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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1954 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1956

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1954
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1954
is herewith respectfully submitted.
LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1955. The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-sixth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1954.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1955. Department of Labour
OFFICIALS
Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. P. Woods, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. A. Little, Administrative Assistant, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. M. Purdie, Chief Inspector of Factories, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
E. L. Allen, Director of Apprenticeship, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
W. Fraser, Chief Conciliation Officer, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Francis C. Dickins, Compensation Counsellor, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Director, Equal Pay Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
515 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
301, 1411 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Court-house, Kelowna, B.C.
Court-house, Smithers, B.C.
P.O. Box 1317, Cranbrook, B.C.
Court-house, Nelson, B.C.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters:  Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J. Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters:  Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J. Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
N. deW. Lyons, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
W. H. Welsh, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
James Walker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
John Tucker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Gordon LeBreton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOL REGULATIONS OFFICERS
(Headquarters:  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
Fraudena Eaton. Hamilton Crisford.
Gordon LeBreton, Government Representative, Board of Examiners in Barbering.
5 H 6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PROVINCIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
Professor E. H. Morrow, LL.D., 4709 West Seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Chief William Scow, Member, Alert Bay, B.C.
Ernest Brewer, Member, Vernon, B.C.
Edward Bolton, Member, Port Essington, B.C.
Capt. Charles W. Cates, Member, 266 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver, B.C.
L. P. Guichon, D.Sc, Member, Quilchena, B.C.
T. R. Kelly, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Summary of Contents
List of Acts Affecting Labour	
Highlights of 1954 Report	
Pace
Inside front cover
Statistics of Trades and Industries _
Employers' Returns—
Payroll
Previous Provincial Payrolls-
Comparison of Payrolls	
Industrial Divisions	
Census Divisions	
  11
  11
   12
   12
   13
   14
   15
  16
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings  17
Industrial Wage	
Firms with Large Payrolls	
Employment	
Statistical Tables	
Summary of All Tables	
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries
" Hours of Work Act "_
  18
  20
  21
  27
  40
  41
  42
  44
  46
  47
  47
Orders and Regulations Made during 1954  48
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees  49
Summary of All Occupations  54
Comparison of 1954 Earnings to Legal Minimum  55
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)  56
  58
  59
  60
  64
  64
Average Weekly Hours	
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour__
Board of Industrial Relations	
Meetings and Delegations
Statistics for Male Employees	
Inspections and Wage Adjustments
Court Cases	
Special Licences	
Conclusion	
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt with, 1953-54.
Table II.—Conciliation, 1954	
Table III.—Boards of Conciliation, 1954	
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause-
Table IV.—Summary of Disputes	
" Labour Relations Act"—Report of Labour Relations Branch     65
67
68
84
109
109
Table V.—Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia, 1939-54___                     _ 111
Chart Showing Percentage of Total Working-time Lost through Industrial Disputes, 1940-54  112
Table VI.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1954  113
Legal Proceedings Involving Labour Relations Board (British Columbia)  113
Summary of Prosecutions for 1954  116
Annual Survey of Organized Labour  116
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Making Returns, etc  117 H 8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Page
" Labour Relations Act"—Report of Labour Relations Branch—Continued
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial Classifications, 1955  118
Organizations of Employees  118
Organizations of Employers  137
Control of Employment of Children  138
" Equal Pay Act"  139
Inspection of Factories  140
Factories  140
Industrial Homework  140
Inspection of Elevators  140
Inspections—Elevator and Factory  141
New Elevator Installations  141
Elevator Operators' Licences  141
Conclusion  141
Apprenticeship Branch  142
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  145
Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs  149
Report of Activities of Rentals Control Branch  156 Highlights of the 1954 Annual Report
This Annual Report for the year 1954, the thirty-seventh in the history of the
Department, conveys in graphic detail the events of another twelve-month period of
industrial progress, a year of advance which has been steady rather than spectacular.
Satisfactory recovery from the reversals noted during the closing months of 1953
became apparent in the second half of the year, and strengthening trends in many important factors in our economy gave assurance of a further upward movement still to come.
The continued stimulus of foreign and domestic demand for primary products
increased production totals in the forest industry, and a strong output was maintained in
base metals, although over-all production totals in the mining industry showed little
change from the level of the previous year.
Completion during the year of some of the larger engineering and industrial programmes was reflected in a decline of heavy-construction totals in the last half of 1954,
although general levels of other building and residential construction continued to increase
during the year.
Market demands for manufactured products again point up the increasing importance of our secondary industries, and record production in the manufacture of lumber,
pulp, veneers, plywood, and all types of building materials was maintained throughout
the year.
Promise of a bright year ahead is seen in the completion during 1954 of expansion
programmes in hydro-electric power for public utilities and for industry, and the development and utilization of British Columbia's natural resources continues to keep pace in the
southern and coastal regions as well as in the northern areas.
Labour disputes and minor work stoppages occurred in some sections of industry
during the year, but with few exceptions were of short duration, and terminated without
serious loss of working-time or major disruption of the industry concerned. Total time
lost due to labour difficulties in 1954 was low in comparison to many previous years.
Employee earnings in most major industrial groups were higher than similar wage
figures compiled for the previous year.
The average weekly industrial wage figure computed for all male wage-earners within
the coverage of the 1954 survey was $68.70, an increase of $3.09 from the previous high
of $65.61 reported in 1953.
Payroll totals continued higher in eighteen of the twenty-five industrial classifications
mentioned in the statistical section of this Report for 1954.
The forest industries registered the greatest single increase in payroll totals during
the year, recovering from the lower trend noted for the previous two years to show a gain
of over $12,500,000 in 1954. The oil refining and distributing industry was second in
order of greatest increase, with payroll totals up over $4,000,000 from the previous year.
Smelting and concentrating industries reported payrolls increased by over $3,500,000,
while pulp and paper manufacturing was up $2,500,000. Public utilities showed a total
payroll increase of over $2,400,000, and food-products manufacturing exceeded the 1953
figures by some $1,600,000. For others, in order of increase, see "Comparison of Payrolls " in Report data.
Following a series of spectacular advances to an all-time high figure in 1953, the
construction industry showed the greatest loss in payroll totals during the year. Completion of many of the heavier-construction projects during 1954 resulted in a drop of over
$40,000,000 from the top figure recorded for the previous year. Unsettled price factors
in metal-mining and continued closure of some operations in this industry were responsible for a further decrease of $4,300,000 in payroll totals in this section as compared
with 1953.   Minor recessions were also noted in payroll totals for metal trades, the coal- H  10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
mining industry, wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), leather- and fur-goods manufacturing,
and house furnishings.
Employment gains which occurred in the forest industries, smelting and concentrating, breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, and in others to a lesser
degree, were offset by lower totals in construction, metal-mining, food-products manufacturing, and the metal trades. Over-all summary totals recorded for 1954 were generally below the level of the previous year. Peak employment during the year was again
noted in the month of August, when a total of 190,555 were employed, this figure comparing with a total of 194,892 reported in August of 1953.
The industrial work-week was again shorter in 1954 than during the previous year.
Continuing the downward trend established over the past few years, the yearly average
reached a new low mark, due to curtailment in heavy construction, metal-mining, and
some manufacturing industries previously reporting a considerable amount of overtime
hours. Although increases appeared in some instances, the majority of industries covered
reported working-hours slightly below the level of the previous year.
For all wage-earners reported in the 1954 survey, the average weekly hours worked
were computed at 41.37, a new low figure for the annual record of industrial working-
hours in this Province. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 11
Statistics of Trades and Industries
Reviewing briefly the recorded experience in various sectors of our industrial
economy during the year, the statistical summary for 1954 highlights with continuing
emphasis the intensity and abundance of progressive development within this Province.
Employers' Returns Total 9,076
Success of the annual statistical survey is largely dependent on the prompt completion and return of information requested in time for tabulation in the tables, and in this
respect it is gratifying to note that during 1954 employers in industry and business
continued to extend to our department a generous amount of assistance and co-operation
in the furtherance of this work.
A total of 9,076 industrial firms completed returns in response to the request for
1954 payroll information, this coverage exceeding that of the previous year, when the
10,000 S ]| ■
8,000 ■ .
7'000 3S«
6,ooo 55!aj| ' i1  '
5,000 5 ;:-
44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
INDUSTRIAL FIRMS REPORTING
1944-1954 H 12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
firm count was 9,008. In addition to industrial totals received in time for tabulation in
the tables, provision is made for the inclusion of late returns in summary totals reported
below, together with other supplementary items contributing to the over-all Provincial
estimated total.
Where mentioned in the text, the term " number of firms reporting " has reference
actually to the number of returns tabulated, since many firms when reporting file separate
returns in more than one industrial classification.
Payroll
The total industrial payroll, as represented in the amount of salaries and wages
reported by the 9,076 firms filing returns in time for classification in the tables, was
$661,537,190 for 1954. The addition of further supplementary amounts of labour
expenditure as noted below provide an annual over-all figure which may be considered
as the entire Provincial estimated payroll. This accumulative figure, comprised of the
industrial summary together with additional payrolls as listed, was estimated to have
reached $1,200,000,000 for 1954.
Payrolls of 9,076 firms making returns to Department of Labour      $661,537,190
Returns received too late to be included in above
summary  1,036,995
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)  44,184,960
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers
covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the
tables, namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)        493,240,855
Total  $1,200,000,000
Previous Provincial Payrolls
Provincial payroll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:—
1928     $183,097,781 1942    $321,981,489
1929—      192,092,249 1943 _      394,953,031
1930     167,133,813 1944        388,100,000
1931_.      131,941,008 1945        383,700,000
1932- -      102,957,074 1946  _..     432,919,727
1933-            99,126,653 1947        557,075,508
1934       113,567,953 1948...       639,995,979
1935         125,812,140 1949.. _       671,980,815
1936       142,349,591 1950.         718,202,028
1937  _    162,654,234 1951.       815,173,090
1938     158,026,375 1952      979,364,603
1939       165,683,460 1953-   1,066,979,0191
1940-      188,325,766 1954    1,200,000,0002
1941    239,525,459
1 1953 total revised since 1953 Report.
2 1954 preliminary total subject to revision.
Preliminary estimates representing the current over-all estimated Provincial payroll
total, as appearing in the Annual Report, are subject to revision in the following year's
issue, based on actual totals and additional information not available at the publication date.
In approaching an annual estimated over-all figure, actual totals resulting from the
year's industrial survey are supplemented by additional figures representing payrolls of STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H  13
all other sections of the labour force in business, trade, and services not immediately
subject to the direct inquiry.
Coverage of the annual survey is based on a segregation of workers into three main
classifications, the percentage of the total annual payroll expended in each of these
departments appearing in the table following, together with comparative data for previous
years.
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Per Cent
9.25
12.01
78.74
Per Cent
9.67
11.58
78.75
Per Cent
9.71
11.98
78.31
Per Cent
9.90
Per Cent
10.85
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen 	
12.92      |        13.20
77.18       1         75.95
Totals    — 	
100.00
100.00             100.00
1
100.00             100.00
1
Comparison of Payrolls
With consumer prices and living costs remaining stabilized, and showing little variation from the levels established during the previous year, some slackening in the upward
trend in industrial payroll totals was apparent in 1954. Although eighteen of the twenty-
five industrial classifications reported increases, the levelling-off trend noted in some
sectors of the economy was responsible for a loss in total industrial payroll of some
$11,577,174 as compared with 1953.
Greatest increase in payrolls was noted in the lumber industries, where a high rate
of production in both primary and secondary phases of the business was responsible for
an annual payroll some $12,559,773 above the 1953 level. Second in order of greatest
increase, the oil refining and distributing industry reported payrolls increased by some
$4,047,425 above the previous year. Next in line, payrolls in the smelting and concentrating industries increased by $3,730,344, followed by pulp and paper manufacturing
with a gain of $2,731,954. Public utilities registered an increase of $2,471,431, while
food-products manufacturing increased by $1,650,959 from the figure for the previous
year. Payrolls in the printing and publishing industry were ahead by $1,414,714;
builders' materials showed an increase of $1,276,749; miscellaneous trades and industries
was up $1,134,398; cartage, trucking, and warehousing, a gain of $840,468; shipbuilding and boat-building showed an increase of $810,262, followed by explosives,
fertilizers, and chemicals, up $602,900, and coast shipping with payrolls increased by
$586,198; laundries, cleaning and dyeing advanced by $443,598; garment-manufacturing was up $389,670; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, an increase
of $386,057; paint-manufacturers, up $288,127; and jewellery manufacturing and
repair, an increase of $54,619.
Sharpest drop recorded in the 1954 survey was in the heavy-construction industries,
with completion of contracts in some of the new development areas, resulting in a decrease
of some $40,336,442 from the all-time high figure for construction payrolls set in 1953.
Payroll totals in the metal-mining industry dropped a further $4,367,236 during 1954,
as a result of continued low production in this industry due to unsettled base-metal
prices and subsequent closure of many smaller operations. Smaller declines were also
apparent in the metal trades, down some $906,861 from the 1953 figure; the coal-mining
industry, off a further $563,050 from the previous year; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.),
a drop of $543,434; leather- and fur-goods manufacturing, a decrease of $178,326; and
house furnishings, off $101,471 from the total reported for 1953. H 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
1952
1953
1954
Industry
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers ._ 	
Builders' materials.    	
39
145
474
20
131
1,825
37
605
99
132
34
182
97
2,267
1,647
152
651
73
18
178
12
82
6
116
178
$5,715,611.00
9,142,882.00
10,571,864.00
6,216,897.00
27,230,354.00
118,731,310.00
7,760,134.00
43,790,357.00
3,533,042.00
5,216,966.00
961,426.00
6,571,954.00
1,896,749.00
135,656,405.00
60,951,413.00
32,651,232.00
30,280,233.00
10,114,512.00
1,518,363.00
13,748,812.00
24,312,238.00
14,677,150.00
19,820,824.00
38,411,133.00
17,549,013.00
40
149
470
18
122
1,794
38
614
101i
130
35
178
104
2,098
1,732
118
610
76
19i
179
13
70
5
119
176
$5,797,412.00
10,299,129.00
12,108,043.00
5,084,966.00
28,347,957.00
126,780,143.00
7,789,167.00
45,003,964.00
3,849,582.001
5,475,245.00
901,147.00
6,806,441.00
2,056,162.00
134,391,075.00
66,816,730.00
26,929,812.00
32,250,549.00
11,135,127.00
1,657,593.001
14,898,592.00
29,584,165.00
13,867,157.00
18,954,994.00
40,640,634.00
21,688,578.00
44
180
473
12
135
1,856
45
576
98
140
34
178
87
2,146
1,708
97
584
89
17
185
13
75
10
116
178
$6,183,469.00
11,575,878.00
12,948,511.00
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
4,521,916.00
28,934,155.00
86,443,701.00
8,392,067.00
46,654,923.00
4,239,252.00
5,373,774.00
955,766.00
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
7,250,039.00
1,877,836.00
146,950,848.00
65,909,869.00
Metal-mining  —   . ~ —
22,562,576.00
33,384,947.00
15,182,552.00
1,945,720.00
16,313,306.00
32,316,119.00
14,677,419.00
22,685,338.00
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
43,112,065.00
21,145,144.00
Totals                 . 	
9,200
$647,030,874.00
9,008
$673,114,364.00
9,076
$661,537,190.00
i Revised since 1953 Report.
Industrial Divisions
Divisional summaries of industrial payroll information have been continued for
purposes of this Report under the three main headings of Greater Vancouver, Vancouver
Island, and Rest of Province. The total amount of annual industrial payroll expended
in each of these areas when reduced to percentages of the whole may then be used as
a basis for measurement of the proportion of the entire Provincial estimated payroll
attributed to that division.
Completion during the year of some of the larger construction projects in new
development areas outside the metropolitan districts resulted in a lower percentage of
over-all payroll attributable to the sections representing Rest of Province, the percentage
in this division decreasing to 39.56 per cent of total in 1954 from 42.43 per cent recorded
for the previous year. A busy programme under way in all branches of the construction
industry in the Greater Vancouver area brought increased payroll totals in this division,
the percentage of labour costs rising in this section from 40.92 per cent of total in 1953
to 42.75 per cent for the year under review. Further development in the Vancouver
Island areas during the year also increased payroll totals in this region, the proportion
of the over-all total attributable to this section rising from 16.65 per cent previously
recorded to 17.69 per cent of total for 1954.
The application of the above-noted percentages to the over-all Provincial estimated
payroll for 1954 gives the proportionate amounts shown in the table below, together with
similar comparative information for previous years:— STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 15
1950
1951
1952
19531
1954s
Greater Vancouver—
$308,324,130.00
277,872,365.00
132,005,533.00
$337,074,073.00
328,270,203.00
149,828,814.00
$403,987,899.00
410,647,578.00
164,729,126.00
$436,607,814.00
452,719,198.00
177,652,007.00
$513,000,000.00
474,720,000.00
Vancouver Island	
212,280,000.00
Totals	
$718,202,028.00
$815,173,090.00
$979,364,603.00
$1,066,979,019.00
$1,200,000,000.00
i 1953 total revised since publication of 1953 Report.
2 1954 preliminary total subject to revision.
-
Census Divisions
Distribution of industrial payroll totals throughout the ten Provincial regional areas
or census divisions provides a valuable indication of the extent of progress and development occurring from year to year in the various sectors. The accompanying map outlines
the numbered areas listed in the table below, and serves as a geographical reference when
using the information.
Summary totals by census area as shown in the table are restricted to industrial
payrolls only, and are therefore not inclusive of all types of business, trade, and services
in each region. As a basis for comparison of annual variation in the work force operating
in each area, however, the industrial-survey totals continue to provide a reliable measure.
Industrial earnings as reported in each of the ten census areas are shown in the
table, together with similar comparative data for previous years.
CENSUS
DIVISION H 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the Comparative
Years 1951 to 1954
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1951
1952
1953
1954
No. 1  	
No. 2	
No. 3   	
No. 4   .              	
$16,925,795
33,803,674
21,563,865
326,844,763
106,834,119
10,905,394
22,065,843
18,808,909
19,560,533
2,140,056
2,291,684
$27,425,293
40,455,349
20,422,805
358,233,779
109,412,278
11,015,136
20,160,757
20,771,777
32,163,701
2,266,598
4.703.401
$19,495,380
42,633,966
20,361,133
370,901,521
111,953,368
15,781,535
21,111,044
18,367,655
44,702,234
3,304,619
4.501 909
$17,125,372
32,519,954
20,790,437
389,154,398
117,023,841
12,487,726
22,351,967
18,012,903
23,458,261
3,387,399
5,224,932
No. 5   	
No. 6       	
No. 7  	
No. 8 _  - ,
No. 9      ~	
No. 10  	
Totals  	
$581,744,635
$647,030,874      [    $673,114,364
1
$661,537,190
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries
Industrial earnings continued to climb during 1954, although increases apparent for
workers in most industries, both in the wage-earner classification and the clerical group,
were perhaps not as great as generally reported during the previous year.
Revision of 1954 questionnaires to give an increasing coverage of the higher-paid
workers in wage-groups beyond the $85 weekly limit previously recorded has provided
a closer approach in the compilation of current average wage levels, and is reflected to
some extent in the higher average figures listed in this section of the Report.
Comparative average weekly earnings for male wage-earners in each industry are
shown in the following table, based on one week of greatest employment for the years
1947 to 1954.
Average Weekly Earnings
in Each Industry (M
ale Wage-earners)
Industry
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers—    	
$41.25
40.50
39.55
45.54
38.84
43.08
44.30
40.09
37.03
35.02
40.90
33.51
32.77
47.28
39.90
47.98
37.41
43.80
35.56
43.70
48.10
47.10
45.55
45.04
39.32
$42.67
44.99
43.50
54.40
40.52
48.23
48.78
44.75
41.40
39.07
45.04
36.50
36.87
49.92
43.65
51.72
40.84
50.38
36.13
47.80
51.25
48.79
52.13
47.67
44.27
$44.67
48.11
46.41
52.68
44.21
50.97
49.33
46.47
43.03
42.41
43.93
41.36
38.75
51.40
45.63
53.51
42.22
53.90
37.21
50.74
54.10
53.37
51.73
51.15
44.07
$46.86
50.90
49.52
54.22
46.43
53.57
51.72
47.17
44.51
41.93
45.71
42.70
40.21
55.49
47.94
56.25
43.95
57.47
43.17
53.18
56.34
52.68
54.29
50.83
48.82
$51.42
54.34
55.10
58.86
53.29
61.57
59.50
53.82
47.49
46.78
54.88
47.57
44.18
61.89
53.77
63.58
48.14
63.88
47.31
58.87
63.74
62.51
63.76
56.88
54.85
$57.75
60.19
58.20
62.97
54.05
65.16
61.92
56.23
52.69
51.71
54.37
50.75
47.63
64.70
57.82
67.29
51.05
64.00
50.36
61.94
65.79
66.03
64.95
60.72
59.29
$61.11
64.33
64.09
66.11
58.46
70.62
66.86
58.71
54.531
53.94
56.54
51.35
48.98
67.68
61.40
71.35
54.71
70.23
52.511
68.33
71.22
70.64
69.32
66.36
60.96
$63.41
67.77
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
66.55
66 89
60.39
74.06
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing -
69.44
61.10
56.56
54 46
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
59.85
54 88
Leather and fur-goods manufacturing—
51.26
71 08
63.68
70.15
Miscellaneous trades and industries   — .
56.48
74 98
56.40
73 26
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
77.38
76.72
72 88
Street-railways, gas, water, power, tele-
73 10
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
63.26
1 Revised since 1953 Report. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 17
Increases and decreases noted in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners
in the 1954 survey are as follows:—
Increases
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water                         Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing  $2.28
manufacturers    $2.30                Lumber industries —     3.40
Builders' materials       3.44               Metal trades     2.28
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing    2.46               Miscellaneous trades and industries  1.77
Coal-mining      0.78               Oil refining and distributing  4.75
Coast shipping      1.93               Paint-manufacturing     3.89
Construction      3.44               Printing and publishing  4,93
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals    2.58               Pulp and paper manufacturing  6.16
Food-products  manufacturing      2.39               Ship-building and boat-building   6.08
Garment-manufacturing      2.03               Smelting and concentrating  3.56
House furnishings        0.52               Street-railways,  gas,  water,  power,  tele-
Jewellery manufacturing and repair....     3.31                   phones, etc.   6.74
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing     3.53               Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)    2.30
Decreases
Metal-mining     $1.20
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings
Clerical employees shared in the wage increases generally apparent for 1954, and
with few exceptions both male and female workers in clerical occupations were reported
at salaries averaging well above the level of the previous year.
In addition to a coverage of office employees, the clerical section is also inclusive
of outside sales personnel, and, as mentioned in earlier Reports, it is the greater earning
power of this group of trained employees that is largely responsible for higher averages
set in those industries employing large numbers of this class of worker.
Average weekly earnings for male clerical workers in all industries under survey
rose to $72.43 in 1954, as compared with $67.87 reported for a similar period in 1953.
For female employees in clerical occupations the 1954 average figure representing weekly
earnings increased to $44.22 from $42.33 previously reported.
Average weekly earnings for male and female clerical workers are shown by industry
in the following table, for the comparative years 1953 and 1954:—
Industry
1953
Males
Females
1954
Males
Females
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers..
Builders' materials-
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing-
Conl-mining	
Coast shipping.. _ —
Construction ..
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals-
Food-products manufacturing- 	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings..
Jewellery manufacturing and repair-
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing-
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining..
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil refining and distributing.. 	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing-
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building .
Smelting and concentrating-
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.-
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
All industries  	
$68.20
69.05
60.97
60.26
62.42
67.33
76.66
64.26
61.021
63.10
53.30
62.63
55.20
72.70
64.04
78.68
59.75
70.95
60.261
64.10
76.21
70.37
81.19
68.22
71.46
$42.40
39.67
37.19
34.83
43.79
42.92
42.74
40.64
42.991
39.59
36.77
36.02
37.84
44.50
40.38
48.11
41.83
49.35
41.921
39.54
46.71
40.17
50.76
44.22
47.81
$67.02
71.94
63.48
62.63
65.51
69.56
81.13
65.58
60.08
61.59
60.05
63.62
60.00
77.58
68.39
85.23
61.07
76.86
65.18
70.16
82.07
73.69
86.15
76.56
77.98
$67.87
$42.33
$72.43
$41.77
41.18
37.92
37.50
44.70
43.74
45.32
41.93
41.89
40.63
39.11
37.17
39.04
46.13
41.97
49.10
44.18
50.19
44.11
41.43
49.13
39.64
51.48
47.60
48.73
$44.22
1 Revised since 1953 Report. H 18 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industrial Wage
Industrial earnings continued to advance during 1954, although the increase was not
as great as recorded for the previous year. With stabilization of consumer prices, and
living costs generally at levels established in 1952 and 1953, most industrial workers,
however, were able to benefit from extra take-home pay.
The average figure representing weekly earnings for male wage-earners in all industrial occupations included in the annual survey reached a new record high of $68.70, up
$3.09 from the figure of $65.61 reported for 1953.
Comparative yearly figures recorded for average weekly industrial earnings from
1918 to 1954 are as follows:—
1918       $27.97      1937       $26.64
1919       29.11      1938     26.70
1920    31.51      1939   26.80
1921     27.62      1940    28.11
1922       27.29      1941   30.67
1923     28.05      1942       35.24
1924    28.39      1943       37.19
1925    27.82      1944     38.70
1926   27.99      1945   38.50
1927     28.29      1946     39.87
1928      28.96      1947       43.49
1929    29.20      1948 __!.      47.30
1930      28.64      1949 _. _   49.21
1931   26.17      1950    51.88
1932   — 23.62      1951     58.67
1933    22.30      1952 A  61.78
1934      23.57      1953    65.61
1935   _    24.09      1954     68.70
1936   26.36 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 19
Based on the computed average figures for each year, the chart shows the trend of
average weekly earnings for all male wage-earners during the period 1918 to 1954:—
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS OF MALE WAGE-
1918 — 1954
EARNERS
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
EARNINGS
YEAR
1918
1919
;::
1921
1922
1923
192*
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
(932
W33
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
9*0
1941
1942
1943
\9mJ|945
1946
1947
1948
1949
w::o
1951
»52
1953
1954
68.00
67.00
66.00
65.00
64,00
63.00
6Z.00
61.00
60.00
59.00
58.00
57.00
56.00
55.00
54.00
53.00
52.00
51.00
50.00
49.00
48.00
47.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
42.00
41.00
40.00
39.00
38.00
37.00
36.00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28,00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
f
I
/
/
1
1
/
/
/
/
/
,
/
/
'
/
/
/
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/
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I
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/
.
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si
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(1954 figure—$68.70.) H 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
30%-
25%-
20%-
15*-
10*-
5*-
1953
19 54
1 1 1 IB
1 1 1 II
;. »■<  ''
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The above bar diagrams indicate the varying percentages of male wage-earners in a series of fixed
wage classifications through the years 1953 and 1954.
Firms with Large Payrolls
The relative weight and concentration of our labour force in the various industrial
classifications included in the annual survey may again be noted in dealing with a segregation of those films reporting in the higher payroll bracket of $100,000 or over.
Based only on industrial returns, the survey of larger firms does not include payrolls
in wholesale or retail trade, transcontinental railways, or payrolls of public authorities
(Federal, Provincial, or municipal). STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 21
As compared with a total of 957 industrial firms filing returns in this higher payroll
group during the previous year, the 1954 figure climbed to 984, an increase of 27.
With the greatest number of firms in the upper payroll bracket the lumber industry
continues in the lead, the 243 firms reporting big payrolls in this industry representing an
increase of 22 from the total recorded in this section for the previous year. In second
position, the construction industry showed a total of 152 returns in the higher bracket,
increased by 1 above the total for the previous year, while the metal trades group was
down 1 from the previous figure with a total of 128. Food-products manufacturing
showed a total of 90 firms in the larger payroll class, although this figure was 3 less than
appeared in the same section during 1953; miscellaneous trades and industries reported
62, an increase of 3; coast shipping total was 37, an increase of 2; wood-manufacturing
(N.E.S.) reported 30 firms in the larger payroll class, this figure being unchanged from
the previous year; builders' materials, 24, also unchanged from the previous year; cartage,
trucking, and warehousing, 23, an increase of 5; metal-mining, 23, a decrease of 5;
printing and publishing, 23, increased by 1; public utilities, 20, a decrease of 1; laundries,
cleaning and dyeing, 18, down 1; ship-building and boat-building, 16, up 1; oil refining
and distributing, 15, unchanged; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers,
14, an increase of 1; garment-manufacturing, 13, up 2; pulp and paper manufacturing,
12, unchanged; house furnishings, 11, a drop of 2; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals,
10, an increase of 2; coal-mining, 5, down 2 from the previous year; leather and fur
goods, 5, up 1; paint-manufacturing, 4, unchanged; smelting and concentrating, 4, an
increase of 1; and jewellery manufacturing and repair, 2, unchanged from the previous
year.
The higher payroll group for 1954 represented some 984 industrial firms with payrolls in excess of $100,000, and of this total 89 were recorded as reporting payrolls of
over $1,000,000. Of this latter group, 14 reported payrolls in excess of $5,000,000,
2 between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, 9 between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, 15 between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and 49 between $1,000,000 and $2,000,000.
Employment
Employment totals in those industries responsible for the largest payrolls were generally below the 1953 levels. With the exception of the lumber industries and public
utilities, most industrial groups representing the heavier-labour totals reported fewer
employed than during the peak months of the previous year. Although thirteen of the
twenty-five classifications covered by the survey showed increased totals, the loss of
employment represented in the remainder was sufficient to reduce the summary figures
below the over-all totals for 1953.
Peak employment continued to appear in the month of August, as in the previous
year, but summary employment figures for all industries in August, 1954, had decreased
to a total of 190,555, as compared with 194,892 reported for the same month of greatest
employment in 1953.
Some of the largest employment gains noted in the thirteen industries reporting
increases were apparent in the lumber industries; smelting and concentrating; breweries,
distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers; public utilities; oil refining and distributing;
and pulp and paper manufacturing. Lower employment totals were recorded in heavy
construction, metal-mining, food-products manufacturing, and metal trades, and others
in lesser degree.
Comparative high and low monthly employment totals for each industry included in
the survey are shown in the following table, together with similar information for the
previous year. Employment charts which also follow indicate the annual trend in relation
to clerical workers, the wage-earner group, and total industrial employment for 1954 and
previous years. H 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table Showing the Amount or Variation of Employment in Each Industry in the
Last Two Years1
Industry
1953
E 3
Zw
g»o.s
Sjwe
Be
1954
T>
2  &
u «
5„3„
*5
c S as
E a
55 ES
June	
1,912
Aug....	
3,186
Aug	
1,728
Feb	
1,503
Aug	
8,805
June	
24,866
Apr	
2,118
Sept	
19,606
Feb.     ..
1,557
Sept... .
1,773
Nov	
417
July...	
3,256
Nov	
702
Sept.. .
41,846
Aug	
17,457
July 	
5,483
Sept	
10,389
Nov	
3,328
June.
518
July	
4,101
July. .   .
6,976
July .
3,908
Dec
5,788
July	
13,396
June	
6,674
Aug	
190,555
CWHr
5SE;
SkJW E
3 E
za
Breweries,   distilleries,   and   aerated-
water manufacturers 	
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing..
Coal-mining 	
Coast shipping  	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals..
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings-
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing.
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing-
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating..
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
telephones, etc...
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)..
All industries 	
July...
Oct-
Oct....
Jan.—
July...
July...
Sept...
Aug...
Mar...
Nov...
Nov...
July...
May...
June..
Aug...
Jan.-
Sept...
Nov...
Aug...
Nov...
July...
Apr. _
Jan.-
July.-
Aug...
Aug—
1,765
2,949
3,717
1,803
9,076
31,181
2,099
20,839
1,6872
1,935
■421
3,193
784
38,727
18,275
6,923
10,850
3,062
4842
3,971
6,631
3,715
4,901
13,011
7,119
194,892
Apr	
Jan	
Feb	
Aug	
Feb	
Jan	
Apr	
Jan	
July	
May	
Mar	
Feb	
Dec	
Dec	
Dec	
Dec	
Jan	
Feb	
Jan.	
Jan	
Jan	
July	
Dec	
Jan	
Dec	
Dec	
1,590
2,485
3,106
1,424
7,564
23,906
1,913
11,454
1,4882
1,713
326
2,950
694
29,761
16,809
5,758
8,488
2,230
4042
3,753
6,121
3,097
4,339
12,161
5,918
163,547
Jan..
Jan...
Feb...
May..
Feb..
Dec.
Nov..
Jan. .
June.
Feb..
Apr..
Jan..
Jan..
Jan. .
Jan..
Apr..
Feb...
Apr..
Jan..
Jan..
Feb...
Jan..
Jan...
Feb..
Jan...
Jan..
1,602
2,732
3,172
1,400
7,765
19,504
2,006
11,386
1,373
1,608
338
2,880
586
28,123
16,114
4,927
8,476
2,860
448
3,876
6,470
3,313
4,505
12,381
5,365
156,342
1 Industrial employment totals include clerical and sales staffs in addition to wage-earners, and are based on the
number of employees reported on the payrolls on the last day of each month or nearest working-date.
2 Revised since 1953 Report. 1,500
1,000
500
0
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Employment of Clerical Workers in Industry, 1953 and
H 23
1954]
y
(1953)
26,000
25,500
(1953)
25,000
/
(1954)
(1954)
24,500
24,000
23,500
22,500
21 500
21 000
20,500
20,000
19,500
19,000
18,500
18,000
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but not
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
January
24,694
February  24,650
March   24,735
April   24,819
Clerical Workers, 1954
(Male and Female)
          25,067
June    	
           25,464
July	
    25,660
August 	
.     25,784
September     25,444
October ._   25,508
November   25,412
December   25,404 H 24
January
February _
March
April 	
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
AVERAGE MONTHLY NUMBER OF WAGE-EARNERS (Male and Female)
1929-31-32-39-41-45-49-51-53-54
|jan.   JFeb. |Mar. JApr.   | May   | June  j July   j Aug. |se
it. | Oct. | Nov. | Dec.
170,000
165,000
160,000
155,000
150,000
145, 000
140,000
135,000
130,000
125,000
120,000
115,000
110,000
105,000
100,000
95,000
90,000
85,000
80,000
\
1951
1954
1953
1949
1945
1941
^*
\
\
/
'•'"     /
—
	
\
\
\
/
/ /
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/'
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\
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f
/
y
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:\
1
/
^
X
\
\ \
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'//'
/
\
/
/
/
/
^
^
X
^
-s^
~^
«*-
y
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\
X
\
/
\
/
S
^
y
I-—'
\S
<
c
r
/
\
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1929
1939
1931
1932
— 164,208
— 158,995
151,829
— 141,975
,
/
<
75,000
70,000
65,000
60,000
55,000
50,000
45,000
40,000
/
r
/
_^.
—..
	
\
>>•
	
^'"
\
\
^
^
^,--
	
S
V
**
F.I
U—"     —  REFERENCE —      """-J
nployment in —
1929 shown thus        -
1931 "          "
1932 "         "          -
1939      "        "         >
1941      "        "
	
	
1951      "
  131,648                May
  136.247                June
1954       "
1954
   151
.544
...     15f
,770                October 	
,425               November   .   .
,771                December 	
      144,626               July    ....
  145,806                August
16:
164 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Total Employment in Industry, 1953 and 1954'
H 25
195,000
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165,000
160,000
155,000
150,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
130,000
125,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0953)
V
A
"0954)
(1954)
(1953)
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
Monthly Totals of Industrial Employment, 1954
(Male and Female)
January	
February „
March	
April 	
156,342
160,897
169,361
170,625
May 	
June 	
July 	
August ..
  176,611
   182,234
  189,085
  190,555
September     189,652
October   184,503
November   177,241
December _  167,379 H 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Monthly Variation in the Number of Wage-earners, Clerical Workers, and
Total Employment in Industry, 19541
Number
Employed
260,
240,
220,
200,
190,
180,
170,
160,
150,
140,
130,
120,
110,
100,
90,
otal erri aloyment
Wage ea
70,000
60,000
50,000
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
15,000
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 27
CONTENTS OF TABLES
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each heading:—■
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.-—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in
or incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing, shipping, and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mining,—This group contains also the operation of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both
general and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not
include the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. G. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies, fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries; packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee, ketchup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery, and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments  (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No.  1G.   Metal-mining.—Includes  all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead
corroders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building and Boat-building.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.-—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—■
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and
undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS
Returns Covering 44 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers,  superintendents,  and managers „     $830,179
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       717,393
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)    4,635,897
Total..
$6,183,469
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
1,173
1,180
1,177
1,183
1,295
1,360
1,349
1,296
1,224
1,213
1,232
1,213
219
242
219
216
220
332
268
263
326
335
356
252
138
139
142
140
148
145
146
143
141
141
135
132
72
68
71
68
May 	
71
75
July 	
78
65
September	
October	
November  -
December 	
74
72
73
74
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
36
11
9
45
60
44
60
130
664
246
82
19
18
5
4
14
13
18
52
109
128
4
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
1
4
1
10
9
15
14
22
30
21
13
6
3
4
3
18
27
15
4
1
1
1 H 28
Table No. 2
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF
Returns Covering 180 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers       $1,502,214
Clerks, stenographers,  salesmen, etc        1,537,162
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers). _     8,536,502
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 3
TotaL.
$11,575,878
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING
Returns Covering 473 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $1,596,070
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       1,276,648
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     10,075,793
Total..
$12,948,511
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
2,260
21
265
186
February 	
2,326
18
263
189
2,399
20
263
190
April	
2,477
21
265
194
May	
2,531
21
268
190
June	
2,551
23
269
202
July.. 	
2,594
20
273
206
2,687
21
274
204
September	
2,659
25
270
202
October 	
2,674
26
271
197
November 	
2,601
23
275
202
December	
2,476
22
270
204
Classified Weekly Earnings
Employment
Month
January....
February-
March.	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August-	
September-
October	
November-
December.-
Wage-earners
Males    Females
2,678
2,671
2,800
2,792
2,945
3,095
3,160
3,185
3,147
3,164
3,150
3,053
15
16
19
17
18
19
21
20
25
20
19
18
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
263
262
267
273
273
277
281
281
279
289
287
288
223
223
222
219
226
227
235
242
244
238
240
240
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00	
72
8
3
8
Under $25.00 	
117
11
8
25
$25.00 to $29.99 -	
11
4
3
11
$25.00 to $29.99.	
38
1
6
14
30.00 to   34.99	
17
4
2
23
30.00 to   34.99  '
79
3
10
51
35.00 to   39.99	
38
3
7
49
35.00 to   39.99-	
62
5
9
68
40.00 to   44.99	
114
3
15
59
40.00 to   44.99	
109
3
14
44
45.00 to   49.99-	
100
6
12
28
45.00 to   49.99	
144
2
11
19
50.00 to   54.99	
189
3
13
16
50.00 to   54.99-	
289
1
32
15
55.00 to   59.99	
358
23
9
55.00 to   59.99  -
304
16
6
60.00 to   69.99-	
989
	
50
5
60.00 to   69.99-	
928
79
8
70.00 to   79.99	
562
58
1
70.00 to   79.99	
1,015
43
2
80.00 to   89.99	
331
54
	
80.00 to   89.99	
255
37
90.00 to   99.99	
183
22
	
90.00 to   99.99	
138
9
100.00 and over
168
	
32
	
100.00 and over
250
	
10
	 Table No. 4
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 5
H 29
COAL-MINING
Returns Covering 12 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)..
Total..
$476,947
68,716
3,976,253
$4,521,916
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
1,431
1
19
8
February. - .
1,475
1
19
8
March  -	
1,468
1
19
8
April 	
1,389
19
8
1,373
19
8
June	
1,398
19
8
July	
1,417
19
8
1,406
19
8
September	
1,391
19
8
October  -
1,419
19
8
November	
1,444
1
19
8
December 	
1,458
1
19
8
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99.
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
1
6
8
14
3
1,204
193
70
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
COAST SHIPPING
Returns Covering 135 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)	
Total	
$2,708,651
1,810,972
24,414,532
$28,934,155
Employment
Month
January	
February-
March 	
April	
May_	
June	
July- -.
August	
September-
October .—
November-
December .
Wage-earners
Males    Females
7,600
7,129
7,326
7,494
7,548
7,760
8,020
8,044
7,917
7,850
7,756
7,879
92
88
76
97
122
168
190
173
138
93
91
89
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
347
209
347
201
346
197
347
203
351
204
360
216
366
227
362
226
362
220
354
211
350
210
351
208
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
I
Males    Females    Males    Females
614
54
209
283
1,215
959
976
607
689
972
1,526
501
327
31
10
14
13
55
49
14
4
1
4
3
6
6
20
24
28
40
95
49
35
10
25
17
24
84
44
30
13
6
2
3 H 30
Table No. 6
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CONSTRUCTION
Returns Covering 1,856 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $9,906,509
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      9,079,275
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    67,457,917
Total   $86,443,701
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
18,052
18,628
20,261
20,446
21,347
21,944
21,718
21,628
20,678
19,566
18,382
16,719
113
110
108
141
157
179
196
166
93
89
92
91
1,880
1,832
1,827
1,800
1,788
1,792
1,750
1,753
1,758
1,748
1,752
1,743
956
941
943
April	
940
945
951
July      	
960
August.	
September	
949
948
949
953
951
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99-
to 34.99-
to 39.99-
to 44.99-
to 49.99_
to 54.99-
to 59.99-
to 69.99-
to 79.99„
to 89.99-
to 99.99-
and over.-.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males    Females
616
264
277
406
636
828
1,395
2,709
6,791
3,673
5,419
3,922
4,182
48
36
27
68
11
13
7
4
3
4
46
13
39
40
68
87
180
147
330
308
227
189
193
91
40
96
148
200
156
120
81
72
19
8
3
2
Table No. 7
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS
Returns Covering 45 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $752,738
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc —    2,321,512
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)—     5,317,817
Total-
$8,392,067
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
1,419
33
458
145
February—.	
1,443
38
456
152
March. 	
1,441
42
456
154
April	
1,467
40
457
154
May   	
1,445
35
458
154
June 	
1,434
36
455
153
July 	
1,457
1,460
37
440
149
August 	
40
439
145
September 	
1,429
40
439
148
October-	
1,420
40
437
143
November 	
1,384
39
438
145
December	
1,393
38
447
143
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 69.99.
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
6
6
4
27
30
36
89
144
453
533
190
63
29
4
14
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
1
3
3
9
17
25
21
56
62
106
114
100
13
32
55
46
23
9
7
2 Table No. 8
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 9
H  31
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 576 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $5,676,129
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       6,426,993
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      34,551,801
Total  - - — - $46,654,923
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
7,249
2,066
1,183
888
February 	
7,412
2,373
1,186
887
March	
7,842
2,602
1,189
894
8,396
2,513
1,199
896
May	
9,133
2,848
1,221
913
June	
9,743
3,285
1,219
933
July 	
10,155
5,700
1,190
958
August 	
10,668
6,434
1,200
955
September 	
10,304
7,190
1,178
934
9,902
6,122
1,205
934
8,337
4,117
1,197
923
December	
7,371
2,436
1,196
905
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over
Wage-earners
Males
736
245
240
305
518
937
1,529
2,121
2,919
1,883
990
475
557
Females
1,637
1,052
1,154
1,670
1,626
1,108
587
465
279
160
58
13
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   I Females
I
20
24
52
74
106
160
307
198
107
65
46
34
52
132
193
241
149
92
43
30
GARMENT-MAKING
Returns Covering 98 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers _      $720,226
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        618,799
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) —   2,900,227
Total-
$4,239,252
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
310
1,103
55
57
February.- -	
313
1,136
50
58
300
1,133
45
55
318
1,117
45
53
May  .
313
982
44    1        58
June —
320
950
44
59
July-	
306
994
40
52
August  -
319
1,051
41
56
September	
326
1,113
41
55
327
1,119
38
54
November	
316
1,070
39
57
December	
322
1,024
38
59
Classified Weekly Earnings H 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 10
HOUSE FURNISHINGS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 140 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc —
._     $906,771
654,459
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,812,544
Total..
$5,373,774
Employment
Month
January	
February—
March	
April	
May	
June 	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
Wage-earners
Males    Females
1,109
1,105
1,136
1,134
1,108
1,099
1,180
1,210
1,223
1,185
1,180
1,118
318
307
314
322
321
329
320
328
333
340
329
315
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
74
73
71
75
83
80
77
78
84
84
83
79
128
123
122
126
124
127
130
133
133
133
136
136
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
60
39
82
82
153
122
233
155
230
196
50
19
11
27
33
88
63
82
40
18
10
4
4
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
3
8
7
9
6
8
12
9
5
4
12
11
13
27
22
26
17
2
6
1
Table No. 11
JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING AND
REPAIR
Returns Covering 34 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers  $122,586
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     169,290
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     663,890
Total-
$955,766
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January.-	
158
155
150
150
151
147
149
150
149
149
156
152
122
116
120
117
116
124
144
137
126
142
166
160
9
9
9
9
9
10
69
64
64
62
63
June	
July _. .	
64
66
68
68
October  —
November 	
December	
75
84
72
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-eamers
Males    Females
9
5
8
14
12
8
9
6
46
32
11
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
30
1
15
	
124
16
8
2
3
	
1
1
2
1
2
	
2
	
5
32
9
11
6
4
6
4
2
1 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 33
Table No. 12
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING
Returns Covering 178 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Table No. 13
Officers, superintendents, and managers-
.-     $705,723
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     1,019,797
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     5,524,519
Total-
$7,250,039
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males    Females
January.—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
802
800
828
849
850
857
856
868
854
822
824
830
1,802
1,841
1,870
1,932
2,012
2,064
2,113
2,076
2,049
1,997
1,931
1,905
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
68
68
64
69
69
70
74
69
70
73
65
65
208
206
211
204
208
219
213
213
212
215
207
205
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 87 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)-.
Total	
$361,724
258,056
1,258,056
$1,877,836
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February 	
280
305
319
314
314
305
317
340
346
333
359
314
223
225
235
250
256
275
267
265
271
265
261
240
42
42
42
42
42
42
43
40
42
41
40
41
41
41
40
40
May 	
41
43
July	
42
August 	
41
39
41
42
41
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00	
61
278
3
17
Under $25 00
23
51
4
$25.00 to $29.99	
19
315
23
$25.00 to $29.99	
7
62
5
30.00 to   34.99	
21
387
33
30.00 to   34.99	
21
52
4
3
35.00 to   39.99-
47
682
57
35.00 to   39.99-	
19
57
2
11
40.00 to   44.99	
85
320
3
45
40.00 to   44.99    ..
40
61
3
12
45.00 to   49.99	
86
163
7
16
45.00 to   49.99
37
21
1
3
50.00 to   54.99	
121
48
4
9
50.00 to   54.99	
78
12
4
5
55,00 to   59.99	
149
24
5
3
55.00 to   59.99	
66
4
1
60.00 to   69.99	
172
34
14
3
60.00 to   69.99
70
1
6
70.00 to   79.99-	
97
4
9
1
70.00 to   79.99    .
17
3
5
1
80.00 to   89.99	
37
2
5
80.00 to   89.99
5
1
90.00 to   99.99	
11
3
	
90.00 to   99.99	
1
100.00 and over
12
2
100.00 and over	
1
3
	 H 34
Table No. 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 15
LUMBER INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 2,146 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers -     $12,087,384
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        6,859,365
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers).-     128,004,099
Total—
$146,950,848
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
26,116
252
1,086
669
February 	
29,735
277
1,086
674
March.  ., .
34,086
328
1,105
690
April  -	
33,888
327
1,105
690
May 	
35,946
334
1,119
690
37,325
347
1,138
716
July —	
39,554
370
1,111
731
August 	
39,251
364
1,110
720
September— 	
39,675
352
1,104
715
October	
38,757
422
1,104
717
November	
37,014
438
1,102
719
December- „
33,002
356
1,099
700
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 —
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99.
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males    Females
649
214
281
374
653
818
1,628
4,226
16,792
7,633
5,097
2,964
4,313
56
34
48
71
80
70
38
60
70
49
17
5
19
7
7
14
20
24
39
61
164
210
167
157
208
40
15
65
100
168
134
73
62
59
18
11
7
2
METAL TRADES
Returns Covering 1,708 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
$11,730,904
13,226,500
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    40,952,465
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Total..
$65,909,869
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
11,721
466
2,328
1,599
February	
11,715
487
2,351
1,585
March 	
11,941
497
2,348
1,601
April 	
12,199
490
2,378
1,613
May.   	
12,372
502
2,378
1,604
June. 	
12,676
530
2,410
1,628
July-	
12,828
540
2,411
1,655
August- —
12,880
529
2,408
1,640
September	
12,737
521
2,401
1,637
October	
12,626
523
2,405
1,652
November	
12,560
503
2,432
1,633
December	
12,373
499
2,422
1,638
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 —
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
461
262
357
471
807
773
1,379
1,246
3,112
3,657
1,177
613
498
75
68
117
85
96
45
64
22
66
5
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
48
22
45
56
97
157
205
266
489
338
269
170
290
111
74
208
325
414
324
151
59
68
27 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 35
Table No. 16
METAL-MINING
Returns Covering 97 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
$1,440,832
3,247,423
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     17,874,321
Total-
$22,562,576
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January   .	
4,638
76
546
100
February       	
4,494
77
551
94
March     .   .... .
4,335
78
542
92
4,224
76
539
88
4,448
4,730
79
543
87
June 	
82
550
91
July  	
4,774
83
533
93
4,768
78
535
88
September 	
4,724
78
529
88
October	
4,624
78
537
89
November	
4,403
74
535
88
December	
4,262
73
532
86
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
to 54.99.
to 59.99.
to 69.99.
to 79.99.
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over..
Wage-earners
Males    Females
126
117
92
91
85
182
404
449
1,062
995
880
396
514
12
14
5
12
3
1
15
4
11
2
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
I
Males  I Females
1
4
8
66
112
108
100
137
4
4
6
8
12
16
26
9
10
3
2
1
Table No. 17
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 584 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)	
Total-
$5,487,212
6,430,494
21,467,241
$33,384,947
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January  	
5,410
1,073
1,040
1,016
February  	
5,332
1,086
1,036
1,022
March— —
5,576
1,094
1,043
1,014
April	
5,665
1,134
1,053
1,021
May 	
5,888
1,250
1,067
1,041
June     	
6,076
1,277
1,069
1,061
July....  	
6,222
1,261
1,064
1,051
6,500
1,231
1,122
1,155
September	
6,253
2,023
1,064
1,049
October	
5,754
1,169
1,063
1,042
November-	
5,592
1,138
1,047
1,042
December	
5,533
1,092
1,053
1,052
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99-
to 34.99...
to 39.99-
to 44.99...
to 49.99...
to 54.99-
to 59.99...
to 69.99-
to 79.99-
to 89.99...
to 99.99-
and over—
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
I
Males    Females    Males  I Females
551
387
202
539
443
732
781
770
1,471
1,098
460
169
263
198
165
989
332
174 |
126
231
59
61
12
1
44
8
36
35
79
131
94
145
221
137
104
53
42
69
41
115
186
235
284
118
68
68
33 H 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 18
Table No. 19
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING
PAINT-MANUFACTURING
Returns Covering 89 Firms
Returns Covering 17 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,532,197
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $543,927
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       4,400,545
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. -       608,786
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)
Total 	
       9,249,810
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)	
Total..   -  $
793,007
  $15,182,552
1,945,720
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
1,999
11
744
369
January	
228
40
116
64
February  -
1,947
18
752
368
February	
235
41
120
65
2,055
21
761
365
March 	
248
47
120
72
April  —
1,718
23
755
364
April 	
255
49
124
71
May    	
1,751
24
776
377
May	
261
50
123
70
June  	
1,771
39
779
386
June.— 	
273
53
122
70
July	
1,784
37
788
385
July	
273
49
124
70
1,765
36
778
394
270
48
124
69
September -
1,756
1,871
39
763
391
248
44
126
69
26
769
384
242
43
129
65
November	
2,147
25
775
381
November 	
234
36
130
64
December	
2,079
22
781
382
December- 	
231
36
128
61
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25 00
63
2
6
Under $25.00	
6
3
1
1
$25.00 to $29.99 -
14
3
1
$25.00 to $29.99	
1
1
30.00 to   34.99	
18
2
2
12
30.00 to   34.99	
14
3
2
5
35.00 to   39.99
24
3
20
31
35.00 to   39.99	
16
3
5
23
40.00 to   44.99	
40
3
29
78
40.00 to   44.99	
19
6
7
10
45.00 to   49.99	
71
1
44
86
45.00 to   49.99	
29
30
6
14
50.00 to   54.99	
95
8
41
75
50.00 to   54.99	
35
2
13
10
55.00 to   59.99- -
149
8
28
36
55.00 to   59.99	
44
1
15
3
60.00 to   69.99	
581
7
104
40
60.00 to   69.99.	
78
1
33
4
70.00 to   79.99	
668
1
160
16
70.00 to   79.99	
24
20
80.00 to   89.99	
373
125
7
80.00 to   89.99	
4
17
	
90.00 to   99.99	
249
93
90.00 to   99.99	
3
8
100.00 and over.
445
	
158
100.00 and over
4
2
	 Table No. 20
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 21
H 37
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING
Returns Covering 185 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers....
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)..
Total..
$2,019,458
5,050,061
9,243,787
$16,313,306
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
2,043
361
827
645
February  	
2,057
361
826
651
2,078
383
823
657
2,094
346
829
652
May. 	
2,094
326
851
663
June 	
2,126
364
863
672
July    	
2,150
382
880
689
2,141
369
866
698
September 	
2,147
381
852
676
October  	
2,143
391
838
666
November	
2,159
398
841
659
December 	
2,154
415
855
660
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Under $25.00—
$25.00 to $29.99
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99.
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99.
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99.
90.00 to 99.99
100.00 and over.
115
86
70
55
97
60
70
69
195
202
519
554
209
Females
Males
82
20
46
33
55
26
57
34
38
35
40
41
98
70
23
59
7
95
3
98
4
107
3
113
137
41
57
131
131
120
73
44
21
20
14
6
11
6
PULP AND PAPER-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 13 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $3,613,764
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       3,129,339
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)...    25,573,016
Total..
$32,316,119
Employment
MoiJth
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February—	
5,648
5,614
5,673
5,789
5,903
5,885
6,085
6,037
5,996
5,983
5,998
5,834
189
197
190
179
186
201
197
202
193
196
203
161
402
406
407
406
411
422
425
429
427
427
427
429
255
253
248
252
257
261
July 	
269
267
September- 	
270
271
271
December	
274
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99—
to 34.99—
to   39.99—
to   44.99	
to   49.99	
to 54.99 -
to 59.99—
to 69.99 -
to 79.99—
to 89.99—
to 99.99—
and over—.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
159
39
34
52
43
55
90
193
1,377
1,302
994
765
1,047
14
2
3
10
45
54
27
31
11
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
2
3
5
5
15
49
92
90
51
101
1
24
35
35
68
29
43
29
7
2 H 38
Table No. 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 23
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING
Returns Covering 75 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
$928,075
1,134,888
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)—     12,614,456
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Total..
$14,677,419
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January. 	
February
2,922
3,243
3,211
3,022
3,227
3,387
3,502
3,420
3,184
3,201
3,285
3,248
10
12
16
16
18
16
18
20
8
6
4
4
269
270
268
279
260
260
265
266
265
267
264
263
112
109
113
April	
119
112
122
July         	
123
122
September	
October	
November  ..
December 	
124
124
121
120
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99.
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
54
16
66
35
85
77
77
94
646
1,249
979
312
563
11
8
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
2
1
4
2
10
14
14
29
39
49
21
19
4
5
27
35
23
14
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING
Returns Covering 10 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,781,388
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.—      5,396,297
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     15,507,653
Total..
$22,685,338
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males    Females
January.—
February-
March	
April ....
May-	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October-	
November-
December—
3,370
3,406
3,422
3,396
3,480
3,567
4,030
4,271
4,294
4,412
4,440
4,471
58
57
57
58
56
59
62
61
60
61
61
60
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
850
849
850
848
869
873
951
984
980
1,027
1,016
1,021
227
228
240
231
228
239
241
236
257
259
233
236
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99	
to   34.99—
to   39.99—
to   44.99	
to   49.99	
to   54.99	
to   59.99.	
to  69.99.	
to   79.99—
to   89.99	
to   99.99—
and over	
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males    Females
33
42
34
34
40
66
111
242
1,193
1,442
729
249
268
47
1
4
10
1
10
8
4
4
7
11
10
81
143
260
242
278
4
15
15
32
70
35
44
37
13 Table No. 24
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 25
H 39
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns Covering 116 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers..
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
$2,588,416
10,488,624
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)     30,035,025
Total.
$43,112,065
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January.— 	
5,639
3,754
1,482
1,567
February-—	
5,669
3,657
1,486
1,569
March 	
5,834
3,681
1,488
1,578
April- — „
5,999
3,813
1,503
1,590
May  	
5,987
3,804
1,531
1,626
June  	
6,075
3,846
1,561
1,706
July 	
6,174
3,860
1,585
1,777
6,252
3,790
1,607
1,741
September	
6,209
3,737
1,590
1,679
October 	
6,262
3,586
1,619
1,661
6,288
3,570
1,602
1,646
December..	
6,171
3,586
1,614
1,664
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
54
26
20
111
85
171
243
549
1,878
1,360
898
926
418
121
179
764
1,212
466
576
318
12
60
26
3
4
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
19
5
6
12
23
31
101
101
335
305
166 j
247
280 I
21
18
131
249
364
325
213
182
170
40
6
3
3
WOOD-MANUFACTURING (N.E.S.)
Returns Covering 178 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,777,839
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc _.       1,356,669
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)     18,010,636
Total..
$21,145,144
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
4,305
4,396
4,811
5,029
5,243
5,400
5,365
5,374
5,308
5,182
4,881
4,678
670
681
758
825
854
868
877
879
865
825
762
746
236
238
244
246
246
241
240
245
245
244
248
243
154
154
155
156
May—	
160
165
July	
August    	
165
165
164
168
165
December	
165
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99.
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99.
to 99.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
147
48
64
64
138
131
286
890
2,893
609
332
82
95
40
26
15
21
52
46
178
280
209
20
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
1
2
1
3
13
9
15
46
34
31
36
58
2
4
10
16
36
24
30
22
14
3
1
1
1 H 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES
Returns Covering 9,076 Firms
Total Salary and Wage Payments During Twelve Months Ended
December 31st, 1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  	
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)	
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey
returns, and additional services not included in the tables, namely,
workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)-
$71,797,863
87,288,063
502,451,264
$1,036,995
44,184,960
but not filing
Governmental
493,240,855
Total..
Employment
$661,537,190
538,462,810
$1,200,000,000
Month
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
January	
February	
March	
April.	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
118,560
122,785
130,717
131,687
136,953
141,304
145,419
146,190
144,178
141,081
136,122
128,334
13,088
13,462
13,909
14,119
14,591
15,466
18,006
18,581
20,030
17,914
15,707
13,641
14,727
14,717
14,739
14,805
14,947
15,070
15,087
15,184
15,040
15,140
15,110
15,120
9,967
9,933
9,996
10,014
10,120
10,394
10,573
10,600
10,404
10,368
10,302
10,284
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—-
to $29.99...
to 34.99...
to 39.99-
to 44.99...
to 49.99-
to 54.99...
to 59.99...
to 69.99-
to 79.99..
to 89.99..
to 99.99...
and over-
Totals...
4,783
1,959
2,242
3,209
5,549
6,489
10,234
15,709
46,504
29,691
21,429
12,633
14,204
174,635
2,998
2,381
4,091
4,584
3,321
2,543
1,859
1,175
890
313
89
27
15
24,286
246
127
235
290
505
727
1,026
1,175
2,706
2,470
2,099
1,720
2,140
15,466
519
392
1,173
1,803
2,345
1,951
1,155
725
667
215
70
26
19
11,060 " HOURS OF WORK ACT "
H 41
M
Hours of Work Act
ff
An amendment to the "Hours of Work Act" which became effective in 1946
reduced the hours of work legally permissible under the Act. Resulting from this legislation, a gradual decline in industrial working-hours became apparent for the years subsequent to 1946 in the record of annual figures shown below covering the period 1930
through 1954.
The computed annual figure representing the average working-hours for all industrial wage-earners reported during one week under survey is shown for each year as an
indicator of the general trend in the industrial work-week.
Following a low mark of 41.89 hours recorded for 1950, the average steadied somewhat to show 42.01 and 42.00 hours for 1951 and 1952, and subsequently dropped to
a lower figure of 41.60 hours for the average work-week in 1953.
The average industrial working-hours computed for all employees reported in the
wage-earner classification in all industries for one week of 1954 was 41.37, the lowest
average figure yet recorded in this section of the Report. Comparative average figures
for the years 1930 to 1954 were as follows:—
1930
1931
1932 .
1933
1934
1935 .
1936 .
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
48.62
1943
47.37
1944
47.69
1945
47.35
1946
47.32
1947
47.17
1948
47.63
1949
47.25
1950
46.84
1951
47.80
1952
46.91
1953
46.90
1954
48.12
  47.19
 46.02
  45.59
  43.63
 42.24
  42.21
  42.24
  41.89
 42.01
 42.00
 41.60
1954  41.37
The varying proportion of the total number of wage-earners working at the legal
maximum hours or less and those remaining at weekly hours in excess of the legal limit
is shown in the table below for the years 1947 to 1954.
Comparative Figures, 1947 to 1954 (Wage-earners)
Year
Firms
Reporting
Wage-earners
Reported
44 Hours or
Less per
Week
In Excess of
44 Hours
1947                   .    .    -	
8,410
8,736
9,020
9,509
9,635
9,200
9,008
9,076
159,300
165,411
161,945
169,342
178,909
180,107
172,174
169,757
Per Cent
80.63
81.59
81.86
83.06
82.24
83.20
85.56
85.93
Per Cent
19.37
1948      -
18.41
1949 	
18.14
1950
16.94
1951                                      .
17.76
1952   - 	
16.80
1953            —  	
14.44
1954                             	
14 07
Hours-of-work information for 1954 is based on returns from some 9,076 employers
replying to the Department of Labour inquiry, and covers a total of some 169,757 wage-
earners, male and female, reported under this section of the questionnaire.
In most industries shorter hours were again noted in the wage-earner sections, the
average work-week decreasing as compared with the previous year in fifteen of the
twenty-nine classifications listed in the following tables.
Increased activity resulting in slightly longer working-hours in some instances was
noted particularly in the secondary forest industries, pulp and paper manufacturing,
ship-building and boat-building, and smelting and concentrating, but such increases were
generally offset by shorter time reported in some of the larger employment classifications, H 42 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
such as the heavy-construction industry, metal-mining, the metal trades, and others in
lesser degree.
The percentage of the total wage-earners reported as working within the limits of
the 44-hour week further increased to the highest figure yet recorded, with 85.93 per
cent of the total showing in this group for 1954. The proportion of workers still in
excess of 44 hours per week was reduced to 14.07 per cent of total, as compared with
14.44 per cent noted for the previous year.
Clerical employees reported in the question dealing with hours of work numbered
some 25,989 for 1954, this group including clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc.,
but excluding officials and executive staff. Average weekly working-hours of clerical
employees in the various industries included in the survey are also shown in a table
which follows this section.
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries
The average weekly hours recorded for 1954 and previous years in the various
industrial classifications included in the survey are shown in the tables which follow,
with separate data for wage-earners and clerical workers. ' HOURS OF WORK ACT '
H 43
Average Weekly Hours of Work
Wage-earners
Industry
1950
1952
1953
1954
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers-
Builders' materials  	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing-
Coal-mining.. 	
Coast shipping-
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals-
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings-
Jewellery manufacturing and repair-
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing _
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries—
Logging-
Lumber-dealers..
Planing-mills	
Sawmills-
Shingle-mills-
Metal trades	
Metal-mining..
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil refining and distributing 	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing -
Pulp and paper manufacturing...
Ship-building and boat-building..
Smelting and concentrating _
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc..
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)  	
41.32
42.65
44.14
39.17
46.83
41.49
42.25
43.70
38.96
40.29
38.85
41.31
40.12
41.57
42.99
41.17
41.15
39.83
41.83
43.95
42.07
43.94
41.57
37.98
43.36
40.21
43.13
40.59
40.16
40.60
42.03
45.19
39.90
46.74
43.02
41.78
43.04
38.51
40.34
38.28
40.94
39.70
42.36
42.61
41.68
41.03
39.88
41.77
44.32
41.54
43.86
40.58
37.72
42.89
41.63
42.17
38.60
39.93
40.39
42.98
44.42
40.08
44.26
43.91
40.29
43.47
39.16
39.95
38.17
41.26
40.28
41.77
42.61
42.18
41.07
39.62
41.39
45.04
40.84
43.40
40.25
37.98
40.82
41.48
40.07
38.49
40.22
40.50
42.26
44.78
39.97
42.84
41.86
41.56
43.05
39.391
40.03
37.57
40.72
40.76
42.11
42.59
42.29
41.05
39.68
42.10
43.88
40.39
43.88
40.711
37.36
41.75
41.08
40.89
39.98
40.04
40.21
41.59
43.79
36.26
43.28
41.25
40.52
42.91
39.15
40.10
38.20
39.21
40.39
42.09
42.23
42.30
41.06
40.08
41.15
43.49
40.39
43.90
40.79
37.91
42.74
42.08
41.79
38.46
40.21
1 Revised since 1953 Report.
Clerical Workers
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers-
Builders' materials  	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing..
Coal-mining-
Coast shipping-
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals-
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair-
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing -
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing ..
Lumber industries—
Logging..
Lumber-dealers-
Planing-mills	
Sawmills	
Shingle-mills-
Metal trades	
Metal-mining-
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing  	
Printing and publishing..
Pulp and paper manufacturing —
Ship-building and boat-building..
Smelting and concentrating -
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) 	
38.81
38.05
39.93
39.50
39.78
37.69
41.27
41.79
38.48
38.97
38.20
42.65
37.59
41.12
41.84
39.82
39.43
39.61
40.47
42.85
41.54
37.64
37.68
36.58
39.35
39.80
42.54
35.19
38.03
38.51
38.05
39.78
39.18
39.93
38.37
39.79
40.52
38.99
39.17
37.62
42.16
38.30
41.50
38.21
40.37
39.33
39.02
39.95
43.80
39.38
37.17
38.74
37.24
37.86
38.63
41.60
35.59
37.30
37.74
37.22
39.42
38.90
38.39
40.11
38.99
40.07
39.83
39.43
37.38
41.69
37.51
39.16
38.57
40.33
39.36
38.44
39.68
42.50
38.87
36.63
38.53
37.08
38.10
38.33
41.08
35.74
38.10
37.80
36.80
40.07
39.68
38.37
39.08
39.09
40.45
39.221
39.04
37.09
41.22
36.46
41.04
39.89
40.46
38.51
37.24
39.39
42.17
38.73
36.81
38.281
36.42
38.50
37.47
40.41
35.93
37.69
38.30
36.43
39.71
39.81
37.82
38.07
38.46
39.33
39.06
38.23
37.05
40.23
38.43
40.32
39.66
41.42
37.55
36.04
39.02
41.75
38.15
36.90
37.83
36.45
37.67
37.16
40.71
35.89
37.11
1 Revised since 1953 Report. H 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers
Returns received from civic and municipal authorities in respect to employment
and payrolls of workers in public works, utilities, etc., as a portion of the total industrial
payroll are first included with similar industrial classifications summarized elsewhere
in this Report.
Following this procedure, the information is again segregated and presented separately in this section, in order that comparative figures on a yearly basis may be maintained
as referring only to payroll and employment data for this class of worker.
Included in the totals are workers employed in public works, the construction and
maintenance of waterworks, generation and distribution of light and power, and similar
operations owned and operated by cities or municipalities completing the reports.
Representing the total labour costs reported by the 147 civic and municipal
administrations completing returns, the 1954 payroll was $19,750,745, an increase of
$842,164 above the total of $18,908,581 reported for the previous year.
Shown in the table below are payroll totals in each of the three main employee
classifications covered in the civic and municipal survey for the comparative years 1952,
1953, and 1954.
1952
1953
1954
Officers, superintendents, and managers 	
Clerks, stenographers, etc.
$1,950,326
1,901,408
12,882,011
$2,180,728
2,142,661
14,585,192
$2,033,828
2,813,855
14,903,062
Totals
$16,733,745
$18,908,581
$19,750,745
Employment totals of workers in civic and municipal occupations were somewhat
higher in 1954 than during the previous year, with principal gains noted in the numbers
of male employees reported in clerical jobs.
The month of August constituted the peak employment period in this section for
1954, a total of 6,626 employees in all categories being reported for that month, as
compared with a high of 6,388 reported in My of 1953.
Comparative employment totals for male and female civic and municipal workers
are shown on a monthly basis in the table following, with separate figures recorded for
wage-earners and clerical employees:—
Employment Totals1 of Civic and Municipal Workers, 1953 and 1954
1953
1954
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January    —
February  	
4,395
4,385
4,510
4,661
4,956
5,174
5,382
5,328
5,048
4,920
4,699
4,632
60
58
63
62
134
162
185
161
74
65
62
54
511
509
517
516
534
526
545
541
542
536
547
543
259
264
265
269
271
285
276
276
275
276
273
275
4,477
4,384
4,591
4,813
5,030
5,200
5,417
5,540
5,077
4,936
4,793
4,658
52
58
64
113
125
155
179
153
75
58
59
52
599
595
603
611
620
625
629
638
627
629
629
639
266
267
271
April  	
267
271
282
July   	
291
295
292
297
November -	
300
304
1 Totals represent the number of employees on payroll on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. STATISTICS OF CIVIC AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS
H 45
A percentage distribution of employment in relation to weekly earnings is shown
in the following table, the percentage figures indicating the proportion of the total male
wage-earner group of civic and municipal employees in the various weekly wage classifications for the comparative years 1953 and 1954:—
Percentage of Employees
Weekly Earnings
Under $25.00
1953
     3.02
1954
2.63
$25 to $29.99                    	
     1.01
1.23
30 to
34.99   _   	
     0.90
1.23
35 to
39.99   	
     1.10
1.06
40 to
44.99
     5.36
2.45
45 to
49.99
     7.43
6.74
50 to
54.99       	
     8.83
7.88
55 to
59.99	
  27.94
24.52
60 to
70.00   	
  28.52
35.49
70 to
80.00
         9.10
10.34
80 and
over  	
     6.79
6.43
Workers in civic and municipal occupations earned more in 1954 than during the
previous year, with wage increases apparent for both classes of employment—wage-
earners and clerical staff.
Average weekly earnings for male wage-earners on civic and municipal payrolls
increased to set a new high mark of $60.59 in 1954, as compared with a previous figure
of $58.81 recorded in 1953.
Increased earnings were also noted for clerical employees, the average weekly salary
for male office-workers being computed at $66.04 in 1954, up from $61.60 reported for
1953, while the average weekly amount paid to female clerical workers in civic and
municipal employment was $45.13, a substantial advance from the figure of $42.31
noted for this group during the previous year.
The average work-week for civic and municipal employees in 1954 was a little less
than during the previous year. Average time was computed at 40.46 hours for the
wage-earner group, as compared with 40.51 hours for a similar week in this section in
1953. For clerical employees the average week was 36.87 hours in 1954, down from
38.11 hours recorded for an average week in 1953. H 46 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1955)
"Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act"
This Act embodies the majority of the provisions of the "Apprenticeship Act."
It contains a new principle which is intended to provide the benefits of apprenticeship
for fringe trades where it is not advisable to designate the trade because training in every
instance is not available. The Act further provides for the issuance of a certificate of
proficiency with respect to certain designated trades. Other changes in the Act were
made to meet these two new conditions.
" Boiler and Pressure-vessel Act Amendment Act, 1955"
This amending legislation revises several definitions and makes them similar to those
in common usage throughout Canada. It also introduces a new interim certificate which,
under certain conditions, permits the owner to put his plant into operation until inspection is possible. This is necessary in the case of new heating installations in remote
parts of the Province, oil-drilling in the Peace River country, and in emergencies. It is
no longer practicable to inspect all plants before operation. A further amendment makes
any certificate subject to annual registration by regulation.
"Employment Agencies Act, 1955"
This Act replaces the " Employment Agencies Act," chapter 109 of the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."   The principal changes are as follows:—
1. Trade-schools registered under the " Trade-schools Regulation Act " are excepted
from the provisions of this Act.
2. Employment agencies are now required to register with and obtain a certificate
from the Minister of Labour.   The registration must be renewed annually.
3. Section 10 prohibits an employment agency which has knowledge of a legal strike
or lockout from sending a person to take employment in place of an employee on strike
or lockout without informing such person of the strike or lockout.
"Workmen's Compensation Act Amendment Act, 1955"
Amendments to the " Workmen's Compensation Act" increase minimum compensation for total disability and temporary total disability from $15 to $25 per week.
Section 54a has been rewritten to provide a simplified form of appeal. The monthly
rate of benefit payable to the widow of a workman in respect of children under 16 years
of age or up to 18 years if attending school is increased from $20 to $25 for each child.
Certain new definitions have been added and further amendments have been made
to ensure prompt progress reports from physicians, qualified practitioners, and others,
thereby reducing unnecessary delays in the payment of workmen's compensation. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 47
Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Members of the Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands, Deputy
Minister of Labour    -      Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Members:
Fraudena Eaton
G. A. Little -
H. J. Young
C. Murdoch
P. Baskin   -
D. J. Baldwin   -
Secretary:
C. R. Margison
Head office
Branch office
All Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
411 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Regional offices:
17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo.    Department of Labour, Prince George.
Court-house, Kelowna. Department of Labour, Smithers.
Court-house, Nelson. Department of Labour, Cranbrook.
515 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the twenty-first annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1954.
The activities of the Board include those formerly directed by the Minimum Wage
Board, which functioned for sixteen years prior to 1934. The original Board dealt with
minimum wages, hours of labour, and conditions of employment for women and girls,
so this report, in so far as it relates to women workers, is the thirty-seventh annual record
of labour laws and their results in that sphere.
Meetings and Delegations
During the year the Board held thirty-three meetings, twenty-five of which were
held in the City of Vancouver, six in the City of Victoria, and two in the City of Prince
George.
The Board held public hearings in Prince George and Vancouver in connection
with the revision of the Minimum Wage Orders applying to employees in the logging
and sawmill industries. The public hearing in Prince George promoted considerable
interest as it is many years since the Board held a meeting in that part of the Province,
and employers and employees in Prince George and the adjacent area took advantage
of the opportunity to discuss problems with the Board.
Certain employers in the construction industry had suggested to the Board that the
daily guarantee provisions of the Minimum Wage Order applying to that industry were
too stringent, and, accordingly, parties affected by the Order were given an opportunity
to make representations to the Board with respect to that matter. As the Board had
also received requests for a revision of the Minimum Wage Order applying to the car- H 48 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
pentry trade, the disposition of the requested revision of the daily guarantee provision
was withheld pending consideration being given to the revision of all Minimum Wage
Orders applying to employers and employees in the construction industry.
Following the coming into effect of the " Equal Pay Act," quite a few complaints
were submitted to the Department by female employees to the effect that they were being
discriminated against by reason of the fact that they were being paid at a rate of pay
less than the rate of pay paid to male employees employed by the same employer for the
same work done in the same establishment. Following the procedure set out in the Act,
twelve of the complaints were referred to the Board, and the Board held the necessary
hearings to give the parties an opportunity to present evidence and make submissions.
The Board found that in every case the complaints were supported by the evidence and
recommended the course that ought to be taken with respect to the complaints. As a
result, the Minister of Labour issued the orders which were necessary to carry out the
recommendations of the Board, and the twelve complainants thereby had their wage rates
adjusted consistent with the provisions of the "Equal Pay Act." It is interesting to note
that five of the complainants received upward wage adjustments of $13 per month, and
seven of the complainants had their wages increased by $16 per month.
As in previous years, due to the increased expansion of industry in the Province,
much of the Board's time was taken up in connection with the consideration of applications for overtime permits. As the Board's authority in this connection is restricted to
the granting of permits only in connection with emergent conditions, numerous delegations
appeared before the Board to present argument to prove to its satisfaction that conditions
were such that overtime permits could be issued consistent with the requirements of the
Act. In this connection, when it appeared that unemployment was to become a problem
in British Columbia during the winter months, the Board sent a circular letter to approximately 20,000 employers suggesting that overtime work might be overcome by the
employment of additional employees. There is no doubt that this circular had a considerable influence upon employers in the matter of working employees overtime.
Shortly after the "Labour Relations Act" was proclaimed in force on June 16th,
1954, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council appointed the members of the Board of
Industrial Relations to the Labour Relations Board, thereby adding considerably to their
duties and responsibilities.
On January 21st, 1954, Mr. C. Murdoch was appointed to the Board, replacing
Mr. H. Douglas, who had retired for personal reasons. Mr. Murdoch, having had
many years' experience as a trade-union official, was well qualified and suited for his
appointment.
Orders and Regulations Made during 1954
Minimum Wage Orders
1. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order
No. 46 (1954).—Following public hearings which had been held in the Cities of Vancouver and Kelowna, the Board made Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46
(1954) which replaced two orders previously in effect establishing minimum wages and
other conditions for employees in the fresh fruit and vegetable industry. Subject to the
provisions of the " Equal Pay Act," the minimum wage for females in that industry was
increased from 40 to 60 cents per hour, and for males from 48 to 75 cents per hour.
The weekly hours of work after which overtime became payable was reduced by nine
hours.
Regulations Made pursuant to the "Hours of Work Act"
Regulation No. 21n—Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—Although this regulation did not change the exemption period which had applied to this industry for a BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 49
number of years, it established it on an annual basis which made it subject to consideration
and possible revision each year. The cancelled regulation had been effective from year
to year.
Regulation No. 23c—Delivery of Milk.—This regulation amended Regulations Nos.
23a and 23b so that the hours of work established by the said regulations applied to the
wholesale and retail delivery of milk. This amendment was made because it was impossible on certain routes to distinguish between retail and wholesale deliveries.
(A summary of the above-mentioned orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new orders and regulations made prior to this Report going to press, may
be obtained free of charge from the Department on request.)
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees
The 1954 statistical survey of female workers in industry and business is summarized
in the section which follows, the tables being so arranged as to provide comparative
information over the past five years dealing with the employment, earnings, and hours
of work of female employees in various industries and occupations for which Minimum
Wage Orders have been set by the Board.
Further emphasizing the weight and importance of this great sector of our total
labour force, employment of women in industry and business continued to increase
during the past year, with summary totals for 1954 exceeding all previous records in
this section of the Report.
Reports from 8,151 firms filing returns for 1954 showed a total employment of
68,239 women workers on payroll during the period under survey, this total representing a substantial increase from the 66,250 female employees reported by some 8,331
firms included in the coverage of the 1953 inquiry.
Mercantile Industry (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting....
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings..
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
1,717
13,728
$464,712.00
$33.85
37.08
1,813
12,206
$384,169.00
$31.47
36.31
1,889
12,534
$364,716.00
$29.10
35.56
1,830
12,570
$351,563.00
$27.97
37.24
1,733
11,946
$334,995.00
$28.04
41.60
The mercantile industry accounted for one of the largest sections of female employment, with 1,717 firms in this industry reporting a total of 13,728 women workers
on payroll during one week of 1954. Although fewer firms completed returns than
during the previous year, the employment represented was greater than for any previous
year in the above table.
As the returns are based on a period of greatest employment, it is not unusual for
many firms in the mercantile industry to use the Christmas week in reporting employment and payroll totals. For this reason, some fluctuation in working-time and resultant
earnings may occur due to the position of the holiday within the working-week.
Average weekly earnings for mercantile workers increased to $33.85 in 1954, the
highest wage figure yet recorded in this classification. The average work-week was,
however, somewhat longer than during a similar period in 1953, the 1954 average increasing to 37.08 hours, as compared with 36.31 hours noted for the previous year. H 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female)
1954
1953
I
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees.
Total weekly earnings..
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week..
248
2,604
$90,153.00
$34.62
37.46
235 |
2,739  |
$90,398.00
$33.00
38.07
258
2,743
$87,558.00
$31.92
39.41
241
2,744
$80,075.00
$29.18
39.28
248
2,539
$69,432.00
$27.35
39.95
A representative week reported by some 248 firms in the laundry, cleaning and
dyeing industries during 1954 showed a total of 2,604 female workers employed, this
figure being slightly below the employment level of the previous year.
For the week reported, the 2,604 employees received a total of $90,153, or an
average per capita weekly wage of $34.62. This figure represents a considerable advance
from the previous year, when average weekly earnings for females in this industry was
computed at $33.
A fractional decrease was also apparent in the hours worked in this classification,
the 1954 working-time being shown as an average of 37.46 hours, compared with 38.07
reported for 1953.
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of employees ..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week„
1,276
11,328
$335,405.00
$29.61
36.55
1,296
10,807
$313,723.00
$29.03
37.22
1,351
10,620
$288,432.00
$27.16
37.63
1,335
10,458
$270,068.00
$25.82
38.49
1,297
10,541
$252,163.00
$23.92
38.01
Hotels and restaurants reporting in the 1954 survey showed a total of 11,328 female
workers employed during one week of that year, this figure representing a substantial
increase from the 10,807 employees shown for 1953, and the highest employment total
yet recorded in this section.
Increased earnings and shorter hours were again apparent for female help in hotel
and catering occupations, the average weekly wage figure for 1954 rising to $29.61
from $29.03 reported for the previous year. Average working-week for employees in
this classification was further reduced to 36.55 hours, as compared with 37.22 hours
noted in 1953.
Office Occupation (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week..
3,483
20,069
$856,551.00
$42.68
37.66
3,588
19,143
$781,343.00
$40.82
37.65
3,555
18,851
$732,206.00
$38.84
38.38
3,501
18,511
$678,776.00
$36.67
38.41
3,333
17,059
$551,373.00
$32.32
38.43
Office occupations in industry and business continue to account for the greatest
number of women employed at any one type of job. Attractive earnings and shorter
hours make this occupation a favoured one for a great majority of women workers, as
evidenced by the rapid increase in employment noted in this section during the past
few years.
Some 20,069 office-workers were reported by firms completing details of female
employment for 1954, as compared with the previous year's high of 19,143, and 18,851 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 51
reported in 1952. Increasing opportunities for female workers with office training proved
a strengthening factor in the high level of wages established in this occupation, and
during 1954 further increases were apparent.
Average per capita weekly earnings for females employed in office occupations was
$42.68 in 1954, up from $40.82 recorded in 1953, to establish a new high for earnings
in this section.
Compared with the 1953 record, little fluctuation was noted in the average weekly
hours worked by office employees, the 1954 average showing at 37.66 hours, almost
unchanged from the low level established during the previous year.
Hairdressing Occupation (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
97
345
$13,844.00
$40.13
38.02
97
283
$10,447.00
$36.92
38.83
113
308
$11,116.00
$36.09
38.85
112
292
$9,710.00
$33.25
40.24
133
400
Total weekly earnings  	
$11,857.00
$29.64
38.40
The above classification is inclusive of females employed in beauty-parlours and
hairdressing establishments, and firms reporting are limited to those employing staff.
While this group remains a comparatively small one, this is due in part to the fact that
many firms in this business are owner-operated, employ no outside help, and are therefore not included in the totals.
Although the number of firms reporting was the same as for the previous year,
employment in 1954 increased to 345 from the low of 283 female employees reported in
this occupation for 1953.
Increased earnings and shorter hours were general for those employed, and the
average figure representing weekly earnings climbed to $40.13 in 1954, well ahead of the
$36.92 recorded for the previous year.
Average hours worked by female employees in this classification were reduced to
38.02 for the week reviewed, as compared with 38.83 hours for a similar period in 1953.
Fis
ding Industry (Fema
e)
1954
1953                    1952
1951
1950
38
2,291
$106,559.00
$46.51
38.67
30
2,424
$99,940.00
$41.23
38.72
26
2,058
$92,234.00
$44.82
39.67
31
2,108
$81,425.00
$38.63
38.43
25
1,709
$59,554.00
$34.85
39 04
Seasonal employment of large numbers of workers for varying periods of time is
common in the fishing industry, depending on the size of the catch and time factors
involving the handling and processing of large quantities of incoming fish.
The 1954 seasonal peak week showed a total of 2,291 females employed, this total
being off somewhat from the high mark of 2,424 reported during the busy period of 1953.
Piece-work, in addition to regular-time wages in this industry, continues to affect the
weekly averages recorded each year, and earnings may fluctuate in accordance with the
particular type of operation in which a plant is engaged.
Average weekly earnings for all females employed during the week of greatest
employment in 1954 was $46.51, the highest average yet recorded for the fishing industry
and well in advance of wage figures shown for this section in 1953 and 1952. H 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Compared with the previous year, the average working-week for female employees
in the fishing industry showed only a fractional change, easing to 38.67 hours from 38.72
hours computed for an average week in this industry in 1953.
Telephone
and Telegraph Occupation (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
264
4,507
$186,712.00
$41.43
37.73
253
4,523
$184,752.00
$40.85
38.06
227
3,952
$143,582.00
$36.33
37.89
220
3,712
$130,116.00
$35.05
36.27
231
3,391
$91,226.00
$26.90
38.92
Female employees in switchboard work and similar occupations in industry and
business relating to the telephone and telegraph coverage are included in the above table,
in addition to firms engaged in the actual business of communications.
Reports from some 264 establishments employing women in occupations relating to
this classification were received for 1954, the returns totalling some 4,507 workers, as
compared with a close figure of 4,523 listed in 1953, when fewer firms reported.
Earnings continued to advance from the level set during 1953, the average weekly
figure for 1954 increasing to a new high of $41.43 from the $40.85 mark established
during the previous year.
Working-hours for employees in switchboard and other telephone and telegraph
occupations decreased slightly from the previous year, the work-week being computed at
37.73 hours, as compared with 38.06 hours recorded in 1953.
Manufacturing Industry (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
746
7,468
$302,609.00
$40.52
38.24
750
7,758
$306,103.00
$39.46
38.72
781
8,044
$306,820.00
$38.14
38.62
796
8,462
$286,483.00
$33.86
38.28
769
8,308
$256,282.00
$30.85
38.32
Employment for females in the manufacturing industries continued to decrease in
1954, following the downward trend generally established from the high totals noted in
this section during earlier years. The 746 firms reporting in time for classification showed
a total of 7,468 female workers in all manufacturing occupations, this total registering a
further decrease from the 7,758 reported by 750 firms in 1953.
Although fewer were employed, women workers in the manufacturing industries
benefited by increased earnings and shorter hours in 1954, the 7,468 employees reported
receiving wages and salaries in amount of $302,609 for one week under survey, to show
an average per capita weekly wage of $40.52, up from an average weekly amount of
$39.46 reported in 1953.
A fractional decrease was also noted in working-time, the average week being
computed at 38.24 hours in 1954, as compared with 38.72 hours recorded for the previous year. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female)
H 53
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week~
85
4,992
$183,278.00
$36.71
42.11
87
5,533
$198,886.00
$35.95
41.99
84
5,688
$202,265.00
$35.56
43.94
80
5,485
$181,235.00
$33.04
41.32
72
5,791
$167,653.00
$28.95
41.89
Seasonal factors involving weather and resultant crop conditions are largely responsible for yearly variation in the record of employment, wages, and general labour activity
in the fruit- and vegetable-processing industries.
During the seasonal peak week of 1954, returns from 85 firms in this industry indicated an over-all total of 4,992 women employed, this total being considerably below the
previous year's total of 5,533 and 5,688 reported in 1952.
Earnings continued in strength above the previous level, however, increasing to
$36.71 for the average week in 1954, up from an average figure of $35.95 recorded for
a similar period in 1953.
Weekly hours of work reported for processing firms in the fruit and vegetable industry were little changed from the previous year, the 1954 average showing at 42.11 hours,
as compared with 41.99 hours during the week under survey in 1953.
Transportation Industry (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
58
135
$4,689.00
$34.73
37.39
48
122
$3,970.00
$32.54
38.11
58
157
$4,789.00
$30.50
39.38
53
139
$3,685.00
$26.51
42.84
40
103
Total weekly earnings 	
$2,523.00
$24.50
42.27
The transportation industry continues to employ a small number of female workers
in delivery, trucking, and messenger work, a total of 135 women being listed in occupations of this nature by the 58 firms reporting in this classification for 1954.
Average weekly earnings for occupations in this small group again increased, the
1954 wage figure rising to $34.73 from $32.54 recorded in 1953, although the work-week
was somewhat shorter on the basis of hours worked than for a similar period during the
previous year.
Following the downward trend noted in the above tables since 1951, weekly hours
worked by employees in this classification again decreased in 1954, the average showing
at 37.39 hours, down from 38.11 mentioned for 1953 and 39.38 shown in 1952.
Public Places of Amusement (Female)
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
107
606
$13,258.00
$21.88
27.14
108
646
$14,336.00
$22.19
28.41
107
612
$11,362.00
$18.57
26.20
107
588
$10,950.00
$18.62
27.89
97
519
$8,753.00
$16.87
27.60
Included in the totals for this section are women employed as theatre ushers, checkroom attendants, and similar occupations in connection with swimming-pools, bowling-
alleys, sports centres, and other such public places of amusement. H 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
A total of 107 firms reported in this business for 1954, with some 606 female
employees shown in the returns, this total, however, being somewhat less than in 1953,
when employment in this classification reached a high of 646.
Work performed in the above-listed occupations is necessarily of a part-time nature,
and it will be noted that weekly hours are shorter and earnings relatively lower than for
other occupations with full-time employment.
The average time worked and resultant weekly earnings in 1954 were slightly below
the 1953 level, which was apparently a busy year for workers in this section. On the
basis of longer hours in 1953, the average employee earnings for the part-time week was
$22.19, this figure decreasing to $21.88 in 1954, when the work-week was recorded at
27.14 hours. As mentioned previously, average earnings in this classification do not
refer to full-time employment.
Personal-service Occupations (Female)
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting...
Total number of employees..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week..
32
26
166
66
$7,150.00
$2,793.00
$43.07
$42.32
39.11
36.98
Commencing in 1953, statistical questionnaires were amended to include a section
which would enable employers to report separately female workers employed in occupations relating to personal service, such as those engaged in the work of massage, physiotherapy, chiropody, chiropractic, osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized
therapeutics, and all work of a like nature.
More complete returns under this heading resulted in increased totals in the 1954
record for this section, although, due to many office-workers being also partially employed
in work of this kind, the figures should properly be considered only as a sampling of
payroll information in this group rather than referring to a total coverage of these
occupations.
The average weekly individual salary computed for the 166 personal-service workers
reported for 1954 was $43.07, as compared with $42.32 listed as average weekly earnings
during the previous year. Average working-time for the week under survey in this section
for 1954 was 39.11 hours.
Summary of All Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act")
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week-
8,151
68,239
$2,564,920.00
$37.59
37.69
8,331
66,250
$2,390,860.00
$36.09
37.82
8,449
65,567
$2,245,080.00
$34.24
38.18
8,306
65,069
$2,084,086.00
$32.03
38.26
7,978
62,306
$1,805,811.00
$28.98
39.30
The summary of 1954 payroll information concerning female workers is based on
returns from 8,151 firms reporting some 68,239 women employed during the week under
survey for that year.
Although the number of firms reporting in time for classification in the tables was
somewhat lower in 1954 than for the peak year of 1952, employment and payroll totals
continued upward in the summary of all occupations, and higher earnings with shorter
hours was apparent in most occupations within the coverage of the " Female Minimum
Wage Act."
For one representative week of 1954 the 68,239 female workers reported were paid
a total of $2,564,920 in salaries and wages, as compared with $2,390,860 paid to 66,250
women employees for a similar pay period in 1953. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 55
For all occupations included in the summary, the average over-all figure representing
weekly earnings increased to $37.59, up $1.50 from the level of the previous year, to set
a new high figure in the record of average earnings for all occupations included in the
survey as a whole.
Minimum Wage Orders in effect during 1954 established legal minimum salaries for
female workers on a weekly basis, ranging from $17.60 to a high of $26.40, with exceptions in some cases providing for higher earnings on a straight-time basis in certain
seasonal occupations exempt from various regulations of the " Hours of Work Act."
Viewed in relation to the range of legal minimum weekly amounts mentioned above,
the summary figure of $37.59 (representing average weekly earnings for females in all
occupations in the annual survey) would appear to emphasize the fact that earnings for
women workers in this Province continue at a level well in advance of the required minima
set by law.
Compared with an average work-week of 37.82 hours recorded for all women
workers under survey in 1953, the average again decreased fractionally, to set a new low
figure of 37.69 hours for an average week in 1954, this figure representing the shortest
time yet recorded in the annual summary of weekly hours of work.
The total of 68,239 female workers mentioned in the summary table for 1954 is
inclusive of only those employees in occupations and industries for which Minimum Wage
Orders have been set by the Board. The totals are not inclusive of domestic workers,
farm-labourers, or fruit-pickers, these occupations being excluded from the coverage of
the provisions of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Federal workers and bank employees are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation.
Table Showing Comparative Relation of 1954 Earnings to Legal Minimum
Industry or Occupation
Number
of
Firms
Reporting
Number
of
Employees
Reported
Total
Weekly
Payroll
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Full-time
Employees
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Percentage
by Which
1954 Average
Earnings Exceed Legal
Minimum
Mercantile-
Laundry	
Hotel and catering-
Office	
Hairdressing	
Fishing-
Telephone and telegraph-
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable _
Transportation-
Public places of amusement-
Personal service	
1,717
248
1,276
3,483
97
38
264
746
85
58
107
32
All occupations..
8,151
13,728
2,604
11,328
20,069
345
2,291
4,507
7,468
4,992
135
606
166
68,239
$464,712
90,153
335,405
856,551
13,844
106,559
186,712
302,609
183,278
4,689
13,258
7,150
$18.00!
17.602
22.003
18.001
25.001
19.201
20.161
17.602
26.40=
18.003
20.003
$2,564,920
$33.85
34.62
29.61
42.68
40.13
46.51
41.43
40.52
36.71
34.73
21.88s
43.07
$37.59
88.1
96.7
34.6
137.1
60.5
142.2
105.5
130.2
39.1
21.6"
115.4
113.6
1 Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week
2 Forty-four hours per week.
3 Forty to forty-four hours per week.
4 Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
5 In the transportation industry it is impracticable to set a weekly rate, owing to the variation of minimum wages in
the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycle, by motor-cycle, or other types of motor-vehicles.
6 Earnings represent partial week only.
Employment and payroll information for each occupational classification included
in the 1954 survey is summarized in the above table, together with the average weekly
earnings in each case shown in relation to the legal minimum wage established for that
occupation by the Orders of the Board. The percentage by which the average exceeds
the fixed rate is also expressed in the table, and it is significant that the figure of $37.59,
which represents the average weekly earnings for all female workers in the survey, was
113.6 per cent in excess of the lowest legal minimum set by the Board. H 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)
Supplementing the regular annual statistical coverage of women workers in industry
and business, the survey for 1954 also included an inquiry directed to hospitals, nursing
homes, and similar institutions. Although nursing staffs are omitted from this survey,
all other female employees reported by these establishments were grouped according to
occupational classifications, and are summarized in the section following, with particular
reference to employment and payrolls in each category and average weekly earnings and
hours of work.
In reference to the general classifications used in the following table, with the exception of those occupations peculiar to the hospital group, employment and payroll totals
noted have already been incorporated in previous summary figures of female workers
shown in this Report. In this section such totals should therefore not be considered as
in addition to these summaries, but rather as here segregated for separate consideration
when grouped together with all other hospital employment.
Based on one weekly period of greatest employment during the year, the table
contains a summarization of payroll information resulting from the hospital survey
for 1954.
Occupational Classification
Number
Employed
Total
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Hours
Laundry 	
Housekeeping and catering-
Office  	
Hairdressing  	
Telephone and telegraph-
Manufacturing	
Personal service	
Transportation	
Technicians, X-ray	
Technicians, laboratory	
Pharmacists	
Dietitians.  	
Physiotherapists-
Therapists, occupational-
Nurses' aides	
625
2,473
814
1
77
42
135
1
76
126
2
38
14
4
1,018
$20,632
80,397
33,642
57
3,065
1,539
5,766
41
3,804
6,336
121
2,305
677
198
35,824
$33.01
32.51
41.33
57.00
39.81
36.64
42.71
41.00
50.05
50.29
60.50
60.66
48.36
49.50
35.19
37.2
38.3
37.8
44.0
38.0
40.2
39.1
40.0
38.5
35.9
40.0
39.8
40.6
42.0
40.0
All occupations..
5,446
$194,404
$35.70 38.4
I
Completed returns were filed by some 135 establishments for the week under review,
with a total reported employment of 5,446 female workers in all listed categories.
Coverage of the survey included public and private hospitals, nursing and rest homes,
solariums, homes for the aged and infirm, and like institutions, but, as previously stated,
female employees engaged in the nursing profession were omitted.
Compared with the previous year, increased employment of female workers was
noticeably apparent in most occupational classifications listed in this section, and with
few exceptions the increase in numbers employed brought shorter over-all working-hours
with no apparent loss in take-home pay. Earnings increased in eight of the fourteen
occupational groups listed in previous Reports.
Female workers engaged in laundry occupations within the hospitals and institutions
reporting increased to 625 in the 1954 survey, the average weekly earnings for workers
in this department being computed at $33.01, up from $32.33 previously reported.
Continuing to represent the largest group, and showing the greatest increase in numbers
employed, housekeeping and catering occupations accounted for some 2,473 female
workers in 1954, this total comparing with 2,034 reported in 1953. Average individual
weekly earnings for this classification rose to $32.51, up from $31.87 previously reported.
An increase in the number of office-workers in hospitals and similar establishments was
also noted in the 1954 survey, a total of 814 females being shown in this section, as BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 57
compared with some 706 office-workers reported in 1953. Average weekly salary for
an office employee in this group was computed at $41.33, increased from $39.90 shown
for the previous year. One institution reported a female employee engaged in the hairdressing occupation at a salary of $57 per week. Under heading of telephone and
telegraph occupations, switchboard operators were reported at slightly higher wages and
shorter hours than for the previous year. Average weekly earnings for the individual
operator in this group was $39.81, up from $39.10 previously reported. Female
employees engaged in workshop occupations under the manufacturing classification
showed earnings slightly higher than during the previous year, the average weekly figure
for workers in this section being computed at $36.64. A group of 135 female employees
reported as engaged in various personal-service occupations were paid an average weekly
per capita salary of $42.71. One female hospital employee reported as engaged in an
occupation under heading of transportation was shown at a weekly salary of $41 for
a 40-hour week.
In dealing with the segregation of those occupations peculiar to hospitals, where
possible from the returns separate compilations were completed for each department.
Technicians were generally reported as engaged in X-ray or laboratory work, and while
the total in the former group remained the same as our previous year's total, the number
of female technicians shown as engaged in laboratory work increased considerably in
1954, a total of 126 employees being reported in this occupation, as compared with 88
previously reported. Average weekly earnings for technicians were computed at $50.05
per week in the X-ray department and $50.29 for laboratory workers, these averages
being slightly off from the 1953 high, due to increased employment resulting in shorter
working-hours in this section. While complete totals of some of the more selected occupations are not possible from the returns, a sampling procedure showed 2 females employed
as pharmacists who were paid average weekly salaries of $60.50 for the period under
review. A group of 38 dietitians were also reported at salaries in the higher bracket,
the average weekly amount for employees in this classification being computed at $60.66.
Physiotherapists, numbering 14, were shown as averaging $48.36 for the week reported,
while a small sampling of 4 occupational therapists whose working-hours were slightly
longer averaged $49.50 for a similar weekly period. With the exceptions of the housekeeping and catering staff, the largest single group of female employees covered in the
1954 survey was nurses' aides, a total of 1,018 being reported in this occupation, a substantial increase from the 822 mentioned in this classification for 1953. Higher earnings
and shorter hours were generally apparent for nurses' aides during the year, the average
weekly earnings for this large group of hospital-workers rising from a per capita figure
of $33.67 in 1953 to $35.19 for the year under review. The average weekly working-
hours for nurses' aides stood at 40.0 for 1954, a fractional decrease from the 40.4 hours
recorded for this occupation during the previous year.
Based on the total of 5,446 females employed in all classifications reported in the
hospital survey, exclusive of nursing staff, the average weekly individual amount representing earnings for all occupations was computed at $35.70 for 1954, increased from
$34.61 noted for a similar week covering all occupations in 1953.
Compared with 39.3 noted as the average weekly working-hours for all hospital
occupations included in the 1953 survey, the average further decreased to 38.4 hours for
a similar weekly period in 1954. H 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Statistics for Male Employees
Comparative general trends in the employment and earnings of some of the more
important occupations within the coverage of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" may be
noted in the following tables, which show for the past four years the results of individual
studies of selected groups of male workers segregated from industrial classifications
shown elsewhere in this Report.
Totals appearing in the tables have specific reference to male wage-earners only,
as reported on the payrolls during the week of employment of the greatest number.
Baking Industry (Male)
1954
1953
1952
1951
158
1,457
$97,052.50
$66.61
39.75
169
1,408
$88,549.00
$62.89
39.86
172
1,371
$78,097.50
$56.96
40.67
178
1,481
$80,170.50
Average weekly earnings .  __	
$54.13
40.89
Construction (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners~.
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week-
1,856
1,794
1,825
2,004
31,118
34,775
37,919
33,891
$2,304,695.50
$2,455,735.50
$2,470,629.50
$2,086,591.00
$74.06
$70.62
$65.16
$61.57
41.25
41.86
43.91
43.02
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Male)
91
3,052
$161,527.00
$52.92
45.80
96
3,362
$176,687.50
$52.55
45.93
91
3,537
$185,689.50
$52.50
46.09
93
2,820
$137,851.50
Average weekly earnings 	
$48.88
45.41
House Furnishings (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week..
140
1,432
$77,990.00
$54.46
40.10
130
1,425
$76,862.50
$53.94
40.03
132
1,439
$74,414.50
$51.71
39.95
132
1,446
$67,648.50
$46.78
40.34
Logging  (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week~
1,106
17,354
$1,358,691.50
$78.29
42.09
1,057
16,606
$1,214,803.50
$73.15
42.11
1,197
19,500
$1,338,218.00
$68.63
41.77
1,253
22,879
$1,526,249.50
$66.71
42.36
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings 	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week-
169
953
$70,112.00
$73.57
39.94
169
965
$68,383.00
$70.86
40.41
207
1,264
$75,623.00
$59.83
39.94 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Plumbing and Heating Industry (Male)
H 59
1954
1953
1952
1951
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings.	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week..
254
1,654
$120,680.00
$72.96
40.68
225
1,576
$108,067.50
$68.57
40.86
231
1,518
$95,900.50
$63.18
40.77
257
1,635
$96,184.00
$58.83
40.48
Sheet-metal Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
80
1,037
$72,755.50
$70.16
39.76
77
904
$59,906.50
$66.27
39.45
70
850
$52,096.00
$61.29
40.39
75
945
$54,839.00
$58.03
39.76
Sawmills (Male)
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners.
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
798
23,030
$1,525,404.50
$66.24
41.06
781
21,471
$1,382,433.50
$64.39
41.05
827
23,425
$1,454,063.50
$62.07
41.07
892
24,013
$1,392,725.00
$58.00
41.03
Shingle-mills (Male)
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
46
2,140
$158,069.00
$73.86
40.08
45
2,504
$173,718.00
$69.38
39.68
56
2,555
$168,307.00
$65.87
39.62
58
3,059
$193,040.00
$63.11
39.88
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male)
Number of firms reporting-
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
82
4,527
$298,934.50
$66.03
41.48
80
4,247
$265,477.00
$62.51
41.63
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners-
Total weekly earnings 	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
178
5,779
$365,586.00
$63.26
40.21
176
6,093
$371,438.00
$60.96
40.04
I
178
5,182
$307,246.50
$59.29
40.22
183
5,001
$274,286.50
$54.85
39.93
Inspections and Wage Adjustments
During the year 1954 the Inspectors of the Department made 18,860 investigations,
and, through the efforts of the Department and co-operation of the employers, collections
made during 1954 amounted to $80,216.66. Department and private cars travelled
204,955 miles in connection with the legislation administered by this office.
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Board, it may be presumed
that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation administered by this
Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the following table:— H 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Comparison of Inspections and Wage Adjustments
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Number of investigations	
Number of Inspectors1	
"Male Minimum Wage Act'
Firms involved	
Employees affected-
Arrears paid-
1 Female Minimum Wage Act'
Firms involved  —
Employees affected	
Arrears paid.
"Annual Holidays Act"-
Firms involved	
Employees affected-
Arrears paid	
$92
$6
$32
17,437
20
586
1,642
,745.40
198
344
,995.38
865
3,295
,377.45
18,421
18
268
547
$25,544.49
132
208
$5,150.03
807
2,288
$22,865.09
15,676
20
139
208
$8,981.31
93
127
$3,575.67
874
2,891
$27,049.21
17,413
20
71
148
$10,194.54
123
208
$4,332.57
694
1,911
$17,540.88
16,542
20
36
76
$2,074.92
52
68
$1,246.08
500
1,470
$14,817.02
18,860
22
70
298
$9,911.02
19
56
$841.34
529
1,242
$16,270.82
Total collected..
$132,118.23 | $53,559.61
$39,606.19
$32,067,99 | $18,138.06
$27,023.18s
1 Average.
2 In addition to the adjustments made under the Minimum Wage and Holiday Acts, 537 firms paid 976 employees
$53,193.48 under the provisions of the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Total collections for 1954 were therefore $80,216.66.   Total adjustments for 1953 were $76,569.42.
Court Cases
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the manner of compliance
with the provisions of the orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to resort
to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained.
A summary of court cases during the year 1954 follows:—
"Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act"
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
A & A Trading Co., 396 Powell St., Vancouver
Beatty & Robson Service (Martin C. Hogan),
125 Beatty St., Vancouver
Berarducci, J. M., Revelstoke	
Bowron  Valley  Lumber  Co.  Ltd.,   Prince
George
Buddrus, Max, Evelyn..
Bystedt, A. C, 3 Alma Place, Victoria-
Cameron, J. J., 25 East Hastings St., Vancouver
Casorso, B. P., Golden-
Cassiar Sawmills  (A. Gilderman), Kitwan-
cool
Conn's  Cafe Limited,  1296  East Hastings
St., Vancouver
Cutillo, Joe, Bear Creek-
Failure to pay wages..
Failure to pay wages..
Failure to pay wages..
Failure to pay wages..
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages...
Failure to pay wages _
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages	
Failure to pay wages	
Failure to pay wages	
Fined $100; arrears had been paid
prior to date of judgment handed
down (four charges).
Fined $20 and ordered to pay arrears
of $56; in default, thirty days
(one charge).
Fined $25 and costs of $5; ordered
to pay arrears of $140 (one
charge).
Fined $400; arrears of $762.43 ordered paid; one case dismissed
(five charges); fine not paid; wage
arrears not paid.
Three months' suspended sentence
and costs of $11; arrears of $75
paid into Court (two charges).
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs; arrears
of $96 ordered paid (one charge).
Fined $100; arrears of $114.46 ordered paid (three charges); in
default, distress or thirty days in
gaol.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
of $75 (one charge); in default,
ten days in gaol.
Fined $300 and ordered to pay
arrears of $1,459.93 plus costs of
$56; in default, one week to two
months in gaol; one case dismissed
without costs (thirteen charges).
Fined $25 plus $3.75 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $13.50; failure
to pay arrears, distress ordered
(one charge).
Fined $25; ordered to pay arrears
of $910.55 (eight charges); if
arrears not paid by October 28th,
1954, thirty to ninety days in gaol. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS H 61
"Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act"—Continued
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Davidson, W. R., Port Crawford-
Evans, Peter, Sawmill, Prince George-
Forbes, C. E., 2665 West Broadway, Vancouver
Fourth   Avenue  Specials   (Michael  Loza),
2342 West Fourth Ave., Vancouver
Hansen   &   Olsen,   2934   St.   Catherine  St.^
Vancouver
Failure to pay wageS-
Failure to pay wages..
Failure to pay wages -
Failure to pay wages..
Failure to pay wages..
Hobart, O. S„ Telkwa..
Failure to pay wages..
Industrial    Radioelectric   Enterprises    Ltd.,
833 River Road, Lulu Island
Lux Cafe (C. Pritsos and A. Pritsos), formerly of 616 Robson St., Vancouver
McKay, Douglas, Balfour	
Macht, W. E., North Kamloops-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Martin, Paul, Trucking Co., Kelowna_
Peterson, A. E., Ferguson..
Plotnikoff, Alex., Parks-
Poohachow, Nick, Winlaw-
Port Cafe, Port Coquitlam..
Scandia Smorgasbord Ltd., 775 Burrard St.,
Vancouver
Scott,   George,   Trucking,   Prince   George
(previously of Ainsworth)
Thomas, Kurt, R.R. 1, Nelson.
West-min Woodcraft Co. Ltd., 1286 Kings-
way, Burnaby
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages-
Fined $50 and ordered to pay arrears
of $295.96 forthwith or serve ten
days in gaol (two charges).
Fined $75; paid arrears of $293;
balance to be paid by March 18th,
1954, or levy by distress, and if
insufficient distress to serve thirty
days in gaol (three charges).
Fined $150 and $3.75 costs; arrears
of $1,054 ordered paid on or before July 31st, 1954; failing this,
one month imprisonment (one
charge).
Fined $25; arrears ordered paid in
the amount of $94.70 by February
15th, 1954; in default, distress; in
default of distress, twenty days in
gaol (one charge).
Fined $25 for each partner, and each
partner ordered to pay half the
arrears of $128.81 owing to employee (one charge).
Fined $75 and costs; in default, one
month in gaol; ordered to pay
arrears within six months; in default, one month in gaol; two
charges, suspended sentence (five
charges).
Fined $845 and costs of $21.50;
arrears of $9,333.19 ordered paid;
sixty suspended sentences (seventy
charges).
Fine of $25 imposed on each partner;
suspended sentence on twenty-five
charges (twenty-six charges).
Fined $100; arrears in wages paid
previously by Court order by Kurt
Thomas, who was in partnership
with McKay (four charges).
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs in each
case, or five days in gaol; arrears
of $7,260.61 ordered paid by October 21st, 1954, or Mr. Macht will
be held in contempt of Court
(twelve charges).
Fined $25 and costs; in default, seven
days in gaol; ordered to pay
arrears by September 27th, 1954,
and in default, seven days in gaol
(one charge).
Fined $25 and costs of $5 or ten days
in gaol; arrears of $623.35 ordered
paid or three months in gaol (one
charge).
Fined $50, and arrears of $1,146.71
ordered paid; in default, two
months in gaol  (eight charges).
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
of $110 within seven days or serve
thirty days in gaol  (one charge).
Fined $175, and arrears of $587.40
ordered paid (seven charges).
Fined $25, and arrears of $60 ordered paid; guilty on one charge;
suspended sentence on one charge
(two charges).
Fined $25, and arrears of $127.30
ordered paid; $91.68 paid into
Court; balance ordered paid by
January 21st, 1955, or two months
in gaol (one charge).
Fined $100, and arrears of $671.72
ordered paid (four charges).
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs; ordered
to pay arrears of $260.52 (one
charge). H 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act"—Continued
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Wilson, Thos. R., 360 Beach Ave., Pitt Lake,
Deep Cove
Wonderland Speedways Ltd. (Carl G. Ram-
stead), R.R. 1, Langley
Wood, Frank, Sawmill, Prince George-
Failure to pay wages-
Failure to pay wages .
Failure to pay wages-
Fined $25, and police costs of $2.50
and Court costs of $2; arrears of
$50, all to be paid on or before
February 27th, 1954; in default,
ten days in gaol (one charge).
Fined $125 and costs of $6; arrears
of $1,097.25 ordered paid; fines
and costs imposed on manager,
Carl G. Ramstead; in default, fifteen days on first charge, thirty
days on each of the other charges
—concurrent (five charges).
Fined $200 and $18 costs; arrears of
$952.50 ordered paid within fifteen
days, or goods and chattels levied
by distress; in insufficient distress,
thirty days in gaol; arrears of
$228.87 paid on one charge (eight
charges).
Hours of Work Act"
Alice   Lake   Logging   Co.   Ltd.,
Hastings St., Vancouver
510  West
Fleetwood Logging Co.  Ltd., 550 Burrard
St., Vancouver
Granite Bay Timber Co. Ltd., New Westminster
Harwood,  E. D.  (Harwood Roofing Co.),
3891 Kingsway, South Burnaby
Fraser Creek Logging Co. Ltd., 995 West
Sixth Ave., Vancouver
Iron Bay Lumber Co., 850 West Hastings
St., Vancouver
Kelley Logging Co. Ltd., 510 West Hastings
St., Vancouver
Matsumoto & Sons Shipyard, Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver
Northern Pulpwood Co. Ltd., foot of Campbell Ave., Vancouver
Port  McNeill   Logging   Co.  Ltd.,  927,  510
West Hastings St., Vancouver
Port Neville  Logging  Co.  Ltd.,   510 West
Hastings St., Vancouver
Timberland   Development   Co.   Ltd.,   New
Westminster
Wall  Rivers Ltd.,  834  Granville  St., Vancouver
Western Logging Co. Ltd., 198 West Hastings St., Vancouver
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by sec. 3 of Act.
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec.  (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Working hours in excess of those
imposed by subsec. (1), sec. 3,
of Act
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined   $25   and   $2.50   costs    (one
charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $50;   in default, fourteen days
in gaol (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge).
Fined $25 (one charge). BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
"Annual Holidays with Pay Act"
H 63
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
A & A Trading Co., 395 Powell St., Vancouver
B.C. Projects Ltd.,  1255 West Pender St.,
Vancouver
Cameron, J. J., 25 East Hastings St., Vancouver
Cinder Crete Works Ltd., Port Coquitlam
(subsidiary of Industrial Radioelectric
Enterprises Ltd)
Clark, Jock, 1155 West Pender St., Vancouver
Community Motors, Port Coquitlam	
Conn's CaffS Ltd.,   1296 East Hastings  St.,
Vancouver
Davidson, Edward, Port Crawford-
Forbes, C. E., 2665 West Broadway, Vancouver
Industrial   Radioelectric   Enterprises   Ltd.,
Lulu Island
Matsumoto & Sons Shipyard, Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver
McNutt, G. S., Haney..
Pappas, T., Fur Co., 850 Granville St., Vancouver
Port Cafe, Port Coquitlam.. 	
Scandia Smorgasbord Ltd., 775 Burrard St.,
Vancouver
West-min Woodcraft Co. Ltd., 1286 Kings-
way, Burnaby
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays .
Failure to
pay
annual holidays  .
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays  .
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays .
Failure to
pay
annual holidays   .
Failure to
pay
annual holidays
Failure to
pay
annual holidays   ...
Suspended sentences; ordered to pay
costs of $12.50 by March 15th,
1954 (five charges).
Fined $25; in default, distress;
arrears were paid before case was
heard (one charge).
Fined $25 and costs; ordered to pay
arrears of $4.16; in default, distress or ten days in gaol (one
charge).
Fined $25 and $24.50 costs; arrears
of $69.39 ordered paid (nine
charges).
Fined $25; in default, distress or
fifteen days in gaol; holiday credits
of $23.40 paid (one charge).
Fined $25 and $7.50 costs; arrears
of $43.81 ordered paid; in default,
ten days in gaol; suspended sentence on two charges (three
charges).
Fined $75 and $15 costs; arrears of
$8.73 ordered paid; failure to pay
arrears by September 11th, 1954,
distress ordered  (four charges).
Fhjed $25; arrears of $19.76 ordered
paid; in default, fourteen days in
gaol (one charge).
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs; arrears
of $26.59 ordered paid on or before July 31st, 1954; failing to
pay, five days in gaol (one charge).
Fined $100 and $2.50 costs; arrears
of $2,048.66 ordered paid; one case
dismissed; 108 cases, suspended
sentence (109 charges).
Fined $25; in default, ten days in
gaol; arrears of $3.39 ordered paid
(one charge).
Fined $150; arrears of $124.13 ordered paid; found guilty on five
charges; fined on two charges and
suspended sentence on three
charges (five charges).
Fined $25; in default, distress or
three days in gaol; ordered to pay
arrears of $17.70 (one charge).
Fined $50 and $2.50 costs; no order
to pay due to lack of records so
as to establish the amount actually
owing (one charge).
Arrears paid; given a verdict of
suspended sentence after pleading
guilty (one charge).
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs; arrears of
$25.62 ordered paid (one charge).
"Male Minimum Wage Act"
Ade  Cement  Finishers  & Contractors,  872
Jones Road, Lulu Island
Community Motors, Port Coquitlam	
Diamond Taxi (William Gibson), 613 Johnson St., Victoria
Matsumoto & Sons Shipyard, Dollarton Highway, North Vancouver
Shunter, C. A., Kelowna  	
Failed to produce records on demand
Failure to produce all records	
Failure to keep true and correct
records of wages paid to an
employee
Failure to pay minimum wage	
Failure to  pay an  employee the
minimum wage
Fined $15 and $6.50 costs (one
charge).
Fined $75 and $7 costs; arrears of
$63.63 ordered paid; in default,
two months in gaol; suspended
sentence on one charge (three
charges).
Fined $20 (one charge).
Fined $50;   in default, fourteen days
in gaol (one charge).
Fined  $50;    arrears  of $60 ordered
paid (one charge). H 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"Female Minimum Wage Act"
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Clark,  Jock,   1155  West  Pender  St.,  Vancouver
Community Motors, Port Coquitlam..
T.   Club   Inn   (Mr.   and   Mrs.   Anderson),
Hedley
Wall Rivers Ltd., 834 Granville St., Vancouver
Failure to pay wages as per Order
No. 34
Failure to pay wages as per Order
No. 34
Failure to pay wages as per Order
No. 52
Failure to keep a true and correct
record,   and   failure  to   comply
with the provisions of sec. 4 (d)
of Order No. 52
Fined $25 on first charge; in default,
distress or fifteen days in gaol;
suspended sentence on other three
charges; arrears of $360 had been
paid (four charges).
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs; arrears
of $45 ordered paid (one charge).
Dismissed (two charges).
Fined $25; one charge dismissed
(two charges).
Department of Labour Act"
Peters, Alec T., Cheslatta Lake-
Failure to furnish information to
the Smithers office of the Department of Labour which was
required of him pursuant to provisions of the Act
Fined $5 and $3.50 costs.
Special Licences
Provision is made in a few of the orders of the Board for a graduated scale of wages
to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in writing have been obtained
from the Board. In the majority of cases there is a six months' learning period for inexperienced employees, during which period they receive periodic increases until at the
expiration of the learning period they are qualified for the minimum wage payable to
experienced employees. The following table shows the number of licences issued in
the various lines of work in 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, and 1954:—
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
6
47
22
40
136
2
8
105
27
60
66
2
6
7
i
65
8
44
32
3
7
51
8
49
25
4
6
17
3
71
4
1
1
Laundry—  	
Mercantile      — - —	
Office             .  .
12
2
66
2
Automotive repair and gasoline service-station —
2
1
Totals       	
297
308
181
143
97
85
During the year 1954, twenty part-time employment permits were issued.
Conclusion
At this time the Board would like to acknowledge its appreciation of the co-operation extended during the year 1954 to its officials in the administration of the various
labour laws by the employers and employees of the Province.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.
Fraudena Eaton.
G. A. Little.
H. J. Young.
C. Murdoch.
P. Baskin.
D. J. Baldwin. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 65
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Personnel
Labour
Relations
Branch
Chief Executive Officer:
B. H. E. Goult   -
Chief Conciliation Officer:
William Fraser -
Conciliation Officers:
R. G. Clements,
Robert Forgie,
E. A.Ivay,
John Sherlock   -
George Carmichael
W. T. McLaughlin
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Labour
Relations
Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands       -     -
Members:
Mrs. Fraudena Eaton
D. J. Baldwin,
Penrod Baskin,
G. A. Little,
Charles Murdoch,
J. H. Young
Registrar:
N. deW. Lyons   -
Assistant Registrar:
David Coton
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Court-house, Kelowna.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Dollarton.
Vancouver.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the annual report of the Labour Relations
Branch for the year ended December 31, 1954.
By the Proclamation of His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor, the " Labour Relations Act" came into force on June 16th, 1954, and the "Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Act" was repealed. On June 17th you announced the appointment of the
Deputy Minister of Labour, Mr. W. H. Sands, as Chairman of the Board, and of
Mrs. Fraudena Eaton, Mr. G. A. Little, Mr. Charles Murdoch, and Mr. H. J. Young,
all of Vancouver, members. The newly constituted Board held its first meeting in Victoria on June 17th, and by the year's end had convened twenty-seven times. The former Board had met on forty-three occasions between January 1st and June 15th, 1954.
Board Enlarged
The Board was enlarged when, upon December 20th, 1954, you announced the
appointment of Mr. D'Arcy J. Baldwin and Mr. Penrod Baskin, both of Vancouver, as
members. H 66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
In accordance with the terms of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act,"
which remained effective until June 15th, 1954, and thereafter pursuant to the provisions of the " Labour Relations Act," chairmen were named for 103 Conciliation Boards.
The disputant parties selected their own chairmen on twenty-four occasions.
Success of Conciliation Officers
There were 333 references to Conciliation Officers during the year. Fifty-three
other cases were carried over from the preceding year since they had not been terminated on December 31st, 1953. The Conciliation Officers settled 198 cases and partially settled three. One hundred and fourteen were referred to Conciliation Boards.
In ten cases the appointments of the Conciliation Officers were cancelled, and in twelve
cases the responsible Officer did not recommend a Conciliation Board. There were
forty-eight cases unterminated at the year's end. In one case the certificate of bargaining authority was cancelled, thus terminating conciliation proceedings.
Of the 114 references to Conciliation Boards during the year, 100 Boards were
appointed as a result of recommendations of Conciliation Officers. Three Boards were
appointed without prior reference to Conciliation Officers. Settlement eventuated in
six cases before Conciliation Boards were appointed. In the remaining five cases,
Boards had been recommended, but had not been appointed at December 31st, 1954.
The Labour Relations Board authorized the issuance of 467 certificates, and
rejected 133 applications for certification. Administrative personnel conducted forty-
nine representation votes and seventy-five strike votes.
The Board entertained fifty-four applications for decertification, of which twenty-
four were rejected and thirty authorized.
Arbitration Boards
On the joint application of both parties in cases where grievance procedure under
collective agreements had been invoked, chairmen were named to eighteen Arbitration
Boards.
There were fifty-nine requests for permission to prosecute, of which forty-four were
approved by the Board.
Court Cases Reviewed
Court cases concerning the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," or
" Labour Relations Act," or implicating the Labour Relations Board itself are reviewed
briefly at the conclusion of this Report.
A summary of matters which are reported upon annually is appended for the years
1949 to 1954, inclusive. Analyses of time-loss through industrial disputes are also
included.
B. H. E. Goult,
Chief Executive Officer,
Labour Relations Branch. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
Summary of Cases Dealt with, 1949-54
H 67
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Number of applications for certification dealt with~
Certifications granted  	
Applications-
Rejected..
Withdrawn-
Representation votes conducted	
Conciliation Officers appointed	
Conciliation Boards established	
Grievance procedure provided	
Permissions to prosecute granted..
Strike votes supervised	
757
594
95
68
80
246
97
12
7
119
765
540
117
108
45
241
110
3
5
322
961
727
142
92
78
357
120
1
4
173
816
640
93
83
53
414
176
3
14
229
664
467
119
78
48
343
129
6
36
221
667
467
133
47
49
333
103
6
44
75
Table 1.—Summary of Cases Dealt with in 1954, Showing Comparison for 1953
1953 1954
Number of applications dealt with  664               667
1953 1954
Certifications granted  467        467
Applications—
Rejected   119        133
Withdrawn      78 47
Representation votes conducted  48                 49
Conciliation Officers appointed  343               333
Conciliation Boards established  129               103
Grievance procedures provided  6                   6
Permissions to prosecute granted  36                 44
Strike votes supervised  221                 75
Industrial Inquiry Commissioners appointed  2
Totals  1,449            1,277 H 68
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DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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Parties  agreed to   be  bound
by the recommendations of
the  Conciliation  Board.
Employer rejected, employees
accepted report of Board.
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Majority   report,   employees'   nominee   dissenting.
The   Board  recommended  that   due  to  circumstances and conditions no increases or payment
for statutory holidays be granted
Majority   report,   employer's   nominee   dissenting.
The Board recommended (1) a wage increase of
5   cents  per  hour  in  all  hourly-paid   classifications;   (2)  3-per-cent increase for all salary-paid
employees;    (3)   one   additional  paid   statutory
holiday;   (4) 2 cents per hour increase in shift
differential   for   night   shift.     Recommendations
to be effective July 1, 1954
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(1) Wages
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June 1—.
June 1	
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Judge J. R. Archibald (C.)
W.H.Phelps (L.)
J. C. Munro (E.)
John Cowan (C.)
Birt Showier (L.)
T. E.H. Ellis (E.)
CA
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British Columbia Fruit Shippers
Ltd., Vernon, B.C., and B.C.
Orchards' Co-operative Association, Cascade Co-operative
Union, Dolph Browne Ltd.,
Haynes Co-operative Growers'
Exchange, Kaleden Co-operative Growers' Association, Ke-
lowna Growers' Exchange,
Keremeos Growers' Co-operative Association, R. H. Mac-
Donald & Sons Ltd., McLean
& Fitzpatrick Ltd., Monashee
Co-operative Growers' Association, Naramata Co-operative
Growers' Exchange, Okanagan
Packers' Co-operative Union,
Oliver Co-operative Growers'
Exchange, Osoyoos Co-operative Fruit & Vegetable Growers' Association, Penticton Cooperative Growers, Pyramid
Co-operative Association,
Southern Co - operative Exchange, United Co-operative
Growers' Association, Unity
Fruit Ltd., Vernon Fruit
Union, Winoka Co-operative
Exchange, all of the Okanagan
Valley, and Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Unions, Locals
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and
11, T.L.C, Okanagan Valley
Canadian Liquid Air Co. Ltd.,
Vancouver, and International
Chemical Workers' Union, Local No. 485, A.F.L., T.L.C.
d
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H 109
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause
Wages and other causes  75
Wages only  10
All terms of collective agreement  16
Hours of work and other causes  2
Total  103
Strikes and Lockouts in British Columbia, 1954
A lockout or an industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout is rarely encountered, and lockouts and strikes are therefore recorded together in the statistical tables.
The term " dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all disputes which have come to the attention of
the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude the possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later information.
Estimates of time-loss are computed by multiplying the number of days a dispute
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
Disputes are listed in the order of the date of their commencement.
Table IV.—Summary of Disputes, 1954
Number
Number
Time-
Industry or
Particulars
of Em
of Em
loss in
Occupation
ployers
ployees
Man-
Affected
Affected
days
Summary of Disputes in Progress Prior to
January 1,1954
Lumber and sawmill work
Commenced September 28, 1953, for wage increases, addi
40
1,552
3,880
ers, Northern Interior
tional statutory holidays,  and minor contract changes,
following reference to Conciliation Board; dispute referred
to Industrial Inquiry Commission; terminated January 5;
compromise
Lumber and sawmill work
Commenced October 23, 1953, for increased wages, union
17
1,100
24,750
ers, Southern Interior
security and  compulsory  check-off,  following  reference
to   Conciliation   Board;   dispute   referred   to   Industrial
Inquiry Commission, terminated February 1;   compromise
Metal-containers    factory
Commenced December 3, 1953, for implementation of pro
1
266
1,862
workers, Vancouver
posed changes in rate structure of basic agreement in
thirty-six plants of affected company in British Columbia
and United States following negotiations;   settlement predicated on an economic adjustment of approximately 15
cents per hour, included in this amount was an 8'/i-cent
general wage increase;   terminated January 11;   compromise
Totals for disputes commencing in 1953 	
58
2,918
30,492
Summary of Disputes Commencing in 1954
Sawmill-workers,   Honey
Commenced January 8,  against demotion of electrician;
1
455
455
moon Bay
negotiations;  return  of  workers  January   11,  pending
negotiations; indefinite
Club employees, Vancouver-
Commenced  March  5  for new  agreement providing  for
increased   wages,   following   reference   to   Conciliation
Board; negotiations; terminated March 9; compromise
7
200
500
Furniture-factory   workers,
Commenced  March  8  and   10,  against removal of basic
1
40
280
Vancouver
minimum rate for piece-workers;   negotiations;   partial
replacement and return of workers April 12;   in favour
of employer
Electrical workers, Kemano
Commenced March 23 to 29 in protest against lunching
away from cook-house;  negotiations;  return of workers
March 30; in favour of workers
1
90
378
Janitors   and   maintenance-
Commenced April 7 for implementation of recommenda
1
24
288
men, Langley Prairie
tions of Conciliation Board for increased wages in new
agreement;   terminated April 23;  negotiations;   in favour
of workers H 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table IV.—Summary of Disputes, 1954—Continued
Industry or
Occupation
Particulars
Number
of Employers
Affected
Number
of Employees
Affected
Time-
loss in
Man-
days
Stationery-store clerks, Vancouver
Sawmill-workers,  S a 1m o n
Arm
Boilermakers   and  welders,
Esquimalt
Loggers, Copper Canyon	
Base-metals miners and mill-
workers, Riondel
Public   works   employees,
Victoria
Fish-tendermen, B.C. Coast
Bakery-workers, Victoria	
Glass-workers, Victoria—	
Cement-workers, Essondale..
Salmon-tendermen,    B.C.
Coast
Garage-workers, Alberni and
Port Alberni
Coal-miners, Michel-
Canning-factory workers,
Penticton, Kelowna, Mission, and Vancouver
Hard-rock miners, Lillooet
Sash and door factory workers, Vernon
Summary of Disputes Commencing in 1954—Continued
Commenced April 13, for new agreement covering wages
and union security following reference to a Conciliation
Board; terminated June 30; return of workers pending
further negotiations; compromise
Commenced April 29, for new agreement providing for
increased wages and pay for two statutory holidays following reference to a Conciliation Board, and for reinstatement of dismissed employees; terminated May 17;
negotiations; compromise
Commenced June 4, protesting suspension of seven welders
for refusal to do certain work unless paid "dirty money";
terminated June 10; return of workers; in favour of
employer
Commenced June 15, against Tuesday to Saturday maintenance-work week; return of workers June 17; referred
to prescribed grievance procedure; indefinite
Commenced June 16, for new agreement providing for
increased wages following reference to Conciliation
Board; terminated September 14; negotiations; compromise
Commenced June 17, for a new agreement providing for
increased wages following reference to a Conciliation
Board; terminated June 30; return of workers, pending
reference to arbitration; indefinite
Commenced June 19, over minimum prices to be paid for
fish;   terminated June 26;   negotiations;   compromise
Commenced July 8 and 9, for a new agreement providing
for reduced hours and other changes following reference
to a Conciliation Board; partial return of workers July
19;   terminated October 27;   negotiations;   compromise
Commenced July 26, for terms of collective agreements
following reference to a Conciliation Board; terminated
August 12 and 16;   negotiations;   compromise
Commenced July 23, for terms of collective agreement following reference to a Conciliation Board; terminated
July 26;   return of workers;   indefinite
Commenced August 7, for a new agreement providing for
increased wages, revision of seniority, and welfare fund
following reference to Conciliation Board; terminated
August 15;   negotiations;   compromise
Commenced September 7 to 10, for new agreements providing for reduction in working-week from forty-four to 40
hours with same take-home pay, and additional holidays
with pay, following reference to Conciliation Board;
terminated in one instance September 24; in others October 12; negotiations; in favour of workers
Commenced October 17, against change in varying times of
shifts; terminated October 25; negotiations', dispute referred to independent chairman; indefinite
Commenced October 27, for terms and conditions of collective agreements following reference to a Conciliation
Board; unterminated December 31, 1954
Commenced November 4, against dismissal of employee;
terminated November 10; negotiations; return of workers;
discharged employee reinstated
Commenced December 1, for terms and conditions of a
collective agreement, following reference to a Conciliation Board; terminated December 7; negotiations; agreement signed; in favour of workers
Totals	
13
54
16
99
245
257
5,620
402
12
10
638
39
700
500
16
15
2,754
192
395
490
16,836
2,442
28,100
21,162
120
10
3,828
897
4,200
27,000
64
75
119
12,622    | 140,958 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH H 111
Table V.—Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia, 1939-54
Year
Number of
Disputes
Beginning
during
Year1
Number of
Disputes
during
Year
Number of
Employers
Affected
Number of
Employees
Affected
Time-loss
in
Working-
days
Time-loss as
Percentage
of Estimated
Total
Working-
time of Wage
and Salary
Earners2
1939.  _	
1940      	
1941 _
4
1
7
50
43
15
18
21
25
8
9
22
26
35
34
21
4
2
8
50
43
15
18
21
25
10
11
22
26
36
36
24
4
2
8
82
43
15
18
524
65
63
44
46
120
381
113
119
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
6,386
3,216
3,007
13,579
3,326
46,806
8,207
12,622
13,803
8,510
7,594
35,024
75,129
4,510
69,595
1,294,202
153,168
106,230
31,692
105,792
74,722
1,234,120
260,335
140,958
0.0283
0.016
0.012
1942  -	
0.046
1943-              	
0.088
1944
0 006
1945 	
1946  .
1947 - _	
1948 _	
1949  	
1950  - .	
1951        _  _
1952
1953
1954	
0.093
1.870
0.202
0.138
0.042
0.138
0.093
1.496
0.314
0 172
1 In this table, figures for disputes extending over the year are counted more than once.
2 Chart shown on following page.
3 Figures in this column revised in 1953 as a result of revised estimates of total working-time of wage and salary
earners.
Source:   British Columbia Department of Labour Annual Reports. H 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CHART SHOWING PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL WORKING-TIME
LOST THROUGH INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES,   1940-54*
% %
1.9
1.8
1.9
1.8
1   7
1.6
1.5
1.4
.4
. 3
.2
.1
0
_/
A
/
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.4
. 3
1940      1942
1944
0
1946      1948      1950      1952     1954
*The time-loss in this chart is shown as a percentage of
the estimated total working-time of wage and salary earners.
Source;    Bureau of Economics and Statistics. . LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 113
Table VI.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1954
Industry
Number of
Employers
Affected
Number of
Employees
Affected
Time-loss
in Man
Working-
days
Manufacturing-
Fisheries 	
Wood products (logging, lumbering, sawmills)..
Metal and hard-rock mining - 	
Coal-mining 	
Service-
Retail trade-
Automobile and garage workerS-
Ship-building  _ 	
Construction	
Totals-
14
21
60
2
1
9
2
7
1
2
119
1,235
6,258
3,368
288
700
481
54
39
99
100
12,622
50,499
31,928
29,767
16,900
4,200
3,230
2,754
897
395
388
140,958
Legal Proceedings Involving the Labour Relations Board
British Columbia Hotel Employees' Union, Local No. 260, C.C.L., vs. Pacific
Western Hotels Limited (Georgia Hotel), Marble Arch (Vancouver) Limited,
Nestor Stryko (Niagara Hotel Company) (represented by the British Columbia
Hotels' Association), and Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, Local No.
28, A.F.L., and Labour Relations Board (British Columbia).
On January 25th, 1955, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Labour Relations Board is within its statutory powers in certifying a group as a unit appropriate for
collective bargaining, even though that group may be a fractional part of a larger unit
which is already certified.
The decision of the Supreme Court is a sequel to an application to the Board, made
in the spring of 1953. In April of that year the British Columbia Hotel Employees'
Union, Local No. 260, C.C.L., applied to be certified for units of employees employed
by the Georgia Hotel, Marble Arch Hotel, and the Niagara Hotel, all of Vancouver,
B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' Union, Local No. 28, A.F.L., had been certified
February 27th, 1952, for a unit of employees in thirty-one Vancouver hotels.
Subsequently the Board ordered that representation votes be taken, but these were
not proceeded with because the British Columbia Hotels' Association, representing the
three hotels, applied to the Supreme Court for a writ of prohibition. Mr. Justice
Manson dismissed this application on February 2nd, 1954.
When the Board endeavoured to again process the application, it was restrained by
an injunction of the Court of Appeal. Thereafter this Court reversed the decision of
Mr. Justice Manson on March 26th, 1954.
Thereupon Local No. 260 appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada. The Supreme
Court of Canada set aside the judgment of the Court of Appeal by restoring that of
Mr. Justice Manson.
Mars Fine Foods Limited (Royal City Cafe), New Westminster, and Beverage
Dispensers' and Culinary Workers' Union, Local No. 535, A.F.L.
Mars Fine Foods Limited (Royal City Cafe), New Westminster, applied to the
Supreme Court to quash an Order of the Labour Relations Board dated August 6th,
1954, certifying the Beverage Dispensers' and Culinary Workers' Union, Local No. 535,
as bargaining agent for employees of the company.
Main grounds for the company's applications were based on submissions that the
Board acted without jurisdiction, or, alternatively, in excess of its jurisdiction in issuing H 114 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
the certification, because it had failed to give the company any opportunity of correcting
or contradicting statements made by the union in its application for certification.
Mr. Justice Coady dismissed the application. In his reasons for judgment, dated
October 6th, 1954, His Lordship drew attention to relevant sections of the "Labour
Relations Act" and to the regulations made under the Act.
Regulation 9 (2) provides that where an application for certification is received,
the Registrar must notify the employer and allow ten days for the submission of observations which the employer believes should be taken into account when the Board considers the application. When a reply requests a hearing upon the application, reasons
for such a request must be given.
Though a reply was received and a hearing was requested, no reasons were submitted, and the Board issued certification.
Mr. Justice Coady held that it was within the discretion of the Board to determine
whether or not a hearing should be held. If the Board, in the exercise of its discretion,
decides no hearing is necessary, and is satisfied to deal with the matter upon the representations made, evidence submitted, and additional information based upon its own
inquiries, he did not think it could be claimed that the Board did something it was not
authorized to do. In dismissing the application, His Lordship held that the Board has
jurisdiction to do as it had done.
British Columbia Electric Company Limited and International Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers, Local No. 213, A.F.L.
On July 22nd, 1954, the Board certified the International Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers, Local No. 213, as bargaining agent for employees of the British Columbia
Electric Company Limited engaged in the manufacture and distribution of gas in Vancouver and Victoria.
The company applied to the Supreme Court to quash the certification, arguing that
the union's constitutional jurisdiction does not extend to gas-workers, and the Board
could not have been satisfied that the majority of the employees affected were members
of the union in good standing.
Mr. Justice Norman W. Whittaker dismissed the application. In his reasons for
judgment, given September 21st, he found that the Act entrusted to the Board the
jurisdiction of determining whether or not the union had as members more than half
the employees in the unit. Once such a determination had been made, the Act required
the Board to do something more; namely, to certify or, if in doubt, to direct that representation vote be taken. The Board had taken a representation vote and had acted
within the terms of the Act and within its jurisdiction in certifying the union as bargaining agent.
In these circumstances, he held that he had not the power to quash the certificate
issued by the Board, following the taking of a representation vote favourable to the union.
Canadian Canners (Western) Limited and United Packinghouse Workers of
America, Locals No. 350, 333, 501, and 339, C.I.O., C.C.L.
On September 17th the Court of Appeal, composed of the Honourable Gordon McG.
Sloan, Chief Justice of British Columbia; Mr. Justice C. B. O'Halloran; and Mr. Justice
H. Davey unanimously upheld the decision of Mr. Justice James M. Coady of the
Supreme Court when it dismissed the appeal of Canadian Canners (Western) Limited.
On August 4th Mr. Justice Coady had upheld the decision of the Labour Relations
Board when he refused the application of the Company to quash an Order of the Board
made under the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," June
11th, 1954, certifying the United Packinghouse Workers of America, Locals No. 350,
333, 501, and 339, in separate operations of the company in Vancouver and Interior LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH H 115
points. The Board had at first refused this certification, but upon a rehearing had issued
the Order. Company's counsel argued that the Board's original decision was legally
right and the subsequent decision legally wrong.
The Appeal Court upheld Mr. Justice Coady's dismissal of the company's application, and expressed the view that he had reached the right conclusion.
General Auto Sales Limited and B.C. Auto Workers, Lodge No. 1857,
A.F.L., T.L.C.
On September 28th, 1954, the Labour Relations Board certified the B.C. Auto
Workers, Lodge No. 1857, as the bargaining authority for the employees of General Auto
Sales Limited, except office staff and outside salesmen.
The company applied to the Court to quash the Order of the Board, claiming that an
amendment of the application for certification constituted a new application involving
different questions of fact and requiring a new inquiry.
Mr. Justice A. D. Macfarlane, in dismissing the application, pointed out that the
provisions of the " Labour Relations Act" provide that the Board may, before certification, include additional employees or exclude different employees from the unit. He
noted that the Board had satisfied itself that there were a majority of the employees
members of the union in the enlarged unit. In the circumstances and under the legislation he did not think he could go behind the position of the Board.
Martin & Robertson Limited and Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) and
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local No. 580
On November 10th, 1953, the Labour Relations Board certified the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local No. 580, as the bargaining agent for employees
of Martin & Robertson Limited.
Martin & Robertson Limited applied to the Supreme Court of British Columbia to
quash the Order of the Board on the ground that baldly the applicant " was not given a
hearing at or before the time the Order was made, and the Board, therefore, in making
the Order acted without jurisdiction."
Evidence disclosed that two letters had been submitted by the company's agent to
the Board, asking that the company be allowed to submit evidence, and that the Board
stated these communications would be considered.
On March 26th, 1954, Mr. Justice J. O. Wilson found that the Board had certified
the union without any further notice to the company, and that whether the company's
representations were to be written or oral, it was entitled to present them. Since the Board
had not given the company this opportunity, the Order of the Board was a nullity and
must be quashed.
Hume & Rumble Limited, Peterson Electrical Construction Company Limited, and
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local No. 213, A.F.L., T.L.C.
On November 30th, 1953, the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) decided
that a Conciliation Board be established pursuant to section 21 of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act." The employers sought an injunction restraining the Board
from acting, which was subsequently dissolved.
In the same instance, in an action against the local, the employer sought a declaration
from the Court that there was an agreement in effect in accordance with the provisions of
the Act.
On May 28th, 1954, Mr. Justice J. O. Wilson found that there was no agreement,
and dismissed the action. H 116 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SUMMARY OF  PROSECUTIONS
There were no charges laid during the year by the Labour Relations Board.
The Board considered applications for permission to prosecute fifty-nine charges.
It granted forty-four, rejected five, nine were withdrawn, and one was not proceeded with.
Annual Survey of Organized Labour
Certain information is required annually from associations of industrial workers
or trade-unions pursuant to section 5 (a) of the " Department of Labour Act." This
return requires the name and address of the organization, its affiliation (if any), and
its total paid-up membership to January 1st, 1955. Members over three months in
arrears are not included in this figure.
The inclusion of the name of any organization does not necessarily constitute its
recognition as a trade-union within the meaning of the " Labour Relations Act,"
This year the annual survey of organized labour by the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics of the Department of Trade and Industry was combined with the annual survey
of labour organization by the Government of Canada under the caption " Joint Survey
of Labour Organization." The surveys were combined to eliminate duplication and to
increase statistical coverage of organized labour in the Province.
A summary of the results of this year's survey of organized labour is shown in
Table V. It is noted that both the number of organizations and total union membership
have increased considerably over the last year. It is believed that part of the increase
can be attributed to the combination of the Provincial and Federal surveys.
Labour Membership Increases
Organized labour membership expressed as percentage of total paid workers in
the British Columbia labour force now stands at 53.21 per cent (see Table V), up 3.21
percentage points from the preceding year.
This year's gain in reported membership continues the unbroken trend of increase
since 1946 and shows an increase of over 300 per cent since 1940. The historical data
shown in Table V reveal that organized labour in British Columbia received its greatest
impetus during the early years of the war (1940 to 1943) and that the only decreasing
membership occurred during the transition from a war-time to a peace-time economy.
Chart I shows the distribution of trade-union membership by major industrial
groups. Each local has been classified into the group in which the majority of its
members are employed. It indicates those industrial fields which have the greatest
number of union members. It does not, however, show which groups are the most
highly organized, as comparable total employment data are not available for the various
categories.
As in previous years, the services group (public and personal) again leads the
other groups with its share of organized labour membership. This year the service
group accounted for 25.32 per cent of total membership, compared with 21.80 per cent
last year. The public services component is the largest single category this year, having
taken over the lead from the wood and woods products group. Organizations in the
public services group consist largely of those representing Provincial and municipal
government employees.
Membership in the wood and woods products group has shown little change in
recent years, generally accounting for approximately one-fifth of total membership. The
largest unions in this group are the International Woodworkers of America, the International Brotherhood of Paper Workers, and the International Brotherhood of Pulp,
Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H  117
Unions Reclassified
That share of total membership claimed by the construction group is down somewhat from last year, but this drop in representation is accounted for largely by the fact
that certain unions formerly included under construction have been reclassified to other
industrial groups. The largest union in the construction group is the Carpenters and
Joiners of America. The remainder include other craft organizations whose members
are chiefly or solely engaged in the construction industry.
The mining and quarrying group is largely composed of the United Mine Workers
of America (C.C.L.) and the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers
(independent).
The other transportation group consists of all trades and occupations connected
with transportation other than railway. Seamen, longshoremen, electric- and motor-
coach employees, teamsters, chauffeurs, and warehousemen are represented in this
category.
Railway Group
The railway transportation group includes the four large independent railway unions
in the runnning trades and also the large membership of the Canadian Brotherhood of
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers.
The metals group contains such unions as the International Association of Machinists and the Shipyard General Workers Federation of British Columbia.
A breakdown of organized labour membership according to sex shows the following:— Per Cent of
Number Total Membership
Females       35,206 18.83
Males   151,745 81.17
Totals
186,951
100.00
As the percentage of females in the paid labour force is roughly 25 per cent of the
total, the above breakdown of union membership by sex indicates that the female segment of the paid labour force is not as highly unionized as the male segment.
Table Vil.—Number of Labour Organizations Reported, Membership and Percentage Increases, and Membership as a Percentage of Paid Workers in Non-
agricultural Industries as of January 1st of Each Year, 1940-55.
Year
Number
of
Organizations
Total
Membership
Percentage
Increase
over 1940
Percentage
Increase
Yearly
Total Paid
Workers
in B.C.
Labour
Force1
Organized
Labour
Membership
as a Percentage of Total
Paid Workers
1940
380
404
402
415
473
617
636
642
715
745
761
770
772
766
795
865
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,320
142,989
146,259
157,287
170,036
174,894
178,533
186,951
12.24
21.71
49.47
17.22
2.46
— 1.75
10.30
13.47
5.67
2.29
7.54
8.10
2.86
2.08
4.71
1941                                                	
12.24
36.61
104.20
139.38
145.27
140.99
165.80
201.60
218.70
225.98
250.56
278.98
289.81
297.92
316.68
1942                                          	
213,000
231,000
266,000
283,000
277,000
300,000
319,000
332,000
343,000
340,000
347,500
355,800
355,330
351,330
28.78
1943                              _ _ -    -
39.66
1044
40.38
1945                                               -   -
38.88
1946
39.03
1947                                               	
39.75
1948                                               	
42.42
1949                              	
43.07
1950                            	
42.64
1Q"!1
46.26
1952                          - 	
48.93
1953       	
49.15
1954                                     	
50.24
1955                                               	
53 21
1 Almost exclusively workers in non-agricultural industries.   Canadian Labour Force Estimates, Canadian Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa. H 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Chart 1.—Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial Classifications,
as of January 1st, 1955
Personal Services
Construction
Services
Public Servic
Metals
Foods
Light, Heat
and Power
Printing & Publishin
Mining and
Quarrying
Communications
Clothing and
Footwear
Railway
Transportation
Other
Transportation
All Other
Wood and Wood Products
Organizations of Employees (Labour Organizations)
The following list of British Columbia labour organizations is arranged alphabetically, according to locality. It shows the post-office addresses of those who furnished the Bureau of Economics and Statistics with data. Names and addresses of the
officers have been revised to the date of publication in all cases where such information
could be obtained. Organizations which have come into existence subsequent to January
1st, 1955, are not included in the list but will be shown in the next publication.
A list of employers' organizations follows that of the labour organizations. Returns
in the former category numbered 25 in 1939 and 1940, 27 in 1941, 32 in 1942, 34 in
1943, 36 in 1944, 37 in 1945 to 1948 (inclusive), 48 in 1949, 46 in 1950, 43 in 1951,
48 in 1952, 45 in 1953, and 45 in 1954.
Listings have been compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics in conjunction with the Labour Relations Branch, Department of Labour. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 119
Abbotsford
Brick and Clay Workers of America, United, Local No.
629.—President, Hugh D. Smith; Recording Secretary,
Henry Tarensenko, Matsqui, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, E. V.
Ogle; Recording Secretary, A. H. Dueck, Abbotsford,
B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
432.—President, George D. Plenert; Recording Secretary, A. E. Ferguson, R.R. 4, Abbotsford, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 34.—Secretary,
Mrs. D. J. Paul, Box 862, Abbotsford, B.C.
Agassiz
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, H. C.
Ditchburn;   Recording Secretary,  Miss J.  A.  Probert,
Agassiz, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   76.—Secretary,
Mrs. M. Bouey, Box 147, Agassiz, B.C.
Alberni
Government   Employees'    Association,    B.C.—President,
R. E. Stratton;   Secretary, Miss R. A. Riley, Box 679,
Alberni, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   70.—Secretary,
Miss M. Michel, 610 Fourteenth Avenue North, Port
Alberni, B.C.
Albion
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 3.—
Secretary, D. Cordoni, Albion, B.C.
Aldergrove
Government   Employees'    Association,    B.C.—President,
F. G. Brain;   Secretary,  J.  Buckley,   19617  Simmonds
Road, R.R. 2, Langley Prairie, B.C.
Alert Bay
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 30.—
Secretary, P. W. Connelly, Alert Bay, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 73.—Secretary,
J. L. Doyle, Alert Bay, B.C.
Alice Arm
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, Local No. 906.—President, Orin G. Ditto; Recording Secretary, John O.
Garner, Alice Arm, B.C.
Annie ville
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 10.—
Secretary, L. Phillips, Annieville, B.C.
Armstrong
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 21.—Secretary,
Miss Pat Thompson, Box 91, Armstrong, B.C.
Ashcropt
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 30.—Secretary,
R. Lott, Clinton, B.C.
Bamberton
Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers' International Union,
Local No. 277.—President, J. Todd; Recording Secretary, A. H. Lowe, Bamberton, B.C.
Bankeir
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1023.—President, A. Nyman;  Recording Secretary,
G. M. Davis, 169 Abbott Street, Penticton, B.C.
Barriere
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   25.—Secretary,
Miss T. Stewart, Barriere, B.C.
Beaton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 920.
—Secretary, Olive Anderson, 111 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Beaverdell
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 900.
—President, Fred Poznikoff;   Recording Secretary, Dale
Scott, Beaverdell, B.C.
Bella Coola
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 27.—
Secretary, J. Johnson, Bella Coola, B.C.
Birch Island
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   26.—Secretary,
Miss L. Uberall, Blue River, B.C.
Blubber Bay
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 882.
—President, C. S. Barker;   Recording Secretary, C. L.
Shaw, Blubber Bay, B.C.
Blue River
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian   Brotherhood   of,   Local   No.    143.—President,
Thomas   Barron,   Sr.;     Financial   Secretary,   William
Haluk, Blue River, B.C.
Bonnington Falls
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,  Local
No. 999.—President, J. H. Ridge;   Recording Secretary,
E. A. Jones, Bonnington Falls, B.C.
Bralorne
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 271.
—President, R. R. Black;   Recording Secretary, J. L.
Morton, Bralorne, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   29.—Secretary,
E. J. Dorran, P.O. Box 127, Bralorne, B.C.
Britannia Beach
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 663.
—President,   J.   H.   Balderson;    Recording   Secretary,
L. R. Simpson, Britannia Beach, B.C.
Burnaby
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 23.—President, Gordon Adamson; Recording Secretary, Miss
Merle Trounce, 4238 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
323.—President, A. B. Morrison; Recording Secretary,
L. W. Fisher, 112 Sullivan Street, New Westminster,
B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 379.
—President, H. Smith; Secretary-Treasurer, G. J. Mc-
Crea, 3309 Lane Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Burns Lake
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 872.—President, Jonas Glaus;   Recording
Secretary, George H. Brown, Burns Lake, B.C.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
W.   Richmond;    Secretary,   Miss   C.   E.   Small,   Burns
Lake, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   55.—Secretary,
Douglas B. Williams, Burns Lake, B.C.
Campbell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1882.—President, A. W. Davidson; Recording Secretary, Earl Adams, Campbell River, B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
630.—President, W. B. Whitmore; Recording Secretary, C. W. Saults, Campbell River, B.C.
Retail and Wholesale Employees' Union, Local No. 290.
—President, Mary MacCormick; Recording Secretary,
Margaret Roach, Campbell River, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 72.—Secretary,
Miss B. Pyatt, General Delivery, Campbell River, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian — Secretary-
Treasurer, Charles F. Wood, c/o Post-office, Campbell
River, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 742.—President, W. Luck;
Recording Secretary, F. C. Wood, R.R. 2, Campbell
River, B.C. H 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Cassiar
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 927.
—President, Peter Ward; Recording Secretary, Harold
Campbell, Cassiar, B.C.
Castlegar
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 9.—Secretary, Miss
Philippa Sibley, Box 62, Castlegar, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners, United Brotherhood of, Local
No. 2300.—President, H. J. Anderson; Recording Secretary, R. J. Thorndale, Robson, B.C.
Chemainus
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 508.—President, David Mason; Recording Secretary, H. E. Irving, Box 332, Chemainus,
B.C.
Chilliwack
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1843.—President, William Bell; Recording Secretary, G. N. Norlen, 520 Young Street, South
Chilliwack, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
R. J. Barrett; Secretary, S. Sykes, 680 Yale Road
West, Chilliwack, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 458. —
President, George Beamin; Recording Secretary, O. R.
Manch, 790 Camp River Road, R.R. 1, Rosedale, B.C.
School District No. 33 Employees' Association, Local No.
21.—President, E. Brown; Recording Secretary, R. G.
Cook, 218 Yale Road East, Chilliwack, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 33.—Secretary,
Miss S. Melanson, 134 Gore Avenue, Chilliwack, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association of
Canada—President, Miss L. Hornby; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Erna Hamm, 126 Tupper Street, Chilliwack,
B.C.
Cloverdale
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 402.—President, Paul Flahr; Recording Secretary, Geraldine
Baldwin, c/o Municipal Hall, Cloverdale, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 36.—Secretary,
Miss B. Lellman, 318 Sixth Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.
Colquitz
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
A. Humphries; Secretary, J. A. Bendall, 2949 Orillia
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Comox
Government   Employees'    Association,   B.C.—President,
H. J. Moore;  Secretary, T. Tams, Box 789, Courtenay,
B.C.
Hospital Employees' Association, St. Joseph's General—
President, Muriel B. Sharp; Recording Secretary, James
P. Rennie, Box 24, Comox, B.C.
Copper Mountain
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 649.—
President, Lome Salmon; Recording Secretary, T. C.
Knowles, Jr., Copper Mountain, B.C.
Courtenay
Auto Workers of B.C., Local No. 1857.—President,
George N. Stowe; Recording Secretary, Walter E. Tar-
ling, R.R. 1, Courtenay, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1638.—President, Thomas Cooper; Financial Secretary, G. E. Bailey, Box 515, Courtenay, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 156.—President, Herbert Sharp; Recording Secretary, Frank Plow-
right, Box 939, Courtenay, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Business Agent,
J. J. Waddell; Recording Secretary, William J. Fidler,
Box 1012, Courtenay, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President and
Secretary, George Harrison, c/o Post-office, Courtenay,
B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 439.—
President, Rees Rogers; Recording Secretary, Randle C.
Moon, Box 1026, Courtenay, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   71.—Secretary,
J. R. Hindle, Box 443, Courtenay, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-363.
■—President, E. Lidberg; Recording Secretary, A. Wiebe,
Salmon River, B.C.
Cranbrook
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1719.—President, Mark Miller; Recording
Secretary, C. B. Comerford, Box 55, Cranbrook, B.C.
General Workers' Union, Local No. 212.—President, Ben
Walkley; Recording Secretary, W. H. Bonner, Box 1396,
Cranbrook, B.C.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.—President,
J.   D.   Swinton;   Recording   Secretary,   Mrs.   Mary   A.
Griffiths, Box 1105, Cranbrook, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 563.—
President, A. DeBuysscher; Recording Secretary, C. W.
Morris, Box 399, Cranbrook, B.C.
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Local No. 559.—President, F. Irvine;  Recording Secretary, M. H. John, Box 157, Cranbrook, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   Local
No.   229.—President,   S.   Johnson;   Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Downey, Box 162, Cranbrook, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen,  Brotherhood  of,  Local  No.  585.—
President,   B.   A.   Craig;   Recording   Secretary,   H.   J.
Conroy, Box 995, Cranbrook, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1292.
—President, H. A. Haynes;  Recording Secretary, L. E.
Kary, Box 1325, Cranbrook, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
173.—President,   Ernest  Doney;    Recording   Secretary,
F. W. Molander, Box 222, Cranbrook, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 2.—Secretary, Miss
Jean Avis, Cranbrook, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-405.
—President, A. F. Dunn;   Recording Secretary, Roy C.
Kretlow, 117 Ninth Avenue, Cranbrook, B.C.
Creston
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2318.—President, C. Sherwood; Recording Secretary, Harry Fofonoff, Creston, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 3014.—President, Ben P. Wills;
Recording Secretary, Adrian C. Kromhout, Box 106,
Creston, B.C.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 7.—
President, Mrs. Mary Pelle; Recording Secretary, Mrs.
Edythe Tedford, Creston, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, V.
Vincent; Secretary, T. G. Waller, Box 340, Creston,
B.C.
School Board Employees' Association, Local No. 435.—
President, L. R. McLennan; Recording Secretary, R. L.
Gilmore, Creston, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 5.—Secretary, Miss
L. Dicken, Creston, B.C.
Cumberland
Firebosses' Union.—President, William Bennie; Recording
Secretary, J. A. Thomson, Box 77, Cumberland, B.C.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7293.—
President, James Williamson; Recording Secretary,
Harry Westfield, Cumberland, B.C.
Dawson Creek
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
Garth Holtalander; Recording Secretary, Miss Elsie
Lapushinsky, General Delivery, Dawson Creek, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 293.—President, W. R.
Cameron; Recording Secretary, D. H. Hawkins, Box
838, Dawson Creek, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 59.—Secretary,
Miss K. F. Dolan, Box 846, Dawson Creek, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 121
Duncan
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1812.—President, P. F. Enright; Recording Secretary, B. Falconberg, Box 1532, Duncan, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 358.—
President, Norman A. Carter; Recording Secretary,
L. C. Wilson, Sherman Road, Duncan, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, W.
Waldon; Secretary, Miss R. A. Wagner, Box 58, Duncan, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
533.—President, F. W. Costin; Recording Secretary,
A. E. Costin, Ladysmith, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Recording Secretary, R. W. Smillie, C.P.E. Duncan Branch, Duncan,
B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 444.
—President, A. Giles; Recording Secretary, Mrs. C.
Sinclair, R.R. 2, Duncan, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 65.—Secretary,
Miss J. Leask, Box 126, Cobble Hill, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-80.
—President, Tony Poje; Recording Secretary, Laurence
Jones, Box 430, Duncan, B.C.
Enderby
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 78.—Secretary,
Hugh Power, Enderby, B.C.
ESQUIMALT
Municipal Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 333.—
President, James Mayzes; Recording Secretary, Robert
Duncan, 1099 Lockley Road, Esquimau, B.C.
ESSONDALE
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, D.
Cosser; Secretary, P. J. Switch (General Secretary),
120 Glover Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Fernie
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of America, International Union of, Local No. 308.
■—President,   Peter   Ax;    Recording   Secretary,   R.   J.
Duthie, Box 1071, Fernie, B.C.
Electrical Workers,  International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 921.—President, R. L. Davis;   Recording Secretary,
R. Battersby, Box 339, Fernie, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, E.
Allen; Recording Secretary, H. Haigh, Fernie, B.C.
Mine Workers  of America,  United,  Local  No.  7310.—
President, Fred Dawson;    Recording Secretary, Robert
Lilley, Box 486, Fernie, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 1.—Secretary, Miss
S. Uphill, Jaffray, B.C.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — Secretary,
Elizabeth Payne, c/o Post-office, Fernie, B.C.
Field
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1454.—President, Louis Port; Recording Secretary,
W. M. Brown, Field, B.C.
Fort Langley
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 32.—
Secretary, E. Burnell, Fort Langley, B.C.
Fort St. John
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, R.
Aubrey; Recording Secretary, A. A. Corieu, Department of Transport, Fort St. John, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
Russ Brown; Secretary, W. G. Cosens, Fort St. John,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 60.—Secretary, Mrs.
M. Hazlett, Fort St. John, B.C.
Golden
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
W. R. Lenny;   Secretary, G. Talerico, Box 133, Golden,
B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
165.—President, O. Beiser;   Financial Secretary, E. H.
Dillon, Golden, B.C.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.,  Local  No.   18. — Secretary,
Walter Ellaschuk, Golden, B.C.
Grand Forks
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 343.—President, Fred Hewett; Financial Secretary, William J.
Beasley, Box 243, Grand Forks, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
E. J. C. Roylance; Secretary, E. A. Johnson, Box 425,
Greenwood, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 12.—Secretary,
Mrs. Jean Teske, Box 142, Grand Forks, B.C.
Greenwood
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 13.—Secretary,
Miss Blanche Kimura, Midway, B.C.
Haney
Government   Employees'    Association,    B.C.—Recording
Secretary, J. H. Brown, Box 253, Haney, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers  of  America,   United,   Local  No.
517.—President,   C.   O'Laughlin;   Recording   Secretary,
Mrs. A. M. Hume, 2951 Dewdney Road, Whonnock,
B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   42.—Secretary,
D. J. N. Stewart, Box 632, Haney, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1367.
— President,   Warren   Lowrey;    Recording   Secretary,
Dennis Stewart, R.R. 1, Hammond, B.C.
Hope
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
C. Karr; Secretary, P. J. Rabbitt, Box 624, Hope, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 32.—Secretary,
Miss Carell Baile, Box 295, Hope, B.C.
loco
Oil Workers' International Union, Local No. 614.—President, Harold Buchanan; Recording Secretary, T. J.
Robitaille, 203 Fourth Avenue, loco, B.C.
Kaleden
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 4.—President, Mrs. Shirley Fretz; Recording Secretary, Mrs.
Eleanor Lockhart, Kaleden, B.C.
Kamloops
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1540.—President, J. Sasges; Recording
Secretary, J. F. Mobley, 717 Nicola Street, Kamloops,
B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President,
Frank C. Fowler; Recording Secretary, Douglas E.
Daws, 1252 Pine Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 993.—President, Daniel Martin; Recording Secretary, Roderick P. MacKenzie, 1193 River Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of.—President,
A. C. Watters; Secretary-Treasurer, J. B. Scott, 125
Fourth Avenue, Kamloops, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 913.
—President, W. L. Miner; Recording Secretary, R. L.
Kennedy, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, H.
Burke; Secretary, A. Norberg, 845 Nicola Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union
of America, International, Local No. 129.—President,
H. C. Graeper; Recording Secretary, Norman Gowans.
R.R. 1, North Kamloops, B.C. H 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 80.—.
President, J. Cuthbert; Financial Secretary, J. Reeves,
R.R. 1, Kamloops, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 821.—
President, W. H. Yearley; Recording Secretary, C. H.
Faulkner, 19 Nicola Street West, Kamloops, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 855.—
President, J. L. Bailargeon; Recording Secretary, L. P.
Martin, 753 Pleasant Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 258.—President, M. J. Cochran; Recording
Secretary, R. J. Perry, R.R. 1, Kamloops, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 930.—President, S. J. Dempsey; Recording
Secretary, Edward Roy Maguraki, 1168 Pleasant Street,
Kamloops, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 748.
—President, W. G. Hilton; Recording Secretary, G. E.
Rebagliati, 779 Nicola Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 15.—President, S. Kurylowich; Recording Secretary, S. Linton, Avola, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 31.—President, G. Wesenko; Recording Secretary,
J. S. Firknil, Kamloops Junction, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1332.—President, R. Morgan; Recording Secretary,
C. Adcock, R.R. 1, Kamloops, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 310.—
President, S. Thornley; Recording Secretary, T. Kuz,
57 Campbell Avenue, North Kamloops, B.C.
National Defence Workers' Federal Union, Local No.
562.—President, F. J. Howett; Recording Secretary,
C. Eyllis, Powers Addition, Kamloops, B.C.
Railroad Signalmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 192.—President, C. Mark; Recording Secretary,
R. G. McPherson, Box 66, Chase, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 519.—
President, A. L. Bartlett; Recording Secretary, Vernon
H. Mott, 521 Seymour Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
148.—President, Bill Purkis; Recording Secretary, John
Hungar, 16 Wilson Street, North Kamloops, B.C.
Railway Conductors of America, Local No. 611.—President, C. J. Rebagliati; Recording Secretary, J. McMillan, R.R. 1, Kamloops, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 150.—President, L. D.
Rye; Recording Secretary, R. Lombardi, 14 Williams
Street, North Kamloops, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 24.—Secretary,
E. E. Hewer, Chase, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 8.
—President, D. Gordon; Secretary Treasurer, F. En-
dersby, 984 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 15.
—President, Mrs. I. Gunn; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
R. Gordon, 35 Seymour Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Kaslo
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 173.—President, N. A. Campbell; Recording Secretary, W. Kicet, Kaslo, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 6.—Secretary, Miss
J. Nomland, Riondel, B.C.
Civil    Servants   of   Canada,   Amalgamated. — President,
H. A. Blake;   Recording Secretary, C. R. Arnold, 2054
Ethel Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Electrical Workers,  International Brotherhood of, Local
No.  1409.—President, D. Henri;   Recording  Secretary,
J. H. Goode, 1654 Pendozi Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
J.  E. Hay;   Secretary,  D.  C. Johnston,  231  Bernard
Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
Packinghouse  Workers of America,  United, Local No.
339.—President,   A.   McCIuroy;    Recording   Secretary,
Mrs. R. Flaig, 1667 Richter Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Postal   Employees'   Association,    Canadian. — President,
Mary  Newton;    Recording  Secretary,   Doug   Moulton,
Box X, Kelowna, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   23.—Secretary,
Miss Joyce Cummings, Box 536, Kelowna, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 323.
—President, E. Embleton;   Recording Secretary, T. R.
Prior, 507 Harvey Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-423.
—President, J. W. Strong;   Recording Secretary, Frank
Jenaway, c/o 249 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
Keremeos
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 9.—
President, Mrs. Dora Murphy; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Barbara Copeland, Keremeos, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 16.—Secretary,
Miss Ruby E. Schaffer, Keremeos, B.C.
Kimberley
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1893.—President, P. O. Thompson; Recording Secretary, P. O. Thompson, Kimberley, B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 651.
—President, R. C. Thompson; Recording Secretary,
H. M. Baker, Box 1, Kimberley, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association.—President, E. D.
Daniel; Recording Secretary, P. D. Woodward, Kimberley, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 3.—Secretary, Miss
E. M. Brland, 475 Ross Street, Kimberley, B.C.
Kitimat
Aluminum Workers' International Union, Local No. 315.
—President, G. F. D. Milne; Recording Secretary,
K. T. Nelson, General Delivery, Station A, Kitimat,
B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1081.—President, Hayden Slump; Financial Secretary, Ernest W. Kitchen, Box 253, Kitimat,
B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
1125.—President, Arthur Fisher; Financial Secretary,
Derek Ffewkes, 23 Quail Street, Kitimat, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 5115.—President, Russell Hoover; Representative, Walter S. Ross,
Box 430, Kitimat; Recording Secretary, R. A. Freeman, Box 430, Kitimat, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 80.—Secretary,
Miss Margaret Bryant, Kitimat, B.C.
Kelowna
Bakery and Confectionery Workers of America, International Union of, Local No. 355. — President, Henry
DeMontreuil; Recording Secretary, Stan Beardmore,
R.R. 2, Kelowna, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1370.—President, Donald Grey; Recording Secretary, Roland Mopson, 925 Glenn Avenue,
Kelowna, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 2771.—President, Adam J. Rieger; Recording Secretary, Arthur H. Hoffman, R.R. 2, Kelowna,
B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 338.—President, Don Appleton; Recording Secretary, Cjesar Turrl,
535 Clement Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.
Ladner
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Dick
Robie;   Recording Secretary, William Kadyschuk, 4763
Sycamore Avenue, Ladner, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 4.—
Secretary, N. Spilchen, Ladner, B.C.
Fire   Fighters,   International   Association   of.—President,
R. Giddens;   Recording Secretary, A. Hales, 932 Dixon
Avenue, Lulu Island, B.C.
Municipal  Employees'   Union,   Delta,   Local  No.   23.—
President, Ian Nicholson;   Recording Secretary, A. H.
Robins, 4995 Central Avenue, Ladner, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   37.—Secretary,
Miss Jean Umpleby, 5592 Alma Road, Vancouver 13,
B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 123
Ladysmith
General Workers' Union, Local No. 237.—President,
William Davenport; Recording Secretary, William Orr,
Box 243, Ladysmith, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 67.—Secretary,
John Ruklin, Box 349, Chemainus, B.C.
Lake Cowichan
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 66.—Secretary,
Gordon H. Davis, Lake Cowichan, B.C.
Langford
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
Frank Ray; Financial Secretary, N. H. Sluggett, 3477
Saanich Road, Victoria, B.C.
Langley Prairie
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 403.—President, R. A. Jensen; Recording Secretary, R. W. Teric-
kow, 4657 Two Hundred Street, R.R. 2, Langley, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 35.—Secretary,
R. S. Price, Langley Elementary School, Langley Prairie,
B.C.
LlLLOOET
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   29.—Secretary,
George Prouins, Box 101, Lillooet, B.C.
Railwaymen,  Canadian Association  of, Local No.  85.—■
President, F. A. Lasser;   Secretary-Treasurer, F. E. C.
Smith, Box 128, Lillooet, B.C.
Massett
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 50.—Secretary,
Mrs. Rosemary Ault, Queen Charlotte City, B.C.
McBride
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 247.—President, L. R.
Wallen; Recording Secretary, G. E. Robert, McBride,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 58.—Secretary,
Miss E. Becker, P.O. Box 163, McBride, B.C.
Merritt
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
J. H. Goldie; Secretary, Ted Law, Box 21, Merritt, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 31.—Secretary,
Mrs. Beatrice E. Selleck, Box 1033, Merritt, B.C.
Miller Bay
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, G.
McDougall; Recording Secretary, E. R. Green, Box 488,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Mission City
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2213.—President, W. M. Lightburn;
Recording Secretary, W. J. L. Vivian, Matsqui, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union ot
America, International, Local No. 1288.—President, Ray
Marshall; Recording Secretary, Ron Herbert, Mount
Lehman, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
501.—President, R. Mandigo; Recording Secretary, Mrs.
Helen Klenk, R.R. 1, Mission City, B.C.
School Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 593.—President, Albert A. Finkbeiner; Recording Secretary, For-
don B. Monds, 216 Second Street, Mission City, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 75.—Secretary,
D. Hood, Box 213, Mission City, B.C.
Nakusp
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 10.—Secretary,
Mrs. M. Robertson, Burton, B.C.
Namu
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 29.—
Secretary, W. Hill, Namu, B.C.
Nanaimo
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 527.—President, A. Clarck; Recording
Secretary, E. Luck, 450 Wesley Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Civic and School Board Employees' Association, Local
No. 401.—President, E. L. Crowe; Recording Secretary,
S. G. Storey, 670 Pine Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, N.
Clift; Recording Secretary, John C. Zasburg, West
Road, Northfield, B.C.
Dry Cleaning and Laundry Workers' Union, Local No. 1.
—President, Elizabeth Thomas; Recording Secretary,
Barbara Hodgson, Nanaimo, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
905.—President, J. R. Menzies; Recording Secretary,
T. MacDonald, 1785 Hallen Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 15.—
Secretary, C. J. Schule, Nanaimo, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
J. A. Barford; Secretary, Miss M. E. Booth, Courthouse, Nanaimo, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' Union,
Local No. 619.—President, Ebenezer Muir; Recording
Secretary, William Hayes, 132 Erye Street, Nanaimo,
B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 501.—
President, H. J. Brown; Financial Secretary, Austin
Craven, 805 Wentworth Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7355.—■
President, Thomas Newman; Financial Secretary,
George Bryce, 60 Robins Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 695.—President, K. O. Gil-
landers; Recording Secretary, A. W. McCandlish, 625
Nicol Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 606.
■—President, John Carruthers; Recording Secretary,
Francis E. Armishaw, 560 Third Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 68. — Secretary,
Peter R. Mclntyre, 1253 Strathmore Avenue, Nanaimo,
B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 3.
—President, J. McArthur; Secretary-Treasurer, C. Tall-
man, 507 Bradley Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of. Local No. 12.
—President, Mrs. G. Wilson; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
F. Waugh, 618 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 337.—
President, Donald Campbell; Recording Secretary, A. R.
Glen, Box 166, Nanaimo, B.C.
Naramata
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 11.—
President, A. R. Hesford; Recording Secretary, Mrs.
Helen H. Vaughan, Naramata, B.C.
Natal
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7292.—
President, Sam English; Recording Secretary, J. Jen-
kinson, Natal, B.C.
Nelson
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors'
International Union of America, Local No. 196.—President, Frank Defoe, Ward Street, Nelson, B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No. 292.—
President, A. G. Lane; Financial Secretary, J. A. Seaby,
413 Silica Street, Nelson, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2458.—President, Mike Makortoff; Recording Secretary, Michael Swetlishoff, 709 Eight Street,
Nelson, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 339.—President, J. W. Corbett; Recording Secretary, Miss K.
Maras, Box 77, Nelson, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1003.—President, J. H. Whitfield; Recording Secretary, R. J. Hesse, 18 Gyro Park Road, Nelson, B.C. H 124
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1141.—President, Peter Patrick; Recording Secretary, J. Verchio, 519 Robson Street, Nelson, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President,
W. R. Jeffs; Secretary, Mrs. M. E. Emmott, Courthouse, Nelson, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' Union,
Local No. 707.—President, J. A. Brooke; Recording Secretary, W. H. Vickers, General Delivery, Nelson, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 579.—
President, James R. Jarvis; Recording Secretary, R. C.
Wright, 310 Carbonate Street, Nelson, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 631.—President, C. Boettger; Recording Secretary, D. McGinn, R.R. 1, Nelson, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 663.—
President, T. Swinden; Recording Secretary, J. E. Bal-
dock, 300 Kerr Block, Nelson, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 181.—President, J. H. Ringrose; Recording Secretary, Peter Shankaruk, 1932 Third Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 901.—
President, James Forgaard; Recording Secretary, Sidney
Toews, Salmo, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Local No. 75.—
President, H. D. Craig; Recording Secretary, Gordon G.
Hood, Creek Street, Nelson, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 558.—
President, Clifford Smith; Recording Secretary, F. H.
Lowe, R.R. 1, Nelson, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1291.—President, W. G. Horvath; Recording Secretary,
Miss Lena Gri, 615 Davies Street, Nelson, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
2318.—President, Joe Haynes; Financial Secretary,
David Nelson Lundie, 124 Nelson Avenue, Nelson, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
98.—President, G. E. Maglio; Recording Secretary,
G. M. Scales, 802 Fifth Street, Nelson, B.C.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local No. 460.
—President, W. E. Marquis; Recording Secretary, A.
Kirby, 820 Carbonate Street, Nelson, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 7.—Secretary, Miss
Kathlyne M. Porter, 715 Kokanee Avenue, Nelson, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 4.—
President, M. M. Spence; Secretary-Treasurer, Eric Ray,
Montrose P.O., B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 13.
—President, Mrs. M. Slattery; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
L. Franco, 924 Warren Street, Trail, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 340.—
President, J. A. Boletti; Financial Secretary, D. H.
Strachan, 1537 Second Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association of Canada.—President, George Bevis; Secretary, Mrs. A. I.
Lawrie, c/o 356 Baker Street, Nelson, B.C.
New Denver
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
J. H. Wood; Secretary, Mrs. Doreen Desrochers, New
Denver, B.C.
New Hazelton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 898.
—President, Herman Bennett; Recording Secretary,
Roger Chartrand, Hazelton, B.C.
New Westminster
Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union
of America, Local No. 4.—President, F. Austin; Recording Secretary, N. A. Ferrero, 10070 Trans-Canada Highway, New Westminster, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1251.—President, Marvin Sather; Financial Secretary, W. E. Lewis, 1502 London Street, New
Westminster, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 387.—President, Bill Campbell; Recording Secretary, Tony Nikkei,
207 East Durham Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, J. A.
Arcand;   Financial Secretary, W. F. Reed, 1483 Davies
Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Cordage   Industrial  Rope   and  Twine  Workers'  Union,
Local No. 1.—President, W. Bowland;   Recording Secretary,   A.   Hards,   359   East   Sixteenth   Avenue,   New
Westminster, B.C.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine  and Allied Workers'  International Union of America, Local No. 69.—President,
M.  Cassia;   Recording Secretary, A. Harris, 223 Phillips Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Fire Fighters' Union, Local No. 256.—President, H. E.
McKnight;   Recording Secretary, Loyd C. Bussey, No.
3 Fire Hall, New Westminster, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No.  5.—
Secretary, C. Person, New Westminster, B.C.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
J. Longstaff;  Secretary, W. Morgan, 610 Fourth Street,
New Westminster, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union
of America, International, Local No.  1070.—President,
Edmund Chaters;   Recording Secretary, Thomas Porter,
1505 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 835.—President, Ray Pigeau;
Recording   Secretary,   W.   H.   O'Brien,   3636   Nelson
Avenue, South Burnaby, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 32.—
President, Alex. Gibson;   Recording Secretary, Arthur
Broughton, 9125 Pike Road, R.R. 5, New Westminster,
B.C.
Longshoremen's   and   Warehousemen's   Union,   International,  Local   No.   502.—President,   Fred   G.   Jackson;
Recording   Secretary,   Roland   R.   Cope,   1409  Eighth
Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Longshoremen's   and   Warehousemen's   Union,   International, Local No. 511.—President, R. Comes;   Recording Secretary,  J.  M.  Kendrick, 2019  Eighth Avenue,
New Westminster, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 313.—
President, R. Whitter;   Recording Secretary, Fred Benson, 466 Graham Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 151.—
President,    R.   Riddell;     Recording   Secretary,   B.   J.
Bradley, 207 Seventh Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 578.
—President,   George H.   Cooper;   Financial  Secretary,
Stanley B. McKee, 12337 Industrial Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Mine Workers of America, United,  Local No.  13156.—
President, Arthur A. Deakin;  Financial Secretary, William Lake, 229 Pearce Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Municipal Employees'  Union, Local No.   16.—President,
R. E. Merriman;   Recording Secretary, F. S. Mitchell,
602 Clark Road, New Westminster, B.C.
Newspaper Guild, American, Local No. 220.—President,
Bruce Smillie;   Recording Secretary, Jeffery Cross, 434
Twelfth Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Packinghouse  Workers   of America,   United,  Local  No.
180.—President,   J.    McKnight;     Financial   Secretary,
C. A. Thompson, 700 Schoolhouse Road, R.R. 16, New
Westminster, B.C.
Packinghouse  Workers  of America,  United,  Local No.
412.—President,   L.   Wagner;    Financial   Secretary,   L.
McLellan, 1407 Buller Avenue, South Burnaby, B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
456.—President, Frank F. Meehan;  719 Hamilton Street
North-west, New Westminster, B.C.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — President,
Henry Waters;   Secretary-Treasurer, W. J. Smillie, 209
East Columbia Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Local No. 427.
—President, G. Sherlock;   Recording Secretary, T. William, 1041 Holly Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association of Street Electric, Local No. 134.
—President, D. L. Bryce;   Financial Secretary, R. C.
Lawrence,  2233   McPherson  Avenue,   South  Burnaby,
B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
280.—President,   R.   Wark;    Recording   Secretary,   T.
Gale,   10879 Bon Accord Road,  R.R.   3, New  Westminster, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H  125
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 226.—President, N. H.
Cheston; Recording Secretary, R. C. Best, Ste. 3, 1115
Seventh Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
School Maintenance Union, Local No. 14.—President,
E. L. Desormeaux; Recording Secretary, G. F. Miller,
1527 Dublin Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Seafarers' International Union of North America. —■
President, H. See; Representative, F. Rolley, Whon-
nock, B.C.
Teachers' Association, New Westminster, Local No. 169.—
Fred Turner, 810 Cherry Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Telephone Workers of British Columbia, Federation of,
Local No. 7.—President, Mrs. S. Duerksen; Secretary-
Treasurer, Mrs. G. Heselton, 2561 Burns Street, South
Burnaby, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 632.—
President, Arthur Scott; Recording Secretary, W. J.
Calhoun, Ste. 12, Carlton Court, 317 Third Avenue,
New Westminster, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association of
Canada.—President, R. D. Shields; Recording Secretary, Miss L. Kenny, 60 Eighth Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International Union,
Local No. 356.—President, R. D. Faumier; Recording
Secretary, M. Johnson, 307 Devoy North-west, New
Westminster, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-357.
—President, Joseph R. Madden; Financial Secretary,
L. E. Vandale, 533 Clarkson Street, New Westminster,
B.C.
Nickel Plate
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 656.—
President, L. Leslie; Financial Secretary, D. K. Hes-
keth, Nickel Plate, B.C.
North Vancouver
Civic Employees' Association, Local No. 3.—President,
Roy V. L. Palmer; Secretary, J. Forrest, Box 203,
North Vancouver, B.C.
Distillery, Rectifying and Wine Workers' International
Union of America, Local No. 153.—President, George
Sawchuck; Financial Secretary, E. Swan, 227 East
Twenty-ninth Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.
Fire Fighters' Union, Local No. 1183.—President, Donald
J. McCormack; Recording Secretary, Robert G. McDonald, 1766 Bond Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Fire Fighters' Union, Local No. 3.—President, James H.
Spencer; Recording Secretary, R. J. Hallaway, 275 East
Keith Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Oil Workers' International Union, Local No. 615.—President, James Jennings; Financial Secretary, John Speers,
584 West Queens Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 44.—Secretary,
Mrs. L. Walker, 1230 West Twentieth Street, North
Vancouver, B.C.
Ocean Falls
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
880.—President and Secretary, Edward E. Cox, Box 511,
Ocean Falls, B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
360.—President, George Pembleton; Recording Secretary, Jack H. Harris, Box 250, Ocean Falls, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 312.—President, James W.
Terry; Recording Secretary, John Mathieson, Box 264,
Ocean Falls, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 49.—Secretary,
Miss S. A. Meek, Box 282, Ocean Falls, B.C.
Okanagan Centre
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 8.—President, George Snowdon; Recording Secretary, J. S. G.
Gibbs, Oyama, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association of
Canada.—President, A. G. Thomas; Recording Secretary, G. D. Paul, 214 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.
Oliver
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 2.—President, Milton Hallman; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Alma
Geddes, Box 606, Oliver, B.C.
Sawmill Employees' Association.—President, T. W. Bous-
field; Financial Secretary, Mrs. Elsie Parker, Oliver,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 14.—Secretary,
Mrs. Mona N. Hodsdon, R.R. 1, Oliver, B.C.
Pender Harbour
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 16.—
Secretary, J. Cameron, Pender Harbour, B.C.
Penticton
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1696.—President, J. C. Mortz; Recording
Secretary, T. C. Hawtree, Box 29, Kaleden, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 308.—President, J. Riley; Recording Secretary, J. P. Van der
Hoop, 476 Bennett Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President,
Charles J. White; Recording Secretary, Dudley St. J.
Land, 250 Nanaimo Street, Penticton, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 10.
—President, J. D. Crawford; Recording Secretary,
J. N. Browne, Fire Hall, Penticton, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 953.
—President, H. C. Locke; Recording Secretary, K. M.
Little, 2101 Thirty-fourth Street, Vernon, B.C.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 1.—
President, Charles L. Vincent; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Helen Nelson, 302 Brunswick Street, Penticton,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
W. J. M. Owen; Secretary, D. Hum, Game Department, Summerland, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 95.—
Recording Secretary, Ralph Johnson, Box 86, West
Bench, Penticton, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 866.—
President, S. J. Cramer; Recording Secretary, A. R.
Fulkerson, 978 Argyle Street, Penticton, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 884.—President, V. E. Moore; Recording
Secretary, P. H. Coulter, 101 Manor Park Drive, Penticton, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
333.—President, I. Parker; Recording Secretary, L.
Payton, 963 Creston Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
Walter Christie; Recording Secretary, R. E. Miller,
c/o Post-office, Penticton, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 914.—
President, J. F. Missler; Recording Secretary, Mrs.
S. B. Kelly, 1316 Killarney Street, Penticton, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 303.—President,
Gordon McNutt; Recording Secretary, J. A. Leslie,
413 Conklin Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 15.—Secretary,
Miss Agnes Hill, 271 Penticton Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Pioneer
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 693.—
President, George Miller; Assistant District Secretary,
Olive Anderson, 111 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Port Alberni
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,   Local   No.   513.—President,   James   G.   Tuckett;
Recording Secretary, Joseph G. Scheofel, 122 Kingsway
South, Port Alberni, B.C.
Civic   Workers'   Union. — President,   Harry   Broadbent;
Recording   Secretary,   Horace   Pearce,   407   Strathern
Street, Port Alberni, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 25.—
Secretary, R. Sparrow, Port Alberni, B.C. H 126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 697.—President, Angelo
Slella; Representative, Gordon S. Deugare, 722 Helton
Avenue, Port Alberni, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 503.—President, M. Mosher; Recording Secretary, C. Anderson, 117 Argyle Street, Port
Alberni, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1642.—President, James Stewart;
Recording Secretary, Don E. Mcintosh, 211 Seventh
Avenue North, Port Alberni, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
Dennis A. Wright; Secretary, Stanley R. Stocken, 714
Tenth Avenue South, Port Alberni, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 592.—President, Harry
Whittaker; Recording Secretary, Andre J. Lamarche,
702 Fifteenth Avenue North, Port Alberni, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 185.—
President, W. F. Allen; Recording Secretary, G. Cain,
712 Sixth Avenue North, Port Alberni, B.C.
Port Alice
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Locai No. 514.—President, C. F. Jen-
kens; Recording Secretary, John E. Thompson, Box
189, Port Alice, B.C.
Port Coquitlam
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 25.—President, J. R. McAlvine; Financial Secretary, J. Dempsey,
Box 346, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 561.
—President, F. B. Turner; Recording Secretary, F. W.
Cole, 924 Medore Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Port Hardy
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. — President,
William McNeil; Recording Secretary, William B. Skea,
Airport, Port Hardy, B.C.
Port Mellon
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, Local No. 297.—
President, James W. Clark; Recording Secretary, John
Roy, P.O. Box 97, Port Mellon, B.C.
Pouce Coupe
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, A.
McMaster; Secretary, T. C. Chapman, Pouce Coupe,
B.C.
Powell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2068.—President, D. Davis; Recording
Secretary, J. Ellsworth, Box 700, Powell River, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
S. R. McGregor; Secretary, Miss E. Cook, Box 116,
Powell River, B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
142.—President, George Young; Financial Secretary,
W. J. McDonald, Box 531, Powell River, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 76. — President, Robert
Bryce; Recording Secretary, E. M. Galley, Box 810,
Powell River, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 476.—
President, Miss Alice Nassichuk; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. W. Bagnall, Box 762, Powell River, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 47.—Secretary, Miss
Lois Marshall, Powell River, B.C.
Prince George
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1998.—President, Ambrose Hayes; Recording Secretary, L. E. Senkpiel, 1980 McBride Crescent, Prince George, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 399.—President, W. H. Rice; Recording Secretary, Gerald Davis,
Box 847, Prince George, B.C.
Electrical Workers,  International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 242.—President, F. A. Belsham;   Financial Secretary, T. R. Freeman, 235 Burden Street, Prince George,
B.C.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
858.—President, Colin Fanshaw;   Recording Secretary,
Craig Fraser, 1155 Lethbridge, Prince George, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, F.
Cunningham;    Secretary,   Miss   D.   Harris,   Box   935,
Prince George, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 843.—
President,   E.   Kirkpatrick;    Recording   Secretary,   G.
Williams, 1984 Twelfth Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood  of,
Local No. 827.—President, A. Maisonneuve;   Recording
Secretary, H. W. Willis,  1785 Fourth Avenue, Prince
George, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way  Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   Local
No.  202.—President, L.  Rawson;   Financial Secretary,
W. Haws, Box 297, Prince George, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   Local
No.    1870.—President,    G.    P.   Whitfield;     Recording
Secretary, J. Wall, Engen, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen,  Brotherhood  of,  Local  No.   869.—
President, A. J. Gotobed;   Recording Secretary, A. A.
Clapperton, 771 Burden Street, Prince George, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local   No.   57.—Secretary,
Miss K. Anne Munro, No. 3, 2050 Thirteenth Avenue,
Prince George, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-424.
— President,   James   Lehman;    Recording   Secretary,
James Parminter, Box 1314, Quesnel, B.C.
Prince Rupert
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1549.—President, J. H. McLeod; Recording Secretary, Gordon McKay, Box 94, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Local No. 1735.—
President, C. F. Graham; Recording Secretary, Edward
Woodward, Box 94, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 5.—President,
Thomas Thomas; Recording Secretary, E. A. Evans,
Box 83, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. — President,
Reginald Charles Edwards; Recording Secretary, H.
Godfrey Bird, 501 Herman Street, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 344.—President, Clarence Adland; Recording Secretary, Doug Hague, Box 15, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
510.—President, T. G. Dyck; Financial Secretary,
M. B. O'Toole, 108 Eighth Avenue West, Prince
Rupert, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
559.—President, J. C. Ewart; Recording Secretary,
J. S. Furness, 1307 First Overlook Street, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 31.—■
Secretary, R. L. Gardiner, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 37.—
Secretary, T. Parkin, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Fishermen's Federal Union, Local No. 80.—President,
Hilmar Mork; Financial Secretary, W. H. Brett, 704
McBride Street, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
G. L. Brodie; Secretary, Miss V. Manojlovich, Department of Public Works, Court-house, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' Union,
Local No. 636.—President, Stanley Morin; Financial
Secretary, George J. Gerrard, Box 144, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 505.—President, Arthur Instance;
Secretary, N. Cronck, 708 Second Avenue West, Prince
Rupert, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 335.—President, A. E. Blackhall; Recording Secretary, A. F. Skattebol, 1425 Graham Avenue, Prince
Rupert, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H  127
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States
and Canada, Local No. 180.—President, G. S. Weather-
ley; Recording Secretary, Sam Fulian, 615 Third
Avenue West, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 708.—President, Peter J.
Lester; Recording Secretary, Reginald Ginn, Box 294,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1016.-—
President, F. I. Parker; Recording Secretary, A. E.
Smith, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
426.—President, E. I. Tschaboid; Recording Secretary,
R. Pollock, 252 Eighth Avenue West, Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 154.—President,
J. H. Mitchell; Recording Secretary, Miss C. S. Paul,
118 Ninth Street, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 52. — Secretary,
Miss Sheila Hicks, Booth Memorial High School, Prince
Rupert, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 413.-—
President, J. D. Standring; Recording Secretary, G. C.
McLean, Box 53, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Princeton
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of America, International Union of, Local No.
367.—President, P. Mitchell; Recording Secretary, W.
Burton, Box 36, Princeton, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, A.
Ryder;   Secretary, A. Pringle, Princeton, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 17. — Secretary,
R. B. Williams, Princeton, B.C.
Qualicum Beach
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2412.—President, Bennie Chaffin; Recording Secretary, Roger Whitmer, Box 44, Qualicum Beach,
B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 69. — Secretary,
Mrs. Flora M. Reddyhoff, Box 161, Qualicum Beach,
B.C.
Quathiaski Cove
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 17.—
Secretary, J. Hewison, Quathiaski Cove, B.C.
Quatsino
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 74. — Secretary,
Richard A. Piercy, Port Hardy, B.C.
Quesnel
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2493.—President, Dan Wies; Representative, Peter Vogt, Box 1266, Quesnel, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
P. J. Shaw; Secretary, Miss A. Hodges, c/o Forest
Service, Quesnel, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 28. — Secretary,
Miss Alethea McAlpine, Quesnel High School, Quesnel,
B.C.
Radium Hot Springs
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, M. T.
Calcutt; Recording Secretary, J. H. Fuller, Invermere,
B.C.
Red Rock
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 221.—President, T. C. Miller; Secretary-Treasurer,
A. Davis, Red Rock, B.C.
Revelstoke
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
466.—President, G. Fuoco; Recording Secretary, A. O.
Olsson, Box 141, Revelstoke, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 363.—President, G. Coccoroch; Recording Secretary, S. Dykstra,
Box 88, Revelstoke, B.C.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 381.—President, D. A. Rix; Recording Secretary,
J. F. Collin, Box 738, Revelstoke, B.C.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Local No. 10.—
President, W. R. Crowle; Recording Secretary, W. H.
Stahl, Revelstoke, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
E. N. Rear; Secretary, Miss E. Colarch, Box 560,
Revelstoke, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 657.—
Chief Engineer, F. J. Westlake; Recording Secretary,
S. G. Bronsdon, Box 698, Revelstoke, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 341.—President, H. D. Norburg; Recording
Secretary, W. S. King, Box 389, Revelstoke, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 258.—
President, R. Scott Watson, Sr.; Recording Secretary,
Guy Micielli, Box 209, Revelstoke, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 208.—President, J. M. Spence; Recording Secretary, G. Hlady, Albert Canyon, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Recording
Secretary, Ronald Belton, Revelstoke, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 51.—
President, John J. Charleston; Recording Secretary,
S. A. Webster, 412 First Street West, Box 681, Revelstoke, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
481.—President, H. Nucich; Recording Secretary, A. S.
Parker, 313 First Street East, Revelstoke, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 19. — Secretary,
Miss Dorothea Lundell, Box 294, Revelstoke, B.C.
Richmond
Civic Employees' Association.—President, G. H. Caroll;
Recording Secretary, Miss V. McKendrick, 800 Blun-
dell Road, Lulu Island, Vancouver 14, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Union, Local No. 19.—President,
G. R. Brunton; Recording Secretary, J. Van Iterson,
1064 Westminster Highway, R.R. 3, Vancouver, B.C.
Rossland
Fire   Fighters,   International   Association   of,   Local   No.
941.—President,   Albert   Heier;    Recording   Secretary,
John Dougan, Box 775, Rossland, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, J.
Profili;   Secretary, B.  I.  Dudley, Box 2024,  Rossland,
B.C.
Saanich
Fire   Fighters,   International   Association   of,   Local   No.
967.—President,   Robert   Slater;    Recording   Secretary,
Thomas W. Jennings, 3919 Cedar Hill Road, Victoria,
B.C.
Municipal   Employees*   Association,   Local   No.   374.—
President,   G.   Bone;    Recording   Secretary,   Mrs.   M.
Wood, 2611 Fifth Street, Victoria, B.C.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 441.—
President,   Norman    Shillitto;     Recording    Secretary,
Joseph H. Nunn, Box 42, Sidney, B.C.
Teachers'  Federation,   B.C.,   Local  No.   63. — Secretary,
Mrs. J. M. Gyllenspetz, 3570 Calumet Avenue, Victoria,
B.C.
Salmon Arm
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
A. F. Brayden; Secretary, Miss Joyce B. Ellis, Box 954,
Salmon Arm, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Financial Secretary, W. R. Gemmill, Salmon Arm, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 20. — Secretary,
Mrs. Muriel Preston, Box 1029, Salmon Arm, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-417.
—President, John Kelly; Recording Secretary, Tom
Shepherd, Canoe, B.C.
Sardis
Fire Fighters, International Association of.—President,
L. J. Adams; Recording Secretary, L. D. Mitchell,
204 Third Avenue, Chilliwack, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
430.—President, Dave Dyck; Recording Secretary, Miss
Lorraine Sauve, Young Road South, Chilliwack, B.C. H 128
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Sechelt
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 46. — Secretary,
Mrs. Cloe Day, Box 1, Gibsons, B.C.
Sidney
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. — President,
Julius Sather; Recording Secretary, Frank Edlington,
R.R. 1, Sidney, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 23.—
Secretary, J. D. Grimson, Sidney, B.C.
Skidegate
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 28.—
Secretary, S. Atkins, Skidegate, B.C.
Slocan
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 8. — Secretary,
Gordon B. McLean, Box i6, New Denver, B.C.
Smlthers
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — President,
L. J. Cox;   Secretary, A. E. Davis, Box 788, Smithers,
B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 111.—
President, T. Britton; Recording Secretary, C. H. Duke,
Box 132, Smithers, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1415.—President,   E.   S.   E.   Abrahamson;    Recording
Secretary, W. E. Jackson, Box 273, Smithers, B.C.
Railway  Employees  and  Transport  Workers,   Canadian
Brotherhood of, Local No. 93.—President, J. S. Lapa-
dat;    Recording  Secretary,  P.  B.  Emerson,  Smithers,
B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,  B.C.,  Local No.   54. — Secretary,
Miss Lois J. Sweeten, Telkwa, B.C.
Sointula
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 26.—
Secretary, A. Hilton, Sointula, B.C.
Sooke
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 24.—
Secretary, P. Forrest, Sooke, B.C.
Teachers'  Federation,   B.C.,  Local  No.   62.-—Secretary,
Stanley J. Cox, 250 Plowright Road, Victoria, B.C.
South Burnaby
Automobile, Aircraft, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America, Union of United, Local No. 432.—
President, A. Blackburn; Recording Secretary, R. W.
Fakeley, 2315 Frederick Avenue, South Burnaby.
Squamish
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 972.—President, A. E. Patenaude; Recording Secretary, H. Hodsmyth, Squamish, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1080.—
President, J. R. Buchanan; Recording Secretary, J. E.
Leech, Squamish, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1419.—President, Robert Watson; Recording Secretary,
A. Fraser, Squamish, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 48. — Secretary,
Miss I. Nygaard, Mount Sheer, B.C.
Stanovan
Oil Workers' International Union, Local No. 610.—President, Duncan Porteous;   Recording Secretary, J. Little-
wood, 1660 Duthie Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Steveston
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 7.—
Secretary, J. Ross, Steveston, B.C.
Fishermen and  Allied Workers' Union, Local No.  8.—
Secretary, T. Foort, Steveston, B.C.
Stewart
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local  No.   51. — Secretary,
Mrs. K. Mausette, Stewart, B.C.
Summerland
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, C. L.
Wright;    Recording   Secretary,   R.   G.   Killick,   West
Summerland, B.C.
Fruit and Vegetable  Workers' Union,  Local No.   12.—
President,   C.   B.   Harking;    Recording   Secretary,   L.
Burnell, West Summerland, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Local  No.   77. — Secretary,
Mrs. Ruth Kramer, Summerland, B.C.
SUNBURY
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 9.—
Secretary, V. Heikkilla, Sunbury, B.C.
Tadanac
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
871.—President, L. A. Davidson; Recording Secretary,
J. McCabe, Jr., 2393 Ninth Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Telkwa
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 340.—President, J. W. Hargreaves; Recording
Secretary, J. E. Williams, Quick, B.C.
Terrace
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
F. W. Stewart; Secretary, Donald J. Kidd, Court-house,
Terrace, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 53. — Secretary,
Mrs. G. Evans, Terrace, B.C.
Trail
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2474.—President, M. Kalmakoff; Recording Secretary, Nels Hansen, Fruitvale, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 343.—President, N. Stoochnoff; Recording Secretary, R. Samuel-
son, Room 2, 910 Portland Street, Trail, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
941.—President, Cyril J. Paul; Recording Secretary,
Charles N. Bogye, 1390 Pine Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union
of America, International, Local No. 114.—President,
W. Perepolkin; Recording Secretary, G. Heinrick,
Kinnaird, B.C.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 302.—
President, Mrs. Hilda Vlahovich; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Mary Booth, 452 Colley Street, Trail, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federal Association of, Local No. 76.—
President, S. J. Simpson; Recording Secretary, S. G.
Spooner, 2017 Second Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No.
480.—President, Albert King; Recording Secretary,
Arnold Iaara, Trail, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
H. E. McLean; Secretary, I. W. Wishlaw, 2147 Third
Avenue, Trail, B.C.
Teachers* Federation, B.C., Local No. 11. — Secretary,
Miss Elsie B. L. Wagner, 313 Sylvia Crescent, Trail,
B.C.
Tranquille
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—President, W.
Philip; Secretary, W. Thomson, c/o Staff—Sanatorium,
Tranquille, B.C.
TULSEQUAH
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 858.—
President, J. A. Phillips; Recording Secretary, H.
Stanley, Tulsequah, B.C.
UCLUELET
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 79. — Secretary,
Miss Vera M. Hansen, Ucluelet, B.C.
Vananda
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 816.—
President, R. Becker;   Recording Secretary, J. Brennan,
Vananda, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 129
Vancouver
Acme Asbestos Employees' Organization.—President, Dave
Parker; Recording Secretary, E. C. Lewis, 3542 East
Twenty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Airlines Dispatchers' Association, Canadian, Local No.
1.—President, S. H. Clarke, 3529 West Forty-first
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Airline Navigators' Association, Canadian. — President,
D. A. Evans; Financial Secretary, D. O. Cliffe, 4021
West Twenty-ninth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Alcazar Hotel Employees' Association.—President, A. D.
Smith; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Jenny Jessup, 337
Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Austin Motor Co. (Canada) Ltd. Employees' Association,
Western Canada Division. — President, William H.
Fisher; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Edith Irene Mc-
William, 2720 Chesterfield Avenue, North Vancouver,
B.C.
B.C. Electric Office Employees' Association, Local No.
378.—President, H. V. Yates; Recording Secretary,
Miss I. Brown, Social Club, 425 Carrall Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers of America, International Union of, Local No. 468.—President, William
Martin; Recording Secretary, Thomas Annal, 2843
West Thirty-sixth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors'
International Union of America, Journeymen, Local No.
120.—President, Ivan Craigie; Recording Secretary,
J. L. Condy, 1336 Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.
Birks Building Employees' Association.—President, Glan
Harding; Recording Secretary, Donald W. Begg, 5464
Balsam Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
194.—President, William J. Johnston; Recording Secretary, F. J. Nicholson, 1880 McBride Avenue, South
Burnaby, B.C.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
359.—President, James Downie; Recording Secretary,
William Blackhall, 1774 East Thirty-third Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
105.—President, John R. Gray; Recording Secretary,
Phyllis Dahl, 2046 Pendrel Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505.—President, John Turner; Recording Secretary, J. P. Reddy,
2771 East Forty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of America, International Union of, Local No.
300.—President, S. Moorhouse; Recording Secretary,
J. Humphreys, 2460 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of America, Grain Workers' Union, International
Union of United, Local No. 333.—President, H. F.
Martin; Recording Secretary, G. H. Frank, 3482 Normandy Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union
of America, Local No. 1.—President, David Powell;
Recording Secretary, J. Geddes, 1342 East Twenty-
eighth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union
of America, Local No. 3.—President, T. Anderson;
Recording Secretary, D. P. Ewan, 4116 Dominion Street,
North Burnaby, B.C.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, International Association of, Local No. 97.—President, Rod
Morrison; Recording Secretary, Lincoln Rutherford,
2461 East Twenty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, International Association of, Local No. 712.—President,
Steven Jurick; Recording Secretary, John McStay, 339
East Twentieth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Broadcast Employees and Technicians, National Association of, Local No. 73.—President, J. S. Laurie; Recording Secretary, C. M. Wilson, 514 West Keith Road,
North Vancouver, B.C.
Brush Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 564.—President, L. S. Smith; Recording Secretary, F. H. Allan,
2615 East Twenty-first Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Building Service Employees' International Union, Local
No. 244.—President, V. Galbraith; Recording Secretary, Ben A. R. Morely, 2833 McGill Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Cafeteria and Coffee Shop Employees' Association.—
President, R. G. Ball; Secretary, Mrs. Veda Williams,
130 West Haslup Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Canada Wire and Cable Employees' Association.—President, J. Pemble; Recording Secretary, G. McPherson,
738 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 452.—President, W. Hargreaves; Recording Secretary, A. Zimmer, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1541.—President, Carl Johnson; Recording Secretary, R. V. Nash, 2803 East Eighteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1928.—President, Clifford L. Bengough;
Recording Secretary, J. G. Bradeen, 611 East Seventh
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2802.—President, J. Thirlwell; Recording Secretary, J. E. Hird, 1524 Sixty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2534.—President, R. W. Hinksman;
Recording Secretary, W. L. Robinson, Box 144, Whal-
Iey, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2404.—President, E. Peladeau; Recording Secretary, J. B. Young, Box 369, Vancouver, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 506.—President, Joseph Bayer; Recording Secretary, P. Perchinski, 411a West Cordova Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Chemical Workers* Union, International, Local No. 511.—
President, George Connelly; Recording Secretary, Don
Laidlaw, 924 Queens Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Chemical Workers' Union, International, Local No. 546.—
President, Walter Martin; Recording Secretary, George
Fae, c/o Patricia Hotel, East Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Christian Labour Association of Canada, Local No. 9.—
President, D. J. A. Radstaak; Recording Secretary,
Fred Pel, 4214 Watling Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
City Hall Employees' Association, Local No. 15.—President, Oliver King; Recording Secretary, Thomas H.
Lewis, Suite 202, 3819 Cambie Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 407.—President, Sam Lindsay; Recording Secretary, W. Huck,
4028 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Civic Employees' Union. — President, Edward Smith;
Recording Secretary, Jack Phillips, 1229 Franklin
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, E.
Gentle; Recording Secretary, T. P. Dunik, 3236 Spruce
Street, North Burnaby, B.C.
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated, Local No.
178.—President, George Cole; Recording Secretary,
George M. Droneck, 620, 193 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Communications Association, Canadian, Local No. 4.—
President, E. Bustin; Financial Secretary, Gerald L.
Gordon, 2146 York Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Construction Workers, United, Local No. 204.—President,
J. P. Lucas; Recording Secretary, W. Sessons, Room
1, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Crone Storage Co. Warehousemen and Packers' Association.—President, F. T. Brydon; Recording Secretary,
A. W. Peters, 8762 Fremlin Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union of America, Local No. 92.—President,
Ray Lawton; Recording Secretary, L. Tinderland, 2997
Parker Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Electrical Trades' Union, Local No. 1.—President, C. P.
Hope; Recording Secretary, R. Adair, 501 Vancouver
Block, 736 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 213.—President, J. H. Waplington; Recording
Secretary, W. Daley, 1055 Victoria Drive, Vancouver,
B.C. H 130
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Elevator Constructors, International Union of, Local No.
82.—President, R. Holmes; Recording Secretary, H. G.
MacKichan, 4633 Elmwood Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Enamel Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 291.—President, John Zaleski; Recording Secretary, Joseph Maxy-
mow, 816 Victoria Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
115.—President, George Parkinson; Recording Secretary, R. Hogoghan, Room 2, 111 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
882.—President, H. Berger; Recording Secretary, H.
Cain, 111 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
963.—President, E. T. Stenner; Recording Secretary,
George Zailo, 380 East Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Fire Fighters' Union, Local No. 18.—President, Hector
Wright; Recording Secretary, Frank Bain, 4559 Belmont Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
901.—President, Robert W. Rowland; Recording Secretary, John MacKay, 2864 West Twenty-third Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 134.—President, C. Wilson; Recording Secretary,
K. Adachi, 3008 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 289.—President, Howard K. Past; Recording Secretary, James E. Fairburn, 3520 Pioneer Avenue, South
Burnaby, B.C.
First Aid Attendants' Association of B.C., Industrial.—
President, Edgar B. Beesley; Secretary, H. W. Hahler,
130 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 1.—
Secretary, M. Canic, Vancouver, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 2.—
Secretary, Mrs. M. Beagle, Vancouver, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United.—President and Secretary-Treasurer, H. Stevens, 138 East
Cordova Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Fur and Leather Workers' Union of the United States
and Canada, Local No. 197.—President, Tom Winter;
Recording Secretary, Mary Turriff, 2149 Victoria Drive,
Vancouver, B.C.
Fur and Leather Workers' Union of the United States
and Canada, Local No. 505.—President, N. R. James;
Recording Secretary, Mary Sold, 506 Gilmore Avenue,
Burnaby, B.C.
Fur and Leather Workers* Union of the United States
and Canada, Local No. 510.—President, Harvey Clarke;
Recording Secretary, Tom Buchanan, 3492 West Sixth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Garment Workers of America, United, Local No. 190.—
President, Barbara L. Davison; Recording Secretary,
Valda M. Reimer, 2765 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Garment Workers of America, United, Local No. 232.—
President, Ada Halloran; Recording Secretary, Phyllis
Fanus, 127 Sea Avenue, North Capital Hill, Vancouver,
B.C.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies', Local
No. 287.—President, Syd Clarkson; Recording Secretary, Doris Morely, 2833 McGill Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies', Local
No. 276.—President, Edward Thomas; Recording Secretary, James Kendall, 3441 Price Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
General Workers' Union, Local No. 307.—Financial Secretary, Miss Freda Haskin, 501 Vancouver Block, 736
Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Glove Workers' Union of America, International, Local
No. 582.—President, Fred Lang; Recording Secretary,
Eileen Gaston, 2124 East Fourth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
C. N. M. Cook; Secretary, E. P. Fox, 8, 407 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
Carl Hauck; General Secretary, E. P. O'Connor, 902
Helmcken Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Granite Cutters' International Association of America.—
President, A. Forbes; Secretary-Treasurer, John Wilson, 3305 Grandview Highway, North Burnaby, B.C.
Harbour Employees' Association, National Harbours
Board.—President, Gordon Hafft; Recording Secretary,
Cyril Hampton, 1146 Pinewood Crescent, North Vancouver, B.C.
Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers, International Association of, Local No. 118.—President,
Robert Turnell; Recording Secretary, John D. McEl-
rea, 3255 Turner Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union
of America, International, Local No. 602.—President,
G. Hird; Recording Secretary, A. Herd, 1272 East
Sixty-fourth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union
of America, International, Local No. 168.—President,
A. R. Andres; Financial Secretary, W. L. Hunchuk,
7963 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Hospital Employees' Organization, St. Paul's.—President,
Albert J. Coady; Recording Secretary, Iris Bissell, 1965
East Thirty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 180.—
President, H. Carden; Financial Secretary, Alex. Pat-
erson, 2774 East Sixteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' Union,
Local No. 28.—President, S. T. Pickett; Recording
Secretary, C. Waddell, Room 406, 402 West Pender
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' Union,
Local No. 676.—President, Harold D. Coullson; Recording Secretary, Frank Fridell, 1945 Harold Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' Union,
Local No. 740.—President, William McDermont; Re-
c6rding Secretary, Hilda Martin, 1143 East Twenty-
eighth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Jewellery Workers' Union, International, Local No. 42.—
President, G. Amos; Recording Secretary, G. H.
Brown, 1608 West Fifty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Jewellery Workers' Union, International, Local No. 57.—
President, John Bujak; Recording Secretary, K. S.
Knapp, 1742 Stephens Street, Vancouver, B.C.
John Wood (Vancouver) Ltd., Employees' Association
of.—Secretary-Treasurer, Colin Stewart, Ste. 110, 1346
Pendrell Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Kelly, Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, George Murray; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Elaine Tuson, 134 Abbott Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Laundry and Dry Cleaners' Salesmen's Association, Local
No. 1.—President, R. C. Sims; Recording Secretary,
George Reid, 3825 Puget Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Laundry and Dry Cleaners' Salesmen's Association, Local
No. 2.—President, George Taylor; Recording Secretary,
T. Lincoln, 6914 Victoria Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Laundry Workers' International Union, Local No. 292.—
President, Agnes Thomson; Recording Secretary, J. H.
Irving, 7660 Archibald Road, R.R. 15, New Westminster, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 12.—
President, R. Hendrickson; Recording Secretary, F.
Anselmo, 1009 East Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Library Staff Association, Local No. 391.—President, Mrs.
Margaret Brunette; Recording Secretary, Miss Marlys
Middleditch, Vancouver Public Library, Vancouver, B.C.
Library Association, B.C.—President, Miss Anne Berry;
Recording Secretary, Mrs. A. Riddell, c/o Vancouver
Public Library, Vancouver, B.C.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local No. 44.—
President, Earl Kinney; Recording Secretary, Edwin
Dill, 422 Richard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 320.—
Recording Secretary, W. Perfonie, 1450 Cypress Street.
Vancouver, B.C.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 907.—
President, T. G. Murphy; Recording Secretary, J. H.
Moscrip, 646 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 131
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of.
Local No. 656.—President, B. D. Mortimer; Recording
Secretary, M. Geluck, 4230 Price Crescent, South
Burnaby, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 939.—President, J. B. Worsley; Recording
Secretary, Leonard J. Sallows, 4947 Elgin Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 501.—President, H. Coombs; Recording Secretary, Wilf J. Desmarais, 6250 Douglas Road,
North Burnaby, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 506.—President, George Fitzgerald;
Recording Secretary, A. G. Smith, 114, 603 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 507.—President, C. McKendrick;
Recording Secretary, J. Urquhart, 792 Powell Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 509.—President, Jack Schindel; Recording Secretary, Hugh Gillies, 45 Dunlevy Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 510.—President, Thomas P. Mayes;
Recording Secretary, James B. Browne, 3677 West Nineteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Lumber Inspectors' Union, Local No. 1.—President, R.
Beaton; Recording Secretary, W. Munsie, 6836 Fleming
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 182.—
President, R. A. Young; Recording Secretary, W. M.
Mitchell, 2038 William Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 692.—
President, L. S. White; Recording Secretary, H. Fish-
man, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 764.—
President, R. M. Waling; Recording Secretary, G. C.
Stock, 929 East Fifty-seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 876.—
President, K. Spratt; Recording Secretary, John Smith,
4567 Blenheim Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 1857—
President, N. G. Wilson; Recording Secretary, Ralph
Rota, 2604 Burns Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 167.—President, J. Krimmer; Financial Secretary,
P. J. Doyle, 2638 West Twenty-first Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 210.—President, H. W. Willock; Financial Secretary, R. Halliday, 3449 Turner Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1734.—President, H. Yeulet; Recording Secretary,
John Roscow, 14 West Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Marble, Slate and Stone Polishers, Tile and Marble Setters,
International Association of, Local No. 78.—President,
A. C. Smith; Financial Secretary, George Tidsbury, 976
Alberta Road, Lulu Island, B.C.
Marble, Slate and Stone Polishers, Tile and Marble Setters,
International Association of, Local No. 179.—President,
A. A. McDonald; Recording Secretary, John Steel, 1156
East Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, Local No. 7.—
President, E. Cahill; Financial Secretary, H. B. McKie,
319 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America,
Amalgamated, Local No. 212.—President, Albert Brewer;
Recording Secretary, Michael Stephens, 1323 Willingdon
Avenue, North Burnaby, B.C.
Merchant Service Guild, Inc.—President, Capt. Harry
Roach; Recording Secretary, G. F. Bullock, 675 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 289.—
President, J. D. Stehr; Financial Secretary, C. G.
Woods, 3995 Dundas Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Monsanto Employees' Committee.—President, H. R. Cor-
ness; Recording Secretary, M. J. Dawn, 2117 Yew
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Moulders and Foundry Workers of North America, International, Local No. 281.—President, John Moka; Recording Secretary, G. Annand, 307 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
Musicians of the United States and Canada, American
Federation of, Local No. 145.—President, Claude Hill;
Recording Secretary, George E. Leach, 315, 402 West
Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Native Brotherhood of B.C. (Fraternal).—President,
Robert P. Clifton; Business Agent, Ed. Nahanee, 718
Ford Building, 193 East Hastings Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Newspaper Guild, Local No. 1.—President, Percy Zimmerman; Recording Secretary, Miss Allison Gentlemen,
2545 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.
Nurses' Association of B.C., Registered.—President, Miss
Alberta Creaser; Executive Secretary, Alice L. Wright,
R.N., 2524 Cypress Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Office and Professional Workers' Organizing Committee,
Local No. 8.—President, Mrs. Pearl E. Hawley; Recording Secretary, Miss Cecile Dickjong, c/o Ste. 4,
45 Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.
Office Employees' International Union, Local No. 15.—
President, Mrs. Mema Holmes; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Laura Ward, 333 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
162.—President, R. Johnson; Recording Secretary, J.
Longmuir, 3727 Douglas Road, North Burnaby, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
249.—President, P. J. Duggan; Financial Secretary, Miss
Cathy Scranton, 4123 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
341.—President, J. Lutgert; Recording Secretary, W.
Cholowski, 2236 St. George Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
350.—President, J. McGuiness; Recording Secretary,
W. Grognet, 1176 Pacific Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
445.—President, L. Gavin; Recording Secretary, J.
Newman, 256 Fifteenth Avenue East, Vancouver, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
453.—President, J. Lawrence; Recording Secretary, V.
Butler, 767 East Sixty-first Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
472.—President, Robert Shaw; Recording Secretary,
George F. Bason, 836 West Twenty-seventh Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
499.—President, Peter McHallam; Recording Secretary,
Mrs. Bertha M. Wright, 918 Fourteenth Avenue, New
Westminster, B.C.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
541.—President, W. Symington; Recording Secretary,
E. Quinell, Room 3, 45 Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 138.—President, James Mc-
Arthur; Recording Secretary, John Hines, 334 East
Cordova Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 726.—President, Aylmer Pratt; Recording
Secretary, J. A. Middleton, 6339 Kitchener Street,
North Bumaby, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 1527.—President, Frank N. Cave; Recording Secretary, William E. Norton, 5850 Cree Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Local
No. 1550.—President, T. J. Briggs; Recording Secretary,
Robert Thomasson, 2461 Neville Street, South Burnaby,
B.C.
Pattern Makers' League of North America, Local No.
1260.—President, J. G. Best; Recording Secretary, H. E.
Oliver, 93 Abercrombie Drive, Sea Island, B.C.
Photo Engravers' Union of North America, International,
Local No. 54.—President, D. W. Lovelock; Recording
Secretary, L. Munro, 3092 West Thirty-third Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Association,
Local No. 779.—President, Robert Parnell; Recording
Secretary, W. E. McMynn, 4860 Eton Street, North
Burnaby, B.C. H 132
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Association,
Local No. 919.—President, Charles Paris; Recording
Secretary, Ralph Baker, 271 South Beto Avenue, North
Burnaby, B.C.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States and
Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local No. 170.—President, J. A. Dilla-
bough; Recording Secretary, James R. Barton, 1148
Thurlow Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States and
Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local No. 516.—President, D. D. Forrester;
Recording Secretary, C. Stone, 3145 Adanac Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States and
Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local No. 571.—President, G. J. Williams;
Recording Secretary, J. Reid, 906 Fifth Street, New
Westminster, B.C.
Policemen's Federal Union, Local No. 12.—President,
F. F. Dougherty; Recording Secretary, B. Hagman, 312
Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Pop's Employees' Welfare Association.—President, Joe
Swita; Recording Secretary, Charles Robert Lauritzen,
3906 West Twenty-fourth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Porters, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car.—President, Frank
Collins; Secretary-Treasurer, Ernest Lawrence, 3695
East Georgia Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President,
W. H. Worton; Secretary, J. P. Doyle, 4509 West Ninth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America,
Local No. 25.—President, S. S. Muir; Recording Secretary, V. Griffiths, 261a Ottawa Avenue, Hollyburn, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America,
Local No. 69.—President, R. A. Scott; Recording Secretary, Len Ainsworth, 2849 Cambridge Street, North
Burnaby, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America,
Local No. 543.—President, R. A. Scott; Secretary-
Treasurer, Thomas S. Ezart, 5407 Commercial Drive,
Vancouver, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America,
Local No. 578.—President, Stuart Mill; Recording Secretary, Glenn Braithwaite, 5610 East Georgia Street,
Burnaby, B.C.
Produce Workers' Union, Canadian, Local No. 1.—President, Ollie Hamilton; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Carrie
McKenzie, 2579 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 655.—President, Stanley
Wiltshire; Recording Secretary, Rodney Lockhart, 906
East Twenty-third Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 433.—President, A. K. Stelp;
Recording Secretary, Margaret Carter, Ste. 1, 525 West
Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Pursers' and Chief Stewards' Association, Local No. 608.—
President, Frank L. Lawrence, 5880 Battison Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Radio and Television Employees of Canada, Association
of.—President, Oliver Henry; Secretary, Thelma Tall-
man, c/o C.B.C., Vancouver, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 144.—
President, H. G. Yearley; Recording Secretary, W. R.
Wright, 3603 Franklin Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 987.—
President, William L. Dufton; Financial Secretary,
J. B. A. Peladeau, 6129 St. Catherine Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1040.—
President, R. A. Swallow; Recording Secretary, W. F.
Doyle, 2915 Waterloo Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association of Street Electric, Local No. 101.
—President, Stan E. Wilcox; Financial Secretary, James
Harkness, 1358 East King Edward Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
46.—President, John Etchells; Recording Secretary, L.
Ramsey, 2851 Brighton Avenue, New Westminster,
B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
404.—President, C. H. Ruffell; Recording Secretary,
A. E. Lawton, 1140 West Keith Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
526.—President, A. R. Davie; Recording Secretary,
J. H. Vallance, 4497 Quebec Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
630.—President, A. Richardson; Recording Secretary,
R. J. McRae, 3935 Trinity Street, North Burnaby, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1241.—President, I. G. Williams; Recording Secretary, V. M. Carlisle, 1983 West Forty-second Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1321.—President, L. C. Pallot; Recording Secretary, Evelyn Leece, 2156 East Forty-fourth Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1322.—President, John A. Laverrock; Recording
Secretary, Miss Frances Gay, 4575 West Sixth Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local
No. 2315.—President, D. H. Cameron; Recording Secretary, J. E. Battye, 525 East Sixtieth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local
No. 3016.—President, L. C. Pallot; Recording Secretary, Mrs. E. R. Sill, 4243 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
58.—President, A. Marchant; Recording Secretary,
Harold Holmes, 2510 West Twenty-first Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
773.—President, L. Love; Recording Secretary, J. C.
Wilson, 330 Nigil Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Conductors of America, Local No. 267.—Recording Secretary, E. H. Bice, 1963 McNicoll Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 59.—President, Andrew
Serink; Recording Secretary, Harold Myskiw, 136 East
Fifty-third Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 82.—President, Thomas
Carroll; Recording Secretary, Anthony Wm. Nokry,
1436 Burnaby Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 162.—President, C. J.
Worsell; Recording Secretary, G. E. Pinkerton, 828
East Thirty-second Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 221.—President, Per-
cival Jones; Recording Secretary, Albert Roberts, 1646
Gilley Avenue, South Burnaby, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 275.—President, Herbert J. Moring; Recording Secretary, Harold R. Haug,
1242 Melville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Railway Mail Clerks' Federation.—President, W. J. Conway; Recording Secretary, H. A. Wobick, 1317 Park
Drive, Vancouver, B.C.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, Local No. 29.—
Recording Secretary, Alex. Stoughton, 1169 Comox
Street, Vancouver, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H  133
Retail Clerks' International Association, Local No. 575.—
President,   A.   Edward   Roman;    Financial   Secretary,
D. A. Wade, Room 205, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
School Service Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 392.
—President,  W. J.  Brock;   Recording Secretary, Mrs.
E. C. Begg, 5246 Rhodes Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Seafarers' International Union of North America, Local
No. 1.—President, Hal C. Banks, 634 St. James Street
West, Montreal, Que.
Seamen's Union, West Coast (Canada).—President, J. S.
Thompson; Financial Secretary, J. M. Smith, 10 Powell Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Sewerage and Drainage Board Employees' Federal Union,
Local No. 393.—President, George Forsythe; Financial
Secretary, Charles Miller, 2976 Forty-second Avenue
East, Vancouver, B.C.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 280.—President, William H. Goldsby; Financial
Secretary, James Walker, 1336 East Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local
No. 314.—President, L. W. Phillips; Recording Secretary, T. R. Owen, 920 East Fifty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Shipyard General Workers' Federation of B.C., Local
No. 1.—President, Samuel B. Jenkins; Financial Secretary, William Stewart, 815 Tobruk Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Shipyard General Workers' Federation of B.C.—President, William A. Stewart; Recording Secretary, John
A. Scott, 339 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Spears & Jackson Employees' Association.—President,
Mathew Wilson; Recording Secretary, Edmund Biddle-
combe, 1254 East Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2655.—President, K. Wood; Representative, E. M. Orr, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2821.—President, William Lamont; Recording Secretary, Alfred
Whittaker, 1804 Grant Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2952.—President, T. H. Richardson; Representative, E. M. Orr,
33 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3229.—President, J. Laughton; Representative, E. M. Orr, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3253.—President, George Curley; Representative, E. M. Orr, 33
East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3302.—President, C. Norrie; Representative, E. M. Orr, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3376.—President, George Gieger; Business Agent, Pen Baskin, 33
East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3452.—President, D. Jones; Representative, E. M. Orr, 33 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3546.—President, W. Robertson; Financial Secretary, A. G. Kline,
2115 Turner Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3910.—President, J. Kinnear; Representative, E. M. Orr, 35 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union of North America,
International, Local No. 88.—President, Bert Myles;
Recording Secretary, Pat Landsley, 605, 998 Thurlow
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Stone Cutters of North America, Journeymen.—President,
Henry Dahlbeck; Recording Secretary, Frank Hall,
2148 Randolph Avenue, South Burnaby, B.C.
Store Union, Retail Clerks, Local No. 517.—President,
Frank Rains; Vice-President, Gerald C. Emary, Room
2, 49 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No. 111.—
President, Raymond Jones; Financial Secretary, F. E.
Barlow, 2304 West Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Headquarters).—President,
Miss Hilda L. Cryderman; Recording Secretary, C. D.
Ovans, 1644 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Burnaby Assistant Teachers),
Local No. 41.—Secretary, D. A. Copan, 4511 Rumble
Street, South Burnaby, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Richmond), Local No. 38.—
Secretary, Miss G. Bloomfield, 1897 West Thirty-seventh
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Elementary Teachers), Local
No. 39.—Secretary, L. C. Curtis, 2005 West Forty-fifth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Vancouver School Supervisors), Local No. 39.—Secretary, J. F. K. Lidstone,
1379 Devonshire Crescent, Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Vancouver School Administrators), Local No. 39.—Secretary, T. G. Currio, 3994
West Thirty-third Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Vancouver Secondary Teachers), Local 39.—Secretary, William Alsbury, 907 Walls
Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (Coquitlam), Local No. 43.—
Secretary, Ronald Crawford, 3112 St. George Street,
Port Moody, B.C.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 31.—
President, W. M. Brown; Financial Secretary, R. D.
Atkinson, 222 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 151.—
President, Albert Blais; Recording Secretary, C. E.
Youngs, 42 East Thirty-ninth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 189.—
President, R. M. Millar; Business Agent, A. Wylie, 942
West Sixteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Teamsters,   Chauffeurs,   Warehousemen   and   Helpers   of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 213 -
President, A. A. Medley; Financial Secretary, J. White-
ford, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 351.—
President, Charles A. Gower; Recording Secretary,
Charles E. Youngs, 42 East Thirty-ninth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Association of, Local No. 464.—
President, George Waithe; Business Agent, Alex. B.
Murray, 2414 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of
America, International Association of, Local No. 842.—■
President, E. B. Green; Financial Secretary, R. A.
Lenfesty, 222 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Telegraphers' Union, Commercial.—President, I. R. Burns;
Recording Secretary, L. A. Nichols, Box 432, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 1.
—President, R. Home; Secretary-Treasurer, A. Padg-
ham, 4095 Briarwood Crescent, South Burnaby, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 5.
—President, F. Devoe; Secretary-Terasurer, W. Hamilton, 1166 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 10.
—President, Miss G. Baillie; Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs.
H. Meldrum, 2109 Venables Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 14.
—President, Mrs. J. Lepkey; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
L. Asher, 326 East Fifty-sixth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 20.
—President, W. Krauchek; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
S. Nelson, 3016 West Second Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Clerical Council).—President, Miss Helen Chisholm; General Secretary, W. Docharty, 713, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Plant Council).—President, Colin Q. Cole; General Secretary, N. G.
Pettigrew, 713, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic Council).—President, Miss Stella McLaren; General Secretary, Miss Thelma Mathias, 713 543 Granville Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Textile Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 12.—President, Mrs. N. Buchanan; Financial Secretary, Mrs. A.
Armstrong, 3535 Vimy Crescent, Vancouver, B.C. H 134
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Television and Radio Artists, American Federation of,
Local No. 24498.—President, Thomas S. Wright; Financial Secretary, Leonard Hayman, 800 Hall Building, 789
West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine
Operators of the United States and Canada, International Alliance of, Local No. F71.—President, Delia
Garland; Financial Secretary, Sheila Pemberton, 607
No. 3 Road, Lulu Island, B.C.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine
Operators of the United States and Canada, International Alliance of, Local No. B 71.—President, Marcel
Provolock; Financial Secretary, George Hislop, 1211
Leroi Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine
Operators of the United States and Canada, International Alliance of, Local No. B 72.—President, John R.
Foster; Financial Secretary, Florence Foster, No. 6,
1004 Wolfe Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine
Operators of the United States and Canada, International Alliance of, Local No. 118.—President, J. Pearson; Financial Secretary, S. A. Summer, 1055 Hands-
worth Road, North Vancouver, B.C.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine
Operators of the United States and Canada, International Alliance of, Local No. 348.—President, W. A.
McCartney; Financial Secretary, F. W. Smith, 3190
West Forty-third Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Trans-Canada Air Lines Traffic Employees' Association.—
President, M. R. Scott; Local Chairman, M. Pratt, 7249
Adera Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Trunk and Bag Industrial Workers' Union, Local No. 1.
—President, Daniel Robert Stuart; Financial Secretary,
Ernest Economy, 2891 West Seventh Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 70.—President, W. E. Campbell; Secretary-Treasurer, D. R.
Dumo, Ste. 20, 3375 Oak Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 226.—
President, H. T. Chambers; Secretary-Treasurer, P.
Campbell, 1063 Adderley Street, North Vancouver, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association of
Canada.—President, Harry A. Crowe; Financial Secretary, Charles T. Emeny, 7, 1360 Burnaby Street, Vancouver, B.C.
University of British Columbia Employees' Federal Union,
Local No. 116.—President, F. H. Colburn; Recording
Secretary, A. Leathern, 518 East Eighth Street, North
Vancouver, B.C.
Upholsterers' Industrial Union, Local No. 1.—President,
Walter Blumm; Financial Secretary, Karl Reich, 2815
Graveley Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-71.
—President, Frank Howard; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred
Fieber, 18 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1217.
—President, Lloyd Whelen; Financial Secretary, S. M.
Hodgsen, 5775 Ontario Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Woodworkers' Union, B.C., Local No. 2.—President,
William G. Dundass, Financial Secretary, Charles E.
Roughsedge, 501 Vancouver Block, 736 Granville Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Vanderhoof
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
G. W. Graham; Secretary, C. Wall, c/o Forest Service,
Vanderhoof, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 56.—Secretary,
Mrs. M. M. Macdonald, Vanderhoof, B.C.
Vernon
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1346.—President, W. A. DeWilde; Recording Secretary, W. J. Forsyth, Box 926, Vemon,
B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2861.—President, Edward Briggs; Recording Secretary, Walter A. Zimmerman, R.R. 3, Vernon, B.C.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 326.—President, Thomas Grant Chase; Recording Secretary, Isaac
Fred Bickert, 3908 Thirty-first Street, Vemon, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, D. H.
Ruppel; Recording Secretary, Miss L. E. Cail, Box 740,
Vernon, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 821.—President, J. G. Swift;  Recording Secretary,
W. S. Cawsey, 4409 Twentieth Street, Vemon, B.C.
Fruit  and  Vegetable  Workers'   Union,   Local  No.   6.—
President, Walter Skobolski;  Recording Secretary, Mrs.
M. M. Atwood, 3107 Thirty-fifth Avenue, Vernon, B.C.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.—President.
J. U. Holt;  Secretary, Mrs. E. M. Forrest, Department
of Agriculture, Court-house, Vernon, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 102.
—President, Frank Squire; Recording Secretary, Robert
W. Hodgson, 2000 Thirty-first Street, Vernon, B.C.
Postal   Employees'    Association,    Canadian.—President,
H. H. Wadsworth;  Recording Secretary, W. E. Rutter,
R.R. 3, Vemon, B.C.
Teachers'   Federation,  B.C.,  Local  No.   22.—Secretary,
Miss Elizabeth J. Riley, 2203 Thirtieth Avenue, Vernon,
B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 6.
—President, R. Couch;   Secretary-Treasurer, C. Heggs,
2604 Twenty-second Street, Vemon, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 16.
—Secretary-Treasurer, Miss A. Devlin, 400 West Second
Street, Revelstoke, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 22.
—President,   Mrs.   A.   Eastwood;    Secretary-Treasurer,
Miss K. Casey, 3107 Thirty-first Avenue, Vernon, B.C.
Typographical   Union,   International,   Local   541.—President, J. Appleton;  Recording Secretary, N. L. Duncan,
130 Jermyn Avenue, Penticton, B.C.
Vesuvius Bay
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 64.—Secretary,
Mrs. Florence Hepburn, Fulford Harbour, Saltspring,
B.C.
Victoria
Automotive Maintenance Workers' Union, Local No. 151.
—President, T. H. Emerson; Recording Secretary, D. M.
Emery, 1508 Arrow Road, R.R. 5, Victoria, B.C.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union
of America, Local No. 267.—President, W. B. Mclntyre;
Recording Secretary, Miss Frances Sim, 2664 Cedar Hill
Road, Victoria, B.C.
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors'
International Union of America, Journeymen, Local No.
372.—President, R. A. Moore; Recording Secretary, L.
Stephenson, 608 Courtney Street, Victoria, B.C.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
191.—President, Richard Lewis; Recording Secretary,
George Taylor, Saanichton P.O., B.C.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
493.—President, Thomas Hammond; Recording Secretary, Albert Hilton, 1040 Pembroke Street, Victoria, B.C.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 147.
—President, E. Lockley; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Foster,
1542 Hampshire Road, Victoria, B.C.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No. 280.—
President, W. Woolcott; Recording Secretary, G.
Parker, 2696 Tillicum Road, Victoria, B.C.
Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union
of America, Local No. 2.—President, Harold Day;
Recording Secretary, J. Beckerley, 3965 Saanich Road,
Victoria, B.C.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, International Association of, Local No. 643.—President,
D. A. Campbell; Recording Secretary, A. Hanson, 726
Powderley Street, Victoria, B.C.
Building Service Employees' International Union, Local
No. 379.—President, Oliver Speed; Recording Secretary, James Richardson, 1818 Julia Street, Victoria,
B.C.
Burial Park Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 479.—
President, R. Ponsford; Recording Secretary, L. E.
Jones, 3850 Rowland Avenue, Victoria, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 135
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 786.—President, William Webb; Recording Secretary, Gordon Newell, 1413 Denman Street,
Victoria, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1598.—President, E. J. Tait; Recording
Secretary, A. Learn, 855 Selkirk Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2527.—President, P. J. Furmston; Recording Secretary, M. Harris, 889 Tillicum Road, Victoria, B.C.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2607.—President, Doris Ada Bish; Recording Secretary, Arthur R. Edwards, 1728 Denman
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Chemical and Explosives Workers' Industrial Union,
Local No. 128.—President, R. C. Barrie; Recording
Secretary, C. R. Nunn, Lochside Road, Saanichton
P.O., B.C.
City Hall Employees' Association, Local No. 388.—President, Bard Wheatcroft; Recording Secretary, Roy
Stewart, c/o Comptroller-Treasurer's Department, City
Hall, Victoria, B.C.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, Local No. 50.—
President, C. A. Holt; Recording Secretary, Edward A.
Duncan, 3079 Orillia Street, Victoria, B.C.
Civilian Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 129.—President, J. Valentine; Recording Secretary, Alfred Newman, 714 Esquimau Road, Victoria, B.C.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. — President,
D. A. Clegg; Recording Secretary, Miss Lily B.
Northam, 2644 Rose Street, Victoria, B.C.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 230.—President, P. Daggitt; Recording Secretary,
G. F. Smith, 613 Pandora Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Engineers, International Union of Operating, Local No.
918.—President, John B. Speakman; Recording Secretary, Myles W. Carmichael, 2165 Fair Street, Victoria,
B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
730.—President, Alfred Adamson; Recording Secretary,
Eric Simmons, 1523 Hillside Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, F.F.F.—President, E. Reynolds; Recording Secretary, Jack Taylor,
850 Snowdrop Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 19.—
Secretary, W. Clarke, Victoria, B.C.
Fuel Distributors' Union, Local No. I.—President, Barton E. Alexander; Recording Secretary, Clifford L.
Alexander, 302 Westholme Hotel, 1417 Government
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Government Employees, American Federation of, Local
No. 59.—President and Recording Secretary, A. L. Kyle,
630 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
L. G. Huck; Secretary, H. A. Carney, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union
of America, Local No. 1093.—President, John Gallow;
Recording Secretary, Stephen Fairbanks, 3132 Donald
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union
of America, Local No. 1204.—President, G. Stenbeck;
Recording Secretary, W. Presky, 920 Russel Street, Victoria, B.C.
Hospital Employees' Association, Royal Jubilee.—President, Miss D. Burrows; Secretary, Mrs. Margaret
Brown, 1959 Beach Drive, Victoria, B.C.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 513.—President, Tom Lus-
combe; Recording Secretary, W. Haley, 1726 Kings
Road, Victoria, B.C.
Laundry Workers' Union, Local No. 1. — President. C.
Parker; Recording Secretary, Miss M. Shambrook, 1029
Empress Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 11.—
President, James Robson; Recording Secretary, Davis
A. Slater, 1630 Oakland Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Library Staff Association, Public Library, Local No. 410.
—President, Fred T. White; Recording Secretary, Miss
Margaret Nelms, Victoria Public Library, Victoria, B.C.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 690.—President, J. E. Wilkinson; Recording
Secretary, A. T. Thompsett, 1161 Burdett Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 456.—
President, W. Corbett; Recording Secretary, J. A. Steel,
483 Grafton Street, Victoria, B.C.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
2824.—President, D. Miller; Recording Secretary, A.
Milke, 170 Crease Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, Local No. 6.
—President, A. W. Jones; Business Agent, J. Ashcroft,
2346 Arbutus Road, R.R. 5, Victoria, B.C.
Moulders' and Foundry Workers' Union, International,
Local No. 144.—President, William Bolme; Recording
Secretary, Sam Emery, 864 Old Esquimau Road, Victoria, B.C.
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 311.—
President, H. Thornber; Recording Secretary, W. E.
Marshall, 1627 Amphion Street, Victoria, B.C.
Musicians of the United States and Canada, American
Federation of, Local No. 247.—President, Charles W.
Hunt; Financial Secretary, Vincent R. Butler, 1534
Hampshire Road, Victoria, B.C.
Newspaper Guild, Local No. 219.—President, L. M. Sal-
laway; Recording Secretary, D. G. Ingham, 2631 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1163.—President, W. H. Rivers;
Recording Secretary, L. Bruntlett, 615 Pandora Avenue,
Victoria, B.C.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
367.—President, R. A. Glenn; Recording Secretary,
P. H. Burton, 151 Wale Road, R.R. 1, Victoria, B.C.
Plasterers' and Cement Masons' International Association,
Local No. 450.—President, Leslie H. Calvert; Recording Secretary, John F. Crooks, 1168 Caledonia Avenue,
Victoria, B.C.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of United States and
Canada, United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local No. 324.—President, C. Harris;
Recording Secretary, M. Di Iorio, 941 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Police Federal Union, Local No. 251.—President, Lome
Shandley; Recording Secretary, R. McNeil, c/o Police
Station, Victoria, B.C.
Police Mutual Benefit Association.—President, Stanley T.
Holmes; Recording Secretary, Detective D. P. Donaldson, 2537 Vancouver Street, Victoria, B.C.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—President,
G. W. Somner; Secretary, J. C. Bunker, 2415 Quadra
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America,
Local No. 79.—President, W. Inglis; Recording Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKenzie Street, Victoria, B.C.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 613.—
President, G. L. Sherwood; Recording Secretary, A. E.
Mummery, 853 Queens Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Railway and Motor Coach Employees of America, Amalgamated Association of Street Electric, Local No. 109.
—President, J. W. McNeill; Recording Secretary, J. F.
Belton, 1972 Bouchier Street, Victoria, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local 1137.—
President, F. Ewer; Recording Secretary, D. Gillespie,
79 Dunford Road, Langford, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local 2320.—
President, John W. Rawlinson; Recording Secretary,
R. E. Whiting, 834 Craigflower Road, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
50.—President, J. F. Welley; Recording Secretary, L. G.
Pelling, 2024 Carnarvon Street, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 222.—President, Carl
Erwin; Recording Secretary, R. E. Tebo, 1461 Thurlow
Road, Victoria, B.C.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local 234.—President, L. A.
McClung; Recording Secretary, A. Wilson, 715 Johnson
Street, Victoria, B.C. H 136
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 276.—President, Mrs.
Dell Bean; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Myris Nuttel,
1116 Leonard Street, Victoria, B.C.
School Board Employees' Association, Local No. 382.—
President, Leonard E. Clarke; Recording Secretary,
A. E. Williams, 1426 Pembroke Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local No.
276.—President, J. W. Quissy; Recording Secretary, H.
Weydert, 3301 Quadra Street, Victoria, B.C.
Shipyard General Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No.
3.—President, M. Leachman; Recording Secretary, F. H.
Crocker, 1786 Fairfield Road, Victoria, B.C.
Shipyard General Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No.
9.—President, N. Russell; Recording Secretary, Don
Douglas, 1338 Wood Street, Victoria, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 61.—Secretary,
Mrs. Dorothy E. White, 2173 Central Avenue, Victoria,
B.C.
Teamsters, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, International Brotherhood of, Local 885.—President, A. J.
McBeth; Recording Secretary, G. Estes, 3011 Colquitz
Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 2.
—President, B. H. Johns; Secretary-Treasurer, A. H.
Barry, 3307 Aldridge Street, Victoria, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 11.
—President, Mrs. G. Hall; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss
M. Munn, 1303 Broad Street, Victoria, B.C.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of, Local No. 21.
—President, F. Holmes; Secretary-Treasurer, Miss J.
Henderson, 711, 1405 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine
Operators, International Alliance of, Local No. 168.—
President, R. A. Jones; Recording Secretary, A. C.
Archer, 2101 Allenby Street, Victoria, B.C.
Trans-Canada Air Lines Traffic Employees' Association.—
President, T. R. Watterson; Chairman, T.E.A. Victoria
Unit, J. R. Hannan, Box 47, Sidney, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 201.—
President, W. Richardson; Recording Secretary, H.
Warren, 2218 Beach Drive, Victoria, B.C.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 121.—
President, A. M. Watson; Recording Secretary, E. G.
Whitten, 53 Wellington Street, Victoria, B.C.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Association of
Canada.—President, C. H. Lowdon; Recording Secretary, Miss E. E. Litherland, 1250 Camrose Crescent,
Victoria, B.C.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Local No. 560.—President, Gordon C. Richards; Recording Secretary, J.
Richards, 981 Cloverdale Avenue, Victoria, B.C.
Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International Union,
Local No. 332.—President, J. Erskine; Financial Secretary, C. Wescott, 772 Gorge Road West, Victoria,
B.C.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-118.
—President, J. MacKenzie; Recording Secretary, S.
Cook, 715 Johnson Street, Victoria, B.C.
Wells
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers' Union, Local No. 685.
—President, W. J. Dunn; Recording Secretary, R. S.
Mclvor, Box 207, Wells, B.C.
West Summerland
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 2742.—President, W. Clark; Recording Secretary, T. G. Reid, Box 145, West Summerland, B.C.
West Vancouver
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 395.—
President, H. W. Davison; Recording Secretary, J. M.
Smeal, 2452 Haywood Avenue, West Vancouver, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 45.—Secretary,
Mrs. R. Begbie, Inglewood Junior High School, 1735
Inglewood Avenue, Hollyburn P.O., B.C.
Westvtew
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 42.—
Secretary, J. Chambers, Westview, B.C.
White Rock
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President, Mrs.
A. B. Williams;   Recording Secretary, John Dilworth,
White Rock, B.C.
Civil  Servants   of  Canada,  Amalgamated.—President,  J.
Phillips;   Recording Secretary, G. S. HiU, 2788 Stayte
Road, R.R. 4, White Rock, B.C.
Williams Lake
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1474.—President, Roger Dupont; Recording Secretary, H. G. Grayson, Box 123, Williams Lake,
B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — President,
C. H. Barlow; Secretary, Mrs. J. M. Lee, Williams
Lake, B.C.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 27. —■ Secretary,
Miss D. M. Spowart, Box 279, Williams Lake, B.C.
Windermere
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Local No. 4. —■ Secretary,
Donald B. Campbell, Invermere, B.C.
Woodfibre
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 494.—President, Alfred
Wardron; Recording Secretary, Otto Peace, Wood-
fibre, B.C.
Woodwards Slough
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 11.—
Secretary, J. Hill, Woodwards Slough, B.C. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 137
Organizations of Employers
Calgary
Coal Operators' Association of Western Canada.—President, S. C. McMullen; Secretary, S. W. Foss, 204
Albert Block, Calgary, Alta.
Kelowna
Fruit  Growers'  Association.—President,  A.  R.  Carrish;
Secretary, J. Maclennan, 1473 Water Street, Kelowna,
B.C.
Shippers'   Association,   Okanagan   Federated.—President,
K. W. Kinnard; Secretary, L. R. Stephens, 1485 Water
Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Penticton
Co-operative Growers, Penticton.—President, John Coe;
Secretary, D. G. Penny, 249 Main Street, Penticton,
B.C.
Prince George
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior.—President,
R. W. Hilton; Secretary, R. J. Gallagher, Room 305,
1705 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Vancouver
Automotive Retailers' Association.—President, Clifford J.
Horwood; Secretary, James L. Kinneard, 1687 West
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Bakers' Allied Trades Association. — President, A. L.
Turvey; Secretary, W. G. Welsford, 199 East Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Bakers' Association, British Columbia.—President, B. M.
Colwell; Secretary, W. G. Welsford, 199 East Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Building and Construction Industries' Exchange of British Columbia.—President, M. L. Barr; Secretary, Harold Cole, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Contractors' Association, General. — President, A. J.
Hutchinson; Secretary, Harold Cole, 342 West Pender
Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, Stewart C.
Murkin; Secretary, Fred Moore, 4368 Price Crescent,
Vancouver, B.C.
Fisheries Association of British Columbia.—President,
J. M. Buchanan; Secretary, J. Macdonald, Room 510,
Shelly Building, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Fishermen's Independent Co-operative Association, British Columbia.—President, J. K. Pope; Secretary, D. E.
Baker, 1136 West Twenty-Fifth Avenue, Vancouver,
B.C.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of British Columbia.
—President, Ante Boroevich; Secretary, Harold Chris-
tenson, 2705 East Fourth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Graphic Arts Association of British Columbia.—President,
Peter E. Cromie; Secretary, Mrs. Audrey Andrew, 608,
355 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Hairdressers' Association of British Columbia.—President,
Mrs. Ellen Kay Smith; Secretary, George R. Matthews,
605 Province Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—President, J. E.
Bengert; Secretary, E. V. Ely, 560 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Industrial Association of British Columbia.—President,
W. L. Macken; Secretary, Margaret Riley, 1024 Marine
Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).—President, Allan Miller; Secretary, R. B. Deacon, 17 East
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners and Linen Supply Association,
Vancouver. — President, Norman Brown; Secretary,
J. R. Taylor, 1111 West Georgia Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Loggers' Association (Inc.), British Columbia.—President,
Otis Hallin; Secretary, John N. Burke, Room 401,
550 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, British Columbia.—
President, L. L. G. Bentley; Secretary, N. R. Dusting,
550 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior.—President,
H. A. McDiarmid; Secretary, L. J. A. Rees, 608
Marine Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Manufacturers' Association, inc., Canadian.—President,
Allan J. McDonell; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 608
Marine Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Merchants Exchange Ltd., Vancouver.—President, W. S.
Brown; Secretary, W. A. Sankey, Marine Building,
Vancouver, B.C.
Milk Distributors' Association, Vancouver. — President,
A. W. Edgar; Secretary, A. W. Edgar, 1259 West
Thirty-second Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—President,
D. R. Nicholson; Secretary, J. J. Brown, Surrey
Centre, B.C.
Millwork Institute, Mainland.—President, M. Flett; Secretary, H. F. Fleming, 3032 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Millwork Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver.—President, George Clark; Secretary, Ronald H. Poole, 3643
Kingsway, Vancouver, B.C.
Mining Association of British Columbia.—President, H. E.
Doelle; Secretary, R. W. Nesbitt, 506, 837 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Morticians, British Columbia Society of.—President, John
D. Hanna; Secretary, Mack Pallard, 1096 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
Motor Transport Labour Relations Council.—President,
J. S. McLean; Secretary, K. D. Large, 810, 207 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Retail Hardware Association, British Columbia. — President, J. E. Sarginson; Secretary, L. L. Cross, 6425
Fraser Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc. (B.C.
Division).—President, W. C. Mainwaring; Secretary,
Grant Deachman, 304 Pemberton Building, 744 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Restaurant Association, Canadian.—President, Ross C.
Brown; Secretary, Philip H. Edgcumbe, 130 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Road Builders' and Heavy Construction Association.—
President, Hugh A. Martin; Secretary, D. J. Baldwin,
Rooms 1 and 2, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Sheet Metal Association of British Columbia.—President,
Rudolph Kason; Secretary, Maurice L. Tucker, 2446
West Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Shingle Association of British Columbia.—President, W. J.
PuIIin; Secretary, Miss Marion E. Welte, 202, 550
Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia. — President,
R. M. Mather; Secretary, T. G. Phillips, 45 Dunlevy
Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Truck Loggers' Association.—President, J. M. Fletcher;
Secretary, T. T. Novis, 425 Howe Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Truck and Construction Equipment Operators of British
Columbia.—President, A. B. Ciccozzi; Secretarv. Leonard T. Frost, 924 West Seventeenth Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
Victoria
Beer Licensees Employers' Association.—President, S. S.
Stewart;  Secretary, W. L. Gouge, 533 Admirals Road,
Esquimau, B.C.
Building Industries' Exchange, Victoria.—President, E. H.
McKinty;   Secretary,   Roy   T.   Lougheed,   816   Wharf
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Electrical   Association    CB.C),   Victoria.—President,   T.
Mawson;  Secretary. F. M. Chiswell, 2311 Shakespeare
Street, Victoria, B.C.
Taxi Operators' Association of Greater Victoria.—President, C. Rawlings; Secretary, A. N. Westwood, c/o Bus
Depot, Broughton Street, Victoria, B.C. H 138
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Control of Employment of Children
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour or a
person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of children under
15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is prohibited by the
" Control of Employment of Children Act."
In order that the health and the scholastic standing of the children will not be
adversely affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in close
co-operation with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the children.
Permits are issued only when it has been established that the child's health will not suffer,
and that the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere with
their standing at school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for which
permits are required; these include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor-power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
The following table contains a summary of permits issued from January 1st to
December 31st, 1954, inclusive:—
Summary of Permits Issued from January 1st, 1954, to December 31st, 1954
District
Vancouver
Cranbrook
Kamloops
Kelowna
Nelson
Prince
George
Smithers
Victoria
Total
Boys—	
Girls	
138
16
2
1
6
2
3
1
5
1
3
1
73
17
230
39
Totals   	
154      |..,_.    |        3
8
4
6
4
90
269
4
12
10
123
3
2
—
1
i
_i
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
5
i
4
6
1
1
10
23
40
2
2
3
2
11
Janitor  	
1
1
Catering  	
Amusement-  .
26
37
176
Shoeshine   	
7
Miscellaneous.! 	
4
3
2
Laundry  -	
1
154
....
3
8
4
6
4
90
269 " EQUAL PAY ACT ■
H  139
»l
Equal Pay Act'
Section 4 of the Act provides that the Minister of Labour may, on the recommendation of the Director, designate an Inspector to inquire into the complaint of a person that
she has been discriminated against in that she has been paid at a rate of pay less than the
rate of pay paid to a male employee employed by her employer for the same work done
in the same establishment.
There were twenty-seven complaints received by the Director during the calendar
year 1954, which was the first year of the Act's operation. In the case of one complaint
the Act did not apply. One complaint was withdrawn. In the case of the other twenty-
five complaints involving three employers, the Minister designated an Inspector to inquire
into the complaints. In the case of eight complaints involving one employer, the Inspector
advised that he had effected a settlement of the matter complained of. In the case of the
remaining seventeen complaints involving two employers, following hearings held by the
Board of Industrial Relations, the Minister issued orders in favour of twelve complainants.
At the end of the year five complaints were under review by the Board.
A summary of the proceedings under the Act during 1954 is given hereunder:—
Summary of Proceedings under the "Equal Pay Act" during 1954
Number of
Complaints
L*: 27
Complaints received1	
Complaints referred to Inspectors during 1954    25
Complaints settled by Inspectors     8
Complaints referred to the Board  17
Complaints withdrawn     1
Number of
Employers
Involved
5
3
1
2
1
1 In the case of one complaint the Act did not apply. H 140 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Factories Inspection Branch
Administrative office     -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Robert M. Purdie     - Chief Inspector of Factories
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection
Branch for the year 1954.
Factories
The year of 1954 was one of steady progress in the Factories Inspection Branch.
While nothing of a spectacular nature occurred, continual improvement in industrial
working conditions are noted. The trend in industry now is the establishment of factories in outlying districts. A new-type building, generally one- or two-storied, covers
a large area, and in the non-congested areas, with careful planning, these are much easier
to heat and ventilate than the older type of factory. The modern lighting, even temperatures, washing facilities, lockers, and lunchrooms all add to the comfort of the employees.
The transportation of merchandise is carried out by motorized or electrified lift-
trucks running in marked traffic lanes, thus providing a speedy and safe service.
Complaints received during the past year have been of a minor nature, and a survey
visit by the Inspector has usually cleared up the problems.
Industrial Homework
The number of permits authorizing industrial homework to be performed in the
home were still held to a minimum, only six being issued to employers and fifteen to
homeworkers. All applications are investigated, and should the Inspector find that the
work should be done in a factory, the permit is refused.
Inspection of Elevators
The duties of the Inspector in this type of work are continually changing. New
equipment is being introduced by the elevator-manufacturers, and constant vigilance by
the Inspector must be maintained to keep well informed on new designs, etc.
One important phase of inspection as time goes on is the old elevator. In this
Province there are many elevators that have been in service at least fifty years. Consequently, a rigid inspection is necessary in order to see that all safety devices are maintained in good operating condition.
It is gratifying to note that the efforts of the elevator-manufacturers to modernize
this older equipment are meeting with a fair measure of success, thus simplifying the
work of our Branch in this field.
We are again pleased to report that no serious or fatal accident pertaining to elevator
equipment was recorded during the past year. Summarized herewith are the various
functions carried out by the Factories Inspection Branch during the year 1954 in enforcing the Act throughout the Province:— INSPECTION OF FACTORIES
H  141
Passenger-elevators
Freight-elevators 	
Dumb-waiters	
Man-lifts 	
Escalators	
Reinspections 	
Inspections
Elevator Inspections
590
720
144
38
51
210
Total
Factory inspections	
Homework inspections
Complaints	
Child investigations 	
Night inspections 	
Factory Inspections
Total
1,753
1,480
3
7
3
10
1,503
New Elevator Installations
During the year sixty-nine plans and specifications relating to the installation of
modern elevator equipment were approved, etc., as follows:—
Passenger-elevators   34
Freight-elevators   20
Dumb-waiters   14
Escalators      1
Total
69
Elevator Operators' Licences
Elevator operators' licences issued in 1954 totalled 1,951, consisting of 384 temporary licences, 307 permanent licences, and 1,260 renewal licences.
Conclusion
We take this opportunity to acknowledge the assistance given our Branch by other
Governmental departments and the continued co-operation of members of the staff; also
we wish to thank all officials and employees connected with industry for their co-operation
during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. M. Purdie,
Chief Inspector of Factories. H 142
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Apprenticeship Branch
(British Columbia)
Head office -      ----- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Branch office   -   Department of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
Hamilton Crisford
Members:
T. McGibbon - -      -      -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J. Tucker- - -      -      -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J.Walker - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W.H.Welsh - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Edmund L. Allen  -------  Director of Apprenticeship.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In submitting this annual report of the activities of the Apprenticeship Branch
during the calendar year 1954, it is a pleasure to report that 1954 was a year of progress
in apprenticeship training. The number of apprentices was increased, the amount of
apprenticeship training was increased, and an agreement was completed that provides
for Federal Government financial co-operation in the training of skilled tradesmen during the next ten years.
Apprentices in Training
At December 31st, 1954, the number of apprentices registered with the Apprenticeship Branch and their distribution by years and trades was as follows:—
Trade or Occupation and Length of
Apprenticeship in Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
First
Prob.      Reg.
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Completed
Automotive maintenance (4)..
Bartering (2)	
Boiler-making (4)	
Bricklaying (4)	
Carpentry (4)..
Electrical work (4-5)_
Glassworking (4)	
Hairdressing (2)	
Jewellery work (5)	
Lithography (2-6)_
Machinist and fitter (5)_
Moulding (4)~
Office-machine mechanic (4)..
Painting and decorating (3)_
Pattern making (5)	
Plastering (4)_.
Plumbing and steam-fitting (4)..
Refrigeration (4)	
Sheet-metal work (5)~
Ship and boat building (4) ..
Sign-painting (4)	
Steel fabrication (4)	
Miscellaneous trades	
27
14
1
1
31
67
5
5
3
27
6
3
1
15
26
19
1
3
10
41
29
2
4
61
21
2
35
3
20
4
4
2
1
6
47
3
21
4
4
5
2
64
"lb
7
54
16
1
12
3
34
8
7
2
4
21
2
25
11
2
10
3
48
11
4
47
56
2
1
3
37
2
3
2
3
29
2
28
61
6
4
23
2
3
61
5
1
3
3
5
25
1
18
14
1
6
2
45
1
1
42
20
241
43
30
20
216
293
13
52
4
16
221
11
22
24
11
30
148
8
131
38
7
31
20
Total apprenticeships-
265
321    I    296
I
296
335
117
1,630
63
41
2
5
46
26
3
11
6
8
44
3
1
6
1
8
26
1
24
5
1
6
1
338 APPRENTICESHIP BRANCH H  143
The distribution of apprentices was as follows: Vancouver and Lower Mainland,
1,053; Victoria and Vancouver Island, 337;  Interior and Northern Districts, 240.
It is noted that the number of apprentices in the first year of their apprenticeship
at December 31st, 1954, was 586, compared to 529 in the preceding year. This represents an increase of more than 10 per cent in persons starting to learn a trade through
apprenticeship. During the year approximately 20 per cent of the persons commencing
on probationary contract discontinued their apprenticeship during the three months' trial
period. This is a result of screening by employers and of the counselling of apprentices
and employers by the staff of the Branch which ensures that the majority of applicants
who are unsuited for the trade are steered away from a career in which they have little
chance of success. The economy effected in the cost of training and the elimination of
unsatisfactory apprentices is evident.
Designated Trades
During the year four applications were received relating to adding occupations to
the schedule of designated trades. Investigations were made and the Provincial Apprenticeship Committee heard representatives of employers and employees.
In three of the cases the Committee was of the opinion that designating the trade
was not advisable as adequate training facilities did not exist in all instances, although
it recognized that in some cases training would be possible.
In one case, after investigation and consideration of the available information, the
Committee recommended that the trade be designated. The Honourable Minister of
Labour concurred in the recommendation, and the trade of watch-repairing was designated by Order in Council.
The following trades are now designated under the "Apprenticeship Act":—
Automotive maintenance. Moulder.
Aviation mechanic. Office-machine mechanic.
Barbering. Painting and decorating.
Bricklaying. Plastering.
Carpentry, joinery, and benchwork. Plumbing and steam-fitting.
Electrical work. Refrigeration.
Glassworking. Service and repair of current-consuming
Jewellery manufacture and repair. electrical appliances.
Lithography. Sheet-metal work.
Machinist. *                                      Ship and boat building industry.
Metal trades— Sign and pictorial painting.
(a) Boiler-making. Steel fabrication.
(b) Pattern-making. Watch-repairing.
Technical Training
The year 1954 witnessed a worth-while increase in the amount of technical and
vocational training in school classes for apprentices. The training was of three general
types—theory of the trade, associated technical knowledge, and practical trade-training
to supplement job-training. Apprentices were enrolled in seventy-two different classes
throughout the Province. The majority of the school training was conducted in Vancouver and Victoria. Two different programmes were used to provide the technical
training.
The first programme made use of evening classes conducted in six locations. There
were 1,511 enrolments, accounting for a total of 69,424 student-hours of instruction
in trade theory and related subjects. Apprentices attended these classes from one to
four nights each week for approximately six months.
The second programme employed day-time classes held during working-hours and
provided 25,240 student-hours of instruction to 217 apprentices. In this training programme, apprentices were brought to Vancouver from all sections of the Province where
suitable school facilities for apprenticeship training do not exist. The normal period in
the school was one month, although in some cases it was considered advisable to increase H 144 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
this time. Transportation and a subsistence allowance were supplied to the apprentices
while absent from their places of employment to attend the school. That employers
are becoming increasingly aware of the value of this annual trade-training was indicated
by the fact that some employers gave financial assistance to their apprentices when the
school training required that they be absent from work.
Federal Government Co-operation
An agreement with the Government of Canada was completed by the Honourable
Minister of Labour on behalf of the Government of British Columbia which provides for
Federal Government co-operation in apprenticeship training for a period of ten years.
Under the agreement the Federal Government will defray one-half the cost of apprenticeship training and other items, including salaries and travelling expenses of Apprenticeship Branch field supervisors and the payment of subsistence allowance and transportation of apprentices attending day-time classes.
Committee Meetings
The Provincial Apprenticeship Committee, which is established to advise the Minister in matters relating to apprenticeship, met five times during the calendar year. They
considered and approved 537 new apprenticeships and recommended that 338 certificates of apprenticeship be issued to graduate apprentices as evidence of having completed their period of apprenticeship and the required technical training.
The Director of Apprenticeship attended meetings of the various Trade Advisory
Committees to discuss the problems and progress of apprenticeship training in the separate trades represented by the Committees. The members of Trade Advisory Committees gave freely of their time and efforts to assist in ensuring the proper training of future
tradesmen.
Supervision and Promotion of Apprenticeship
During the year the majority of the apprentices and their employers were visited
to ascertain the progress of the apprentices and the effectiveness of the training. Advice
was asked of and offered by the inspection staff regarding training on the job and in the
schools. Information was gathered to assist in developing the technical training programme to suit the requirements of industry.
An increase was noted in the number of requests made by high schools for members of the staff to address student groups on the subject of apprenticeship. Assistance
was given to the National Employment Service and Unemployment Insurance Commission of the Federal Department of Labour in counselling young men regarding employment as apprentices and in informing the public of apprenticeship matters at the Pacific
National Exhibition.
Conclusion
The activities of the Apprenticeship Branch are directed toward producing proficient tradesmen—men who are capable of the high standard of production so necessary
to maintain a high standard of living. It is gratifying to be able to report that we are
receiving co-operation from industry and organized labour, which bodies apparently
recognize that the only satisfactory way in which skilled craftsmen can be produced in
sufficient numbers to satisfy their needs is through apprenticeship training within the
industries. The British Columbia apprenticeship system has been built on a foundation
of progressive training in co-operation with industry, and to this our long-range pro-
gramme owes its success. Edmund l  All£N>
Director of Apprenticeship. TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH
H 145
Report of the
Trade-schools Regulation Branch
Administrative offices   -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Officers
Chairman:
Hamilton Crisford.
Members:
Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Edmund L. Allen.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch
for the calendar year 1954.
The majority of schools were contacted this year and made conversant with our
Act and regulations, and the number of complaints dealt with was small.
The following is the list of registered schools:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Modern
business course, special elective course.
American School of Correspondence, Drexel Avenue at East Fifty-eighth Street,
Chicago 37, 111.: Engineering and commerce as covered by the school bulletin.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.: Civil, mining, structural, mechanical, electrical, radio, and
aeronautical engineering, general and higher education.
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, 3224 Sixteenth Street North-west, Washington 10, D.C.:  Radio engineering.
Columbia Business Institute, 301 Financial Center Building, 233 South-west Sixth
Avenue, Portland 4, Ore.:  Railroad telegraphy.
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation Limited, 12520 One Hundred and Second
Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.: Diesel auto mechanics, welding, refrigeration and
air-conditioning.
The School of Creative Art Ltd., 12522 One Hundred and Second Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.:   Showcard-writing.
The School of Creative Photography Limited, 12520 One Hundred and Second
Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.:   Photography.
DeVry Technical Institute, Inc., 4141 Belmont Avenue, Chicago 41, 111.: Television, radio, and electronic training.
Famous Artists School, 106 Adelaide Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial art,
painting.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
111.:  Accounting.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian Limited, 7475 Sherbrooke Street
West, Montreal, Que.: Art, architecture, business training, chemical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, general education, mechanical
engineering, mining, railroading, domestic engineering, navigation, pulp and
paper making, textile manufacture, and other courses as listed in prospectus.
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, 111.: Business
management, higher accountancy (all sections), La Salle salesmanship, practical book-keeping, traffic management, law, stenotypy (less machine), fore-
manship and production methods, and other courses as per prospectus. H 146 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
National Radio Institute, Sixteenth and U Streets North-west, Washington 9, D.C.:
Practical radio and television servicing course.
Northern Institute of Technology Ltd. (Radio College of Canada), 86 Bathurst
Street, Toronto 2b, Ont.: Applied radio and television, radio operating, radio
and television technology, radio engineering, television servicing, electronics
communications.
Shaw Schools Limited, 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial business
courses, short-story writing, stationary engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Radio School Limited, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Wireless telegraphy, railroad telegraphy, radio and television servicing.
Tractor Training Service, 406 Panama Building, Portland 4, Ore.: Tractor and
equipment training.
Utilities Engineering Institute, 2525 North Sheffield Avenue, Chicago 14, 111.:
Mechanical refrigeration, mechanical refrigeration and air-conditioning, auto
body and fender and scientific motor tune-up, welding, air-conditioning, scientific motor tune-up, auto body and fender, diesel, diesel and scientific motor
tune-up.
Autolec National Educational Master & Group Program, 1025 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:   Automotive electricity, carburetion, and tune-up.
The Barclay's Dance Studio, 720 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Professional
dancing.
Bel-Parker, 1574 West Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
B.C. School of Floral Design, 2523 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.: Floral
designing.
B.C. Tree Fruits Limited, Kelowna, B.C.:   Fruit-packing.
British Columbia Advanced Hair Design School, 768 Granville Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.:  Advanced hairdressing.
Carlyle Schools Limited, 718 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Physicians'
office assistants.
Central Business College, 8 Dahlstrom Building, 19 Nowell Street, Chilliwack, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Clayton School of Journalism, 511 Province Building, 198 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 3, B.C.:   Journalism.
Club and Cabaret and Construction Camp, Culinary and Service Employees Union,
Local No. 740, Bar-tending School, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3,
B.C.:   Bar-tending.
The Comptometer School, 308 Randall Building, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:   Comptometer operation.
Cranbrook College of Commerce, Cranbrook, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Duffus School of Business Ltd., 522 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Dressmaking,
designing, and pattern-making, tailoring, millinery, leathercraft.
Fenton Commercial Schools Ltd., 2015 West Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver 13,
B.C.:   Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Fine Arts Studio, 910, 441 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Fine art.
Golden Commercial Classes, Golden, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and
governmental). TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH H 147
Gondo's Sewing School, 779 Cadder Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Herbert Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Lownds School of Commerce Limited, 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd Willton School of Ladies Haircutting, 1107 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.:  Ladies' haircutting.
Lrn-Rite Welding School, 163 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Welding.
Maxine Beauty School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Mikie Designing and Dressmaking Academy, 711 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 4,
B.C.:   Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts, flower arrangements.
Moler Barber School, 615 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.:   Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Arthur Murray Studios (Canada) Ltd., 646 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:
Professional dancing.
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, 3300 Thirty-first Street, Vernon, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nelson Business College, 1017 Hoover Street, Nelson, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Nelson Commercial Training School, 701 Front Street, Nelson, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
O.K. Valley Hairdressing School, 453 Lawrence Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Penticton College of Commerce, 19 Craig Building, 221 Main Street, Penticton,
B.C.:   Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pipeline Welding School, 1585 East Pender Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.: Pipeline
welding.
Pitman Business College Limited, 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Prince George Business College, 1330 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Royal Business College, 2509 Government Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
H. Faulkner Smith School of Applied and Fine Art, 3842 Oak Street, Vancouver 9,
B.C.:  Commercial art.
Sprott-Shaw Schools (Vancouver) Limited, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), wireless telegraphy, railroad telegraphy, radio and television servicing.
Sprott-Shaw (Victoria) Business Institute Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), Elmer Wheeler sales
course.
St. Ann's Academy, Commercial Department, 835 Humboldt Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
St. Ann's Convent, Commercial Department, Nanaimo, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
Success Business College, 2350 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sun Electric Technician Course, 120 West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.:
Automotive testing. H 148 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.:
Stationary, marine, and diesel engineering.
Victoria Hairdressing School, 738 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.:   Hairdressing.
Welding Construction School, 148 East First Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Welding.
Western Radio Academy, 1451 Burnaby Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Radio broadcasting.
Western School of Commerce, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental), Elmer Wheeler sales course.
Edmund L. Allen,
Administrative Officer. ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS H 149
Provincial Advisory Committee
on Indian Affairs
Head office    -------    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Committee
Chairman:
Professor Ellis H. Morrow, LL.D.,
B.A., M.B.A., F.C.I.    -----   Vancouver.
Members:
Edward N. Bolton ------- Port Essington.
Ernest Brewer -------- Vernon.
Capt. Charles Cates    ------ North Vancouver.
Lawrence P. Guichon, D.Sc. -   -   -   - Quilchena.
Chief William D. Scow ------ Alert Bay.
Secretary
T. R. Kelly  -------   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the Fifth Annual Report of the Provincial
Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1954.
Meetings of the Committee
The Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs met twice during 1954. The
first meeting was held in Victoria from March 9th to 12th, and the second in Vancouver
from November 3rd to 5th.
The session in March was of especial interest owing to the attendance of a number
of distinguished visitors from outside the Province. The Honourable W. A. Goodfellow,
Minister of Public Welfare and Chairman of the Legislative Committee on Indian Affairs
in Ontario, attended with Mr. A. O. C. Cole, Secretary of the Legislative Committee.
Mr. V. R. Farrell, Administrative Assistant and Special Representative of the Alaska
Native Service, came from Seattle, Wash., U.S.A., in order to address the meeting.
The Deputy Attorney-General of British Columbia, as well as Provincial Deputy
Ministers from the Departments of Labour, Health and Welfare, Education, and Lands
reported to the Committee on various aspects of Indian affairs which affect their
Departments.
The Committee was also addressed by Dr. W. S. Barclay, Regional Director of
Indian Health Services, Department of National Health and Welfare; Rev. P. R. Kelly,
D.D., Chairman of the Legislative Committee of the Native Brotherhood of British
Columbia; and Mr. Andrew Paull, President of the North American Brotherhood.
As the March meeting of the Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs was
held during the legislative session in Victoria, three members of the Legislature, representing northern and interior areas of the Province and in whose constituencies there is
a large Indian population, were invited to attend. Problems affecting the Indians in their
districts were outlined by Mr. F. X. Richter, M.L.A. for Similkameen; Mr. Frank
Howard, M.L.A. for Skeena;  and Mr. Bruce Brown, M.L.A. for Prince Rupert. H 150 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The meeting of the Advisory Committee in November also attracted considerable
interest and was attended by Mr. George Hahn, M.P. for New Westminster; the Commissioner for Indian Affairs in British Columbia and the Superintendent of the Vancouver
Indian Agency; Mr. F. X. Richter, M.L.A.; the Provincial Game Commissioner for
British Columbia; and Dr. H. B. Hawthorn, who, at the request of the Federal Government, is directing a research survey of the Indians of this Province which is being carried
out by the University of British Columbia.
Mr. Deane Goard, Principal of Vancouver Vocational Institute, and Mr. Edmund L.
Allen, Director of Apprenticeship of the Provincial Department of Labour, addressed the
Committee, and consideration was given to the desirability of encouraging young Indians
to avail themselves of the vocational and apprenticeship training which is open to all
citizens of this Province.
The November meeting of the Advisory Committee was made the subject of a
C.B.C. television programme, during which individual members were questioned on the
work and aims of the Committee.
Members of the Committee
Since the last Report, more members of the Committee have been honoured for
public service. The Chairman, Dr. E. H. Morrow, was accorded an honorary degree of
Doctor of Laws and Letters from the University of Western Ontario; Chief W. D. Scow
and Mr. E. Brewer received Coronation Medals in recognition of long service as councillors and advisers to the Indian bands in their areas.
Tours Made by Members of the Committee
In order to gather first-hand information on certain aspects of Indian affairs, Dr.
E. H. Morrow, Chairman of the Advisory Committee, made a tour of the Central and
Southern Interior districts of British Columbia during the month of September. The
Indian Agencies of Lytton, Kamloops, and Okanagan were visited by the Chairman,
who conferred with the Superintendents, school-teachers, Provincial Government officials, and Magistrates in the various districts through which he passed. Much valuable
information was accumulated during this tour, which provided a basis for discussion at
the November meeting of the Committee.
In September a tour was also made by Capt. Charles Cates and the Secretary covering the Lytton Agency and the Squamish Valley area of the Vancouver Indian Agency.
The Superintendents once again offered every facility and courtesy to the representatives
of the Committee, and a number of local problems were discussed and later brought to
the attention of members during the meeting in November.
Public Relations
In response to the widening interest in the Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian
Affairs in British Columbia, you accepted an invitation to address the B.C. Indian Arts
and Welfare Society in Victoria in December to give an outline of the recent work of the
Committee, and to suggest ways in which the society could assist the Indians of this
Province.
During the year under review, the Secretary was also invited to address the Coordinating Council on Citizenship in Vancouver, a chapter of the I.O.D.E. in Victoria,
and the Rotary Club in Chilliwack.
In May, at your request, the Secretary attended the Annual Convention of the
Magistrates of British Columbia as an observer. Delegates to this Convention in previous
years had expressed an interest in various aspects of Indian problems, and on this occa- ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS H 151
sion Dr. H. B. Hawthorn, of the Department of Anthropology at the University of British
Columbia, had been invited to address the Convention on "An Indian before the Courts."
Federal-Provincial Co-operation in Indian
Health and Welfare
Health
The Health Branch of the Provincial Department of Health and Welfare is continuing its co-operation with the Indian Health Services, Department of National Health and
Welfare, by supplying health-unit services to various Indian reservations throughout
British Columbia on a per capita charge basis. Such assistance is rendered by the Province in areas where there is no coverage available by the Indian Health Services. Thirty-
seven Indian reservations are at present being served by Provincial health units in British
Columbia.
Indians are included in the V.D. services and follow-up treatment which is extended
to citizens of this Province and, by arrangement with the Indian Affairs Branch, Provincial
health nurses may now go on Indian reservations to investigate V.D. infection.
In 1953, for the first time, nurses of the Indian Health Services attended refresher
courses which are held annually for Provincial health nurses in British Columbia.
In his address to the Advisory Committee in March, Dr. W. S. Barclay, Regional
Superintendent of the Indian Health Services, stated that Provincial co-operation was
invaluable in the successful reduction of the incidence of tuberculosis by the diagnostic
work of the portable X-ray units among the native people of this Province. He also
stated that considerable reliance was placed on Provincial health services for co-operation
in immunization and other preventive measures taken against sickness. In the field of
infectious diseases, Dr. Barclay stated that Federal-Provincial co-operation is complete,
it being realized that an individual could be the carrier of a disease which might affect the
health of the population of the Province both in and outside Indian reservations.
Welfare
In accordance with the Provincial Order in Council passed in December, 1953,
requesting the Advisory Committee " to investigate means of attaining more Dominion-
Provincial co-operation in health and welfare administration " with regard to the native
Indians of this Province, investigations have continued on various aspects of these
problems.
A special committee appointed by the Government of British Columbia to investigate
conditions in the Provincial Industrial Schools in this Province published its report at the
end of 1954. While this investigation was in progress, it was not possible for the Advisory
Committee to make further assessments on the situation quoted in its last Report
concerning the high percentage of Indian girls committed to this institution.
Delinquency Investigation
At the end of 1953, reports were received by the Provincial Department of Health
and Welfare from the Stipendiary Magistrate in a northern district concerning the incidence of juvenile delinquency on an Indian reservation in his area. After consultation
with this Department and the Indian Affairs Branch, the Secretary of the Advisory
Committee, accompanied by the Federal Indian Welfare official, paid a visit to the village
concerned in January, 1954. Meetings were held on the reservations with councillors
and representatives of village organizations, and later with the entire Indian population.
The interest of both Governments in their welfare was explained to the native people, and
an appeal was made to their ancestral pride and tradition to bring about an improvement
in their moral behaviour.   Individually and collectively, the village people promised that H 152 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
such improvements would take place in all phases of their village life. It was gratifying
to learn when the Secretary of the Advisory Committee paid a second visit to the village
in May, 1954, that this pledge had been kept by the native people, and that there had also
been a resurgence of interest in community activities both on and off the Indian reservations. The almost total lack of delinquency in this area during the past months has also
been noted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Further aspects of delinquency are continuing to be investigated in other districts by
the Committee, in close co-operation with the Indian Affairs Branch.
Education
Joint Education in Provincial Public Schools
An increasing number of Indian children have been attending Provincial public
schools since 1949, when the "Public Schools Act" of British Columbia was amended
to enable them to do so with the consent of local School Boards. Latest statistics show
that the number of Indian children attending private and public schools outside of reservations in British Columbia is almost equal to the total number being educated at similar
schools in all other Provinces. Inspectors of Provincial schools report that Indian children
in public schools have mixed well with their fellow students and are making good progress
in their education.
One of the main features of educational progress among Indians is that native
students in Provincial public schools are becoming gradually synchronized as to age and
grade in the classrooms. The difficulty created by students in grades below their age-group
is gradually disappearing.
Parent-Teacher Associations
It is interesting to note that all-Indian Parent-Teacher Association groups are increasing, and that parents of native children attending public schools are taking part in
non-Indian parent-teacher groups outside the reservations.
Summer School, Community Programmes Branch
The Community Programmes Branch of the Provincial Department of Education
held its first Summer School session in Victoria during July, 1954. Considerable interest
was caused by the attendance of an elected woman councillor of the Masset Indian Band
from the Queen Charlotte Islands. Mrs. Hester Marks's attendance was another example
of Federal-Provincial co-operation, her expenses being shared by both Governments. It
is hoped that more Indians will avail themselves of this opportunity to be trained for the
organization of community activities on reservations.
Clerical Training
As a result of a resolution passed at the March meeting of the Advisory Committee,
you approached the Minister of Education on the advisability of providing clerical training
for Indian children attending public schools. This proposal was discussed at the meeting
of high-school principals in Victoria in July, and subsequently the Minister of Education
ordered a directive to be issued by the Department of Education to all principals bringing
their attention to the need for this special training for Indian children.
Vocational Training
During the past five years approximately 100 Indian boys and girls have attended the
Vancouver Vocational Institute. The facilities of this organization are open to all who
apply and are able to pay the fees, and for whom there is a vacancy.
The Vocational Institute also handles supplementary training offered by the Provincial Department of Labour to indentured apprentices.   Transportation by the Govern- ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS H 153
ment is arranged for pupils from outlying districts to Vancouver, and in some cases
boarding homes are found for them. A subsistence allowance of $14 a week for out-of-
town students and $10 a week for those living in Vancouver is paid by the Apprenticeship
Branch of the Provincial Government, as well as the cost of their training. Every effort
is being made to increase the number of Indians who are availing themselves of this
instruction.
Approximately 50 per cent of the young Indians who have attended the Vancouver
Vocational Institute came from districts outside the city. Most of them were in the 20-
to 30-year-old age-group, and a large proportion had attended high school, but not all of
them wanted to go on to the University. It is this latter group which comes to the Vocational Institute for advice and training in order to earn a livelihood.
One young Indian woman, Miss Hazel Tom, from Shalalth in the Lytton Agency,
graduated recently from the year's course in practical nursing at Vancouver Vocational
Institute. She is the first Indian from her reserve to go on from school and complete a
training course of any kind. Her nursing career will begin in St. Paul's Hospital in
Vancouver, where she spent the last two months of her training.
Agriculture
The Provincial Department of Agriculture reports that many of its services are
available to native Indians on much the same basis as is offered to other citizens of this
Province.
District Agriculturists and Departmental Inspectors extend their activities to the
reservations, on the request of individual Indians or Indian Superintendents.
The reseeding of range land on reservations has been a topic of mutual interest to
all agriculturists, and consultations have taken place between the Indian Affairs Branch
and the Provincial Department of Agriculture on this subject. The possibility of large-
scale reseeding by aeroplane has been investigated carefully, and the Indian Affairs
Branch has carried out such a project on an experimental basis in the Kamloops district.
The result of this experiment will be of interest to all agricultural areas when an assessment of the experiment has been made.
Successful weed-control requires the close co-operation of many departments of the
Federal, Provincial, and municipal governments. The importance of controlling the
growth of weeds is being recognized by the authorities concerned with agricultural
development, and closer co-ordination of effort is being planned.
4-H Clubs have been established at St. Joseph's Residential School near Williams
Lake, and also at St. Mary's Residential School near Mission City. The activities of these
clubs are open to any Indian boys or girls who wish to join.
Game Branch
Since many of the natives of the Northern Interior of British Columbia derive part
of their livelihood through hunting and trapping, the Indian Affairs Branch, advised by
the Federal Fur Supervisor, has collaborated very closely with the Provincial Game
Branch to assure a continuing supply of fur and game in northern districts. With this
in view, game biologists are making a survey of the potential fur and game resources
before submitting recommendations as a basis for future legislation. The costs of this
survey are being shared by the two Governments.
Also during the past year, the Indian Affairs Branch has made a substantial grant to
the predator-control programme of the Provincial Game Commission, on the contention
that the native Indian trappers benefit from the work being carried out in this regard.
Although the " Game Act" of British Columbia does not require the native Indian
to purchase a hunting or trapping licence, every effort is made by the Game Branch H 154 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
officials and the Indian Affairs Branch to make the Indian trapper register his trap-line,
at a reduced fee, to protect his right to a line. The native trapper is also urged to submit
a report of the season's fur-catch for purposes of assessment in the annual crop for conservation records. The non-Indian trapper is required by law to do this.
With the realization that many native Indians are still dependent on game for food,
the Act allows them the privilege of taking male deer or fish for consumption at any time
of the year, within certain limitations. Indians of the north and north-eastern sections
of the Province may be declared in certain circumstances exempt from the restrictive
provisions of the Act.
The question of encouraging Indians to become guides for hunters has been considered by the Advisory Committee. It is felt that the native Indians of this Province are
eminently suited to this profession, particularly those who come from districts where
game is to be found. Of the 3,300 known hunters who visited British Columbia in 1953,
a considerable proportion of them asked for Indian guides. Provincial Game Officers
and officials of the Indian Affairs Branch state that