS OFFICERS
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
Fraudena Eaton. E. L. Allen. Hamilton Crisford.
Clifford A. Mason, Government Representative, Board of Examiners in Barbering. F 6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PROVINCIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
Professor E. H. Morrow, LL.D., 1050 Jefferson Avenue, West Vancouver, B.C.
Chief William Scow, Member, Alert Bay, B.C.
Ernest Brewer, Member, Vernon, B.C.
Edward Bolton, Member, Port Essington, B.C.
Capt. Charles W. Cates, Member, 266 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver, B.C.
L. P. Guichon, D.Sc, Member, Quilchena, B.C.
Miss J. R. Wright, Acting-Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Summary of Contents
Page
List of Acts Affecting Labour Inside front cover
Highlights of 1955 Report  9
Statistics of Trades and Industries  11
Employers' Returns  11
Payroll  12
Previous Provincial Payrolls 1  12
Comparison of Payrolls  13
Census Divisions  14
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries  16
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings  17
Industrial Wage  18
Firms with Large Payrolls  20
Employment  21
Statistical Tables  26
Summary of All Tables  39
" Hours of Work Act"  40
Average Weekly Hours  41
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers  43
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour  45
Board of Industrial Relations  46
Meetings and Delegations  46
Orders and Regulations Made during 1955  47
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees  48
Summary of All Occupations  54
Comparison of 1955 Earnings to Legal Minimum  55
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)  55
Statistics for Male Employees	
Investigations and Wage Adjustments.
Court Cases	
Special Licences	
Conclusion	
' Labour Relations Act"—Report of Labour Relations Branch-
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt with, 1950-55	
Table II.—Conciliation, 1955	
Table III.—Boards of Conciliation, 1955	
57
59
60
63
63
64
65
67
79
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause   102
Table IV.—Summary of Industrial Disputes  102
Table V.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1939-55  104
Chart Showing Percentage of Total Working-time Lost through Industrial
Disputes, 1941-55  105
Table VI.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1955  106
Legal Proceedings Involving Labour Relations Board (British Columbia)  106
Summary of Prosecutions for 1955  107
Annual Survey of Organized Labour  107
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Making Returns, etc  108
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial Classifications, 1956  109
Organizations of Employees  109
Organizations of Employers  127 F 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Control of Employment of Children.
"Equal Pay Act"	
Inspection of Factories	
Factories	
Industrial Homework	
Inspection of Elevators	
Inspections—Elevator and Factory..
New Elevator Installations	
Elevator Operators' Licences	
Conclusion	
Apprenticeship Branch
Trade-schools Regulation Branch.
Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs.
Page
128
129
130
130
130
130
131
131
132
132
133
137
141 Highlights of the 1955 Annual Report
This Annual Report for the year 1955, being the thirty-eighth issued by the
Department, reviews a year of marked acceleration in all phases of our industrial growth
and development, a further rapid step in the all-out drive for economic security in this
Province.
The promise of a continued upward movement in the trend established during the
closing months of 1954 became a realization early in the new year, with a definite recovery
from the moderate recession noted in the previous Report.
Increasing demand for basic materials pushed production levels to record heights
in most industries, and the urgency for greater capacity in the manufacture of commodities
and durable goods became the incentive force in a busy programme of new construction
and expansion of existing plant facilities.
Population of the Province continued to increase rapidly during 1955, and the need
for residential housing, schools, hospitals, and commercial buildings created new records
in construction of this type. In the field of industrial construction, the commencement
of many large-scale engineering projects, the continuing development of our resources for
power, and an extensive highway programme contributed largely to full employment and
expanding payrolls during the year, and would indicate a further substantial increase in
construction totals for 1956.
The forest industries continued a further series of spectacular advances, with both
primary and secondary phases of this industry recording marked increase in payrolls and
production figures as compared with 1954 totals. Leading in the forest industries group,
the pulp and paper section disclosed a continuing programme of modernization and
expansion beyond comparison with previous years. Sawmilling and the manufacture
of veneers, plywoods, and all manner of building materials continued at record levels
throughout the year.
Rising demand for base metals together with higher prices were the necessary
incentive for increased production in the mining industry, the resulting upswing in payrolls
here carrying a special significance, in the light of decreases noted in the industry during
the previous two-year period.
Earnings for industrial workers continued to rise, exceeding similar wage figures for
the previous year, and establishing record levels in most instances.
The average industrial wage figure computed for all male wage-earners within the
coverage of the 1955 survey was $70.47, an increase of $1.77 from the previous high of
$68.70 reported in 1954.
Payroll totals continued to increase in twenty-three of the twenty-five industrial
classifications mentioned in the statistical section of this Report for 1955.
Greatest single increase in payroll totals during the year was seen in the construction
industry, which recovered from a recession during the previous year to show a gain of
over $18,000,000 in 1955. The forest industries recorded the second largest increase,
with payroll totals up in excess of $15,700,000 from the previous year. Metal-trades
industries reported payrolls increased by $8,900,000, while smelting and concentrating
was ahead some $5,500,000. Miscellaneous trades and industries showed a gain of
$3,400,000, while wood-manufacturing (not elsewhere specified) increased by $3,200,000,
and public utilities exceeded the previous year's totals by some $2,600,000. For others,
in order of increase, see " Comparison of Payrolls " in Report data.
Summary employment totals in 1955 generally exceeded similar figures for the
previous year, with the largest increases apparent in the construction industry, smelting F  10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
and concentrating, the metal trades, builders' materials, and others in lesser degree. The
month of August continued as the period of peak employment during the year, the August
total for 1955 rising to a new high of 205,195 industrial workers employed, as compared
with a total of 190,555 recorded for the same month in 1954.
The industrial work-week was computed at a record low number of hours in 1955
despite increased activity in many of the larger employment industries. The average
weekly hours worked by all wage-earners reported in the 1955 survey was 41.34, a
fraction below the figure of 41.37 noted for the previous year, and representing the
shortest industrial work-week recorded to date in this Province. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F  11
Statistics of Trades and Industries
An appraisal of the year's progress and a brief glimpse of our present industrial
prosperity and future economic well-being are presented in the statistical summary for
1955, which comments briefly on the various changes which occurred during the past
twelve months.
Employers' Returns Total 9,537
An encouraging increase in the number of firms responding to the inquiry for payroll
information was immediately apparent during the 1955 survey, a total of 9,537 industrial
firms completing returns in time for tabulation in the Report, this total being well above
the previous coverage of 9,076 firms reporting in 1954.
The assistance and co-operation of industry and business in the prompt return of
statistical information as requested contributes largely to the success of the annual surveys,
INDUSTRIAL FIRMS REPORTING
1945-1955 F 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
and in this respect our Department is again grateful for a full measure of help and
consideration on the part of employers during 1955.
The term " number of firms reporting " where mentioned throughout the text of the
Report has reference actually to the number of returns tabulated, since many firms when
reporting file separate returns in more than one industrial classification.
Payroll
The total amount of salaries and wages reported by the 9,537 industrial firms fifing
returns in time for classification in the tables was $731,815,777 for 1955, this figure being
assessed for purposes of the Report as the industrial payroll for the year. In addition
to the industrial payroll, various supplementary items of labour expenditure as noted in
the table below provide an accumulative figure which may be considered as representing
the entire Provincial estimated payroll. This accumulative total, comprising the industrial
summary and additional figures as listed, was estimated at $1,250,000,000 for 1955.
Payrolls of 9,537 firms making returns to Department of Labour	
Returns received too late to be included in above
summary 	
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)	
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers
covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the
tables; namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll) 	
$731,815,777
1,910,902
44,774,441
471,498,880
Total  $ 1,250,000,000
Previous Provincial Payrolls
Provincial payroll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:
1928-
1929..
1930..
1931-
1932-
1933..
1934..
1935-
1936-
1937..
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941..
$183,097
192,092
167,133
131,941
102,957
99,126
113,567
125,812
142,349
162,654
158,026
165,683
188,325
239,525
,781
249
813
,008
,074
,653
,953
,140
,591
,234
,375
460
,766
,459
1942...
1943...
1944-.
1945...
1946...
1947...
1948...
1949...
1950-
1951 ..
1952...
1953...
1954...
1955...
$321,981,489
394,953,031
388,100,000
383,700,000
432,919,727
557,075,508
639,995,979
671,980,815
718,202,028
815,173,090
979,364,603
1,066,979,019
1,107,897,363!
1,250,000,0002
1 1954 total revised since 1954 Report.
2 1955 preliminary total subject to revision.
In order to obtain a summary figure representing the over-all preliminary estimated
Provincial payroll, the actual totals resulting from the year's industrial survey are further
supplemented by additional payrolls representing the remainder of the labour force in
those sections of business, trade, and services not subject to the direct inquiry.
As additional information becomes available, the estimated payroll total appearing
in the Annual Report is subject to revision in the following year's issue. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F  13
A segregation of the total coverage of the annual survey into three main classifications may be noted in the following table, which gives the proportion of the known
industrial payroll expended annually in each department:—
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers 	
Per Cent
9.67
11.58
78.75
Per Cent
9.71
11.98
78.31
Per Cent
9.90
12.92
77.18
Per Cent
10.85
13.20
75.95
Per Cent
10.99
12.88
76.13
Totals     	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
Comparison of Payrolls
Recovering from the minor recession of 1954, the trend in industrial payroll totals
continued upward in 1955, with twenty-three of the twenty-five industrial classifications
under survey reporting substantial increases from the previous year. The total industrial
payroll increased by some $70,278,587, up 10.6 per cent from the 1954 figure.
Greatest increase in 1955 was apparent in the construction industry, where a stepped-
up programme of new engineering projects, plant expansion, industrial and residential
construction pushed payroll totals some $18,243,376 above the level of the previous year.
The forest industries continued at a high rate of expansion in all phases of the business
during the year, with the second largest payroll increase recorded in this section. Market
demands for increasing supplies of primary forest products and expansion of existing
plant facilities and new mills to meet the necessity for greater secondary production
resulted in an increase here of $15,744,527. Metal-trades industries expanded rapidly
during the year, with payrolls up an additional $8,903,516, followed by the smelting and
concentrating industries, increased by $5,522,714. Miscellaneous trades and industries
showed a gain of $3,420,160, while payroll totals in wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) were
up $3,276,648. Public utilities recorded an increase of $2,622,742; the pulp and paper
manufacturing group was ahead some $2,545,641. Payrolls in food-products manufacturing increased by $1,811,272 from the previous year's figure; cartage, trucking, and
warehousing registered a gain of $1,715,782; metal-mining increased substantially, with
payrolls up $1,448,265; builders' materials showed an increase of $1,383,940; coast
shipping, an increase of $1,179,582; printing and publishing advanced by $734,085;
explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals were up $520,393; ship-building and boat-building
payrolls increased by $514,248; oil refining and distributing was ahead $308,152;
breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers showed an increase of $273,827;
paint-manufacturing, an increase of $204,185; coal-mining, up $163,265; leather- and
fur-goods manufacturing, an increase of $82,319; jewellery manufacturing and repair,
up $36,375;  and house furnishings, an increase of $15,652.
Minor decreases were noted in the launderies, cleaning and dyeing industries (down
$202,209) and garment-manufacturing (off $189,870), although fewer firms reported in
time for tabulation in these instances, and the totals mentioned might therefore be
considered as preliminary. r
F  14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industry
1953
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
1954
I
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
1955
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers  _  	
Builders'materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing-
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping-
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals..
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings-
Jewellery manufacturing and repair-
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing-
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries 	
Metal trades. 	
Metal-mining..
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing-
Pulp and paper manufacturing-
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating  	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
40
149
470
18
122
1,794
38
614
1011
130
35
178
104
2,098
1,732
118
610
76
191
179
13
70
5
119
176
9,008
$5,797,
10,299
12,108
5,084
28,347,
126,780,
7,789,
45,003
3,849
5,475,
901
6,806,
2,056,
134,391,
66,816,
26,929,
32,250,
11,135,
1,657,
14,898.
29,584,
13,867,
18,954,'
412.00
129.00
,043.00
,966.00
,957.00
,143.00
,167.00
,964.00
,582.00!
,245.00
,147.00
,441.00
,162.00
,075.00
,730.00
,812.00
549.00
127.00
593.001
592.00
165.00
157.00
994.00
40,640,634.00
21,688,578.00
$673,114,364.00
44
180
473
12
135
1,856
45
576
98
140 |
34
178
87
2,146
1,708
97
584
89
17
185
13
75
10
116
178
9,076
$6,183,469.00
46
11,575,878.00
190
12,948,511.00
506
4,521,916.00
12
28,934,155.00
140
86,443,701.00
2,067
8,392,067.00
40
46,654,923.00
582
4,239,252.00
86
5,373,774.00
144
955,766.00
33
7,250,039.00
157
1,877,836.00
80
146,950,848.00
2,329
65,909,869.00
1,776
22,562,576.00
115
33,384,947.00
551
15,182,552.00
96
1,945,720.00
19
16,313,306.00
181
32,316,119.00
15
14,677,419.00
77
22,685,338.00
10
43,112,065.00
109
21,145,144.00
176
$661,537,190.00
9,537
$6,457
12,959
14,664.
4,685,
30,113,
104,687
8,912
48,466
4,049
5,389
992
7,047,
1,960
162,695,
74,813,
24,010,
36,805.
15,490
2,149.
17,047,
34,861,
15,191.
28,208,
,296.00
818.00
293.00
181.00
737.00
077.00
,460.00
,195.00
,382.00
,426.00
,141.00
830.00
155.00
375.00
385.00
841.00
107.00
704.00
905.00
391.00
760.00
667.00
052.00
45,734,807.00
24,421,792.00
$731,815,777.00
1 Revised since 1953 Report.
Census Divisions
In past years divisional summaries of payroll information had been prepared on the
basis of a distribution under the three main headings of " Greater Vancouver," " Rest of
Province," and " Vancouver Island." Broad percentages of the total as represented by
each of these divisions were then applied to the over-all Provincial estimated payroll for
each year to show the relative growth in each sector.
With the growing concentration of industrial weight in newly developed areas outside the city boundaries, however, and the extension of city coverage to include adjoining
municipalities and districts, it is deemed advisable to present instead the main census
divisional totals together with a detailed breakdown showing by payroll totals the extent
of industrial expansion in various sectors of our new metropolitan areas.
Accordingly, the table which follows includes a section under headings of the
" Census Metropolitan Area of Vancouver " and the " Census Metropolitan Area of
Victoria," which will be used from year to year to measure the industrial progress
recorded in each of these separate divisional areas. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 15
CENSUS
DIVISION
British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the
Comparative Years 1952 to 1955
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1952
1953
1954
1955
No. 1	
$27,425,293
$19,495,380
$17,125,372
$18,197,303
No. 2	
40,455,349
42,633,966
32,519,954
35,044,981
No. 3 	
20,422,805
20,361,133
20,790,437
25,599,069
No. 4 	
358,233,779
370,901,521
389,154,398
417,102,635
No. 5	
109,412,278
111,953,368
117,023,841
127,543,124
No. 6 	
11,015,136
15,781,535
12,487,726
15,313,185
No. 7 -
20,160,757
21,111,044
22,351,967
26,336,337
No. 8	
20,771,777
18,367,655
18,012,903
23,336,723
No. 9	
32,163,701
44,702,234
23,458,261
36,329,470
No. 10	
2,266,598
3,304,619
3,387,399
4,591,602
4,703,401
4,501,909
5,224,932
2,421,348
Totals	
$647,030,874
$673,114,364
$661,537,190
$731,815,777 F 16 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industrial Payroll Totals Reported for the Census Metropolitan
Areas of Vancouver and Victoria, 1955
Area
Payroll (Salaries and
Wages), 1955
Census Metropolitan Area of Vancouver, including
Vancouver City, North Vancouver City and District, West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Fraser Mills, Richmond, Surrey, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody  $371,640,166
Census Metropolitan Area of Victoria, including Victoria City, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich, and
Central Saanich       50,163,395
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries
Average take-home pay continued to increase for most industrial workers in 1955,
and with few exceptions both wage-earners and clerical employees shared in the higher
earnings recorded during the year.
While the increases in some cases did not range as high as those noted for 1954,
this was generally apparent in those industries recording an exceptionally high rate of
gain during the previous year.
The table following is based on a weekly period of greatest employment during
each year, and shows the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners in each industry
included in the survey for the years 1948 to 1955.
Average Weekly Earnings
in Each Industry (Male Wage-earners)
Industry
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
$42.67
44.99
43.50
54.40
40.52
48.23
48.78
44.75
41.40
39.07
45.04
36.50
36.87
49.92
43.65
51.72
40.84
50.38
36.13
47.80
51.25
48.79
52.13
47.67
44.27
$44.67
48.11
46.41
52.68
44.21
50.97
49.33
46.47
43.03
42.41
43.93
41.36
38.75
51.40
45.63
53.51
42.22
53.90
37.21
50.74
54.10
53.37
51.73
51.15
44.07
$46.86
50.90
49.52
54.22
46.43
53.57
51.72
47.17
44.51
41.93
45.71
42.70
40.21
55.49
47.94
56.25
43.95
57.47
43.17
53.18
56.34
52.68
54.29
50.83
48.82
$51.42
54.34
55.10
58.86
53.29
61.57
59.50
53.82
47.49
46.78
54.88
47.57
44.18
61.89
53.77
63.58
48.14
63.88
47.31
58.87
63.74
62.51
63.76
56.88
54.85
$57.75
60.19
58.20
62.97
54.05
65.16
61.92
56.23
52.69
51.71
54.37
50.75
47.63
64.70
57.82
67.29
51.05
64.00
50.36
61.94
65.79
66.03
64.95
60.72
59.29
$61.11
64.33
64.09
66.11
58.46
70.62
66.86
58.71
54.531
53.94
56.54
51.35
48.98
67.68
61.40
71.35
54.71
70.23
52.511
68.33
71.22
70.64
69.32
66.36
60.96
$63.41
67.77
66.55
66.89
60.39
74.06
69.44
61.10
56.56
54.46
59.85
54.88
51.26
71.08
63.68
70.15
56.48
74.98
56.40
73.26
77.38
76.72
72.88
73.10
63.26
$68.43
68.34
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coal-mining   	
69.34
66.53
61.63
74.96
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals
71.77
62.62
57.55
58.97
62.11
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing   .
56.44
54.82
72.50
65.54
73.62
60.89
79.36
60.38
74.72
Pulp and paper manufacturing 	
Ship-building and boat-building 	
78.99
77.51
76.11
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc 	
74.67
65.56
1 Revised since 1953 Report. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 17
Increases and decreases noted in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners
in the 1955 survey are as follows:—
Increases
Breweries,  distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers „   	
Builders' materials    	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coast shipping _ 	
Construction     	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals -
Food-products manufacturing 	
Garment-manufacturing    	
House furnishings
Jewellery manufacturing and repair —
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing .
$5.02
.57
2.79
1.24
.90
2.33
1.52
.99
4.51
2.26
1.56
3.56
Lumber industries
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining
— $1.42
.  1.86
— 3.47
Miscellaneous trades and industries  4.41
Oil refining and distributing  — 4.38
Paint-manufacturing      3.98
Printing and publishing   1.46
Pulp and paper manufacturing    1.61
Ship-building and boat-building .
Smelting and concentrating  	
Street-railways,  gas,  water,  power,  telephones, etc.
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)
.79
3.23
1.57
2.30
Decreases
Coal-mining
$0.36
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings
While the clerical classification is broadly defined as office personnel, the inclusion
also in this group of employees in outside sales occupations has resulted in higher averages recorded in the tables compiled each year for this section.
Almost without exception both male and female workers in clerical occupations
earned more in 1955 than during the previous year. The level of average weekly earnings for this class of worker in all industries covered by the survey gained substantially
from the figure set for 1954.
Average weekly earnings for male clerical workers in all industries under survey
in 1955 climbed to $75.36, up from $72.43 reported in this classification during a similar
period in 1954. The average figure representing weekly earnings for all female employees
in clerical occupations also increased during the year, rising to $45.84 in 1955, up from
$44.22 previously reported.
Comparative average weekly earnings for male and female clerical workers are
shown by industry in the following table, for the years 1954 and 1955:—
Industry
1954
1955
Males
Females
Males
Females
$67.02
71.94
63.48
62.63
65.51
69.56
81.13
65.58
60.08
61.59
60.05
63.62
60.00
77.58
68.39
85.23
61.07
76.86
65.18
70.16
82.07
73.69
86.15
76.56
77.98
$41.77
41.18
37.92
37.50
44.70
43.74
45.32
41.93
41.89
40.63
39.11
37.17
39.04
46.13
41.97
49.10
44.18
50.19
44.11
41.43
49.13
39.64
51.48
47.60
48.73
$70.04
76.21
66.97
63.68
68.43
73.53
84.23
68.90
66.96
70.45
60.06
70.67
63.12
79.98
72.13
87.15
65.30
77.32
68.79
73.83
85.24
76.86
88.15
76.87
78.21
$44.15
44.07
39.53
39.17
46.75
45.28
47.12
44.16
47 08
41.62
42 48
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 	
39.84
41 15
48 34
43 39
50 44
46 41
53 30
Paint-manufacturing -   _ 	
44.33
39 46
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc 	
48.04
$72.43
$44.22
$75.36
$45.84 F 18 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industrial Wage
With no significant change in the level of consumer prices during the year, the higher
earnings enjoyed by most industrial workers in British Columbia during 1955 resulted
in a general improvement in purchasing power and a standard of living unexceeded in
previous years.
The average figure representing weekly earnings for male wage-earners in all industrial occupations included in the annual survey reached a new high mark of $70.47 in
1955, up $1.77 from the figure of $68.70 recorded for 1954.
The annual figures representing average weekly industrial earnings for the comparative years 1918 to 1955 are as follows:—
1918 	
1919    	
1920 	
1921 _ 	
1922 	
1923   	
1924  	
1925 	
1926   	
1927  	
1928    	
1929  _ 	
1930  	
1931 _ 	
1932   	
1933 	
1934 	
1935   	
$27.97
1937 	
.   $26.64
29.11
1938  .
        26.70
31.51
1939 	
   ,   26.80
27.62
1940  —	
  .    28.11
27.29
1941 . .
30.67
28.05
1942     	
35.24
28.39
1943 .
        37.19
27.82
1944 	
  38.70
27.99
1945 	
  38.50
28.29
1946	
        39.87
28.96
1947 	
  43.49
29.20
1948 	
.. 47.30
28.64
1949 	
  49.21
26.17
1950	
  51.88
23.62
1951   	
  58.67
22.30
23.57
1952 __ 	
1953	
   61.78
  65.61
24.09
1954 	
  68.70
26.36
1955 	
    70.47 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F  19
Based on the computed average figures for each year, the chart shows the trend of
average weekly earnings for all male wage-earners during the period 1918 to 1955:—
Average Weekly Earnings of Male Wage-earners, 1918—55
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
EARNINGS
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
19/1
1922
1923
1924
1925
mt
■927
ma
1929
19.30
I9JI
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
.938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
70.00
69.00
68.00
67.00
66.00
65.00
64.00
63.00
62.00
61.00
60.00
59.00
58.00
57.00
56.00
55.00
54.00
53.00
52.00
51.00
50.00
49.00
48.00
47.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
42.00
41.00
40.00
39.00
38.00
37.00
36.00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30,00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
/
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(1955 figure—$70.47.)
. F 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Wage Distribution
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
1954
1955
_
__■_ _ _
rr
ri
ill
i
tj_i	
■
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The above bar diagrams indicate the varying percentages of male wage-earners in a series of fixed wage classifications through the years 1954 and 1955.
Firms with Large Payrolls
The annual survey of firms reporting in the higher payroll bracket of $100,000 or
over presents an interesting picture of the comparative concentration of labour in various
industries. Restricted to a coverage only of industrial payrolls, the survey of larger firms
does not include wholesale or retail trade, transcontinental railways, or payrolls of public
authorities (Federal, Provincial, or municipal).
Continuation of an era of industrial prosperity is reflected in the increasing numbers
of firms reporting in this higher payroll group, the 1955 total of firms with payrolls of
$100,000 or over rising to 1,070, an increase of 86 above the 984 reported for the
previous year. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES F 21
Intensified development of our forest resources was again responsible for the lumber
industry continuing in the lead with the greatest number of firms in the upper payroll
bracket, a total of 261 being recorded in this industry, as compared with 243 noted in
1955, an increase of 18. Continuing in second position, the construction industry gained
sharply with a total of 180, increased by 28 from the total for the previous year, while the
metal-trades section was third with a total of 148 firms reporting in the larger payroll
group, this figure representing an increase of 20 above the previous mark. Food-products
manufacturing showed a total of 94 firms in the upper payroll bracket, an increase of 4
from the previous year; miscellaneous trades and industries reported 68, an increase of 6;
coast shipping total was 41, an increase of 4; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) listed 30
firms in the larger payroll class, this figure being unchanged from the total for the previous
year; cartage, trucking, and warehousing reported 26, an increase of 3; printing and
publishing, 24, increased by 1; metal-mining, 23, unchanged from the previous year;
builders' materials, 22, a decrease of 2; the public utilities section, 20, unchanged from
the total for the previous year; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 18, also unchanged
from the previous reported figure; ship-building and boat-building, 15, a decrease of
1; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, 14, unchanged; garment-
manufacturing, 14, increased by 1; oil refining and distributing, 14, a decrease of 1;
house furnishings, 13, an increase of 2; pulp and paper manufacturing, 12, unchanged
from the previous year; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, 10, also unchanged; paint-
manufacturing, 7, an increase of 3; coal-mining, 5, unchanged from the previous year;
leather and fur goods, 5, also unchanged; smelting and concentrating, 4; and jewellery
manufacturing and repair, 2, both also unchanged from totals reported for the previous
year.
Included in the total of 1,070 industrial firms listed in the larger payroll section there
were some 96 who reported payrolls of over $1,000,000. Of this latter group, 14
reported payrolls in excess of $5,000,000, 5 between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, 10
between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, 12 between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and 55
between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000.
Employment
Major gains in employment were noted for most industries during 1955, in comparison with figures reported for the previous year. Higher totals recorded during the
peak months of 1955 appeared in twenty of the twenty-five industrial classifications
covered in the survey, with increases most apparent in those of the larger employment
groups showing a moderate recession during the previous twelve months. Increases
ranged from 2 per cent to a high of 18 per cent in one major employment section.
Top employment figures continued to appear during the month of August, as in the
preceding year, the August total in 1955, however, reaching a new high mark of 205,195,
compared with 190,555 recorded for the same month in 1954.
Of the twenty industries reporting higher employment, some of the larger increases
were apparent in the construction group; smelting and concentrating; the metal trades;
builders' materials; cartage, trucking, and warehousing; and miscellaneous trades and
industries. Minor decreases were noted in the peak monthly totals for laundries, cleaning
and dyeing; coal-mining; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers; house
furnishings; and public utilities.
The table following shows by industry the high and low monthly employment totals
recorded for 1955, together with comparative information for the previous year. Charts
are also included in this section showing the trend of employment for clerical workers,
the wage-earner group, and total industrial employment for 1955 and previous years. F 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table Showing the Amount or Variation of Employment in Each Industry
in the Last Two Years1
Industry
1954
SSwE
2iW
a « ex's
JgsS
-3.2
E »
= E
1955
•a
° i.
1 "
J3      O
J-> °
a tSaS
E&
•S-gsS
SSwE
§E
zn
June	
1,859
Oct	
3,515
Oct	
4,112
Jan	
1,447
July	
9,010
Sept	
29,410
Aug..	
2,202
Aug..	
20,447
Oct	
1,592
Nov..	
1,730
Nov	
438
July	
3,124
Oct	
718
Aug	
44,528
Nov	
19,304
July	
5,893
Sept	
11,468
Jan	
3,387
Aug	
568
Nov.. -
4,206
June	
7,316
Dec	
4,294
Sept.
6,782
July	
13,378
Oct	
7,029
Aug	
205,195
a % a£
£SE§
2h4W£
S p.
Breweries,   distilleries,   and   aerated-
water manufacturers 	
Builders' materials  	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing-
Co al-min ing- 	
Coast sh ipping	
Construction 	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals^
Food-products manufacturing—	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings-
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing —.
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing..
Lumber industries.- 	
Metal trades  	
Metal-mining-
Miscellaneous trades and industries.-
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing-,	
Printing and publishing ..
Pulp and paper manufacturing —
Ship-building and boat-building _
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
telephones, etc.
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)-
All industries-
June	
1,912
Aug	
3,186
Aug	
3,728
Feb	
1,503
Aug	
8,805
June. -
24,866
Apr.	
2,118
Sept	
19,606
Feb -
1,557
Sept	
1,773
417
July.. .
3,256
Nov	
702
Sept	
41,846
Aug	
17,457
July	
5,483
Sept	
10,389
Nov	
3,328
June..	
518
July ...
4,101
July	
6,976
July	
3,908
Dec
5,788
July	
13,396
June
6,674
Aug	
190,555
Jan...
Jan...
Feb.„
May..
Feb...
Dec.
Nov..
Jan	
June..
Feb...
Apr...
Jan.._
Jan.._
Jan—
Jan	
Apr...
Feb...
Apr...
Jan	
Jan.._
Feb...
Jan.—
Jan	
Feb...
Jan	
Jan	
1,602
2,732
3,172
1,400
7,765
19,504
2,006
11,386
1,373
1,608
338
2,880
586
28,123
16,114
4,927
8,476
2,860
448
3,876
6,470
3,313
4,505
12,381
5,365
156,342
Jan	
Jan	
Jan	
Sept.-.
Oct	
Jan	
Apr	
Feb.	
May	
Feb	
Mar ,
Feb.	
Feb	
Jan	
Jan	
Jan	
Jan	
Oct	
Jan	
Jan	
Jan	
Jan	
Mar	
Feb	
Jan	
Jan	
1,590
2,799
3,377
1,398
8,042
18,393
2,075
11,633
1,421
1,424
362
2,759
616
34,746
16,750
4,947
8,267
2,907
505
3,883
6,656
3,387
5,662
12,428
6,011
163,684
1 Industrial employment totals include clerical and sales staffs in addition to wage-earners, and are based on the
number of employees reported on the payrolls on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. STATISTICS OF TRADES
Employment of Clerical Workers i
AND INDUSTRIES F 23
n Industry, 1954 and 19551
29,000
28,500
28,000
27,500
27,000
26,500
26,000
25,500
25,000
24,500
24,000
23,500
23,000
22,500
22,000
21,500
21,000
20,500
20,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
09S5)
~~~~
(1954)
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but not
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
January   24,873
February     25,012
March   25,328
April   25,499
Clerical Workers, 1955
(Male and Female)
May .—
June 	
July 	
August ,
  26,016
  26,644
 27,012
  27,350
September
26,967
October  _ 26,965
November     27,077
December  27.020 Average Monthly Number of Wage-earners (Male and Female)
1939-41-45-49-51-54-55
I Jan.    | Feb.   |Mar.  |Apr.   | May   | June   | July    j Aug.  |Sept.  | Oct.   |  Nov. | Dec.
175,000
165,000
160,000
155,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
130, 000
125,000
120,000
115,000
105,000
100,000
95,000
90, 000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
7/
/
,'
/
^
y
/;
~7
/
~y
^1
y
/
/
/
-?:
/
/
\
x.
.       —   REFERENCE
Employment in —
1939 shown thus       3
1941
1945
1949
1951
1954
1955
N
^\
) c
■ x •
1955
1951
1954
1949
1945
1941
1939
1955
January
February
138,811
141,304
146,120
May
158,449
March 	
April   _ 150,194
June   165,828
July   173,031
August   177,845
September    _ 177,305
October     173,202
November    166,189
December   153,495 220,000
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Total Employment in Industry, 1954 and 19551
F 25
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
Monthly Totals of Industrial Employment, 1955
(Male and Female)
January ..
February
163,684
166,316
March   171,448
April   175,693
May ....
June
July 	
August
184,465
192,472
200,043
205,195
September     204,272
October  200,167
November    193,266
December
... 180,515
I F 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CONTENTS OF TABLES
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in
or incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing, shipping, and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both
general and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not
include the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies, fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries; packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee, ketchup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery, and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, osy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No.   16.   Metal-mining.—Includes  all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead
corroders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building and Boat-bulldlng.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, al30 construction and repair of small craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and
undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS
Returns Covering 46 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments., 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $884,552
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc _       743,997
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     4,828,747
Total..
6,457,296
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
1,125
1,133
1,147
1,169
1,215
1,299
1,348
1,313
1,223
1,205
1,225
1,219
254
256
245
261
261
334
233
250
261
261
340
260
139
140
142
145
146
150
147
151
140
139
141
141
72
February	
72
70
73
May _	
June   	
July	
74
76
76
76
September	
October 	
November 	
December	
77
77
77
78
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
38
11
24
33
39
31
46
71
542
312
75
67
136
9
3
8
21
7
61
25
78
123
4
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
5
5
15
11
7
23
25
22
14
17
2
2
6
12
20
21
10
2
1
1
1
J STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 27
Table No. 2
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF
Returns Covering 190 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,638,312
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc _       1,892,682
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      9,428,824
Total..
$12,959,818
Emploj
ment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
2,282
2,318
2,457
2,536
2,626
2,683
2,741
2,779
2,860
2,927
2,826
2,578
18
19
19
19
21
21
23
25
21
18
19
13
300
308
317
315
318
322
322
329
339
339
338
337
199
197
202
204
May 	
June 	
July	
211
216
225
226
September	
230
231
November.	
December 	
235
231
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99-
to 99.99.
and over..
Wage-earners
Males    Females
134
28
31
58
62
82
198
332
907
656
389
208
246
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
5
8
6
14
16
15
57
57
66
44
50
11
2
21
37
68
47
27
10
14
4
Table No. 3
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING
Returns Covering 506 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,634,691
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc  —      1,761,333
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     11,268,269
Total   $14,664,293
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
2,815
12
275
275
February	
2,862
13
288
277
2,994
3,058
12
15
284
287
274
April- -
279
May  	
3,170
17
286
282
June 	
3,274
19
283
293
July 	
3,357
27
295
298
3,426
23
301
312
3,455
23
303
312
October 	
3,464
37
295
316
November	
3,473
16
300
318
December 	
3,343
16
299
314
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
156
51
75
51
112
124
219
258
858
984
419
245
414
15
3
12
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
4
15
6
14
8
24
26
65
57
41
20
22
35
17
35
84
79
38
20
7
10
5
1 F 28
Table No. 4
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 5
COAL-MINING
Returns Covering 12 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers       $486,208
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc — —.        67,866
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) _     4,131,107
Total-
$4,685,181
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January. 	
1,418
1,407
1,390
1,383
1,382
1,395
1,391
1,416
1,370
1,372
1,408
1,387
1
1
1
1
1
1
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
9
9
9
9
9
June-	
July                 	
9
9
August 	
9
9
October	
November	
December  	
9
9
9
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00.	
to $29.99...
to 34.99...
to 39.99...
to 44.99..
to 49.99...
to 54.99...
to 59.99...
to 69.99...
to 79.99_
to 89.99-
to 99.99...
and over.-
Wage-earners
Males    Females
2
3
4
17
1
1,210
152
55
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
COAST SHIPPING
Returns Covering 140 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $2,822,303
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       1,977,211
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    25,314,223
Total-
$30,113,737
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January-	
7,619
72
361
205
February —-	
7,799
76
359
203
March -	
7,643
94
361
174
April 	
7,801
70
361
207
May 	
7,660
93
365
209
June-	
8,270
116
379
219
July	
8,261
142
385
222
August	
7,875
133
378
226
7,789
107
369
217
October 	
7,390
79
359
214
November 	
7,997
81
362
210
December 	
8,004
77
358
206
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 -
to $29.99...
to 34.99...
to 39.99-
to 44.99..
to 49.99..
to 54.99_
to 59.99„
to 69.99-
to 79.99-
to 89.99..
to 99.99-
and over...
Wage-earners
Males    Females
573
76
221
230
1,258
1,110
654
777
617
1,187
1,549
712
314
9
4
30
52
10
3
3
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
4
2
6
7
16
19
31
38
85
52
57
19
30
4
3
6
22
73
55
33
19
4
2
3
1
1 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 29
Table No. 6
CONSTRUCTION
Returns Covering 2,067 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers.     $11,722,919
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc         9,824,223
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       83,139,935
Total.     $104,687,077
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January - 	
15,696
93
1,655
949
February 	
16,132
97
1,698
957
17,237
90
1,751
998
19,103
100
1,829
1,012
May 	
21,369
145
1,831
1,029
June 	
23,313
167
1,898
1,074
July 	
24,622
190
1,944
1,090
August	
26,048
178
1,963
1,124
September	
26,205
120
1,954
1,131
October	
26,019
124
1,975
1,145
November	
24,179
119
1,971
1,163
December 	
21,759
119
1,988
1,158
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00.	
to $29.99	
to   34.99	
to   39.99.	
to   44.99.	
to   49.99	
to   54.99.	
to   59.99.	
to   69.99	
to   79.99.—
to   89.99	
to   99.99	
and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
897
310
318
492
780
734
1,444
2,012
6,957
4,100
4,547
4,839
5,576
55
18
29
62
18
9
18
10
5
7
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
47
18
30
38
73
62
103
112
306
333
284
196
327
102
45
98
126
236
169
147
102
82
36
14
5
10
Table No. 7
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS
Returns Covering 40 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers—
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers).
Total..
$778,637
2,465,855
5,667,968
$8,912,460
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
1,457
42
477
153
February 	
1,506
42
477
152
March 	
1,439
42
478
154
April 	
1,399
41
482
153
May 	
1,471
42
484
149
June 	
1,502
41
490
150
July  -	
1,478
39
488
148
1,526
43
482
151
1,430
54
476
152
October	
1.404
54
475
152
November	
1,429
54
479
153
1,432
47
476
154
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
15
6
9
10
43
29
78
82
306
546
272
75
50
3
4
17
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
1
4
2
7
9
13
22
46
62
63
125
134
1
6
23
37
47
25
7
7
4
1 F 30
Table No. 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 9
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 582 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers.—     $6,042,410
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       6,663,790
Wage-earners (including piece-workers),..     35,759,995
Total-
$48,466,195
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
February	
7,448
7,314
7,650
8,219
9,029
9,490
10,455
10,998
10,404
9,720
8,750
7,563
2,427
2,267
2,358
2,510
2,914
3,348
6,073
7,258
7,288
6,427
5,219
2,697
1,144
1,146
1,162
1,162
1,202
1,216
1,212
1,218
1,202
1,188
1,180
1,156
902
906
897
902
906
June.	
July-.    ...
August 	
September	
October..	
947
959
973
983
968
943
December	
921
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males
763
209
239
299
502
688
1,205
1,778
3,183
2,035
954
543
752
Females
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   [ Females
I
1,622
948
1,074
1,350
1,876
1,257
872
407
385
155
130
10
1
17
2
23
21
36
63
106
105
290
208
151
101
81
36
36
106
134
223
183
140
48
45
17
2
1
2
GARMENT-MAKING
Returns Covering 86 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
$627,033
499,373
Wage-earners (including piece-workers).    2,922,976
Total..
$4,049,382
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January- 	
318
1,148
30
54
February- ,
309
1,181
30
56
319
1,162
30
56
April	
315
1,083
30
60
May  	
312
1,022
30
57
June-	
312
1,070
31
60
July-  .. .
317
1,100
31
56
August 	
319
1,114
31
59
September	
324
1,132
31
58
October 	
319
1,183
30
60
November- 	
319
1,091
30
61
December 	
324
1,031
30
61
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00....
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
13
16
12
18
40
25
30
40
68
50
25
10
6
188
243
212
183
164
129
87
36
40
17
3
7
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
10
11
7
15 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 31
Table No. 10
HOUSE FURNISHINGS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 144 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $807,212
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       683,992
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,898,222
Total-
$5,389,426
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
948
264
83
130
February 	
957
252
83
132
March. -	
980
266
85
137
1,020
257
86
140
May 	
1,033
274
85
136
June  	
1,069
260
81
133
July     --
1,096
263
81
137
August-	
1,133
272
85
129
September  .
1,153
284
85
147
October....	
1,161
299
89
145
November 	
1,181
310
87
152
December.	
1,156
297
85
152
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
65
19
74
60
84
98
126
154
239
181
80
54
45
22
23
57
54
90
45
20
19
14
2
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
1
1
3
1
2
19
5
13
11
10
7
16
18
8
22
16
27
27
21
14
6
1
1
Table No. 11
JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING AND
REPAIR
Returns Covering 33 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $87,233
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc..     172,937
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     731,971
Total-
$992,141
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February	
156
158
156
158
155
154
157
156
155
155
160
154
138
134
131
132
135
154
154
149
145
148
186
175
11
11
11
11
11
12
13
12
12
12
11
11
65
63
64
62
May 	
June	
July	
64
63
62
59
63
October	
71
81
December	
76
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males     Females
12
2
7
16
16
4
9
3
44
37
9
11
14
29
18
103
24
9
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
3
26
14
7
5
12 F 32
Table No. 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING
Returns Covering 157 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
...     $639,510
651,710
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,756,610
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Total-
$7,047,830
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January— 	
752
1,768
75
183
February  —
755
1,742
76
186
769
1,775
73
179
April	
775
1,830
80
183
788
1,873
77
188
819
1,961
82
200
July     	
811
2,031
85
197
August	
808
2,028
85
184
September	
782
1,967
81
195
October 	
782
1,901
84
188
November	
778
1,868
85
199
December	
768
1,825
80
200
Classified Ween-Iy Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 —
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99.
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
46
21
35
41
64
64
115
134
184
131
22
13
17
254
236
347
500
384
228
124
29
15
3
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
1
1
2
1
3
10
10
8
3
1
9
14
42
39
36
28
12
7
5
1
1
Table No. 13
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 80 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers .
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
$382,488
262,993
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,314,674
Total-
$1,960,155
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January    ...
322
226
35
41
February- —
314
230
35
37
304
263
36
39
April 	
310
271
34
40
May   	
309
284
33
39
June 	
325
280
32
40
July- -
323
278
32
42
August-	
314
288
32
42
319
295
36
41
October	
329
314
35
40
November -
331
278
40
42
306
258
37
41
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99...
30.00 to 34.99-
35.00 to 39.99-
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99...
50.00 to 54.99...
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to 69.99...
70.00 to 79.99-
80.00 to 89.99-
90.00 to   99.99—
100.00 and over—
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males    Females
20
15
14
16
25
25
71
44
79
29
14
6
6
34
61
42
71
69
21
17
6
4
2
2
6
6
13
7
3
2
1 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES                                   F 33
Table No. 14
Table No. 15
LUMBER INDUSTRIES
METAL TRADES
Returns Covering 2,329 Firms
Returns Covering 1,776 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
     $1
3,902,226
8,408,080
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $12,856,676
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     14,094,545
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)
....    '
7,862,164
°                      V                 e f
'
Total— 	
$162,695,375
Total  $74,813,385
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
32,675
273
1,075
723
January	
12,528
449
2,195
1,578
February  .   . .„	
34,660
298
1,086
727
February...	
12,729
473
2,242
1,588
36,481
36,262
1,098
1,102
745
12,954
496
2,273
1,603
April 	
334
749
April 	
13,243
504
2,277
1,612
May	
38,828
361
1,109
770
May	
13,522
527
2,310
1,656
June	
40,351
396
1,121
793
June  	
13,989
565
2,341
1,697
July	
41,521
413
1,140
803
July.	
14,302
575
2,338
1,723
August	
September	
42,143
41,962
1,140
1,132
807
14,613
577
2,350
1,723
434
811
September	
14,554
590
2,327
1,728
October.-— 	
41,549
492
1,123
833
October .	
14,544
619
2,358
1,746
November. 	
37,529
496
1,124
825
November.	
14,559
602
2,371
1,772
December 	
32,759
328
1,110
808
December 	
14,346
590
2,366
1,759
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
.  For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25 00
1,122
357
57
19
37
Under $25.00.	
624
57
47
108
$25.00 to $29.99	
33
8
23
$25.00 to $29.99	
248
28
25
84
30.00 to   34.99	
343
38
10
39
30.00 to   34.99	
338
70
35
171
35.00 to   39.99	
481
72
13
82
35.00 to   39.99	
478
113
53
265
40.00 to   44.99	
699
67
22
153
40.00 to   44.99-	
720
103
68
412
45.00 to   49.99	
887
92
23
166
45.00 to   49.99	
767
81
103
334
50.00 to   54.99	
1,702
41
35
126
50.00 to   54.99	
1,335
77
152
225
55.00 to   59.99	
2,714
52
42
88
55.00 to   59.99	
1,282
56
231
85
60.00 to   69.99-	
16,355
88
129
81
60.00 to   69.99	
3,262
64
416
84
70.00 to   79.99	
8,231
62
204
33
70.00 to   79.99	
3,837
22
290
41
80.00 to   89.99	
5,958
20
222
9
80.00 to   89.99	
1,869
1
287
7
90.00 to   99.99	
3,659
2
161
3
90.00 to   99.99.	
797
240
1
100.00 and over
6,314
7
278
4
100.00 and over
843
390
1
2 F 34
Table No. 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
METAL-MINING
Returns Covering 115 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,730,070
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        3,406,851
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     18,873,920
Total-
$24,010,841
Employment
Month
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
Wage-earners
Males    Females
4,242
4,261
4,404
4,525
4,853
5,020
5,127
5,052
4,928
4,888
4,761
4,526
67
68
65
67
73
74
74
81
76
75
77
74
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
538
536
556
563
586
590
591
585
574
566
570
575
100
99
99
97
98
98
101
102
104
105
107
105
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99.
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
68
23
31
31
59
165
479
536
910
1,017
1,355
457
515
9
12
2
8
6
7
4
9
19
5
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
1
9
15
52
114
106
133
219
1
7
1
9
23
15
23
9
15
3
3
Table No. 17
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 551 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
.    $6,063,834
.     7,262,194
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     23,479,079
Total-
.— $36,805,107
Employment
Month
January	
February.	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
Wage-earners
Males    Females
5,164
5,321
5,492
5,657
6,051
6,476
6,581
7,351
6,897
6,195
6,148
6,107
1,063
1,101
1,135
1,193
1,304
1,400
1,427
1,531
2,294
1,414
1,353
1,280
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1,055
1,075
1,114
1,133
1,147
1,167
1,176
1,243
1,182
1,187
1,193
1,205
985
1,001
1,015
1,030
1,036
1,077
1,112
1,201
1,095
1,093
1,093
1,102
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
468
133
423
391
606
479
671
757
,609
,529
769
280
418
249
125
254
1,038
281
225
177
123
68
36
13
2
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
45
8
35
59
55
99
90
106
260
185
142
72
106
37
43
86
210
239
217
179
75
106
42
15
1 Table No. 18
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 19
F 35
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING
Returns Covering 96 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $2,893,296
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.      4,441,870
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      8,155,538
Total   $15,490,704
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
2,232
1,882
1,946
1,852
1,908
1,926
1,933
1,918
1,866
1,727
2,140
2,103
69
70
76
54
92
71
85
75
63
20
61
61
720
718
723
718
753
775
776
795
772
759
758
762
366
February	
347
370
361
May 	
June	
July
383
396
398
407
September	
October	
November	
December- 	
408
401
394
399
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
61
11
13
16
27
72
92
131
332
595
453
280
717
33
3
7
5
2
4
13
14
28
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
11
27
28
37
36
116
135
158
99
121
4
2
3
18
57
79
102
62
50
24
PAINT-MANUFACTURING
Returns Covering 19 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
Total-
$404,022
692,587
1,053,296
$2,149,905
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males    Females
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October..	
November-
December—
281
286
295
299
303
324
324
324
308
315
314
315
41
43
46
48
50
48
52
51
52
47
51
48
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
115
120
118
118
115
116
114
117
115
116
118
116
68
67
69
70
70
71
74
76
73
74
76
73
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
6
2
17
22
23
17
36
40
78
64
27
3
7
4
3
7
19
7
5
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
3
6
4
11
6
30
27
12
12
3
1
2
7
8
27
14
6
4
5 F 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 20
Table No. 21
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING
PULP AND PAPER-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 181 Firms
Returns Covering 15 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $2,025,276
Officers, superintendents, and r
4,031,856
3,361,268
7,468,636
Clerks, stenographers, salesme
5,559,821
9.462.294
workers) —
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)
Total   	
    2
Total— 	
  $17,047,391
. $34,861,760
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males   I Females
Males
Females
2,029
364
865
625
5,688
170
508
290
2,055
380
849
655
5,713
171
516
295
2,037
379
850
662
5,768
171
525
304
2,055
356
863
670
5,821
167
541
303
2,075
367
865
672
5,980
214
563
310
2,071
351
870
681
June
6,196
218
580
322
July
2,080
371
893
703
July         	
6,138
206
589
328
2,120
369
895
711
6,155
203
600
332
2,156
392
891
703
6,028
173
576
330
October. ~ .    	
2,181
398
868
702
October 	
6,079
169
585
330
November 	
2,204
416
883
703
November.	
6,079
185
592
328
December —
2,193
402
878
712
December 	
6,044
177
583
332
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00
125
91
16
50
Under $25.00 -	
111
17
1
$25.00 to $29.99	
66
40
27
46
$25.00 to $29.99.	
46
6
2
2
30.00 to   34.99	
78
53
21
92
30.00 to   34.99	
32
4
2
18
35.00 to   39.99-	
67
38
31
152
35.00 to   39.99	
44
9
2
29
40.00 to   44.99	
72
45
23
128
40.00 to   44.99	
52
17
8
54
45.00 to   49.99	
50
28
30
90
45.00 to   49.99--	
45
41
7
67
50.00 to   54.99	
75
97
63
55
50.00 to   54.99	
92
55
17
40
55.00 to   59.99	
68
17
49
27
55.00 to   59.99	
163
23
22
54
60.00 to   69.99	
205
11
99
28
60.00 to   69.99	
1,161
30
39
37
70.00 to   79.99-	
197
15
85
17
70.00 to   79.99	
1,304
4
98
19
80.00 to   89.99	
343
8
116
4
80.00 to   89.99	
1,300
5
99
6
90.00 to   99.99	
380
6
144
13
90.00 to   99.99...	
688
95
	
100.00 and over
575
163
7
100.00 and over
1,171
202
	 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES                                   F 37
Table No. 22
Table No. 23
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING
Returns Covering 77 Firms
Returns Covering 10 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
$834,126
1,220,128
3,137,413
Officers, superintendents, and managers.     $2,017,799
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)
     1
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)
Total	
    20,889,167
Total	
  $15,191,667
  $28,208,052
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
3,041
4
228
114
January..	
4,531
61
927
235
February	
3,134
4
223
111
February.	
4,488
67
894
239
3,360
5
221
115
4,453
69
902
238
3,563
6
223
112
April	
4,568
69
816
251
May	
3,446
7
223
117
May	
4,798
71
931
257
June	
3,384
7
224
121
June  	
5,007
77
942
271
July. 	
3,281
12
223
124
July	
5,212
85
957
274
3,340
11
226
129
5,234
86
965
271
September	
3,478
9
222
126
September	
5,481
85
939
277
October	
3,721
6
221
126
October	
5,356
87
957
280
November	
3,905
3
218
129
November	
5,314
68
944
300
December 	
3,940
3
220
131
December	
5,260
65
960
310
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00
95
7
2
6
Under $25.00	
43
47
4
$25.00 to $29.99...	
62
1
2
11
$25.00 to $29.99.	
23
3
1
	
30.00 to   34.99	
46
2
1
29
30.00 to   34.99  .
36
2
8
3
35.00 to   39.99...	
62
3
4
31
35.00 to   39.99	
33
4
6
32
40.00 to   44.99
60
1
2
25
40.00 to   44.99	
39
2
5
53
45.00 to   49.99	
86
	
10
14
45.00 to   49.99	
53
3
2
83
50.00 to   54.99.
82
11
7
50.00 to   54.99...	
78
1
5
48
55.00 to   59.99	
87
1
10
5
55.00 to   59.99.	
127
5
15
29
60.00 to   69.99	
513
27
2
60.00 to  69.99	
1,133
15
60
38
70.00 to   79.99—
1,069
43
2
70.00 to   79.99	
2,183
5
127
25
80.00 to   89.99	
1,294
40
1
80.00 to   89.99	
1,051
2
183
3
90.00 to   99.99	
457
18
90.00 to   99.99	
366
2
226
100.00 and over
597
43
100.00 and over
516
1
349
1 F 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 24
Table No. 25
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
WOOD-MANUFACTURING  (N.E.S.)
Returns Covering 109 Firms
Returns Covering 176 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Salary and Wage Payments, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and
Clerks, stenographers, salesme
Wage-earners (including piece
3,047,610
1,179,127
1,508,070
Officers, superintend
Clerks, stenographer
Wage-earners (inclu
Total	
    i
2,095,197
1,623,018
0,703,577
s, salesme
ding piece
-workers)      1
-workers)    2
Total  $45,734,807
       $24,421,792
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
5,912
3,501
1,637
1,681
January	
4,792
815
238
166
February   —   	
5,934
3,195
1,647
1,652
February...	
4,877
820
243
165
5,971
6,170
3,209
3,282
1,648
1,641
1 667
5,202
844
247
164
1,668
April 	
5,397
867
248
168
May	
6,157
3,382
1,697
1,689
May	
5,581
899
252
167
June	
July
6,212
6,315
6,347
1,738
1,751
1,785
5,613
918
257
171
3,496
3,417
1 816
July	
5,615
896
258
175
1,796
August.. -	
5,643
894
258
180
September — .
6,295
3,441
1,773
1,710
September	
5,666
911
259
178
October 	
6,274
3,368
1,752
1,684
October 	
5,687
898
262
182
November	
6,368
3,397
1,746
1,705
November- -
5,649
872
262
180
December.-.	
6,294
3,401
1,746
1,710
December	
5,496
874
263
177
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00
91
83
21
30
Under $25.00	
167
27
5
7
$25.00 to $29.99.  .   .
66
115
4
29
$25.00 to $29.99	
60
13
1
1
30.00 to   34.99	
61
646
9
132
30.00 to   34.99	
113
23
5
12
35.00 to   39.99-	
53
724
13
259
35.00 to   39.99	
55
34
	
11
40.00 to   44.99	
98
840
20
279
40.00 to   44.99	
105
45
3
39
45.00 to   49.99	
131
655
50
361
45.00 to   49.99-	
120
39
6
31
50.00 to   54.99	
140
107
86
222
50.00 to   54.99	
424
35
7
39
55.00 to   59.99.	
371
190
98
203
55.00 to   59.99	
415
287
12
7
60.00 to   69.99	
1,562
52
306
186
60.00 to   69.99	
2,939
329
39
24
70.00 to   79.99.-	
1,657
23
309
40
70.00 to   79.99	
1,111
118
39
4
80.00 to   89.99 -
715
5
228
9
80.00 to   89.99	
482
7
37
3
90.00 to   99.99	
1,097
4
155
2
90.00 to   99.99	
179
1
39
	
100.00 and over..	
557
350
10
100.00 and over
172
	
48
1 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
F 39
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES
Returns Covering 9,537 Firms
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months Ended
December 31st, 1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers .—- 	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.     _	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  —- 	
Returns received too late to be included in above summary ~
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll) 	
$80,455,496
94,218,537
557,141,744
$1,910,902
44,774,441
$731,815,777
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the tables, namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll) 	
Total-
Employment
471,498,880
518,184,223
$1,250,000,000
Month
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
125,471
128,304
132,848
136,658
144,021
150,474
154,786
158,351
157,088
154,763
149,026
139,376
13,340
13.000
13,272
13,536
14,428
15,354
18,245
19,494
20,217
18,439
17,163
14,119
14,705
14,819
15,024
15,084
15,438
15,716
15,860
16,045
15,809
15,793
15,822
15,801
10,168
10,193
10,304
10,415
10,578
10,928
11,152
11,305
11,158
11,172
11,255
11,219
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00   	
5,772
1,861
2,590
3,059
5,588
5,889
9,418
12,377
45,253
33,194
24,026
15,426
19,920
2,926
1,948
3,014
4,340
4,076
3,006
1,800
1,371
1,301
489
200
36
18
250
110
220
289
404
560
850
983
2,488
2,487
2,341
1,925
2,955
505
$25.00 to $29.99  	
388
30.00 to   34.99                     -                 -          	
969
11 00 to   30 Q9
1,632
2,320
2,105
1,539
874
40 oo to 44 qq
45.00 to   49.99                  .             .	
50.00 to   54.99     .._	
SS 00 tr,    59.99
60.00 to   69.99  	
839
70.00 to   79.99	
321
80.00 to   89.99	
96
90.00 to   99.99-	
29
100.00 and over   	
40
Totals 	
184,373
24,525
15,862
11,657 F 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
«
Hours of Work Act"
The gradual decline in industrial working-hours, which has been apparent since the
early post-war years, reached a low ebb in 1954, the average for that year being noted at
the lowest point since the 44-hour limit became effective in 1946.
Representing the average working-time for all industrial wage-earners reported
during one week of normal employment, the single figure computed for each year is
recorded as a reliable indicator of the general trend in hours of work.
During the year 1955 the average industrial work-week for all employees reported
in the wage-earner classification was computed at 41.34 hours, a new low figure in the
yearly averages listed in this section of the Report. Comparative average figures for
the years 1930 to 1955 were as follows:—
1930 .
1931 .
1932-
1933 -
1934.
1935 .
1936 .
1937.
1938 .
1939.
1940.
1941 .
1942 .
48.62
47.37
47.69
47.35
47.32
47.17
47.63
47.25
46.84
47.80
46.91
46.90
48.12
1943 .
1944.
1945 .
1946-
1947 -
1948 .
1949 .
1950 .
1951 .
1952 .
1953 .
1954.
1955 .
47.19
46.02
-45.59
43.63
42.24
42.21
42.24
41.89
42.01
42.00
41.60
41.37
41.34
The table below shows the total number of wage-earners reported under a section
of the questionnaire dealing with hours of work, together with the proportion of the total
working at the legal maximum hours or less and those remaining at hours in excess of
the legal limit.
Comparative Figures, 1947 to 1955 (Wage-earners)
Year
Firms
Reporting
Wage-earners
Reported
44 Hours or
Less per
Week
In Excess of
44 Hours
1947        	
8,410
8,736
9,020
9,509
9,635
9,200
9.008
9,076
9,537
1
|     Per Cent
159.300                80.63
Per Cent
19.37
1948..   .  	
1949     	
1950 —      " 	
1951.   —   . ..      .    :.                   - -	
165,411
161,945
169,342
178,909
81.59
81.86
83.06
82.24
18.41
18.14
16.94
17.76
1952 _                         	
180,107
172,174
169,757
177,025
83.20
85.56
85.93
84.75
16.80
1953...      	
1954 .                 . 	
1955
14.44
14.07
15.25
Information dealing with hours of work for 1955 is based on a coverage of some
177,025 wage-earners, male and female, as reported in this section of the questionnaire
by the 9,537 employers replying to the Department of Labour inquiry.
In relation to figures for the previous year, such changes as occurred in the average
working-time in most industries during 1955 were very slight, the increase or decrease in
most instances resulting only in fractional differences in the annual figures compiled for
this Report.
For wage-earners the average work-week in 1955 was shorter in sixteen of the
twenty-nine industrial classifications covered in the hours-of-work inquiry, while the
average working-time for clerical employees decreased in eighteen of the industries listed.
Somewhat longer hours were noted in metal-mining, coal-mining, the construction
industry, public utilities, and others in lesser degree, but such minor increases were
offset by shorter working-time in most forest industries, cartage and warehousing, coast ; HOURS OF WORK ACT '
F 41
shipping, pulp and paper manufacturing, ship-building, and similar classifications accounting for the greater proportion of over-all employment.
In 1954 the proportion of the total wage-earner section reported as working in
excess of the forty-four-hour week stood at 14.07 per cent, the lowest yet recorded for
this group. With the increased coverage of the current year's survey, however, and
greater activity noted in some industries normally reporting longer hours, the 1955
percentage in excess of the legal limit was slightly higher at 15.25 per cent of total.
Some 84.75 per cent of the reported total of 177,025 wage-earners were shown as working
at or below the forty-four-hour limit.
Clerical workers included in the survey relating to hours of work numbered some
26,855 for 1955, as compared with 25,989 reported in this classification during the
previous year.
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries
Hours-of-work information compiled separately for wage-earners and clerical workers is presented in the tables immediately following, the listed figures representing the
average weekly hours recorded for 1955 and previous years in the various industrial
classifications included in the survey. F 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Average Weekly Hours of Work
Wage-earners
Industry
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
40.60
42.03
45.19
39.90
46.74
43.02
41.78
43.04
38.51
40.34
38.28
40.94
39.70
42.36
42.61
41.68
41.03
39.88
41.77
44.32
41.54
43.86
40.58
37.72
42.89
41.63
42.17
38.60
39.93
40.39
42.98
44.42
40.08
44.26
43.91
40.29
43.47
39.16
39.95
38.17
41.26
40.28
41.77
42.61
42.18
41.07
39.62
41.39
45.04
40.84
43.40
40.25
37.98
40.82
41.48
40.07
38.49
40.22
40.50
42.26
44.78
39.97
42.84
41.86
41.56
43.05
39.391
40.03
37.57
40.72
40.76
42.11
42.59
42.29
41.05
39.68
42.10
43.88
40.39
43.88
40.711
37.36
41.75
41.08
40.89
39.98
40.04
40.21
41.59
43.79
36.26
43.28
41.25
40.52
42.91
39.15
40.10
38.20
39.21
40.39
42.09
42.23
42.30
41.06
40.08
41.15
43.49
40.39
43.90
40.79
37.91
42.74
42.08
41.79
38.46
40.21
40.28
41.00
42.92
40.08
42.60
41.51
40.75
42.65
38.75
House furnishings      -	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair      - 	
40.45
37.58
39.32
40.68
Lumber industries—
42.05
42.49
41.26
Sawmills  - —
40.99
39.82
40.97
44.23
40.48
44.14
39.87
37.07
42.42
41.16
41.61
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.	
38.63
40.87
1 Revised since 1953 Report.
Clerical Workers
38.51
38.05
39.78
39.18
39.93
38.37
39.79
40.52
38.99
39.17
37.62
42.16
38.30
41.50
38.21
40.37
39.33
39.02
39.95
43.80
39.38
37.17
38.74
37.24
37.86
38.63
41.60
35.59
37.30
37.74
37.22
39.42
38.90
38.39
40.11
38.99
40.07
39.83
39.43
37.38
41.69
37.51
39.16
38.57
40.33
39.36
38.44
39.68
42.50
38.87
36.63
38.53
37.08
38.10
38.33
41.08
35.74
38.10
37.80
36.80
40.07
39.68
38.37
39.08
39.09
40.45
39.221
39.04
37.09
41.22
36.46
41.04
39.89
40.46
38.51
37.24
39.39
42.17
38.73
36.81
38.281
36.42
38.50
37.47
40.41
35.93
37.69
38.30
36.43
39.71
39.81
37.82
38.07
38.46
39.33
39.06
38.23
37.05
40.23
38.43
40.32
39.66
41.42
37.55
36.04
39.02
41.75
38.15
36.90
37.83
36.45
37.67
37.16
40.71
35.89
37.11
38 04
36.64
39.38
39.82
38.00
37.77
38.64
39.04
38.59
38 13
37.54
39 62
37.87
Lumber industries—
39.51
39 71
40 96
Sawmills   	
36.91
37.13
38.73
41.97
38.05
37 20
36.99
38 39
38.07
36 92
39 60
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc  	
35.87
36 12
1 Revised since 1953 Report. STATISTICS OF CIVIL AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS
F 43
Statistics of Civil and Municipal Workers
A segregation of statistical information with particular reference to civic and
municipal workers is maintained on an annual basis for presentation in the section to
follow. While the 1955 totals appearing in this section have already been included with
summary figures shown elsewhere in this Report (as a portion of the total Provincial payroll), they are presented here in direct comparison with similar totals for civic and
municipal workers in previous years.
Summary totals mentioned in the tables are inclusive of workers employed in public
works, the construction and maintenance of waterworks, generation and distribution of
light and power, and similar operations owned and operated by the cities and municipalities reporting in the survey.
Total labour costs reported by the 139 civic and municipal administrations completing returns in time for tabulation in the 1955 survey amounted to $21,358,355, an increase
of $1,607,610 above the figure of $19,750,745 reported for 1954.
Payroll totals for each of the three main classifications of civic and municipal
employees covered in the 1955 survey are shown in the table following, together with
comparative figures for the years 1953 and 1954:—
1953
1954
1955
Officers, superintendents, and managers-
Clerks, stenographers, etc	
Wage-earners	
$2,180,728
2,142,661
14,585,192
$2,033,828
2,813,855
14,903,062
$2,169,471
2,613,945
16,574,939
Totals-
$18,908,581
$19,750,745
$21,358,355
On the basis of the returns received, over-all employment totals of civic and municipal workers in 1955 were slightly below the level of the previous year, although some
increase was apparent in the number of female office employees reported.
Top employment period was during the month of July, a total of 6,403 employees
in all categories being reported for that month, as compared with a high of 6,626 reported
in August of 1954.
Monthly employment totals of male and female civic and municipal workers are
shown in the table below, with separate figures relating to wage-earners and clerical
employees for the comparative years 1954 and 1955:— F 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Employment Totals1 of Civic and Municipal Workers, 1954 and 1955
1954
1955
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January    ■ 	
4,477
4.384
4,591
4,813
5,030
5,200
5,417
5,540
5,077
4,936
4,793
4,658
52
58
64
113
125
155
179
153
75
58
59
52
599
595
603
611
620
625
629
638
627
629
629
639
266
267
271
267
271
282
291
295
292
297
300
304
4,536
4,550
4,648
4,829
5,050
5,225
5,356
5,328
5,164
4,979
4,771
4,661
54
62
49
78
107
126
142
146
61
69
54
68
551
557
557
557
564
567
580
577
579
577
579
583
296
297
March   	
April    	
May     	
June   	
July                  .    -
299
303
304
322
325
ing
September   	
October    	
November-	
December—  	
322
331
334
331
1 Totals represent the number of employees on payroll on the last day of each month or nearest working-date.
Indicating the varying proportion of the male wage-earner group in each wage
category, the percentages listed below show the comparative concentration of civic and
municipal employment in relation to weekly earnings for the years 1954 and 1955.
Percentage of Employees
Weekly Earnings 1954
Under $25.00  2.63
$25.00 to $29.99  1.23
30.00 to    34.99  1.23
35.00 to   39.99  1.06
40.00 to   44.99  2.45
45.00 to   49.99  6.74
50.00 to   54.99  7.88
55.00 to    59.99  24.52
60.00 to   69.99  35.49
70.00 to    79.99  10.34
80.00 to    89.99  3.93
90.00 to   99.99  1.95
100.00 and over.
0.55
1955
3.55
0.64
1.09
1.76
3.21
4.50
9.63
14.26
40.56
11.89
4.16
2.33
2.42
Average weekly earnings for civic and municipal workers in the wage-earner group
climbed to a new high of $61.95 in 1955, an increase of $1.36 above the average of
$60.59 recorded for the previous year.
Clerical earnings in this section did not reach the high mark of the preceding year,
and were generally just below the level of the 1954 averages. For male employees in
clerical occupations the average was computed at $65.20, off slightly from the previous
year's high of $66.04, while female office-workers earned an average of $44.73 for the
week under review, just below the 1954 figure of $45.13.
Average working-time for civic and municipal employees was a little less in 1955
than during 1954. The average figure representing weekly hours for wage-earners was
computed at 40.11, down from 40.46 hours for a similar period in 1954. The average
week for clerical employees stood at 36.69 hours in 1955, a fraction below the 36.87
hours recorded for this group in 1954. SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR F 45
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1956)
'Annual Holidays Act, 1956
>»
This Act provides for an annual holiday of two weeks with pay based on 4 per cent
of the total wages and salary earned by the employee for the period of his employment.
The Act comes into force July 1st, 1957.
" Boiler and Pressure-vessel Act Amendment Act, 1956 '
The definition of " Department " was deleted as being unnecessary.
" Coal-mines Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1956 "
This Act made minor amendments to meet the recent amendments made to the
Canadian Electrical Code.
Factories Act Amendment Act, 1956
»»
This Act deleted from the existing Statute the restrictions on the hours of operation
of laundry, cleaning, dyeing, pressing, and dressmaking establishments. The hours of
operation of such establishments may now be governed by municipal by-law.
" Fair Employment Practices Act "
This Act makes statutory the principle that it is contrary to public policy in British
Columbia to discriminate against men and women in respect of their employment or
membership in trade-unions because of race, religion, colour, nationality, ancestry, or
place of origin.
" Mechanics' Lien Act, 1956 "
This Act repeals the " Mechanics' Lien Act" and substitutes a new Act for it.
Basically the effect and purpose of the new Act is to simplify the procedure for filing
mechanics' liens and taking action to enforce same, to extend the trust fund provisions,
to create certain hold-back provisions, and to eliminate certain unused provisions in
anomalous situations which have arisen under the present Act.
" Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act Amendment
Act, 1956 "
This Act made minor amendments to meet Workmen's Compensation Board regulations as to the waiting period for silicosis examination and to permit the use of higher
voltage in main access haulage-ways where electric street-cars are used to transport men
to and from work. F 46 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Members of the Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands, Deputy
Minister of Labour -      -      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Members:
Fraudena Eaton - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
G. A. Little - - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
H. J. Young - - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
C. Murdoch - - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
P. Baskin    - - - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
D. J. Baldwin - - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Secretary:
C. R. Margison        -      -      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Head office       - Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch office    -      -      -      -      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Regional offices:
17 Bastion St., Nanaimo. Department of Labour, Prince George.
Court-house, Kelowna. Department of Labour, Smithers.
Court-house, Nelson. Department of Labour, Cranbrook.
515 Columbia St., Kamloops. Department of Labour, Mission.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the twenty-second annual report of the Board
of Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1955.
The activities of the Board include those formerly directed by the Minimum Wage
Board, which functioned for sixteen years prior to 1934. The original Board dealt with
minimum wages, hours of labour, and conditions of employment for women and girls,
so this report, in so far as it relates to women workers, is the thirty-eighth annual record
of labour laws and their results in that sphere.
Meetings and Delegations
During the year the Board held fifty-six meetings, forty-eight of which were held in
the City of Vancouver, six in the City of Victoria, and two on the Queen Charlotte Islands.
The Board held public hearings in Victoria and Vancouver, B.C., in connection with
the revision of Minimum Wage Orders applying to employees in the construction, manufacturing, and baking industries. Public hearings were also held in Vancouver, B.C., in
connection with the revision of Order No. 4, applicable to employees in the cook- and
bunk-house occupation in unorganized territory; Orders Nos. 1, 50, and 62 with respect
to the logging, sawmill, and shingle industries; and the making of a Minimum Wage Order
to apply to employees in the mining industry. The Board held hearings at Juskatla and
Aero Camp, Q.C.I., for the purpose of giving employees in the logging industry in that
area an opportunity to make representations to the Board in connection with the hours
of work in that industry. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS F 47
Following the procedure set out in the "Equal Pay Act," five complaints were
referred to the Board. After hearing the affected parties, the Board found that the
complaints were supported by the evidence and recommended the course that ought to
be taken with respect to the complaints. As a result, the Minister of Labour issued
orders carrying out the Board's recommendations.
Orders and Regulations Made during 1955
Minimum Wage Orders
1. Construction Industry—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 12 (1955).—Following
public hearings the Board made Order No. 12 (1955), which consolidated five separate
Orders and established a minimum wage of $1.50 per hour for tradesmen and $1 per
hour for other employees to whom the Order applies.
2. Logging and Sawmill Industry—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 1
(1955).—This Order of the Board combined separate Orders which previously applied
to the logging, sawmill, and shingle industries and established a minimum wage of $1 per
hour for employees in those industries.
3. Sheet-metal Trade—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 10k (1955).—Having
regard to the minimum wage of $1.50 per hour established for tradesmen under Order
No. 12, following consultations with representatives of the employers and employees the
Board increased the minimum wage for employees in the sheet-metal trade from $1.25 to
$1.50 per hour.
4. Mining Industry—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 9 (1955).—With the exception of certain employees who had been covered by an occupational order of the Board,
employees in this industry had not heretofore been afforded the protection of a minimum
wage. Due to the nature of the industry, problems in connection with the regulation of
hours of work existed and special consideration had to be given to prospectors and
employees engaged in development work. Special conditions were established in this
Order to take care of this matter. The Order establishes a minimum wage of $1 per
hour, except that for boys under the age of 18 years employed on a casual basis the
minimum wage is 60 cents per hour.
5. Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 13 (1955).—There are cases
where an employee may be employed by one employer in respect of several different
occupations, one or more of which is not limited to an eight-hour day. An example of
this might be a sales clerk employed in a mercantile establishment and who is also required
to deliver merchandise by truck for the same employer. Because of the exceptions
provided by or under the "Hours of Work Act" and Orders of the Board, such an
employee is not required to be paid overtime until he has worked in excess of eight hours
in the day as a clerk and in excess of eight and a half hours in the day as a truck-driver.
To correct this apparent injustice, Order No. 13 (1955) requires an employer to pay an
employee working under the circumstances described an overtime rate of pay of not less
than time and one-half the employee's regular rate for all hours worked in excess of eight
in the day and forty-four in the week.
Regulations Made pursuant to the " Hours of Work Act "
Regulation No. 41—Logging Industry.—This regulation allows employees in the
logging industry to work an average forty-four-hour week over a two-week period
provided the eight-hour day is not exceeded.
Regulation No. 21 (1955)—Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—This regulation
exempted the industry from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" for the period
June 1st, 1955, to and including November 30th, 1955. F 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Christmas Regulation.—This regulation permitted employees in retail establishments
in the mercantile industry to work up to ten hours in the day on any two days of the week
ended December 24th, 1955.
Regulation Made pursuant to the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts
For the purpose of the efficient administration of the Male and Female Minimum
Wage Acts, the Board made Regulation No. 3, which exempted the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway Company and its employees from the operation of those Statutes.
(A summary of the above-mentioned orders and regulations, together with existing
and new orders and regulations made prior to this Report going to press, may be obtained
free of charge from the Department on request.)
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees
Importance of women workers in the industrial and business life of our Province,
and the extent of their contribution to the total labour force is fully emphasized in the
following section. A comparative five-year summarization of information dealing with
the employment, earnings, and hours of work of female employees in various industries
and occupations is included in the tables, based generally on the coverage of minimum
wage legislation for women, as set by the Board.
Completed returns were received from some 8,170 firms reporting on the week of
greatest employment under survey in 1955, the returns indicating a summary total of
some 70,776 women workers on payroll during this period. Compared with the previous
year's total of 68,239, the 1955 figure represents a substantial increase in employment,
inasmuch as the coverage of the current survey remained almost the same as during 1954,
with little change noted in the number of firms reporting.
Mercantile Industry (Female)
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting —
Total number of employees..
Total weekly earnings..
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week..
1,698
14,374
1,771.00
$34.00
36.05
1,717
13,728
$464,712.00
$33.85
37.08
1,813
12,206
$384,169.00
$31.47
36.31
1,889
12,534
$364,716.00
$29.10
35.56
1,830
12,570
$351,563.00
$27.97
37.24
The mercantile industry continued to account for one of the largest sections of female
employment, a total of 14,374 women workers being reported by the 1,698 firms completing returns in this classification for 1955.
With the week of greatest employment occurring during the Christmas period in this
industry, some fluctuation in the average hours recorded is usually noted in the above
table, depending on the position of the holiday within the working-week.
Average weekly earnings for mercantile employees were slightly higher than during
the previous year, the 1955 average increasing to $34, from $33.85 for the week under
review in 1954.   Shorter working-time was also noted in this instance, the average week BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
F 49
in 1955 decreasing to 36.05 hours, compared with 37.08 hours listed for the previous
year.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
236
2,797
$97,185.00
$34.75
37.69
248
2,604
$90,153.00
$34.62
37.46
235
2,739
$90,398.00
$33.00
38.07
258
2,743
$87,558.00
$31.92
39.41
241
2,744
Total weekly earnings - 	
$80,075.00
$29.18
39.28
A group of 236 firms completing returns in the laundry, cleaning and dyeing industries reported a total employment of 2,797 female workers for the week under survey in
1955, compared with 2,604 employed in this section during a similar period in 1954.
The average per capita weekly wage for females in laundry occupations was computed at $34.75 for 1955, increased slightly from the previous year's figure of $34.62.
Average working-time was recorded at 37.69 hours during the week reported in the
current survey, also a little above the 1954 figure reported for this classification.
Hotel an
d Catering
Industry
(Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
Number of firms reporting   	
1,237
11,197
$340,848.00
$30.44
36.10
1,276
11,328
$335,405.00
$29.61
36.55
1,296
10,807
$313,723.00
$29.03
37.22
1,351
10,620
$288,432.00
$27.16
37.63
1,335
10,458
Total weekly earnings - 	
Average weekly earnings -   '  .',,.	
$270,068.00
$25.82
38.49
During one week of 1955 some 1,237 firms in the hotel and restaurant business
reported a total employment of 11,197 female workers, this figure being a little below the
previous total of 11,328 submitted for 1954, when slightly more firms completed returns.
Higher earnings and shorter hours were again noted in hotel and catering occupations, the average weekly wage figure for women workers increasing to $30.44 in 1955
from $29.61 reported for the previous year. The average work-week was further reduced
to 36.10 hours in 1955, as compared with 36.55 hours previously noted.
Office Occupation (Female)
1955
1951
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings 	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
3,538
21,214
$924,867.00
$43.60
37.30
3,483
20,069
$856,551.00
$42.68
37.66
3,588
19,143
$781,343.00
$40.82
37.65
3,555
18,851
$732,206.00
$38.84
38.38
3,501
18,511
$678,776.00
$36.67
38.41
Opportunities for female office employees continued to increase during 1955, the
attractive earnings and shorter hours to be found in this class of work appealing to the
great majority of women employed. Almost thirty per cent of the total employees covered
in the survey were accounted for in occupations relating to this classification.
A consistent increase in the employment totals reported in the above table continued
through 1955, the 3,538 employers who reported female office-workers for that year
showing a total of 21,214 employed during the week of the survey, a substantial increase
from the 20,069 females reported in this section during the previous year, and representing a new high mark in the number of women employed at any one type of job. F 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Earnings for office-workers again increased during 1955, the average wage-figure for
female employees being computed at $43.60, up from $42.68 recorded in this occupation
for 1954, and $40.82 noted in 1953.
Average working-time was slightly less than during the previous year, the average
work-week in this section being reported at 37.30 hours for 1955, compared with 37.66
hours recorded for a similar week during the previous year.
Hairdressing Occupation (Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees -
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings..
Average hours worked per week..
95
375
$16,025.00
$42.73
38.74
97
345
$13,844.00
$40.13
38.02
97
283
$10,447.00
$36.92
38.83
113
308
$11,116.00
$36.09
38.85
112
292
$9,710.00
$33.25
40.24
Many establishments in the hairdressing and beauty-parlour business are owner-
operated, and are not included in the above table by reason of the fact that no outside
help is employed. As the survey is restricted to only those firms reporting employees,
the group remains a comparatively small one, but continues to show improvement from
year to year.
Although little change was noted in the number of firms reporting, the number of
females employed in beauty-parlour and hairdressing occupations increased to 375 in
the 1955 survey, up from 345 reported in 1954.
Earnings continued to increase, the 1955 average weekly wage paid to operators in
this business amounting to $42.73, substantially increased from $40.13 in 1954, and
$36.92 recorded for 1953.
A fractional increase was noted, however, in the length of the average work-week,
which increased slightly to 38.74 hours in 1955, compared with 38.02 hours previously
reported.
Fishing Industry (Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
21
2,108
$68,449.00
$32.47
26.63
38
2,291
$106,559.00
$46.51
38.67
30
2,424
$99,940.00
$41.23
38.72
26
2,058
$92,234.00
$44.82
39.67
31
2,108
$81,425.00
$38.63
38.43
Employment of female workers in the fishing industry is largely dependent on varying factors common to the industry itself. Seasonal variation in the size of the catch,
and difficulties involving the handling and processing of large quantities of incoming fish
within certain time-limits result in fluctuation in the numbers employed, time worked,
and resultant earnings in this industry.
Returns were received from 21 firms in this classification, with a reported total of
2,108 female employees for 1955, this figure being somewhat less than the 2,291
reported in 1954, and the high total of 2,424 women workers reported during the peak
year of 1953.
Piece-workers, in addition to regular full-time employees in this industry, continue
to affect the averages recorded each year for this section, and many seasonal processing
operations are completed by employing large numbers of workers for a comparatively
short working-period. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
F 51
Average work-week during the survey period was 26.63 hours, considerably shorter
than the week of greatest employment in 1954, when the average stood at 38.67 hours.
With the reduction in working-time, a resultant drop in earnings was noted in this classification for 1955, the average figure being computed at $32.47 for the week under survey
in that year, compared with a high of $46.51 recorded for a full week during the seasonal
peak period of 1954.
Telephone
and Telegraph Occupation (Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
310
4,194
$175,661.00
$41.88
37.87
264
4,507
$186,712.00
$41.43
37.73
253
4,523
$184,752.00
$40.85
38.06
227
3,952
$143,582.00
$36.33
37.89
220
3,712
$130,116.00
$35.05
Average hours worked per week	
36.27
In addition to firms in the actual business of communications, the above tabulations
are also inclusive of information submitted by establishments employing female workers
in switchboard work, and similar occupations closely related to the coverage of the telephone and telegraph industry.
A total of 310 firms completed returns in time for classification in the above table
for 1955, the returns indicating a total employment of 4,194 female workers on payroll
during the period of the survey in that year, as compared with somewhat higher totals of
4,507 reported in 1954, and 4,523 in 1953.
Average weekly earnings, however, continued to increase in telephone and telegraph
occupations, the 1955 average for female operators rising to a new high of $41.88 for
the current year, as compared with $41.43 in 1954, and $40.85 for 1953.
Working-time for employees in switchboard and other telephone and telegraph occupations advanced slightly to 37.87 hours during the average week of 1955, up from 37.73
hours recorded for a similar weekly period during the previous year.
Manufacturing Industry (Female)
1955                   1954
1953
1952
1951
747
746
750
781
8,044
$306,820.00
$38.14
38.62
796
7,779
$331,754.00
$42.65
38.41
7,468
$302,609.00
$40.52
38.24
7,758
$306,103.00
$39.46
38.72
8,462
$286,483.00
$33.86
38.28
Average weekly earnings —	
Recovering from the gradual recession which had resulted in lower employment
totals in this section for the past few years, the manufacturing industries reported
increased activity during the year under review, with rising employment of female
workers totalling 7,779 in 1955, substantially higher than the total of 7,468 women
employees reported in this category during the low year of 1954.
The total payroll for the 7,779 employees mentioned in the table above for one
week of 1955 was $331,754, amounting to a per capita average weekly wage of $42.65
for all female employees reported in this classification. Compared with the previous
year, weekly earnings in this section were $2.13 above the average figure of $40.52
noted for 1954.
Working-time in most manufacturing industries remained almost at the level of the
previous year, the average for the week under review advancing a fraction to 38.41 hours,
from 38.24 hours listed in the above table for 1954. F 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
79
5,703
$216,078.00
$37.89
41.73
85
4,992
$183,278.00
$36.71
42.11
87
5,533
$198,886.00
$35.95
41.99
84
5,688
$202,265.00
$35.56
43.94
80
Total number of employees 	
5,485
$181,235.00
$33.04
Average hours worked per week  	
41.32
Employment, earnings, and general labour activity in the fruit- and vegetable-
processing industries are subject to considerable variation in the annual survey totals,
due to the seasonal nature of the industry and the effects of weather and resultant crop
conditions.
The year 1955 became a good year for workers in this industry, with increased
employment, higher take-home pay, and shorter hours than reported for the previous
year. Compared with the 4,992 female workers reported in fruit- and vegetable-processing jobs in 1954, employment increased to a total of 5,703 women in this industry during
the seasonal peak of 1955.
Average weekly earnings were higher at $37.89, increased from $36.71 previously
recorded for this classification.
Working-time for the week of the survey was a little less than during 1954, the
average week amounting to 41.73 hours in 1955, down from 42.11 hours recorded in
this section for the previous year.
Transportation Industry (Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees —
Total weekly earnings -	
Average weekly earnings .
Average hours worked per week-
57
128
$4,560.00
$35.63
38.64
58
135
$4,689.00
$34.73
37.39
48
122
$3,970.00
$32.54
38.11
58
157
$4,789.00
$30.50
39.38
53
139
$3,685.00
$26.51
42.84
A small group of transportation companies continue to employ female workers in
occupations relating to this industry, the women workers in this instance being engaged
in delivery, trucking, messenger work, and occupations of a similar nature.
Employment in this small group remained generally at the average for the two
previous years, although weekly earnings for female workers in occupations classified
here continued to show improvement over past years.
Average weekly earnings for the 128 women listed in the returns for 1955 increased
to $35.63, as compared with an individual average figure of $34.73 recorded in 1954,
and $32.54 noted for 1953.
The average weekly hours worked by females in this section was somewhat higher
for the week under survey in 1955, increasing slightly to 38.64 hours, from the low figure
of 37.39 hours recorded for a similar week in 1954. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Public Places of Amusement (Female)
F 53
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
108
709
$19,447.00
$27.43
31.27
107
606
$13,258.00
$21.88
27.14
108
646
$14,336.00
$22.19
28.41
107
612
$11,362.00
$18.57
26.20
107
588
$10,950.00
Average weekly earnings   	
Average hours worked per week.	
$18.62
27.89
A total of 108 firms submitted returns covering payroll information in the classification dealing with public places of amusement, the reports concerning female workers
employed as theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and in similar occupations in connection with swimming-pools, bowling-alleys, sports centres, and other such establishments.
Increased activity was noted in this section for 1955, a total of 709 women being
reported on payroll during the period of the survey, this total having increased from 606
reported for a similar week in 1954.
Most occupations included in this classification are necessarily of a casual or part-
time nature, and the hours worked and weekly earnings mentioned in the above table
should therefore be considered as referring to a partial week, rather than to full-time
employment comparable with other types of work.
The average time worked and resultant weekly earnings for employees in most
public places of amusement were considerably above the figures reported for the previous
year, and it was apparent that for establishments in this business, 1955 was a busy year.
With longer hours noted in this section, the average individual earnings for the week
under survey in 1955 increased to $27.43, this amount being based on a work-week of
31.27 hours. Comparable per capita weekly wage-figure for workers in this category
during 1954 was $21.88, when the average part-time work-week amounted to 27.14
hours.
Personal-service Occupations (Female)
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees 	
Total weekly earnings...-	
Average weekly earnings.- 	
Average hours worked per week.
44
198
$8,689.00
$43.88
37.22
32
166
$7,150.00
$43.07
39.11
26
66
$2,793.00
$42.32
36.98
For the past three years a sampling has been taken from the statistical returns to
separately classify female workers employed in occupations relating to personal service,
such as those engaged in the work of massage, physiotherapy, chiropody, chiropractic,
osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized therapeutics, and all work of
a like nature.
Coverage of employees in this type of occupation increased considerably in 1955,
although the totals should still be considered as a sampling of these occupations rather
than representing the total number employed in this work. Difficulties in correct classification of many employees in medical offices is sometimes due to the employee being
partially engaged in personal-service work in addition to regular office duties.
Average individual salary paid to personal-service workers for the week under
review in 1955 was $43.88, increased from an average wage of $43.07 for a similar
week in 1954, and $42.32 in 1953.
The average work-week for employees in this classification during the 1955 survey
was computed at 37.22 hours. F 54 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Summary of All Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act ")
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
Number of firms reporting ...
Total number of employees..
Total weekly earnings _
Average weekly earnings...	
Average hours worked per week..
8,170
70,776
$2,692,334.00
$38.04
37.02
8,151
68,239
$2,564,920.00
$37.59
37.69
8,331
66,250
$2,390,860.00
$36.09
37.82
8,449
65,567
$2,245,080.00
$34.24
38.18
8,306
65,069
$2,084,086.00
$32.03
38.26
The above summary totals of all occupations included in the coverage of the 1955
survey of female workers is based on returns from some 8,170 firms reporting a total of
70,776 women employed during the week of greatest employment in that year.
While some fluctuation has occurred from year to year in the number of firms
reporting, it is significant that the total reported employment of women workers continues
to increase, with higher earnings and shorter hours apparent in most occupations within
the coverage of the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
During one week of the survey in 1955 a total of $2,692,334 in salaries and wages
was paid to the 70,776 female workers employed, as compared with $2,564,920 paid to
68,239 women employees for a similar pay period in 1954.
The average single figure representing weekly earnings for all occupations included
in the annual summary increased to a new record high of $38.04, up from $37.59
reported for the previous year, and $36.09 noted in 1953.
With some exceptions in the case of occupations exempt from various regulations
of the " Hours of Work Act," the Minimum Wage Orders in effect during 1955 established
a minimum range of salaries for female workers on a weekly basis from $17.60 to a high
of $24.60 in one industry.
Representing the average weekly earnings for females in all occupations included in
the annual survey for 1955, the summary figure of $38.04 continues to substantiate the
fact that earnings for female workers in British Columbia are sustained at levels well
above the required minima set by law.
The average work-week recorded for all women workers under survey in 1955 was
37.02 hours, a further decrease from the previous year's figure, and the shortest working-
period yet reported in the annual summary of weekly hours of work.
The summary total of 70,776 female workers covered by the survey in 1955 is
restricted to include only those employees in occupations and industries for which Minimum Wage Orders have been set by the Board. Domestic workers, farm-labourers, and
fruit-pickers are not included in the totals, these occupations being exempt from coverage
under the provisions of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Bank employees and Federal workers are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS F 55
Table Showing Comparative Relation of 1955 Earnings to Legal Minimum
Industry or Occupation
Number
of
Firms
Reporting
Number
of
Employees
Reported
Total
Weekly
Payroll
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Full-time
Employees
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Percentage
by Which
1955 Average
Earnings Exceed Legal
Minimum
Mercantile -
Laundry-
Hotel and catering-
Office	
Hairdressing —
Fishing
Telephone and telegraph..
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
Transportation-
Public places of amusement-
Personal service	
1,698
236
1,237
3,538
95
21
310
747
79
57
108
44
14,374
2,797
11,197
21,214
375
2,108
4,194
7,779
5,703
128
709
198
$488,771
97,185
340,848
924,867
16,025
68,449
175,661
331,754
216,078
4,560
19,447
8,689
$18.00l
17.602
22.003
18.00*
25.001
19.201
20.161
17.602
26.402
18.003
20.003
$34.00
34.75
30.44
43.60
42.73
32.47
41.88
42.65
37.89
35.63
27.43°
43.88
88.9
97.4
38.4
142.2
70.9
69.1
107.7
142.3
43.5
52.4°
119.4
All occupations..
8,170
70,776
$2,692,334
$38.04
116.1
1 Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
3 Forty-four hours per week.
3 Forty to forty-four hours per week.
4 Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
5 In the transportation industry it is impracticable to set a weekly rate, owing to the variation of minimum wages in
the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycle, by motor-cycle, or other types of motor-vehicles.
6 Earnings represent partial week only.
The above table is provided each year to show the average weekly earnings in relation
to the legal minimum wage established for each occupational classification by the Orders
of the Board. A percentage column in the table indicates to what extent the legal
minimum in each case is exceeded by the average earnings for that year. For all female
workers included in the 1955 survey it was significant that the average weekly figure of
$38.04 mentioned in the summary was 116.1 per cent above the lowest legal rate set by
the Board.
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)
The importance of hospitals and nursing and rest homes as a necessary adjunct to
a growing population is further emphasized by the steady increase in occupational opportunities for female workers in this line of endeavour. In addition to regular nursing and
professional staffs, a wide distribution of supplementary help must be maintained by these
establishments, which now embraces almost every type of vocational calling suitable or
adaptable to female employment.
Following the regular annual survey of women workers in industry and business,
a separate inquiry dealing with female employment is directed to public and private
hospitals, nursing and rest homes, solariums, homes for the aged and infirm, and like
institutions. Although nursing staffs are omitted from this survey, all other female
workers are classified according to occupation and summarized in the following section,
with particular reference to employment and payrolls in each category and average
weekly earnings and hours of work. F 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The table below contains a summarization of payroll information resulting from the
hospital survey for 1955, based on one weekly period of greatest employment during
that year:—
Occupational Classification
Number
Employed
Total
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Hours
Laundry	
Housekeeping and catering-
Office	
Hairdressing..
Telephone and telegraph-
Manufacturing  	
Personal service 	
Transportation-
Technicians, X-ray	
Technicians, laboratory	
Pharmacists	
Dieticians	
Physiotherapists 	
Therapists, occupational-
Nurses' aides  	
All occupations-
686
2,300
839
1
80
44
114
2
78
125
5
34
21
7
1,240
$22,230
75,806
35,513
62
3,235
1,642
4,654
73
4,068
6,699
253
2,086
1,110
348
44,378
$32.41
32.96
42.33
62.00
40.44
37.32
40.82
36.50
52.15
53.59
50.60
61.35
52.86
49.71
35.79
35.8
37.4
37.9
40.0
37.6
39.3
37.7
37.5
40.4
39.7
39.0
41.3
38.7
38.0
39.1
5,576
$202,157
$36.25
37.8
Returns were completed by 132 establishments for the week under review in 1955,
the survey including public and private hospitals, nursing and rest homes, solariums,
homes for the aged and infirm, and like institutions.
Employment of female workers continued to increase from the previous year, a total
of 5,576 being reported on payroll for the period under survey, this figure representing
all occupational classifications listed in the above table in addition to regular nursing
staffs, which, as stated previously, were omitted from the coverage. Working-hours were
generally a little below the previous year, while earnings increased in eleven of the fifteen
occupational groups included in the survey.
Compared with the previous year, employment in laundry occupations in reporting
establishments increased in 1955, a total of 686 female workers being reported in this
department, as against 625 previously shown. With the increase in employment, however,
shorter hours were noted in this section, and average weekly earnings were computed at
$32.41, as compared with $33.01 noted in 1954. The housekeeping and catering departments continued to represent the largest number of female employees, a total of 2,300
being reported in this occupational group. Average weekly earnings in this section were
$32.96, up from $32.51 reported for the previous year. Employment of office-workers
in hospitals and similar establishments remained generally at the level of the previous
survey, a total of 839 being shown in this category for 1955, as against 814 listed in 1954.
Average weekly salary for office occupations was computed at $42.33, increased from
$41.33 previously shown. One institution reported a female employee in the hairdressing
occupation at a salary of $62 per week, this figure having increased from $57 reported in
1954. Switchboard operators in hospital work numbered 80 in the current survey, as
compared with 77 previously listed, while weekly earnings in this occupation increased
from $39.81 to $40.44 for the year under review. Workshop occupations coming within
the manufacturing classification remained a comparatively small group, the 44 employees
listed under this heading earning an average of $37.32 per week in 1955, a fractional
increase from the previous year's figure of $36.64 per week in this section. A group of
114 female workers listed as engaged in various personal-service occupations were paid
an average per capita salary of $40.82 during the week of the survey. Two women
transportation workers were shown as employed in hospital work at an average weekly
salary of $36.50.
With reference to women in occupations more closely related to the actual work
of hospitalization, where possible from the returns a segregation was made to properly BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
F 57
classify the employment hours and earnings of each department. Beginning with technicians, the 1955 survey showed a total of 78 workers employed as X-ray technicians, the
average weekly salary for this group amounting to $52.15, up from $50.05 fisted as
individual weekly earnings in this section during 1954. A substantial increase was also
noted in the earnings of laboratory technicians, the 125 employees shown in this department receiving an average of $53.59 for the week under review, as compared with a
weekly figure of $50.29 noted for this occupation during the previous year. Under
heading of other selected occupations filled by female workers, a small sampling of 5
employees engaged as pharmacists showed this group as receiving average salaries of
$50.60 for the week under review. Dieticians mentioned in the returns numbered 34,
this group being reported at higher wage rates, and averaging $61.35 per week at the
time of the survey, this figure comparing with $60.66 per week noted for this occupation
in 1954. Reports dealing with therapy-workers listed some 21 physiotherapists employed
at average weekly earnings of $52.86, a substantial increase from the comparable figure
of $48.36 reported as weekly earnings for this occupation during the previous year.
A small group of 7 occupational therapists were reported at varying wage rates, averaging $49.71 per week, a fractional increase from the 1954 figure. Nurses' aides represented one of the largest single sections of female employment reported in the hospital
survey. Second only in size to the housekeeping and catering classification, the 1955
total in this occupation increased to 1,240 from 1,018 reported for the previous year.
Higher earnings and shorter hours were again apparent for nurses' aides, with average
weekly earnings for this occupation increasing to $35.79 during the year, as compared
with $35.19 previously reported. Average weekly hours worked by nurses' aides in
1955 was 39.1, slightly less than the 40.0 hours recorded in this section for the previous
year.
For all occupations listed in the hospital survey, exclusive of nursing staff, the
average weekly figure representing individual earnings for the 5,576 female workers
under survey was $36.25, increased from $35.70 computed for a similar week covering
all occupations in 1954.
Compared with the previous year's average, the weekly working-hours for female
employees in all hospital occupations decreased slightly in 1955, the average figure being
recorded at 37.8 hours, down from 38.4 hours noted in the survey for 1954.
Statistics for Male Employees
Separate classifications of some of the more important male occupational groups
are taken each year from the total coverage of the industrial survey, in order to show
the general trend of employment and earnings for male workers in various types of
business.
The tables which follow refer specifically to the male wage-earner section in each
industry mentioned, and are based on comparative totals reported for the past four
years during the week of employment of the greatest number.
Baking Industry (Male)
1955
1954
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week~
156
1,336
$93,249.50
$69.80
39.83
158
1,457
$97,052.50
$66.61
39.75
169
1,408
$88,549.00
$62.89
39.86
172
1,371
$78,097.50
$56.96
40.67 F 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Construction (Male)
1955
1954
1953
1952
2,067
33,006
$2,474,233.50
$74.96
41.51
1,856
31,118
$2,304,695.50
$74.06
41.25
1,794
34,775
$2,455,735.50
$70.62
41.86
1,825
37,919
$2,470,629.50
$65.16
43.91
Total weeklv earnings
Fruit
and Vegetable Industry (Male!
96
3,264
$181,050.00
$55.47
47.15
91
3,052
$161,527.00
$52.92
45.80
96
3,362
$176,687.50
$52.55
45.93
91
3,537
$185,689.50
$52.50
46.09
House Furnishings (Male)
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
144
1,279
$75,420.00
$58.97
40.45
140
1,432
$77,990.00
$54.46
40.10
130
1,425
$76,862.50
$53.94
40.03
132
1,439
$74,414.50
$51.71
39.95
Logging (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners.-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
1,225
18,806
$1,511,815.50
$80.39
42.05
1,106
17,354
$1,358,691.50
$78.29
42.09
1,057
16,606
$1,214,803.50
$73.15
42.11
1,197
19,500
$1,338,218.00
$68.63
41.77
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners	
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week-
182
1,111
$84,760.00
$76.29
40.04
169
953
$70,112.00
$73.57
39.94
169
965
$68,383.00
$70.86
40.41
181
1,081
$69,213.50
$64.03
40.36
Plumbing and Heating Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
270
1,872
$134,731.50
$71.97
40.32
254
1,654
$120,680.00
$72.96
40.68
231
1,518
$95,900.50
$63.18
40.77
Sheet-metal Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week_
75
1,091
$76,685.00
$70.29
40.01
80
1,037
$72,755.50
$70.16
39.76
77
904
$59,906.50
$66.27
39.45
70
850
$52,096.00
$61.29
40.39
Sawmills (Male)
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week~
854
23,890
$1,601,877.00
$67.05
40.99
798
23,030
$1,525,404.50
$66.24
41.06
781
21,471
$1,382,433.50
$64.39
41.05
827
23,425
$1,454,063.50
$62.07
41.07 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Shingle-mills (Male)
F 59
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
56
2,397
$181,458.50
$75.70
39.82
46
2,140
$158,069.00
$73.86
40.08
45
2,504
$173,718.00
$69.38
39.68
56
2,555
$168,307.00
$65.87
39.62
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male)
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings-.
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week~
77
4,510
$349,565.00
$77.51
41.16
75
4,253
$326,272.00
$76.72
42.08
70
4,155
$293,503.50
$70.64
41.08
82
4,527
$298,934.50
$66.03
41.48
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week-
176
6,342
$415,793.50
$65.56
40.87
178
5,779
$365,586.00
$63.26
40.21
176
6,093
$371,438.00
$60.96
40.04
178
5,182
$307,246.50
$59.29
40.22
Investigations and Wage Adjustments
During the year 1955 the Industrial Relations Officers of the Department made
18,670 investigations, and, through the efforts of the Department and the co-operation
of the employers, collections made during 1955 amounted to $93,712.64. Department
cars travelled 131,830 miles in connection with the legislation administered by this office.
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Board, it may be presumed
that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation administered by this
Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the following table:—
Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments
1950
1951
1952
1954
1955
Number of investigations   -
Number of Industrial Relations Officers1-
" Male Minimum Wage Act"—
Firms involved- _	
Employees affected 	
Arrears paid.
' Female Minimum Wage Act"-
Firms involved  	
Employees affected	
Arrears paid -
"Annual Holidays Act*
Firms involved	
Employees affected-
Arrears paid	
Total collected..—	
$25
$5
$22.
18,421
18
268
547
544.49
132
208
150.03
807
2,288
865.09
15,676
20
139
208
$8,981.31
93
127
$3,575.67
874
2,891
$27,049.21
17,413
20
71
148
$10,194.54
123
208
$4,332.57
694
1,911
$17,540.88
16,542
20
36
76
$2,074.92
52
68
$1,246.08
500
1,470
$14,817.02
18,860
22
70
298
$9,911.02
19
56
$841.34
529
1,242
$16,270.82
18,670
21
78
441
$11,178.85
11
27
$549.56
453
1,129
$11,361.02
$53,559.61
$39,606.19
$32,067.99
$18,138.06
$27,023.18
$23,089.432
1 Average.
2 In addition to the adjustments made under the Minimum Wage and Holiday Acts, 528 firms paid 1,165 employees.
$70,623.21 under the provisions of the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Total adjustments for 1955 were therefore $93,712.64. Total adjustments for 1954 were $80,216.66. F 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Court Cases
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the manner of compliance
with the provisions of the orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to resort to
the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained.
A summary of Court cases during the year 1955 follows:—
Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Century Motors, 3410 Fraser St., Vancouver
Coulter, T. A., 3975 West Fourteenth Ave.,
Vancouver
G. & H. Logging (H. Godkin), Sardis _
Lillooet Mining & Dredging Co.  Ltd.,  Lillooet
Olynyk, Steve, Smithers .
Burke, T., 1536 Graveley St., Vancouver..
Lillooet  Mining & Dredging  Co.  Ltd.,  Lillooet
Negraeff, Jack J., Grand Forks..
Neid & MacDonald, Carmi .
Neufelt, Dan, Danskin .
Peacock, F. R., & Co. Ltd., 168 East Second
Ave., Vancouver
Grey, Fred, Victoria	
Plotnikofl, Alex., Parks
Atchison, Cliff  (Nadina Sawmills), Nadina
Crossing, via Burns Lake
Cutillo, Joe, Bear Creek, near Trail—
Davis, W., 2931 Carson St., Burnaby-
Fergusson, G. N., and Silver Prince Mines
Ltd., 736 Granville St., Vancouver
Home, Thomas, 973 Lovatt St., Victoria-
Ritco, George, Grand Forks 	
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $215.
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $95; in default,
thirty days in gaol.
Ordered to pay arrears of $23.56;
suspended sentence.
Three employees (three charges);
fined $25 on each charge ($75)
and $79.50 costs; ordered to pay
arrears of $1,627.93.
Three employees (three charges);
fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears of $301.30 (two charges);
suspended sentence.
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $90; failure to
pay, thirty days in gaol.
Six employees (six charges); fined
$100 and costs; ordered to pay
arrears of $3,292.31 (two charges);
suspended sentence.
Two employees (three charges); fined
$75 and ordered to pay arrears of
$172.85; in default, two months in
gaol.
Thirteen employees (thirteen charges);
one case withdrawn; eleven cases
suspended sentence and ordered to
pay arrears within one year; fined
$25 for one case and ordered to pay
arrears; in default, three days in
gaol.
Three employees (three charges);
fined $75 and $12.50 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $606; in default,
ten days in gaol.
Fined $100 and $3.75 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $51.34.
Fined $25 and costs; ordered to pay
arrears of $135; fine, costs, and
arrears paid in full.
Five employees (five charges); all
five cases dismissed.
Four employees (four charges); suspended sentence and $2.50 costs on
each charge; arrears of $199.55
paid into Court.
Three employees (three charges); one
case dismissed; fined $50 and ordered to pay arrears of $210.
Two employees (two charges); fined
$100 and $5 costs; ordered to pay
arrears of $213.60; in default,
thirty days in gaol.
Six employees (six charges); company and director each fined $25
on each charge ($250.80 total) plus
$3 costs; ordered to pay arrears
of $1,646.50; one charge dismissed.
Two employees (two charges); fined
$50.
Two employees (two charges); fined
$50 and ordered to pay arrears of
$180; in default, two months in
gaol. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued
F 61
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Shoal Harbour Marine Service Ltd., Sidney
Wagner, Joseph C, 538 West Eighth Ave.,
Vancouver
Eleanor Sawmills (J. E. Stonehouse), 1920
Glenaire Drive, North Vancouver
George Berry Sawmill, Quesnel ~	
Silvergreen Timber Co. Ltd., Port Coquitlam
McBreen,   A.    (Art's   Septic   Tanks),   529
Ebert St., Burquitlam
Chartrand,  E.,   125  East Third  Ave.,  New
Westminster
Patenaude, Wilfred, Horsefly  „„_. 	
West-Min  Woodcraft  Co.,   1268  Kingsway,
Burnaby
Lougheed Auto Sales Ltd., 1743 East Broadway, Vancouver
Sherstobito, M. G., Grand Forks 	
Superior Building Wreckers Ltd., 1257 Seymour St., Vancouver
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Fined $25 and $5 costs.
Two employees (two charges); fined
$50 and $7.50 costs; ordered to
pay arrears of $120.90.
Case dismissed.
Fined  $29.50;   fine paid;   no  order
to pay arrears.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs;   arrears
paid.
Three   employees    (three   charges);
fined $25;  two suspended sentence;
ordered   to   pay   arrears   to   two
employees   of   $167;    in   default,
thirty days in gaol;   employer paid
$132 to one employee.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs;   ordered
to pay arrears of $210;  in default,
fourteen days in gaol.
Suspended    sentence;     arrears    of
$274.15    paid   prior   to   hearing;
costs of $5.50.
Ten employees   (ten  charges);   suspended sentence;    ordered to pay
arrears of $1,622.14.
Fined $35 and $3.75 costs;  arrears of
$100.50 ordered paid on or before
August 4th, 1955,
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
of $46.75;   in default, thirty days
in gaol.
Two employees (two charges);  fined
$25   and  $3.75  costs;    ordered  to
pay arrears of $16;   one suspended
sentence.
Hours of Work Act "
Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd., Terrace	
Silvergreen Timber Co. Ltd., Port Coquitlam
Burbank   Candies  Ltd.,  2765  West  Fourth
Ave., Vancouver
Broadway Cafe" Ltd., Prince Rupert..
Chow's Commodore Cafe Ltd., Prince Rupert
Ideal Cleaning & Laundry Ltd., Prince Rupert
Brewster Ford Mountain Lodge Ltd., Lake
Wapta
Brewster Ford Mountain Lodge Ltd., Lake
Wapta
Brewster Ford Mountain Lodge Ltd., Lake
Wapta
Radium Hot Springs Hotel Ltd., Radium..
General Construction Co. Ltd., Kitimat	
Johnson - Crooks   Construction   Corporation
(B.C.) Ltd., Kitimat
Working employee excessive hours
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep true and correct
records and working employees
in excess of eight hours a day
and forty-four hours in week
Working an employee a greater
number of hours than those imposed by the Act and failure to
keep true and correct records
Working an employee a greater
number of hours than those imposed by the Act and failure to
keep true and correct records
Working an employee a greater
number of hours than those imposed in the Act
Failure to produce records to an
authorized person
Employing an employee outside the
hours as fixed by notice posted
Employing an employee outside the
hours as fixed by notice posted
Failure to post notices of working-
hours of employees
Employing an employee for a
greater number of hours than
imposed in Act
Employing an employee for a
greater number of hours than
imposed in Act
Fined $25 and $3 costs.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Six  charges;    fined  $50  and  $22.50
costs;  four suspended sentences.
Two charges (one employee);   fined
$20 and $5 costs.
Two charges (one employee);   fined
$30 and $5 costs.
Fined $25 and $5 costs.
Fined $10 and $2.30 costs; default,
distress; collection by distress.
Fined $25 and 50 cents costs; default, distress; collection by distress.
Two charges (two employees); fined
$50 and $3 costs; default, distress;
collection by distress.
Two charges;  fined $50 and $7 costs.
Fined $25 and costs.
Fined $25 and costs. F 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Hours of Work Act "—Continued
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Radium Motors Ltd., Radium Junction.
Wilder   Bros.   Lumber   Co.   Ltd.,   Radium
Junction
Terminal Construction Co. Ltd., Kitimat-
Gibson,  W.  F.,  &  Sons,  355  Burrard  St.,
Vancouver
Employing   an    employee   for   a
greater   number  of  hours   than
imposed in Act
Employing   an    employee   for   a
greater   number  of  hours  than
imposed in Act
Employing   an    employee   for   a
greater  number  of  hours   than
imposed in Act
Employing   an    employee   for   a
greater  number  of  hours   than
imposed in Act
Fined $10 and $3.50 costs.
Fined $10 and $5.50 costs.
Fined $25 and costs.
Each partner (A. E. Gibson, J. G.
Gibson, J. L. Gibson, and W. G.
Gibson) fined $10.
'Annual Holidays Act "
Century Motors, 3410 Fraser St., Vancouver
Coy, C. T., 325 Howe St., Vancouver.- _
West-Min Woodcraft Co. Ltd., 1268 Kings-
way, Burnaby
Superior Building Wreckers Ltd., 1257 Seymour St., Vancouver
Shoal Harbour Marine Service Ltd., Sidney
Wagner, Joseph C, 538 West Eighth Ave.,
Vancouver
McAlpine, Dugald J., 1013, 675 West Hastings St., Vancouver
Burke, T., 1536 Graveley St., Vancouver	
Eleanor Sawmills  (J. E. Stonehouse), 1920
Glenaire Drive, North Vancouver
Failure to pay holiday credits to
an employee
Failure to pay holiday credits to
an employee
Failure to pay holiday credits to
employees
Failure to pay holiday credits to
employees
Failure to pay holiday credits to
employee
Failure to pay holiday credits to
employee
Failure to pay holiday credits to
employee
Failure to pay holiday credits to
employee
Failure to pay holiday credits to
employee
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;   ordered
to pay arrears of $22.10.
Case dismissed.
Forty - four employees (forty - four
charges); suspended sentence; ordered to pay arrears of $645.23.
Seven employees (seven charges);
fined $25 and $7.50 costs; suspended sentence; ordered to pay
arrears of $33.70.
Case dismissed.
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;
to pay arrears of $1.67.
Case dismissed.
ordered
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $2.72; failure to
pay, ten days in gaol.
Case dismissed.
" Male Minimum Wage Act "
Golub's   Baking   Ltd.,
Vancouver
1460   Venables   St.,
Dobbyn, Clarence W., 3580 Cedar Hill Road,
Saanich
Gateway Lodge Ltd., Radium —
Swanson, A. T. (Swanson's Fuel & Cartage),
Surrey
Failure to keep in principal place
of business true and correct
records
Failure to produce records to a
duly authorized person
Failure to give rest period of
twenty - four consecutive hours
(Male and Female Minimum
Wage Order No. 54)
Failure to keep records	
Fined $10 and $3.75 costs.
Fined $15 or three days in gaol.
Four employees (four charges); fined
$40 and $14 costs.
Fined $15 and $4 costs.
" Female Minimum Wage Act "
Vogue Cafe (Kosmos Essinos), 1409 Douglas St., Victoria
Electric Accounting Ltd., 306 Columbia St.,
New Westminster
Beaumont, A. E. (Grandview Dental Laboratory), 1437 Commercial Drive, Vancouver
Failure to keep true  and correct
records   of   hours   worked   and
wages paid
Failure to keep true  and correct
records   of   hours   worked   and
wages paid
Failure to pay minimum wage to
an employee
Fined $25;   in default, five days in
gaol.
Fined $10 and costs.
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;   failure to
pay;   two months in gaol.
Employment Agencies Act "
Universal Personal Services Ltd., 712 Robson St., Vancouver
Unlawfully did receive a fee from
a person seeking employment
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Special Licences
F 63
Provision is made in a few of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale of wages
to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in writing have been obtained
from the Board. In the majority of cases there is a six months' learning period for
inexperienced employees, during which period they receive periodic increases, until at
the expiration of the learning period they are qualified for the minimum wage payable to
experienced employees. The following table shows the number of licences issued in
the various lines of work in 1952, 1953, 1954, and 1955:—
1952
1953
1954
1955
Telephone and telegraph-
Laundry	
Mercantile	
Office	
Practical nurse (students)-
Manufacturing-
Household furniture-
Automotive repair and gasoline service-Station-
Hospitals	
51
49
25
17
3
71
4
1
1
12
2
66
2
2
1
Totals-
97
85
61
2
67
During the year 1955, thirteen part-time employment permits were issued.
Conclusion
At this time the Board would like to acknowledge its appreciation of the cooperation extended during the year 1955 to its officials in the administration of the various
labour laws by the employers and employees of the Province.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.
Fraudena Eaton.
G. A. Little.
H. J. Young.
C. Murdoch.
P. Baskin.
D. J. Baldwin. F 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Labour
Relations
Branch
Personnel
Chief Executive Officer:
B. H. E. Goult   -
Chief Conciliation Officer:
William Fraser -
Conciliation Officers:
R. G. Clements,
Robert Forgie,
George Carmichael,
E. A. Ivay
John Sherlock    -
W. T. McLaughlin
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Court-house, Kelowna.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Labour
Relations
Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands -      -      -
Members:
Mrs. Fraudena Eaton
D. J. Baldwin
PenjAqq Baskin   -
G. A. Little,
Charles Murdoch,
J. H. Young -     -     -
Registrar:
N. deW. Lyons
Assistant Registrar:
David Coton
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Dollarton.
Vancouver.
Dollarton.
Vancouver.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,-—I have the honour to present the annual report of the Labour Relations Branch
for the year ended December 31st, 1955.
The Labour Relations Board met during the year on fifty occasions.
In accordance with the provisions of the " Labour Relations Act," chairmen were
named by the Minister for ninety-one Conciliation Boards. The nominees of the disputant
parties selected their own chairman on thirty-four occasions.
Conciliation Officers Successful
There were 268 references to Conciliation Officers during the year. Forty-eight
other cases were carried over from the preceding year since they were unterminated on
December 31st, 1954.
Conciliation Officers settled 164 cases. One hundred and one disputes were referred
to Conciliation Boards.   In seven cases the appointments of the Conciliation Officers were
J LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 65
cancelled, and in nine cases the responsible Conciliation Officer did not recommend a
Conciliation Board. There were thirty-seven cases unterminated at the year's end. In
three cases the certificates of bargaining authority were cancelled, thus terminating conciliation proceedings.
References to Conciliation Officers involving more than one employer resulted in the
appointment of additional Conciliation Boards in five instances.
Of the 101 references to Conciliation Boards during the year, eighty-nine Boards
were appointed as a result of recommendations of Conciliation Officers. Two Boards were
appointed without prior reference to Conciliation Officers. Settlement eventuated in four
cases before Conciliation Boards were appointed. In the remaining five cases, Boards had
been recommended but had not been appointed at December 31st, 1955.
The Labour Relations Board authorized the issuance of 486 certificates, and rejected
180 applications for certification. Administrative personnel conducted forty representation votes and sixty-one strike votes.
The Board entertained twenty-eight applications for decertification, of which fourteen
were rejected and fourteen authorized.
Arbitration Boards
On the joint applcation of both parties in cases where grievance procedure under
collective agreements had been invoked, chairman were named to twenty-one Arbitration
Boards.
Review of Legal Proceedings
Court cases concerning the "Labour Relations Act" or implicating the Labour
Relations Board itself are reviewed briefly at the conclusion of this Report.
A summary of matters which are reported upon annually is appended for the years
1950 to 1955, inclusive. Analyses of time-loss through industrial disputes are also
included.
B. H. E. Goult,
Chief Executive Officer,
Labour Relations Branch.
Table 1.—Summary of Cases Dealt with, 1950—55
1950
1951            1952
!
1953
1954
1955
765
540
117
108
45
241
110
3
5
322
961
727
142
92
78
357
120
1
4
173
816
640
93
83
53
414
176
3
14
229
664
467
119
78
48
343
129
6
36
221
667
467
133
47
49
333
103
6
44
75
Applications—
180
40
40
Conciliation Officers appointed    .
268
91
Grievance procedure provided 	
2
15
61
. F 66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Summary of Cases Dealt with in 1955, Showing Comparison for 1954
1954 1955
Number of applications dealt with      647 706
1954 1955
Certifications granted  467        486
Applications—
Rejected   133        180
Withdrawn      47 40
Representation votes conducted       49 40
Conciliation Officers appointed      333 268
Conciliation Boards established      103 91
Grievance procedures provided         6 2
Permissions to prosecute granted        44 15
Strike votes supervised        75 61
Industrial Inquiry Commissioners appointed      	
Totals  1,257 1,183 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 67
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A F  102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Analysis of Disputes Before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause
Wages and other causes  56
Wages only .  8
All terms of collective agreement 1  15
Hours of work and other causes ;  6
Transportation and room and board  3
Union security and other causes  3
Total.
91
Strikes and Lockout's in British Columbia, 1955
A lockout or an industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout is rarely encountered, and lockouts and strikes are therefore recorded together in the statistical tables.
The term " dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all work stoppages which have come to the
attention of the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude
the possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time-loss are computed by multiplying the number of days a stoppage
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
Disputes are listed in the order of the date of their commencement.
Table IV.—Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1955
Number
Number
Time-
Industry or
of Em
of Em
loss in
Occupation
ployers
ployees
Man-
Affected ■■
Affected
days
Summary of Disputes in Progress Prior to January 1,1955
Canning-factory workers,
Commenced October 27, 1954, for terms and conditions of
500
1,500
Penticton, Kelowna, Mis
collective agreement following reference to Conciliation
sion, Ashcroft,  and Vancouver
Board;   terminated January 6;   negotiations  with assistance of Departmental officers;  in favour of employees
500
1,500
Summary of Disputes Commencing in 1955
Commencing January 13, for a union agreement providing
Electricians, North Vancou
94 to
9,374
ver
for increased wages, following reference to a Conciliation
Board;   terminated July 6;   return of workers;   in favour
of employer
69
Typographers, Port Alberni—
Commenced January  13,  for  union  agreement  and wage
increase  following   reference  to   a   Conciliation   Board;
terminated   March   21;    negotiations;    union   agreement
signed;  in favour of employees
4
144
Labourers, South Burnaby
Commenced January 21, for changes in job classifications;
terminated February 2;   arbitration;  indefinite
5
40
Sawmill-workers,   Port   Al
Commenced March 18, when employees refused to handle
800
443
berni
production-sheets which had been declared "hot";   ter
minated March 21;  mediation with assistance of Concili
|
ation Officer;   compromise
1
Hard-rock     miners,     Cow
Commenced March 31st, against dismissal of worker;   ter
19
237
ichan Bay
minated April 18;  negotiations;  new contract signed;   in
favour of workers
Sawmill-workers, Chemainus
Commenced May 6, against swing-shift rules;   terminated
May 9;  return of workers;  negotiations;  indefinite
154
58
Furniture-factory    workers,
Commenced May  10,  against dismissal of shop  steward;
175
3,325
Vancouver
mediation with assistance  of Conciliation Officers;   terminated June 6th;  in favour of workers
Sawmill-workers, Penticton....
Commenced June 10, when planer-mill employee quit after
refusing to teach new man the job;  terminated June 10;
negotiations;    re-employment   of   discharged   employee;
compromise
68
106 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
Table IV.—Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1955—Continued
F 103
Number
Number
Time-
Industry or
Occupation
Particulars
of Employers
of Employees
loss in
Man-
Affected
Affected
days
Sawmill-workers, New West
Commenced June 21, against dismissal of employee;   ter
1
32
288
minster
minated July 5;  negotiations;   reinstatement of employee
Sawmill-workers, Giscombe-
Commenced June 28, against shutdown of cook-house;  terminated July 4;  return of workers; indefinite
1
150
450
Carpenters, Kitimat	
Commenced July 2, when men refused to work the Saturday
following a legal holiday;  discharge of men who refused
to work;  terminated July 5; negotiations;  indefinite
1
128
256
Seamen, B.C. Coast
Commenced July 3, for a new agreement following refer
1
328
16,432
ence to a conciliation board (federal);   terminated Sep
tember  4;   negotiations  with  assistance  of  Conciliation
Officers (federal);  agreement signed
Sawmill-workers, Clearwater
Commenced July 8, following strike vote for implementation of Conciliation Officer's report involving wage rates;
terminated same day when employer agreed to implement
standard agreement
1
85
48
Loggers, Franklin River	
Commenced July 12, against piece-work rates paid fallers
and buckers; negotiations; return of workers at enhanced
rates;  in favour of workers
1
22
176
Upholsterers, Vancouver	
Commenced August 4, against company's refusal to accept
check-off, following reference to Conciliation Board and
strike vote;   negotiations;   work resumed August 17;   in
1
16
160
—   *"
favour of workers
Commenced August 25, for wage increase of 10 cents per
25
526
7,364
Fruit and vegetable workers,
hour following reference to Conciliation Board and strike
Okanagan Valley
vote;   negotiations, with assistance of Departmental officers;  terminated September 10;  compromise
Sawmill-workers, Wasa	
Commenced September   16,  against  employer's  refusal  to
sign collective agreement after extended negotiations; terminated September 24;   further negotiations;   agreement
signed; in favour of workers
1
24
144
Fallers and buckers, Kelsey
Commenced September 23, against condition of saws sup
1
19
342
Bay
plied by contractors and daily contract minimum rates;
negotiations;   return of workers October 20 when company allowed men to use their own saws at company's
expense; compromise
Gypsum-production workers,
Commenced September 25th, against change in shift sched
1
117
602
South Westminster
ule, and for enhanced overtime rates for Saturday shift;
terminated October 1;   negotiations;   matter referred to
arbitration; indefinite
Fallers and buckers, Camp
Commenced September 27, against minimum rate per thou
1
12
48
bell River
sand board-feet of lumber;  return of workers October 3;
in favour of employer
1
Fallers and buckers, Meade
Commenced October 17 and 20 for enhanced minimum rate
1       1     f   81
162
Creek and Gordon River
for fallers and buckers per thousand board-feet;  negotiations with assistance of Conciliation Officer;  terminated
October 24; in favour of workers
1    (210
840
Operating engineers, Lower
Commenced November 6, for wage increases and improved
16      |       107
1,177
Mainland and Vancouver
conditions   following  reference  to   Conciliation  Board;
1
Island
strike vote; negotiations with assistance of Departmental
1
officials; terminated November 22; return of workers for
same  amount  of wages  recommended by  Conciliation
Board;  in favour of employers
Miscellaneous warehousemen
Commenced December 8, for wage increases and improved
1
19
304
and pipe-fitters, Vancouver
conditions   following   reference   to   Conciliation   Board;
strike vote;  unterminated December 31
Totals
63
3,695
44,020 F 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table V.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1939—55
Year
Working-
force1
Number of
Disputes
Beginning
during
Year2
Number of
Disputes
during
Year
Number of
Employers
Affected
Number of
Employees
Affected
Time-loss
in
Working-
days
Time-loss as
Percentage
of Estimated
Total
Working-
time of Wage
and Salary
Earners3
1939	
1940 	
1941	
1942	
1943 	
1944 	
180,000
187,000
218,000
265,000
304,000
298,000
282,000
322,000
334,000
338,000
340,000
335,000
341,000
356,000
356,000
351,000
368,000
4
1
7
50
43
15
18
21
25
8
9
22
26
35
34
21
23
4
2
8
50
43
15
18
21
25
10
11
22
26
36
36
24
24
4
2
8
82
43
15
18
524
65
63
44
46
120
381
113
119
63
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
6,386
3,216
3,007
13,579
3,326
46,806
8,207
12,622
3,695
13,803
8,510
7,594
35,024
75,129
4,510
69,595
1,294,202
153,168
106,230
31,692
105,792
74,722
1,234,120
260,335
140,958
44,020
0.028
0.016
0.012
0.046
0.088
0.006
1945... .	
1946. 	
1947 : ■
1948 	
1949-. 	
0.093
1.870
0.202
0.138
0.042
1950 	
1951 	
1952	
0.138
0.093
1.496
1953 	
1954 	
1955    •	
0.314
0.172
0.051
1 Paid workers in non-agricultural industries.
2 In this table, figures for disputes extending over the year are counted more than once.
3 Figures in this column revised in 1953 as a result of revised estimates of total working-time of wage and salary
earners.
Source:   British Columbia Department of Labour Annual Reports.   Working-force data obtained from reports of the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. %
1.9
Chart Showing Percentage of Total Working-time Lost through
Industrial Disputes, 1941-55*
1.8
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.3
■
.1
-v^~
.2
.1
1941      1943     1945      1947      1949     1951      1953     1955
* The time-loss in this chart is shown as a percentage of the estimated total working-time of wage and salary earners
Source: Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
5 F 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table VI.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1955
Industry
Number of
Employers
Number of
Employees
Man-days
Lost
31
1
27
1
2
1
1,432
328
1,764
19
133
19
22,469
16,432
4,282
304
296
237
Totals -	
63
3,695
44,020
Legal Proceedings Involving the Labour Relations Board
Amalgamated Association of Street Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees
of America, Division No. 101, vs. Labour Relations Board
On December 14, 1955, the Labour Relations Board ruled that the application of the
Street Railwaymen's Union to be certified for ticket-clerks, chief ticket-clerks, and depot
clerks engaged in selling fare-tickets to transit-operators, cashing wage-cheques for transit-
operators and garage personnel, and other related duties, at Oakridge Transit Centre and
Cambie Service Garage, Vancouver, and at North Vancouver, be rejected for the reason
that the unit is not appropriate for collective bargaining.
The union applied to the Supreme Court to have the ruling of the Board quashed,
claiming that the Board acted without jurisdiction, or in excess of jurisdiction, and that
the decision was bad in law.
The application was opposed by the B.C. Electric Office Employees' Union, Local
No. 378, O.E.I.U., and by the British Columbia Electric Railway Company Limited.
On March 5th, 1956, the Chief Justice, in dismissing the application, stated that he
could not conclude that the Board acted without jurisdiction, or in excess of its jurisdiction, and that its ruling was not bad in law or arbitrarily or capriciously made.
International Brotherhood of Paper Makers, Local No. 456, vs.
Labour Relations Board
On May 11th, 1955, the International Union of Operating Engineers, Local No. 882,
applied to the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) to be certified for a unit of
employees of Westminster Paper Company Limited employed as engineers and firemen in
the power-plant of the company at New Westminster.
The International Brotherhood of Paper Makers, Local No. 456, was certified for all
employees of the company (with certain exceptions) on February 26th, 1945.
The Labour Relations Board convened a meeting to hear the application. It was
conceded by all parties that the applicant had as members in good standing a majority of
the employees in the unit for which the application for certification was made. The Board
reserved its decision, and subsequently ordered a representation vote of the employees in
question to decide by which union they desired to be represented.
Paper Makers' Union, Local No. 456, thereupon applied to the Supreme Court for
a writ of prohibition to prohibit the Board from taking the vote, claiming that the Board
had no jurisdiction to conduct it.
On June 21st, Mr. Justice Manson ordered that the writ of prohibition be issued, and
that an application for an order absolute be heard June 29th. This application came on
for hearing before Mr. Justice Wilson, and was dismissed. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 107
British Columbia Hotel Employees' Union, Local No. 260, C.C.L., and Hotel and
Restaurant Employees' Union, Local No. 28, A.F.L., and the Labour Relations
Board.
On April 25th, 1953, Local No. 260 applied to be certified as bargaining agent for
the employees of the Georgia Hotel, Vancouver. These employees were then represented
by the Hotel and Restaurant Employees, Local No. 28. The application raised the question of the jurisdiction of the Board to certify Local No. 260, since such employees were
members of Local No. 28. The application of Local No. 260 was allowed to stand in
abeyance pending the decision of the Courts.
On January 25th, 1955, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Labour Relations Board is within its statutory powers in certifying a group as a unit appropriate for
collective bargaining, even though that group may be a fractional part of a larger unit
which is already certified.   (See Annual Report, 1954, page 113.)
Thereafter, proceedings on the application of Local No. 260 were carried on under
the "Labour Relations Act" (1954). On March 10th, 1955, the Board directed that a
representative vote be taken. The vote was in favour of Local No. 260. Subsequently, it
was made to appear that the names of certain persons qualified to vote had been omitted
from the voters list. The Board directed that these persons be allowed to vote. Local No.
260 objected, and after hearing submissions and argument, the Board revoked its decision
to open the poll, and rejected the application for certification of Local No. 260. Whereupon, the union applied to the Court for orders to quash the decision of the Board, and to
compel the Board to certify Local No. 260.
The case came on for hearing before Mr. Justice Manson, who ordered that the
Board's decision of March 10th, 1955, be quashed, and that the Board be directed to
certify Local No. 260. The Board appealed.
The Court of Appeal dismissed the appeal from Mr. Justice Manson's decision to
quash the Board's order of March 16th, 1955. The appeal of the Board against the
Judge's order to certify Local No. 260 was allowed.
The application of Local No. 260 to be certified subsequently was withdrawn.
SUMMARY OF PROSECUTIONS
There were no charges laid during the year by the Labour Relations Board.
The Board considered applications for permission to prosecute nineteen charges.
It granted fifteen and rejected four.
Annual Survey of Organized Labour
Each year certain information is required from associations of industrial workers or
trade-unions pursuant to section 5 (a) of the " Department of Labour Act." This return
requires the name and address of the organization, its affiliation (if any), and its total
paid-up membership, in this instance, to January 1st, 1956. Members over three months
in arrears are not included in this figure.
The inclusion of the name of any organization in the listing "Organizations of
Employees (Labour Organizations)" does not necessarily constitute its recognition as a
trade-union within the meaning of the " Labour Relations Act."
This year's survey of organized labour in British Columbia was again conducted by
the Bureau of Economics and Statistics of the Province in co-operation with the Federal
Department of Labour. The results in that survey are summarized in Table VII. As in
previous years, both the number of organizations and the total organized labour membership registered increases. The historical data in Table VII shows that organized labour in
British Columbia received its greatest impetus during the early years of the war, and that
the only decrease in membership since 1940 occurred in 1946 during the transition from
a war-time to a peace-time economy. F  108
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Paid Workers Increase
Organized labour membership expressed as a percentage of total paid workers in the
British Columbia labour force now stands at 52.16 per cent, down fractionally from last
year. The reason for the decrease in this percentage is the considerable increase in paid
workers over the previous year.
The chart on page 109 shows the distribution of organized labour membership by
major industrial groups, each local having been classified into the group in which the
majority of its members are employed. It indicates those industrial fields which have the
greatest number of union members; it does not, however, show which groups are the most
highly organized, as comparable total employment data are not available for the various
categories.
The industrial distribution of total organized labour membership shows little basic
change from the preceding year. The services group (public and personal) again leads all
others with its share of membership. Public services, consisting largely of government
employees, is the largest single item (21.04 per cent of total membership).
The wood and wood products group is next in importance to service and accounts
for approximately 21 per cent of the total membership. The largest organizations in this
group are the International Woodworkers of America, the International Brotherhood
of Papermakers, and the International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill
Workers.
Construction Group
Third in importance is the construction group, with approximately 10 per cent ol
total membership. The Carpenters and Joiners Union is the largest organization in this
group. The remainder include other craft organizations whose members are solely or
chiefly engaged in the construction industry.
The other transportation group consists of all trades and occupations connected with
transportation, other than railway. Seamen, longshoremen, electric- and motor-coach
employees, teamsters, chauffeurs, and warehousemen are represented in this category.
The railway transportation group includes the four large independent railway unions
in the running trades and also the large membership of the Canadian Brotherhood of
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers.
The metals group contains such unions as the International Association of Machinists and the Shipyard General Workers Federation of British Columbia.
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Reported, Membership and Percentage Increases, and Membership as a Percentage of Paid Workers in Non-
agricultural Industries as of January 1st of Each Year,   1940—56.
Year
Number
of
Organizations
Total
Membership
Percentage
Increase
over 1940
Percentage
Increase
Yearly
Total Paid
Workers
in B.C.
Labour
Force1
Organized
Labour
Membership
as a Percentage of Total
Paid Workers
1940
380
404
402
415
473
617
636
642
715
745
761
770
772
766
795
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,320
142,989
146,259
157,287
170,036
174,894
178,533
12.24
21.71
49.47
17.22
2.46
— 1.75
10.30
13.47
5.67
2.29
7.54
8.10
2.86
T941
12.24
36.61
104.20
139.38
145.27
140.99
165.80
201.60
218.70
225.98
250.56
278.98
289.81
297.92
1947
213,000
231,000
266,000
283,000
277,000
300,000
319,000
332,000
343,000
340,000
347,500
355.800
28.78
1943	
39.66
1«44
40.38
1945      .                             '"     ■ ■'
38.88
1946	
39.03
1947                -	
39.75
1948
42.42
19fcl9
43.07
1950      - -
1951 ■    - -       .
42.64
46.26
1952 	
1953        -                  _.                   ~-
48.93
49.15
1954	
2.08      1      355.330
50.24
1955   	
1956         	
865
869
186,951
191,952
316.68
327.82
4.71
2.68
351,330
368,000
53.21
52.16
1 Almost exclusively workers in non-agricultural industries.   Canadian Labour Force Estimates, Canadian Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 109
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial
Classifications, 1956
Personal Services
Construction
Services
Public Services
Metals
Mining and Quarrying
Communications
Clothing and
Footwear
Railway
Transportation
Other
Transportation
Light, Heat and Power
'  Printing and Publishing'
All Other Wood and Wood Products
Organizations of Employees (Labour Organizations)
The list of British Columbia labour organizations, which follows, is arranged alphabetically, according to location. It shows the post-office addresses of those who have
furnished the Bureau of Economics and Statistics with data. Names and addresses of
the officers have been revised to the date of publication in all cases where such information could be obtained. Organizations which have come into existence subsequent to
January 1, 1956, are not included in the list, but will be shown in the next publication.
A list of employers' organizations follows that of the labour organizations. Returns
in the former category numbered 25 in 1939 and 1940, 27 in 1941, 32 in 1942, 34 in
1943, 36 in 1944, 37 in 1945 to 1948 (inclusive), 48 in 1949, 46 in 1950, 43 in 1951,
48 in 1952, 45 in 1953 to 1956 (inclusive).
Listings have been compiled by the Bureau of Economics and statistics in conjunction with the Labour Relations Branch, Department of Labour. F 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Abbotsford
Brick and Clay Workers of America, United, Local No.
629.—President, J. S. Rosie; Recording Secretary,
H. Tarasenko, R.R.  1, Matsqui, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, F. V.
Ogle; Recording Secretary, T. R. Franklin, Haney,
B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
432.—President, H. Schmidt; Recording Secretary,
J. Klein, R.R. 5, Jackson Road, Abbotsford, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Recording
Secretary, E. M. Szigety, 1304 McCallum Rd., R.R. 5,
Abbotsford, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Abbotsford.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. D. J. Paul, Box 862 Abbotsford, B.C.
Agassiz
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Agassiz Local,
Local Council.—President, H. C. Ditchburn; Recording Secretary, Miss J. A. Probert, Agassiz, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
M. Bouey, Box 147, Agassiz, B.C.
Alberni
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
V. J. Belknap; Secretary, Mrs. Lillian Bigmore, Box
218, Alberni, B.C.
Aldergrove
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Langley.—Secretary-Treasurer, Norman Green, County Line Road, R.R. 1,
Aldergrove,  B.C.
Alert Bay
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, J. L.
Doyle, Alert Bay, B.C.
Alice Arm
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 906.—President, Orin Ditto; Financial
Secretary, Geo. Ewing, Alice Arm, B.C.
Armstrong
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Manfred C. Schmid, Box 421, Armstrong, B.C.
Ashcroft
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Ashcroft Lodge, Federation of, Local No. 210.—President, H. Willock;   Representative, R. Halliday, 3449 Turner Street, Vancouver
6, B.C.
Bamberton
Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers, International
Union of, Local No. 277.—President, J. Todd; Recording Secretary, Richard Brown, R.R. 1, Cobble Hill,
B.C.
Beaverdell
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 900.—(Information not available.)
Bella Coola
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 27.—
President, C. Allertson; Recording Secretary, John
McHardy, Bella Coola, B.C.
Blubber Bay
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 882.—President, N. McLeod, Blubber Bay,
B.C.; Financial Secretary, H. Eslinger, Blubber Bay,
B.C.
Blue River
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 143.—President, T.
Barron, Sr.; Financial Secretary, William Haluk, Blue
River, B.C.
Bonnington Falls
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 999.—President, J. H. Ridge; Recording Secretary,
E. A. Jones, P.O. Box 12, Bonnington Falls, B.C.
Bralorne
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 271.—President, R.R. Black; Financial Secretary, W. G. Osborne, Bralorne, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, Bralorne Sub-local. — Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss M. Roscoe, Bralorne, B.C.
Britannia Beach
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 663.—President, J. Balderson;  Financial Secretary, A. Bennett, Box  174, Mount Sheer, B.C.
Burnaby
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Burnaby, Local No. 23.
—President, Gordon Adamson; Recording Secretary,
John Murton, 2131 Merrit Street South, Burnaby,
B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
323.—President, A. B. Morrison; Recording Secretary,
L. W. Fisher,  112 Sullivan Street, Burnaby 3, B.C.
School Administrators' Association, Burnaby.—Secretary-
Treasurer, L. J. Costley, 4532 Venables Street, Burnaby 2, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Burnaby,
Local No. 379.—President, H. Smith, Recording Secretary, G. J. McCrea, 3309 Lane Street, Burnaby 1,
B.C.
Teachers' Assistants' Federation. — Secretary-Treasurer,
D. A. Copan, 4667 Highlawn Drive, Burnaby 2, B.C.
Burns Lake
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,   Local   No.   872.—President,   Jonas   Glans,   Burns
Lake,    B.C.;     Recording    Secretary,    George    Brown,
Burns  Lake,  B.C.
Government    Employees'    Association,    B.C.—President,
W.  H.  Richmond;   Secretary, Miss C.  E. Small, Box
288,  Burns Lake,  B.C.
Teachers' Federation.—Secretary-Treasurer, R. L. Huish,
Burns Lake, B.C.
Campbell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1882.—President, Jack Krywo; Financial
Secretary, Mike Odowichuk, R.R. 1, Campbell River,
B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers Union, United, Local
No. 17.—President, Lewis Joyce; Recording Secretary,
John S. Hewison, R.R. 1, Campbell River, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association, Campbell River, Local No. 623.—President, Carrol Spiers; Recording
Secretary, Mrs. I. B. Sandberg, Box 224, Campbell
River,  B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 630.—President, Andrew Woodcock; Recording
Secretary, Robert B. Phillips, General Delivery, Campbell River, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. •— Secretary-
Treasurer, Charles F. Wood, Campbell River, B.C.
Retail-Wholesale Employees' Union, Vancouver Island,
Local No. 290.—President, Claude Howard; Recording Secretary, Miss Evelyn Erickson, Island Highway,
Campbell River, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, Local 742.—
President, Delbert E. Ross; Recording Secretary,
F. C. Wood, R.R. 2, Campbell River, B.C.
Cassiar
Mine,   Mill   and   Smelter  Workers,   International   Union
of, Local No. 927.—President, H. Beyer, Cassiar, B.C.
Castlegar
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2300.—President, R. H. French; Recording Secretary, R. J. Thorndale, Box 616, Castlegar, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss E.
McKinnon, Castlegar, B.C.
Chemainus
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International,
Local No. 508.—President, Robert Rae;   Recording Secretary, Henry E. Irving, Box 332, Chemainus_ B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 111
Chilliwack
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1843.—President, William Bell; Recording Secretary, G. N. Norlen, 520 Young Street South,
Chilliwack,  B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Chilliwack Local
Council.—President, W. A. Chater; Financial Secretary,
C. L. Caverley, Vedder Crossing, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
W. L. Bates; Secretary, E. L. Anderson, 77 College
Street, Chilliwack, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association, Chilliwack, Local 458.—
President, Raymond Vickerson; Secretary-Treasurer,
O. R. Mauch, 790 Camp River Road, R.R. 1, Rosedale,
B.C.
Public Employees, National Union of, Local No. 411.—
President, J. H. Dunn; Financial Secretary, H. G.
Palmer, 660 Trans-Canada Highway East, R.R. 1, Rose-
dale, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
430.—President, L. Cherry; Recording Secretary, I. Fitzgerald, Vedder Crossing, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Joan
Hudson, 26 Princess Avenue East, Chilliwack, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association, National (Fraser Valley Branch).—President, J. E. Ache-
son;   Recording Secretary, Mrs. Stewart, Mission, B.C.
Chinook Cove
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
M. E. Collets, Chinook Cove, B.C.
Clearwater
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Birch Island. — Secretary-
Treasurer, J. T. Chubra, Clearwater, B.C.
Cloverdale
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 402.—
President, Jack Wilson; Recording Secretary, Mrs.
Bernita Collishaw, Box 393, Cloverdale, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Cloverdale
Branch.—President (pro. tern.), H. A. Sullivan; Recording Secretary, R. G. Beauchamp, Cloverdale, B.C.
Copper Mountain
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 649.—President, T. C. Knowles; Financial
Secretary, R. E. Archibald, Box 42, Copper Mountain,
B.C.
Courtenay
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.  1638.—President, A. Storrie;   Recording
Secretary, Lome Paisley, Merville, B.C.
Civil  Servants  of Canada,  Amalgamated—President,  M.
Mendria;   Recording Secretary, W. J. Fidler, Courtenay,
B.C.
Civic  Employees'   Union,   Courtenay,  Local  No.   156.—
President,   D.   Neidrauer;    Recording   Secretary,   Miss
Julia Vanyo, Courtenay, B.C.
Government  Employees'  Association,  B.C.,  Comox District.—President,   M.   S.   Witzel;    Secretary,  T.  Tams,
Box 789, Courtenay, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 439.—
President,  Ross Rogers;   Recording Secretary,  Randle
C. Moon, Box 1026, Courtenay, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association,  Canadian.—President, G.
Harrison;   Recording Secretary, G. Harrison, Box 597,
Courtenay, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer,   J.   R.
Hindle, Box 443, Courtenay, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-363.
—President, E. Lodberg; Recording Secretary, G. Prain,
Courtenay, B.C.
Coquitlam
Municipal Employees* Union, Coquitlam, Local No. 16.—
President, R. E. Merriman; Financial Secretary, F. T.
Mitchell, 602 Clark Road, New Westminster, B.C.
Cranbrook
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1675.—President, T. A. Gillespie; Recording Secretary, J. W. Broadhurst, Box 1103, Kimberley, B.C.
General Workers' Union, East Kootenay, Local 212.—
President, Ben Walkley; Recording Secretary, W. H.
Bohmer, Box 1396, Cranbrook, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
J. G. Ritchie; Secretary, Mrs. M. A. Griffiths, Box
1105, Cranbrook, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 563.—
President, C. N. Parkin; Recording Secretary, C. W.
Morris, Box 399, Cranbrook, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local 559.—President, W. D. Johnson; Recording Secretary, M. H. John, Box 157, Cranbrook, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 229.—President, G. Bourne; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Downey, Box 162, Cranbrook, B.C.
Postal Employees Association, Canadian.—President, Marvin Fennessy; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Marjorie
Engles, Box 294, Cranbrook, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Buckley Lodge, Local
No. 585.—President, B. A. Craig; Recording and Financial Secretary, H. J. Conroy, P.O. Box 995, Cranbrook,
B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Baker Mountain, Local No. 1292.—President, Harry A. Haynes;
Recording Secretary, Laurence E. Kary, P.O. Box 1325,
324 Sixteenth Avenue, Cranbrook, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
173.—President, L. G. Martin; Recording Secretary,
R. S. Kuhn, 410 Thirteenth Avenue, Box 1382, Cranbrook, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Iris
Hall, Cranbrook, B.C.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, Kootenay
District, Local No. 405.—President, Otto Anderson;
Financial Secretary, Alex Sutherland, General Delivery,
Cranbrook, B.C.
Creston
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Creston Valley.—President, W. White; Secretary, Miss Polly Lak-
tin, Box 39, Creston, B.C.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Local 3014.—
President, Ben Wills, Creston, B.C.
School Employees' Association, General, Creston, Local
No. 435.—President, T. A. Montgomery; Recording
Secretary, R. L. Golmore, Creston, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. J.
McKelvery, Creston, B.C.
Crowsnest
Lime Products Workers, Canadian Union of, Local No.
306.—President, George Yoshinaka; Recording Secretary, Michio Kimoto, Summit Lime Works, Crowsnest,
B.C.
Cumberland
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President, William
Bennie;   Financial Secretary, Jack A.  Thomson,  P.O.
Box 77, Cumberland, B.C.
Mine  Workers  of America,  United,  Local  No.  7293.—
President,   James   Williamson;     Recording   Secretary,
Harry Westfield, Cumberland, B.C.
Dawson Creek
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 1237.—President, K. B. Shaw; Recording
Secretary, Laurence Connors, Box 1625, Dawson Creek,
B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
G. A. Holtslander; Recording Secretary, H. Bowman,
Dawson Creek, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
M. E. Golata, Dawson Creek, B.C. F 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Duncan
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1812.—President, P. F. Anright; Recording Secretary, D. Chandler, Duncan, B.C.
Civic and Municipal Employees, Duncan, Local No. 358.—
President, Norman Carter; Financial Secretary, A. Le-
Quesne, 262 Ingram Street, Duncan, B.C.
Government Employees' Association.—President, L. W.
Eckford; Secretary, Miss R. A. Wagner, Box 58, Duncan, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Island
Lodge, Local No. 533.—President, F. W. Costin; Recording Secretary, A. E. Costin, Ladysmith, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Recording Secretary, R. W. Smillie, Duncan, B.C.
Teachers' Federation.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mary Her-
riges, Box 1344, Duncan, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association, National, Upper Island Branch.—President, Lex Bickford;
Recording Secretary, A. D. McWhinnie, Box 173, Duncan, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-80.—
President, Tony Poje; Recording Secretary, Robert Bouchard, Box 430, Duncan, B.C.
Enderby
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Hugh
Power, Box 383, Enderby, B.C.
Esperanza
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
L. K. Devlin, Esperanza, B.C.
Fernie
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, United, International Union of, Local No.
308.—President, P. Ax;  Recording Secretary, J. Savage,
Box 1071, Fernie, B.C.
Electrical Workers,   International Brotherhood  of,  Local
No.   921.—President,   R.   L.   Davis,   General   Delivery,
Elko, B.C.;  Recording Secretary, R. Battersby, Box 339,
Fernie, B.C.
Government   Employees'   Association.—President,   E.   D.
Allan;   Secretary, H. Haigh, Box 697, Fernie, B.C.
Mine Workers of America, United, District 18, Local No.
7310.—President,  Fred  Dawson;   Recording  Secretary,
Robert Lilley, Box 486, Fernie, B.C.
Postal   Employees'    Association,    Canadian. — President,
Marvin Fennesy;   Recording  Secretary, Miss Margaret
Roe, Kimberley, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secertary-Treasurer, Miss L.
Gigliotti, Box 647, Fernie, B.C.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.   (sub-local).—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss E. K. Whalley, Fernie, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.  (South Country Sub-local).—
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss V. E. Rese, Waldo, B.C.
Field
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1454.—President, Louis Port: Recording Secretary,
W. M. Brown, Field, B.C.
Fort St. John
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, A. B.
Perry;    Recording   Secretary,  A.   A.   Gorieu,  Fort  St.
John, B.C.
Government  Employees'  Association,—President,  W.   G.
Cosens;   Secretary, W.  B.  Stewart, Box 339, Fort St.
John, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. H.
Hornick, Fort St. John, B.C.
Ganges
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, James
Wickens, Ganges, B.C.
Gibsons
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
Wilio Wiren; Secretary-Treasurer, William G. Brown,
R.R. 1, Gibsons, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. K.
Henderson, Gibsons, B.C.
Golden
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
W. R. Lenny;   Secretary, G. Talerico, Box 133, Golden,
B.C.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   Local
No.   165.—President,   O.   Buser;    Recording   Secretary,
E. H. Dillon, Golden, B.C.
Teachers' Federation,  B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. L.
Neville, Golden, B.C.
Grand Forks
Civic Employees' Federation, National Union of Public
Employees, Grand Forks, Local No. 453.—President,
Fred Hewett; Recording Secretary, W. J. Beasley, Box
243, Grand Forks, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss M.
Imayoshi, Box 142, Grand Forks, B.C.
Greenwood
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
E. J. C. Roylance; Secretary, E. A. Johnson, Box 425,
Greenwood, B.C.
Haney
Employees' Union, Maple Ridge School District, Local
No. 703.—President, W. Kennedy; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Jean Grevelling, Brown Road, Haney, B.C.
Employees' Union, District of Maple Ridge, Local No.
622.—President, Stan Porcha; Secretary-Treasurer, W. J.
Biggs, R.R. 1, Whonock, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, Alco Branch.—President, N. M. Agle; Recording Secretary, J. H. Brown,
Box 253, Haney, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
517.—President, C. O'Laughlin; Recording Secretary, C.
Baker, Haney, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Recording Secretary, Miss Vivi M. Bryan, Haney, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-367.
— President, W. Lowery; Recording Secretary, D.
Stewart, Box 88, Haney, B.C.
Hope
Government Employees' Association, Allison Pass.—President, V. R. Green; Secretary, C. Patterson, Box 624,
Hope, B.C.
Invermere
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss D.
Worsley, Invermere, B.C.
Kamloops
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1540.—President, C. W. Wooley; Recording Secretary, J. F. Mobley, 717 Nicola Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. —- President,
Angus E. McGregor; Recording Secretary, Douglas E.
Daws, R.C.N.A.D., Kamloops, B.C.
Defence Workers' Federal Union, National, Local No.
562.—President, J. E. Dobie; Financial Secretary, J. M.
Desjardins, 129 Victoria, Street West, Kamloops, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 993.—President, F. J. Todd; Recording Secretary,
R. P. MacKenzie, 1193 River Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 913.
—President, W. L. Miner; Recording Secretary, R. L.
Kennedy, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Tranquille.—
President, D. Bednard, Tranquille, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 821.—
President, J. O. Richmond; Recording Secretary, J. J.
Waugh, 543 Seymour Street, Kamloops, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 113
Locomotive Engineers, North Thompson Brotherhood
of, Local No. 855.—President, M. Whiteford; Recording Secretary, L. P. Martin, 753 Pleasant Street,
Kamloops, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Engineers, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 930.—President, S. J. Dempsey; Recording
Secretary, E. R. Nagurski, 1168 Pleasant Street, Kamloops,  B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of.
Local No. 258.—President, M. J. Cochran; Recording
Secretary, R. J. Perry, 265 Perry Avenue, North
Kamloops, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 748.
—President, H. Blakey; Recording Secretary, J. MacDonald,  829 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Mount
Cavell, Local No. 15.—President, S. Kurylowich; Recording Secretary, S. Linton, Avola, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 31.—President, I. High; Recording Secretary, G.
Werenko, Kamloops Junction, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   North
.. Thompson Valley Lodge, Local No. 1332.—President,
T. Lawrie; Recording Secretary, S. J. Mooney, 838
Pleasant Street,  Kamloops, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association, Kamloops, Local No.
310.—President, T. Kuz; Recording Secretary, D. E.
Embury, Lome Street,  East  Kamloops, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
D. J. G. Dick; Secretary-Treasurer, F. B. Tedder,
R.R.   1,   Kamloops,  B.C.
Railway Signalmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 192.—Vice-President, R. G. McPherson; Recording Secretary, A. L. Gregory, 690 Fourth Avenue,
Kamloops,  B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 519.—■
President, C. M. Lee; Recording Secretary, Vernon H.
Mott,   521   Seymour   Street,   Kamloops,   B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Thompson Lodge, Local No. 148.—President, J. Latremouille;
Recording Secretary, J. Hungar, 172 Wilson Street,
North Kamloops, B.C.
Railway Conductors and Brakemen, Order of, Local No.
611.—President, C. J. Rebagliati; Recording Secretary,
J.  McMillan,  310 Leigh Road, North Kamloops, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 150.—President,
L. D. Rye; Recording Secretary, R. Lombari, 156
Williams  Street, North Kamloops, B.C.
Railwaymen, The Canadian Association of, Local No.
30.—President, Zenon David; Recording Secretary,
D. B. Roberts, 216 Avenue Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Jim
Barker, 752 Pine Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Kaslo
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 173.—President, N. A. Campbell; Recording Secretary, W. Kiut, Kaslo, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, A. Bur-
gis, Kaslo,  B.C.
Kelowna
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union
of America, Local No. 355.—President, T. Rose; Financial Secretary, G. M. Jennens, 1974 McDougall
Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1370.—President, James Ditchkoff; Recording Secretary, B. W. SaloveofI, 974 Borden Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
Civic Employees, Kelowna, Federal Union of, Local No.
338.—President, G. Brownlee, Recording Secretary,
Stanley Chatham, 690 Cambridge, Kelowna, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President,
H. A. Blake; Recording Secretary, C. R. Arnold,
2054 Ethel Street,  Kelowna, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1409.—President, E. D. Henrie; Recording Secretary, Lloyd W. Hooper, 413 Patterson Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
Employees' Federal Union, Kelowna City Hall, Local
No. 472.—President, A. E. Anderson; Recording Secretary, Mrs. J. Jeanne Hall, 1435 Water Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, L.
MacDonald; Secretary, Mrs. V. Vagg, Department of
Highways, Court-house, Kelowna, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
339.—President, A. Mclnroy; Recording Secretary, E.
Pearse,  605  Francis Avenue,  Kelowna, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President,
A. D. Moulton; Recording Secretary, G. J. Munro,
R.R.   1, Kelowna, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Okanagan Valley, Local No. 445.—President, M. M. Holland, Secretary-Treasurer, E. J. W. Adkins, 563 Central Avenue,  Kelowna,  B.C.
School Employees' Federal Union, Okanagan Valley,
Local No. 323.—President, E. Embleton; Recording
Secretary, T. R. Prior, 597 Harvey Avenue, Kelowna,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, C. C.
Kelly, Lakeview Street, R.R. 1, Kelowna, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-423.
—President, Adam Schleppe; Recording Secretary,
Noel  Gooding,  249 Bernard Ave., Kelowna, B.C.
Keremeos
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
R. E. Schaffer, Keremeos, B.C.
Kettle Valley
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Mrs. N. Henry, Secretary-
Treasurer,  Kettle  Valley,   B.C.
Kimberley
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1719.—President, Palmer Void; Recording Secretary, Ronald Jenkins, P.O. Box 1023,
Cranbrook,  B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 651.—President, R. C. Thompson; Financial Secretary, E. J. Clemmer, Box 989, Kimberley,
B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 935.—New local (information not available).
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
A. R. Lymberry, Box 142, Chapman Camp, B.C.
Kitimat
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1081.—President, Howard W. Bush; Recording Secretary, Fred J. Cook (acting), P.O. Box 578,
Kitimat, B.C.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, Local No.
384.—President, David B. Mott; Recording Secretary,
Ted Takacs, Box 129, Kitimat, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1661.—President, P. J. Buckley; Recording Secretary, A. Kadulski, P.O. Box 548, Station A, Kitimat,
B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Alcan Local.—
President, F. J. W. Banks; Recording Secretary, J. E.
Eakin, Box 415, Station A, Kitimat, B.C.
Municipal and School Board District, Kitimat, Local
No. 707.—President, J. W. Powell; Recording Secretary, W. G. Heyman, Station A, Kitimat, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, The
Brotherhood of, Local 1802.—President, P. Budlong;
Financial Secretary, Robert Moore, P.O. Box 337,
Kitimat,  B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President,
H. A. Maclean; Recording Secretary, R. L. Tronson,
Kitimat, B.C.
Safety and First Aid Attendants' Union, Federal, Local
No. 634.—Vice-President, Gunther Sanders; Recording  Secretary,  Steen  Cassidy, Box  352, Kitimat, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss S.
Alton, Kitimat, B.C. F  114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
; Lac la Hache
Maitnenance-of-way Employees, Local No. 221.—President, T. D. Miller; Secretary, V. J. Cardin, Lac la
Hache, B.C.
Ladner
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Ladner Local.—
President,   Dick   Robie;    Recording   Secretary,   R.   G.
Cadieux, P.O. Box 209, Ladner, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Local No. 1.—
President   (to  be named later);    Recording  Secretary,
Donald A. Robertson, Box 372, Ladner, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Ladner Local.'—
President, A. Hales;   Recording Secretary, L. Orr, Fire
Hall, V. W. S. Ladner, B.C.
Municipal Employees, Delta, Local No. 23.—President, Ian
Nicholison;    Financial  Secretary,  A. M.  Robins,  4995
Central Avenue, Ladner, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Paulette
Davis, c/o Mrs. Slemon, R.R. 2, Ladner, B.C.
Ladysmith
General Workers' Union, Vancouver Island, Local No.
237.—President, G. McKeen; Recording Secretary, William Orr, 347 Third Avenue, P.O. Box 243, Ladysmith,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, A. Nicholson, c/o F. Rumble, R.R. 2, Ladysmith, B.C.
Merritt
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
J. H. Goldie; Secretary, Ted Law, Box 21, Merritt, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, H. C.
Farr, Box 378, Merritt, B.C.
Mission City
Carpenters and Jomers of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2213.—President, W. M. Lightburn, Recording Secretary, W. J. L. Vivian, Box 425, Mission
City, B.C.
Government Employees' Association.—President, W. J.
Armstrong; Secretary, K. W. Akitt, Box 685, Mission,
B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
501.—President, A. Wason; Recording Secretary, R.
Gustofson, Matsqui, B.C.
School Employees' Union, Local No. 593.—President,
M. A. Finkbeiner; Financial Secretary, M. F. Hayes,
Box 842, Mission City, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. J. S.
Ryan, c/o Mr. Ritz, Mission City, B.C.
Nakusp
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer,   Mrs.
Alice LaRue, Nakusp, B.C.
Lake Cowichan
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 905.—President, G. Mackus; Financial Secretary, C. Ward, Lake Cowichan, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Richard
E. Kirby, Lake Cowichan, B.C.
Langley
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Fraser Valley.
—President, A. Elmore, Secretary, J. Buckley, 19617
Simmonds Road, R.R. 2, Langley, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association, Langley, Local No.
403.—President, R. A. Jensen; Recording Secretary,
R. W. Terichow, 4657 200th Street, R.R. 2, Langley,
B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President, L.
Farquhar; Recording Secretary, Mrs. S. Inkster, Langley, B.C.
Lillooet
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
John   Brown;    Recording   Secretary,   A.   C.   Pritchard,
Lillooet, B.C.
Railwaymen, The Canadian Association of, Local No. 85.
—Secretary, F. E. C. Smith, Box 128, Lillooet, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer,   Miss
Margaret Layne, Box 101, Lillooet, B.C.
Lytton
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 34. — Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss M. Lawrence, Lytton, B.C.
Masset
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
Phyllis Steel, Masset, B.C.
McBride
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
Clifford Brooks; Recording Secretary, Geo. G. Callaghan, McBride, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local 247. — President, W. E.
Mintz; Recording Secretary, G. E. Kohub, McBride,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, R. E.
Dalby, Box 63, McBride, B.C.
Nanaimo
Carpenters and Jo'ners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 527.—President, A. Clarck; Recording
Secretary, A. W. Browett, 219 Princess Street, Nanaimo,
B.C.
Civic and School Board Employees' Association, Nanaimo,
Local No. 401.—President, E. L. Crowe; Recording
Secretary, S. G. Storey, 670 Pine Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Nanaimo Local.
—President, F. Leyland; Recording Secretary, J. C.
Zasburg, West Road, Northfield, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
905.—President, W. Renney; Recording Secretary, T.
MacDonald, 1785 Hallen Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
David Block; Secretary, Miss M. E. Booth, Drawer 22,
Nanaimo, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees and Bartenders, International Union, Local No. 619.—President, Ebenezer
Muir; Recording Secretary, Wm. Hayes, 132 Frye
Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7355, District 18, 102-103 Burns Building, Calgary, Alta.—President, Thomas Newman; Financial Secretary, George
Bryce, 60 Robins Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Association,
Operative, Local No. 28.—President, Joseph Dawson;
Secretary-Treasurer, Henry S. Hackwood, 218 Hali-
burton Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 695.—President, William
Younghusband; Recording Secretary, A. W. McCand-
lish, 625 Nicol Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Nanaimo District, No. 68, Local No. 606.—President, John Carruthers; Recording Secretary, Michael Krall, 644 Hali-
burton Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss H.
Armstrong, 56 Acacia Avenue, Nanaimo, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 337.—
President, Duncan A. Macaulay; Recording Secretary,
A. R. Glen, Box 166, Nanaimo, B.C.
Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International Union,
Local No. 546.—President, F. J. Hackwood; Financial
Secretary, T. F. Bracewell, R.R. 1, Nanaimo, B.C.
Natal
Teachers'  Federation,   B.C.   (Michel-Natal  Sub-local).—
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss L. Zinovich, Natal, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 115
Nelson
Barbers, Hairdressers, Cosmetologists, Proprietors of
America, Journeymen, International Union of, Local
No. 196.—President, Frank Dafoe; Recording Secretary,
M. N. Olson, 463 Josephine Street, Nelson, B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, International Union of, United, Local No.
292.—President, Bertie Crissall, 224 Gore Street, Nelson, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2458.—President, Samuel Lauder; Recording Secretary, Frank Tough, 1023 Eighth Street,
Nelson, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Nelson, Local No. 339.—
President, R. T. Hickey; Recording Secretary, Miss K.
Maras, Box 77, Nelson, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1003.—President, J. H. Whitfield; Recording Secretary, A. S. Pagdin, 220 Vernon Street, Nelson, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1900.—President, H. Barone; Recording Secretary,
E. Box, South Slocan, B.C.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1141.—President, F. J. Vecchio; Recording Secretary, R. S. Horswill, 924 Observatory Street, Nelson,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
B. J. Fitchett; Secretary, Mrs. M. E. Emmott, Courthouse, Nelson, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 707.—President, Jack A.
Brooke; Recording Secretary, William H. Vickers,
General Delivery, Nelson, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 579.—
President, E. W. Butler; Financial Secretary, R. C.
Wright, 310 Carbonate Street, Nelson, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 631.—President, C. L. Boeteger; Recording
Secretary, D. McGinn, 809 Cottonwood Street, Nelson,
B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 663.—
President, W. Lunn; Recording Secretary, J. E. Baldock,
300 Kerr Block, Nelson, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 181.—President, J. H. Ringrose; Recording Secretary, P. Shankaruk, 1932 Third Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Postal Employees and Federated Association of Letter
Carriers, Canadian.—President, H. D. Craig; Recording
Secretary, H. L. Mason, 820 Mill Street, Nelson, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Brotherhood of, Express and Station Employees, Local No.
2318.—President, F. R. Wallace; Recording Secretary,
B. J. Monteleone, 314 Hart Street, Nelson, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
98.—President, F. W. Cartwright; Recording Secretary,
G. M. Scales, 802 Fifth Street, Nelson, B.C.
Railway Conductors and Brakemen, Order of, Kokanee
Division, Local No. 460.—President, W. E. Marquis;
Recording Secretary, A. Kirby, 820 Carbonate Street,
Nelson, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1291.
—President, E. E. Stepp; Recording Secretary, E. Gri,
615 Davies Street, Nelson, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 558.—>
President, Clifford Smith; Recording Secretary, Fred H.
Lowe, R.R. 1, Nelson, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, A. L.
Carder, 610 Houston Street, Nelson, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 340.—
President, J. A. Boletti; Financial Secretary, D. H.
Strachan, 1124 Third Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association, National, Kootenay Branch Local. — President, George
Bevis; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. P. Harrison, c/o 356
Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.
New Hazelton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 898.—Financial Secretary, R. D. Hay, New
Hazelton, B.C.
New Denver
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
William Craft; Secretary, Mrs. G. M. Rowe, New
Denver, B.C.
New Westminster
Beverage Dispensers' and Culinary Workers' Local No.
835. — President, Ray Pigeau; Recording Secretary,
Harry O'Brien, New Westminster, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1251.—President, J. W. Winger; Recording Secretary, J. Ireland, 1826 Sixth Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2534.—President, Lloyd M. Robinson;
Recording Secretary, E. Salzborn, 5865 Lancaster Street,
Vancouver 16, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, New Westminster, Local
No. 387.—President, W. Campbell; Recording Secretary, T. Nikel, 207 East Durham Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, New Westminster
- Local.—President, R. V. Cheale; Recording Secretary,
H. W. Darby, 381 Government Road, R.R. 8, New
Westminster, B.C.
Construction and General Labourers' Local No. 1070.—
President, Edmund Chaters; Recording Secretary,
Thomas Porter, 1505 Sixth Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.
Cordage Industrial Rope and Twine Workers' Union,
Local No. 1.—President, W. Bowland; Financial Secretary, George St. Laurent, 2217 Lorraine Avenue, R.R. 2,
New Westminster, B.C.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union of America, Local No. 69.—President, Carl
Hudson; Recording Secretary, Arthur Harris, 223 Phillips Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 256.
—President, H. E. McKnight; Recording Secretary,
Lloyd C. Bussey, 47 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, A.
Bent; Secretary, William Morgan, New Westminster,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, V.
Harding; General Secretary, W. R. Low, 355 Munday
Road, R.R. 2, New Westminster, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 32.—
President, Alex. Gibson; Recording Secretary, A.
Broughton, 9125 Pike Road, R.R. 5, New Westminster,
B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 502.—President, Leo W. Labinsky;
Recording Secretary, R. R. Cope, 1409 Eighth Avenue,
New Westminster, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 511.—President, R. Coines; Recording
Secretary, M. Kendrick, 2019 Eighth Avenue, New
Westminster, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 131.—
President, R. Whitter; Recording Secretary, Fred Benson, 466 Graham Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 151.—
President, A. K. Lord; Recording Secretary, Fred
Bradley, 207 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 13156.—
President, A. Deakin; Financial Secretary, W. Lake,
229 Pearce Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Newspaper Guild, Local 220 of the American.—President,
C. Jennings; Recording Secretary, Mary Mahovlic, 5
East Eighth Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
180.—President, J. McKnight; Recording Secretary, G.
Baxter, 375 Keary Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
412.—President, L. Wagner; Recording Secretary, J.
Bleackly, 1517 Seventeenth Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
456.—President, W. G. Royal; Recording Secretary,
Miss G. Christink, No. 3, 226 Tenth Street, New Westminster, B.C. F 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 131.—
President, R. Whitter; Recording Secretary, Fred
Benson, 466 Graham Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Policemen's Association, New Westminster, Local No.
294.—President, Ronald D. Burgess, 1410 Hamilton
Street, New Westminster; Recording Secretary, T. F.
Taphouse, 117 East Eighth Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, New Westminster Branch, President, Henry Waters; Secretary-
Treasurer, W. J. Smillie, 209 East Columbia Street,
New  Westminster,   B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistant's Union, New Westminster, Local No. 427.—President, R. E. Jure; Recording Secretary, Thomas Williams, 1041 Holly Street,
South Burnaby, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 46.—President, John Etchells; Recording Secretary, Leonard Ramsey, 2761 Brighton Avenue, R.R. 8,
New Westminster, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood, Local No.
280. — President, A. Cawley; Recording Secretary,
K. C. Wright, 449 Garrett Street, New Westminster,
B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 226.—President,
L. V. Torrance; Recording Secretary, T. E. Dobson,
917   Sherwood  Ave.,   New  Westminster,   B.C.
School Maintenance Union, New Westminster, Local No.
14.—President, R. H. Rhodes; Financial Secretary,
G. F. Miller, 1527 Dublin Street, New Westminster,
B.C.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Division 134.—
President, S. T. Dare; Recording Secretary, W. F.
Stiller, 11684 Chalmers Road, R.R. 9, New Westminster, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, George
Copeland, 2231 Dublin Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
J. E. Work, 428 Fourth Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, W. J. A.
McPhail, 1175 Douglas Road, New Westminster, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 632.—
President, A. Scott; Recording Secretary, W. J. Calhoun, Suite 12, Carlton Court, 317 Third Avenue, New
Westminster, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association, New
Westminster.—President, D. V. Ford; Recording Secretary, Mrs. H. J. Wilson, P.O. Box 511, New Westminster, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-357.
President, Joseph R. Madden; Financial Secretary,
L. E. Vandale, 533 Clarkson Street, New Westminster,
B.C.
North Kamloops
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
D. C. MacColl; Secretary, Mrs. Joan Mason, 176
Kerr Street, North Kamloops, B.C.
North Surrey
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 578.—President, George Cooper;   Finan-
. cial Secretary, S. H. McKee, 12337 116th Avenue,
North Surrey, B.C.
North Vancouver
Civic Employees' Association, The North Vancouver,
Local No. 3.—President, Jack Beattie; Executive Secretary, A. H. Hopen, 3450 Sunset Boulevard, North
Vancouver, B.C.
Electrical Workers' International Brotherhood, Local
No. 1685.—President, Harry Ryan; Recording Secretary, Herb Elson, 2033 Larson Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Fire Fighters, District of North Vancouver, Local No.
1183.—President, Donald McCormack; Recording Secretary, Herbert W. Steel, 700 Cove Cliff Rd., Deep
Cove, B.C.
Fire Fighters' Union, North Vancouver City, Local No.
914.—President, James Spencer; Recording Secretary,
Richard John Hallaway, 645 St. Davids Avenue, North
Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 260.—Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss M. Wilson, 1138 Ridgewood Drive,
North Vancouver, B.C.
Ocean Falls
Engineers, International Union of, Operating, Local No.
880.—President, J. L. Williamson; Recording Secretary, A. Lamb, Ocean Falls, B.C.
Papermakers, The International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 360.—President, George Pembleton; Recording
Secretary,  Walter  Scott,  Box  250,   Ocean Falls,  B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, The International Brotherhood of, Local No. 312.—President,
J. W. Terry; Recording Secretary, John Mathieson,
Box 264, Ocean Falls, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 37.—Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss B. Barton, Box 282, Ocean Falls,
B.C.
Oliver
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 61.—Secretary-
Treasurer,  Clem Whiles,  Oliver, B.C.
Parksville
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 43.—Secretary-
Treasurer, Mrs. W. Bayliss, Box 744, Parksville, B.C.
Penticton
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1696.—President, E. J. Cormeir; Recording Secretary, L. C. Hawtrie, Box 29, Kaleden,
B.C.
Civic Employees Federal Union, Penticton, Local No.
308.—President, George Hill; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. V. A. MacDonald, c/o 101 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President,
C. J. White, Recording Secretary, D. St. J. Land, 250
Nanaimo Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
W. J. M. Owen; Secretary, D. G. Touchette, General
Delivery, Penticton, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 95.
—President, A. Andrews; Representative, Ralph Johnson, Box 86, West Bench, Penticton, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 866.—
President, S. J. Cramer; Recording Secretary, A. R.
Falkerson,  978 Argyle Street, Penticton, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 884.—President, V. E. Moore; Financial
Secretary, R. F. MacKinnon, 358 Douglas Avenue,
Penticton,  B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Lodge
1023.—President, A. Nyman; Recording Secretary, G.
Davis,   169 Abbott Street, Penticton,  B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
333.—President, I. Barnes; Recording Secretary, L.
Payton, 936 Creston Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
Joe Gonda; Recording Secretary, R. E. Miller, Box 12,
Kaleden,  B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 914.—
President, F. G. Vader; Recording Secretary, S. D.
Marshall, 295 Nelson Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 303.—President,
Gordon H. McNutt; Recording Secretary, Frank
Quast, 964 Dynes Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 1.—Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss Mary Mclnnes, 101 Manor Park Drive,
Penticton, B.C.
Pioneer Mines
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 693.—President, George Miller; Financial Secretary, Geo. Higgs, Pioneer Mines, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 117
Pitt Meadows
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, C. E.
Gilpin, Lougheed Highway, Pitt Meadows, B.C.
Pouce Coupe
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
John C. Kemple; Secretary, T. C. Chapman, Pouce
Coupe, B.C.
Port Alberni
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 513.—President, James G. Tickett; Recording Secretary, J. G. Schrapl, 122 Kingsway South,
Port Alberni, B.C.
Civic Workers' Union, Port Alberni District.—President,
G. Boquist; Financial Secretary, Stanley Wilson, 905
Bute Street, Port Alberni, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 697.—President, Angelo
Stella; Recording Secretary, Gordon S. Daugau, 722
Hilton Avenue, Port Alberni, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 100.—
Recording Secretary, Douglas R. Wilkie, 821 Fourteenth
Avenue North, Port Alberni, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International,
Local No. 503.—President, Langford McKie; Financial
Secretary, Charles E. Anderson, 101 First Avenue, Port
Alberni, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 1642. — President, D. S.
Marrs; Recording Secretary, Don Mcintosh, 211 Seventh
Avenue North, Port Alberni, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
D. A. Wright; Recording Secretary, S. R. Stocken,
714 Tenth Avenue South, Port Alberni, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Papermill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 592.—President, Garnet
Harry; Recording Secretary, William Krawetz, 1001
Ninth Avenue North, Port Alberni, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss M.
Michel, 610 Fourteenth Avenue North, Port Alberni,
B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 185.—
President, W. F. Allen; Financial Secretary, J. A.
Moore, 708 Eleventh Avenue South, Port Alberni, B.C.
Port Alice
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 514.—President, P. E. Gordon;   Recording Secretary, R. McKay, Port Alice, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 19.—Secretary-
Treasurer, G. W. Moffat, Drawer F., Port Alice, B.C.
Port Coquitlam
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 25.—President, R. J. McIIvane; Recording Secretary, J. Wempley,
Edinburgh Street, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 561.
—President, J. L. Jonsson; Recording Secretary, F. W.
Cole, 924 Madore Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Port Mellon
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 297.—President, James W.
Clark; Recording Secretary, Lome Gregory, Port Mellon, B.C.
Powell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2068.—President, D. A. Davis; Recording
Secretary, R. B. Lawson, Box 700, Powell River, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
S. R. McGregor; Secretary, Miss E. Cook, Box 116,
Powell River, B.C.
School Board Employees' Union, Powell River, Local
No. 476. — President, Barney Markland; Secretary-
Treasurer, J. W. Bagnall, Box 762, Powell River, B.C.
Papermakers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
142.—President, Geo. Young; Recording Secretary,
T. H. H. Marrion, Box 730, Powell River, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 76.—President, E. M. Gol-
ley; Recording Secretary, C. M. Mouat, Box 745,
Powell River, B.C.
Prince George
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1993. — President, Ferdinand Scholz,
Financial Secretary, A. W. Wilson, 530 Freeman Street,
Prince George, B.C.
Civic Employees' Local Union, Prince George, Local No.
399.—President, H. Redekopp; Recording Secretary,
W. H. Rice, 1951 Ingledew Street, Prince George, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 242.—President, Fred Belsham; Recording Secretary, Colin Soles, 1695 Central Street, Prince George,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, H.
Beckley; Secretary, Mrs. T. Mclntyre, Box 935 Prince
George, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
858. — President, Alvin Wiley; Recording Secretary,
Ernest Chapman, 1515 Redwood Street, Prince George,
B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 843.—
President, R. Cadden; Recording Secretary, R. T. Mac-
Kenrot, 1033 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 827.—President, C. D. Martinson; Recording
Secretary, H. W. Willis, 1417 Cedar Street, Prince
George, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 202.—President, B. Stafano; Financial Secretary,
W. Haws, Box 297, Prince George, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1870.—President, G. P. Whitfield; Recording Secretary, J. Wall, Engen, B.C.
Postal Employees and Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 127.—President, James Smith; Recording Secretary, Geo. W. Meadows, 1704 Maple
Street, Prince George, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 869.—
President, John Hopson; Recording Secretary, A. A.
Clapperton, 711 Burden Street, Prince George, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 136.—Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss Muriel Stuart, 1085 Vancouver Street,
Prince George, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-424.
—President, J. Lehman; Recording Secretary, W. Rude-
loff, 1331 Fourth Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Prince Rupert
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of (Piledrive Section), Local No. 1549.—President,
Kenneth Hardy; Recording Secretary, Jack Rennie, Box
94, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1735.—President, C. F. Graham; Recording Secretary, E. Woodward, Box 94, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Prince Rupert, Local
No. 5.—President, T. Thomas; Recording Secretary,
E. A. Evans, Box 83, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Prince Rupert
Local Council.—President, R. C. Edwards; Recording
Secretary, H. G. Bird, 134 West Fifth Avenue, Prince
Rupert, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. — President,
George McDougall; Recording Secretary, Denis Lips-
combe, Miller Bay Hospital, Box 488, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 344.—President, Denis Mulroney; Recording Secretary, Doug. Hague, Room 2, Ul Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver 3, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of, Operating, Local No.
510.—President, John G. Dyck; Recording Secretary,
G. D. Donaldson, 1119 Eighth Avenue, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
559.—President, J. C. Ewart; Secretary-Treasurer, J. S.
Furness, 1532 Second Overlook Street, Prince Rupert,
B.C. F 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Fishermen and Allied Workers Union, United, Prince
Rupert Shoreworkers Local, Local No. 31.—President,
Mrs. Verna Parkin; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Florence Greenwood, 1219 Prince Rupert Boulevard, General Delivery, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United, Local No.
37.—President, Clarence A. Callow; Recording Secretary, Charles Ryalls, Pioneer Rooms, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Fishermen's, Deep Sea, Federal Union of British Columbia, Local No. 80.—President, Hilmar Mork; Treasurer,
W. H. Brett, 704 McBride Street, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C7—President,
G. L. Brodie; Secretary, V. Manojlovich, Court-house,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Hotel Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International
Union, Local No. 636.—President, Barney De Fehr;
Recording Secretary, Roy Little, Prince Rupert Hotel,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International,
Local No. 505.—President, W. Nixon; Recording Secretary, N. Cronck, 708 Second Avenue West, Prince
Rupert, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 335.—President, C. E. Olson;   Recording Secretary,
A. F. Skattebol, 1425 Graham Avenue, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, Journeymen and Apprentices of, United Association of, Local No. 180.—
Recording Secretary, Sam Julian, 621% Third Avenue,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 708. — President, E. P.
O'Neal; Recording Secretary, E. Moore, Box 294,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Totem Lodge, Local
No. 1016.—President, R. J. Hogg; Recording Secretary,
D. L. Jensen, 404 Sherbrooke Avenue, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
426.—President, E. I. Tschabold; Recording Secretary,
R. Pollock, 252 Eighth Avenue West, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 154. — President, J.
Rhodes; Recording Secretary, G. H. R. Lindelauf,
516 Sixth Avenue West, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
Georgina McNay, 146 Seventh Avenue East, Prince
Rupert, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 413.—-
President, Jack Manheim; Recording Secretary, John
D. Standring, 613 Sixth Avenue West, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Princeton
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, G.
Kassa;   Secretary, A. Ryder, Princeton, B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Soft Drink, Cereal and Distillery Workers
of America, Local No. 367.—President, P. Mitchell;
Recording Secretary, W. Burton, Jr., Box 745, Princeton, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Ervin
Dahl, Princeton, B.C.
Qualicum Beach
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2412.—President, A. Lamarre; Financial
Secretary, H. Large, Box 44, Qualicum Beach, B.C.
Quesnel
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,  Local No. 2493.—President,  Paul E.  R. Williams;
Recording Secretary, James W. Beat, Box 77, Quesnel,
B.C.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
P. J.  Shaw;   Secretary, Miss A.  Hodges,  B.C.  Forest
Service, Quesnel, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President, Mrs.
B. C. Garvin;   Financial Secretary, J. T. Kelly,  Staff
Post-office, Quesnel, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, G. E.
Brunelle, Box 1149, Quesnel, B.C.
Radium Hot Springs
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. — President,
Ronald Bradshaw; Recording Secretary, G. R. H. Cameron, Radium Hot Springs, B.C.
Revelstoke
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 466—President, G.
Fuocco; Financial Secretary, E. Barry, 1414 Douglas
St., Revelstoke, B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drinks, and Distillery
Workers of America, United, International Union of,
Local No. 352.—President, L. Nordstom, Revelstoke,
B.C., Recording Secretary, L. Renyard, Box 44, Revelstoke, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Recording
Secretary, John E. Delaville, Salmon Arm, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
G. A. Graham, R.R. 3, Salmon Arm, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-417.
—President, J. Kelly; Recording Secretary, C. De Nene,
R.R. 3, Salmon Arm, B.C.
Sandspit
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, L. C.
McKee; Recording Secretary, Donald Staryk, Radio
Range Station, Sandspit, B.C.
Saudis
Fire Fighters, International Association of. — President,
J. W. Penner; Recording Secretary, C. E. Machin, 467
South Sumas, R.R. 4, Sardis, B.C.
Sidney
Air Lines Traffic Employees' Association, Trans-Canada.
—President,   Charles  A.   Rhind;    Recording  Secretary,
Cathy Odette, T.C.A., Toronto, Ont.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Corresponding
Secretary, S. W. Hambley, Sidney, B.C.
Skidegate
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United, Local No.
28.—President, Coleman Casey; Financial Secretary,
E. Regnery, Skidegate, B.C.
Smithers
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
L. J. Cox; Secretary, A. E. Davis, Box 788, Smithers,
B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Babine Division,
Local No. 111.—President, T. Britton; Recording Secretary, C. H. Duke, Box 132, Smithers, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Canadian National System Federation, Brotherhood of, Local No. 340. —
President, J. Hargreaves; Recording Secretary, J. E.
Williams, Quick, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Bulkley
Lodge, Local No. 1415.—President, W. Davis; Recording Secretary, W. E. Jackson, Box 273, Smithers, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 93.—Recording Secretary, P. B. Emerson, Box 247, Smithers, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
Jane Lee, Box 553, Smithers, B.C.
Sointula
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United, Local No.
26.—President, Wayne Patterson; Recording Secretary,
Philip Hilton, Sointula, B.C.
Sooke
School Board Employees, Sooke, Local No. 459.—President, J. Zalenko; Recording Secretary, F. Stones, General Delivery, Sooke, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 119
South Burnaby
Automobile, Aircraft, and Implement Workers of America, United, Local No. 432.—President, A. Blackburn;
Recording Secretary, R. W. Fakeley; 2315 Frederick
Avenue, South Burnaby, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 656.—President, B. D. Mortimer; Recording
Secretary, M. Geluch, 4230 Price Crescent, South Burnaby, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Shop Secretary-Treasurer,
R. C. Hill, 3055 Empress Avenue, South Burnaby, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, Local No. 221.—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss R. Utendale, 2060 Balmoral Street, South
Burnaby, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, Local No. 20.—Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. Joan Palmer, 1274 Burris Street, South Burnaby,
B.C.
South Hazelton
Teachers' Federation.—Secretary-Treasurer, E. McKeogh,
South Hazelton, B.C.
South Slocan
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 36. — Secretary-
Treasurer, H. Dahlquist, South Slocan, B.C.
Squamish
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Local No. 972.—President, E. A. Patenaude;   Recording
Secretary, H. Hodsmyth, Squamish, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   Local
No. 215.—President, G. Confortin;   Financial Secretary,
G. M. Comber, Squamish, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen,  Brotherhood  of,  Local No.   1080.—
President, H. Butterworth;   Recording Secretary, J. E.
Leech, Squamish, B.C.
Railway   Carmen   of  America,   Brotherhood,   Local  No.
1419.—President,   John   Huron;    Recording   Secretary,
Alexander Fraser, Squamish, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer,   Mrs.
Ruther Turbay, Squamish, B.C.
Stewart
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, Miss E. Jacobsen,
Stewart, B.C.
Summerland
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Harold Burdon; Recording Secretary, J. M. McDougald,
Experimental Farm, Summerland, B.C.
Terrace
Government Employees' Association.—President, J. D.
Williams, Box 23, Terrace, B.C.
Trail
Civic Workers' Union, Trail and District, Local No. 343.
—President, A. Burton; Recording Secretary, C. Uni-
lowsky, Room 2, 910 Portland Street, Trail, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 871,
Tadanac.—President, Dallis L. Woodburn; Recording
Secretary, R. Houndle, 2025 Fifth Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
941.—President, Cyril J. Paul; Recording Secretary,
Charles N. Bogyo, 2198 Third Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 76.—
President, E. Harris; Recording Secretary, S. T.
Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 480.—President, A. King; Financial Secretary, R. Morandini, 910 Portland Street, Trail, B.C.
Postal Employees Association, Canadian, Trail Branch.—
President, Don D. Weis; Recording Secretary, I. W.
Wishlaw, Trail, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
Bernie Fletcher, 1900 Oak Street, Trail, B.C.
Tulsequah
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 858.—President, P. Appleby; Financial Secretary, O. Nukka, Tulsequah, B.C.
Ucluelet
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C. — Secretary-Treasurer,   Miss
V. M. Nanson, Box 142, Ucluelet, B.C.
Vananda
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 816.—Financial Secretary, J. K. Johnson,
Vananda, B.C.
Vancouver
Administrators' Association, Vancouver School, Local No.
59.—Secretary-Treasurer, A. A. Hards, 4643 Puget
Drive, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Airline Dispatchers' Association, Canadian, Local No. 1.
—President, G. Stuart; Recording Secretary, W. J.
Sheffield, 38 Ecker Drive, Toronto 14, Ont.
Airline Flight Attendants' Association, Canadian.—President, Art Bolton; Recording Secretary, Miss E. B.
Campbell, 91 St. Josephs Boulevard, Apt. 30, Dorval,
B.C.
Airline Navigators' Association, Canadian. — President,
D. A. Evans; Recording Secretary, D. Cliffe, 4021 West
Twenty-ninth Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers, International Union
of America, Local No. 468.—President, William Martin;
Recording Secretary, Douglas Urquhart, 3086 West
Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, Local No. 189.—President, S.
Purdy; Recording Secretary, C. Wooding, 364 East
Twenty-fourth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Barbers', Hairdressers', Journeymen, Cosmetologists', and
Proprietors' International Union of America, Locai No.
120.—President, Arthur Johnson; Recording Secretary,
J. L. Condy, 1336 Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, Local No. 676.—President,
Harold D. Courson; Representative, Robert G. Bed-
dome, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
194.—President, William J. Johnson; Recording Secretary, Francis J. Nicholson, 1880 McBride Avenue,
South Burnaby, B.C.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
359.—President, Jas. Downie; Financial Secretary,
M. H. Downie, 136 West Fifth Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 105.
—President, John Gray; Recording Secretary, P. Dahl,
2046 Pendrell Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505.—President, John Turner; Recording Secretary, James P.
Roddy, 2771 East Forty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver 16,
B.C.
Brewery Workers' Union, Local No. 300. — President,
R. J.  Clader;   Recording Secretary, J. R. Humphreys,
2460 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union, Local No.
1.—President, J. S. Baker; Recording Secretary, J.
Geddes, 1342 East Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Ironworkers, International Association of, Local No. 97. — President,
Robert Knox; Recording Secretary, Lincoln Rutherford,
2461 East Twenty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Bridge,  Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, Shopmen's  International  Association of,  Local No.  712.—
President,   Steven  Jurick;    Recording   Secretary,  John
McStay, 339 East Twentieth Ave., Vancouver, B.C.
Broadcast Employees and Technicians, National Association of, Local No. 73.—President, J. S. Laurie, 881
Sinclair Street, West Vancouver, B.C.
Brush Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver, Local No.
564.—President, L. J. Smith; Recording Secretary,
F. H. Allan, 2615 East Twentieth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Building Service Employees' International Union, Local
No. 244.—President, Vic Galbraith; Recording Secretary, Ben A. R. Morley, 2833 McGill Street, Vancouver,
B.C. F 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 452.—President, W. Page; Financial
Secretary, P. J. Deplissey, 2137 Dunblane Avenue,
South Burnaby, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1928.—President, Clifford L. Bengough;
Recording Secretary, Kenneth Bampton, 356 West
Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Chemical Workers' Union, International, Local No. 511.
—President, George Connolly; Recording Secretary,
George Hygh, 4007 Dunbar Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Chemical Workers' Union, International, Local No. 546.
—President, J. P. McGellegatt; Recording Secretary,
G. Rae, 403 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
City Hall Employees' Association, Local No. 15.—President, Oliver King; Recording Secretary, T. H. Lewis,
Suite 202, 3819 Cambie Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Civic Employees' Union, Outside Workers, Vancouver.—
President, Bruce McKinnon; Recording Secretary, Jack
Phillips, 339 West Pender St., Vancouver, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Vancouver, Local No.
407.—President, Denis Cronin; Recording Secretary,
W. G. Gauld, Room 200, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Vancouver Local
Council.—President, H. Goebel; Financial Secretary,
Miss C. Hall, 556 Granville St., Vancouver B.C.
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated, Journeymen
Tailors, Local No. 178.—President, Frank W. Armstrong; Financial Secretary, George Cole, 620, 193
East Hastings Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Club, Cabaret, Construction Camp, Culinary and Service
Employees' Union, Local No. 740.—President, William
McDermont; Recording Secretary, Hilda Martin, 1143
East Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Communications Association, Canadian, Local No. 4.—
Vice-President, R. E. Bustin; Financial Secretary, Gerald L. Gordon, 2146 York Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Construction Workers, United, Local No. 204, Division
of District 50, United Mine Workers of America.—
President, J. P. Lucas; Recording Secretary, William
Sissons, 876 Westminster Highway, Lulu Island, B.C.
Construction and General Labourers, No. 602.—President,
L. Smillie; Financial Secretary, C. H. Savage, 307 West
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Converters, Vancouver, Local No. 433.—President, A. K.
Stelp; Recording Secretary, Margaret Carter, Suite 1,
525 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Counsellors' Association, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
J. A. Findlay, 2376 West Forty-third Avenue, Vancouver
13, B.C.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union of America, Local No. 92.—President,
Raymond Lawton; Recording Secretary, Miss Lois W.
Tinderland, 2997 Parker Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Distillery, Rectifying and Wine Workers' International
Union of America, Local No. 153.—President, Neil
MacPherson; Financial Secretary, Wilfred J. Tremblay,
176 East Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 213.—President, J. Waplington; Recording Secretary, W. Daley, 1055 Victoria Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Enamel Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver, Local No.
291.—President, John Zaleski; Recording Secretary, Joseph Mzxymow, 816 Victoria Drive, Vancouver 6, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of, Operating, Local No.
115.—President, C. H. Wren; Recording Secretary,
R. R. Malange, 5804 Fraser Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of, Operating, Local No.
882.—President, R. Berger; Recording Secretary, H.
Cain, 111 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of, Operating, Local No.
963.—Recording Secretary, George Zailo, 380 East Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Federal Union, Municipal Foremen, Vancouver and District, Local No. 349.—President, W. Briggs; Recording
Secretary, L. T. Emmery, 332 East Sixtieth Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Federal Union, University of British Columbia, Local No.
116.—President, F. C. Colbum; Secretary, A. Leathern,
518 East Eighth Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Film Exchange Employees, Local No. B-71.—President,
M. Proudlock; Financial Secretary, G. Hislop, 1211
Leroi Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 18.
—President, Hector Wright; Recording Secretary,
Frank Bain, 4559 Belmont Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Fire Fighters, British Columbia University Area, Local
No. 901.—President, R. W. Rowland; Recording Secretary, W. R. Darlington, 2 Acadia Circle, Vancouver 8,
B.C.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 289.—President, Dan Bratko; Recording Secretary,
James E. Gairburn, 3520 Pioneer Avenue, South Burnaby 1, B.C.
First Aid Attendants', The Industrial, Association of B.C.
—President, Mrs. E. M. McCallum; Secretary, H. W.
Mahler, 130 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United (Headquarters).— Secretary - Treasurer, Homer Stevens, 138
East Cordova Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Floorlayers' Local, Local No. 1541.—President, O. Soder-
man; Recording Secretary, R. V. Nash, 2803 East Eighteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Food Products Employees' Association; Kelly-Douglas,
Nabob. — President, George Tuson; Secretary, Miss
Joyce Roop, c/o Kelly Douglas, 3700 Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.
Garment Workers of America, United, Local No. 190.—
President, Mrs. Irene Stinson; Recording Secretary,
Walter W. Shaw, 3435 West Sixth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Garment Workers of America, United, Local No. 232.—
President, Phillis M. Fannus; Recording Secretary,
Dianne Prost, 4035 East First Avenue, North Burnaby,
B.C.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies', Local
No. 276.—President, Edward Thomas; Recording Secretary, James Kendall, 3441 Price Street, Vancouver 16,
B.C.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies', Local
No. 287.—President, Sydney Clarkson, Recording Secretary, Raymond Boutin, 753 East Twentieth Avenue,
Vancouver 10, B.C.
General Workers' Union, Mainland, Local No. 307.—■
Recording Secretary, Miss Freda Haskin, 501 Vancouver
Block, Vancouver 2, B.C.
Gillnetters' Association, B.C.—President, H. Lee; Financial Secretary, F. Rolley, Whonock, B.C.
Glaziers' and Glassworkers' Local No. 1527.—President,
Frank N. Cave; Recording Secretary, William C.
Norton, 5850 Cree Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Glove Workers' Federal Union, Vancouver, Local No.
582.—President, David Morgan; Recording Secretary,
Dorothy Mason, 361 West Seventeenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
C. C. Stuart; Executive Secretary, E. P. Fox, No. 8,
407 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, Joseph F. Christian; General Secretary, E. P. O'Connor,
902 Helmcken Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Grain Workers' Union, Local No. 333.—President, J. D.
Newell; Recording Secretary, G. H. Frank, 3482 Normandy Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Granite Cutters' International Association of America.—
President, Allan Forbes; Financial Secretary, Allan
Forbes, 712 East Sixty-second Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers, International Association of, Local No. 118.—President, George
Banner; Recording Secretary, D. McElrea, 4402 Kaslo
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 180.—
President, H. Garden; Recording Secretary, Alex Paterson, 2274 East Sixteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Hospital Employees' Organization (St. Paul's.)—Secretary-
Treasurer, Albert J. Coady, 3937 West Twenty-ninth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 28.—President, T. C. Newton;
Recording Secretary, Mrs. C. Waddell, Room 406, 402
West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 121
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, Local No. 42.—
President, G. Amos; Recording Secretary, George H.
Brown, 1608 West Fifty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Jewelry Workers' and Watchmakers' International Union,
Local No. 57.—President, Dorse McTaggart; Recording
Secretary, Alexander Marshall, 1765 West Tenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire and Metal,
Local No. 207.—President, A. Fontaine; Recording Secretary, Walter Dow, 825 Delta Avenue, North Burnaby,
B.C.
Laundry and Dry Cleaners' Salesmen's Association, Vancouver District, Local No. 1.—President, Colin Fleming,
352 East Sixth Street, North Vancouver, B.C.; Recording Secretary, Walter Dafoe, 220 Stirling Avenue, Vancouver 14, B.C.
Laundry and Dry Cleaners, Vancouver and District, Locals Nos. 1 and 2.—President, C. Fleming, 352 East
Sixth Street, North Vancouver, B.C.; Recording Secretary, W. Dafoe, 220 Stirling Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Laundry Workers' International Union, Local No. 292.—
President, Agnes Thomson; Financial Secretary, J. H.
Irving, 7660 Archibald, R.R. 15, New Westminster, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Branch 12.—
President, J. D. Shrimpton; Recording Secretary, F.
Anselmo, 1009 East Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver 10,
B.C.
Library Staff Association, Vancouver Public, Local No.
391.—President, Miss Betty Kinnear; Recording Secretary, Mrs. E. Bligh, Business and Economics Division,
Vancouver Public Library, Main and Hastings, Vancouver, B.C.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local No. 44.—
President, Earl Kinney; Recording Secretary, Albert N.
Larochelle, 5363 Clarendon Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 907.—
President, T. G. Murphy; Financial Secretary, R. S.
Smith, 2614 East Third Avenue, Vancouver 12, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 939.—President, John Livingstone; Recording Secretary, Leonard J. Sallows, 4947 Elgin Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 320.—
President, A. A. Robertson; Secretary-Treasurer, S. F.
Laycock, Box 204, Squamish, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 501.—President, Watson Jones; Recording Secretary, W. J. Desmarais, 6250 Douglas Rd.,
North Burnaby, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 507.—President, C. McKendrick;
Recording Secretary, J. Urquhart, 792 Powell Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Lumber Inspection Union, B.C. Division, Local No. 1.—
President, B. G. Lane; Recording Secretary, E. E.
Smith, 7855 Fraser Street, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local No.
509.—President, Alfred J. Duncan; Recording Secretary, Hugh Gillies, R.R. 1, Burns Road, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International,
Local No. 510.—President, Thomas P. Mayes; Recording Secretary, J. B. Browne, 3677 West Nineteenth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 182.—
President, L. Thomas; Recording Secretary, W. M.
Mitchell, 2038 William Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 692.—
President, L. White; Recording Secretary, H. Fishman,
4862 Ridgelawn Drive, North Burnaby, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Canadian Airways Lodge, Local No. 764.—President, M. R. Waling;
Recording Secretary, G. O. Stock, 316 Sixth Avenue,
New Westminster, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Sea Air Lodge,
Local  No.   876.—President,   K.   R.   Spratt;    Recording
Secretary, John Smith, 4567 Blenheim Street, Vancouver 8, B.C.
6
Machinists, International Association of, B.C. Workers,
Local No. 1857.—President, Walter Penny; Financial
Secretary, L. W. Burkinshaw, 2185 West Thirteenth
Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Mailers' Union, Vancouver, Local No. 70.—President,
W. E. Campbell; Recording Secretary-Treasurer, D. R.
Durno, 4323 Valley Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 167.—President, J. H. Krimmer; Financial Secretary, P. J. Doyle, 2638 West Twenty-first Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Marine Checkers' and Weighers' Association, International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
Local No. 506.—President, Geo. Fitzgerald; Financial
Secretary, A. G. Smith, 878 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver 4, B.C.
Marble Polishers, Rubbers and Cutters, International
Association of, Local No. 179.—President, W. A.
McDonald; Recording Secretary, John Steel, 1307 East
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, Council No.
7.—President, R. Greaves; Recording Secretary, H. B.
McKie, 319 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial Union,
Local No. 1.—President, Samuel Jenkins; Financial
Secretary, William Stewart, 815 Tobruk Street, North
Vancouver, B.C.
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America,
Amalgamated, Local No. 197.—President, Tom Winter;
Representative, T. B. Buchanan, Room 203, 307 West
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America,
Amalgamated, Local No. 212. — President, Albert
Thomas; Recording Secretary, Michael Stephens, 1323
Willingdon Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America,
Amalgamated, Local No. 505.—President, N. R. James;
Recording Secretary, L. W. Beaudreault, 5680 Clarendon Street, Vancouver 16, B.C.
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America,
Amalgamated, Local No. 510. — President, Harvey
Clarke; Representative, T. B. Buchanan, 3482 West
Sixth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Merchant Service Guild, Inc., Canadian.—President, Capt.
Harry Roach, 193 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 4,
B.C.; General Secretary, G. F. Bullock, 193 East
Hastings Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 289.—President, J. Stehr; Financial Secretary, C. G. Woods, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Milk Salesdrivers' and Dairy Employees' Union, Local
No. 464.—President, George Waithe; Financial Secretary, John Brown, 1054 East Fifty-sixth Avenue, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Molders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International,
Local No. 281.—President, R. S. Wilson; Recording
Secretary, G. Annand, 2681 East Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, American Federation of Musicians, Local No. 145.—President, Claude
Hill; Recording Secretary, George Leach, 315, 402
West Pender Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia (Fraternal).—
President, Robert P. Clifton; Recording Secretary,
George N. Wilson, Bella Bella, B.C.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, Local No. 1.—President,
C. Crombie; Recording Secretary, Miss Allison Gentleman, 2545 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, Local No. 2.—President,
Sid Sheard; Recording Secretary, Georgia Lane, 1128
West Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, Local No. 207,—President,
Ken McConnell; Recording Secretary, R. M. Shaw,
2136  West  Forty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver,  B.C.
Newspaper Pressmen, Vancouver, Local No. 25.—President, S. S. Muir; Financial Secretary, V. Griffiths,
2614 West Ottawa Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Nurses' Association of B.C., Registered, Local No. 548.—
President, Miss A. Creasor; Secretary, A. L. Wright,
R.N., 2524 Cypress Street, Vancouver, B.C. F 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Office and Professional Workers' Organizing Committee,
Local No. 8.—President, Mrs. Pearl E. Hawley;
Financial Secretary, Miss Cecile Dickjong, c/o Room 4,
45 Kingsway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Office Employees' International Union, Local No. 15.—
President, Mrs. Myrna Holmes; Recording Secretary,
Vera Kohmer, 1266 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Office Employees' Association, Film Exchange, Local No.
F-71.—President, Henry Heck; Recording Secretary,
R. Isman, c/o M.G.M. Pictures of Canada Ltd., 2188
West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Office Employees' Association, B.C. Electric, Employees'
International Union, Local No. 378.—President, W. A.
Lowe; Recording Secretary, Mrs. K. Impey, B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association, Social Club, 425
Carrall Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers' International Union,
Local No. 16-606.—President, S. Sawchuk; Recording
Secretary, D. Horley, 3532 Cambridge Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers' International Union,
Local No. 16-601.—President, J. Warren; Financial
Secretary, R. B. Burns, 4737 East Hastings Street,
North Burnaby, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
162.—President, R. Johnson; Recording Secretary, J.
Longmuir, 3727 Douglas Road, North Burnaby, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
249.—President, J. Collins; Recording Secretary, J.
Atkinson, 3335 Windsor Street, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
283.—President, P. Christie; Recording Secretary,
S. E. Taylor, 1146 East Sixty-first Street, Vancouver
15, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
341.—President, J. Lutgert; Recording Secretary, W.
Cholowski, 2236 St. George Street, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
350.—President, J. McGuinness; Recording Secretary,
B. Moran, 1241 Homer Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
445.—President, J. MacKenzie; Recording Secretary,
L. Gavin, 6232 Main Street, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
453.—President, J. Lawrence, Recording Secretary, P.
Fries, 3747 Renfrew Street, Vancouver 12, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
472.—President, R. Shaw; Recording Secretary, G.
Bason, 836 West 27th Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
499.—President, P. McHallam; Recording Secretary,
B. Wright, 918 Fourteenth Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
541.—President, W. Symington; Recording Secretary,
E. Quinell, Room 3, 45 Kingsway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 138.—President, J. McArthur; Recording Secretary, J. Hines, 242 Grant
Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
Paint and Varnish Workers' Union, Local No. 1550.—
President, T. J. Briggs; Financial Secretary, C. V.
Erickson, 85 South Sea Avenue, North Burnaby, B.C.
Pattern Makers Association of Vancouver, B.C., and
vicinity.—President, J. G. Best; Recording Secretary,
H. E. Oliver, 93 Abercrombie Drive, Sea Island, B.C.
Pipefitters, C.P.R. and C.N.R., Railroad, United Association of, Local No. 571.—President, J. Williams;
Recording Secretary, J. Reid, 906 Fifth Street, New
Westminster, B.C.
Photo Engravers', International, Union of North America,
Local No. 54.—President, D. W. Lovelock; Recording
Secretary, Wilmer Blenkin, 4516 Parker Street, Burnaby,
B.C.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 779.—President, R. H. Par-
nell; Recording Secretary, W. E. McMynn, 490 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 919.—President, O. C. Paris;
Recording Secretary, R. Baker, 101, 119 West Pender
Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry, Journeymen and
Apprentices of the, United Association, Local No.
170.—President, J. A. Dillabourgh; Recording Secretary, J. R. Barton, Room 109, 307 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
Policemen, City, Federal Labour Union, Local No. 12.—
President, F. F. Dougherty; Recording Secretary, Ben.
Hagman, 312 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Porters, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car.—President, F. C.
Collins; Financial Secretary, E. Lawrence, 3696 East
Georgia Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Vancouver
Branch.—President, W. Worton; Secretary, J. P. Doyle,
4509 West Ninth Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Vancouver,
Local No. 69.—President, R. A. Scott; Recording Secretary, L. Ainsworth, 3849 Cambridge Street, North
Burnaby, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' International Union of
North America, Local No. 578.—President, L. McLeod;
Recording Secretary, Glenn Braithewaite, 5610 East
Georgia Street, North Burnaby, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' International Union of
North America, Local No. 598.—President, D. F.
Brown; Recording Secretary, R. Bryan, 3151 East
Twenty-first Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf and Dock Builders, Local
No. 2404.—President, E. Peladeau; Recording Secretary, W. McLellan, Box 369, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Projectionists' Union, B.C., Local No. 348.—President,
A. E. McManua; Recording Secretary, D. Foli, 3460
Prince Albert Street, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 655.—President, S. Wiltshire; Recording Secretary, L. Lockhart, 904 East
Twenty-third Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Pursers' and Chief Stewards' Association, Vancouver,
Local No. 608.—President, F. L. Lawrence; Financial
Secretary, N. Davidson, 1074 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Radio and Television Artists, Local No. 24498,—President, Mrs. S. Creighton; Recording Secretary, Mrs. J.
Carter, Suite 2, 2480 Laurel Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen. Brotherhood of, Vancouver Lodge,
Local No. 144.—President, W. E. Tompkins; Recording
Secretary, W. R. Wright, 3603 Franklin Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Local
No. 221.—President, C. S. Davies; Recording Secretary,
G. E. Palmer, P.O. Box 964, Vancouver, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Lions' Gate Lodge,
Local No. 987.—President, W. L. Dufton; Recording
Secretary, William Basil, Suite 200, 1298 West Tenth
Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1040.—
President, J. W. Tessley; Recording Secretary, W. F.
Doyle, 2915 Waterloo Street, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood, of, Local No.
404.—President, C. H. Ruffell; Recording Secretary,
A. E. Lawton, 1140 West Keith Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood, of, Local No.
526.—President, A. R. Davie; Recording Secretary,
J. H. Vallance, 4497 Quebec Street, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood, of, Local No.
630.—President, A. Richardson; Recording Secretary,
L. M. Zacharias, 4464 Forest Street, South Bumaby,
B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1241.—President, Ivor Williams; Recording Secretary,
Fred Palmer, 3869 Union Street, North Burnaby, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Vandee Lodge, Local No. 1321.
—President, D. R. Ross; Recording Secretary, Walter
Turner, 3900 Heather Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1370.—President, G. J. Webster; Recording Secretary,
A. A. Bicknell, 1245 East Sixty-second Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F  123
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood, of, Local No.
2315.—President, D. H. Cameron; Recording Secretary,
J. E. Battye, 525 East Sixtieth Avenue, Vancouver 15,
B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood, of, Local No.
2334.—President, F. A. Yearly; Recording Secretary,
J. H. Orr, 606 East Sixtieth Avenue, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
3016.—President, W. A. McKinnon; Recording Secretary, Mrs. G. R. Dore, 804 Lansdowne Road, Lulu
Island, Vancouver 14, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
58.—President, A. Marchant; Recording Secretary, H.
Holmes, 2510 West Twenty-first Avenue, Vancouver 8,
B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
773.—President, L. Love; Financial Secretary, D. E.
Fourn, 3304 Nanaimo Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Conductors and Brakemen, Order of, Local No.
267.—President, D. Fearn; Representative, E. H. Bice,
1963 McNicoll Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No.
59.—President, Fred Quakenbush; Recording Secretary,
Bill Schlamp, 3228 Napier Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No.
162.—President, H. H. Dickson;   Recording Secretary,
F. H. Killick, 3728 West Thirty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 275.—President, George
Dale;   Recording Secretary, Ernest Hughes,  145 South
MacDonald Avenue, North Burnaby, B.C.
Railway Mail Clerks' Vancouver Association.—President,
H. A. Wobick;   Recording Secretary, R. H. Busch, 4660
Arbor Street, South Burnaby, B.C
Ra'lwaymen,  Canadian  Association  of,  Local No.  74.—
President,   Zenon   David;    Recording   Secretary,   D.   B.
Roberts, 216 Avenue Building, Winnipeg, Man.
Railwaymen of Hanna, Alberta, Canadian Association of,
Local   No.   29.—Recording   Secreary,   Alex   Stoughton,
1169 Comox Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local No.
535.—President,   J.   F.   Mason;    Recording   Secretary,
Miss L. J. Mcintosh, Room 2, 49 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local No.
580.—President, R. C Haynes;   Recording Secretary, V.
Sanford,   Room  2,  49  West  Hastings  St.,  Vancouver,
B.C.
Retail   Food   and   Drug   Clerks'   Union   (formerly   Retail
Grocery and Food Clerks' Union), Local No. 1518.—
President,   A.   McDonald;    Financial  Secretary,  D.   A.
Wade, Room 205, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Refrigeration Workers' Union, Local No. 516.—President,
D. D. Forrester;   Recording Secretary, J. Wesley, 1766
Fourth Avenue, West Vancouver, B.C.
Seamen's Union, West Coast  (Canada), Local No.  1.—
President, J. S. Thomson;   Recording Secretary, J. M.
Smith, 2796 Eton Street, Vancouver, B.C
Sewerage and Drainage Board Employees' Union, Greater
Vancouver and Vancouver, Local No. 393.—President,
G. Forsythe;   Recording Secretary, G. E. Patton, 4925
Earles Road, Vancouver, BC.
School Service Employees' Association, Vancouver, Local
No. 20.—President, W. J. Brock; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. E. C. Begg, 5246 Rhodes Street, Vancouver 16,
B.C.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 280.—President, E. Fenton; Recording Secretary,
R. Danbert, 1133 West Windsor Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 314.—President, L. W. Phillips; Recording Secretary, T. R. Owen, 920 East Fifty-fifth Ave., Vancouver,
B.C.
Shingle Weavers, chartered by United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Local No. 2802.—President, J. C. Thirwell; Recording Secretary, J. E. Hird,
1524 West Sixty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver 14, B.C.
Shipwrights, Boat-Builders, Joiners and Caulkers, United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, Local No. 506.
—President, J. Bayer; Recording Secretary, P. Pere-
henski, 548 West Twenty-fourth Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Sign and Pictorial Painters, Local No. 726.—President,
William McNey; Recording Secretary, J. A. Middleton,
6339 Kitchener Street, North Burnaby, B.C.
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, International, Local No. 88.—President, R. N. Myles; Financial Secretary, G. R. Prouton, 4311 Albert Street, North Burnaby,
B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2655.—President, K. Woods; Secretary, J. Thomas, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2821.—President, W. Lamont; Secretary, A. Whittaker, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2952.—President, T. H. Richardson; Secretary, C. Derdak, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3253.—President, S. Sykes; Secretary, W. Tommila, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3302.—President, C. Norrie; Secretary, F. Horton, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3376.—President, G. Geiger; Recording Secretary, L. Magda, 33
East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3452.—President, D. Jones; Secretary, R. L. Symons, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3495.—President, A. P. LeDoux; Secretary, E. McKenzie, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3546.—President, E. A. Stitchell; Secretary, G. Smith, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3910.—President, J. Kinnear; Secretary, G. Smith; 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3229.—President, J. Laughton, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10,
B.C.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor-coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Local No. 101.
—President, S. E. Wilcox; Recording Secretary, Charles
Stewart, 2605 East Twenty-third Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Stone Cutters' Association of North America, Journeymen.—President, Harry H. Dahlbeck; Recording Secretary, Frank Hall, 2148 Randolph Avenue, South Burnaby, B.C.
Sugar Workers, Industrial Union of, Local No. 517.—
President, Frank Rains; Recording Secretary, O.
Plumbley, Room 2, 49 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Supervisors' Association, Vancouver School, Local No.
10.—Secretary-Treasurer, John Lidstone, 1379 Devonshire Crescent, Vancouver, B.C.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No. 111.—
President, L. A. Munday; Financial Secretary, F. E.
Barlow, 2304 West Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Taxi Cab, Stage, Bus Drivers and Dispatchers, Local No.
151.—President, Albert Blais; Recording Secretary,
C. E. Youngs, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Teachers' Association (Vancouver Secondary), Local No.
709.—Secretary-Treasurer, William Alsbury, 2772 East
Fifth Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Teachers' Association (Vancouver Elementary), Local
No. 888.—Secretary-Treasurer, L. C. Curtis, 2005 West
Forty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — President, J. Phillipson;
Financial Secretary, W. A. Wilander, 4027 West
Thirty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen, Helpers (Miscellaneous Workers of America), International Brotherhood of, Local No. 351.—President, J. E. Dewar;
Recording Secretary, C. E. Youngs, 42 East Thirty-ninth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. F 124
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Terrazzo Mechanics, Local No. 4.—President, F. Austin;
Recording Secretary, N. A. Ferrero; 10080 Trans-
Canada Highway, North Surrey, B.C.
Textiles Union, Vancouver, Local No. 12.—President,
Grace Cheyne; Financial Secretary, Annie Armstrong,
3535 Vimy Crescent, Vancouver, B.C.
Textile Workers' Industrial Union of British Columbia,
Local No. 221.—President, Frank Jaszai; Secretary-
Treasurer, W. Skurjat, 4275 Lynn Valley Road, North
Vancouver, B.C.
Theatre Employees Union, Local No. B-72.—President,
John R. Foster; Recording Secretary, Anne McLeod,
1535 Vine Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.
Theatrical and Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine Operators, International Alliance of, Local No.
118.—President, R. Martin; Recording Secretary, F. P.
Chamberlain, 4614 Linwood Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Tile Setters' Union, Local No. 3.—President, T. Anderson;
Representative, D. P. Ewan, 4116 Dominion Street,
North Burnaby, B.C.
Tile Setters' Helpers' Union, Local No. 78.—President, C.
Campbell; Recording Secretary, J. Kotylak, 1096 West
Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Traffic Employees' Association, Trans-Canada Air Lines.—
Vice-Chairman, Malcolm Baillie; Recording Secretary,
Babs Smith, 2872 West Thirty-fourth Ave., Vancouver
13, B.C.
Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, General, Local No.
31.—President, W. M. Brown; Financial Secretary,
R. A. Lenfesty, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Truck Drivers', Building Material, Construction and Fuel
Truck Drivers' Union, Local No. 213.—President, A. A.
Medley; Recording Secretary, M. Boychuk, 490 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Trunk and Bag Industrial Workers' Union, Local No. 1.
—President, Wanda Newberger; Financial Secretary,
E. Eonomy, 2891 West Seventh Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Tunnel and Rock Workers Union, Local No. 168.—President, A. R. Andres; Recording Secretary, W. L. Hun-
chuk, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 226.—
President, H. T. Chambers; Financial Secretary, P.
Campbell, 1063 Adderley Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association, National.—President, Lome A. Haire; Recording Secretary, Miss M. E. Bassett, 1840 Robson Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Upholsterers' Industrial Union, Local No. 1.—President,
Walter Blumm; Recording Secretary, Clyde Ramsey,
2285 Kent Street, Vancouver 15, B.C.
Watchmakers' Union, Local 57, of the International
Jewelry Workers' Union, Local No. 57.—President,
Dorse McTaggart; Recording Secretary, Alexander
Marshall, 1765 West Tenth Ave., Vancouver 9, B.C.
Telephone Workers, B.C. Federation of, Local No. 639.—
President, C. Q. Cole; Recording Secretary, Mrs. M.
Burton, 2324 Jones Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.
Warehousemen, General, Union of, Local No. 842.—
President, Edward Green; Recording Secretary, Ruby
Breeze, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Woodworkers' Union, British Columbia, Local No. 9.—
President, William J. Pierce; Recording Secretary, A.
Duff, 501 Vancouver Block, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-71.—
President, Frank Howard; Recording Secretary-Treasurer, Fred Fieber, 18 West Hastings Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-217.
—President, Lloyd D. Whalen; Representative, Harry
Bardsley, 425 Beatrice Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Vanderhoof
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
G. W. Graham; Secretary, C. Wall, B.C. Forest Service, Vanderhoof, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, Local No. 2.—Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. M. M. Macdonald, Vanderhoof, B.C.
Vernon
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1346.—President, W. A. Wilde; Recording Secretary, W. J. Forsyth, Vernon, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2861.—President, Edward Munk; Financial Secretary, Michael Sherba, R.R. 3, Vernon, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 326.—President, Thomas G. Chase; Recording Secretary, I. F.
Bickert, 3908 Thirty-first Street, Vernon, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. — President,
W. H. Rappel; Recording Secretary, Miss L. E. Carl,
Vernon, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 821.—President, Gordon Kelly; Recording Secretary, W. S. Cawsey, 4409 Twenty-ninth Street, Vernon,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
Alex. Craig; Secretary, W. H. Neufield, Staff, Home
for the Aged, Vernon, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No.
102.—President, F. Squire; Recording Secretary, Robt.
W. Hodgson, 2000 Thirty-first Street, Vernon, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Okanagan
Valley, Local No. 953.—President, H. Locks; Recording Secretary, K. M. Little, 3005 Thirtieth Street, Vernon, B.C.
Plumbing, Pipe Fitting Apprentices' and Journeymen's
Association, Local No. 423.—President, Bruce Gow,
General Delivery, Vernon, B.C.; Recording Secretary,
Alex. Frick, R.R. 3, Vernon, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
H. H. Wadsworth; Recording Secretary, W. E. Rutler,
R.R. 3, Vemon, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. E.
Hamilton,  3305  Twenty-second Street,  Vernon,  B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 541.—
President, J. R. Appleton; Recording Secretary, N. L.
Duncan, 130 Hermyn Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association, National.—President, J. H. Hamilton; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Vera M. Billard, Vernon, B.C.
Victoria
Automotive Maintenance Workers' Union, Local No. 151.
—President, Tom Emerson; Recording Secretary, Herbert Smith, 240 Robert Street, Victoria, B.C.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union
of America, Local No. 267.—President, William Bruce
Mclntyre; Recording Secretary, Robert Leach, 905
Ellery Street, Victoria, B.C.
Barbers, Hairdressers, Cosmetologists and Proprietors,
International Union of America, Journeymen, Local No.
372.—President, R. A. Moore; Recording Secretary, A.
Masters, 3087 Irma Street, Victoria, B.C.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders, Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191.—President, Richard Lewis; Recording Secretary, George Taylor, 3782 Tillicum Road, Victoria,
B.C.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 147.
—President, Miss J. Blackstock; Recording Secretary,
R. Foster. 2021 Carnarvon Street, Victoria, B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Malt, Yeast, Soft Drink and
Distillery Workers of America, International Union of
United, Local No. 280.—President, T. Johnson; Recording Secretary, G. Parker, 2696 Tillicum Road, Victoria,
B.C.
Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union,
Local No. 2.—President, Harold Day; Financial Secretary, J. Beckerley, 3965 Saanich Road, Victoria, B.C.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, Shipyard Riggers, Benchmen and Helpers, International
Association of, Local No. 643.—President, D. A. Campbell; Financial Secretary, Andrew Mason, 3981 Douglas
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Building Service Employees' International Union, Local
No. 379.—President, Oliver Speed; Recording Secretary, A. P. Rayment, 615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria,
B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 125
Building Construction and General Labourers Union,
Local No. 1093.—President, John Gallow; Recording
Secretary, Stephen Fairbanks, 615 Pandora Avenue,
Victoria, B.C.
Burial Park Employees' Federal Union, Royal Oak, Local
No. 479.—President, R. Ponsford; Recording Secretary,
L. E. Jones, 3850 Rowland Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 786.—President, William Webb; Recording Secretary, Gordon Newell, 615 Pandora Avenue,
Victoria, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1598.—President, E. J. Tait, Happy Valley Road; Recording Secretary, A. Learn, 855 Selkirk
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2415.—President, A. Haines; Recording
Secretary, C. Bellhouse, Room 101, 615 Pandora
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2527. — President, George Stevens;
Recording Secretary, Michael Harris, 615 Pandora
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Chemical and Explosives Workers' Industrial Union,
Canadian, Local No. 128.—President, R. C. Barrie;
Recording Secretary, C. R. Nunn, Lochside Road,
Saanichton P.O., B.C.
City Hall Employees, Victoria, Local No. 388.—President,
David W. R. Smith; Recording Secretary, Roy Stewart,
c/o Comptroller, Treasury Department, City Hall, Victoria, B.C.
Civilian Workers Federal Union, National Defence, Local
No. 129.—President, Frank Gibbins; Recording Secretary, Geo. S. Pottingale, 215 Suzanne Place, Victoria,
B.C.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, Local No. 50.—
President, L. P. Anderson; Financial Secretary, J. A.
Bleackley, 2567 Prior Street, Victoria, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Victoria Local
Council.—President, E. G. Harvey; Recording Secretary, Miss Lily B. Northam, 2644 Rose Street, Victoria,
B.C.
Municipal Employees' Union, Esquimalt, Local No. 333.—
President, Kenneth Avery; Recording Secretary, John
Edward Cooper, 1164 Esquimalt Road, Esquimalt, B.C.
Dock and Shipyard Workers' Union, Local No. 1204.—
President, N. P. Specht; Recording Secretary, W. W.
Prosky, 920 Russell Street, Victoria, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 230.—President, Percy Daggitt; Recording Secretary, J. A. Driscoll, 603 Pandora Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
Steve Crothers; Secretary, W. H. Sluggett, 3477 Saanich
Road, Victoria, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
H. A. Bendall; Secretary, H. Ferguson, 912 Daffodil
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
L. C. Huck; Secretary, H. A. Carney, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Engineers, Operating, International Union of, Local No.
918.—President, John B. Speakman; Recording Secretary, Myles Carmichael, 2169 Fair Street, Victoria, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 730.
—President, Alfred Adamson; Recording Secretary, Eric
Simmons, 1523 Hillside Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Fire Fighters' Union, Federal, Esquimalt, Local No. 1.—
President, Earl M. Reynolds; Recording Secretary, J.
Taylor, 850 Snowdrop Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Government Employees, American Federation of, Local
No. 59.—President, Harold M. Larsen, P.O. Box 484,
Victoria, B.C.
Hospital Employees' Association (Royal Jubilee Hospital).
—President, Mrs. J. Callam; Secretary, Mrs. A. Mene-
ley, 2327 Florence Street, Victoria, B.C.
Hotel, Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 513.—President, T. Luscombe;
Recording Secretary, W. Haley, 1727 Kings Road, Victoria, B.C.
Iron Molders' and Foundry Workers' Union of North
America, International, Local No. 144.—President, William Bohme; Financial Secretary, Archie Clegg, 192
Helmcken Road, Victoria, B.C.
Lathers' International Union, Local No. 332.—President,
L. McKay; Financial Secretary, Mr. Westcott, 2849
Shelbourne Street, Victoria, B.C.
Laundry Workers' Union, Local No. 1. — President, C.
Parker; Financial Secretary, M. C. Milley, 2913 Austin
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 11.—
President, Victor Sanderson; Recording Secretary, David
Slater, 1630 Oakland Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Library Staff Association, Victoria Public, Local No. 410.
—President, Miss Dora Payne; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Bertha Thompson, Victoria, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 501.—
President, George Foster; Financial Secretary, Austin
Craven, 805 Wentworth Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 690.—President, J. E. Wilkinson; Recording
Secretary, A. T. Thompsett, 1161 Burdett Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Machinists', Fitters' and Helpers' Union, Local No. 3.—
President, M. Leachman; Recording Secretary, W. Jes-
sop, 2423 Hamiota Street, Victoria, B.C.
Mailers' Union, Victoria, Local 121.—President, A. M.
Watson; Financial Secretary, C. H. Miller, 1961 Watson Street, Victoria, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 2824.—President, G. Ferrier; Recording Secretary,
A. Milke, 170 Crease Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Marine Engineers, Incorporated National Association of,
Local No. 6.—President, J. Y. Sinclair; Recording Secretary, A. J. Ascroft, 2346 Arbutus Road, R.R. 5,
Victoria, B.C.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, Local No. 247.—
President, B. Anderson; Recording Secretary, V. R.
Butler, 1534 Hampshire Road, Victoria, B.C.
Newspaper Guild, Victoria, Federal Union, Local No.
219.—President, L. M. Sallaway; Recording Secretary,
D. G. Ingham, 2631 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.
Office Employees' Association, B.C. Electric, Local No.
300.—President, A. A. Playfair; Treasurer, D. Stewart,
713 Oliver Street, Victoria, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1163.—President, W. H. Rivers;
Recording Secretary, L. Bruntlett, Room 101, 615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
367.—President, James L. Misner; Recording Secretary,
Ronald L. Jarrett, 1250 Denman Street, Victoria, B.C.
Plasterers and Cement Masons International Association,
Operative, Local No. 450.—President, Leslie H. Calvert;
Recording Secretary, John F. Crooks, 1168 Caledonia
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of United States and
Canada, Journeymen and Apprentices of the, United
Association of, Local No. 324. — President, D. H.
Recording Secretary, E. J. Erb, 2546 Scott Street,
Victoria, B.C.
Police Federal Union, Victoria City, Local No. 251.—
President, Lome Shandley; Recording Secretary, Roy
Foster, 3152 Mars Street, Victoria, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President, G.
Somner; Recording Secretary, J. Bunker, 2415 Quadra
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Local No. 79.—
President, William Inglis; Recording Secretary, F. H.
Larsen, 1236 McKenzie Street, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 613.—
President, J. A. Stone; Recording Secretary, A. E.
Mummery, 853 Queens Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
50.—President, F. McLaughlin; Financial Secretary,
M. Baker, 340 Grange Road, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 222.—President, C. A.
Erwin; Recording Secretary, R. E. Tebo, 1480 Thur-
low Road, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 234.—President, L. A.
McClung; Financial Secretary, R. A. Fletcher, 715
Johnson Street, Victoria, B.C. F 126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Division 276.—President, Bruno
Carl Nickel; Recording Secretary, Richard Little, 1535
York Place, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Steamship Clerks, Brotherhood of, Island Lodge,
Local No. 1,137.—President, Ralph Moore; Financial
Secretary, Arthur Knott, 1250 Rockland Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Pacific Lodge,
Local No. 2320.—President, F. E. Whale; Recording
Secretary, S. Morse, 611 Battery Street, Victoria, B.C.
School Board Employees' Association, Greater Victoria,
Local No. 382.—President, S. J. Sweeney; Recording
Secretary, A. L. Grover, P.O. Box 295, Victoria, B.C.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 276.—President, John W. Quisey; Recording Secretary, H. Weydert, 3301 Quadra Street, Victoria, B.C.
Shipyard Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 493.—
President, Thomas Hammond; Recording Secretary,
George E. Hardy, 3920 Prestwood, Victoria, B.C.
Shipwrights, Joiners and Caulkers' Industrial Union,
Local No. 9.—President, N. Russell; Recording Secretary, Don Douglas, 1338 Wood Street, Victoria, B.C.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Division 109.—
President, J. W. McNeill; Recording Secretary, J. F.
Belton, 1972 Bouchier Street, Victoria, B.C.
Teamsters' Union, General, Local No. 885.—President,
S. Mclnnes; Recording Secretary, G. Estes, 3011 Colquitz Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, Local No. 84.—Secretary-Treasurer,
Mrs. J. E. Heintzman, Bennett Road, R.R. 1, Victoria,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation (Greater) Victoria, Local No. 3.—
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss K. M. Thompson, 832 Link-
leas Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Theatrical, Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine
Operators, International Alliance of, Local No. 168.—
President, R. A. Jones; Recording Secretary, A. C.
Archer, 2101 Allenby Street, Victoria, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 201.—
President, William Richardson; Recording Secretary,
Herbert Warren, 2218 Beach Drive, Victoria, B.C.
Water District, Greater Victoria, Employees' Federal
Union, Local No. 598.—President, W. B. Eden; Recording Secretary, W. P. Bays, 385 Davida Avenue,
Victoria, B.C.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Victoria and District,
Local No. 560.—President, Gordon C. Richards; Financial Secretary, W. Norman Scott, 613 Pandora Avenue,
Victoria, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-118.
—President, J. MacKenzie; Recording Secretary, S.
Cook, 715 Johnson Street, Victoria, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association, National.—President, Humphrey Loudon; Recording Secretary, Miss Eleanor Nagel, 1039 Johnson Street, Victoria, B.C.
Wells
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 685.—Financial Secretary, A. McLean, Wells,
B.C.
West Summerland
Lumber and Sawmill Workers Union, Local No. 2742.—
President, Harold Weins; Recording Secretary, T. F.
Reid, Box 145, West Summerland, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, A. B.
Brandon, West Summerland, B.C.
West Vancouver
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 395.—
President, H. W. Davison; Recording Secretary, J. M.
Smeal, 2452 Haywood Avenue, West Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 124.—Secretary-
Treasurer, Miss A. Polishchuk, 1250 Mathers Avenue,
West Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, K. Jackson, Box 614, Westview, B.C.
White Rock
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, B.C., Border
Peace Arch Local.—President, R. C. Barton, Curtis
Road, R.R. 4, White Rock, B.C.; Recording Secretary,
Geo. S. Hill, 2788 Stayte Road, R.R. 4, White Rock,
B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
C. C. Netherton; Financial Secretary, John Dilworth,
Sunnyside Road, R.R. 4, White Rock, B.C.
Williams Lake
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
C. H. Barlow; Secretary, Douglas Matthew, Williams
Lake, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. B.
Cassan, Box 522, Williams Lake, B.C.
Woodfibre
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 494.—President, A. Weldron;
Recording Secretary, R. F. Maitland, Box 65, Wood-
fibre, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
F 127
Organizations of Employers
Calgary
Coal Operators' Association of Western Canada.—President, S. C. McMullen; Secretary, S. W. Foss, 204
Albert Block, Calgary, Alta.
Kelowna
Fruit   Growers'   Association.—President,   A.   R.   Carrish;
Secretary, J. McLennan, Okanagan Mission, B.C.
Shippers'  Association,  Okanagan Federated. ■— President,
K. W. Kinnard;  Secretary, L. R. Stephens, 1485 Water
Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Penticton
Co-operative Growers, Penticton.—President, W. H. Morris; Secretary, D. G. Penny, 249 Main Street, Penticton,
B.C.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior.—Secretary,
L. J. A. Rees, 639 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.
Prince George
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior.—President,
F. W. Dobson; Secretary, R. J. Gallagher, Room 305,
1705 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Vancouver
Automotive Retailers' Association.—President, C. J. Hor-
wood; Secretary, J. L. Kinneard, 1687 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
Bakers' Association, British Columbia.—President, B. M.
Colwell; Secretary, W. G. Welsford, 199 East Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Building and Construction Industries' Exchange of British
Columbia.—President, C. W. Leek, Leek & Company
Ltd.; Secretary, Harold Cole, 342 West Pender Street,
Vancouver 3, B.C.
Contractors' Association, General.—L. J. Bennett; Secretary, Harold Cole, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver
3, B.C.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, S. C. Mur-
kin; Secretary, Fred Moore, 4368 Price Crescent, Vancouver, B.C.
Fisheries Association of British Columbia. — President,
J. M. Buchanan; Secretary, J. Macdonald, 510 Shelly
Building, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Fishermen's Independent Co-operative Association, British
Columbia.—President, J. K. Pope; Secretary, D. E.
Baker, 476 West Twenty-sixth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of British Columbia.
—President, Ante Boroevich; Secretary, H. A. Chris-
tianson, 7160 Kitchener Street, North Burnaby, B.C.
Graphic Arts Association of British Columbia.—President,
Peter E. Cromie; Secretary, Mrs. Audrey Andrew, 608,
355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Hairdressers' Association of British Columbia.—President,
Mrs. Ellen K. Smith; Secretary, Geo. R. Matthews,
605, 198 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hotels' Association, British Columbia. — President, C.
Oscar Matson; Secretary, E. V. F. Ely, 1307 West
Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver 13, B.C.
Industrial Association of British Columbia.—President,
W. L. Macken; Secretary, J. R. Edgett, 1024 Marine
Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).—President, Roy R. Campbell; Secretary, Reginald B. Deacon,
17 East Broadway, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners and Linen Supply Association,
Vancouver.—President, Frank Watson; Secretary, J. R.
Taylor, 300, llll West Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Loggers'Association (Inc.), British Columbia.—President,
Otis D. Hallin; Secretary, John N. Burke, Room 401,
550 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, British Columbia.—
President, L. L. G. Bentley; Secretary, N. R. Dusting,
302 Forest Industries Building, 550 Burrard Street,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
Manufacturers' Association, Inc. — President, Allan J.
McDonell; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608 Marine
Building, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Merchants Exchange Ltd., Vancouver.—President, E. G.
Shafer, Marine Building, Vancouver 1, B.C.; Secretary,
W. A. Sankey, Marine Building, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Milk Distributors' Association, Vancouver.—President,
A. W. Edgar; Secretary, A. W. Edgar, 1259 West
Thirty-second Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—President,
D. R. Nicholson; Secretary, J. J. Brown, Surrey Centre, B.C.
Millwork Institute, Mainland.—President, John F. Sigurdson, 1275 West Sixth Avenue; Secretary, Herbert F.
Fleming, 75 Peveril Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Millwork Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver.—President, George Clarke; Secretary, Ronald H. Poole,
5980 Joyce Road, Vancouver 16, B.C.
Mining Association of British Columbia.—President, H. E.
Doelle; Secretary, R. W. Nesbitt, Room 506, 837 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Morticians, British Columbia Society of.—President, D. V.
Lock; Secretary, Mach Pallard, 8835 Hudson Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Motor Transport Labour Relations Council.—President,
J. S. McLean; Secretary, K. D. Large, 810, 207 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Retail Hardware Association, British Columbia.—President, J. Sarginsoll; Secretary, L. Cross, 6425 Fraser
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc. (B.C.
Division).—President, Roy C. Sim; Secretary, H. C.
Boulton, 225 Pemberton Building, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Restaurant Association, Canadian.—President, Nick Con-
stabaris; Secretary, Philip H. Edgcumbe, 130 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Road Builders' and Heavy Construction Association.—
President, Graham R. Dawson; Secretary, D. J. Baldwin, Rooms 1 and 2, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Sheet Metal Association of British Columbia.—President,
Donald F. Donson; Secretary, Maurice L. Tucker,
2446 West Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Shingle Association of British Columbia. — President,
W. J. Pullin; Secretary, Miss Marion E. Welte, 202,
550 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia.—President,
R. M. Mather; Secretary, T. G. Phillips, 45 Dunlevy
Avenue, Vancouver 4, B.C.
Truck Loggers' Association.—President, J. E. Fletcher;
Secretary, T. T. Novis, 19, 425 Howe Street, Vancouver
1,B.C.
Truck and Construction Equipment Operators of British
Columbia.—President, A. B. Cicozzi; Secretary, Leonard T. Frost, 924 West Seventeenth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Victoria
Automobile Dealers Association.—President, David Law-
son; Secretary, Roy T. Lougheed, 816 Wharf Street,
Victoria, B.C.
Beer Licensees Employers' Association.—President, John
J. Puhack; Secretary, W. L. Gouge, 156 View Royal
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Building Industries' Exchange, Victoria.—President, W. B.
Dillabough; Secretary, Roy T. Lougheed, 816 Wharf
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Electrical Association (B.C.), Victoria.—President, Colin
Fensham; Secretary, P. M. Chiswell, 2311 Shakespeare
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.—President, C. Rawlings; Secretary, A. N. Westwood, c/o
Bus Depot, Broughton Street, Victoria, B.C. F 128
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Control of Employment of Children
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour or a
person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of children under
15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is prohibited by the
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
In order that the health and scholastic standing of the children will not be adversely
affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in close co-operation
with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the children. Permits are
issued only when it has been established that the child's health will not suffer, and that
the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere with their
standing at school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for
which permits are required; these include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor-power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations-
(11) Transportation industry-
(12) Laundry, cleaning and dyeing industry (added August 26th, 1955)-
The following table contains a summary of permits issued from January 1st to
December 31st, 1955, inclusive:—
Summary o
f Permits Issued for Year T955
District
Vancouver
Victoria
Cranbrook
Kamloops
Kelowna
Nelson
Prince
George
Smithers
Total
Boys   	
Girls 	
121
10
59
11
2
1
1
3
13
4
201
24
Totals 	
131
70      1        2
1
1                3
13
4
225
Manufacturing   	
6
1
3
10
9
96
2
4
6
2
12
28
19
1
2
1
1
li
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
4
2
4
18
1
Logging   	
1
6
23
38
126
Service-station 	
Transportation  	
6
6
131
70
2
1
1
3
13
4
225 " EQUAL PAY ACT '
F  129
Equal Pay Act
Section 4 of the Act provides that the Minister of Labour may, on the recommendation of the Director, designate an Industrial Relations Officer to inquire into the
complaint of a person that she has been discriminated against in that she has been paid
at a rate of pay less than the rate of pay paid to a male employee employed by her
employer for the same work done in the same establishment.
Five complaints made in 1954 were referred to the Board of Industrial Relations.
Following the hearing held by the Board, the Minister of Labour issued orders in favour
of the complainants.
There were two complaints received by the Director during the calendar year 1955,
both of which were settled by Industrial Relations Officers appointed by the Minister.
Summary of Proceedings under (he " Equal Pay Act " during 1954 and 1955
1954
Complaints
Employers
Involved
1955
Complaints
Employers
Involved
Complaints received   	
Complaints referred to Industrial Relations Officers _
Complaints settled by Industrial Relations Officers	
Complaints referred to the Board	
Complaints withdrawn  _ 	
27i
25
17
1
1 In the case of one complaint the Act did not apply. F 130 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Factories Inspection Branch
Administrative office    -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Robert M. Purdie     - Chief Inspector of Factories.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection
Branch for the year 1955.
Factories
The steady growth of industry in the Province continued throughout the year 1955.
Many new factories have been erected and extensive alterations have been made to
existing plants.
An inspectional tour of the Kitimat and Kemano sites proved that the Province is
fast becoming a leader in industry. The smelter at Kitimat was hardly in operation when
plans were made to increase production, which entailed the building of more pot-lines,
the development of more electrical power, and the employment of many more men to
erect the necessary buildings. Acres of buildings to-day stand where just a few years
ago mud-flats were to be seen. The pot-lines are erected on thousands of yards of
gravel fill, while the townsite is hewn out of virgin forest land. When the proposed
additions to the smelter are completed, this plant will be the largest of its type in the
world. The power plant at Kemano, which supplies the electricity for the smelter and
adjoining districts, is constructed in the heart of a mountain hundreds of feet underground. One enters this power plant by a wide paved road. It is hard to realize
millions of yards of earth and rock have been excavated to house the components of
this plant. The finished walls, tiled floors, lighting, and ventilation all add to the
completeness of this project. In 1955 a railroad was completed from Kitimat to
Terrace, thus providing a land link to the northern main line.
Around Vancouver and vicinity, steady industrial growth has taken place- Factories
are being built on the Grandview and Lougheed Highways, on Lulu Island, on Annacis
Island, and on the North Shore. Many of these are new industries in the Province.
A major part of the Factory Inspector's time has been taken up with inspections, consultations, and in giving help and advice in planning for adequate ventilation, lunchrooms, washrooms, and locker facilities, thus providing a service much appreciated by
the various firms concerned.
Industrial Homework
Permits authorizing industrial homework to be performed in the home were held
to a minimum. Improved factories and working conditions, holiday pay, and good
supervision have a tendency to discourage a worker from applying for a permit, which
makes the task of the Inspector lighter.
Inspection of Elevators
Elevator inspection continues to take up the major part of the Inspectors' time.
The number of elevators in the Province is increasing. However, it is not the new
installations that are creating the problems.   The older types of elevators, after years of INSPECTION OF FACTORIES F 131
wear, are an ever-increasing responsibility. To keep this type of equipment in safe
operating condition, the inspection must be of a most rigid nature. On older types of
elevators the wear of the worms and gears, while not dangerous, can cause rough operation. Back-lash in gears results in jerky starting and stopping, throwing undue strain
on cable sockets and fastenings, car suspension members, and stay-bolts. This shortens
the life of the elevator. When these conditions develop, the Inspector usually gives the
owner the benefit of his experience. He will recommend that gears be renewed or, if
the installation is of a very old type, recommend an entirely new installation. In large
new buildings the trend now is to operator-less elevators. However, where elderly
people and children are transported, such as in department stores, operators are still
needed.
A major change in the policy of the Branch was brought about by an Order in
Council (No. 1522) approved lune 18th, 1955. A fee for every elevator inspection,
except in a hospital, was to be charged.   The fees are as follows:—
Inspection
of New Any Other
Installation Inspection
Passenger-elevator  $10.00 $5.00
Freight-elevator  10.00 5.00
Escalator or moving stairway  4.00 2.00
Dumb-waiter   6.00 3.00
Man-lift  6.00 3.00
Hand-power elevator  8.00 4.00
The extra work in planning, designing, and procuring the necessary ledgers, invoice
forms, receipt forms, and taking care of all the details necessary to implement this Order
in Council was ably handled by the Branch staff. The staff are to be commended for
their efforts.
We are again proud to state that no fatal or serious accident occurred in the elevator
field in this Province during the past year.
The following are the pertinent facts regarding the year's activities for 1955:—
Elevator Inspections
Passenger-elevators   604
Escalators  51
Freight-elevators  697
Hydraulic elevators  68
Hand-power elevators  80
Dumb-waiters  150
Man-lifts    38
Reinspections   190
TotaL .  1,878
New Elevator Installations
Plans Received
Passenger-elevators  42
Freight-elevators  27
Dumb-waiters  12
Total  81
Of the above, nine were replacements. F 132 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Elevator Operators' Licences
Elevator operators' licences issued in  1955  totalled 2,033,  consisting of 417
temporary licences, 335 permanent licences, and 1,281 renewal licences.
Factory Inspections
Factory inspections totalled 1,490, and child investigations, 10.
Conclusion
We take this opportunity to acknowledge the assistance given our Branch by other
Governmental departments and the continued co-operation of members of the staff.
Also we wish to thank all officials and employees connected with industry for their
co-operation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. M. Purdie,
Chief Inspector of Factories. APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH
F  133
Report of the Apprenticeship and
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch
Head office -      -----   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Branch office    -    Department of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
Hamilton Crisford      -      -   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Members:
T. McGibbon - -      -      -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J. Tucker - - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J. Walker- - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W. H. Welsh - -      -      -   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Edmund L. Allen
Director of Apprenticeship.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith tender a report of the activities of the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch for the year ending December 31st, 1955. In presenting
this report I wish to point out that the name of the Branch (formerly the Apprenticeship
Branch) was changed as a result of new legislation which you sponsored and which
received Royal assent on March 15th, 1955.
Changes in Legislation
On March 15th, 1955, a new Act, the "Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act," repealed the "Apprenticeship Act " which was passed in 1935. The new Act,
while retaining all the features of the previous legislation, has also enlarged the scope
of apprenticeship. It is still required of employers to register all apprentices in designated
trades, and still required that all minors in those trades be apprentices. In addition,
authority is given to arrange contracts of apprenticeship in trades not designated in the
Act when, in the opinion of the Director of Apprenticeship, an apprenticeship is desirable.
The Act designates the same trades as did the repealed Act, with one exception—
the trade of aviation mechanic was removed from the schedule. The trades designated
for apprenticeship training are as follows:—
Automotive maintenance.
Bartering.
Bricklaying.
Carpentry, joinery, and benchwork.
Electrical work.
Glassworking.
Jewellery manufacture and repair.
Lithography.
Machinist.
Metal trades—
(a) Boiler-making.
(fe) Pattern-making.
Moulder.
Office-machine mechanc.
Painting and decorating.
Plastering.
Plumbing and steam-fitting.
Refrigeration.
Service and repair of current-consuming
electrical appliances.
Sheet-metal work.
Ship- and boat-building industry.
Sign and pictorial painting.
Steel fabrication.
Watch-repairing. F  134
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The "Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act" goes further and provides for certificates of proficiency for tradesmen who previously had no opportunity
to be examined and certificated. The Lieutenant-Governor may specify by Order in
Council that certificates of proficiency be made available to qualified tradesmen in any
of the designated trades. There is no compulsion for a tradesman to obtain a certificate
of proficiency, and there is no interference with his right to engage in a trade without
a certificate. It does, however, provide for voluntary examination leading to certification.
General regulations were promulgated setting out a procedure to be followed in administering this section of the Act and covering the obligations of employers and apprentices.
Apprentices in Training
The registration and training of apprentices was not interrupted by the change in
legislation. The number of apprentices registered by the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's
Qualification Branch at December 31st, 1955, was 1,993. It is of interest to note that the
number of apprentices serving their first year of apprenticeship was 833, an increase of
more than 40 per cent over the previous year, and that the total number in training
showed an increase of more than 20 per cent over the previous year. Their distribution
by years and trades was as follows:—
Trade or Occupation and Length of
Apprenticeship in Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
First
Prob.      Reg,
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Completed
in
1955
Automotive maintenance (4)..
Bartering (2)	
Boiler-making (4)	
Bricklaying (4)	
Carpentry (4)„
Electrical work (4-5)..
Floorlaying (3) 	
Glassworking (4)	
Hairdressing (2)	
Jewellery work (5)	
Lathing (3)..
Lithography (2-6)	
Machinist and fitter (5)..
Moulding (4)_.
Office-machine mechanic (4)..
Painting and decorating (3)	
Pattern-making (5)	
Plastering (4)	
Plumbing and steam-fitting (4)..
Refrigeration (4 )  __ 	
Sheet-metal work (5)..
Ship and boat building (4)_.
Sign-painting (4) 	
Steel fabrication (4)	
Miscellaneous trades	
Total apprenticeships..
29
17
4
49
63
14
2
23
11
1
12
~T
5
1
17
28
2
29
4
2
4
5
323
90
46
11
1
72
29
2
2
31
3
4
7
52
3
10
13
1
12
45
3
41
9
3
12
510
42
5
2
57
45
3
14
7
32
3
6
6
1
11
39
1
31
4
3
3
1
324
73
69
65
1
4
33
3
8
9
3
2
38
2
31
10
2
12
3
388
48
12
4
64
97
2
40
1
3
3
2
42
1
31
7
369
13
46
79
282
63
39
19
311
312
16
11
68
5
24
21
215
10
28
36
11
44
192
9
176
34
10
39
18
1,993
56
44
3
4
25
20
2
26
1
6
39
2
1
5
2
15
31
2
14
14
1
6
2
321
Technical and Vocational Training
The school training programme continued to increase during the year. Evening
classes provided 87,018 student-hours of instruction. There were 1,712 enrolments in
111 different evening classes of trade theory and related subjects. The majority of these
classes were held in Vancouver and Victoria because of the concentration of apprentices
in those cities, but evening classes for apprentices were also conducted in Nanaimo,
Penticton, and Trail. APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH
F 135
Daytime school training was provided to 341 apprentices for a total of 51,892
student-hours of instruction. These classes were held in Nanaimo, Vancouver, and
Victoria, and apprentices were brought from all parts of the Province to these centres
for periods of one or two months. While attending the schools they were paid a subsistence allowance, and their return transportation was paid by the Branch. In many
instances, employers gave financial assistance to their apprentices when they were absent
from work to attend classes and in some cases trade-unions contributed financially to
the apprentices. As in the past two years, daytime instruction was given in the trades
of automotive maintenance, barbering, carpentry and joinery, sheet metal, and welding.
The daytime programme was expanded to include bricklaying, electrical work, lathing,
painting and decorating, and plastering.
The apprenticeship classes were conducted with the co-operation of the Department
of Education and city School Boards and were held in city and government schools
wherever possible. The demand on space for so much training was too great for the
schools to handle completely, and special arrangements were made with the board of
directors of the Pacific National Exhibition for the use of buildings at Exhibition Park
in Vancouver. This accommodation was only temporary and not altogether satisfactory.
In spite of the disadvantages of the temporary quarters, the success of the classes was
encouraging. Realizing the need for satisfactory permanent accommodation for these
classes, plans were made for a permanent building-trades centre, and it is expected that
a start will be made on construction soon.
Qualification of Tradesmen
The trade of refrigeration was specified for the purpose of issuing certificates of
proficiency by an Order in Council dated November 18th, 1955. A Trade Advisory
Committee and a Curriculum Committee did much work in the preparation of special
trade regulations and a course of study leading to examination. The employers and
trade-union offered excellent co-operation in preparing for the operation of the certification programme, and it is likely that we will soon be ready to proceed with examinations.
Representatives of the automotive trade also made application to have certificates
of proficiency issued in that trade. Because of the size of the trade and the number of
organizations within the trade, a great deal of time will be required to work out the
details of certificating. Discussions have already been held with some of the organizations, and work is continuing in preparation for eventual certification.
Supervision and Promotion of Apprenticeship
The continued development of the resources of the Province occasioned a sharp
increase in construction and an obvious need for more trained men in the future. More
apprentices were engaged and more demands were made on the Apprenticeship and
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch for special training to advance apprentices for this
important work. That recently graduated apprentices were moved into responsible
positions is gratifying to observe.
Much time was spent in counselling young men and employers and in arranging
apprenticeships and co-ordinating technical and job training. High schools asked for
and received the services of the Apprenticeship Counsellors. Student groups and student
counsellors were informed of apprenticeship conditions and opportunities. The Branch
co-operated as usual with the National Employment Service and Unemployment Insurance Commission of the Federal Department of Labour in counselling youth and
apprenticeship placement. This work has proven valuable in directing young men to
the right type of work. F  136 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The volume of counselling work has grown to such an extent that routine visits
to apprentices and employers were necessarily curtailed this year. For the first time
in many years it was not possible to visit every apprentice on the job, although the
majority of their employers were interviewed. Assistance was obtained from the
Industrial Relations Officers of the Board of Industrial Relations. These Officers, in the
course of their regular inspections, reported to the Director regarding wage rates and
registration of minors. In some instances they drew attention to the need for the services
of an Apprenticeship Counsellor. To give them an insight into the main features of
apprenticeship, the Industrial Relations Officers were conducted through the Vancouver
Vocational Institute, and most of them also spent a period of time with an Apprenticeship Counsellor visiting employers and apprentices on the job.
Committee Meetings
The Provincial Apprenticeship Committee met on six occasions during the year
and, after due consideration, approved 847 new apprenticeship contracts. It also
recommended that certificates of apprenticeship be issued to persons who completed
their training.
The Director of Apprenticeship attended meetings of Apprenticeship Trade Advisory Committees and Vocational Education Committees. Committee members have
done a great deal of work toward revising the training curriculums for apprenticeship
classes to ensure that the courses are kept in line with present-day requirements.
Working closely with the Department of Education on matters relating to technical
and vocational training is resulting in co-ordination of training for the needs of industry.
Conclusion
The increased activity of the past few years continued throughout 1955, and there
is every indication that the future will call for an even greater expansion of our
operations. The urgent need for skilled men can best be met by vocational training
co-ordinated with apprenticeship. That employers and trade-unions recognize this fact
is indicated by the co-operation they are extending to our training programme. This
year it has become evident that more vocational-training facilities are required, and so
it is hoped that in the coming year we will see an expansion of our facilities.
Edmund L. Allen,
Director of Apprenticeship. TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH
Report of the
Trade-schools Regulation Branch
F 137
Administrative offices
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Officers
Chairman: Members:
Hamilton Crisford. Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Edmund L. Allen.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch
for the calendar year 1955.
The majority of schools were contacted this year and made conversant with our Act
and regulations, and the number of complaints dealt with was small.
The following is the list of registered schools:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Modern
business course, special elective course.
American School of Correspondence, Drexel Avenue at East Fifty-eighth Street,
Chicago 37, 111.: Engineering and commerce subjects as covered by the school
bulletin.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.: Civil, mechanical, electrical, radio, aeronautical engineering,
and other groups as per school bulletin " Engineering Opportunities."
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 Sixteenth Street North-west, Washington 5, D.C: Radio-electronic engineering.
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second
Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.: Diesel and auto mechanics, refrigeration and air-
conditioning, oxy-acetylene and electric welding.
The Creative School of Art Ltd., 12522 One Hundred and Second Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.: Showcard-writing (including the art of lettering, silk-screen processing, air-brush technique in connection with illustrative art).
School of Creative Photography Ltd., 935 Weston Road, Toronto 9, Ont.: Photography.
Columbia Business Institute, 301 Financial Center Building, 233 South-west Sixth
Avenue, Portland 4, Ore.: Rairoad telegraphy.
DeVry Technical Institute, Inc., 2533 North Ashland Avenue, Chicago 14, 111.:
Television, radio, and electronic training.
Famous Artists Schools, 106 Adelaide Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial art,
painting.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian Limited, 7475 Sherbrooke Street
West, Montreal, Que.: Art, architecture, business training, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, general education, mechanical
engineering, mining, railroading, domestic engineering, navigation, pulp and
paper making, textile manufacture, and other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
111.: Accountancy.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, 111.: Business
Management, higher accountancy, La Salle salesmanship, practical bookkeeping, traffic management, law, stenotypy (less machine), foremanship and F 138 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
production methods, industrial management, and other courses as per prospectus.
M.C.C. Schools, 303 Mitchell-Copp Building, Winnipeg 1, Man.: Kindergarten,
commercial home study.
National Radio Institute, Inc., Sixteenth and U Streets North-west, Washington,
D.C: Practical radio and television servicing and professional television
servicing.
National Schools, 4000 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles 37, Calif.: Diesel, automotive, and allied mechanics; radio, television, and electronics; advanced
television.
Radio College of Canada, 86 Bathurst Street, Toronto 2b, Ont.: Applied radio and
television, radio communications, radio and television technology, radio engineering, television servicing.
Shaw Schools Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial course, short-
story writing, stationary engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Wireless telegraphy, railroad telegraphy, radio and television servicing.
Television-Electronics Institute Ltd., 935a Weston Road, Toronto 9, Ont.: Television and radio service and repair.
Tractor Training Service, 406 Panama Building, Portland 4, Ore.: Tractor and
equipment training.
Utilities Engineering Institute, 2525 North Sheffield Avenue, Chicago 14, 111.: Auto
body and fender, diesel, mechanical refrigeration, air-conditioning, refrigeration
and heating, and scientific motor tune-up, diesel and scientific motor tune-up,
welding.
Autolec National Educational Master & Group Program, 1025 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.: Automotive electricity, carburetion, and tune-up.
The Barclay's Dance Studio, 720 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Professional
dancing.
Bel-Parker Business College, 1574 West Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
B.C. School of Floral Design, 2523 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.: Floral
designing.
B.C. Tree Fruits Limited, Kelowna, B.C.:  Fruit-packing.
British Columbia Advanced Hair Design School, 768 Granville Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.:  Advanced hairdressing.
Carlyle Schools Limited, 640 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Physicians' office
assistants.
Central Business College, 8 Dahlstrom Building, 19 Nowell Street, Chilliwack, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Canadian Crafts, B 10, 510 Hastings Street West, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Leathercraft.
Clayton School of Journalism, 511 Province Building, 198 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 3, B.C.:  Journalism.
Club and Cabaret and Construction Camp, Culinary and Service Employees' Union,
Local No. 740, Bar-tending School, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3,
B.C.: Bar-tending.
The Comptometer School, 308 Randall Building, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Comptometer operation.
Duffus School of Business Ltd., 522 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal development and modelling. TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH
F 139
■
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Dressmaking,
designing and pattern-making, tailoring, millinery.
Fine Arts Studio, 910, 441 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Fine art.
Fine Arts School and Gallery, 1666 Robson Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Fine art.
Fenton Commercial Schools Ltd., 2015 West Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver 13,
B.C.:  Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
General Business School Ltd., 602 Broughton Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Georgian House School of Charm, 938 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal
development and modelling.
Gondo's Sewing School, 779 Cadder Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Herbert Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Kinman Business University, Howard Street at First Avenue, Spokane, Wash.:
Business education.
Lownds School of Commerce Ltd., 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd Willton School of Ladies Haircutting, 1107 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.: Ladies'haircutting.
Maxine Beauty School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Mikie Designing and Dressmaking Academy, 711 East Hastings Street, Vancouver
4, B.C.: Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Moler Barber School, 615 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.:  Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Arthur Murray Studios (Canada) Ltd., 646 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:
Professional dancing.
Mount Royal College, 1135 Seventh Avenue, Calgary Alta.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, 3300 Thirty-first Street, Vernon, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nelson Commercial Training School, 701 Front Street, Nelson, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
O.K. Valley Hairdressing School, 453 Lawrence Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Olga's School of Hairdressing, 3201 Tronson Avenue, Vernon, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Penticton College of Commerce, 19 Craig Building, 221 Main Street, Penticton,
B.C.:   Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College Ltd., 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Prince George Business College, 1330 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Royal Business College, 2509 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
H. Faulkner Smith School of Applied and Fine Art, 3842 Oak Street, Vancouver 9,
B.C.:   Commercial art.
Sprott-Shaw Schools (Vancouver) Ltd., 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), wireless telegraphy, railroad telegraphy, radio and television servicing. F 140 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Sprott-Shaw (Victoria) Business Institute Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria,
B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental), Elmer Wheeler
sales course.
St. Ann's Convent, Commercial Department, Nanaimo, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Success Business College, 2350 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Paul's School of Dressmaking and Designing, 255 Dunlevy Street, Vancouver 4,
B.C.:  Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Sun Electric Technician's Course, 1100 Venables Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.:
Automotive testing.
Speedwriting School, Castlegar, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.:
Stationary, marine, and diesel engineering.
Victoria Hairdressing School, 738 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Welding Construction School, 148 East First Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Welding.
Western Radio Academy, 1451 Burnaby Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Radio broadcasting.
Western Radio Electronic Television Schools Ltd., 1065 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:  Radio, electronics, television.
Western School of Commerce, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Office
occupations  (commercial and governmental), Elmer Wheeler sales course.
Edmund L. Allen,
Administrative Officer. ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS F 141
Provincial Advisory Committee
on Indian Affairs
Head office ------    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Committee
Chairman:
Professor Ellis H. Morrow, B.A., M.B.A.,
F.C.I., LL.D. ------    Vancouver.
Vice-Chairman:
Chief William D. Scow      - Alert Bay.
Members:
Edward N. Bolton      ----- Port Essington.
Ernest Brewer   ------ Vernon.
Capt. Charles Cates   ----- North Vancouver.
Lawrence P. Guichon, D.Sc    - Quilchena.
Secretary
Miss Joanna R. Wright - Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Sixth Annual Report of the Provincial
Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1955.
During the past year, members of the Advisory Committee have been greatly encouraged by evidence of increasing interest in Indian affairs. Not since the inception of
the Committee have matters relating to the social and economic welfare of the Indians
figured so largely in the press, on the radio, or in the thoughts of the public as they did
during 1955.
The voice of the native citizens of this Province is also being heard with a new
emphasis, and is being listened to with respect and sympathy by fellow Canadians.
The Advisory Committee is conscious of an awakening sense of responsible leadership among the Indians, who in many districts are showing a tendency to take part in the
industrial and community life of the Province.
Even in remote areas of British Columbia, where the Indians have been cut off from
close or continuing contact with western civilization, they are being attracted to it by the
availability of good wages, educational facilities, and new interests.
The role of the Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs during this period
of integration was given considerable thought at its recent meeting in Victoria.
Meeting of the Committee
The meeting of the Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs, which took place in the
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, from November 1st to 3rd, was considered by members
to be its most successful and eventful conference. This was largely due to the extent of
public interest shown in subjects under discussion, to the practical nature of suggestions
for progressive action made by guest speakers, and to the number of recommendations
pertinent to current problems which were submitted to the Minister of Labour at the close
of the meeting by the Advisory Committee. F  142 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The Honourable W. A. C Bennett, Premier of British Columbia, in speaking to
the members on November 2nd, paid tribute to the work being done by the Provincial
Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs, and gave assurance of the Government's continuing support in the task yet to be accomplished of integrating the Indian people into the
life of the Province.
Members of the Committee expressed appreciation that the Honourable the Minister
of Labour was able to attend all sessions of the meeting, and derived valuable assistance
and guidance in their deliberations from his opening address calling for information and
advice on specific subjects.
Capt. John Cates, former Minister of Labour, under whom the Provincial Advisory
Committee was formed, was invited to attend the meeting; also Mr. Donald Robinson,
M.L.A. for Lillooet, in whose constituency there is a large Indian population.
The Honourable Kenneth Kiernan, Minister of Agriculture, and his Deputy Minister,
Mr. W. McGillivray, addressed the meeting on November 2nd, when Mr. W. S. Arneil,
Federal Commissioner for Indian Affairs in British Columbia, also was present and took
part in the subsequent discussions.
Other guest speakers included Mrs. E. Evans, president of the Home and School
Parent-Teacher Federation of Canada; Mr. J. V. Boys, Superintendent of the Cowichan
Indian Agency, Vancouver Island; Mr. J. A. Sadler, Director of Welfare in the Provincial
Department of Health and Welfare; and Mr. A. C. Bachelor, Regional Consultant for
Vancouver Island of the Community Programmes Branch in the Department of Education. Miss J. E. M. Bruce and Miss V. Ashdown, representing the B.C. Indian Arts and
Welfare Society, were also present.
A reception took place at Government House on the afternoon of November 1st,
when the members of the Advisory Committee were introduced to the new Lieutenant-
Governor, the Honourable Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C The role of the
Committee was discussed with the Lieutenant-Governor, who showed great interest in
its work and offered his support in its future endeavours.
The Advisory Committee was entertained that evening by the B.C. Indian Arts and
Welfare Society. Members of the Committee were invited to speak, and expressed
unanimous accord with the work which the society has done in the past and is planning
for the future.
At a dinner held on November 2nd, given by the Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister
of Labour, and members of the Advisory Committee to a number of distinguished guests,
Mr. Wilson Duff, Anthropologist of the Provincial Museum, was guest speaker. In his
address Mr. Duff outlined the work which is being undertaken by the Provincial Department of Education to preserve and perpetuate native art and culture in British Columbia.
Films were shown of the traditional dances performed at Alberni, Vancouver Island,
B.C., by Indians wearing authentic masks and costumes.
A letter of appreciation was sent by members of the Advisory Committee to Mr.
T. R. Kelly for the work he had carried out during the past years as Secretary to the
Committee, and good wishes were expressed for every success in his new appointment
with the Indian Affairs Branch in Ottawa.
Members
Three members of the Advisory Committee have been honoured during the year
by being chosen for public service in various capacities.
Chief William D. Scow, of Alert Bay, was elected by the Indians of his district to
attend a conference in Ottawa, called by the Honourable the Minister of Citizenship and
Immigration in December, to consider amendments to the " Indian Act."
Mr. E. Bolton was appointed in March of this year as a member of the Advisory
Board to assist the Committee on Management for the Skeena River Salmon Fisheries. ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
F 143
Capt. Charles Cates was re-elected by acclamation in 1955 as Mayor of North
Vancouver, and he reports that the Indians are showing an increasing degree of cooperation in civic affairs in North Vancouver.
Addresses Given by the Secretary-
Two public addresses were given during the year by the Secretary:   one to the
Burrard View Parent-Teacher Association, and the other to the Native Missionary Conference held at Union College at the University of British Columbia.    Both these addresses were well received and aroused interest in Indian affairs.
Federal-Provincial Co-operation
The courtesy and co-operation of the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia
and his staff throughout the year have been of great assistance to the work of the Advisory
Committee.
During the Secretary's tour in the central and northern areas of the Province, the
goodwill and assistance received from Superintendents of Indian Agencies and Assistant
Superintendents were of great value and encouragement to her.
Correlation of information on co-operative action being taken by various departments of the Provincial Government with the Federal Government was made at the
close of the year, and are referred to under specific headings in this Report.
Special Investigation
In pursuance of a recommendation made to the Minister of Labour by the Advisory
Committee in November, 1954, authorization was given for an investigation to be made
into reports of unfavourable living conditions, lack of school facilities, and delinquency,
which were said to exist among the native Indians in the Babine and Stuart Lake areas.
Preliminary meetings to discuss this matter were held in the spring between representatives of the Advisory Committee and of the Indian Affairs Branch. The Commissioner for Indian Affairs asked that the investigation by the Committee be postponed
until the autumn, to enable Federal officials to make a previous survey of the situation.
At the request of the Advisory Committee, a conference was subsequently arranged
at Burns Lake on October 5th by Mr. Cyril Shelford, M.L.A. for Omineca, with the
active co-operation of the Burns Lake Board of Trade. Those in attendance included
the president and vice-president of the Burns Lake Board of Trade; also representatives
from all churches, from the Burns Lake School Board, and the school teaching staff; the
Parent-Teacher Association; and officials from the Provincial Departments of Health
and Welfare, Education, Lands, and Labour. Indian delegates were also present from
the Babine Lake and Stuart Lake Indian Agencies. The Advisory Committee was represented by the Honourable the Minister of Labour and also the Secretary.
The existing conditions of the Indians living in the Burns Lake district were discussed by those present at the conference, and the information and advice offered assisted
greatly in the investigation.
It was found that adverse conditions in the Burns Lake district exist largely because
Indians from Northern Babine Lake reserves are being attracted by work available at
Pendleton Bay, a white settlement some 25 miles north of Burns Lake. Many of the
Indians working in the timber-mills at Pendleton Bay are living in insanitary housing
conditions on Provincial land. An influx of Indian children to the Provincial public
school is also causing overcrowded classrooms. F 144 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
A survey of Pendleton Bay was made by the Minister of Labour at the close of the
conference with two delegates to the conference. The Secretary also visited the area on
three occasions accompanied by the Indian Superintendent of the Stuart Lake Agency,
the Acting-Superintendent of the Babine Agency, and an official from the Provincial
Department of Education.
A comprehensive report on the situation was studied by the Advisory Committee
at its meeting in November and, as a result of recommendations made to the Minister
of Labour by the Advisory Committee, the following action has already been taken in
order to improve the living conditions of the Indians in the Babine Lake area.
Negotiations are in progress between the Provincial Department of Lands and the
Indian Affairs Branch for land to be made available by the Province for the setting-up
of a new Indian reserve at Pendleton Bay, where the Indians can be properly housed and
cared for.
In December a decision was made by the Burns Lake School Board to provide an
extra teacher and additional accommodation at the Pendleton Bay Public School, where
approximately 75 per cent of the pupils are now Indian children.
The Director of the Cariboo Health Unit of the Provincial Department of Health
and Welfare is in direct touch with the Regional Superintendent of the Indian Health
Services, with a view to improving insanitary living conditions among the Indians at
Pendleton Bay.
The Community Programmes Branch of the Department of Education is approaching the Pendleton Bay community regarding the establishment of a Recreation Commission as a joint project with the Indian residents in that district.
Further action to be taken in other aspects of this investigation is still under consideration by the Advisory Committee.
Education
Provincial Public Schools
Since the " Public Schools Act" was amended in 1949 to make Provincial school
education available to Indian children, by agreement with local School Boards, a growing
number are attending regular public schools. This is especially true at the secondary-
school level, where Indian children are taking advantage of facilities provided. The
approximate figures for such attendance during 1955 are: Elementary, 1,100, and
secondary, 550. The tuition fees for Indian children attending Provincial public schools
are paid by the Indian Affairs Branch.
British Columbia leads all other Provinces in the number of Indian children being
educated in its public schools, training-schools, and the University. Indeed, latest statistics show that nearly one-third of the young Indians in this Province are receiving education and vocational training off their reserves.
This means that more Indian children in British Columbia than anywhere else in
Canada are getting the opportunity to work and play with their white neighbours during
the impressionable years of childhood. It means, also, that this Province is preparing a
future generation of Indian leaders, parents, and wage-earners who will take their place
with greater ease and confidence beside their fellow-citizens in British Columbia.
Indian Day-schools on Reserves
By agreement with the Indian Affairs Branch, Provincial Inspectors of Schools report
upon the work of teachers in Indian day-schools in or adjacent to their inspectorates.
In the school-year 1954-55, 101 inspections by Provincial officials were made, and
reports filed both with the Indian Affairs Branch and the Provincial Superintendent of
Education.   In this way the general standard of Indian day-school education is maintained ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
F 145
on a comparable basis with that of Provincial public schools. Thus the Indian child
emerges from his school on a reserve better fitted to mix with his white neighbours in
adult life.
School Agreements
An agreement was reached between the Federal and Provincial Governments for
sharing the capital costs of the construction of the Alert Bay High School, which was
opened by the Provincial Minister of Education last April. This is the largest school to
be built for the joint education of Indian and white children, with some 100 Indian pupils
and 80 white pupils now attending. It is anticipated that a school will be completed at
Skidegate in the Queen Charlotte School District next year as the result of a similar
agreement.
Community Programmes
Leadership Training Course
This year a second Indian woman councillor from Masset, Mrs. Mona Bell, attended
the leadership training course conducted by the Community Programmes Branch of the
Provincial Department of Education at the Summer School held in Victoria last July.
In an effort to attract more Indians from other parts of the Province to attend these
courses, the approval of the Commissioner for Indian Affairs has been given to the cir-
cularization of all Indian Agents in British Columbia with current literature from the
Community Programmes Branch in Victoria. The Advisory Committee is anxious that
more native Indians should be encouraged to join white students in training for joint
community projects. There are Indians sitting on a Recreation Commission along with
white citizens in Alert Bay, a member of the Committee reported, and it is proving most
successful in bringing together the Indian and white populations in various community
activities.
Vocational and Apprenticeship Training
The fundamental purpose of any vocational training programme for Indians is to
prepare them to find a secure place within the Provincial community, and to teach them
the habits of a setded existence with an occupation which will provide them with a more
secure livelihood than their aboriginal way of life.
The members of the Advisory Committee consider, however, that it is essential to
foster within the Indians themselves adequate reasons for taking part actively in a training
programme. The public-school education offered to Indians by this Province plays an
important part in awakening within the young people a desire to progress with their classmates into various spheres of vocational training.
The Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs recommended last year that
further steps be taken to encourage young Indians to avail themselves of vocational and
apprenticeship training, and there has been particular emphasis placed on this field of
activity during 1955.
The Department of Education at present operates the Federal-Provincial Vocational
School at Nanaimo. The Advisory Committee was represented at a meeting in September
when plans were discussed to extend the programme offered at this school to include
courses in building construction, boat-building, and marine-engine maintenance and
operation. One purpose of this expansion will be to provide practical training for Indians
engaged in the fishing industry and other vocations, thus meeting an existing need and
providing immediate and practical assistance to the native population.
Indians are also being given greater encouragement to attend the Vancouver Vocational Institute, which offers over twenty different types of training, ranging from stenog- F 146 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
raphy, hairdressing, beauty culture, and nursing for girls, to navigation, auto mechanics,
carpentry, and diesel-engine training for boys.
Vocational and apprenticeship training for Indian youth is of particular interest to
the Provincial Department of Labour, and representatives from that Department, as well
as from the Advisory Committee, sit on various committees when such matters are
discussed.
As a result of the Provincial Advisory Committee's recommendation regarding vocational and apprenticeship training, the Director of Apprenticeship has given much thought
to means by which more Indians could be encouraged to avail themselves of training.
A three-point programme of action has therefore been drawn up this year: Firstly, Indian
youth must be selected, and trade training provided for them free of cost; secondly,
employment should be found for them, and a close liaison maintained during the first year
or so of their employment; and thirdly, vocational training programmes should be provided for them during each year of their apprenticeship until their training is completed.
The first phase of this programme is already under way, and consideration is now being
given to means by which the remainder can be implemented .
In addition, after consultation with the Indian Affairs Branch and the Director of
the Vancouver Vocational Institute, another carpentry training group has been started on
premises operated by the Apprenticeship Branch, which is particularly designed to include
Indian apprentices.
Indian Labour
Concurrently with this training programme, Department of Labour officials are
constantly alert for any discrimination against Indians in the field of labour. Tribute has
been paid by Indian Superintendents to their assistance in helping the Indians with industrial relations and eliminating exploitation of Indian labour. Indians are being increasingly employed in logging camps, timber-mills, fish-canneries, and many other industrial
concerns. The Government also uses Indian labour in highway construction, boundary
surveys, and other Provincial projects.
University of British Columbia Training Courses
It is encouraging to note that seven Indians attended the Youth Training Courses
held at the University of British Columbia in 1955. Five of the students were from Bella
Bella, one from Bella Coola, and one from Chilliwack.
The late Mr. Dan Aasu, of Cape Mudge, was the only Indian among thirty-five
British Columbia fishermen to attend the course at the University of British Columbia
sponsored by the University Extension Branch of the Department of Fisheries. This was
the first course of its kind to be inaugurated at the University.
Health
The same harmonious co-operation continued during 1955 as in past years between
Indian and Provincial health services. Numerous consultations between Dr. W. S. Barclay, Regional Superintendent of Indian Health Services, and officials of the Provincial
Health Branch helped to co-ordinate the work being undertaken by both Governments
throughout the year.
During 1955 Dr. Barclay was unanimously appointed as a member of the Health
Officers' Council, which is composed of all the full-time Medical Health Officers of British
Columbia, and he participated in two of its meetings during the year. ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
F 147
In a further effort to co-ordinate the communicable-disease control measures
throughout the Province, the Superintendent of Indian Health Services in British Columbia was also elected to the Communicable Disease Sub-committee of the Health Officers'
Council, and attended the two meetings of that group during 1955 in order to consider
revision of the Communicable Disease Regulations.
The Federal Indian Health Superintendent also participated in the planning of the
Salk vaccine programme designed to promote immunization against poliomyelitis. As a
result, the same programme of poliomyelitis immunization was made available to the
Indian as to the white population. Wherever possible, the immunizations were handled
by the Indian Health Services. Where this was not possible, the Indians in the specific
age-groups of 5 and 6 years of age were immunized at the clinic organized by the Provincial public health services. During the programme, 744 Indian children in those specific
age-groups received Salk vaccine. It is proposed that the same programme for poliomyelitis immunization for Indian children as for white children will be maintained in
future.
Provincial Public Health Nursing services continue to be provided to certain Indian
reservations where no Federal Indian health services are available. During the year
Provincial health services were extended to 2,998 Indians on forty-four different reservations, and reports were forwarded to the Indian Superintendents concerned. A per capita
charge of $1.25 per annum is made to the Indian Health Services by the Provincial
Government for this service.
Certain Provincial public health educational material is supplied on request to the
Indian Health Services, mostly in the form of literature dealing with such subjects as
nutrition, child-care, and dental education.
Hospitals and Homes
All Indians resident in the Province of British Columbia are covered for hospital
insurance, regardless of whether or not they reside on reservations.
In addition, the Research Division of the Hospital Insurance Service furnishes
statistical information to officials of the Indian Affairs Branch.
The Hospital Insurance Service, through its medical consultant and the manager of
the Hospital Finance Division, has worked very closely with the Regional Superintendent
of Indian Health Services to facilitate the handling of accounts for Indians resident on
reservations or elsewhere in the Province.
Due to the co-ordination of administration which has been established during past
years, excellent co-operation exists between Indian Health Services and the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.
Mental Hospitals
Indians who are the responsibility of the Federal Government are treated in Provincial Mental Hospitals on the same basis as non-Indians, the full cost of their maintenance
being paid by the Federal Government.
Provincial Homes for the Aged and Infirm
The " Provincial Home for the Aged Act," operated by the Department of Health
and Welfare, was amended this year, thereby enabling Indians to be admitted to the Home
at Kamloops.
Under the " Provincial Infirmaries Act," which is operated by the British Columbia
Hospital Insurance Service, the infirmary at Marpole, at Allco for ambulatory aged, and
at Mount St. Mary's in Victoria are open to Indians. F 148 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The Provincial Homes for the Aged at Vernon, Terrace, and Coquitlam, which are
operated under the Provincial Mental Health Services, also admit Indian patients.
The Federal Government pays the full cost for Indians treated in the above
institutions.
Welfare
At its November meeting the Advisory Committee discussed the growing need for
welfare services among the Indians of British Columbia. At this stage of their development, when the Indians are emerging from their reserves in increasing numbers and being
influenced by a different civilization, it is considered essential that they should be given
sympathetic guidance and a degree of supervision during this transitional period. Only
by such assistance can the aged and the middle-aged Indians, as well as the young people,
learn how to make themselves acceptable neighbours to their fellow-citizens of this
Province.
Furthermore, it is considered that a large percentage of the effort and money now
being spent on schools, health services, and corrective institutions is not being put to its
best use because, without the supervision of welfare workers, the behaviour pattern, home
conditions, and health habits of the Indians remain unaffected.
The Committee therefore recommended that Provincial and Federal Governments
consult as to how increased welfare services could be made available to the native people
in British Columbia.
The Advisory Committee is aware that the Provincial welfare workers throughout
the Province assist the Indian Affairs Branch whenever possible in this sphere of Federal
responsibility. In addition, the co-operation of the Provincial Health Branch is extended
in various ways.
Increasing numbers of applications are made by Indians on reserves to the Supreme
Court under the "Adoption Act" each year. These investigations are made by social
workers on the Provincial field staff in compliance with this Act.
The Provincial Child Welfare Division has in care twenty-nine Indian children as
wards and non-wards of the Superintendent of Child Welfare under the " Protection of
Children Act"; of these twenty-nine Indian children at present in care, only three are
in Indian foster homes. This is a phase of work which the Committee considers could
improve, when more welfare workers are available to encourage better home conditions
on Indian reserves.
In the administration of the " Protection of Children Act" and the " Children of
Unmarried Parents Act," complaints are accepted by the Provincial Welfare Branch in
respect to Indian children.
The Family Division of the Provincial Welfare Branch acts as a referral body and
receives frequent requests from welfare departments in the United States for approval
of repatriation of Indians who have become indigent there. In all such cases, when
Indian status has been confirmed, the request is referred to the local Indian Superintendent, who deals with the matter direct with the inquiring agency or department.
The Family Counselling Service of the Provincial Welfare Branch for problems of
relationship and behaviour are available to Indians off the reserves, but with the present
complement of staff such services cannot be extended to the reserves. It has been
suggested that some agreement might be reached with the Indian Affairs Branch in this
regard.
Social Allowance is granted from the Provincial and municipal welfare offices on
occasion to single persons or heads of families who are registered Indians, but for whom
the Indian Affairs Branch disclaims responsibility because they have been off the reserve
for more than eighteen months. This assistance is automatically cancelled if the individual returns to the reserve. ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS F  149
Old-age Pensions
The Provincial Government pays half of the $40 monthly pension to those eligible
for Old-age Assistance, as well as a $15 maximum bonus, subject to a means test. During
1955, 247 Indians received such benefits from Old-age Assistance pensions and bonuses
in British Columbia.
The Federal Government pays the whole of the $40 monthly pension to those eligible
for the Old Age Security pension, but in British Columbia an additional maximum bonus
of $15 is paid by the Provincial Government, subject to a means test. During 1955,
686 Indians received Old Age Security bonuses from this Province.
Oakalla Prison Farm
A report recently received from Mr. Hugh Christie, Warden of the Oakalla Prison
Farm, stated that the change in the calibre of Indian inmates during the past fifteen years
has been striking. There was a day when the Indian was considered to be a most difficult
person to retain. To-day they are to be found among the best work gangs, and are the
most energetic farm workers in the prison. Unquestionably, the Warden stated, the
Indians are among the best athletes and, during the Christmas season when seventeen
teams competed in an organized play-off, the two winning basketball teams were from
the Indian groups. Mr. Christie concluded his report by saying that the general appearance and attitude of Indian boys would be an inspiration to anyone anxious to see the
possibilities which exist in the future for the Indian youth of this Province.
Social Security Tax
Since the Province first introduced the social service and municipal aid tax, the
Indians have opposed the payment of this tax on goods purchased at stores situated
within their reserves.
The Advisory Committee made an investigation of the Indian plea for exemption
from payment of this tax, and in February of this year the Provincial Government ruled
that sales of tangible personal property to Indians from Indian stores within the limits
of a reserve were to be exempt from the tax, now known as the 5-per-cent social security
tax. Exceptions to this ruling are Indian storekeepers who wish to sell goods to whites
as well as to Indians, or white storekeepers who operate stores on an Indian reserve.
Exemption from the purchase of a trade licence is applicable to an Indian operating
a business in similar circumstances.
Agriculture
At the November meeting of the Provincial Advisory Committee, concern was
expressed regarding the possibility that Indians are not being given the type of assistance
which would enable them to utilize to the fullest benefit the agricultural land which they
own. This matter was deliberated when the Honourable Kenneth Kiernan, Minister of
Agriculture, took part in a discussion with members of the Committee and the Indian
Commissioner for British Columbia. The fact that much agricultural land on reserves is
not being used to the advantage of the Indians themselves nor to the good of the Province was reviewed, and the desirability of training more Indian farmers was considered.
The Committee fully realizes that neither Federal nor Provincial legislation can
force the Indians to farm or lease their land. This is a matter for the native landholders
to decide for themselves. Nevertheless, it was considered that greater encouragement
could be given to Indians to utilize for their own benefit potential agricultural lands. F 150 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
This could be done by stimulating the Indians' interest in farming through training and
supervision in order to ensure a return for their labour, or by the Indians receiving income
from rentals on land at present lying idle on their reserves.
The Advisory Committee subsequently recommended that, in order to promote a
fuller utilization of Indian reserve agricultural land and to ensure its continuing fertility,
aggressive action be taken by Federal-Provincial authorities to encourage agricultural
training of Indian youth, and, if possible, that the existing close and harmonious cooperation between the Federal and Provincial Governments in agricultural matters be
further intensified and extended.
The Advisory Committee is informed that close and harmonious co-operation exists
wherever possible between the Provincial Department of Agriculture and the Indian
Affairs Branch. The Indian Commissioner for British Columbia has expressed appreciation of the advice and guidance given to officers of his Department by Provincial district
agriculturists and horticulturists. Members of his staff are in the habit of discussing with
Provincial district officers many matters relating to farm problems and land development,
both in the field of general agriculture and in the more specialized work of horticulture.
The Agricultural Engineering Division of the Extension Branch has collaborated on
various occasions in examining proposed Indian land-clearing projects in several districts
throughout the Province. The Department's land-clearing equipment has been used for
the purpose of making more land available for cultivation on the reserves, particularly in
the Cowichan, Squilax, Salmon Arm, and Vernon areas.
With the full approval of Superintendents of the Indian Affairs Branch, the Extension
Branch of the Provincial Department of Agriculture has encouraged participation by
Indian boys and girls in the 4-H Club movement. Successful clubs have been organized
at Mission City in the Fraser Valley and at St. Joseph's Mission near Williams Lake. In
Vernon three Indian boys are members of the Beef Calf Club, one of whom is now taking
a course in agriculture at the University of British Columbia.
The Superintendent of Women's Institutes reports that in various parts of the Province, more especially at Penticton and Cedar, groups of Indian women are active members
of Women's Institutes. There is a proposal to start an all-Indian Women's Institute at
Cedar on Vancouver Island.
Lands
Throughout the year considerable information of a general nature, in addition to
reference maps, lithographed maps, and air photos, has been furnished to the Indian
Commissioner for British Columbia by the Provincial Lands Department, as well as to
various Indian Agents.
During 1955, arrangements were finalized with the Indian Affairs Branch for the
payment to the Indians of royalty upon any gravel removed by the Pacific Great Eastern
Railroad Company from Capilano Indian reserve cut-off lands.
Re-establishment and subdivision surveys of Indian reserves in British Columbia
were made free of charge for the Department of Mines and Technical Surveys in Ottawa
prior to the field season, together with copies of field-notes, plans of relevant surveys, and
other pertinent information.
Also during 1955, three plans of re-establishment surveys of Indian reserves, the
boundaries of which bordered Provincial Crown lands, were examined and checked prior
to confirmation by the Surveyor-General in Ottawa.
Public Works
The erection of a bridge across the Similkameen River to connect the Indians of the
Lower Similkameen reservations with the town of Cawston was completed this year. The
cost of construction was shared equally between the Indian Affairs Branch and the
Provincial Government. ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS F 151
Totem-pole Restoration Programme
The work of chief Indian carver Mungo Martin and two assistant Indian carvers
continued into its fourth year under the auspices of the Provincial Museum of British
Columbia. The copying of some fourteen ancient Haida, Bella Coola, Tsimshian, and
Kwakiutl poles from the Museum collection was completed. In addition, a replica was
made of one of the largest Haida totem-poles brought from the Queen Charlotte Indian
village of Tanoo a year ago.
These poles, as well as a copy of a Kwakiutl longhouse, have been erected in Thunderbird Park, Victoria, and are a source of great interest to residents and tourists alike.
Public Relations
Recent census figures quoted by the Federal Government show that the Indians of
Canada are growing in numbers. During the past five years they increased by more than
15,000, from 135,407 in 1949 to an estimated 151,558 in 1955, representing an increase
of 11.1 per cent in that period. The Indians are thus the fastest-growing ethnic race in
Canada to-day.
When considered regionally, the greatest numerical increase among Canadian Indians
during the same period was in British Columbia, where the population rose by 11.2 per
cent, from 27,936 in 1949 to an estimated 31,086 in 1955.
Allied to the rising Indian population in this Province is the fact that an increasing
number of Indians are seeking integration into the. social and industrial life of British
Columbia. This move by the Indians toward the white man's way of life is placing a
responsibility upon the rest of the inhabitants of this Province to encourage and assist the
process of integration.
The Provincial Advisory Committee gave this matter much consideration at its
meeting in November and submitted a recommendation advocating an intensified public
relations programme to assist whites as well as Indians to take part in joint social projects
such as the Parent-Teacher Associations, Women's Institutes, 4-H Clubs, Scouts and
Guides. Joint sports activities were especially recommended, as well as joint cultural
activities, including drama, music, and dancing.
At this stage of progress in the Indians' development, the Committee considered
there is less value in social projects designed for Indian participation alone. Community
activities should be jointly shared by Indians and whites alike whenever possible.
The Advisory Committee is greatly encouraged by the number of organizations and
groups of citizens which are already interested in the progressive development of the
Indian population in this Province.
The B.C. Indian Arts and Welfare Society, the Coqualeetza Fellowship, and the
Okanagan Society for the Revival of Indian Arts and Crafts have done much valuable
work in past years to preserve and perpetuate native culture, and to give welfare assistance
when possible.
During 1955 the CJVI Victoria broadcasting-station organized a series of thirteen
weekly discussions, during which Indian speakers, as well as government and municipal
officials, gave their views on a number of outstanding problems.
This year the Christmas Bureau of the Community Chest of Greater Victoria for the
first time included the native population in special assistance to needy families and individuals at Christmas.
Also in 1955 the first all-Indian Air Cadet Squadron in Canada was formed at
Williams Lake, consisting of fifty-three Indian boys from the St. Joseph's Mission School
on the Indian reserve. F  152 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
In reviewing such indications of public interest in Indian affairs during the past year,
the Advisory Committee is confident of continuing support in its work. The acceptance
of a common future on the part of both Indians and non-Indians alike is creating a mutual
desire to five and work together as fellow-citizens. At this propitious period of integration,
the Advisory Committee, after its initial five years of operation, is better equipped to
co-operate to the fullest extent with Federal and Provincial authorities to enable the
native people of this Province to enjoy and assume the responsibilities of full citizenship.
In conclusion, the Advisory Committee feels it should report to you the quickening
in its activities during the latter half of the year as a result of the energy and initiative of
the Secretary. The members would be remiss if they failed to reflect in their Annual
Report the deep satisfaction with the work of Miss Joanna R. Wright, as recorded in the
minutes of the November meeting. Also, we wish to repeat our warm thanks for the
strong leadership given to the Committee by the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
especially during the three days of our annual conference.
Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs.
E. H. Morrow, Chairman.
W. D. Scow, Vice-Chairman.
E. N. Bolton, Member.
E. Brewer, Member.
C Cates, Member.
L. P. Guichon, Member.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956
1,460-756-4335

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