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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-second Annual Report 1952-53 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-second Annual Report
1952-53
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-second Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
ROBERT WILLIAM BONNER,
Minister of Education.
February, 1954.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Robert William Bonner
Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
Assistant Deputy
Minister of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed.
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister:
R. C. Grant, B.A.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria. C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Greater
Victoria.
C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schools in School Districts:
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Telkwa.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Mission City.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Alberni.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Prince Rupert.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Chilliwack.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pasd., Penticton.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Dawson Creek.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B. A., Kimberley.
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
A. D. W. Jones, B.A., Abbotsford.
A. S. To WELL
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), Cranbrook.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Pasd., Trail.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., Nelson.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Pasd., Kamloops.
Earl Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Williams Lake.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.
F.C.P., Victoria.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., New Westminster.
D. C. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Nelson.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., New Westminster.
L. B. Stibbs, B.A., Salmon Arm.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Duncan.
M.A., Vernon.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS
Vancouver:
F. C. Boyes, M.A., Principal.
H. H. Grantham, M.A., Ph.D., Acting Vice-
Principal.
W. H. Auld., B.A.
Mrs. Geraldine Birkett, B.A., B.Ed.
E. B. Broome, B.Ed., MA.
L. E. Brown, B.P.E.
F. C. Hardwick, M.A.
Miss A. J. Kilgour, B.A.
J. McGechaen, M.A.
Miss M. E. McManus, Mus.Bac, M.A.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
Miss K. L. Meredith.
E. G. Ozard, B.A.
C. W. Truax, B.A., B.Ed.
Miss Stella Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
Miss Z. M. Manning.
Model School:
Miss M. J. MacDonald, A.T.C.M., B.A.
Victoria:
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A., Principal.
H. C. Gilliland, M.A., Vice-Principal.
Miss K. M. Baker, B.A.
G. A. Brand, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland.
Miss D. M. Daniels, B.A.
H. E. Farquhar, B.A.
D. B. Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus.
A. W. Johns.
F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.Paed. P 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Pasd., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education:  H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc, M.A.
Inspectors of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S., and Miss D. De Jong, B.Sc.,(H.E.).
Director, Educational and Vocational Guidance: H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Acting Director, Recreation and Physical Education: R. J. Phillips.
Director, Visual Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director, School Radio Broadcasts: Philip J. Kitley, M.A.
Director, Community Programmes: L. J. Wallace, B.A., M.Ed.
Director, Summer School of Education: F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.Paed.
Director, Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director, School and Community Drama: H. S. Hurn, B.A.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch:  P. G. Barr.
Departmental Comptroller: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind: C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Research Assistant: J. R. Meredith, B.A.
School Planning and Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Chairman, Assessment Equalization Board: D. K. Kennedy. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  11
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver  32
Victoria  33
Report of the Director of the Summer School of Education  36
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  46
Report of the Director of Home Economics  50
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  52
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)  59
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  67
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  69
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  70
School District No. 36 (Surrey)  72
Reports of District Inspectors  73
Report of the Superintendent, the School for the Deaf and the Blind  108
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  110
Elementary Correspondence School  114
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  115
Report on Adult Education—
Industrial Education  119
Correspondence Instruction—
High School  122
Elementary School  123
Recreation and Physical Education  123
School and Community Drama  126
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  128
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  130
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  132
Report of the Director of Visual Education  136
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "  138 P 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools  12
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Cost per Pupil to Provincial Government  14
Cost per Pupil, on Various Bases, for the School-year 1952-53  15
Children of Foreign Parentage  16
Number of School Districts  16
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  16
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  17
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  18
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  18
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  19
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  19
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  20
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  21
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  21
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School  23
Teachers' Salaries by Type of SchooL
Classification of Teachers' Salaries	
23
24
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1952-53 by Provincial Government  25
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1952-53 by School Districts  26
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  141
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades_
175
Information re Examination Papers Inside back cover H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education.  Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1952-53
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1954.
To the Honourable Robert William Bonner,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-second Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1953.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 183,112
to 195,290, and the average daily attendance increased from 163,364 to 176,138. The
percentage of the regular attendance was 90.19.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large Rural
Rural
Total
6,553
9,683
5,452
493
2,795
45,282
7,154
14,982
7,331
452
3,459
964
58,864
718
4,805
________
112
340
1,111
14,425
29,470
12,783
1,363
8,333
1,927
12,625
3,759
15,044
120,301
Totals	
70,258
93,206
30,263
1,563
195,290
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:-—■
In the High Correspondence School classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 2,863 officially registered in high,
superior, or elementary schools)        837
In the Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular
students     1,536
Under section 13 (g) of the "Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction  31
2,404
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  2,582
Night-schools   17,795
Vancouver School of Art  88
Vancouver Vocational Institute  1,767
High Correspondence School (adults only)  3,514
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)  299
Carried forward
28,499
11 P  12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Brought forward  28,449
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education classes  59,503
Summer School of Education (1952 session)  1,608
Normal School, Vancouver  406
Normal School, Victoria  207
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training  91
Victoria College  3241
University of British Columbia  5,3552
1 This figure does not include an enrolment of 753 in the special evening classes.
2 This figure does not include the following enrolments:   1952 summer session, 958;
200;   correspondence courses, 166;   partial students (Recreation Course), 21.
95,943
1952-53 extra sessional classes,
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1952-53:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
945
12,919
10,851
10,791
10,268
9,761
9,055
8,793
7,745
6,669
5,202
3,676
2,748
471
889
11,745
9,754
9,799
9,740
9,292
8,583
8,073
7,421
6,891
5,646
4,275
3,046
242
1,834
Grade I                                                	
24,664
Grade II            	
20,605
Grade III         	
20,590
Grade IV        .        -                                   -	
20,008
Grade V                               _     	
19,053
Grade VI                                                      -
17,638
Grade VII
16,866
Grade VIII              - -  -
15,166
Grade IX           _ _   -	
13,560
Grade X                     _    -	
10,848
Grade XI                                   - -	
7,951
Grade XII 	
5,794
Grade XIII
713
Totals	
99,894
95,396
195,290
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of
pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher
are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Type of School
Grade
Teachers
Special
Instructors
Total
per Grade
Teacher
471
946
379
-82
428
108
3,688
190
344
146
1
62
17
171
72
661
1,290
525
83
490
125
3,859
72
14,425
29,470
12,783
1,927
12,625
3,759
120,301
7.39
15.09
6.55
0.99
6.46
1.92
61.60
30 62
31 15
33 73
23.50
Elementary-senior high schools ~
Elementary-junior high schools __
29.50
34.80
32.62
6,102
1,003
7,105
195,290
100.00
32.00 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
P 13
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
University
Degrees
Without
University
Degrees
Total
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools _
Superior schools-
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools_
Elementary schools	
Unclassified 	
542
987
384
17
183
47
348
29
Totals..
2,537
119
303
141
66
307
78
3,511
43
4,568
661
1,290
525
83
490
125
3,859
72
7,105
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of School
Districts
I	
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877-78...
1882-83...
1887-88-.
1892-93-
1897-98-
1902-03„
1907-08-
1912-13..
1913-14-
1917-18-
1922-23..
1927-28-
1928-29..
1929-30-
1930-31..
1931-32...
1932-33...
1933-34.
1934-35...
1935-36-
1936-37__.
1937-38...
1938-39...
1939-40-
1940-41-
1941-42-
1942--13-
1943-44-
1944-45-
1945^16..
1946-47-
1947-48..
1948-49-
1949-50_
1950-51-
1951-52..
1952-53...
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
6,598
7,105
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
$48,411,141
60,758.751
113,679.361
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28s
3,532,518.95'
3,765,920.693
3,743,317.083
3,834,727.193
4,015,074.37s
2,849,972.02s
2,611,937.80s
2,835,040.74s
2,972,385.04s
3,277,660.23s
3,524,962.69s
3,630,670.78s
3,585,769.00s
3,963,848.24s
4,028,397.88s
3,924,243.53s
4,244,898.82s
5,022,534.59s
5,765,205.50s
9,398,473.46s
12,468,653.18s
17,363,430.94s
22,809,631.23s
25,830,076.88s
26,885,980.43s
26,555,080.24s
$215,056.222
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.54s
9,261,094.98s
11,149,996.27s
10,008,255.66s
10,061,387.99s
9,719,333.81s
8,941,497.34s
8,213,369.04s
8,458,156.00s
8,775,353.78s
9,593,562.64s
10,193,367.08s
10,640,740.47s
10,521,684.92s
10,982,364.49s
11,120,801.94s
11,502,291.35s
12,231,029.35s
13,683,538.18s
14,818,625.81s
20,176,930.53s
25,768,392.09s
35,538,079.88s
47,726,750.37s
54,195,133.95s
57,881,559.48s
58,401,121.15s
i The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
J P  14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1952-53
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL
TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
The following table shows the enrolment during the last eighteen years and also the
cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year
Total
Enrolment
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance
1935-36-
1936-37-
1937-38-
1938-39-
1939-40-
1940-41-
1941-42-
1942-43_
1943-44-
1944-45-
1945-46-
1946-47-
1947-48-
1948-49-
1949-50-
1950-51-
1951-52-
1952-53-
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
$21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
27.82
28.51
28.82
29.81
33.97
36.56
58.24
74.54
97.76
124.59
131.15
128.78
117.50
$24.46
26.10
27.18
27.92
27.14
32.25
33.13
35.59
34.46
39.51
41.67
66.17
84.21
109.42
138.63
147.56
144.38
130.28 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
P  15
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1952-53
Grand total cost of education  $58,401,121.15
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment, Victoria College—     $14,998.15
Special grant to Victoria College        30,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  2,420,839.00
Normal School, Vancouver      137,939.70
Normal School, Victoria      129,873.58
Cost of night-schools        33,348.77
Correspondence schools—
High school     210,790.76
Elementary school         74,543.81
Adult education      553,037.05
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act  3,190.00
       3,608,560.82
Net cost for total enrolment of 195,290 pupils  $54,792,560.33
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  280.57
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on total enrolment  1.45
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 176,138  311.08
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on average daily attendance 1.61
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 195,290
pupils for year ($26,555,080.24-$3,608,560.82)     22,946,519.42
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  117.50
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (193 days) on
total enrolment	
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily
attendance 	
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (193 days) on
average daily attendance	
Cost per capita for year on population of 1,200,000 (1953 estimate)—
Cost per capita per school-day (193 days) on population of 1,200,000
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
1,200,000 	
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (193 days)
on population of 1,200,000	
1 Computed on the net total cost of $54,792,560.33, which includes debt and capital charges.
3 Computed on the net total cost to the Provincial Government of $22,946,519.42.
.61
130.28
.68
45.661
.241
19.122
.IO2 P  16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year 1952-53 was as follows:—
Type of School
to
C
a
u
'£
i
a
m
V
.3
_a
_.
u
0
-Q
O
£
3
O
M
u
C
u
M
a
a
1
<_
«
3
•o
a
1
a.
w
a
a.
1
S»
w
3
1
M
1
c
«
krainians
ther Foreign
O
<
U
(-1
E
a,
o
a
s
*-,
a.
0.
«
3   |   O
H
189
303
5
63
143
358
27
222
166
153
141
463
1
2701   425
440 j 1,025
3,063
Junior-senior high schools	
433
175
171
145
458
908
70
256
385
279
29911,323
6,367
176
200
1
10
38
123
452
38
131
89
138
1711   443
2891   560
2,723
Superior schools             ..   .   ...
21
29
62
47
62
8
20
5
11|     90
121   146
514
Elementary-senior high schools—
172
61
5
63
147
345
134
163
80
64|   278
118|   310
1,940
Elementary-junior high schools—
44
26
10
51
99
2
20
10
38
321   156
431   157
496
888)1,483
786
393
1,328
3,713
235
949
811
706
861|3,317|1,296|3,743
20,701
Totals	
1,923|2,249|1,006
I         1
774|2,297
1
5,937
37211,720
1
1,644
1,399
1.57916.070
2,46816,366
1
35,804
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1952-53:—
Municipal school districts       7
Large municipal school districts     36
Large rural school districts     36
Rural school districts (unattached)     21
Total number of districts  100
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 14,425; of this
number, 7,027 were boys and 7,398 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1952-53 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7. Nelson..
10. Arrow Lakes-
11. Trail	
19. Revelstoke	
21. Armstrong-Spallumcheen-
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
39. Vancouver 	
40. New Westminster-
41. Burnaby..
44. North Vancouver..
45. West Vancouver....
53. Terrace  —
61. Greater Victoria-
68. Nanaimo	
71. Courtenay	
Totals .
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
11
3
23
6
4
15
16
29
12
144
27
46
22
9
4
72
17
11
471
13
3
33
10
9
22
22
35
18
205
34
60
27
12
4
113
25
16
661
322
84
628
164
161
461
446
885
444
4,501
805
1,447
638
327
107
2,254
481
270
14,425 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
P 17
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 29,470;
of this number, 14,476 were boys and 14,994 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions, numbers of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1952-53
in each district are shown in the following:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
4
17
20
20
7
10
14
17
12
20
30
7
16
19
32
13
8
30
67
13
24
224
28
36
9
23
18
5
4
20
19
14
19
27
14
12
32
7
22
6
11
23
28
28
8
10
18
23
16
25
40
10
21
27
44
17
11
43
90
18
32
311
36
50
10
33
26
7
4
29
29
18
27
34
18
18
42
10
32
9
15
530
618
576
234
237
423
11. Trail    	
480
12. Grand Forks.  	
335
501
971
222
467
23. Kelowna  _	
612
1,070
416
245
975
2,122
37. Delta	
375
38. Richmond 	
737
7,596
42. Maple Ridge_      	
939
43. Coquitlam.   	
46. Sechelt     _	
994
236
47. Powell River.  	
653
589
121
95
738
587
353
63. Saanich      _ 	
546
747
377
355
70. Alberni 	
981
195
728
172
322
Totals	
54
946
1,290
29,470 P  18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 12,783; of this
number, 6,509 were boys and 6,274 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1952-53 in each district
are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
I
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
14
24
23
19
24
25
17
76
32
33
24
43
25
22
33
31
24
30
33
24
107
42
43
30
70
36
483
11. Trail       ...       _            —            	
755
??    Vprnnn
702
616
31. Chilliwack
770
34. Abbotsford                  .   .
852
527
2,611
1,156
1,158
878
41   Burnaby   	
1,514
761
Totals
18
380
525
12,783
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 1,927; of this number,
1,002 were boys and 925 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions, number
of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1952-53 in each district are shown in
the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3
4
4
3
8
2
3
3
7
2
5
3
2
3
10
1
3
3
8
2
3
3
4
4
3
8
2
3
3
7
2
5
3
2
3
10
2
3
3
8
2
3
71
100
86
76
13. Kettle Valley. _	
169
18. Golden  	
55
68
53
179
29. Lillooet _ _	
36
150
41
20
59
54. Smithers	
305
28
95
61
73. Alert Bay _ 	
163
79. Ucluelet-Tofino            	
49
63
Totals                              	
27
82
83
1,927 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
P 19
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 12,625;
of this number, 6,429 were boys and 6,196 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1952-53 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
4.
6.
10.
13.
17.
18.
20.
22.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
39.
48.
49.
50.
53.
56.
58.
60.
64.
69.
71.
72.
73.
74.
78.
79.
Fernie.	
Windermere	
Kootenay Lake	
Arrow Lakes.	
Kettle Valley	
Princeton —	
Golden ___ 	
Salmon Arm	
Vernon  	
Kamloops __	
Barriere  _
Birch Island 	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel 	
Lillooet..—  	
South Cariboo 	
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon 	
Vancouver-	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls  	
Queen Charlotte	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof.	
McBride	
Peace River North	
Saltspring 	
Qualicum	
Courtenay-	
Campbell River	
Alert Bay 	
Quatsino  ___
Enderby  	
Ucluelet-Tofino—	
Unattached districts.
Totals	
37
12
8
5
6
17
7
10
13
6
5
6
18
6
19
21
11
4
16
19
19
4
6
11
8
16
10
24
11
29
6
9
11
5
13
428
44
12
8
5
6
21
7
10
18
6
5
6
21
8
22
24
12
4
20
23
21
4
6
11
9
21
13
31
12
32
6
9
13
5
15
490
1,128
323
222
136
148
578
206
296
404
162
126
166
542
172
503
568
370
105
493
451
609
99
183
341
231
501
325
655
335
1,005
131
243
394
134
340
12,625
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 3,759;
of this number, 1,928 were boys and 1,831 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1952-53 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
34. Abbotsford..
41. Burnaby	
45. West Vancouver..
67. Ladysmith	
Totals..
16
61
20
11
loF
16
71
25
13
125
569
2,178
617
395
3,759 P 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 120,301; of this
number, 62,523 were boys and 57,778 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1952-53 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley_	
Windermere-
Creston.	
Kootenay Lake..
Nelson	
Slocan  —
Castlegar—	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks-	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden 	
Revelstoke —
Salmon Arm._
Armstrong-Spallumcheen__
Vernon_ _	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops- 	
Barriere—	
Birch Island .__	
Williams Lake- 	
Quesnel _ 	
Lillooet-	
Ashcroft	
Merritt  _	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley- 	
Surrey	
Delta 	
Richmond 	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby. 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—
Sechelt	
Powell River-	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert _	
Terrace 	
Smithers 	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke.— 	
Saanich _	
Saltspring-	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan-
5
4
6
5
7
5
12
13
13
4
13
2
7
3
5
5
5
6
5
10
I
6
17
27
6
6
17
21
5
8
4
7
13
20
18
34
8
9
49
6
17
12
12
11
5
12
11
7
6
3
1
8
9
5
11
5
36
10
29
15
27
11
12
5
16
6
27
32
5
27
5
44
24
29
11
98
17
8
30
37
14
9
7
20
30
14
43
73
64
6
7
20
33
5
8
4
20
75
52
58
139
25
76
907
70
147
42
64
110
43
23
43
11
6
6
1
36
23
11
20
9
75
12
56
18
255
30
35
6
43
25
28
33
5
29
5
47
24
29
11
105
18
8
31
40
14
9
7
20
31
15
45
75
64
6
7
20
33
5
8
4
20
76
54
58
139
26
77
1,010
73
149
42
64
117
46
23
44
11
6
6
1
36
24
11
20
9
77
12
57
18
262
30
35
6
44
26
161
952
1,055
93
746
69
1,509
552
876
333
3,078
566
128
1,026
1,286
364
233
136
675
918
538
1,530
2,416
1,871
95
121
326
926
96
115
57
587
2,675
1,679
1,859
5,301
885
2,677
30,109
2,743
5,423
1,501
2,331
4,239
1,586
586
1,275
210
94
117
9
1,168
724
346
570
207
1,992
193
1,574
334
9,807
906
1,082
101
1,225
801 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
P 21
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo —	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay 	
72. Campbell River.- _.
73. Alert Bay 	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission  	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby 	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino	
  Unattached districts-
Totals _	
15
19
8
5
15
3
1
6
2
19
849
16
73
10
55
55
25
9
5
36
10
13
9
2
39
3,688
16
76
10
58
55
25
9
5
37
10
13
9
2
41
3,859
527
2,183
287
1,886
1,768
422
116
98
1,166
306
486
181
21
1,091
120,301
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
No. and Name of School District
39. Vancouver 	
Number of Teachers
  38
40. New Westminster  2
41. Burnaby   6
43. Coquitlam  2
59. Peace River South  2
61. Greater Victoria   22
Totals  72
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Khnberley—
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson- 	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes-
Trail 	
8. Slocan..
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Grand Forks.—	
Kettle Valley.— -
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton 	
Keremeos 	
Princeton	
Golden 	
Revelstoke—
Salmon Arm..
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon  	
Kamloops-
Barriere—
5
7
8
9
7
16
16
14
7
16
3
11
4
6
6
6
8
7
13
2
10
21
29
7
45
44
52
20
51
17
79
34
43
19
162
29
22
50
67
21
26
16
29
56
18
97
127
102
11
52
51
61
20
61
17
93
34
47
19
194
34
22
56
80
24
30
16
33
62
24
119
148
114
11
1,289
1,482
1,673
487
1,422
377
2,624
789
1,299
553
4,941
901
445
1,527
2,257
586
811
397
907
1,681
699
3,150
4,090
3,103
221 P 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
26. Birch Island _._ —	
7
22
23
8
11
5
9
15
25
19
40
9
10
62
9
24
13
14
13
7
14
13
10
8
4
2
9
11
8
13
7
37
11
30
16
35
13
15
6
17
7
7
20
9
9
18
21
11
7
16
4
2
7
4
21
13
45
52
26
29
15
32
128
105
88
223
38
100
1,367
129
287
70
100
156
72
37
69
32
25
10
4
54
33
26
25
23
95
20
75
34
370
44
54
16
70
39
39
115
34
87
84
57
23
14
58
16
24
20
9
55
13
48
58
29
32
16
35
141
121
101
253
44
109
691
151
329
78
116
174
83
38
80
36
27
10
4
62
34
28
26
23
106
21
88
39
467
48
62
19
78
44
47
137
41
100
93
60
23
14
69
19
28
22
9
59
287
27. Williams Lake	
1,047
28. Quesnel	
1,514
29. Lillooet — _ 	
635
683
31. Merritt    	
427
937
4,330
34. Abbotsford. - _	
3,544
2,834
7,950
1,260
3,414
37. Delta ..   - _ _     ...
45,310
4,704
10,206
2,440
3,325
5,755
2,530
972
42. Maple Ridge. _ 	
45. West Vancouver.- -    _ _	
46. Sechelt _	
47. Powell River                	
1,969
681
49. Ocean Falls 	
703
216
51. Portland Canal..  _  _	
68
1,757
1,014
772
693
53. Terrace. _.  	
54. Smithers _ _ _ _. 	
643
2,730
424
58. McBride _ —	
2,161
835
13,575
1,259
1,628
426
1,972
1,178
1,277
64. Saltspring  _	
3,425
942
2,867
2,568
1,488
410
69. Qualicum — — __  	
72. Campbell River	
73. Alert Bay  _	
341
1,894
478
808
78. Enderby _	
575
79. Ucluelet-Tofino _	
204
1,494
Totals...	
1,033
6,102
7,105
195,290 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
P 23
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in
each type of school for the school-year 1952-53:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Daily
Attendance
Total
Boys
Girls
29
54
18
27
49
7
849
661
1,290
525
83
490
125
3,859
14,425
29,470
12,783
1,927
12,625
3,759
120,301
7,027
14,476
6,509
1,002
6,429
1,928
62,523
7,398
14,994
6,274
925
6,196
1,831
57,778
11,661.26
26,301.60
11,728.70
1,749.18
11,313.55
3,476.21
109,907.58
Totals   _
1,033
7,105
195,290
99,894
95,396
176,138.08
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100
are excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number of
Teachers
High
Salary
Low
Salary
Average
Salary
471
946
379
82
428
108
3,688
$5,900
5,960
6,302
5,975
5,838
5,470
6,470
$1,027
1,035
1,027
1,350
1,325
1,930
1,000
$4,476
3,855
3,716
3,035
3,213
3,256
3,011
Supervising Principals
Senior high schools- —
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools _ 	
Elementary-senior high schools
Elementary-junior high schools.
Elementary schools 	
$7,420
7,380
7,050
6,970
6,785
7,005
$5,427
5,100
5,828
4,304
5,210
2,260
$6,444
6,202
6,354
5,908
5,836
5,904
Special Instructors
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools	
Superior schools..
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools-
Elementary schools 	
Unclassified-  	
163
301
130
1
41
12
101
72
$6,372
6,530
6,380
1,251
6,220
6,035
5,200
14,976
$1,008
1,590
2,225
1,251
2,355
2,805
1,100
1,287
$4,477
3,904
3,792
1,251
3,460
3,831
3,212
4,305 P 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers,
teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and
teachers earning less than $1,100 per annum:—
Number of
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
$1,100-$ 1,199  19
1,200- 1,299  19
1,300- 1,399  15
1,400- 1,499  13
1,500- 1,599  20
1,600- 1,699  25
1,700- 1,799  13
1,800- 1,899  56
1,900- 1,999  109
2,000- 2,099  149
2,100- 2,199  237
2,200- 2,299  296
2,300- 2,399  186
2,400- 2,499  249
2,500- 2,599  258
2,600- 2,699  236
2,700- 2,799  253
2,800- 2,899  236
2,900- 2,999  214
3,000- 3,099  224
3,100- 3,199  225
3,200- 3,299  223
3,300- 3,399  216
3,400- 3,499  201
3,500- 3,599  240
3,600- 3,699  290
3,700- 3,799  274
3,800- 3,899  200
Salary Range Teachers
$3,900-$3,999  266
4,000- 4,099  219
4,100- 4,199  128
4,200- 4,299  108
4,300- 4,399  77
4,400- 4,499  70
4,500- 4,599  156
4,600- 4,699  139
4,700- 4,799  135
4,800- 4,899  112
4,900- 4,999  115
5,000- 5,099  92
5,100- 5,199  61
5,200- 5,299  83
5,300- 5,399  111
5,400- 5,499  72
5,500- 5,599  78
5,600- 5,699  76
5,700- 5,799  23
5,800- 5,899  15
5,900- 5,999  27
6,000- 6,099  10
6,100- 6,199  11
6,200- 6,299  15
6,300- 6,399  21
6,400 and over  80
Total 6,996 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT P 25
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1952-53
Minister's office  $14,577.21
General office  113,382.71
Text-book Branch (free texts, maps, etc.)   251,322.00
High Correspondence School  210,790.76
Elementary Correspondence School  74,543.81
Industrial Education  95,640.79
Visual Education  62,956.52
Inspection of Schools  352,324.57
Normal School, Vancouver  137,939.70
Normal School, Victoria  129,873.58
School for the Deaf and the Blind  270,857.07
Basic and supplementary grants  9,262,198.31
Special salary grant paid under section 13 (g) of the Act  3,190.00
Teachers' superannuation (6 per cent)   1,436,597.21
Special aid to rural areas  4,853,650.00
School buildings and essential new equipment  4,974,034.67
Education of soldiers' dependent children  15,143.30
Examinations   76,108.70
Conveying children to central schools  1,021,337.97
Summer School .  53,011.70
Adult Education—
Extension and Adult Education  28,814.29
Recreational and Physical Education  129,956.30
Urban Occupational Training  36,365.45
Rural Occupational Training  12,980.85
Student-aid bursaries  116,245.00
Re-establishment training  32,999.10
Apprentice-training   50,805.89
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement  144,870.17
School radio broadcasts  31,469.14
Division of Curriculum  14,762.21
Division of Educational Reference and School Service  15,718.14
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  40,831.61
Educational and Vocational Guidance  10,475.95
Board of Reference  137.90
Assessment Equalization Board  10,831.90
Incidentals and contingencies  17,496.76
University of British Columbia—
General grant  $2,333,250.00
Teacher-training   16,750.00
University Endowment Lands  70,839.00
       2,420,839.00
Special grant to Victoria College  30,000.00
Total expenditure by Government  $26,555,080.24
Amount expended by districts (including debt and capital charges)     31,846,040.91
Grand total expenditure  $58,401,121.15 P 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1952-53
No. and Name of School District
Total
Expenditure1
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10
11
12
13.
14
15.
16
17
18
19
20
21
22.
23.
24
25
26
27
28,
29.
30,
31
32.
33.
34.
35,
36.
37,
38
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45,
46,
47,
48,
49.
50.
51.
52,
53,
54,
55,
56,
57,
58,
59,
60.
61.
62,
63.
64,
65,
66,
67
68,
69
70,
71,
72,
Fernie 	
Cranbrook—.
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Creston  _
Kootenay Lake..
Nelson 	
Slocan 	
. Castlegar 	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley _	
Southern Okanagan-
Penticton 	
Keremeos  	
Princeton	
Golden —
. Revelstoke-.   	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.-
Vernon  _ —
Kelowna _	
Kamloops  	
Barriere   	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake_
Quesnel- 	
Lillooet 	
South CariboO-
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey 	
Delta 	
Richmond...
. Vancouver..
New Westminster.-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal-
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich   _
Saltspring	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum..
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Campbell River..
$376.
300,
381,
106
420,
80,
595
210
305
120
1,186
205
173,
382,
520.
155.
180
91
182,
345,
130,
665.
755.
799.
62.
89.
507,
383,
184.
225.
103
222.
894,
784,
528.
1,002,
414,
1,020.
13,055.
920
2,946.
673.
756,
1,042.
711
289
497
246
226
112
24
383
207
181
207
178
951
275
742
312
3,592.
326,
521.
123.
510.
344,
314
1,425,
639,
602,
1,110,
472,
,756.36
,896.81
158.26
143.60
750.67
178.56
383.58
,102.80
,209.08
,764.22
,941.08
,195.17
,513.49
,461.71
,372.16
,085.90
,043.98
.033.51
,096.53
,255.85
.384.38
,678,26
,170.10
,893.23
,329.00
,869,86
,840.93
.596.53
,044.66
,251.09
,729.97
,610.58
719.47
,494.28
,454.13
.508.86
,791.32
,190.98
,016.97
,022.70
,387.92
639.41
,393.95
,745.02
,709.32
,929.12
,105.80
,350.88
,978.01
455.87
,119.64
,041.17
,603.95
,381.89
,781.76
913.10
906.54
,466.15
,952.10
,835.47
,435.36
,116.19
,250,41
,161,70
109.58
,342.64
,144.91
,958.07
,288.32
759.60
,333.18
,497.05
$201,148.63
157,280.61
157,485.79
82,358.74
304,356.45
47,774.02
289,069.16
135,229.52
186,483.31
97,217.01
421,725.60
115,890.17
105,034.19
265,466.41
169,821.45
105,466.54
121,322.94
71,293.05
88,893.82
184,650.07
51,545.23
319,222.93
343,862.68
404,582.86
47,834.27
66,242.31
327,762.24
292,633.44
46,858.65
131,133.01
53,362.59
156,910.90
346,553.24
359,481.70
213,953.10
387,276.37
154,664.52
361,038.18
2,711,753.84
192,900.81
1,055,852.60
272,521.57
312,951.71
335,068.88
186,528.76
182,468.86
226,452.72
122,222.88
81,511.81
57,899.36
12,860.04
61,962.40
149,258.03
132,974.50
162,768.87
137,687.11
474,665.18
165,231.33
487,720.00
198,624.32
970,743.14
185,585.59
236,186.23
89,140.47
246,414.17
159,066.27
128,308.51
630,461.75
373,040.61
248,874.96
600,162.97
277,781.22
$175,607.73
143,616.20
223,672.47
23,784.86
116,394.22
32,404.54
306,314.42
74,873.28
118,725.77
23,547.21
765,215.48
89,305.00
68,479.30
116,995.30
350,550.71
49,619.36
58,721.04
19,740.46
93,202.71
160,605.78
78,839.15
346,455.33
411,307.42
395,310.37
14,494.73
23,627.55
180,078.69
90,963.09
137,186.01
94,118.08
50,367.38
65,699.68
548,166.23
425,012.58
314,501.03
615,232.49
260,126.80
659,152.80
10,343,263.13
727,121.89
1,890,535.32
401,117.84
443,442.24
707,676.14
525,180.56
107,460.26
270,653.08
124,128.00
145,466.20
54,556.51
11,259.60
321,078.77
58,345.92
48,407.39
45,012.89
41,225.99
477,241.36
110,234.82
255,232.10
114,211.15
2,621,692.22
140,530.60
285,064.18
34,021.23
263,695.41
185,276.37
185,836.40
795,496.32
266,247.71
353,884.64
510,170.21
194,715.83
1 Includes debt and capital charges. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
P 27
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1952-53
—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Total
Expenditure!
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
73. Alert Bay-
74. Quatsino—
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland..
78. Enderby—	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino-
Unattached
Atlin..
Bamfield	
Belmont Park _
Butedale	
Camp Mile 163-
Camp Mile 300-
Camp Mile 456-
Chezacut	
Comox Airport-
Esperanza..
Fort Nelson-
Fort Nelson Airport-
Kyuquot	
Lower Post	
Sarita River	
Sydney Inlet	
Tahsis River 	
Tatlayoko-
Telegraph Creek..
Tulsequah..
University Hill-
Zeballos	
Totals..
166,991.13
120,033.40
688,319.60
471,510.60
166,070.61
122,234.75
78,778.12
,003.24
029.61
,721.20
,474.97
,153.02
,197.93
,324.56
,804.44
470.00
,248.81
,646.26
,586.12
,402.81
,536.53
,620.53
,132.38
,192.10
,987.13
,475.01
,316.44
,002.65
,177.23
$52,151,475.88
96,620.15
27,895.40
308,183.70
221,354.73
58,040.76
74,898.06
49,611.30
3,137.21
12,185.93
54,721.20
2,135.27
2,858.68
10,874.46
4,037.86
2,538.61
4,470.00
1,908.27
5,260.44
4,586.12
5,962.30
8,536.53
278.14
3,062.56
4,120.12
3,987.13
37,294.10
2,841.14
46,178.58
7,319.05
$20,305,434.97
70,370.98
92,138.00
380,135.90
250,155.87
108,029.85
47,336.69
29,166.82
1,866.03
3,843.68
2,339.70
294.34
1,323.47
286,70
265,83
3,340.54
385.82
1,440.51
3,342.39
69.82
4,071.98
8,180.91
3,475.30
46,824.07
5,858.18
$31,846,040.91
1 Includes debt and capital charges.
EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS, 1953
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225,
generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C.
2nd in B.C.
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3
Area 4
Area 5
Area 6
Area 7
Area 8
Area 9
Area 10
Area ll1
Area 12
Area 13
Gary Edward Corbett.	
Trudean Mounce..	
Michael John Fraser..—
Robert Stewart Roger	
Ted Albert Woodhouse.-
Elizabeth Riediger.	
John Hugo Duerksen	
Mary-Alice Sutter	
Florence Joan Grierson...
John Walter May. 	
Klaus Fritz Hochsmann„
June Mordina Whaun—
Lorraine Elizabeth Brand—
Harcourt Robin Brammall..
Oak Bay High School  ___ _	
Cumberland Junior-Senior High School
Nelson High School __ __.
Penticton Senior High School	
Vernon High School 	
Chilliwack High School  	
Langley Junior-Senior High School	
John Oliver Junior-Senior High School-
Shurpass Pacific College (Vancouver) ...
Prince of Wales High School 	
Burnaby South High School 	
West Vancouver High School 	
Victoria High School  	
North Saanich High School	
94.4
93.5
90.4
86.8
86.3
88.6
90.0
88.8
92.9
89.5
92.1
91.8
91.5
87.9
1 As no candidate achieved the minimum standard of 75 per cent, no award was made. P 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT  1952-53
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by Gary Edward Corbett. The Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for the second highest standing in the University Entrance examinations
was won by Trudean Mounce.
Senior Matriculation
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University
of British Columbia for general proficiency were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Robert Hugh Veach	
Barbara Lucy Morrison-
Karl Dau	
Ruth Julia Krane	
William Vaughan Simpkinson	
Roberta Cunningham Stevenson..
Kamloops High School—	
J. Lloyd Crowe High School (Trail).
Chilliwack Senior High School	
Nelson High School..
J. Lloyd Crowe High School (Trail)-.
Nelson High School	
92.7
88.6
88.4
87.7
87.4
87.2
GENERAL REVIEW
Considerable progress has been made in all branches of Departmental work during
the year.   Reports of these branches appear in the following pages.
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
The reorganization of this Branch is proceeding satisfactorily and will replace the
former Pro-Rec organization. The objectives of the new Branch are to foster and
develop local recreation commissions in all parts of the Province where the need is felt.
These voluntary commissions will direct and plan for the needs of their communities.
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION
Schools exist primarily because of what takes place in the actual classrooms. In
other words, the learning situation—what is taught and how it is taught—is of prime
importance.
In general, it may be said that major emphasis is being placed on the fundamental
skills of reading, writing, spelling, and arithmetic.
No one wishes to return to the days when these were the sole objectives of the
educational process. They are, however, a major constituent of a good education and
are possible of attainment if the following principles are observed:—
(a) Permanence of learning is never achieved completely unless there be
frequent use of the knowledge or skill. It is the task of each teacher from
Grades I to XII to reteach, review, and refresh all fundamental skills.
(b) Students vary markedly in aptitudes and abilities. All cannot learn or
perform at the same rate or to the same extent. Hence one standard, or
rate of performance, for all is not possible. Given good teaching and
sufficient time and repetition, all pupils can master the simple fundamental skills and in varying degrees the more difficult and complex
operations.
(c) The atmosphere in which learning takes place is of vital importance.
Given understanding, encouragement, a reasoned hope of mastery and
pleasant compulsion, even the slow-learning pupil can make steady and
significant progress. From the apt and able student nothing but highest
possible performance should be accepted.
Without sacrificing other values, principals and teachers are bending every effort
toward mastery of the fundamental skills. report of superintendent p 29
Revisions and Course Changes
Curriculum development is concerned essentially with improving the quality of
education which each child receives. As such, the curriculum is under continuous
appraisal and revision.   During the year the following revisions were completed:—
English.—Two courses were developed for Grade XII to complete the revision
of senior high school English.   A tentative course for Grade VII initiated
the revision of junior high school English.
Social Studies.—Revised courses in geography, economics, and law were issued
for senior high school students.
Science.—Revisions were completed in the advanced elective courses in chemistry and physics.
Music.—A revised course in music for Grades I to III was issued as the first
in a series of revisions in the school music programme.
Grade XIII.—New courses were developed in French, German, Latin, Spanish,
and mathematics.
In connection with the courses now comprising the secondary-school curriculum,
it is not expected that any school in the Province will offer all courses listed.   Schools
should offer those courses which best meet pupil and community needs and for which
adequate staff and facilities are available.
New Text-book Adoptions
As part of the process of keeping the curriculum efficient and up to date, it is
necessary that prescribed text-books should be subject to regular examination and
appraisal. If changes in text-books are deemed advisable, the following steps are
taken:—
(1) All Canadian publishers are notified and are asked to submit texts for
consideration.
(2) A text-book appraisal and selection committee is formed, whose membership includes outstanding teachers and University professors.
(3) A careful examination is made of each text submitted, and one or more
are recommended on the basis of the results of standard evaluation
procedures.
(4) In the process of examining texts, particular consideration is given to
those written and published in Canada, and every encouragement is given
to the submission of manuscripts by Canadian authors.
(5) Where no purely Canadian text can be found to meet the requirements,
steps may be taken to secure a Canadian edition of the best of the British
or American texts submitted. This edition is made by Canadian authors
and is published in Canada and, where possible, in British Columbia.
The few exceptions to this are chiefly the texts for those subjects in which
the small enrolment makes it financially impossible to secure a Canadian
publication.
The following texts or new editions were prescribed for the year under review:—
English:—
Beckoning Trails, for English 7.
Using Our Language, for English 7.
Essays of Yesterday and Today, for English 40.
Shakespeare:   Romeo and Juliet, for English 40.
Argosy to Adventure, for English 41.
Applied English, for English 93. P 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Social Studies:—
Canadian Social Studies Atlas, for Social Studies 30 and Geography 91.
The World, for Geography 91.
Our Economic Life, for Economics 92.
Canadian Law, for Law 93.
British Columbia Acts, for Law 93.
Mathematics:  Basic Algebra, for Mathematics 100.
Science:—
Modern Chemistry, for Chemistry 91.
High School Physics, for Physics 91.
Workbook and Laboratory Manual, for Physics 91.
Languages:—
A Simpler French Course, for French 110.
Vingt et un Contes, for French 110.
Die verschwundene miniatur, for German 110.
Pole Poppenspaler, for German 110.
A Book of German Verse, for German 110.
German in Review, for German 110.
Introduction to Greek, for Greek 90.
Latin Fundamentals, for Latin 110.
The Book of the Ancient Romans, for Latin 110.
Spanish Review Grammar, for Spanish 110.
Historias de don Quijote, for Spanish 110.
Nuestra Natacha, for Spanish 110.
Amada Nervo, sus majores cuentos, for Spanish 110.
Commerce:—
Pitman Shorthand Dictation and Transcription, for Shorthand 31, Secretarial Practice 92 and 93.
20th Century Bookkeeping and Accounting, for Bookkeeping 91.
Comptometer Course for Business Training, for Business Machine Practice 39.
Monroe School Manual of Instruction, for Business Machine Practice 39.
Key Driven Calculator Course, for Business Machine Practice 39.
Drama:  Stage and School, for Drama 10, 20, and 30.
RETIREMENTS
At the conclusion of the school-year the Department lost by retirement its Deputy
Minister and Superintendent of Education, Dr. F. T. Fairey, who joined the Department
in 1938 and assumed the position of Deputy Minister in 1945.
Dr. Fairey made a significant contribution to education during his term of office,
and many important changes and advances were made. Principal among these was the
huge task of implementing the Cameron Report, whereby the number of school districts
in the Province was reduced from 650 to 75.
During the year Mr. Ray G. Williston, B.A., Inspector of Schools at Prince George,
resigned, and was elected to the Provincial Legislature.
The following valued officials of the Department also severed their connection with
it in order to accept other employment: Miss C. G. Furneaux, Mrs. M. A. Scace, Mr.
W. F. Marr, Mr. G. Blair, and Mr. R. J. Phillips. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
P 31
APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS
The following appointments and promotions have been made during the year:—■
To be Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education:   Mr. H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
To be Assistant Deputy:  Mr. J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed.
To be Inspectors of Schools:   Miss Daisy de Jong (Home Economics); Dr.
Dennis Smith, Nelson Inspectorate;  and Mr. Arthur Jones, Abbotsford
Inspectorate.
To Vancouver Normal School:   Miss F. J. Burnham, Miss K. L. Meredith,
and Mr. W. H. Auld.
To other official positions:   Mr. L. J. Wallace, Director, Community Programmes; Mr. P. E. Wilkinson, Assistant Registrar; Mr. J. Ross Hind,
Assistant Registrar;  Mr. J. H. Wilson, Supervisor, School Plans;   and
Mr. J. K. Taylor, Departmental Administration.
The success of a Department of Education depends in very great measure on the
assistance and co-operation received from many sources.    These include members of
the Legislature, Municipal Councils, the School Trustees, the Parent-Teacher Associations, the University staff, the school staffs, and the officials of the Department of Education and of other departments of government.   All of these and many others have
contributed " beyond the call of duty," and the Department of Education is most grateful.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. L. CAMPBELL,
Superintendent of Education. P 32
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver
REPORT OF F. C. BOYES, M.A., PRINCIPAL
The fifty-second session of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, began on September 8th, 1952, and ended on June 19th, 1953. Enrolment and results are indicated
in the following table:—
Men
Women
Total
Enrolled    _	
120
102
286
271
406
373
These figures show an over-all increase of some 18 per cent. The increase in men
students was 9 per cent, in women students 22 per cent. In view of the decrease in
enrolment the previous year, it was difficult to estimate correctly. The great and unexpected increase strained all of our facilities to the breaking-point. The ratio of staff to
students was out of line with the accepted ratio for such institutions. Our library,
auditorium, and cafeteria were badly congested. The supervision load carried by staff
members during the practice teaching periods was too heavy. In spite of these handicaps,
a great deal of good work was accomplished and a fine group of young people took the
inconveniences with rare good humour.
The following students were granted distinction standing: George Cuthbert John
Barwis, Edith Catherine Carter, Barbara Elizabeth Corbett, June Inez Cruickshank,
Sister Mary Immaculata, Barbara Ann Hall, Donald Joplin, Mrs. Geraldine Madge
McGill, Francis Edward McPhalen, Merrill Horace Edmund Muttart, Doreen Nettleton,
Shirley Joan Pike, Mrs. Gladys May Whitlam Pound, Mrs. Sheila Doreen Thompson,
and James Alexander Waldie. The special award from the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation was divided this year between Barbara Corbett and Francis McPhalen. The
staff was unable to choose between them, and the executive of the Federation kindly
consented to divide the award and strike a second medal.
The range in the academic standing of the students remained much the same as in
the previous year. Sixteen students had university degrees, while 112 had University
Entrance standing. Thirty-five students had completed two or three years of university
work. One hundred students had full Senior Matriculation standing and thirty-one had
full First Year standing. One hundred and one students had partial Senior Matriculation or First Year standing. Seven students were graduates of the Vancouver Art School
and four had degrees in music.
Members of this staff would like to urge high-school principals and counsellors to
encourage their students to complete their Senior Matriculation or First Year work
before attending Normal School. That extra year of work is worth a great deal when
the time comes to face a class.
Once more it is a pleasure to say how much we appreciate the contribution to our
training programme, which is made so efficiently and pleasantly by so many officials and
teachers. The principals and staffs of the Model and Simon Fraser Schools bear a heavy
burden in this regard. Their work in the field of fall participation and in the presentation of demonstration lessons for our students is excellent. The attitude of Mr. H. N.
MacCorkindale, his assistants, and the principals and staffs of the Vancouver schools
toward our work is most commendable.    This same situation pertains in the cases of PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
P 33
Mr. R. S. Shields and his New Westminster staff, Messrs. C. G. Brown and C. J.
Fredrickson in Burnaby, and Mr. William Gray, of North Vancouver. During the past
few years more and more Inspectors have offered their schools for practice-teaching.
All have given fully of their time to assist in the work of teacher-training. We are
happy to acknowledge the value of their efforts in this regard.
During the year we had the privilege of hearing talks by officials of various branches
of the Government and of teachers' groups. One of the most valuable contributions was
made by a panel of School Inspectors chaired by Inspector C. J. Fredrickson. The
students were enthusiastic in their response to this discussion. The staff of the Normal
School would like these men to know that we, too, appreciated their efforts.
The Provincial Model School continues its most interesting and useful role. Miss
Manning, Mrs. Sinclair, and Miss Grier are real assets to our young teachers. Their
students are a credit to them. This year, two of our distinction graduates were once
pupils of Miss Manning. Work habits learned in that situation have enabled these
girls to excel in any field in which they engage.
The Metropolitan Health Committee looked after the health needs of the students
in the usual effective and efficient manner. Both staff and students recognize the value
of the contribution made by this group, and we are happy to extend to its members our
sincere appreciation for their work.
Staff changes became necessary during the year because of the retirement of two of
our members and of the granting of one year's leave of absence to a third. Mr. T. R.
Hall was superannuated as of June 30th, 1952, and Mr. F. C. Boyes was appointed to
carry on as principal. Miss Faye Burnham resigned to be married, and Miss Kay
Meredith was appointed as instructress in Physical Education. Her work is of a high
order. Dr. H. H. Grantham was granted one year's leave of absence to carry on work
with U.N.E.S.C.O. in Indonesia. The City of Vancouver loaned us Mr. Norval Brown
to carry on in his place. His work was excellent, and I would like to see him become
a regular member of this staff. Mr. Wilfred Auld was appointed as instructor in Social
Studies. We were most fortunate to secure him. Mr. Enoch Broome was appointed
acting vice-principal.   I cannot speak too highly of his work in that capacity.
In closing, I would like to express my sincere thanks to the officials and staff
members of the Department of Education and of the Department of Public Works.
I have always met with the highest degree of co-operation in my dealing with all of
them. Perhaps I might be allowed to say a special " thank you " to Mr. Evans, the
Registrar, who works tirelessly to help us with our many problems.
Provincial Normal School, Victoria
REPORT OF H. O. ENGLISH, B.A., B.S.A., PRINCIPAL
The thirty-ninth session of the Provincial Normal School at Victoria began on September 8th, 1952, and ended on June 19th, 1953. Enrolment and results are shown in
the table which follows:—
Men
Women
Total
49
44
3
2
158
149
7
2
207
193
10
Incomplete	
4 P 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1952-53
Honour Standing and Awards
Four students graduated with honour standing, namely: Betty Ann Carstens, Courtenay; Bonita Evans, Duncan; Marguerite Mawer, B.A., Victoria; and Else Nyffeler,
Oyama.
The Denton Memorial Award for outstanding achievement and leadership was won
by Marguerite Mawer.
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation medal and prize for scholarship and
teaching ability was awarded to Betty Ann Carstens.
Our Programme
The time (in hours) allotted to each course, not including organized extra-curricular
activities, was as follows: Introduction to Teaching, 30; Educational Psychology, 30;
School Organization and Accounting (including School Law and Reports), 30; English,
75; Speech and Drama, 30; Health and Physical Education, 75; Social Studies, 55;
Science, 45; Arithmetic, 30; Music, 45; Art, 45; Primary Methods, 30; Primary
Printing, Penmanship, and Blackboard Writing, 15; Visual Education, 15; Library
Management, 15; Library Use, 60; Assemblies, 40; Special Lectures, 10; Observation
and Practice Teaching, 232. All these courses are required; no optional courses are
offered.
Observation and Practice-teaching
During the year each student was given an opportunity to observe the work of
children and the techniques employed by classroom teachers in at least ten different
schools. In each instance approximately six students were assigned to a specific classroom and remained in that situation for at least one-half day.
For teaching experience, the school continued the practice used in former years,
assigning students to classrooms for teaching experience at three different times; namely,
two weeks near the end of November, two weeks at the end of February, and four
weeks following the Easter holiday. In November, and again in February, two students
worked as a team in each classroom. For the final practicum, only one student was
assigned to each classroom. In almost every instance the students were given complete
charge of the classrooms for the entire practicum. As far as possible during the year
each student-teacher was given an opportunity to gain experience in both urban and
rural classrooms. Altogether, for observation and practice-teaching, we used a total of
403 classrooms in 123 schools.
The co-operation of School Inspectors, principals, and teachers in the placement
and sympathetic guidance of our students was appreciated, for without their co-operation this part of our training programme would not be effective.
Health Services
Dr. J. L. Gayton, Medical Health Officer, gave all students a thorough examination early in the fall term, so that necessary attention could be given and Physical Education exemptions and modifications determined. During the year there were scores of
consultations on health matters. In several instances, students were referred to Victoria
doctors for treatment. As usual, the immunity record of each student in relation to
smallpox, diphtheria, etc., was ascertained early in the year and preventive inoculations
offered.   Most of the students accepted this service;  all were X-rayed at the TB. clinic.
As in recent years, Dr. Gayton made arrangements for a series of lectures that
would bring first-hand information to the students from authorities actually working in
the field of public health. The speakers and their subjects were as follows: Dr. A. N.
Beattie, " School Medical, Nursing, and Sanitation Services "; Dr. J. L. Gayton, " Communicable Diseases  and Immunization"  and  " Tuberculosis";   Dr.  A.  B.  Sinclair, PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
P 35
" Venereal Diseases "; and Mr. R. H. Goodacre, " Provincial Health Services and
Health Material."
During the year Miss Helen McAleese, of the Saanich and South Vancouver Island
Health Unit staff, visited the school regularly for supervision and consultations, and to
assist with medical examinations and inoculations.
Faculty and students alike appreciate the excellent services rendered to this school
by Dr. Gayton and Miss McAleese. We extend to them and to the Department of
Health and Welfare, which authorizes this service, our sincere thanks.
Again, as for several years past, the St. John Ambulance Association provided an
evening course in first aid. One hundred and eighty-four students completed the course
successfully and were awarded certificates.
In conclusion, it should be noted that although the number of candidates seeking
admission to the teaching profession is inadequate, there appears to be gradual improvement in the personality and scholarship qualifications of those registering for the training programme. Also, that a very high percentage of those graduating from this school,
including those who possessed only University Entrance standing on admission, have
demonstrated their ability to adapt themselves to the demands of our profession and to
render satisfactory service in our public schools. P 36
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
REPORT OF F. HENRY JOHNSON, M.A., D.P_ed., DIRECTOR
At the fortieth session of the Department's Summer School of Education, July 2nd
to August 5th, 1953, the enrolment reached a new high of 1,711 teachers. This was an
increase of 6 per cent over last year's previous record of 1,608. In attendance, this is
possibly the largest Summer School of Education in Canada. Out-of-Province addresses
were given by fifty-eight teachers, but it is probable that this represents fewer than the
actual number of teachers attending from other Provinces, as many of them may have
recently established residence in this Province.
The faculty was increased this year to sixty-six, of whom thirteen were visiting lecturers, chiefly from other Canadian Provinces. It was necessary to accommodate the
Industrial Arts Section, which in the past has met in Vancouver, at Victoria in the F. T.
Fairey Vocational Technical Building due to building alterations at the Vancouver
Technical School. In Victoria, seventy-two courses were offered and an additional
twenty-six courses in the Industrial Arts Section. At Vancouver, the Commercial Section,
located on the campus of the University of British Columbia, offered six courses.
Again, as last year, over half (55 per cent) of the teachers attending were working
for higher certificates beyond that of the Elementary Basic. This fact and the record
enrolment would seem to be indicative of a general interest among British Columbia
teachers in improving the status of their profession.
Due to the large enrolment, there were the usual problems of accommodation. To
the faculty and to the teachers in attendance, I am grateful for their cheerful co-operation
under these difficulties. For the improvement in our library facilities, grateful acknowledgment is due to the librarians of the Victoria and Vancouver Normal Schools, the Public
Library Commission, the University of British Columbia, and the Victoria City Library.
Courses and Enrolment (Summer Session Only)
Figures for the numbers of courses offered, numbers of instructors, and total enrolment for the past five years are shown in the table below:—
Courses
Instructors
Enrolment
72
26
6
53
9
4
1,561
86
Vancouver Section, 1953 -    	
64
Totals for 1953       _	
104
100
88
91
85
66
61
56
48
52
1,711
1,608
1,465
Totals for 1952          	
Totals for 1951       _ _ _	
Totals for 1950      -	
1,462
Totals for 1949              	
1,308
Courses Offered
Victoria Section
Philosophy, Methodology, and Administration of Education: Enrolment
1.    Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  131
9b. Visual Education Workshop (Construction)      30
11.    Principles of Visual Education     52
14.    The Curriculum:  Its Objectives and Procedures     77
50.    Classroom Organization and Management  154
52.    School Organization and Administration in British Columbia      62
63.    Introduction to Educational Supervision     58
104x. Workshop in Educational Leadership     13 summer school of education
P 37
Psychology of Education:
110.    Educational Psychology  82
115.    Psychology of Adolescence  118
126.    Adjusting School Work to Individual Differences  113
150.    Growth and Development of Children  152
155.    Principles of Guidance in the Personality Adjustment of
School Children  116
159.    Mental Hygiene  95
Kindergarten-Primary Education:
440a. School Music in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  145
543.    Physical Education in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades 57
584. Art Education for the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  60
585. Evaluation of Current Practices in Kindergarten-Primary
Grades   122
590.    Principles and Practices of Primary Education  128
592. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  148
593. Reading in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  134
596. Language and Literature in the Kindergarten-Primary
Grades   139
597. Arithmetic in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  146
Intermediate Grades Education:
32.    Intermediate Observation and Laboratory Class  87
35.    Activity or Enterprise in the Elementary School  61
200.    Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades  148
212.    Creative Writing  32
214.    Classroom Dramatization and Creative Dramatics  46
216.    Speech Arts   52
261.    Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades  114
277.    The Teaching of Elementary Science  88
357.    Art Education in the Elementary School  52
440b. School Music—Intermediate Grades  88
520.    Physical Education for the Elementary Classroom
Teacher  47
Secondary Grades Education:
100.    Philosophy and Methods of Secondary Education  52
346.    Modern Canada  60
441.    Music Education in the Secondary School  8
801.    Workshop in Effective Living  10
Art:
356.    Twentieth Century Art  35
365.    Modelling and Sculpture   37
367.    Design III  7
371.    Picture-making  59
382.    Design I  48
384. Art Criticism I  52
385. Print-making  52
392.    Design II  18
397.    Drawing and Painting III  27 P 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Music:
446.    Choral Music and Conducting II  19
448c Instrumental Ensemble—Brass  14
456. Introductory Music Appreciation  27
457. Instrumental Music I  47
465.    Advanced Choral Literature and Conducting  33
469.    Summer School Chorus  199
Library Service:
409.    Orientation to School Library Work  29
412.    Children's Literature  18
414.    Book Selection .  24
Guidance and Counselling:
190x. Counsellors' Conference   16
193.    Occupational Information Techniques  28
Physical Education:
P.E. 201.    Gymnastics (for Women)  14
P.E. 211.    Team Games I (for Women)   15
P.E. 219.    Minor Games (for Men and Women)   13
P.E. 231.    Aquatics (for Men and Women)   28
P.E. 240.    Dance (for Men and Women)   32
P.E. 241.    Dance (for Women)   17
P.E. 406.    Workshop in Elementary and Junior High School
Physical Education Curriculum  33
Home Economics:
650a. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  14
650b. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  38
651.    Problems in Home Economics Education  28
Typewriting:
604.    Practical Typewriting  40
Senior Matriculation:
213.    Senior Matriculation English  150
313.    Senior Matriculation World History -  93
316.    Senior Matriculation Canadian History  118
Industrial Arts Education:
220.    Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School   3
223. Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  4
224. Freehand Sketching Applied to the Industrial Arts  1
225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  1
227. Elementary Woodwork  9
228. Elementary Wood-turning _.  4
229a. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)   6
229b. Farm Mechanics (Electricity)   9
229c Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)   8
231. Elementary Electrical Theory  9
232. Elementary Electrical Shopwork  9
234. Art Metalwork  7
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  6
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work  11 summer school of education
P 39
Industrial Arts Education—Continued
238.    Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School   12
241. Practical Geometry       9
242. Freehand Sketching  15
243. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  20
245. Advanced Woodwork (Benchwork)        9
246. Advanced Wood-turning   18
247. Practice in the Use of Woodworking Machinery;  Care
and Maintenance  11
248a. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)   19
248b. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)        5
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work  17
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  20
255.    Auto Mechanics (for Farm Mechanics, Vocational
Teacher-training)    13
Vancouver Section
Commercial Education:
623. Typewriting (Teaching Methods)   33
625. Elementary Bookkeeping (Teaching Procedure)   22
629. Correspondence and Filing  18
630. Commercial Arithmetic   16
633. Office Routine, Business Forms, and Secretarial Practice 22
634. Workshop in Commercial Education  49
Student Courses1
Total in 1953
5,150
Total in 1952  5,776
Total in 1951   4,104
Total in 1950  4,443
Total in 1949  3,649
1 These figures are totals of all course enrolments.
Registration
Table I.—Teaching Experience of Those Registered
13 or more years  297
10 to 12 years  92
7 to 9 years  101
4 to 6 years  215
1 to 3 years	
Less than 1 year..
Unreported 	
Total..
871
94
41
1,711
Table II.—Type of School in Which Teachers Taught in 1952-53
More than 10 rooms
7 to 10 rooms	
4 to 6 rooms	
3 rooms	
726
189
251
74
2 rooms  131
1 room  141
Unreported or did not
teach this year  199 P 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Table III.—Grades Taught by Teachers Enrolled
Grade XIII     15 Grade V  366
Grade XII  226 Grade IV  409
Grade XI  240 Grade III  420
Grade X  247 Grade II  454
Grade IX  296 Grade I  446
Grade VIII  354 Kindergarten     10
Grade VII  349 Special classes     27
Grade VI  310 Unreported   155
Table IV.—Advanced Certificates Sought
Primary  288                 Industrial Arts     86
Intermediate   138                Physical Education     53
Art   90                Counsellor h     27
Commercial   64                SA. (Instructor)      31
Music  67                Handicapped        6
Library   38                Not specified       6
Home Economics   51                                                        	
Total  945
Faculty
Abercrombie, W. T., B.A., Principal, Fairview High School of Commerce, Vancouver.
Bancroft, Miss June-Diane E., B.P.E., Instructor in Physical Education, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver.
Brown, Mrs. May, B.Sc. (P.E.), Lecturer, School of Physical Education, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver,
de Bruyn, J., M.A., Instructor, Department of English, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver.
Cameron, Mrs. Gloria, R.N., B.Sc, City Health Nurse, Victoria.
Carruthers, Miss Bertha Muriel, B.A., Librarian in Charge of Elementary School Libraries, Vancouver.
Conner, Miss Florence, B.A.Mus., Music Specialist, Vancouver Schools.
Crabtree, Miss Joyce, B.Sc.(H.Ec), B.Ed., Home Economics Instructor, Vancouver
Technical School, Vancouver.
Ferguson, Miss Nancy, B.A., Physical Education Instructor, Central Junior High School,
Victoria.
Furneaux, Miss Catherine G., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Inspector of Home Economics, Department
of Education, Victoria.
Gibson, W. S., Machine-shop Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Gower, F., Electrical Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Graham, Colin D., B.A., M.A., Curator of the Victoria Arts Centre, Victoria.
Grant, George, B.A., M.Sc.(P.E.), Supervisor of Physical Education, Greater Victoria
Schools, Victoria.
Hagen, C. Larry, S.B., Instructor, Department of Psychology, University of Utah, Salt
Lake City.
Hammerl, Miss Melva L., M.A., Supervising Teacher in Art, Roosevelt School, Detroit,
Mich.
Hanson, Mrs. Elva P., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Cowichan High
School, Duncan.
Hardie, William Leslie, M.A., Head of English Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria. summer school of education
P 41
Heywood, Robert H., B.A., Head of Commercial Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Hutchinson, H. F., Industrial Arts Instructor, Trail High School, Trail.
Irvine, Miss Jean R., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
James, Miss Marian D., Primary Specialist, Supervisor of Kindergarten and Primary
Grades, Greater Victoria Schools, Victoria.
Jarvis, Donald A., Dip., V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Johns, Harold P., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance,
Department of Education, Victoria.
Johnson, Heber D., M.A., Principal, Ballard High School, Seattle, Wash.
Kaasa, W. H., B.Ed., Drama Director, Victoria Composite High School, Edmonton, Alta.
Kelly, Eric, M.A., Instructor in Social Studies, John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Kurth, Burton, Chief Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Lane, Edwin I., B.A., Art Instructor, West Vancouver Junior-Senior High School, West
Vancouver.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Levirs, Franklin P., M.A., M.S.(Ed.), Inspector of Schools, Cranbrook.
Lidstone, John, B.Sc, Supervisor of Art and Manual Arts, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Love, Miss E. M. Yvonne, B.Sc(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Gladstone Junior-
Senior High School, Vancouver.
Mahaffy, Miss C. Elizabeth, M.D., L.M.C.C, Assistant Medical Health Officer, School
Medical Officer, Victoria.
Martin, Miss May, Vice-Principal and Librarian, Tecumseh School, Vancouver.
Merrick, Charles J., Draughting Instructor, Gladstone Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
McDougall, William Dewar, M.A., Ed.D., Professor of Education and Chairman of the
Division of Elementary Education, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta,
Edmonton, Alta.
MacKenzie, Russell K, M.A., Mental Health Co-ordinator, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
McLagan, R. Moir, B.A., B.Pasd., Head of Effective Living Department, Victoria High
School, Victoria.
MacLeod, Clare R., B.A., B.Pced., Assistant Superintendent and Public School Inspector,
Board of Education, Windsor, Ont.
Norton, Miss Miriam, M.A., Instructor in English, Provincial Normal School, Winnipeg,
Man.
O'Donnell, Harold C, B.A., B.Ed., Principal, Tolmie Elementary School, Victoria.
Ozard, Elmore G., B.A., Art Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Perry, Raymond C, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, Calif.
Plenderleith, William A., M.A., D.Pced., Inspector of Schools, Department of Education,
Victoria.
Pollock, J. R., B.A.Sc, Director of Visual Education, Department of Education, Vancouver.
Pritchard, Vaughan G., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Quayle, T., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Vancouver.
Rickard, Victor E., Vocational Instructor, Como Lake High School, Coquitlam.
Robson, C. W. Sherwood, Music Specialist, John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Rogers, Miss Bertha, B.Sc, M.A., Director of Home Economics, Department of Education, Victoria.
Roy, Miss Elsie, Kindergarten-Primary Supervisor, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver. P 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Shadbolt, J. L., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Slind, Lloyd H., L.R.S.M., B.Sc, B.Mus.Ed., Professor of Music Education, Florida
State University, Tallahassee, Fla.
Smith, D., Industrial Arts Instructor, North Vancouver High School, Vancouver.
Smith, Henry Lawson, M.A., Principal, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Smith, J., Auto Mechanics Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Stark, R. T., Sheet-metal Work Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Steinson, S. W., M.A., D.Ed., Instructor in Psychology, Saskatoon Normal School,
Saskatoon, Sask.
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Victoria.
Swainson, Neil A., B.A., Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Toder, Mrs. Dorothy M., Primary Specialist, Teacher-in-Charge, Spring Ridge School,
Victoria.
Wallace, Lawrence J., B.A., M.Ed., Counsellor and Director of Co-curricular Activities,
Victoria High School, Victoria.
Watson, Stanley A., B.A., Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education and Curriculum Co-ordinator, Department of Education, Toronto, Ont.
Yerian, Theo, Ph. D., Head of Departments of Secretarial Science and Business Education, Oregon State College, Corvallis, Ore.
Zeran, Franklin R., Ph.D., Dean, School of Education and Director of Summer Sessions,
Oregon State College, Corvallis, Ore.
Student Activity Society
Auditing dates do not permit the inclusion here of 1953 accounts. The following
statement is of the accounts of the preceding or 1952 session, as audited by Ismay, Bois-
ton, Dunn & Co., chartered accountants.
Receipts
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $3,166.00
Additional income (cash receipts, cafeteria, etc.)        985.90
Total  $4,151.90
Disbursements
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $2,847.65
Social affairs, dances, picnics, entertainment  574.86
Service charges and incidentals  294.15
Total  $3,716.66
Excess of receipts over disbursements      $435.24
Disbursements re Cafeteria Fund        500.00
Excess of disbursements over receipts for the year        $64.76
Funds on hand, December 31st, 1952 (after deducting
excess of disbursements as above)  $1,106.32
Winter In-service Courses
During the past three years there has been an increasing demand among teachers for
in-service courses in teacher-education to be given during the fall to spring session in summer school of education
P 43
various urban centres. In the year 1952-53, forty-five courses were offered in twelve
centres; that is, Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo, Maple Ridge, Mission, Langley, Abbotsford, Trail, Kimberley, Nelson, University of British Columbia School of Commerce, and
the School for the Deaf and the Blind. These courses enrolled 609 teachers, an increase
of 297 over last year's enrolment.
Winter In-service Courses
Year
Number of
Courses
Number of
Centres
Enrolment
1952-53     _  	
1951-52  __._      	
45
23
24
12
6
6
609
312
1950-51  _   _	
246 P 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Intermediate demonstration class.
Class in woodworking (Technical and Vocational Section). summer school of education
P 45
Class in print-making (Course 385).
Professor Slind's class in instrumental music (Course 448c). P 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1952-53
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL
AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
This report covers the work of the following for the school-year 1952-53:—
(a) Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b) Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in
junior and senior high schools.
(c) Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—" A," Woodwork and
Draughting, and "B," Metalwork and Draughting — for University
Entrance.
(d) Vancouver Technical School.
(e) Vancouver School of Art.
(/)   Night-schools.
(g) Teacher-training.
(h)  Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
(/)   Vancouver Vocational Institute.
Industrial Arts
Junior High Schools
(Report prepared by C. J. Strong, M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes.)
The work carried on in Industrial Arts centres throughout British Columbia during
the past school-year, 1952-53, can be considered to be up to previous standards. The
continued increase in the number of centres, instructors, and students has made the
work of inspection increasingly necessary. The appointment of Mr. Thomas A. Quayle
in September, 1952, as Inspector of Technical Classes has made it possible to share the
work and to carry out more detailed inspections when necessary. It was possible to
spend more time in helping beginning teachers and others requiring assistance in interpreting the curriculum, raising the standard of instruction, and quality of students' work.
Although there was no increase in the number of school districts providing facilities for
instruction in Industrial Arts, twenty-five instructors were added to our staff.
There are sixty-one school districts in which Industrial Arts is established, these
being Abbotsford, Agassiz, Alberni, Armstrong, Ashcroft, Burnaby, Campbell River,
Chilliwack, Castlegar, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta,
Fernie, Fraser Canyon, Grand Forks, Kamloops, Kelowna, Keremeos, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Lake Cowichan, Langley, Lillooet, Maple Ridge, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson,
New Westminster, North Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Peace River South, Peace River
North, Penticton, Powell River, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Qualicum,
Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Saltspring, Sechelt, Smithers,
Sooke, Southern Okanagan, Surrey, Summerland, Trail, University Hill, Vancouver,
Vernon, Greater Victoria, West Vancouver, and Williams Lake.
Senior High Schools
Industrial Arts courses in senior high schools continue to show an increased enrolment. The revised programme of studies, used for the first time during the past school-
year, has met with general approval. The General Shop Courses 24, 34, and 94 have
lived up to our expectations, and this coming school-year should see more schools
adopting these courses in their programme. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION P 47
Industrial Arts Option for University Entrance
During the past year a great deal of work has been done in preparing a new
course which will be known as Technical Science. This course is a challenge to students of good ability, with mechanical aptitude, and scientific interest who may wish to
proceed to more advanced training in university or industry on graduation from high
school. Several high schools are offering this course for the first time in this coming
school-year, 1953-54.
The total number of pupils participating is as follows:—
Junior high schools   15,611
Junior-senior high schools      6,966
Total  22,577
Industrial Arts
(Report prepared by T. A. Quayle, Inspector of Technical Classes.)
During the first part of the year's work it was my privilege and pleasure to visit
practically all of the Industrial Arts centres in the Province. I was very much impressed
on this visit with the great expansion and the high standard of facilities provided to
teach Industrial Arts.
During the second part of the year's work, on my visits to centres assigned to me
for inspection, I was able to observe more closely the standard of work being done.
While there will undoubtedly always be room for improvement, standards on the whole
were good, indicating very satisfactory progress in this department.
It is pleasant to note the courtesy and co-operation extended by local Inspectors
of Schools and School Board officials on visits to the various districts.
Vancouver Technical School
The following report has been prepared by Mr. E. M. White, B.A.Sc, principal
of the Vancouver Technical School:—
" The past year has seen the preparation and finalizing of plans for the new junior
high school wing and alterations to the Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and Physical
Education Departments. The plans have been most carefully and expertly prepared by
Mr. E. King and his architectural staff at the Vancouver School Board, and we are
looking forward to the added facilities with tremendous anticipation.
" Many of our disabilities in our existing building will have been remedied, and the
introduction of the junior high school will make us much more of a composite high
school, with a very definite technical and commercial bias in the last two years of
high-school work. It will also give us a better cross-section of our community.
A fuller academic programme will also be provided for those students wishing to proceed to the University. However, our technical and commercial bias will not be lost
sight of, but rather enlarged upon.
" The same high demand for our graduates prevails, and practically all our Grade
XII students were placed before the end of June.
" There was a total enrolment of 1,047 students at the school during the year
1952-53."
Vancouver School of Art
The Vancouver School of Art 1952-53 session has proved the value of the
improved accommodation, which has reflected itself in the quality and quantity of the
work accomplished. Both staff and students have greatly appreciated the practicability
and beauty of their surroundings. P 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Completion of the facade design and the installation of metal doors has given
a sense of completion to the building.
The especially built mural walls proved very useful in the painting of the scenery
for the Beaux Arts Ball. This affair, held in conjunction with the Women's Auxiliary
of the Vancouver Art Gallery, reflected a great deal of credit upon the committees and
students participating.   This ball is a fine contribution to the pageantry of the city.
Graphic Arts students held successful exhibitions in the Vancouver Art Gallery and
the Victoria Gallery and exhibited with distinction in two national print shows in
Toronto.
The school exhibit held at the Vancouver Art Gallery was the attraction of a great
deal of favourable notice from the press and the public.
Mr. Yasukawa, Consul for Japan, and Mrs. Yasukawa very kindly gave an illustrated lecture to the students on the culture of Japan. Mr. Yasukawa's donation to the
library of two fine books was greatly appreciated.
Book donations have also been received from the French Embassy, the American
Consulate, the Belgian Consulate, and from the Students' Council.
In competition with all art schools and universities of Canada, two students of the
school, Mr. Startup and Mr. Mayrs, won both first and second prizes respectively. As
Mr. Startup won an additional award, this meant that the School of Art won the
majority of awards in this Toronto competition. This competition, which was started
four years ago, has been won three times by students of the school, and twice they have
been second.
Students designed for the School Board the Coronation booklet and the graduation
certificates.
We are glad to report that student placement continues to be high. Mr. Startup,
received two attractive offers while in Toronto.
Staff members have been active in the art world. Mr. J. L. Shadbolt has completed a mural painting for the lobby of the Alcazar Hotel and a mural for the entrance
hall of the Cockfield-Brown Advertising Agency, as well as designing a very successful
set for the Ballet Festival.   Mr. Shadbolt also held a one-man show at the Art Gallery.
Mr. P. Aspell was honoured by having a canvas purchased by the National Gallery
at Ottawa.
Mr. Lionel Thomas has been appointed as a judge for the Canadian National Art
Exhibition at Toronto.
Staff members have exhibited in painting and ceramics with distinction in Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle, Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa, and were also well represented in
the touring Canadian Art Show.
The staff has active representation in the Federation of Canadian Artists, the Community Arts Council, the British Columbia Industrial Arts Council, the British Columbia Fine Arts, and in both the Exhibition Committee and the Purchase and Acceptance
Committee of the Vancouver Art Gallery.
Night-schools
Classes in night-schools operated by the local School Boards continue to increase
because of public demand.   The enrolment during the year 1952-53 was as follows:—
Students
Vocational      4,996
Non-vocational   12,799
Apprenticeship classes      1,523
Total  19,318 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
P 49
Training of Industrial Arts and Vocational Teachers
Mr. Dalgleish is in charge of this unit at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, working under the direction of the Department of Education, who share on a 50-50 basis
the full cost of the training with the Federal Department of Labour.
Tradesmen with a good education are selected for training for a period of one
year. The trainees have to support themselves, but the training given is free. The men
who have been trained in the last few years have done very good work as teachers and
continue their training at Summer School until they qualify for the final certificate. The
enrolment during the past year was as follows:— students
Part-time courses      77
Full-time courses      14
Summer School     86
Total  177
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement
Under the above agreement, Vocational courses are offered in day and night
schools in three areas of training: (a) Industrial, (b) Commercial, and (c) Agriculture. Extra grants are paid to School Boards who offer such courses. The cost is
shared equally between the Provincial and Federal Governments. For the year 1952-53
the enrolment was as follows: —
Number of
Pupils
Number of Teachers
Part Time
Full Time
5,378
4,905
91
236
53
180
6
Totals	
10,374
236
239
Vancouver Vocational Institute
The Vancouver Vocational Institute is operated by the Vancouver Board of School
Trustees. All classes receive grants under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Schools'
Assistance Agreement.
During the past year there was a total enrolment of 1,767 students and a total of
22 subjects taught. r
P 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc(H.Ec), M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools     2,635
Junior high schools  14,598
In Grade VII     7,379
In Grade VIII     6,548
In Grade IX     3,306
17,233
17,233
School for the Deaf and the Blind  13
Senior high schools     7,554
High-school boys        260
Technical students  59
Private schools        358
Indian schools  60
418
In elementary grades (Grades VII and
VIII)        194
In high school (senior grades)        224
418
Total number of students taking Home Economics
Courses  25,218
There are 125 Home Economics centres in public schools, 5 in private schools, and
2 in Indian schools throughout the Province.                        centres Rooms
One-room centres     70 70
Two-room centres     42 84
Three-room centres      12 36
Four-room centres       5 20
Five-room centres       2 10
Six-room centres       1 6
Totals  132 226
New Home Economics centres were opened at:—
Fruitvale:  Fruitvale Elementary-Junior High School.
Lytton: Lytton Elementary-High School.
Qualicum:  Qualicum Beach Elementary-High School.
Saanich:  Royal Oak Junior-Senior High School.
Victoria:  John Stubbs Memorial School.
During the session 1952-1953, new school buildings with Home Economics centres
were opened at:—
Abbotsford:  Abbotsford Junior High School.
Cumberland:  Cumberland Junior-Senior High School. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS
P 51
Kamloops:  Kamloops Junior-Senior High School.
Mission:  Mission Junior-Senior High School.
Nanaimo:  Nanaimo High School.
Richmond: Richmond Senior High School.
Victoria:  Esquimalt High School and Oak Bay Junior High School.
Williams Lake:  Williams Lake Elementary-High School.
An additional Home Economics all-purpose room was equipped in the Langley
Junior-Senior High School.
There are 225 Home Economics teachers on the staffs of the schools in the Province,
showing an increase of 20 over the total for last year. Of these, 72 are graduates of the
School of Home Economics of the University of British Columbia.
Teacher-training courses, offered through the Summer Schools of the Province, were
continued. A total of 90 Home Economics teachers was enrolled. Courses offered were
as follows:—
Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics.
Problems in Home Economics Education.
Miss Catherine G. Furneaux, B.Sc(H.Ec);  Mrs. Elva P. Hanson, B.Sc(H.Ec);
Miss Jean Irvine, B.Sc(H.Ec);  and Miss B. Rogers, B.Sc(H.Ec), M.A.;  were the
instructors.    Miss E.  M.  Yvonne Love,  B.Sc(H.Ec),  with Miss Joyce Crabtree,
B.Sc(H.Ec), B.Ed., as her assistant, directed the work of the cafeteria.
In an effort to meet the increasing demand for Home Economics teachers, provision
was made for teachers with Permanent First Class or Academic Certificates to qualify
for Elementary Home Economics Certificates through three sessions at the Provincial
Summer School of Education in Victoria.
During September Miss Catherine G. Furneaux resigned her position as Inspector of
Home Economics and was married to Mr. Gordon T. Lough, of Edmonton, Alta.
Miss Daisy de Jong was appointed to succeed Miss Furneaux. Miss de Jong taught
Home Economics in Nanaimo, Duncan, Saanich, Prince George, and latterly at Magee
Senior High School in Vancouver. She served for two years in the Army Service Corps,
Foods Division, during the war. P 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A.,
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment
The most pressing problem confronting the Vancouver Board of School Trustees is
the provision of sufficient classroom accommodation. The following table will illustrate this.
Enrolment by Grades, September 30th, 1952, and Predicted Enrolment
by Grades, 1953-58
Birthrate
Index1
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
1952 _ _ _	
1.21
1.33
1.25
1.28
1.25
1.28
1.31
5,669
6,140
5,900
6,000
5,804
5,930
6,100
4,387
5,669
6,140
5,900
6,000
5,804
5,930
4,464
4,387
5,669
6,140
5,900
6,000
5,804
4,394
4,464
4,387
5,669
6,140
5,900
6,000
4,089
4,394
4.464
4,387
5,669
6,140
5.900
3,795
4,089
4.394
4,464
4,387
5,669
6 140
3,586
3,795
4,089
4,394
4,464
4,387
5,669
1953      —   -	
1954	
1955. _  _	
1956 - — _	
1957  _	
1958                             	
1
Grade
VIII
Grade
IX
Grade
X
Grade
XI
Grade
XII
Grade
XIII
Sp.
Total
1952                            	
3,273
3,586
3,795
4,089
4,394
4,464
4,387
3,075
3,207
3,516
3,419
4,007
4,306
4,375
2,637
2,716
2,782
3,050
3,226
3,475
3,735
1,941
1,939
2,077
2,127
2,331
2,467
2,657
1,512
1,400
1,432
1,534
1,571
1,722
1,822
162
150
150
150
150
150
150
1,303
1,325
1,300
1,320
1,300
1,320
1,350
44,287
47,261
50,095
52,643
55,343
57,734
60,019
1953                              	
1954	
1955  _	
1956	
1957	
1958 	
1 Birth-rate index is derived from the number of resident births six years prior to date in column 1 (1945=1.00).
School Buildings
The following buildings were completed in the school-year 1952-53:—
Southlands Elementary School: Eight standard classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.  Completion date, November 30th, 1952.
Cavell No. 2 Addition: Six standard classrooms, health service room, two
outside covered play-spaces, lunchroom. Completion date, October 31st,
1952.
Gladstone Secondary School (addition): Unit E—sixteen standard classrooms, five special classrooms, one auxiliary classroom, and auditorium;
Unit F—gymnasium; Unit G—cafeteria (addition to existing cafeteria);
Unit H—two shops.    Completion date, March 31st, 1953.
Carleton No. 2 Elementary School: Seven classrooms. Completion date,
February 20th, 1953.
Woodland Assembly-room-Lunchroom (addition): Assembly-room-lunchroom, kitchen, storage-rooms.    Completion date, March 31st, 1953.
Begbie Elementary School (addition): One classroom. Completion date,
September 2nd, 1952.
Douglas Elementary School (addition): Two classrooms. Completion date,
September 2nd, 1952. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER) P 53
Van Home Elementary School (addition): Three classrooms. Completion
date, September 2nd, 1952.
Portable Classrooms,   1952  (each unit consisting of one classroom, toilet-
rooms, and cloakrooms):   Two units, Renfrew; one unit, Hastings; two
units, Douglas;   one unit, Queen Elizabeth;   one unit, Lord Roberts.
Completion date, November 30th, 1952.
The following buildings were under construction in the school-year 1952-53:—
John Oliver High School (second addition): Eighteen standard classrooms,
four special classrooms (three General Science, one Art), four shops
(junior), five Home Economics rooms, auditorium, cafeteria and kitchen.
Maple Grove No. 1 Addition: Four standard classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
Lord Nelson No. 2 Elementary School:  Six classrooms.
Nightingale Gymnasium - Auditorium  (addition):   Gymnasium - auditorium,
dental clinic
Plans in the course of preparation are as follows:—
Technical School (addition): Sixteen standard classrooms, twelve special
rooms and shops, double gymnasium, cafeteria.
Britannia High School (addition): Sixteen standard classrooms, eleven special rooms and shops, double gymnasium, cafeteria.
New Secondary School, Fifty-fourth Avenue and Heather Street: Twenty-two
standard classrooms, twenty-one special rooms and shops, double gymnasium, cafeteria.
Maple Grove No. 2 Addition (Sir William Osier): Eight classrooms, lunchroom.
Brock (addition):   Eight classrooms, lunchroom, gymnasium-auditorium.
Lloyd George (addition): Six classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
McBride (addition):  Four classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
Queen Mary (addition): Four classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
Roberts (addition):  Gymnasium-auditorium, lunchroom.
Renfrew (addition):  Six classrooms, two special rooms.
Portable Classrooms (eight): One unit, Hastings Elementary; two units,
Douglas Elementary; one unit, Wolfe Elementary; two units, Tecumseh
Elementary; two units, Sexsmith Elementary.
Testing
The following tests were given during the school-year 1952-53: —
(a) Number of individual intelligence tests given, 1,355.
(b) Number of pupils given group intelligence tests, 12,362.
(c) During September the Detroit Beginning First-grade Intelligence Test
(Revised) was administered to all Grade I pupils.
(d) For June, 1953, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were given
to approximately 4,100 pupils of Grades VI and VIII—Grade VI in junior
high-school areas for promotion to junior high school and Grade VIII
pupils in senior high-school areas for promotion to senior high school.
The type of standardized tests used aids principals and Inspectors in
maintaining levels of achievement. Tests were administered by the classroom teacher under the direction of the principal, and promotion lists were
submitted to the Bureau of Measurements.
(e) Vancouver General Hospital probationary classes in nursing were tested—
one class each in September and February. P 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
(/) Testing of Pupils under Age for Grades II, III, and IV.—At the beginning
of September forty-eight children entering the Vancouver school system
from private schools who were under age for Grade II, III, or IV were
tested to determine their ability to do the work of the grade concerned.
Pupils in this category were those entering Grade II who were under
7 years of age, those entering Grade III who were under 8 years of age,
and those entering Grade IV who were under 9 years of age as at November 30th. The Supervisor of Primary Work, Miss E. Roy, administered
a standardized reading examination and tests in arithmetic, printing, oral
reading, and phonics. Members of the Bureau of Measurements staff gave
each child an individual intelligence test. Resulting placements were as
follows: In Grade IV—one pupil demoted to Grade III; in Grade III—
four pupils to remain and two pupils demoted to Grade II; in Grade II—
nineteen pupils to remain, twelve pupils demoted to Grade I, and ten
pupils to remain on trial for six weeks, or longer.
(g) Bryant Reading Tests, Grades II to VI, Inclusive.—During November,
February, and May sets of tests prepared and standardized by Mr. S. J.
Bryant, principal retired of Lord Nelson School, were administered to all
pupils in Grades II to VI, inclusive. It is anticipated that other tests will
be prepared, so that there will be available one test per grade for each
month of the school-year.
(h) Provincial Testing Programme.—(1) Inspectors' Test in Arithmetic Computation, Grade VIII.—At the request of the Deputy Superintendent of
Education, Mr. H. L. Campbell, an arithmetic computation test (British
Columbia Tests—Arithmetic Computation, Form A, for Grades V and
VI), standardized for Grades V and VI, was given from October 15th to
17th, inclusive, to students of Grade VIII in elementary and secondary
schools. The same test was administered to Grade VIII pupils in other
schools in British Columbia. The purpose of the test was to determine
weaknesses which may exist in arithmetic computation. Form B of the
test was given early in June as a follow-up to measure the improvement
which may have taken place since October.
(2) Scholastic Aptitude Testing.—During the latter part of March,
at the request of the Department of Education, a scholastic aptitude test
(The Dominion Tests—Group Test of Learning Capacity, British Columbia Edition, Advanced Form B) was administered in School District No.
39 (Vancouver) to all pupils taking English 30, 31, 32, and English 40.
Arrangements for the project and distribution of testing materials were
made through the Bureau of Measurements. Tests were administered by
the teacher, and the marking of test papers and tabulation of results were
carried out by the Department of Education. Results were returned in
time for entering on the transcript form of each candidate. Purposes of
the test are defined in the following paragraphs of Dr. C. B. Conway's
letter:—
" The new requirements for high-school graduation have presented
problems regarding standards of achievement to be required in different
courses from General and University Programme students. For example,
the students taking Latin 91 may be of an entirely different calibre than
those taking Biology 91. School standards in courses taken by a large
number of General Programme students may be much lower than those in
courses taken chiefly as a University Programme major.
" Because of the need for additional information, a group test of
learning capacity will be administered in your school ... to all U.P.
and G.P. students enrolled in English 30, 31, 32 or English 40." SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER) P 55
(3) Standardization of Social Studies 20 Test.—The Department
of Education is standardizing a test in Social Studies 20. In order to
establish norms and to determine the suitability of the test items, it was
requested that Vancouver schools participate in this project. Accordingly,
two experimental forms of a test in Social Studies 20 were given to all
Social Studies 20 pupils during the days from May 19th to 25th. Tests
were allocated through the Bureau of Measurements. Papers were
marked in the Department of Education, and test results furnished each
school.
(4) Terminal Survey Course Test in Mathematics 30.—As has been
customary during the past few years, the Department of Education carried
out a Provincial survey of one of the high-school terminal courses—
namely, Mathematics 30 —■" to establish Provincial standards and to
enable principals and teachers to make comparisons with results for the
Province as a whole." On June 11th all Vancouver pupils enrolled in
Mathematics 30 were given a Mathematics 30 examination, which included
a test in arithmetic fundamentals. Distribution of the tests was arranged
by the Bureau of Measurements. The Department of Education will score
the test papers and provide a statistical analysis of the results.
Reports and Statistics
The following reports and statistics were compiled during the year:—
(a) Analysis of the results of the achievement and intelligence tests given in
June, 1952, to junior high-school entrance pupils and to senior high-school
entrance pupils.
(b) Compilation of statistics on the geographical origin of new pupils enrolling
in Vancouver Schools, September 2nd, 1952, to November 30th, 1952,
inclusive.
(c) Compilation of statistics on age-grade census for September, 1952, and
promotion summary for elementary schools for June, 1952.
(d) Tabulation of the Oriental school population of Vancouver schools as at
June.
(e) One hundred and seven transcripts of school records were forwarded to
the Department of High School Correspondence Instruction, Victoria,
B.C., at the request of the Director.
(/) Preparation of outlines of courses to be offered in the secondary schools
of Vancouver in the school-year 1953-54.
(g) Sorting and forwarding to principals of secondary schools the applications
of students for choice of course—approximately 4,400.
(h) Questionnaire on Industrial Arts and Commercial courses. The information requested in this questionnaire by the Director of Technical Education
for the Province of British Columbia is compiled each year in the Bureau
of Measurements.
(i) Racial origin of pupils in classes for new Canadians—a tabulation was
made showing the number of pupils of each nationality in our twenty
classes for new Canadians.
(/') Record and medical cards, and requests for same handled: Number of
cards coming into office (record card and medical card for the same pupil
counted as one card), 21,056; number of requests for cards made by
schools, 17,187; requests which the Bureau of Measurements made to
schools for cards which had not been sent to office, 5,251. P 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
In concluding my report on this very important department of our school system,
I wish to pay a special tribute to Dr. S. A. Miller and his most capable staff for the
splendid reports on various topics prepared for the Superintendent and Board during the
past year.
Evening Classes
Classes during the school-year 1952-53 were conducted at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, the Vancouver School of Art, seven high schools, four elementary schools,
and seventeen other centres throughout the city. Subject registrations for adult evening
classes, 14,044 in all, reached their highest level this year. The total registration represents a gain over last year of 1,468 persons enrolled in courses involving 162 different
subjects.
Table Showing Classification of Evening-school Subjects for the 1952—53 School-year,
the Number of Classes, the Number of Subject Registrations, and the Number of
Teachers in Each Division.
Subjects
Number
of
Subjects
Number
of
Classes
Enrolments
Number
of
Teachers
Male
Female
Total
25
56
11
19
15
24
2
3
7
67
142
46
20
63
62
38
4
27
1.563
3,383
535
178
53
605
573
113
290
1,310
187
1,078
302
1,691
922
417
178
666
2,873
3,570
1,613
480
1,744
1,527
990
291
956
40
122
30
Teacher-training (including kindergarten-teacher training).
17
29
53
29
5
19
Totals   -   - -	
162
469
7,293
6,751
14,044
344
i Shop and technical-vocational distribution:   Apprenticeship, 38 classes, with 669 males registered;
ship, 104 classes, with 2,714 males and 187 females registered, a total of 2,901 registrations.
non-apprentice-
Table Showing the Number of Evening Classes Conducted at the Centres in Operation
during the 1952—53 School-year and the Number of Subject Registrations at Each
Centre.
Number of
Classes
Subject Registrations
Male
Female
Total
107
85
45
30
31
26
41
19
8
22
12
10
33
1,981
1,828
862
197
314
331
311
241
396
254
161
417
244
1,280
367
926
578
829
888
402
3
413
307
100
414
2,225
3,108
1,229
1,123
892
1,160
1,199
643
399
667
307
261
Miscellaneous  _ _ -	
831
Totals                       -   -                       	
469
7,293
6,751
14,044
To Mr. Graham Bruce, Director of Adult Education and Night Schools, and his
splendid staff, great praise is due for the excellent work being done in this most important
field of adult education. This city can be justly proud of the contributions made to assist
all types of adults in developing their interests and capacities. All non-vocational courses
are self-supporting. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER)
P 57
Supervision of Instruction
Classroom instruction has been maintained at a high standard. Our special supervisors of music, handwork, art, home economics, physical education, and primary grades
have co-operated splendidly with the Superintendent, Inspectors, and principals in promoting growth and development among our teaching staff. All principals of our elementary and secondary schools do give a large proportion of their time to the supervision of
classroom instruction.
All new teachers appointed to the staff have been specially helped by the supervisors
and visited on many different occasions by the Inspectors. In-service training classes
have been organized for many teachers requiring help and guidance.
Considerable progress has been made during the year in expanding the counselling
and mental-health service. The number of counsellors has been increased, and facilities
for doing work have been greatly improved. The counselling programme and industry
have been linked closer than ever. The National Employment Service has worked most
co-operatively with our staff. Many groups, such as the Chartered Accountants Institute,
have discussed their mutual problems with teacher groups and counsellors on different
occasions.
The programme of mental health has continued to grow, so that now co-ordinated
work is being done in the elementary schools as well as the secondary schools.
A conference of counsellors was held recently in connection with the mental-hygiene
programme, and the two specially trained teachers, together with the psychiatrist from
the Department of School Health, carried on a very splendid panel discussion. The
teachers were very much encouraged and were very enthusiastic about the Workshop
Conference. It is hoped that more frequent conferences will be held during the coming
year.   Counselling, mental hygiene, and guidance are being more closely integrated.
Superannuation
The following members of the staff retired on superannuation this year. Every one
of them is to be highly commended for their splendid and loyal service during their many
years with us.
Teacher
School
Date of
Appointment
February, 1914.
August, 1913.
September, 1920.
September, 1925.
August, 1911.
September, 1923.
August, 1913.
September, 1911.
October, 1911
Clarke, J. A.                          	
Norquay (principal)	
Heaslip, L. W                                                 --
McRae, Miss R. I. R - - 	
Carleton.—  	
September, 1924.
August, 1914.
The following teachers retired on disability pension during the year:-
Teacher
School
Date of Retirement
Date of
Appointment
Griffin, G. H.                         	
December 18th, 1951	
February 1st, 1953
February 1st, 1952....
April 30th, 1953
September, 1927.
September, 1926.
September, 1922.
August, 1908.
MacLeod, JPG.
Wishart, A.
Woodhead, T. W	
- P 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Teachers who died during the school-year 1952-53 are as follows:
Teacher
School
Deceased
Date of
Appointment
Burrows, Miss W.__
Cummings, R. E._~.
Osterhout, V. H	
Snider, E. E	
Queen Mary....
Templeton	
King Edward-
Van Home _
August 19th, 1952	
June 12th, 1953	
October 6th, 1952 ._....
September 25th, 1952
February, 1923.
September, 1925.
September, 1931.
September, 1930.
In concluding this brief report to your Department, I wish to thank the Mayor, City
Council, Fire Department, Police Department, Parks Board, Library Board, and all the
officials of these various organizations for their splendid co-operation during the year.
I am particularly indebted to the press for the splendid reporting which they have
made on many intricate problems during the year.
Needless to say, the splendid work which has been done during the past year could
not have been accomplished without the splendid support, hard work, and excellent teamwork of the Vancouver Board of School Trustees and staff.
To you, Sir, and to the members of your Department, I am more than grateful for
your kind guidance, splendid advice, and help on every occasion. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS P 59
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.P^jd., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The school-year just closed has been an eventful one. Among other things, it was
the Coronation year, and all of us have been conscious of this great event, particularly
during the last three months. Two students from the high schools of this area, through
the generosity of many citizens and organizations, attended the Coronation ceremonies.
The Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire presented five Coronation scholarships to students in each of our five high schools. Finally, a splendid colour film entitled
"A Queen Is Crowned" was made available locally, through the management of the
Odeon Theatre, to all school-children to commemorate the occasion.
Important steps in providing additional school accommodation occurred during the
year. The Oak Bay Junior High School was occupied last October, with an initial enrolment of 250 pupils. The additions and alterations to Mount View High School were
carried out during the year, even though classes were in session. The Macdonald Park
Primary School will be ready for occupancy this September. Construction on Central
Junior High School began in the spring of this year and has progressed satisfactorily. We
expect that it will be ready for use in September, 1954. A contract was let recently for
alterations and additions to Mount Douglas High School, which will be completed by
December of this year, and, finally, plans and specifications for the new Lansdowne Junior
High School are now virtually complete, and building should commence this autumn.
The above presents an imposing picture in new school construction, albeit these units were
planned six years ago and are only now taking form.
During the past year much good work has been done at all grade levels in the school
system. The teaching staff has endeavoured to maintain a high standard in both the
academic and cultural fields. Increased attention is being paid to securing personnel who
have qualifications in music, physical education, art, and, to a lesser degree, dramatics
and folk-dancing. While we all recognize the fact that the three " R's " still comprise the
backbone of the school programme, these other subjects are very important aspects in the
present-day education of every boy and girl.
May I take this opportunity, once again, to thank the members of the Greater
Victoria School Board, the administrative and teaching staffs of this system for their
continued support and co-operation in making our local educational programme as effective as possible.
Victoria College
(W. Harry Hickman, M.A., Docteur de l'Universite de Paris, Principal)
Victoria College has just completed its fiftieth year. During jubilee celebrations,
members and two teachers of the class of 1903 met in Victoria, the $259,000 Ewing
Building was officially opened by the Honourable Minister of Education, and Chancellor
Sherwood Lett of the University of British Columbia gave the annual assembly address.
The Fiftieth Anniversary Library Fund, established in honour of former professors of the
College, surpassed considerably the $5,000 minimum objective.
The new library offers facilities for displaying acquisitions which, it is hoped, will be
the nucleus of a collection of British Columbia art, of interest not only to the students of
the College, but to the community. Six original canvasses have already been donated
or purchased. P 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Under the energetic direction of Mr. Robert Wallace, vice-principal of the College,
the Evening Division offered twenty courses to a total of 748 adults.
Victoria High School
(H. L. Smith, M.A., Principal)
The total registration at the Victoria High School during the past year was slightly
higher than that of the previous school session. There were but few changes in the
teaching staff, and school work proceeded with most commendable harmony and, in my
opinion, with a high standard of efficiency. Through the co-operation of a most devoted
staff, and the initiative and enthusiasm of an active Students' Association, the extracurricular school programme functioned with conspicuous success.
Examinations in June, 1952, were highly satisfactory. One of our students, Miss
Sonia Stuart, led all Provincial candidates in the University Entrance examinations and
was the recipient of the Governor-General's medal, the first to be awarded for this
distinction.
Oak Bay High School
(Charles A. Gibbard, B.A., Principal)
This year the net enrolment at Oak Bay High School increased from 377 in June,
1952, to 417 in June, 1953, the increase occurring largely in Grade IX.
As a result of the wide variety of courses and of co-curricular activities, especially
in athletics, and the harmony which exists between staff and students, the holding power
of the school remains excellent.
The students of this school have continued to select the University Programme
largely, and a satisfactory standard of work has been maintained.
The opening of the new Oak Bay Junior High School in January has enabled us to
make considerable use of the facilities of that school, especially the splendidly equipped
shops and laboratories for Industrial Arts and Home Economics, and the auditorium and
gymnasium. We owe our thanks to the principal, Mr. R. T. Kipling, for his hearty
co-operation.
Mount View High School
(J. M. Thomas, M.A., D.Pced., Principal)
The school-year 1952-53 has been marked by improvement in buildings and equipment. The new gymnasium will be a great asset in the Physical Education programme.
The alterations to the auditorium now, for the first time, provide proper facilities for stage
productions of any kind. The new library provides better facilities for all associated
library functions. The use of the old library for a sewing-room adds greatly to the
adequacy of the Home Economics Department. The medical room and private counselling rooms are very valuable additions.
Staff co-operation has been good, and a tribute should be paid to those members of
the staff who gave so freely of their time in promoting various projects " beyond the call
of duty."
Academic achievement has been maintained at a satisfactory standard, notwithstanding the serious handicap of new building, reconstruction work in the school, and
lack of heat for some months.
Esquimalt High School
(Clive Kelly, B.A., Principal)
This school was enlarged and much of the old part reconstructed during 1951-52.
It was officially opened on November 5th by the Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
P 61
New equipment for Science, Physical Education, Industrial Arts, Home Economics,
and Art was added during the year to improve facilities for teaching these subjects.
Projects carried out during the year included a country fair and operetta, as well as
the usual complement of social and cultural activities. In all of these activities the staff
is to be commended for sharing equally and uncomplainingly the responsibility for their
success.
Mount Douglas High School
(Eric Forster, B.A., B.Ed., Principal)
During the year 140 students were enrolled. This represents a slight increase from
last year. Noticeable has been the large number of students leaving both Commercial
classes and Grade XI to seek gainful employment.
The school offers a full programme of curricular subjects, including Drama, Music,
Journalism, Commercial subjects, Home Economics, and Industrial Arts. In extracurricular fields the school offers Boys' and Girls' Hi-Y, Glee Club, Red Cross, inter-
house and inter-high sports. Mention should be made of the Mount Douglas Parent-
Teacher Association, which is a vital factor in our school-life.
Central Junior High School
(William McMichael, B.A., Principal)
Construction of the new Central Junior High School Building is now in progress.
Demolition of the East Building in February created the problem of accommodation. In
anticipation of such a situation, the Commerce classes were transferred to Victoria High
School at the commencement of the term in September. Alterations in the West Building
and in the girls' gymnasium have provided added classroom space to accommodate thirteen regular and two special classes.
The transfer from the East Building was completed by February 25th without any
loss of school time; all classes remained on schedule. This was made possible by the
much appreciated co-operation of the Maintenance Department.
Only a few of the extra-curricular activities have had to be curtailed or dispensed
with owing to lack of proper facilities. The sports programme has been maintained,
although with limited space for activities. Other groups continuing their regular programmes were those in swimming, photography, Junior Red Cross, School Safety Patrol,
school paper, art, and music.
S. J. Willis Junior High School
(B. C. Gillie, B.A., B.Ed., Principal)
This, the third, year of operation for this school was marked by a decided increase in
enrolment, bringing the numbers up to 700 for most of the year. This number represents
approximately a capacity load for the school, there now being classes registered in four
special rooms of the school over and above those in the sixteen regular classrooms.
We are now well settled into our academic routine, and at least some of the long-
range plans established three years ago appear to be bearing fruit. This is particularly
true in connection with the remedial work being done in the special classes in Grades VII
and VIII. Test results from the Child Study Department show some improvement in
standards.
During the spring term a special effort was made to acquaint parents with the details
of course planning in the high schools. A well-attended meeting of all parents of Grades
VIII and IX was the highlight of this plan and seemed to produce very satisfactory results.
It is planned to continue this practice in the following years.
With the permission of the Department of Education and the co-operation of various
lay groups, members of this staff this year worked out a special curriculum for a course in P 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Grade IX designed to suit students who, for one reason or another, are likely to leave
school at the end of that grade. Since approximately 20 per cent of our students drop
out at this time, it seemed worth while endeavouring to prepare some sort of programme
which would be especially useful to them. It is planned to put this programme into
effect in September, 1953.
Oak Bay Junior High School
(R. T. Kipling, B.A., Principal)
This school was opened officially in March by the Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston,
Minister of Education. The very large number of visitors to this ceremony showed the
great interest that the public has in the schools and school system of Greater Victoria.
Much credit is due to all of those responsible for the designing and construction of the
school.
It is most gratifying to see the use the community is making of the facilities of the
school. The auditorium is in constant use for the presentation of concerts and various
dramatic productions. The gymnasium has been used several times for basketball
play-offs.
It has been a pleasure for me to have had a most loyal and efficient staff. Their
tireless energy and interest at all times in the welfare of the pupils and the school have
been responsible for making our first year a most happy and successful one.
Elementary Schools
(John Gough, M.A., Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools)
The commencement of another school-year in September found approximately 9,300
pupils in attendance at twenty-eight elementary schools. By way of a temporary expedient to cope with the ever-expanding enrolment, fourteen additional classrooms were
provided by erecting annexes at Cedar Hill, Craigflower, Oaklands, and View Royal
Schools, and by utilizing space in basements and auditoriums at other points.
Visits to a large number of classrooms, particularly those of the new members of the
staff, prompt one to pay tribute to the general competence and enthusiasm of the teachers,
some of whom faced large classes or sub-standard classroom situations.
In order to improve the reporting of pupil achievement to parents, greater use was
made by principals and their staffs of teacher-parent conferences. Additional attention
was given also to ways of adapting instruction to the readiness, ability, and maturation
level of the children, both on an individual and group basis, in accord with the promotional policy of the area.
Primary Department
(Miss Marian D. James, Director)
Throughout the whole school-year much time and thought has been given to meeting the needs of the children in the primary grades of our schools. It has been very
encouraging to find an ever-increasing interest in grouping the children for instruction.
This allows the brightest children to go ahead according to their ability and readiness
for more advanced work, as well as giving the slow learners every opportunity to succeed at a slower rate of learning. An effort is being made to allow children to progress
normally rather than to repeat work that they have completed successfully.
Parent-teacher interviews have become popular in most schools. These interviews
supplement the regular form of reporting to parents and do not replace the sending-out
of report cards.
During the fall term I was given an opportunity to meet the principals of the
schools to put before them some of the policies of the Primary Department. This meeting proved very valuable. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
P 63
Following the Grade IV testing programme in October, I presented to the principals and teachers ways and means of improving the mastery of the basic arithmetic
skills. Most schools have made a good effort to supplement the regular arithmetic
programme with certain retention drills.
In March a display of the art work of the elementary schools was held at the Arts
Centre of Greater Victoria. This display was well received by the many teachers and
parents who visited it.
The meetings for parents of children commencing school in September, 1953, were
held during May and June as in 1952.
The primary classes of the district participated in the Musical Festival, the Drama
Festival, and the Folk-dancing Festival. The work in each case was good. The
number of entries in the Folk-dancing Festival was disappointing.
The new art programme for all grades was carefully studied. Plans were made to
obtain necessary supplies and equipment to enable the teachers to follow this programme.
In March a display of library books was held at the School Board office. This
display seemed to be a great help to the teachers to select their library books.
Department of Physical Education
(George Grant, B.A., Director)
There were twenty-seven new teachers of Physical Education in the elementary
schools (exclusive of Grades I and II) and sixteen still here who were new the year
before.
There were eight new teachers of Physical Education in the junior and senior high
schools and two who were new the year before. There are twenty-two secondary-
school teachers of Physical Education.
These teachers received a considerable amount of the time spent on supervisory
visits, including sample lessons, discussions, and round-table meetings.
This year Miss Nancy Ferguson spent two half-days a week assisting elementary
teachers with their rhythms and dance programme. All principals and teachers concerned spoke very highly of the assistance received and hope that this part of the
physical-education programme can be extended next year to include all elementary
schools.
In-service Training.—The year 1952-53 produced few but well-attended meetings
of elementary- and secondary-school teachers, as follows:—
(1) The November meeting for Grade I and Grades II and III teachers was
used for Physical Education techniques and materials. A part of each
meeting was taken by Miss Ferguson for rhythms and dance.
(2) Similar meetings were held for Grade IV and Grades V to VIII in the
fall term.
(3) Two meetings with Grade V swim-teachers covered organization and
water techniques before each session.
(4) Meetings with men and women basketball coaches of the elementary
schools. The women had extra meetings for play and officiating practice.
(5) Two meetings each with men and women junior and senior high Physical
Education teachers on curriculum, methods, and organization.
(6) Seventeen teachers took the night-school class on "Physical Education
for the Elementary Classroom Teacher " (No. 520) and received Department of Education credits. p 64 public schools report, 1952-53
Special Education Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
There were eleven special classes for handicapped children in the Greater Victoria
schools this year. Four special classes for slow-learning children were held at George
Jay School and two at Central Junior High School. The elementary special class was
for very slow learners of various ages. The other special classes, in order of chronological age, were called primary, junior, intermediate, and senior.
In addition to the six special classes for slow learners, there were two special
English classes at North Ward School, for new Canadians, and three special remedial
classes for pupils who were too handicapped educationally to attend regular classes.
One such class was held at McKenzie Avenue School, and the other two at S. J. Willis
Junior High School.
Child Study Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
Standardized tests of many kinds were given throughout the year in various grades:
Grades IV and VI were tested in reading, vocabulary, spelling, and arithmetic; Grade
VII, in language and composition; and Grade VIII, in work-study skills and mathematics.
Six tests were administered for the Provincial Department of Education, Division
of Tests, Standards, and Research. These were surveys in scholastic aptitude, arithmetic, social studies, and mathematics.
Scholastic-aptitude surveys were made in Grades IV, VIII, XI, and XIII. Over
160 individual psychomatic examinations were administered to distinguish remedial-
reading cases from candidates for special classes.
The achievement tests above Grade IV were part of the regular spring testing programme in the basic skills, the major objective of which continues to be the identification of remedial cases in time to help them.
Apart from the achievement tests used by the Child Study Department, there were
tests in arithmetic, spelling, reading, and study skills which were supplied by the Child
Study Department to principals and teachers. These tests were used as teaching aids to
diagnose weaknesses and improve instruction.
Remedial-reading materials were made quickly available to the schools for use in
reading experiments. Probably the most important contribution made by the Child
Study Department is the consultant service it offers to the schools on the teaching of
reading and the identification and treatment of retarded readers before they reach the
high school.
Audio-Visual Department
(Denis W. Brown, B.A.)
In-service Training.—Special emphasis has been placed during the past year on the
correct use of teaching-tools and suggested improvements of classroom techniques. The
use of instructional aids, with particular reference to the basic subjects, was discussed
with teacher groups at all grade levels. This form of in-service training was very well
received, and is intended as part of a continuous programme.
The services of an active and hard-working film-strip committee have been most
helpful. Bi-weekly viewings of hundreds of film-strips resulted in the selection of additional slide-films for our growing library. Teachers are most enthusiastic in their opinion
of film-strips for classroom use, and when each school is equipped with a film-strip
projector, the utilization of these aids will be increased. The representatives from primary
to high-school level, who worked on the selection committee, chose all strips with extreme
care. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS P 65
Statistical Summary.—The following statistics are self-explanatory:—
School journeys (involving over 5,500 pupils, plus transportation for the Musical Festival, totalling over 8,500
pupils)           117
Flat picture  and model loans   (for  one-  to  three-week
periods)   Items    1,322
Free materials distributed (posters, charts, pamphlets, models,
etc.)   Items 17,342
Film-strip requisitions Items       584
Maps repaired or mounted for racks Items       247
Cost of film damage (all schools)      Nil
School Dental Health Services
(Dr. Hugh Clarke, D.D.S., Director)
We have now completed another full year working under the new Preventive Dental
Health Programme, and I feel justified in reporting that it has been a most successful one.
This year marks the first time that all school dental services in this Province have adopted
a preventive programme with emphasis on the educational side rather than the reparative.
Almost all operative time is given to treating pre-school, kindergarten, and Grade I
children where the most good can be done. In this school district we give emergency
treatment, whenever possible, to the pupils in the upper grades.
The following is a summary of the year's work: Dental examinations made, 20,431;
parents interviewed, 1,565; fillings of all kinds, 2,138; teeth extracted, 211; miscellaneous treatments, 780; and prophylaxis (teeth cleaned), 212.
Mental Health Department
(Miss Edna Lawrence, Co-ordinator)
In general, the work of the Mental Health Department falls into five divisions:
School Personnel, Health Personnel, Social Agency Personnel, the General Public, and
Conferences of various types. These are not distinct, but are in fact closely interrelated
in most practical situations encountered.
One of the most encouraging aspects of my four years' work has been the enthusiastic and intelligent co-operation received from administrators, principals, teachers, health
officials, social workers, and parents. Such interest in the mental health of Victoria's
children should ensure the future success of the programme.
Speech Therapy Department
(Miss Marie C. Crickmay, L.C.S.T., Director)
During the year 1952-53 speech therapy has been available for the children attending the Greater Victoria schools.
With the co-operation of the teachers, a survey of all cases was carried during September and October; 278 children were examined, and of these it was found that 115
were in need of treatment.
During the year 272 visits were made to the schools, and fifty parents were interviewed.
The year's work has been immeasurably helped by the co-operation of both parents
and teachers.
Music Department
(H. J. Bigsby, B.A.(Mus.Ed.), Director)
This year, as in previous years, we were interested in two phases of the music curriculum—the general classroom programme and the instrmental programme.
3 P 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
The growing tendency toward the 6-3-3 system of schools in this district has made
the subject of Music much easier, not only to teach, but to administer. Grades VII and
VIII are better serviced, with a much wider programme adapted to their needs, when
taught by a specialist at the junior high-school level.
In writing of the instrumental phase of the music programme, one cannot be anything
but encouraged at the progress to date. Looking back to 1946, we find there were but
two groups, totalling eighty players with two instructors. This year's figures are thirteen
groups servicing twenty-three schools with an enrolment of over 500 taught by nine
instructors, four of whom are devoting full time to the teaching of instrumental music.
The physical accommodation (instrumental-music rooms) has been improving as
a result of our newer buildings, and is now quite satisfactory, with one exception, and that
is the definite need for an instrumental room at our largest school—Victoria High School.
Under special projects we should mention the in-service training course for conducting which was held at the beginning of the school-year; the student symphony concerts,
which were well patronized again this year; and some very fine school operettas that were
presented, especially at the high-school level.
Eight of our teachers were asked to serve on the Victoria section of the Music
Curriculum Revision Committee. I acted in the capacity of consultant of this Committee
and can vouch for the hard work and worth-while contributions these teachers made to
this year-long task.
Home Economics Department
(Miss Beth T. Ramsay, M.A., Director)
The Home Economics classes have shown a decided increase this year over 1952,
with an enrolment of 1,537. An even greater increase is expected in the fall, which is
taxing our present laboratories beyond their capacity.
An extra room was opened at the S. J. Willis this year, and an additional one will be
needed at the Oak Bay Junior High in September.
With two new centres opened at Esquimalt High and Oak Bay Junior High and the
S. J. Willis in 1951, we have three very modern and up-to-date Home Economics centres.
The work throughout the district has been kept up to a high standard, and the
general tone of all classes good.
The staff has been most co-operative, and the attendance at the monthly meetings
good.
Industrial Arts and Vocational-Technical Education
(John S. White, Director)
Seven centres are now in operation throughout the Greater Victoria area to provide
Industrial Arts facilities for the elementary, junior high, and senior high school classes.
All Vocational-Technical classes (with Industrial Arts from Victoria High School) are
centred in the F. T. Fairey Vocational-Technical Unit. Enrolment in the Greater Victoria
area is as follows: Grades VII to IX, inclusive, Industrial Arts, 1,129; Grades X to XII,
inclusive, Industrial Arts, 411; and Grades X to XII, inclusive, Vocational-Technical,
192.
Two new centres came into existence this year with the opening of the new Esquimalt
High School additions and the new Oak Bay Junior High School. Both of these new
schools relieved the holding of classes in old run-down buildings with very limited
facilities, and so we are now able to operate Industrial Arts properly as it should be done
for the first time in these two widely separated communities.
Monthly meetings are held on the second teaching Tuesday of each month. These
are well attended, with an elected chairman and secretary presiding. A prepared paper
is presented by one member at each meeting on some subject in the technical field. Business, teaching problems, and other matters are discussed. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
P 67
An " open night" was held at the F. T. Fairey Vocational-Technical Unit on May
19th, in which the students were at work to present to parents and the general public the
meaning of vocational and technical education. Principals and staffs of all schools were
invited.   A special tour was arranged for members of the Gyro Club.
Evening Classes
(John S. White, Director)
The year was successful, although the over-all enrolment was below that of the
previous year. The increase in fees to meet the increased costs in salaries and operating
expense could be the factor influencing this.   The enrolment was as follows:—
Number
of
Classes
Enrolment
Types of Courses
First
Term
Second
Term
40
17
3-5
21
3
736
295
24
319
54
560
289
65
288
80
Totals                                                                         	
86
1,428
1,282
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)
REPORT OF R. S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
Definite progress in all phases of educational work has been evident throughout
the school system. Our schools are doing splendid work; of the many services which
are purchased by taxes, there is none from which society and the individual citizen
receive more benefit than from public education. The cost of education appears to be
negligible as compared with the values received because of the resultant productivity of
the individuals who receive an education exceeding the cost many times over.
There are no supervisors in the schools of District No. 40 other than the principals
and Inspector, and to all principals I wish to give special mention for the outstanding
work accomplished and to their continued study of modern theories and practices.
There is evidence in abundance that, through their guidance and encouragement, teachers are using recommended procedures in instructional work with confidence and success. Variations are noticeable, but the formal classroom relationships and methods of
years past have disappeared, though the influence of continued drill on fundamentals
has not been set aside. There is greater flexibility in organization, increased sharing in
classroom activities by pupils, and a more definite bond of co-operation in the relationships between pupils and teachers. A greater variety of illustrative materials is in use,
and the radio and movie camera are contributing much to classroom instruction.
The Board of School Trustees—men and women of proven ability and enthusiasm
for pupil advancement in all phases of citizenship—study carefully the needs and
requirements of those over whom they have control, and the schools, equipment, and
morale are a credit to any electorate.
Progress was made on the building of the new Senior High Academic-Vocational
School, costing over a million and a half dollars; plans and specifications are expected
to be ready in early summer. Two elementary classrooms are being added to Tweeds-
muir Elementary School, to be ready for classes in the early fall term, and the increased P 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
enrolment at Richard McBride School is being carefully watched as to additional building requirements. The lunchroom at the Junior High School is expected to be ready
in September.
The health programme in New Westminster keeps pace with increased needs. The
Simon Fraser Health Unit, with Dr. Wylde in charge of medical services and Dr. Old-
field in charge of dental requirements, does excellent work.
It is gratifying to note the large percentage of teachers and principals who take
refresher courses at universities and Summer Schools, and who return to their classes
with increased knowledge of modern methods and subject-matter. Our entire school
system benefits.
An outstanding demonstration of values of international pupil relationship was
enjoyed by the pupils of Grade V, Lord Tweedsmuir School, under the leadership of
the principal, Mr. W. O. Hudson, when two classes of students from the model elementary Campus School of Bellingham, Wash., visited Lord Tweedsmuir School for the day.
The visit was returned by Tweedsmuir students, and the interchange of ideas, methods,
and general information was of great mutual benefit.
Another international incident worthy of mention was the assembly at the Peace
Arch on the boundary-line at Blaine, Wash., which thousands of pupils and parents
from the Lower Mainland of British Columbia and from the State of Washington
attended. At this gathering. Miss Eileen Schaffer, of the T. J. Trapp Technical High
School, winner of the oratorical contest sponsored by the Peace Arch Committee, gave
the address for Canadian students over the C.B.C. network.
Such affairs give a practical demonstration of two nations living side by side in
peace.
Although the pupils engaged in many extra-curricular activities, the classroom
work of the pupils showed steady improvement.
The most notable extra-curricular activity this year was the staging of the Eighty-
second Annual May Day, under the leadership of Mr. Fraser Hine. The visit of the
Prince and Princess supplied the motif for perhaps one of the most spectacular patriotic
displays ever held in the city. To Mr. Hine, the teachers and pupils, we express
appreciation.
This year we have been favoured in having as guests to our schools many Canadian leaders, among whom were the Honourable L. St. Laurent, and the Honourable
Lester Pearson. Suitable programmes under Mr. R. W. Adams, principal of the Junior
High School, were arranged and appreciated by all concerned.
Night-school enjoyed the most successful year to date, under the principalship of
Mr. Frank Morris. A wider range of subjects was covered, and the attendance was
most satisfactory.
It is with keen regret we mention the serious illness of Mr. T. H. Calder, M.A.,
principal of the Duke of Connaught High School. Stricken two months before retirement, Mr. Calder brings to a close a most successful tenure of office. An able principal, a scholar, and a friend of students, his work will long be remembered. We wish
for him a speedy recovery.
I wish to express my appreciation of the help given me in my work by officials of
the Department of Education, of the hearty co-operation at all times of the Board of
School Trustees, the secretarial staff, and the Parent-Teacher Associations, and of the
hearty co-operation and enthusiastic support of the principals and teachers, who have
worked loyally and harmoniously. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS P 69
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., AND C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A.,
MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS
The report submitted for the school-year 1951-52 showed an enrolment of 9,338
pupils, with a staff of 301 teachers. This enrolment was distributed as follows: Grades
I to VI, 6,210; Grades VII to IX, 2,087; and Grades X to XIII, 1,041.
The year 1952-53 shows 10,206 pupils enrolled, as follows: Grades I to VI, 6,623;
Grades VI to IX, 2,243; and Grades X to XIII, 1,340. The number of teachers on the
staff was 327.
This increase of 868 pupils and twenty-six teachers has every indication of becoming an annual problem. The number of new houses being constructed and occupied each
month ensures a constantly increasing school population. Despite the fact that eighteen
new classrooms and six portable units were brought into use during the year, June saw
this accommodation completely occupied. During the year new school units were opened
at Marlborough, Cascade Heights, Suncrest, and Westridge. By the opening of the fall
term, extensions to Alpha Junior High School and Edmonds Junior High School will
relieve the tension in these schools. Construction is also under way to complete the final
projects under the 1950 by-law; namely, Burnaby South High School extension, Mc-
Pherson Park Junior High School gymnasium, Second Street extension, and Lyndhurst
Elementary School. The problems of accommodation, although still serious in the
elementary schools, promise to be particularly acute in the secondary schools where shift
classes are not possible and facilities are inadequate.
Careful studies of the population trends, school attendance, and housing developments give every indication that by 1960 Burnaby can expect to have enrolled in its
schools 17,500 students. As a result of these studies, plans are being laid for an extensive
building and reconstruction programme.
Coincident with the development of new schools was an event of passing historic
interest to Burnaby citizens. Kingsway West School, one of the oldest in Burnaby, was
abandoned December 15th, 1952. This school-site was purchased by the Simpson-Sears
Company, and a large retail store is now being constructed where the old school stood.
Particular attention was paid during the year to child study, the improvement of
teaching procedures, and supervision. The work of the two elementary supervisors, Miss
Jean Bailey and Miss K. Collins, was invaluable in the development of the in-service
training programme, but, due to the rapid expansion of the school system, the teacher
turn-over, and the employment of inexperienced teachers, it was felt that further expansion of the administrative and supervisory staff was necessary. It was also felt that,
rather than develop a number of vertical departments under various supervisors, it was
desirable to develop a horizontal organization of in-service training. Commencing in
September, 1953, this plan has been placed under the direction of Dr. C. C. Watson,
whose long teaching record, industrial experience, and studies endow him with the background and training necessary for the development of a fruitful programme.
As the district becomes rapidly urbanized, the number of social problems related to
the schools shows a more than proportionate increase. The services of Mr. H. J. Mc-
Pherson have been increasingly devoted to school social work, and it is anticipated that
they will require his full-time attention in the near future.
Considerable attention has been paid to the development of a modest testing programme and the establishment of individual pupil records. The assistance of the principals and the counsellors has been greatly appreciated. Considerable experimentation
was done by several schools in the field of pupil reporting, and it was gratifying to note
the whole-hearted co-operation extended by the parents and the teachers.   It is expected P 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
that a mutually satisfactory solution will be found for this rather difficult and, at times,
contentious problem.
All of the schools celebrated, in a most pleasing and appropriate manner, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. The celebrations, for the most part, took the form of
school and community gatherings either in the schools or adjoining parks.
Continued close co-operation continues to exist between the School Board, its
officials, the school nursing staff, and the medical staff of the Metropolitan Health Board.
Plans were laid for a continuing permanent liaison committee to bring into still closer
harmony the services of the teaching staff and the Health Department.
It has been a pleasure to record the courteous assistance extended at all times by
the various officials located in the Department of Education in Victoria. Burnaby's
many problems have always received prompt and effective attention.
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
During the year 1952-53 in this inspectorate there were twenty schools in operation—thirteen in North Vancouver and seven in West Vancouver. A total of 255 full-
time teachers was employed—174 in District No. 44 and 81 in District No. 45.
The enrolment for the year in School District No. 44 was 5,599 pupils, representing an increase of 12 per cent over that of the preceding year. In School District No.
45 the enrolment was 2,482 pupils, being 14 per cent greater than in the preceding year.
The figures given below for the first six grades show clearly the problems of
accommodation which face the respective School Boards in the next few years.
School District No. 44 School District No. 45
Grade I  769 Grade I  331
Grade II  694 Grade II  289
Grade III  636 Grade III  266
Grade IV  637 Grade IV  301
Grade V  553 Grade V  241
Grade VI  495 Grade VI  236
In the North Vancouver area the enrolment in Grade I is more than 50 per cent
greater than that in Grade VI, and in West Vancouver it is over 40 per cent.
North Vancouver
With the opening of schools in September, the increased school population was
provided for by the completion of three building projects—additions to Sutherland
Junior High School, Highlands Elementary School, and Norgate Elementary School.
As every classroom in each school was occupied, the building plan for the year was to
provide new accommodation for an expected increase of over 600 new pupils in
September, 1953.
Plans were made and construction carried out for three projects—six rooms added
to Highlands Elementary School, two rooms to North Star School, and a four-room annex
to Ridgeway School.
The plan was continued of rewiring older-type schools to improve lighting, together
with interior decorating of classrooms to effect the same object. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS P 71
Since 1946, when the school district was reorganized, all capital expenditure for
new buildings has been financed without borrowing. The strain of doing this, however,
was being felt, so that the new system of financing under the " Public Schools Construction Act" should ease the situation for all concerned.
With the prospect of new subdivisions in this school district, the School Board
endeavours to provide for new school-sites and keeps in touch with Municipal Councils
and Town Planning Commissions with respect to this matter.
A few years ago a special class for slow-moving children was operated, and later,
for various reasons, abandoned. This year it was possible to resume this type of
instruction, and a teacher and a classroom were made available in Queen Mary School.
More such schools are needed, but the obstacle is the lack of classroom space.
The mental health co-ordinator, Miss Mary Craig, having completed a year of
training in Toronto, began her work in North Vancouver, and while it is too soon to
measure results, it would appear that her contribution to the school system will prove
highly beneficial.
The pool library continued to grow, and, with the yearly addition of new reading
materials and the improved library service given to each school, better reading habits are
observed among the school-children.
West Vancouver
With the opening of the new high-school building it was possible to separate the
senior high school from the junior high school, and each is now in charge of its own
principal. A new four-room elementary school at West Bay provided accommodation for
children in the mid-western section of the municipality. This building was no sooner
occupied than the architect was instructed to prepare plans for the addition of four
rooms. This construction was carried out and will be available with the opening of
school in September, 1953.
Growth in the eastern section of the district resulted in the need for a new school
there, and a four-room school was built during the year and should be occupied also in
September.   This is the Cedarvale Elementary School.
The building programme to be presented to the ratepayers in December has received
careful consideration by the School Board and would appear to meet requirements estimated for next year.
Tests given by Dr. Conway's division and internal testing by the principals indicate
that the teaching staff is doing excellent work and is maintaining among the pupils a high
standard of achievement.
General
With the growth in school population, additional staff has been necessary to provide
health services for the two districts. These services are supplied by the North Shore
Union Board of Health, the staff of which is made up of a full-time medical director,
a part-time doctor, nine public health nurses, one supervisor, two sanitarians, and two
clerks.   Mental-health clinics were again held twice monthly by Dr. Gundry.
The yearly increase in teaching staff makes supervision of instruction more difficult,
so that the appointment of a helping teacher for primary teachers, planned by the North
Vancouver Board, will give some relief.
Again appreciation is expressed for assistance in carrying out my work, received
from teachers, principals, School Board members and personnel, and the Department of
Education. P 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.Fmn.,
MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The enrolment in School District No. 36 (Surrey) continued to grow during the
school-year 1952-53, and reached a new high of 7,287 pupils, an increase of approximately 10 per cent. The elementary grades accounted for 4,704 pupils and Grades VI
to XIII for 2,583. There were in operation thirty-four elementary schools, four junior-
senior high schools, and one senior high school. Two of the high schools enrolled
Grade XIII.
During the year two new classrooms were added to White Rock Elementary School,
and eight classrooms were constructed in the basements of existing schools. These
basement rooms, of which we have eleven, are not satisfactory, but they are better than
the only alternative—double shifts. When the year ended there were eighteen classes
on shift.
The teaching staff increased during the year, until it reached a total of 231. At this
point it was realized that adequate supervision of the teaching staff by one person was
quite impossible, so the School Board engaged Miss Erna Stephenson as helping teacher
in the primary grades. From the date of her appointment, Miss Stephenson has rendered
valuable service, and the standard of the primary grades has improved considerably under
her care.
The Grades VII and VIII classes enrolled in the elementary schools were transported
to the high schools for Home Economics and Industrial Arts, and good progress was
made in these subjects.
Teacher turnover again was a major problem, as was difficulty in getting teachers
qualified to teach the special subjects. Because of this, it was impossible to teach Music
and Art in most of our high schools. Many of the elementary schools also were without
capable instruction in Music. Teachers for Home Economics, Commercial subjects, and
Physical Education were very hard to get. It is to be hoped that a way will be found to
attract more teachers into these special fields.
At the end of their term of office, two of the veteran members of the Surrey School
Board—Mr. Ray Shepherd and Mr. David Brankin—retired from the Board. Both of
these gentlemen gave freely of their time for many years, and they take with them the
good wishes of their colleagues.
In closing, I would like to thank the officers of the Department of Education, the
Surrey School Board, and the principals and teachers of Surrey for the co-operation and
help which they have extended to me during the past year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 73
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 53 (Terrace), No. 54 (Smithers),
and No. 55 (Burns Lake)
REPORT OF H. D. ABBOTT, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Through the efforts of keenly interested School Boards, the educational requirements
of this area are being provided. Enrolments continue to increase, and all three districts
are arranging for additional classrooms and teachers. A junior-senior high-school building is under construction at Terrace. This will make it possible to broaden the curriculum
there. At Houston the former superior school will commence the next term as an enlarged
elementary-senior high school. This will enable senior students to complete their
secondary-school education without boarding in another centre. School-building by-laws
are being prepared in the Smithers and Burns Lake districts.
Staffing has been a problem in this area. Although no school was closed for lack
of a teacher, it was not always possible to obtain the services of fully qualified teachers.
However, it is gratifying to be able to report that the teaching staff has been most
conscientious and co-operative.   It has been a pleasure to work with them.
Continuing attention has been given to testing in the schools. Under the direction
of Dr. Conway, various tests of Province-wide scope were administered. In addition,
many standardized and teacher-made examinations were given. In all cases, teachers
were encouraged to make use of the results in a follow-up programme.
Throughout the year, stress has been placed upon development and maintenance
of good standards in the fundamentals. There has been an emphasis upon good work
habits. Note-books are examined not only by teachers, but also by principals and
Inspector. Work samples and charts posted in classrooms show that good results are
being obtained from consistent attention to improvement in handwriting, arithmetic,
spelling, and composition. In each school the children who are retarded in reading
comprehension and rate are receiving special attention. Increased mastery of the reading
skills will soon be reflected in greater appreciation and understanding of literature, social
studies, and science text-books.
In conclusion, I wish to pay tribute to the public health officers for their splendid
work in the schools, the Department of Education officials for their invaluable assistance,
and particularly the School Board secretary-treasurers for their untiring and faithful
service. P 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School Districts No. 38 (Richmond), No. 73 (Alert Bay), Unattached School
District at University Hall, and Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, M.A., E.D., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Organization
Schools
Teachers
District
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
Jr.
High
Elem.-
High
Superior
Elem.
Graded
Elem.
Ungraded
High
and Jr.
High
Elem.
and
Sup.
Special
No. 38 (Richmond)- ____.
No. 73 (Alert Bay)
1
1
2
1
1
7
2
8
55
4
8
77
19
7
Unattached—■
University Hill _   _
Provincial School for the
Deaf and the Blind .
24
Totals 	
1
1
3
1
7
10
67
103
24
Totals: Schools, 24; teachers, 194.
School District No. 38 (Richmond)
The school population continued its upward trend during the year. The new
junior-senior high school was not ready for occupancy at the commencement of the
school term. In order to relieve the elementary schools from carrying the Grades VII
and VIII classes, as they have done for the past three years, the two secondary schools
—Cambie Junior High (newly organized) and Richmond Junior-Senior High—were
placed on a shift basis. This continued until January, 1953, when the new junior-
senior high school was opened. Students and teachers of both schools deserve credit
for the manner in which they conducted themselves under rather trying conditions.
During the fall the renovation of the old Bridgeport School was carried out while
school was in session. The Board is to be congratulated on this project, which has
changed an old school into a bright, modern building which will serve the system for at
least another twenty years. The pupils and staff in this situation also deserve the highest commendation for continuing their regular classroom programmes without cessation
while the work was in progress.
Expandable two-room schools to provide accommodation for 1953-54 have been
planned for the following areas: Thompson Subdivision, Brighouse Estate, and Blun-
dell-Siddaway Road. A one-room portable school is also contemplated for the Hamilton School. In addition to providing needed classrooms, these schools should also be
a factor in relieving the demand for bus transportation, as all are situated in fast-
growing areas. In the Hamilton community, Grades IV to VI will attend the school
there instead of being transported to the Mitchell School.
School District No. 73 (Alert Bay)
Drilling for water to supply the new Alert Bay Junior-Senior High School was carried on during the year. Due to quicksand formation, the well proved to be a failure,
and new sources of water-supply, chiefly from the Village of Alert Bay and the Indian
village wells, are now under examination. Until a satisfactory supply of water can be
obtained, it has been deemed inadvisable to proceed with the construction of this school
project.
The excellent modern primary unit planned at Port McNeill School was completed
and placed in service at the beginning of the term.    In addition, another high-school REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 75
classroom was provided by division of the large room in the old building. Due to
increased enrolment, the status of the school was raised from superior to elementary-
high, thus bringing advanced educational facilities to this logging area.
The addition to the Minstrel Island School to provide washrooms and storage space
was completed in time for school reopening. This, together with improvements to the
teacherage, has provided excellent modern physical-educational facilities for this isolated
area.
During the year a class for new Canadians was provided at the Malcolm Island
School at Sointula. This has proved very successful, and these Finnish children will be
able to proceed in the regular grades next term.
University Hill School District
The accommodation problem in this area continues to become more
was necessary to acquire the use of another army hutment for the b
September school term.
In the fall the by-law to provide funds for the construction f
junior-senior high school was passed by a large majority.   Plann
during the year, and it is hoped to have complete'1"
ready for submission to the Department in tj>^
that the building will be ready for occur" P 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
The highlight of the school-year in Nanaimo was the opening of the splendid new
senior high school. Junior high-school pupils who had been on a shift system immediately filled to capacity the old dilapidated buildings vacated by the senior students. It is
essential that these old buildings be replaced by two new junior high schools as soon as
possible and a by-law to that effect will be put before the electors early in the coming
school-year.
An interesting feature of the school programme this year was a class for new
Canadians of public-school age.   The class consisted of fifteen Chinese, two Germans,
" " Austrian, and one Finn whose difficulties with the English language made it impos-
fhem to receive instruction in the ordinary classes.   A capable and sympathetic
'" charge of this group and, utilizing material supplied by the Correspondence
id various other sources, was able to make excellent progress with it.
Tosphere prevailed at all times, and during the year about one-third of
to return to regular classes.   The remainder will enter the ordinary
■ ■„
(Powell River), and No. 74 (Quatsino) REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 77
Quatsino
The by-law passed in October, 1951, to provide much needed new schools at Port
Alice and Port Hardy has been balked by frustrating delays and accompanying increases
in building costs. In order that the moneys voted may suffice, efforts are being made to
pare the original plans to the point where they will be within reach of the funds available.
General
In general, the schools of my inspectorate have operated satisfactorily this year. The
members of the various School Boards and teaching staffs have worked conscientiously,
with the result that continued progress has been made and much meritorious work
accomplished.
School Districts No. 42 (Maple Ridge) and No. 75 (Mission)
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
Enrolment continues to increase in this area, with the larger percentage gain at the
secondary level, as shown in the following table:—
Year
Elementary
Secondary
Total
1948-49     	
1,308
1,358
1,464
723
817
910
2,031
1950-51           _.                                          _-              	
2,175
1952-53     	
2,374
At the beginning of the fall term, September, 1952, a new two-room school was
opened at Mount Crescent, a similar unit at Yennadon, and a one-room school at Albion.
These units are already full, and a third room is being added to Yennadon. A five-room
school is under construction at Pitt Meadows; this should be ready for September, 1953,
and it will replace a number of obsolete units. Construction has started on a new senior
high school. On June 21st, 1953, fire totally destroyed the Maple Ridge Junior-Senior
High school. It had been planned to use this building as a junior high school on completion of the new senior high school building. Now the School Board is faced with the
immediately problem of finding temporary quarters for nearly 1,000 students and the
ultimate problem of replacing the destroyed building with another for junior high needs.
In this district, school finance continues to be a problem. It has a low total assessment in relation to pupil enrolment. In a large number of cases the assessed wealth
which supports the family lies outside the district, yet the district is faced with the educational costs for the children on a local land-tax basis.
In spite of overcrowded conditions, the work in the schools has been very satisfactory. It is gratifying to note the continuing interest of teachers in in-service training
classes and the increasing attendance at summer schools.
District No. 75 (Mission)
The transfer of pupils to the new junior-senior high school was made over the
Thanksgiving week-end, 1952. The school was officially opened on December 3rd,
1952, by the Honourable Tilly Jean Rolson, Minister of Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey,
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education. Approximately 1,200 people attended
the ceremony and later had an opportunity to view the school.   This completion made P 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
the former junior-senior high-school building available for the elementary classes which
had been spread through temporary quarters for four years.
The growth of this district may be described as steady, and the Board is wisely
looking ahead. It is planning for future sites and for the building of the facilities which
had to be cut from the junior-senior high school when the tenders received were higher
than the by-law fund.   The last of the one-room schools is now being modernized.
In June, 1953, the trustees and teachers met together to honour Mr. A. McMillan
on his retirement after many years of faithful service to this district.
The educational growth of pupils and the interest of teachers in in-service work
continues at a high level.
Conclusion
In both districts many related school activities have been carried on—in music,
drama, sports, and evening classes. Principals and teachers are commended for their
interest, and students for the favourable comment brought to their schools. I extend my
sincere thanks to the trustees, who have served so conscientiously, to secretary-treasurers
for co-operation, and to the local health unit for assistance from time to time.
School Districts No. 12 (Grand Forks), No. 13 (Kettle Valley),
and No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The year 1952-53 has not been a difficult one in this inspectorate, as there have
been no major problems.
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
A slight increase in enrolment in both the elementary and junior-senior high schools
was noted. One of the small rural schools, Kettle River North, was closed at the beginning
of the year, and a bus was put into operation. The number of pupils going into high
school from Brown Creek and Kettle River North had been increasing, and boarding
facilities were becoming quite a problem, but by placing this bus in service all high-school
students from this area were enabled to live at home.
For some years there has been a movement to form a class at night-school for
English for new Canadians, but was unsuccessful until this year, when twenty-three registered. Those taking the course were well pleased with it and hope to go on next year.
However, other subjects in night-school fell away, and no other courses were offered.
The staffing of the schools was not difficult, and the calibre of teachers secured was
high. A good maintenance programme is being carried out regularly and with excellent
results.
The Kootenay-Boundary Drama Festival was staged in Grand Forks Junior-Senior
High School and was most successful. Its success was due largely to the splendid co-operation of the staff, and the support of the citizens who opened their homes for billets. Owing
to the large number of entries, it was necessary to carry it for three evenings and two
afternoons. Mr. Sidney Risk, as adjudicator, was very much appreciated for his helpful
suggestions and criticisms.
Due to illness, the Board lost the services of its secretary-treasurer, Mr. H. Sutherland, who was succeeded by Mr. J. A. Hutton, former City Clerk of Grand Forks. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 79
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
All schools in this district were staffed, and it was necessary to secure only one
teacher without teacher training. The proportion of school population of the rural area
is becoming greater than the urban, with the result that there is increased demand for
transportation. During the early part of the term the pupils in Greenwood were housed
in temporary accommodations until their new school was built. Late in October a start
was made on the new six-room school, and the classes were moved in late in January.
The building is very nice, and pupils and staff, as well as the public, are quite happy with
the situation. There is a continued rise in the number of pupils from the small rural
schools who are going on to high school.   This is most gratifying.
A very successful dental clinic was held during the year, and credit for its organization and success goes to the Parent-Teacher Association and Community Association.
Credit is due Mrs. Klemens, who acted as secretary and carried much of the load of
organizing the programme.
District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
There was a very slight increase in school population in this district. There was no
difficulty obtaining staff, as all positions were filled with certificated teachers. A long-
term programme of maintenance and renovations is being carried on here, and has proved
very satisfactory. The maintenance staff has done an excellent job in modernizing old
classrooms and furniture.
The district was most fortunate during the year in obtaining the services of a dentist
from the Department of Health and Welfare. He has initiated a regular dental programme
in the district.
Conferences between welfare and health officials, principals, counsellors, and myself
were held regularly and proved most successful in dealing with problem cases.
In closing, may I once again thank the secretary-treasurers, members of the School
Boards, welfare workers, and public health officials, principals and teachers for their
splendid co-operation during the past year.
School Districts No. 69 (QuaKcum), No. 70 (Alberni), No. 79 (Ucluelet-
Tofino), and Unattached School Districts at Bamfield, Esperanza, Kyuquot,
R.C.A.F. Station (Tofino), Sarita River, Sydney Inlet, Tahsis River, and
Zeballos.
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The one large municipal, two large rural, and eight small unattached school districts
comprising this inspectorate have in excess of 4,000 pupils enrolled in the thirty schools,
which are staffed by some 160 teachers.
School District No. 69 (Qualicum)
This year has seen the reorganization of classes made possible by the completion of
the recent building programme. With a complete and experienced staff, the new junior-
senior high school at Qualicum was opened early in October. This school enrols all
senior high-school pupils in District No. 69 (Qualicum) and provides education at the
junior high-school level for those pupils in the vicinity of Qualicum Beach and in the
area lying north along the Island Highway. All Home Economics and Industrial Arts
classes are held at this centre.   The new Parksville Junior High School was opened in P 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
January, and provides accommodation and instruction for junior high-school pupils residing at Parksville, as well as for those living along the Alberni Highway and the Island
Highway (south). At Qualicum Beach and Parksville the administration and supervision
of the respective four- and six-room elementary schools were placed under the high-
school principals. Other elementary schools were in operation at Bowser, Little Qualicum, Hilliers, French Creek, Errington, and Nanoose. At the latter point, continued
increase in school enrolment necessitated the transporting of the Grade VI pupils to
Parksville. Because the funds made available in the district's first by-law have proven to
be inadequate to meet even existing requirements, the Board is presently making an
extensive survey of its immediate and future needs. In all probability a substantial
by-law will be placed before the ratepayers early in the fall. The Board and teaching staff
are to be commended for the manner in which they have met the problems arising from
current shortages. The educational programme, although somewhat interrupted by late
openings and change-over from the shift system, has been carried out in a generally satisfactory manner.
School District No. 70 (Alberni)
The new 1,000-pupil Alberni District Junior-Senior High School opened in September with an enrolment of 974 pupils. In all probability this number will be considerably
increased by the fall of 1953. The School Board is keeping a watchful eye on enrolment
trends within this steadily growing district. If the increase in school population continues
even at the present rate, the Board will have to go to the ratepayers very shortly with a
by-law. It would seem desirable to establish junior high schools at the two ends of the
district and leave the present junior-senior high school to accommodate the pupils in the
central area. As new subdivisions are opened up and the population moves more to the
suburbs, it would appear that the Board should consider the advisability of providing a
number of smaller neighbourhood schools to house the elementary grades. Already there
is need for new or better elementary-school facilities at several points in the district.
During the year the Board has concerned itself largely with routine administrative
matters. Considerable maintenance work has been done, and a good start made on the
improvement and beautification of school playgrounds. In this connection the staff and
students of the Alberni District High School deserve special mention.
In administering and supervising the educational programme in this district, the
work of the Board and Provincial Inspector is considerably facilitated by the able and
willing assistance of the two senior principals. Principal E. Dunn of the Alberni District
High School acts as senior principal in the field of secondary education. Principal G.
Jamieson of the Alberni Elementary School has similar responsibilities at the elementary
level. During the year special attention was given to remedial instruction and to the
problems confronting new Canadians. Miss E. B. Alexander and Mrs. M. D. Narroway,
both experienced and especially trained teachers, carried out effective programmes with
the considerable number of pupils in their respective classes.
The educational programme in this school district was uninterrupted during the year.
The quality of classroom work shows steady and positive improvement, and results are
well up to expectations.
School District No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino)
This new large rural school district was created by Order in Council dated April
2nd and effective January 1st, 1953. It embraces the former school districts of Kildonan,
Port Albion, Ucluelet, Clayoquot, and Tofino, as well as a large portion of unorganized
and sparsely settled territory on the west coast of Vancouver Island. Open schools are
operated at Kildonan, Ucluelet, Port Albion, and Tofino. A staff of nine teachers administers to the educational needs of 200 pupils in Grades I to XII. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 81
A temporary School Board of seven members has taken office. The spirit of enthusiasm, co-operation, and friendliness which has pervaded the first meetings of the new
Board presages well for the future of the new district. Already a building by-law has
been prepared to increase and improve facilities and accommodation. Meetings of ratepayers have been held at all the larger centres, and the chances of passing the by-law
appear to be good. It is planned to utilize the new Ucluelet School for junior-senior high-
school work and to build a new three-room elementary school on an extension of the
present school-site. The Tofino School is to be completely modernized and more play
space provided. The Board contemplates the introduction of both Home Economics and
Industrial Arts classes at Ucluelet. More accommodation and additional equipment will
be necessary. The educational programme in this district was generally quite satisfactory.
The senior room at Tofino enrolled Grades V to X. The high-school section at Ucluelet
was quite large. Both situations placed a very heavy teaching load on the instructors.
These situations will be remedied next fall, when all Grades VII to XII pupils will attend
the school at Ucluelet under the instruction of an increased and fully trained staff.
Unattached School Districts
Most of these school districts have been fortunate in obtaining and retaining the
services of experienced, forward-looking teachers. In all communities there is a happy
relationship between the school and the home. At Bamfield a three-teacher school has
operated to the satisfaction of the pupils, parents, and staff. At Tahsis and Zeballos, two-
room schools were in operation. At other points, the one-room school continued to meet
quite satisfactorily the educational and cultural needs of the small community. It is
regretted that the anticipated teacher turnover this summer may break a fine record of
continuity of instruction in some of these communities. A number of teachers are temporarily leaving the profession to continue with higher education.
This, my first, year in this inspectorate has been a most interesting one. My experiences with Boards, secretaries, principals, and teachers have been most gratifying.
Monthly bulletins dealing with educational matters have been regularly dispatched to
Boards and teachers. In co-operation with the teachers, a district-wide testing programme was inaugurated. Tests sent from the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research
have been administered. Principals' meetings have been held. A survey of out-of-class
supervision was made. A bulletin on the functions of various educational officials was
prepared. At least one visit was made to all schools, with the exception of two rural
schools which could not conveniently be reached. Reports were prepared on a good
percentage of learning situations. In June, classification lists showing placement and disposition of the pupils were prepared.
In closing, I wish to express my gratitude for the helpfulness and co-operation of
all those with whom I have worked. Boards, principals, and teachers have given most
generously of their time and effort to promote better educational opportunities for the
children. Classroom work has been conscientiously and well done, and a very definite
attempt made to maintain and improve past educational standards. It has been a pleasure
to work with those interested in the education of the youth in this part of the Province.
To all of these and to the Department officials in Victoria, I wish to express my sincere
thanks. P 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School Districts No. 49 (Ocean Falls), No. 51 (Portland Canal), No. 52 (Prince
Rupert), and Unattached School Districts of Butedale, Tulsequah, Kemano,
and Kitimat.
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
This district employed twenty-seven teachers. It operated six ungraded elementary
schools and two graded elementary-high schools. All buildings have been well maintained.   Living accommodation for teachers in this area has been adequately met.
In September, 1952, a new school was opened at South Bentinck Arm. A new
three-room elementary school has been built at Bella Coola, through the joint effort of
the school district and the Department of Indian Affairs. This school is ready for
occupancy in September, 1953, and will accommodate both white and native children.
The schools at Bella Bella and Ocean Falls have been renovated to provide better
accommodation.
Good interest has been maintained in the night-school courses offered at Ocean
Falls. The schools of the Bella Coola Valley again availed themselves of the services
of the dental clinic.
Although the personnel of the School Board of this district have experienced several changes during the past year, its efforts have been continuous. The contribution of
both trustees and teaching staff to the educational programme of this district is very
commendable.
School District No. 51 (Portland Canal)
Three schools operated in this district during the year—ungraded schools at Alice
Arm and Premier, and a three-room superior school at Stewart.
Unsettled mining conditions have had an effect on this area. Premier School was
closed in April, when Silbak-Premier mine ceased operation. The Alice Arm School
was reopened in September, in quarters located at the Torbrit silver mine, north of
Alice Arm. Living accommodation for Alice Arm children was found at this new location.    Due to a strike, this mine has not operated since May.
Economic conditions at Stewart have improved with logging operations. The
school enrolment has remained steady. The school building is old, but is being well
maintained.   This district found difficulty in procuring teaching staff for its schools.
School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
Prince Rupert employs a staff of sixty-two teachers. It operates three ungraded
and six graded schools. The school population shows a steady increase and is taxing
present accommodation. In September a school was opened at Inverness. In December a by-law to provide a six-room school at Port Edward received approval, and construction has commenced.
A satisfactory programme of maintenance has been followed; particular emphasis
has been given to improving the appearance of school-grounds in Prince Rupert.
Health services are supplied to the schools by the Skeena Health Unit.
The schools have been staffed with qualified teachers, although the shortage of
secondary teachers necessitated the employment of elementary teachers in secondary
schools. Night-school classes and classes for new Canadians were established. The
schools participated in the Music and Drama Festival and made a fine contribution to
the Education Week programme.
The interest of local organizations in supplying scholarships to high-school graduates is appreciated. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 83
Unattached Schools
Ungraded schools are located at Tulsequah, on the Taku River, and at Butedale.
Limited but satisfactory accommodation is provided in each area.
The Morrison-Knudsen Company operates a five-room school, with Grades I to
IX, at Kemano. Kitimat Constructors operates a four-room school, with Grades I to
XI, at Kitimat. The regular programme was offered in both schools. Kitimat has now
been incorporated as a municipality, and this area became School District No. 80
(Kitimat), effective July, 1953.
School Districts No. 33 (Chilliwack) and No. 76 (Agassiz)
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 33 (Chilliwack) employed 141 teachers to instruct 4,174
pupils.   Fifteen schools were in operation during the year.
In School District No. 76 (Agassiz) three schools enrolled 480 pupils, with a total
staff of nineteen teachers. Construction of the new elementary-high school at Agassiz
was completed in June. All the schools in District No. 76 are now of acceptable
standard.
District No. 33 (Chilliwack) found it necessary to open seven additional classrooms to accommodate the increased enrolment. Five of these additional classes were
enrolled in basements, activity-rooms, or in other temporary space. A new two-room
school of prefabricated panel type was constructed at Cultus Lake. The Cultus Lake
School has provided excellent classroom accommodation at a very reasonable cost.
Considerable testing with standardized tests in reading, writing, and arithmetic was.
undertaken throughout the elementary-school grades.    More than 400 pupils took the
tests in each grade and in each subject examined.   The result of this testing programme
indicates that the elementary-school pupils are doing as well, or better, in these fundamental tool subjects as pupils of former years.
Adequate instructional supervision from the inspectoral level becomes continually
more difficult to achieve. The rapid increase in our school population not only has
increased the number of teachers in our districts, but also has increased the desire of
the Boards for constant consultation with the Inspector.
A noteworthy feature of the Chilliwack District during the past year has been the
continued popularity of the night-school classes. The night-school has operated for
four nights a week, with an enrolment of over 400 adults.
Again I would like to pay tribute to the very good work done by a loyal and
efficient staff of teachers.
School Districts No. 32 (Fraser Canyon) and No. 34 (Abbotsford)
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A., B.Ed.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Because of the increased duties delegated to me as Consultant in Vocational Agriculture, Mr. Floyd L. Irwin, Inspector of Schools, was assigned to assist me in this
inspectorate. The following report covers the outstanding activities of the inspectorate
under our combined charge. P 84
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
School enrolments increased from 821 in June, 1952, to 906 in June, 1953, or
slightly more than 10 per cent, with a corresponding increase in the number of teachers
from thirty-one to thirty-five. This increase, along with the even greater anticipated
increase in 1953-54, was the basis for outstanding activities of the school-year.
To accommodate the above increase in enrolment, additional rooms had to be found
in Hope and Spuzzum. This was achieved by dividing the oversize classroom at Spuzzum
into two rooms and by renting the Canadian Legion Hall in Hope. To provide for
future increases, the Board of Trustees has planned a new six-room elementary building
for Hope, located strategically in a rapidly growing residential area about four city blocks
from the present school.
In addition to this planned new accommodation, plans were completed for the
replacement of the present inadequate structure at Keefers, and to modernize the building
at Ruby Creek, recently purchased from the Knowlton Logging Company. Maintenance
of existing schools to a functionally high standard has been a continuing policy of the
Board.
A competent staff of teachers was employed during the year, and a good educational
standard has been maintained throughout the district. The following figures show the
numbers of teachers by certificate classification: E.T., 1; E.C., 10; E.B., 16; S.B., 7;
andS.A., 1.
For the first time in the history of the district, night-school classes were operated,
and while these did not prove to be as successful as anticipated, it is felt that they did lay
the foundation for successful future development.
During the year the teaching staff, Board of School Trustees, staff of the Upper
Fraser Valley Health Unit, and the secretary-treasurer worked harmoniously with the
Department of Education in carrying through the educational programme.
School District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
The outstanding event of the school-year in this district was the completion and
opening of the Abbotsford Junior High School. This building was officially opened by
Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, on November 14th.
Its opening not only provided needed accommodation for some 650 pupils, but also
marked the completion of the organization of the district along a 6-3—3 division basis,
and thus set the pattern for future development.
Opening of one-room schools at Ridgedale and Barrowtown carried Board policy
along the line of establishing local schools in areas where feasible one step nearer to
completion, while opening of a large activity-room at Upper Sumas was in line with
Board policy to provide Physical Education facilities in larger elementary schools, where
warranted.
While enrolment of pupils increased during the year by about 5 per cent, increases
to staff amounted only to 2Vz per cent due to improved accommodation and reorganization. The district was again fortunate in having a competent staff of teachers. The
numbers of teachers by certificate classification were as follows: E.T., 2; E.C., 14;
E.B., 60; E.A., 3; S.B., 32; S.A., 3; and S.C., 3.
The night-school has become well established in this district and another successful
year was experienced. Sixteen courses were carried through to completion, with a peak
enrolment of approximately 350 students. Three of these courses were in-service courses
for teachers. Five classes for new Canadians were conducted, with about 60 students
enrolled.
This district joined the Upper Fraser Valley Health Unit during the year and is
receiving the full public health services for the first time in some years. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 85
Plans for the building of a new senior high school to house 600 students and an
additional junior high school to accommodate 350 students have occupied the attention
of the Board of Trustees for the latter part of the year. It is anticipated that a by-law
will be presented to the people during the coming year.
The harmonious co-operation existing among the Board of Trustees, Municipal
Councils, Department of Education, and school district staffs has resulted in material
progress during the year just past.
School Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake), No. 7 (Nelson), and No. 8 (Slocan)
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P.ED.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The school-year 1952-53 has been characterized by a continuation of overcrowded
conditions and the lack of facilities for a full secondary programme in both School
Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake) and No. 7 (Nelson). It is pleasing, indeed, to be able
to report that a building programme estimated at more than $2,000,000 for the Nelson
District received over 80 per cent support from the ratepayers. Construction has commenced on the additions to the Salmo Elementary School. An early start is forecast on
the new Nelson Senior High School and on the additions to the Nelson Junior High School,
the Hume Elementary School, and the Salmo Junior-Senior High School. In the Kootenay
Lake District, construction has been started on the four-classroom addition to the Riondel
Superior School, the new one-room school at Ainsworth, and the additions to the Kaslo
High-Elementary School. The Slocan Board of School Trustees is completing an additional classroom each on the junior-senior high schools at Slocan City and South Slocan.
On the completion of these building programmes, a marked improvement in school
facilities will have resulted.
Filling a long-felt district need, a special class for retarded children was established
this year in the Nelson Central Elementary School. This year, also, saw the first in-service
training course for teachers established in the district under the Summer School of
Education.
The forty-one schools were staffed in these districts with a total of 146 teachers.
An increasing difficulty to obtain fully qualified secondary teachers was noted. The
smaller schools, in particular, suffer from the inability to obtain specialist teachers.
The increased emphasis during the past few years on instruction in the tool subjects
and on work habits is bringing gratifying results. The Provincial testing programme and
the district use of standardized tests are utilized to plan remedial instruction.
Three candidates from the Nelson Senior High School brought honour to themselves
and their school in the University Entrance and Senior Matriculation examinations. Miss
Ruth Crane and Miss Roberta Stevenson won Provincial Senior Matriculation Scholarships, and Mr. Michael Fraser won the University Entrance Scholarship for the area, as
well as the University Alumni Scholarship.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to the three School Boards, the
secretary-treasurers, the principals, and the teachers for the co-operation that has
"prevailed. P 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School Districts No. 3 (Kimberley), No. 4 (Windermere), and No. 18 (Golden)
REPORT OF I. H. R. JEFFERY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The inspectorate, with headquarters at Kimberley, embraces two large rural school
districts (No. 4 and No. 18) and the large municipal school district (No. 3).
In each of the three districts there has been a steady growth of school population,
particularly in the larger centres. Rather than a population influx, an increase in the
number of Grade I beginners from established homes and the development of holding
power in the secondary school above Grade VIII have been largely responsible for the
trend in population statistics.
For the entire school-year in Kimberley City, two divisions have been on swing shift
in each of Blarchmont Elementary and A. A. Watkins Elementary Schools as a result of
the failure of Construction By-law No. 2 in March, 1952.
A revised limited by-law based on immediate needs was passed with approximately
63 per cent majority on December 11th. It provided for a four-room elementary school
on the Lindsay Park site in Kimberley and three rooms of a four-room plan elementary
school at rural Chapman Camp. Increased accommodation difficulties can be expected
during the school-year 1953—54, as the two buildings cannot be ready for occupancy at
the opening of the fall term.
In September, in the rural portion of School District No. 3 (Kimberley), the Board
opened Springbrook Elementary school, a new portable building which replaced the
improvised log-cabin school at remote Sheep Creek.
In School District No. 4 (Windermere) a one-room elementary school was opened
in company-provided quarters at Giant Mascot Mines. The Edgewater Elementary
School organization was replaced by an elementary-senior high school plan, with two
additional divisions housed in quarters provided by Edgewater Sawmills Limited. An
additional classroom was opened at Canal Flats in a building provided by Columbia Contracting Company.
In School District No. 18 (Golden) a one-room elementary school was opened in
company-provided quarters at Moseson's lumber camp near Field. On December 10th
a construction by-law was passed with a 70-per-cent majority. It provided for a six-room
elementary-senior high school replacement at Golden and a four-room elementary-senior
high school building at Parson for consolidation of Harrogate, Castledale, Parson, and
McMurdo rural sections.
The district inspectoral office again set up a minimum programme for standardized
testing as a supplement to the programme of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research. Larger schools have co-operated well in the organization of the supply of testing
materials and in the assistance to teachers of near-by one-room schools.
During the year the East Kootenay Administrative Council held three profitable
meetings that were attended by principals, vice-principals, and Inspectors of Schools for
East Kootenay.
The Kimberley Board of School Trustees is to be commended for the success of its
initial organization of adult night-school education under a principal. The excellent
enrolment in fourteen Vocational and Non-vocational classes at the opening was well
maintained.
One can readily appreciate the growing progressive attitude of the three School,
Boards in the area.   There is much concentration on the study of population trends and
in the provision of better building and grounds facilities as finances permit.   This corr
mendable attitude augurs well for the future of education in the inspectorate.
In conclusion, I wish to express my gratitude to the Department of Educatio
trustees, representatives, secretary-treasurers, principals, teachers, and other school p'
sonnel for their splendid co-operation and assistance during the year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 87
School Districts No. 59 (Peace River South), No. 60 (Peace River North), and
Unattached School Districts at Atlin, Camp Mile 163, Camp Mile 300,
Camp Mile 456, Fort Nelson, Fort Nelson Airport, Lower Post, and
Telegraph Creek.
REPORT OF G. E. JOHNSON, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
One hundred and forty-four teachers employed in fifty-seven schools made up the
staff of this inspectorate during the past school-year. The rural population of the Peace
River area is, for the most part, scattered on large farms. Long distances, coupled with
poor road conditions throughout the greater part of the year, make consolidation in such
an area inadvisable. This inspectorate will probably always be characterized by many
small schools.
It was not possible to obtain fully trained teachers for all the schools in the inspectorate during the year. The annual teacher turnover continued to be high. In the rural
schools outside of Dawson Creek and Fort St. John, this turnover amounted to 73 per
cent over the preceding year. Such a situation poses an instructional problem, not easy
of solution until there is a better supply of qualified teachers. The work of supervision
was made easier, however, by the able assistance of Mr. F. L. Irwin, Inspector of Schools,
who spent two months in the area.
School enrolments continued to mount. In Dawson Creek three temporary classrooms were added during the year to the South Peace Junior-Senior High School. Another room will be needed for September, 1953. The holding power of this district high
school shows steady increase, and under capable administration the school has been able
to offer a diversified programme aimed at meeting the needs of all its students. A new
wing to the South Peace dormitory was opened in September, 1952, and some eighty
students were accommodated.
The new Dawson Creek Elementary School, opened late in the 1951-52 term, was
filled to capacity, and three classes had to be accommodated in an annex. Figures for
September, 1953, indicate that at least another four classrooms will be required at that
time. The kindergarten department of this school has proved very popular and worth
while, and plans call for a second kindergarten room for September, 1953.
North of the Peace a by-law was approved by the ratepayers in November, 1952,
and late in the school-year a contract was awarded to build the North Peace Junior-Senior
High School at Fort St. John. The completion of this school will mean that a satisfactory
secondary programme can be offered to the students of this northern district.
Early in the school-year new schools were opened at Montney, North Pine, and
Upper Pine in School District No. 60. Plans for the school-year 1953-54 call for new
one-room schools at Erinlea and Moose Creek and an additional classroom at Blueberry.
Pupil enrolments showed an increase in most of the unattached school districts.
A third classroom was provided this year at Camp Mile 300. Fort Nelson and Lower
Post will likely become two-room situations before another year.
One of the most interesting developments during the year was the creation of a new
school district at McDame Creek, just south of the British Columbia-Yukon Border, at
the site of the Cassiar Asbestos Corporation. A one-room school will open in September,
1953, in temporary accommodation. As company plans are developed and a permanent
townsite is laid out, growth in this new school district will undoubtedly be rapid.
I wish to record here my very sincere thanks and appreciation to those trustees,
secretary-treasurers, and teachers who helped to make my first year in this office so
enjoyable. The hospitality and friendliness of the people in this northern portion of the
Province, along with their progressive attitude in school matters, are outstanding. P 88
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1952-53
School Districts No. 1  (Fernie) and No. 2  (Cranbrook)
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Increasing school population in District No. 2 compelled the opening of additional
divisions in both elementary and secondary grades of the Cranbrook schools. The school
at Foothills was closed down in May, when the lumber-mill there ceased to operate.
Inability to secure qualified personnel forced the temporary abandonment of counselling
services in the Mount Baker Junior-Senior High School, a loss badly felt in a fast-growing
school.
School construction in District No. 1 got under way with the completion of the
Jaffray addition, while work was started on the addition at Fernie and on the new schools
at Sparwood, Elko, Newgate, and Gold Creek. District No. 2 is also faced with the
problem of providing additional school accommodation at Cranbrook in the near future.
One-room schools at Mayook and Fort Steele were closed when the enrolment fell
below minimum requirements.
New transportation routes were opened up from Mayook to Wardner and from
Dorr to Waldo.
The usual testing programme was carried on from this office, with some expansion
in the secondary grades. Results over the years tend to show steady improvement in both
spelling and arithmetic fundamentals.
Principals and vice-principals, together with Inspectors, met at Cranbrook four times
during the year to discuss common problems. This East Kootenay School Administrators'
Council has been an effective means of exchanging ideas and has done much to set up a
uniform administrative policy in the area.
Homogeneous grouping, introduced experimentally two years ago in the Cranbrook
elementary schools, has proven very successful in terms of pupil progress. This has been
due to the intelligent and conscientious effort of the teachers concerned and to sympathetic administration within the schools.
School Board members, as in the past, have done a splendid job of providing excellent school facilities for all the children in the area.
School District No. 11 (Trail)
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.P_ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate comprises School District No. 11 (Trail), which has one senior
high school, one junior-senior high school, one junior high school, one elementary-
junior high school, and twelve elementary schools. The net enrolment for the year was
4,941, with a staff of 193 teachers. The increase in school population during the past
six years is indicated in the following table:—
Enrolment
Increase
1946
1952
of Increase
Grades I to VI                .___	
Grades VII to IX               _  	
2,271
897
543
2,925
1,228
788
654
331
245
29
37
Grades X to XIII      -   _.__
45
Totals     _    	
3,711
4,941
1,230
33 REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 89
It is significant that the greatest percentage of increase is in the senior high-school
grades. This is apparently the result of an increased holding power in those grades.
Improved facilities and the introduction of many new courses, especially in the Industrial Arts and Commercial fields, have been important factors in this commendable
growth.
The school population is steadily increasing in this rapidly expanding industrial
area. Two by-laws in 1947 and 1949 made available approximately $4,000,000 for
improvements to existing schools and provision for a number of new schools. These
projects were completed with the opening of the Fruitvale Elementary-Junior High
School in September, 1952. The Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston, Minister of Education, and Mr. H. L. Campbell, Deputy Superintendent of Education, participated at the
official opening. Lack of funds made it necessary for the Board of School Trustees to
delete temporarily the auditorium-gymnasium from the construction plans. This school
is of significance because it provides the Fruitvale area with a well-equipped junior high
school, with facilities for Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and Commercial courses.
Previously, students from Fruitvale had to be transported to the Trail Junior High
School.
All schools operated efficiently, with principals and teachers co-operating to put
into practice the objectives of the programme of studies. The elementary schools were
staffed with fully qualified teachers. In order to fill all vacancies in the secondary
schools, it was necessary to appoint teachers who lacked the required professional or
academic qualifications. It is becoming increasingly difficult to find fully qualified
teachers in Music, Commerce, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and Physical Education. There also appears to be a shortage of female teachers qualified to teach in the
secondary schools.
Regular meetings of school principals were held during the year. As a result of
these meetings, there has been a good effort in all classrooms to achieve worthy standards in academic attainment, commensurate with the ability of each child. Particular
emphasis was given to the fundamentals in arithmetic in Grades IV to XI. A gratifying
improvement was noted.
A class for the mentally and physically handicapped children in attendance at
Rossland elementary schools was opened in the Cook Avenue School. The resulting
success of this venture has prompted the Board of Trustees to start a similar class in
Trail in September, 1953.
Evening classes for adults continued to expand. Approximately 800 persons were
enrolled in a wide choice of Vocational and Non-vocational courses. Two in-service
teacher education courses were offered with the approval of the Superintendent of Education. These proved popular with the teachers, and it is hoped to expand the offering
for next year.
The classroom phase of apprentice-training was taken over by the Trail Board of
School Trustees. This work is carried on in the evening at the J. Lloyd Crowe High
School.    The complete cost is borne by the Provincial and Federal Governments.
The Trail District was privileged to enjoy the experience of an exchange teacher
from Eastern Canada. Miss Mildred Morgan, of Halifax, exchanged with Miss Violet
Flick, of the James L. Webster School.
In June of this year, Miss Barbara Morrison and Mr. William Simpkinson brought
distinction to themselves and to the J. Lloyd Crowe High School by winning Royal
Institute Scholarships for Senior Matriculation.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation of the co-operation I have
received during the year from the Department of Education, from the Board of School
Trustees, and from the principals and teachers of this district. P 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School Districts No. 5 (Creston), No. 9 (Castlegar), and No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
report of j. j. Mckenzie, b.a., inspector of schools
During the past three years the number of teachers in this inspectorate has increased
by twenty-four and the number of children attending school by over 500. The greatest
increase has been in School District No. 9 (Castlegar), which now employs fifty-two
teachers and has in attendance just under 1,500 pupils. It would appear that a steady
increase in school population in this district can be expected for the next few years. In
School Districts No. 5 and No. 10 slight but significant increases in pupil enrolment have
taken place during the past year.
School District No. 5 (Creston)
During the summer the Erickson school was lost by fire. This necessitated transporting the school-children of this area into Creston, where they operated as a separate
unit in the Creston Elementary School. Reconstruction of a new two-room prefabricated
building was commenced in the fall, and it is now ready for occupancy. A two-room
addition of similar construction has been completed at Crawford Bay. Under the able
direction of Mr. R. Roebuck, supervisor of buildings and maintenance, these schools have
been constructed at a considerable saving to the Board.
During the Easter holidays the various chapters of the British Columbia Future
Farmers held their convention in Creston. A good representation of students from
Montana and Idaho also attended. In all, approximately 100 students participated. The
convention was fortunate in having in attendance Mr. A. W. Johnson, State Supervisor
of Vocational Agriculture for Montana, and Mr. W. H. Grant, Inspector of Schools and
Consultant for Vocational Agriculture in British Columbia schools. The programme was
well organized and capably directed. All students actively participated in some part of
it. Much credit is due the Creston instructor, Mr. John Verkerk, and the Creston
students for the business-like manner in which they handled all details associated with
the organization of the convention and for the able direction and leadership given the
programme. The convention proved very worth while to students, instructors, and others
who attended.
School District No. 9 (Castlegar)
In School District No. 9 (Castlegar) the school population in both the elementary
and secondary levels has increased to the point of overcrowding. In September next it
will be necessary to use the old brick building at Brilliant to house elementary pupils.
The junior-senior high school will require additional space in the Castlegar No. 2 Elementary Schools to take care of the overflow. Due to the above conditions the Board of
Trustees for this district finds it necessary to place a building by-law before the ratepayers this fall. It is hoped that this by-law, which will be for the construction of both
elementary and secondary accommodation, will take care of the needs of this rapidly
expanding area for a reasonable period of time.
School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
In School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes) an addition of one classroom is being made
to the Nakusp Elementary School to take care of the pupils who were housed previously
in a one-room building on the high-school grounds. It is anticipated that in the near
future further accommodation will be needed, particularly in the Nakusp area. The
school population in other points in the district appears to remain fairly constant.
During the year a good programme of standardized testing was carried out in all
school districts.   This was supplemented by tests from the Bureau of Tests, Standards, REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 91
and Research. Remedial programmes were organized in the larger schools, with an
emphasis on the fundamentals, particularly arithmetic and reading. The results generally
proved worth while. This was due in a large measure to the capable direction of the
principals and the excellent co-operation of their staffs.
In concluding this report, I wish to express my thanks to all my School Boards, their
secretary-treasurers, the principals and their staffs for the splendid co-operation they have
extended to me throughout the year. The trustees particularly have given most generously
of their time and effort to bring about satisfactory solutions of their many problems.
School Districts No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch Island), No. 29 (Lillooet),
and No. 30 (South Cariboo)
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.P_ed.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 25 (Barriere)
This has been a year of consolidation of gains rather than expansion. Transportation
and building facilities have been adequate to provide a satisfactory standard of elementary-
and secondary-school education for the children in all parts of the district. In spite of
a very small annual turnover in teaching personnel, the difficulty in procuring good
teachers is a major source of concern.
School District No. 26 (Birch Island)
In common with many other school districts of the Province, this district was faced
during the year with the necessity of reopening closed schools and extreme overcrowding
in others, including the newly built Clearwater Elementary-High School. Birch Island
Elementary School was reopened as a primary school, and plans made to reopen two
more schools as enrolment warranted.
Blue River Superior School was renovated and an additional classroom added, with,
at the same time, installation of modern heat, lighting, and plumbing. This work completed the plans authorized under School Loan By-law No. 1, passed in 1951.
As a service to the community concerned, special attention was given by the teacher,
with the full co-operation of the Board, to provide extra teaching in English to some
twenty new Canadians of Italian origin at Avola.
The shortage of adequately qualified and trained teachers became even more acute
during the year, with indications that the year 1953-54 will see no improvement in this
respect.
Arrangements were completed during the year for the commencement of a badly
needed dental service for this district, on a private-practice basis, pending the establishment of the preventive programme envisaged by the Department of Health and Welfare.
School District No. 29 (Lillooet)
Lillooet District now has thirty-two teachers, 702 students, and nine schools—two
of these consolidated. The ever-increasing population has meant new schools and the
replacement of old ones. A new school and teacherage at Blue Ridge has taken care of
children who previously had to cross an aerial ferry. Gold Bridge and Shalalth both have
new schools, replacing old ones. The approval for an activity-room and stage at Lillooet
will mean more school sports and drama. This year Lillooet won the cup for their play
at the Kamloops Festival. P 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Both Lillooet and Bralorne Schools offer Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and
Commercial subjects, both for students and for night-schools. Lillooet has built up a
school band of ten students and hopes to increase the number this year. The larger
schools have audio-visual aids and radio-phonographs to supplement their studies. Blue
Ridge School also is teaching photography and film development. All these have helped
to hold the older students in school.
School District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
The school population for the school-year 1952-53 was 670, an increase of 122
over the previous term, with indications of a still further increase for the coming term.
The Home Economics and Industrial Arts courses, which have been in operation for
one year at Lytton and two at Clinton and Ashcroft, have been very successful and most
beneficial to the pupils in this rural area.
For the coming term the rural school at Loon Lake will be closed and the pupils
from this school transported to Clinton. As it has been impossible to obtain a teacher
for the rural school at Green Lake South, the pupils of this area will also be transported
to the Clinton School. An additional fifty-five-passenger bus will be put on the Clinton
run to provide increased transportation facilities to accommodate the additional pupils
from Green Lake South and Loon Lake. A new bus route is also being established to
bring pupils from Botanie Valley to the Lytton School.
It has been necessary to provide temporary accommodation at the Clinton School
to take care of the increased enrolment. If the present trend of increased school population continues, plans will be made for additions to the three elementary-senior high
schools—Clinton, Ashcroft, and Lytton.
School Districts No. 24 (Kamloops) and No. 31 (Merritt)
REPORT OF E. MARRIOTT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 24 (Kamloops)
Thirty schools were in operation in School District No. 24, with a total enrolment
of 3,051 students and a staff of 114 teachers. Of the schools in operation, there were
twenty one-room schools, four two-room schools, one elementary-high school of six divisions, four graded elementary schools of eight or more divisions, and one junior-senior
high school with a staff of forty-four teachers.
The shortage of teachers in the Province as a whole resulted in a 45-per-cent
turnover of staff in this district for the year 1952-53 and the necessity of employing
some teachers without the necessary qualifications for the positions to which they were
appointed. The teachers employed in the secondary grades held certificates under the
following classifications: S.A., 5; S.B., 32; S.C.,4; E.B., 4; E.C., 1; andE.T., 1. Those
in the elementary schools were as follows: S.B., 1; E.A., 1; E.B., 46; E.C., 16; and
E.T., 3. The median experience of all teachers employed in this district was close to
eight years, and compared favourably with the median for this Province.
The enrolment in School District No. 24 has increased steadily during the past five
years, with the consequent overcrowding of facilities in spite of the construction of many
additional classrooms. The following table of enrolment for the past five years shows the
rate of increase:— REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 93
Grades
1 to VI
Grades
VII to IX
Grades
X to XIII
Total
1948-49 _	
1,522
1,608
1,711
1,772
1,879
548
592
638
692
363
394
403
409
2,433
1949-50 _      _	
2,594
1950-51 _.___	
1951-52   ___
2,752
2,873
1952-53                                         .-.            _	
710                   462
3,051
Provision for a new junior-senior high school was made in the by-law passed in
1949. This new school was opened in September, 1952, with an enrolment of 1,050
students. The former junior-senior high school was converted for elementary grades,
and was officially named the Allan Matthews Elementary School, in honour of Allan F.
Matthews, retired Inspector of Schools, who is still resident in this district.
School District No. 31 (Merritt)
Five schools were in operation in this district—one elementary-high school of twelve
divisions located at Merritt and four rural schools. The total enrolment for June, 1953,
was 415 students. This district has lacked adequate facilities for the secondary grades,
resulting in a large drop-out beyond Grade VIII. Of the total enrolment during 1952-53,
only twenty-five, or 6 per cent, were attending Grades X, XI, and XII, as compared to 15
per cent in the Kamloops District, where facilities for a broad secondary programme are
provided.
General
A programme of testing was commenced during the year in all schools. The following tests were administered in the rural schools from this office, and similar tests were
used in the graded schools by the principals:—
Monroe Basic Reading Tests—Grades I—III.
Metropolitan Achievement Tests—Grades II-VIII.
Otis Quick-scoring Intelligence Test, Alpha A—Grades II-IV.
Otis Self-administering Intelligence Test—Form B—Grades V-VIII.
Principals' conferences were organized and held monthly for the purpose of improving administrative and supervisory practices.
A friendly spirit of co-operation prevailed among teachers, principals, and the
Boards of Trustees. All are to be commended for their untiring efforts in furthering
educational progress throughout this area.
After many years of energetic and devoted service to education as teacher, principal,
and Inspector of Schools, Mr. H. A. McArthur retired in August, 1952. He was held in
the highest esteem by the School Board members, by the teachers, and by the community
at large. I am happy to report that Mr. McArthur has chosen to remain in this district,
and is actively engaged in many organizations interested in the betterment of the
community.
School Districts No. 23 (Kelowna) and No. 77 (Summerland)
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In this inspectorate there has been little of the spectacular during the school-year.
Nevertheless, it has been a busy one for all concerned in the great social enterprise of
attempting to prepare all the children of all the people for worthy citizenship and lives P 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
that will be happy and successful because of right ideals accepted, good habits formed,
ability in social adjustment developed, tools of learning mastered, knowledge gained,
and, we trust, appropriate wisdom attained. Here I wish to acknowledge with gratitude
the co-operativeness and faithfulness of the members of the School Boards and teaching
staffs in all that is designed to promote the welfare and growth of the pupils. I feel that,
by and large, we are very fortunate in the character and ability of our trustees and teachers.
I am ever mindful and appreciative of the fact that trustees give freely of their time and
talents, without monetary reward, finding their compensation in the knowledge of the
importance of the service rendered.
In both school districts supervisory emphasis has been placed upon the development
and maintenance of basic skills as the sine qua non of instruction and learning in all
subjects, and on efforts to realize more fully the social objectives of education. It seems
necessary to reaffirm constantly that public education is a social function and must not
only assist the pupil in adjusting to his immediate social environment, but must also
promote his capacity for readjustment to a changing society. All concerned with education must recognize that " the power of reacting intelligently to his environment is the
basis of individual growth " and that " the way and manner of lessons, activities, and
games transcend in social values the measurable items of subject-matter." To promote
this concept of education, and its practice, suitable opportunities have been embraced
at School Board meetings, staff meetings, teacher group conferences, conferences with
principals and individual teachers, and in educational addresses. Through the democratic organization of the schools, diversified curricula, and a wide variety of activities,
as well as by means of classroom procedures, progress is being made in this phase of
education.
To assist the teacher in developing and maintaining the basic skills, survey and
diagnostic tests have been used freely—some published material but much prepared and
multigraphed in this office. In this respect the tests and analyses supplied by the Division
of Tests, Standards, and Research have been very helpful. On the whole, teachers have
made a good effort to overcome weaknesses as they have been revealed.
For the first time in this inspectorate a carefully planned procedure was launched
in the primary grades to permit the slow-learning pupils to progress, with mastery, in a
four-year programme, while provision was made for mature, quick-learning pupils to
complete the work in two years. Careful supervision was exercised in the selection of
the pupils for these groups and in the administration of the instructional programme.
As far as can be judged, in the first year of operation good results are indicated. However, careful supervision and continuous evaluation will be necessary while the pilot
groups are completing their programmes.
Particulars of the individual districts that should find a place in this report follow.
School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
The net pupil enrolment was 4,093, an increase of 126 over that of last year.
Almost 90 per cent of this increase was in the secondary grades. The number of teachers
employed was 148.
A very important forward step was made by the appointment of Mr. Joseph Billyeald
as Mental Health Co-ordinator. Mr. Billyeald had been on the secondary-school staff
of the district for several years, and during 1951-52 he was granted leave of absence to
take special training for his new post. Since last September he has been of much assistance to many teachers and parents in dealing with problem cases involving maladjustment. He has also been very successful in creating new interest and understanding on
the part of many community groups in respect to mental-health problems. From his
year-end report I quote:— REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 95
" It has been a pleasure to find the teachers of the district, on the whole, most
responsive to the idea of endeavouring to meet the emotional needs of their pupils as an
indispensable part of their job of imparting knowledge, skills, and attitudes. In mental-
health circles there is sometimes grave doubt expressed concerning the adequacy of
teachers in Canada in this respect, but my experience this year has been, almost without
exception, most reassuring."
School District No. 77 (Summerland)
This district has two schools only—a consolidated elementary school and a consolidated junior-senior high school. The net pupil enrolment this year was 808, an increase
of 47 over that of last year, almost equally divided between the elementary and secondary grades. There were twenty-eight teachers employed, one having been added to the
elementary-school staff in September. An additional teacher will be required in the
secondary school next September. Both the Home Economics and the Industrial Arts
accommodation have become inadequate for the numbers enrolled, and one division of
the elementary school is occupying a basement room. New space will have to be provided to improve these situations.
School Districts No. 27 (Williams Lake), No. 28 (Quesnel), and Unattached
School Districts at Chezacut and Tatlayoko
REPORT OF W. J. MOUAT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
There has been a steady increase in the school population of this inspectorate, as
shown by the tables below, which give November enrolment figures:—
Enrolment
Total
Increase
over 1950
1950
1951
1952
Grades I to VI       	
District No. 28
670
244
84
874
308
118
993
375
135
323
Grades VII to IX         -
131
Grades X to XII  _        -
51
Totals       	
9JH
1,300
1,503
505
Grades I to VI  _	
Grades VII to IX	
District No. 27
550
155
59
64!
225
62
720
236
76
170
81
Grades X to XII  __.__ _— 	
17
Totals _   _—
764
928
1,032
268
Grades I to VI    	
Chezacut
11
16
16
16
14
5
Grades I to VI —	
Tatlayoko
14
1,773
2,260
2,565
792
The tables show an increase in enrolment of over 50 per cent in District No. 28,
of over 35 per cent in District No. 27, and of over 44 per cent in the inspectorate.
Statistics now available indicate a further increase of about 500 pupils in this inspectorate this coming term. P 96
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
This district opened a high-school dormitory, several new rural buildings, and a
large addition to its high school this year. In addition to this, it continued with its
programme of improving its school services. This dormitory proved a very definite
success in its first year, with an enrolment of thirty-two students from all over the
widely spread Williams Lake District. The Board of Trustees, representatives of the
district, secretary-treasurer, and the school staff have worked very hard on this project.
The excellent co-operation they have had from the matron, her staff, and the students
have made for this success. This year the Board added to the dormitory to give it a
capacity of eighty students. It will have approximately sixty this term. The problems
created by great distances and the steady increase in enrolment have given the Board
and its staff a very heavy burden of work in the past year. The school population of
the district is overcrowding school facilities at the present, so little relief can be seen in
this respect for the coming year.
School District No. 28 (Quesnel)
School District No. 28 has been faced with a heavy increase in enrolment this year
and will have to contend with an even greater one this term. However, its building
programme has progressed to the point that the end of the year should see its most
obsolete rural schools replaced with adequate classrooms, a new eight-room elementary-
school building in West Quesnel, and a very fine addition to its high-school building.
However, although these new facilities will relieve the overcrowding and double-shifting
and obviate the necessity of renting temporary accommodation for the balance of the
term, they will be crowded almost to capacity.
The Board, its secretary-treasurer, representatives, and staff have worked very hard
and given many hours of their time to give the students a good educational system
under very adverse conditions, and to plan for the future needs of the area. They have
succeeded to a surprising degree, and deserve the gratitude of the students, parents, and
ratepayers.
Chezacut
Chezacut School Board has had another successful year, and this school continues
to provide a valuable service.
Tatlayoko
This school is operating for its second year. It has served the needs of a number
of families in the Tatlayoko, Tatla Lake, Westbranch, and Choelquoit Lake areas.
These places mentioned include a large region. These students have boarded in Tatlayoko Valley.   They have done good work under a capable teacher.
School Districts No. 62 (Sooke), No. 63 (Saanich), No. 64 (Saltspring),
and Unattached School District at Belmont Park
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P_*d.,
F.R.S.A., F.C.P., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The school population in this inspectorate continues to increase at the rate of
approximately 15 per cent per annum. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 97
School District No. 62 (Sooke)
This fast-growing school district extends from the western boundaries of Greater
Victoria to the wooded mountains beyond Port Renfrew.
To accommodate the increased enrolment and to eliminate several obsolete school
buildings, the ratepayers of the Sooke School District approved a money by-law for
$576,000 in January, 1953. The subsequent building programme will relieve the overcrowded conditions in the elementary schools and also establish the initial units of two
modern secondary-school buildings.
School District No. 63 (Saanich)
This large municipal district includes Central Saanich Municipality, the rural areas
of Saanich, and James Island, and part of Saanich Municipality.
This school district, which has just completed the building of schools authorized
by a recent by-law, is already experiencing difficulties in accommodation. The projected
enrolment for the next six years indicates that the school population will double during
that period. Consequently, another by-law will have to be passed by the ratepayers in
the near future if adequate educational accommodation is to be supplied for the students
of the district.
School District No. 64 (Saltspring)
This district is composed of a number of gulf islands lying off the eastern shores of
South Vancouver Island. On Saltspring Island an elementary-high school containing
thirteen divisions supplies secondary education for the district.
This year a modern two-room elementary school was opened at Galiano Island to
replace an obsolete building.
Projected enrolments indicate that additional accommodation will have to be provided on Saltspring Island in the very near future.
Belmont Park School District (Unattached)
This district, which was established for children of navy personnel, supports only
one school, the John Stubbs Memorial Elementary School. The school enrols pupils
from kindergarten age up to the Grade VIII level.
The pupil enrolment and school staff have doubled since the opening of the school
in October, 1951. Enrolment statistics indicate that the school population will be
sufficient to justify the establishment of a junior high school by September, 1954.
General
It is satisfying to note that the Departmental representative has received excellent
co-operation from all Boards and teaching personnel, and that highly commendable results
are generally being attained by those responsible for the educational welfare of the
children.
School Districts No. 43 (Coquitlam) and No. 46 (Sechelt)
REPORT OF C. T. RENDLE, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
There were no outstanding changes in the schools of Districts No. 43 (Coquitlam)
and No. 46 (Sechelt) during the past school-year.
Anticipated enrolments were as expected, and there are no major problems of
accommodation.   One hundred and fifty-one teachers were employed in the two districts P 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
to teach 4,229 pupils. In addition to the regular staff, School District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
employed a primary specialist and a relieving teacher.
This was the second year of operation for the new high schools in each district.
Curriculum offerings have been increased in all schools. While it is early to predict
ultimate outcomes, it is reasonable to expect a marked increase in the retention of pupils
at the secondary level.
Vocational courses continue to attract and maintain the interest of the students,
particularly those following the General Programme. In the Como Lake High School
(Coquitlam) fifty-nine students took the Vocational Commercial courses. Thirty-nine
were enrolled in the Vocational Lumber (Specified Trade). This programme includes
training in lumber-grading, tallying, draughting, carpentry and its allied trades of wiring,
plumbing, bricklaying, machine-shop (related to lumber), and practical mathematics.
The practical applications of the programme are realized through planning and construction of a small bungalow. This is a most creditable achievement, and those responsible for the organization and teaching of the courses are to be commended for their
accomplishments.
Vocational Commercial courses were introduced at the Moody High School for the
first time. Twenty-six pupils in Grades XI and XII were enrolled. The graduates in the
Vocational courses have little difficulty in finding employment.
Modified programmes of remedial instruction in reading and arithmetic were followed with some success. The treatment of problem cases is a source of some concern.
The scattered nature of the areas and lack of transportation make it difficult to establish
special classes for the physically and mentally handicapped children.
Principals' and teachers' meetings are held monthly and are resulting in improved
administration, supervision, and instruction. Teaching staffs in both areas are loyal,
co-operative, and industrious.
Testing programmes were carried out in both districts.
Plans for a two-room school in the Municipality of Coquitlam were approved, and
construction commenced in July. With minor exceptions, this completes the programme
as outlined in By-law No. 2. It is expected that funds will be available to complete the
programme as originally planned.
Efficient maintenance and improvement of buildings are noted in both districts.
Ground improvements are slow, but show steady development.
Some difficulties were experienced in transportation. It is likely that this will
continue to be a vexing problem for some time.
Health services in the Sechelt District were disrupted. The programme was severely
handicapped by the lack of a public health nurse and dentist for the greater part of the
school-year.   A normal programme was followed in the Coquitlam District.
Parent-teacher organizations continue to thrive, and their contributions to our
programmes are acknowledged.
In conclusion, I should like to record my appreciation of the faithful service of the
School Board members, area representatives, principals, teachers, secretary-treasurers,
and other employees, and also of the close co-operation received from them. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 99
School Districts No. 35 (Langley) and No. 48 (Howe Sound)
REPORT OF H. D. STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 35 (Langley)
In 1949 a large composite high school was opened to serve the needs for secondary
education in the Municipality of Langley. The building, designed for 750 pupils, was
overcrowded from opening-day. Nine hundred and forty-two pupils are now crowded
into the building, and a further 112 pupils can only be accommodated for part of their
courses and spend most of their time at an elementary school.
All elementary-school buildings are crowded. Basement rooms are again being
used as temporary classrooms.
Despite handicaps, teachers and pupils have displayed an excellent spirit of cooperation. Good scholarship has been maintained, and an extensive co-curricular programme offered by teachers in both the elementary and secondary schools.
The organization pattern of instruction from Grade VII through Grade XIII was
as follows:  Number of Students
Teaching Subject Courses Taught
English  12 979
Social Studies  6 856
Effective Living  5 801
Physical Education (Grade VI)  1 12
Mathematics  9 833
Science  4 649
Biology  2 77
Chemistry  2 54
French   5 278
Physics   2 24
German  4 34
Agriculture  8 152
Art   5 247
Music   6 206
Home Economics  9 400
Industrial Arts  9 450
Commerce  10 404
Law  1 16
Vocational Commerce  10 35
Vocational Agriculture  5 59
School records show that sixty-five students completed the High School Graduation
Programme, of whom forty-six also completed the University Programme.
The Board of School Trustees is to be complimented for the smooth and efficient
operation of its school system, and its excellent relations with teachers and the people in
the school district.
School District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
As a result of the construction of a highway between Britannia Mines and Britannia
Beach, the Board of School Trustees closed the two-teacher high school at Britannia
Mines and arranged for the conveyance of the pupils to the junior-senior high school at
Squamish.
The school at Squamish affords excellent facilities for a good secondary-school programme.    It is provided with needed teaching materials and the resources of twelve P  100
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
academic teachers.    In addition to the usual academic studies, pupils have available
optional courses in Music, Art, Home Economics, Commerce, and Industrial Arts.
The Board of School Trustees is fully informed of the educational needs of the area.
By holding regular meetings in the various communities, it is especially sensitive to the
needs of each community.
Owing to the peculiar geographical location of the component parts of the school
district, the members of the Board of School Trustees offer public service which must
be performed with considerable sacrifice and inconvenience. This service is greatly
appreciated.
Academic Progress
In both the small, isolated one-teacher rural schools and the large composite secondary schools, conscientious teachers gave excellent service, much more than called for by
contractual obligations. It was noticeable, however, that it was increasingly difficult to
obtain such teachers for the one-teacher schools and almost impossible to obtain highly
qualified teachers to teach courses in Physical Education, Commerce, Music, Art, Home
Economics, and Industrial Arts.
The school principals and teachers have made extensive use of available materials to
assist them in determining the scholastic abilities of the pupils.
In October and May of each year standardized tests are used to measure the level of
performance of pupils from Grade II through to Grade IX. In addition, valuable factual
information is gained as a result of both the Province-wide surveys conducted by the
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research as well as locally prepared tests for the
measurement and direction of instruction in the fundamental or tool subjects.
Special mention is made of the care exercised by teachers and principals to meet
parents, to explain fully the method used in reporting pupil progress. Individual conferences when parents and teachers have pooled their knowledge with respect to particular
pupils have proven most advantageous to all concerned.
This report would be incomplete without due recognition of the many individuals
and organizations contributing to the successful operation of the public schools in the
above-mentioned school districts.
School Districts No. 20 (Salmon Arm) and No. 19 (Revelstoke)
REPORT OF L. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
It is interesting to note certain statistical comparisons in these two districts (see
tables below), since the organization of larger school districts in 1946.
District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
Year
Enrolment by Grades
Number
of
Teachers
Number
Of
1
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII    IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
Total
One-room
Schools
1946
1952	
80
127
60
98
59
101
67
86
63
108
55
80
66
82
1
66 |    51
64 j    52
47
47
32
34
24 |    17
37         5
687
921
27
32
7
4
Increase 	
__.... | ..____
1
1
...... | ..____
I
  1
1
234
5      |      -3
1
District No. 20 (Salmon Arm)
1946
1952	
1         1
136 |  120 j  122
209 [ 172 | 156
113
184
105
143
1
125       95
156 j 155
105
114
1
64 j    54
105 | 108
1          1
60 |    28 j      5
69 j    54 j    18
1,135
1,653
1
48              28
64      |         6
Increase _
—- 1   1 '
1          1
...... | ...___
1
__.... | .   .
1
...... | ...___ | ......
1          1
518
16      |    -22
I
J REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 101
The trend has been very definitely toward consolidation of schools during these
years, with the result that practically all children can attend elementary and secondary
schools without much difficulty. The decrease in one-room schools in District No. 20
is very noticeable.
The Salmon Arm District has now five consolidated school areas. These are Salmon
Arm, Falkland, North Shuswap, Carlin, and Eagle Valley. This consolidation requires
a large fleet of buses to transport the children to the various schools. In this district
there are eleven vehicles owned by the district and private contracts number four. It is
quite evident that the School Board will have to give serious study to the possibility of
decentralization in the near future. Too many children presently enrolled in the lower
elementary grades are being transported to the large consolidated schools.
In the Revelstoke District there are consolidated schools situated in Arrowhead
and in the City of Revelstoke—two natural points. This district has shown a slow but
steady increase in school population.
In both districts the School Boards continue to give efficient service and are untiring
in their efforts to improve the educational facilities for the children in their areas. It is
pleasing to observe the earnest sincerity of these individuals.
In both districts, school accommodation will become definitely inadequate in 1953
(September), and the problem will steadily increase. Planning has already commenced
to overcome this difficulty, if possible.
Educational standards are reliably satisfactory, when all factors are taken into consideration. It was found impossible again to staff all vacancies with properly qualified
teachers.
I would like to take this opportunity to thank the principals, teachers, trustees,
secretary-treasurers, and School Board officials, who have proved so co-operative and
helpful to me this year.
School Districts No. 71 (Courtenay), No. 72 (Campbell River), and
Comox Airport Rural School District
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment, Staff, and Schools, 1946-53
District
Date
Number of
Pupils
Number of
Schools
Number of
Teachers
Nn
71
June, 1946  	
June, 1953 _. -___	
1,809
2,545
292
1,463
4,008
14
18
16
21
39
60
1~>
93
No
June, 1946 _ 	
June, 1953__ _	
June, 1953  _
21
Inspectorate totals ...	
60
153
Types of Schools
District
Senior
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
El.-Sr.
High
Superior
Elementary
One- and
Two-room
Rural
No. 71       -	
No. 72 	
1
1
1
1
1
13
2
2
17 p 102 public schools report, 1952-53
School District No. 71
The building programme was partially completed during the school-year. In April
Dr. F. T. Fairey opened three new schools—Courtenay West Elementary, Tsolum Elementary, and Cumberland addition. Courtenay High School and Royston Elementary
School were also completed. At present the Tsolum High School, Comox addition, and
Union Bay addition are in the process of construction.
The influx of personnel to the R.C.A.F. station at Comox caused considerable
overcrowding. The Department of National Defence housing units were completed, but
no school construction was done, and not even temporary accommodation was provided.
District No. 71 opened temporary quarters to accommodate pupils living in Department
of National Defence housing until June.
School District No. 72
Ten classes (approximately 350 pupils) were operated on shift during the entire
school-year. The completion of the eight-room Campbellton Elementary School in July
will relieve this situation and make for desirable decentralization of elementary pupils
next September. A fourth room is being added to Sayward. Three more one-room
schools at isolated logging camps were opened during the year. This district has a total
of seventeen one-room schools in the islands of the gulf—all small schools and all more
or less isolated.
School Population
Campbell  River  Elementary-Senior High  School  and  two
elementary schools   1,183
Seventeen one- and two-room schools   220
One superior school   60
Total  1,463
Comox Airport Rural School District
On September 5th, 1952, a separate school district was formed conterminous with
the Department of National Defence property at the R.C.A.F. station at Comox. This
district will be administered by an official trustee. No school buildings have been provided at time of writing, but temporary quarters for the 160 children will be made available for September.
General
As in other years, a music festival and a drama festival were held; 1,600 children
participated in the music festival. An art display was staged for the first time, with
considerable success.
The teachers' work, both in school and in the heavy load of extra-curricular activities, deserves much credit. The School Trustees continue to give unstintingly of their
time and effort.
School Districts No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan),
and No. 67 (Ladysmith)
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., M.B.A,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, with offices located in Duncan, embraces the following school
districts: No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan), and No. 67 (Ladysmith). REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 103
The enrolment and staffs in these school districts, as of June, 1953, are as follows:—
Pupils
District
Elementary
Secondary
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1952
1953
1,211
750
715
1,223
793
798
648
359
379
685
400
443
17
7
7
17
7
8
79
41
42
78
46
No. 67 (Ladysmith)	
47
Totals	
2,676
2,814
1.386    1    1.528
31
32
162
171
The statistics above indicate that a measure of steady growth was experienced in this
inspectoral area during the period June, 1952, to June, 1953. All three school districts
participated in this growth, and the increase, though not rapid, was consistent.
In each district the increase has been relatively greater in the secondary school than
in the elementary school. This fact does, in part, tend to offer a measure of worth of the
secondary-school programmes operative in the communities concerned. As a result of
this trend, further expansion plans are being laid by the Boards of School Trustees. The
trend toward more secondary-school training is the more noteworthy since it has been
accompanied by a general broadening of interest in educational affairs.
This interest has been manifested in public utterances by leading citizens, in statements in the press, and in discussions, both public and private, held from time to time.
During the fall and winter, education underwent a general process of public evaluation.
As a result of this interest, a greater number of people appear to have become much more
concerned about the education of their children. During this period a number of meetings were held with P.-T.A. groups, and an unusual degree of interest was evident. There
is no doubt that this has resulted in a more positive attitude toward and a better understanding of the purposes of public education.
School District No. 65 (Cowichan)
The opening of the new Somenos three-room school in January was a welcome relief
to the congested elementary school in Duncan and eliminated the use of substandard
basement rooms in that school. Staffing problems, which have remained somewhat difficult over the past years, show promise of improvement. By the middle of June, 1953, a
large number of teacher applications had been received.
Reports from Cowichan High School would indicate that a larger proportion of the
prospective graduates are planning advanced training. This is due in part to the quality
of the counselling service which has been built up over the past years.
Adult night-school classes again operated very effectively during the winter.
It is with deep regret that I report the death during the year of Mr. P. R. Leighton.
He had served on the Board as a valued, faithful member for many years. Mr. John
Homer, of Duncan, was elected to serve in his place.
School District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
In this district a good deal of the Board's attention has been directed toward the
provision of adequate secondary accommodation. In working out the plans the teaching
staff was invited to participate, and a successful co-operative effort resulted.
The school hot-lunch programme operating in Lake Cowichan continues to offer
useful and efficient service.
The additional numbers of pupils enrolled in kindergarten in the Lake Cowichan
Elementary School necessitated the opening of an additional classroom for kindergarten P  104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
work.   Arrangements were made for the three kindergarten teachers to pay an observational visit to the Victoria schools.
School District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
The increasing number of pupils in the Saltair portion of this district necessitated
the opening of a temporary classroom in a hall which was equipped for this purpose. In
Ladysmith a second Home Economics teacher was added to the staff to meet the increased
demand for Home Economics. Plans are being made to offer Senior Matriculation in
Ladysmith during the coming year.
After many long years of efficient and faithful service as a Board member, Mr. C. C.
Jones, School Board Chairman, found it necessary, due to ill health, to retire from the
Board. Through his resignation, the School Board members, the teaching staff, and the
public with whom, and for whom, he served so long lost a valued servant. To succeed
Mr. Jones, Mr. Ray Chamberlain was elected Chairman.
General Remarks
The general educational progress in this area has been well maintained. Various
attempts at evaluation have been made throughout the year, and in both the formal
instruction and the less formal activities results have been gratifying. The teachers of
the district have worked conscientiously and consistently in the maintenance of good
standards. Special mention is due the school trustees and the school representatives.
Commendation is due them for their tireless, willing efforts offered in community service.
School Districts No. 21 (Armstrong-Spalluincheen), No. 22 (Vernon),
and No. 78 (Enderby)
REPORT OF A. S. TOWELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The most notable development in this inspectorate during the school-year 1952-53
occurred in what was formerly School District No. 21 (Armstrong-Enderby). For
more than half a dozen years its trustees had been vainly struggling with the problem of
devising a building programme that would be supported by the ratepayers of both sections of the district. A by-law had been prepared, voted upon, and overwhelmingly
defeated. Meanwhile the lack of accommodation at both Armstrong and Enderby
became more and more nearly intolerable.
Most of those concerned with the problem finally became convinced that further
effort was futile, and that the only hope of a solution lay in severance of the district.
This would permit each section to tackle its own building problems without reference
to the other.
Following negotiations which settled financial and other details to the satisfaction
of all parties, an Order in Council was passed, effective January 1st, 1953, setting up
two new school districts—No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen) and No. 78 (Enderby).
The two new Boards got to work immediately and made good progress. By late
spring, plans and estimates were complete, and before the summer vacation, by-laws
had been presented and successfully passed in both districts.
At the date of this writing, construction is already under way on a new fourteen-
room junior-senior high school at Armstrong, and within a few days work will begin on
a six-room elementary school, a gymnasium, and three one-room rural schools in the.
Enderby District.   Early in 1954 all these should be in use, and for the first time in a REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
P 105
good many years the teachers and pupils will be working under conditions and with
equipment comparable to those provided in most other districts.
In contrast to the foregoing, affairs in School District No. 21 (Vernon) ran very
smoothly and relatively uneventfully during the year. Completion of the gymnasium
at Vernon Senior High School brought the building programme to its final conclusion.
Worthy perhaps of special note was the establishment of a superior school at
Cherryville. As previously reported, a new two-room building there had made possible
a small consolidation that eliminated three highly unsatisfactory one-room schools.
With the opening of a third room it became possible to provide instruction at the high-
school level in a community where it has never been available.
Results have been most gratifying, and the improvement in the educational situation might almost be termed a transformation. The pupils have improved markedly in
interest, attitude, behaviour, and even in their dress and appearance. Parents and other
adults have become interested, and a spirit of co-operation has replaced the former
indifference.   It is pleasing to be able to record such a development.
School Districts No. 15 (Penticton), No. 16 (Keremeos),
and No. 17 (Princeton)
REPORT OF ALEX. TURNBULL, M.C., M.M., B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Penticton inspectorate consists of Penticton, Keremeos, and Princeton School Districts.   The following is a statistical summary of the area:—
Number
Teachers
Pupils
14
3
[
|              70
j             62
2,204
1,451
Totals -    	
17
132
1
3,655
The above figures indicate an increase of only 110 pupils over the previous report.
As a result, accommodation problems were at a minimum as compared with other years.
However, estimates for next term indicate that this is a temporary lull, and increases in
both staff and number of classrooms will be necessary. Plans for the extension of
Princeton School have already been approved.
All schools operated on a normal basis during the year, with little interruption.
Community use of the buildings continues to be in demand, and night-school attendance
has been maintained. At Princeton an important change in organization was made
when a bus service was instituted to Copper Mountain. Pupils from Grades IX to XIII
are now brought to the larger centre, and high-school facilities are offered on an equal
basis for the whole district.   The change has proved to be a success.
Regular academic courses, vocational courses, and special activities received due
attention throughout the term. Increasing interest has been shown in cultural groups,
and students took effective part in dramatics, musical events, and public speaking. With
the facilities now available, reasonable inter-school athletic contests were supported.
Classes in agriculture show a steady growth, and the enrolment continues to increase.
Driving instruction was offered as an extra in Penticton High School.
The district scholarship was awarded to Penticton High School again this year.
Robert Roger won the honour for his standing in the University Entrance examinations
in June. P  106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Unique distinction came to the schools when Mr. D. P. O'Connell, principal of
Penticton Elementary Schools, was named the " good citizen " for 1953. It was a well-
deserved tribute to long and faithful service in school and community. This recognition
was greatly appreciated by his fellow teachers and all connected with education.
The staff has shown pleasing co-operation. Concern for the standard of work done,
and continued study to improve it, has been most evident. Advanced training has been
undertaken by a goodly number of the teachers. Relationships between staff and School
Boards have been excellent, and it is very satisfactory to record the fine support received
from all.
Penticton District lost an old friend with the passing of Mr. K. J. Palmer early in the
year.   He had served as secretary of the Board until just a few weeks before his death.
Mrs. Maude Adams, of Penticton Elementary Schools, went on overseas exchange
to England for the year, and her place on the staff was taken by Mr. George Woolfenden.
His kindly personality will be remembered by all with whom he associated.
Members of the department of public health continue to render service of a high
order. Conditions were such that the demand v/as heavy for long periods during the
year. The dental service becomes increasingly popular and begins to fill a long-felt need
in the district.
Co-operation with teacher-training schools was extended when students from the
Education class at the University of British Columbia were assigned to Penticton High
School for two weeks in the spring. This was the first opportunity for the district to
assist in the high-school training programme. As usual, members of the classes from
Vancouver and Victoria Normal Schools were welcomed in the elementary rooms.
Maintenance of schools is reaching new standards, and school property receives
proper attention. With an increase of two new buses, transportation seems to be adequate
for the time.   Isolated routes still provide problems in both service and cost.
Testing was carried out under the guidance of the Division of Tests, Standards, and
Research. Regular meetings were held with principals and vice-principals. It has been
a year of progress and adjustment, with an improved school spirit and attitude evident.
Coronation year was observed with suitable ceremonies. These were shortly
followed by impressive graduation exercises, in which the largest senior classes in the
history of the schools took part.
It was a happy, progressive year, and to all those who so ably contributed to it,
I extend sincere thanks.
School Districts No. 56 (Vanderhoof), No. 57, (Prince George),
and No. 58 (McBride)
REPORT OF R. G. WILLISTON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Steady growth in school attendance in the above three districts continued throughout
the year, and problems created by the increased enrolments kept everyone associated with
the schools busy. Many planned projects designed to improve teaching facilities within
present schools had to be abandoned as the provision of additional accommodation and
basic equipment used up all available funds.
The supply of properly qualified teachers continued short of demand, particularly in
secondary schools, and as a consequence the maintenance of satisfactory standards of
instruction continued to be difficult. The experienced, able teachers have had to assume
responsibilities and duties beyond the normal call of duty. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS P 107
School District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
Prefabricated one-room panel schools were first tried in this district. They proved
to be economical, warm, and quickly available. Two were built during the holiday
period—one at Braeside and the other placed temporarily at Vanderhoof. A by-law was
prepared which would include new schools at Vanderhoof, Fort St. James, and Endako.
Dormitory facilities were to be provided for secondary-school pupils in Vanderhoof.
District Office facilities and a teacherage were also to be placed at this latter point.
A new school was built at Fort Fraser during the year, to replace the one destroyed by
fire.   Two rooms are complete, with a third available when required.
Overcrowding in Vanderhoof was very severe, with normal classrooms partitioned
in half and basements brought into use.
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
The most severe overcrowding ever experienced in Prince George made teaching
conditions very difficult. Double-shifting, partitioned classrooms, temporary hall accommodation, and extension in school-hours were all used to handle the situation. Teachers
and employees generally are to be commended for their good spirit and effective work
under very trying conditions.
Contracts were let for the eighteen-room Connaught Elementary School and the
seven-room addition to the junior-senior high school. The prices were considerably
below estimates, which was very gratifying. Additions to schools were built at Chief
Lake, West Lake, and Hixon. Old schools or buildings were renovated for use at
Sylvan Glade and Hansard. A new one-room school was built at Bonnett Hill, two
rooms on the John Hart Highway, and the Stone Creek School was reopened. Five
new teacherages were built.
The school dormitory continues to grow and render invaluable service to rural
pupils. Almost ninety pupils remained in regular attendance during the year, and their
academic achievement continued to be better than average.
Plans are being prepared for the construction of a new senior high school and
another large elementary school.
School District No. 58 (McBride)
In early May Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education,
opened the new McBride High School. This building was in the planning stages for
more than four years and is a credit to those associated in its construction. With the
opening of this building it was possible to do away with all temporary classroom accommodation in use in the village.
A new school and teacherage were constructed at Tete Jaune, and pupils at North
Tete Jaune, long without schooling, were transported to the new building. A new teacherage was constructed at Red Pass, and a combined teacherage-administration building
provided in McBride.    Schools were renovated at Valemount and Dunster.
Boards of School Trustees, teachers, and other employees were most co-operative
with Department officials and carried out their duties in such a way as to make difficult
tasks pleasant and personally rewarding. P  108
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
Attendance
During the 1952-53 school-year there were 155 students enrolled in the school, as
shown below. Of these, five were enrolled from the Province of Alberta and one from
the Northwest Territories.
Day Pupils
Resident
Total
32
10
96
17
128
27
Totals                                            - _ _	
42
113
155
In addition to the above, seven deaf children of pre-school age from Vancouver and
surrounding areas received part-time instruction and eight others received home-training
by correspondence.
Health
The general health of the children in residence has been exceptionally good throughout the year.
In co-operation with the Department of Dentistry of the Metropolitan Health Services, all our children were examined and treated during the term in our newly equipped
dental clinic.
Under the chairmanship of Dr. Reba Willets, School Medical Officer, committee
meetings were held before the beginning of the term to study and to develop a suitable
plan for screening applicants for the deaf department of this school. The adopted programme prescribed that, whenever possible, all new cases should be examined by the
following specialists: A paediatrician, an opthalmologist, an otologist, and audiometrist,
a psychiatrist, and a psychologist. These reports are then reviewed by the School Medical
Officer and the Superintendent of the School for the Deaf for final decision regarding
admission to the school. This procedure has been in operation during the past year
and has been very successful from many points of view.
For those who have participated in these new projects and for those services
extended to us by the Medical Department of the Metropolitan Health Services, the
Children's Health Centre, and the Child Guidance Clinic, I wish to express sincere
appreciation.
Training Programme
Following the Easter holidays, an intermediate deaf class of day and resident
students was transferred to the Trafalgar School, with Miss Whiteside as teacher. One
of the primary objectives in this undertaking has been to achieve higher standards of
speech and lipreading through integration with normal-hearing children in certain programmed activities and on the playing-fields.    It has proved most successful.
Two of our Grade VIII resident partial-sighted students were transferred after the
Easter holidays to the sight-saving class at Kitsilano High School. Here again we had
hoped through associations with normal students to achieve a number of desirable
objectives.   This undertaking, too, has been most successful.
Two of our senior students were enrolled in Vancouver Vocational Institute and
are now steadily employed as power sewing-machine operators. Three other students
were placed in Provincial Civil Service positions and two in office work. SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND
P 109
A service of guidance and counselling to parents of pre-school blind children,
initiated last term, has again been provided jointly by this school and the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind, under the expert supervision of Miss Eileen Scott.
This has been a very worth-while and much appreciated service by the parents of seventy
little blind children.
General Remarks
I regret to report the resignations of four valuable members of the staff at the end
of the term—Miss Helen Woodward (vice-principal), Mrs. Unrau, and Messrs. Carson,
Giesbrecht, and Westman.   They have contributed much to the progress of this school.
In concluding this report, 1 wish to express sincere thanks to Inspectors Gray and
Burnett, of our Management Committee, for their counsel and sympathetic understanding
of our special problems. I wish, likewise, to thank the many volunteeer assistants and
all members of the staff for their faithful service and support. P 110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. ES L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1952-53 was 7,210.   This figure shows an increase of 1,267 over 1951-52.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in school—■ Per Cent
1. School-age students registered in high and superior
schools. (Throughout this report the term " school-
age " refers to students under 18 years of age.) ____ 2,673
2. School-age students registered in elementary schools     106
Total number of school-age students  2,779
3. Students of 18,  19, and 20 years registered in
their local schools        80
4. Students of 21 years or over registered in their
local schools  4
Total number of students registered in their
local schools taking one or more correspondence courses  2,863      39.8
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because of physical disability        94
2. School-age students gainfully employed      140
3. School-age students studying courses at home because of the distance factor      161
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary        44
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons        23
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered in
their local schools      375
Total number of students under 21 years not
registered in their local schools and
obtaining their education by correspondence      837      11.6
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  3,510      48.6
Total number of students  7,210    100.0
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age  3,236      44.9
2. Pupils 18, 19, and 20 years      460        6.4
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  3,514      48.7
Totals  7,210    100.0 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS P 111
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses.   Others
registered for only one or two courses.    The number of students who enrolled in each
of the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  733
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 40  798
English 91   12
Social Studies 10, 20, 30  608
History 91   47
Science 10, 20, 30  337
Mathematics 10, 11, 20, 30, 91  1,533
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92  282
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92  135
French 10, 20, 91, 92  396
Effective Living 10, 20, 30  428
Agriculture 10, 20   197
Social Studies 32  12
Geography 91   20
Homemaking 10, 20, 30  355
Art 10, 20  282
Record-keeping 11   467
Business Fundamentals 24  116
Book-keeping 24, 91, 95  419
Mathematics 12  83
Shorthand 21, 31   244
Typewriting 10, 20  685
Secretarial Practice 92, 93  4
English 93 (Business English)  75
English 32 (Journalism)   34
Biology 91   82
Chemistry 91  50
Physics 91   64
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  40
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20  284
Sheet-metal Work 20  8
Metal-mining  _•  5
Auto Mechanics 91, 92  186
Diesel Engineering 91   64
Electricity 20  159
Radio and Wireless 30  78
Elementary Geology 29   43
Forestry 30  73
Art 39   45
Frame-house Construction 20  45
Home Furnishing 23  50
Extra-mural Music 11, 21  10
Total  9,588
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course. P  112
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature 100 ____
English Composition 101
Mathematics 101 	
French 101	
Latin 101 	
  162
  135
  110
     89
     31
History 101 _.      72
Chemistry 100     30
Physics 100     30
Homemaking 91     27
Agriculture 100       8
German 90  106
Total
800
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also be
classified in the following table:—
Steam Engineering Ia, Ib, IIa      427
House Painting and Decorating.
Aviation I	
Industrial Mathematics 	
Soils and Field Crops	
Practical Design	
Glove-making	
Air Navigation I, II
Mathematics for Steam Engineering IIa
Fruit-growing 	
Accountancy for Credit Unions	
Spherical Trigonometry	
English 19	
Dressmaking 	
11
9
99
1
46
7
15
34
3
13
7
505
17
Total
1,194
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates of
public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students
of 16 years or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students
living outside this Province.
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 639 students the fees
were paid by their School Boards.
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1. Hospital cases	
2. British Columbia Penitentiary
3. Oakalla Prison	
4. Girls' Industrial Home	
5. Boys' Industrial Home	
6. New Haven	
7. On relief or equivalent	
8. Disabled students at home	
9. Students needed at home	
114
84
103
21
18
44
4
7
18
Total
413 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS P 113
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers  579
Nurses   374
Medicine   96
Science  49
Law  35
Art   64
Theology   37
Pharmacy   3 8
Miscellaneous   75
Commercial   735
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 378
Police   19
Aviation   27
Her Majesty's Forces  63
Civil Service  12
Agriculture and farming  112
Forestry    93
Mining   6
Journalism    44
Diesel and steam engineering  578
Radio   50
Miscellaneous   34
Not given  3,712
Total  7,210
Completion of Courses
A total of 91,352 papers was marked during the year, which is an increase over the
number of papers marked in the preceding year. We have five-, ten-, twelve-, eighteen-,
and twenty-paper courses.
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of sixty-four instructors
were employed during the year.
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 5,897 students with material from our course
in English I for New Canadians, 427 students were supplied with material from the
English II for New Canadians, and 505 students took the course in English II (English
19) by correspondence. Classes in English were held in forty-six night-school centres,
and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in 119 small, isolated places
throughout the Province.
New Courses
Social Studies 30; Effective Living 30; Science 10, 20; French 92; Latin 92; Spanish
91, 92; Business Fundamentals 24; History 91; Radio and Wireless 30; Forestry 30;
English 91; and Dressmaking were the new courses offered during the year.
-' P  114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1952-53 there were 1,536 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
Correspondence School. Of these, 1,408 were enrolled at Victoria and the remaining
128 were enrolled at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tabulation below
shows the enrolment by month and grade for each locality.
Enrolled at Victoria
Grade
I
Grade
II
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Grade
VIII
Total
149
182
209
223
233
250
260
264
263
258
114
135
153
161
172
190
192
206
210
211
116
135
147
152
160
167
172
175
182
187
96
122
132
136
140
148
151
159
163
165
81
100
111
115
121
128
131
144
151
147
78
99
109
110
118
124
130
143
146
147
80
103
115
124
131
138
141
140
154
166
57
80
87
92
98
108
116
122
125
127
771
956
November  _	
December    	
January.-   	
1,063
1,113
1,173
1,253
1,293
1,353
1,394
1,408
March   	
Enrolled at Pouce Coupe (Peace River Branch)
September-
October 	
November..
December.-
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
11
14
9
3
4
10
7
2
14
18
10
4
5
12
7
4
15
21
11
5
7
13
9
4
16
24
13
6
9
14
9
4
24
27
18
9
10
15
11
6
25
27
18
9
10
16
11
6
25
27
18
10
9
17
11
6
25
27
18
12
10
17
11
6
25
28
18
13
10
16
12
6
25
28
18
13
10
16
12
6
60
74
85
95
120
122
123
126
128
128
The number of papers corrected in the two centres was as follows: Victoria, 149,877
papers; Pouce Coupe, 16,920 papers—a total of 166,797 papers.
The staff in Victoria consisted of the Director, twelve full-time instructors, one
part-time instructor, and an office staff of five members; in Pouce Coupe, one full-time
instructor and one part-time instructor.
To cope with the number of papers submitted, it was necessary at times to employ,
on a piece-work basis, twelve qualified people to mark papers in their own homes.
During the year new courses were produced in Reading for Grade VI and in Art for
Grades I to V, inclusive. These courses were devised, written, and illustrated wholly
by staff instructors.
In addition to the numbers shown above, adult students enrolled for courses from
Grades I to VIII as follows:—
September     85
October  134
November   156
December   178
January  194
February   217
March   241
April   257
May  279
June   299
There were 5,481 papers of adult students corrected during the year. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH P 115
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
Anyone who refers to the annual reports of this Branch for a number of years past
will find reference each year to lack of space in the office and shipping-room. This
unsatisfactory condition still exists and is not conducive to pleasant or efficient operation.
School buildings which were satisfactory and contained sufficient classrooms, etc., ten or
fifteen years ago have, in the interim, been much improved and added to. The Text-book
Branch continues to operate in the quarters I took over twenty-three years ago, although
the volume of business increases year by year. Despite these difficulties, the year
1952-53 was a busy and successful one.
The Text-book Rental Scheme continues to develop as planned and anticipated.
Pupil participation is practically 100 per cent, the collecting and remitting of rentals is
under control, and data of much statistical value is being properly recorded. Curriculum
and text-book changes have been facilitated, and the over-all costs have never exceeded
expectations. In general, teachers, principals, and secretary-treasurers co-operate fully,
and rental collections bear a reasonably correct relationship to total text-book issues.
To ensure the continued success of the Rental Plan, teachers are asked again to instruct
pupils how to open a new book, to insist on all text-books being covered and otherwise
properly handled and cared for, and, when necessary, to assess and collect from the pupils
concerned for loss or wilful damage.
As is customary, the Text-book Branch supplied the required free text-books and the
various forms, etc., to schools and School Boards as and when required. Curriculum and
other bulletins were also distributed, as were 5 tons of Coronation medallions. Orders
for books from the various dealers throughout the Province were processed and completed
in a satisfactory manner.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies during the school-year 1952-53 to
public and private schools and to correspondence students required an expenditure of
$251,322; 4,711 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 16,700. From these
orders the sum of $485,724.79 was collected and deposited in the Treasury to the credit
of Text-book Branch Operating Account.
A total of 2,579 Rental Plan requisitions was received, checked, and completed, and
$279,259.71 in rental fees and remittances for lost and damaged books was collected and
deposited in the Treasury. During the school-year $3,750.58 was refunded to pupils
who left the school system prior to March 31st.
Once more it is a pleasure to express appreciation to a very loyal and hard-working
staff and to all school officials, particularly secretary-treasurers, for their many acts of
co-operation.   Without support of this nature, satisfactory reports cannot be made.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE, TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1953
The accompanying financial statements are presented in the form required by the
Audit Branch and indicate a successful year's operation, my twenty-second, and the
fourth to include the Text-book Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $370,589.71, is properly valued at publisher's
price, plus income freight. Rental stock on hand, $339,743.81, represents the value of
the books in the schools (Rental Plan), less depreciation, but it does not take into P  116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT  1952-53
account the transportation and other costs involved in moving these books from our
shipping-room to the various schools of the Province, nor does it give us an opportunity
to cover office overhead, etc. It might be argued that the rental stock on hand is undervalued to the extent of our regular mark-up.
Sales
Our sales to dealers, etc., amounted to $544,521.73, and discount allowed was
$97,068.85.
Rentals
We received $272,688.29 in rental fees from the various schools, an increase of
7.6 per cent over the previous year. It will be noted that the Rental Plan statement
shows a deficit of $99,254.20. This deficit was fully anticipated because no subsidy to
the Rental Plan was included in the official estimates. It is interesting to note that if we
had been permitted to use our regular mark-up in connection with the valuation of the
rental stock on hand in the schools, the apparent deficit would only have been $76,427.85.
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1953
Sales
Revenue—
Sales „
Less discount
Net sales	
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1952  $316,403.41
Purchases for year (cost, freight, and
duty)     456,064.50
$544,521.73
97,068.85
$447,452.88
Inventory, March 31st, 1953
Cost of sales	
$772,467.91
370,589.71
Gross profit
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages
401,878.20
$45,574.68
Packing and general expenses
Freight and delivery	
Sundry expenses 	
$36,663.02
4,016.66
7,620.92
2,217.82
50,518.42
Excess of expenditure over revenue transferred to Capital
Investment Account       $4,943.74 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
Rentals
Rental fees collected	
Inventory, March 31st, 1952  $327,957.86
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, and duty)     342,395.20
P 117
$272,688.29
Inventory, March 31st, 1951 _____ $314,991.57
Less three years' depreciation at Z'iVz per cent
per annum     314,991.57
$670,353.06
Inventory, March 31st, 1952  $334,441.00
Less two years' depreciation
at 33VS per cent per
annum     222,960.66
Inventory, March 31st, 1953  $342,395.20
Less one year's depreciation
at 33V& per cent per
annum     114,131.73
$111,480.34
228,263.47
339,743.81
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages  $29,997.01
Packing and general expenses  3,286.35
Freight and delivery  6,235.30
Sundry expenses   1,814.58
$330,609.25
41,333.24
371,942.49
Excess of expenditure over revenue transferred to Capital
Investment Account     $99,254.20 P  118
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand _
Cash in bank __
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1953
Assets
$100.00
350.00
  $450.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand     370,589.71
Consigned text-books  $670,353.06
Less depreciation1     330,609.25
     339,743.81
         7,934.96
         9,848.46
Accounts receivable	
Obsolete stock on hand	
Subsidies provided for Text-book Rental Plan     $64,497.20
Less 1949-50 profit         1,697.68
Rental Plan profit, 1949-50
62,799.52
1,697.68
$793,064.14
1 Third-year depreciation on 1950-51 inventory ....
Second-year depreciation on 1951-52 inventory
Depreciation on 1952-53 inventory   .__
$104,997.19
111,480.33
114,131.73
$330,609.25
Liabilities
  $450.00
  9,848.46
  643.35
Capital Investment Account  782,122.33
Treasury advances	
Reserve for obsolete stock
Suspense Account
$793,064.14 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
P  119
Industrial Education
H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Under the general heading of "Adult Education," two groups of classes are
administered by the Department of Education. These groups are: (1) Those that are
conducted in co-operation with the Federal Government, and (2) those that are the direct
responsibility of the Province. The reports of the responsible officers are grouped here
for convenience.
Industrial Education—H. A. Jones, Director of Technical and Vocational Education.
(1) Canadian Vocational Training Programme.
(a) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement.
(b) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement.
(2) Night-schools (see Industrial Education report).
Correspondence Instruction—
*High School—Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.
♦Elementary School—A. H. Plows, Director.
*Recreational and Physical Education—R. J. Phillips, Director.
*School and Community Drama—H. S. Hum, B.A., Director.
(1) CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME
During the fiscal year 1952-53 the following schedules of the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Training Agreement were in operation: Schedule C—Urban Occupational
Training; Schedule E—Rural Training; Schedule H—Student Aid; Schedule M—
Unemployed Workers; Schedule K-2—Defence Training.
A new Schedule R is now under consideration to train handicapped persons.
Apprentice technical training at night-school and by correspondence was also given
under the Apprentice Training Agreement.
(a) Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training
Under this schedule, classes were held at the Dominion-Provincial Vocational
Training School at Nanaimo in Diesel and Automotive Mechanics. At the Vancouver
Vocational Institute classes were held in Power Sewing. The cost of these classes was
shared equally between the Federal Department of Labour and the Provincial Government. Forty-five male students were trained at the Vocational School in Nanaimo, and
thirty female students were trained in Power-machine Sewing at the Vancouver Vocational
Institute.
Schedule E—Rural Training
The Ninth Annual Dominion-Provincial Youth Training School was held at the
Youth Training Centre of the University of British Columbia from January 5th to
February 28th, 1953. This school was sponsored by the Federal Department of Labour,
the Provincial Department of Education and Agriculture, and was administered by the
Extension Department of the University of British Columbia.
* See separate report following. P  120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Thirty-six boys and twenty girls enrolled in the eight-week training programme.
These rural students represented nearly every district in British Columbia.
The main courses of instruction for the boys included: Carpentry, agricultural
engineering, blacksmithing, motors, welding, electricity, horticulture, dairying, beekeeping, handicrafts, and public speaking. For the girls: Sewing, weaving, handicrafts,
cooking, nutrition, home management, home nursing, personal relationships, child
development, ceramics, and public speaking. Both boys and girls also received instruction in record-keeping, clubs and government, geography and natural resources of British
Columbia, and field-trips.
All of the foregoing instruction was given during the day, and in the evening the
students attended courses in physical education, party planning, photography, projection,
first aid, dramatics, publications, and study and reading.
Along with their regular eight hours of instruction each day, these rural young
people organized a students' council; organized and operated a co-operative canteen;
published a weekly paper and prepared material for an annual; took turns at janitorial
and kitchen duties; designed and purchased Youth Training School pins, rings, and
crests; organized a blood drive for the Red Cross blood clinic; and did exceptional job
work in organizing and carrying out their final evening at the Youth Training School,
which included a banquet, display, fashion show, play, and dance.
The staff of the 1953 Youth Training School consisted of members of the University,
Department of Extension, the Faculty of Agriculture and other faculties of the University,
the Provincial Department of Agriculture, the Federal Department of Agriculture, commercial companies, and individual specialists. In all, there were seventy-four different
persons who instructed and gave talks to the 1953 Youth Training students.
Schedule H—Student Aid
Under the provisions of the Dominion-Provincial Student Aid Schedule, students
of academic merit who are in need of it may secure financial assistance to enable them
to proceed with their education beyond the level of the secondary school. The awards
granted are in the form of 60 per cent bursary and 40 per cent loan, which is repayable
one year after the recipient has entered employment.
During the past year 613 awards ranging from $50 were made. The total fund
available was $120,000.
Number of Students
Institution Assisted
Section I.—Students in any faculty and in any year-
University of British Columbia	
Victoria College	
King Edward High School
Langley Junior-Senior High SchooL
Prince George High School	
North Vancouver High School
Prince Charles Junior-Senior High School, Creston..
Kelowna High School	
University of Alberta	
University of Oregon—Dental	
University of Oregon—Medical	
University of Washington	
University of Ottawa	
Queen's University	
University of Western Ontario	
University of Toronto	
McGill University	
424
21
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
3
2
2
1
10
10 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
P 121
Number of Students
Institution Assisted
Section I.—Students in any faculty and in any year—Continued
Ontario Veterinary College  5
Pacific University, Forest Grove, Ore  1
University of Seattle  2
Royal Military College, Kingston, Ont  1
  499
Section II.—Nurses in training at hospitals—
Royal Jubilee Hospital       8
St. Paul's School of Nursing       5
Vancouver General Hospital       5
Royal Columbian Hospital       5
 ■    23
Section III.—Students attending Normal Schools—
Vancouver Normal ,     44
Victoria Normal     43
     87
Section IV.—Students attending public technical, vocational, or
art schools where fees are charged—
Vancouver Vocational Institute       2
Vancouver School of Art       2
       4
Total number of awards  613
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training
Classes under Schedule M have been in operation at the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Training School at Nanaimo and also at the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
Handicapped persons were also trained under this schedule, and placed in jobs, during
the past year.   It is proposed next year to train these people under a new Schedule R.
During the year 1952-53 twenty-eight women and thirty-two men received training
under Schedule M.
Schedule K-2—Defence Training
The Province of British Columbia entered into an agreement with the Federal
Government in 1951 under which special classes are held for the training of welders for
the shipyards of Victoria, which are classified by the Federal Government as defence
industries. Day and night classes were set up in the Vocational Department of Victoria
High School at no cost to the Victoria School Board.
The cost of training and all capital and operating expenditures were shared by the
Federal and Provincial Governments on a 75-25 basis, the Federal Government paying
the larger share.
(b) Apprentice-training
Up to this year the technical training of apprentices has been given at night-schools
in the larger cities and by correspondence courses for those who could not attend classes.
Apprentices in the smaller towns did not get an opportunity to master all the skills and
knowledge of their trade. A start has been made in the training of outside apprentices
by offering them day-time courses at the Vancouver Vocational Institute. The present
plan is a very moderate one and requires an apprentice to attend the Vocational Institute
for at least one month during each apprentice-year. Travelling expenses and fees are
paid, and a subsistence allowance of $14 per week is paid the apprentice while he is
attending day classes. It is hoped that next year more money will be made available, so
that every apprentice in British Columbia will have an opportunity to master his trade. P  122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
The Department of Labour, Ottawa, and the British Columbia Department of
Education share equally in the cost of apprenticeship training.
During the year 1952-53 a total of 1,523 apprentices were trained in the following
centres: Vancouver, Victoria, Duncan, Nanaimo, New Westminster, and Trail. Instruction by correspondence was given to 171 students.
Enrolment Summary
The enrolment summary of the classes administered by the Industrial Education
Branch during the year 1952-53 is as follows:—
Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement—
Sub-schedule C—Urban Occupational Training        75
Sub-schedule E—Rural Training        56
Sub-schedule H—Student Aid      614
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training        60
Schedule K-2—Defence Training        83
Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement  1,694
Total enrolment  2,582
High School Correspondence Adult Education
EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. £S L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1952-53 was 7,210. Of this number, 6.4 per cent or 460 were between the ages
of 18 and 20, and 48.7 per cent or 3,514 were 21 years or over. Thus 55.1 per cent
of our students can be classified as adults. This is a decrease of 6.3 per cent over the
figures of 1951-52. There was an increase of 964 students in the number of students
over 21 years and a decrease of 638 in the number of students between the ages of
18 and 20 years.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices      112
Army, Navy, Air Force        40
Civil Servants        31
Police   7
Domestic workers        22
Farming and ranching        62
Firemen, engineers      310
Forestry         28
Housewives         9 0
Lumbering         70
Merchants         23
Mining         30
Office-workers      348 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
P 123
Professional—■
Teachers 	
Nurses
  229
__         80
Miscellaneous
     25
Railroad                         — .
      334
        11
Skilled labour          _   - 	
      224
Unskilled labour .   -   	
      217
Miscellaneous
        21
Total      	
   1.980
Elementary Correspondence School Adult Class
MR. ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
In the school-year 1952-53 the enrolment in the adult class of the Elementary
Correspondence School was 299 students. The enrolment figures for the year are as
follows:—
September      85 February   217
October  134 March   241
November   156 April   257
December  178 May   279
January   194 June   299
During the year, 5,481 papers of adult students were corrected.
Recreation and Physical Education Branch
R. J. PHILLIPS, ACTING DIRECTOR
While the general policy and programme of the Branch remained unchanged during
this fiscal year, there were indications of impending change. Some of these trends will
be dealt with later in the report.
The inter-high school sports competitions were continued under local auspices and
assisted by the Branch.   The results were as follows:—
Sport Host Winner
Girls' volleyball.____ Cranbrook Westbank.
Boys' volleyball ____ Cranbrook Kelowna.
Boys' basketball ____ University of British Columbia .__ South Burnaby.
Girls' basketball _..__ Kamloops South Burnaby.
Boys' curling Vernon Kelowna.
The popularity of the Pro-Rec Physical Fitness centres is indicated in the increased
enrolment.   The registration and attendance in the centres was as follows:—
Pro-Rec centres:   Number of centres, 213;  registration, 18,591;  attendance,
220,077.
Community centres: Number of centres, 12; registration, 40,912. P  124 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
Location of Pro-Rec Centres
Vancouver and New Westminster.—There were fifty Pro-Rec centres for women,
five mixed, and forty-one for men.
Fraser Valley.—Abbotsford, Aldergrove, Bridal Falls, County Line, Chilliwack,
Cloverdale, Clearbrook, Haney, Hjorth Road, Hatzic Prairie, Kennedy, Langley, Mission,
Murrayville, Ocean Park, Ruskin, Sardis, West Townline.
Okanagan-Kootenay.—Chapman Camp, Edgewater, Fernie, Falkland, Glenmore,
Greenwood, Grand Forks, Invermere, Kelowna, Kimberley, McDougall, Marysville, Nelson, Osoyoos, Okanagan Centre, Oliver, Princeton, Peachland, Rossland, Salmon Arm,
Summerland, Vernon, Windermere, Winfield.
Victoria.—There were eight centres for women, ten for mixed, and six for men.
Vancouver Island.—Brentwood, Cedar, Courtenay, Great Central Lake, Port Alberni,
Royston, Union Bay, Youbou.
Northern British Columbia and West Coast.—Britannia, Bridge River, Clinton,
Francois Lake, Glenwood, Hazelton, Prince Rupert, Quesnel, Squamish, Terrace, Vanderhoof, Woodfibre, Wells.
Grants to Community Centres
Twelve organizations received the Department of Education's Community Centre
Grants, as follows: Campbell River Recreational Association, Courtenay Recreational
Association, Kamloops Athletic Association, Kimberley Amateur Athletic Association,
Kitsilano War Memorial Community Centre, Marpole Community Centre, North Vancouver Memorial Community Centre, Prince George Civic Centre, Prince Rupert Civic
Centre Association, Rossland Civic Activities Association, Sunset Memorial Centre, Trail
Athletic Association.
Fitness Demonstrations
A curtailed budget in the new fiscal year forced the cancellation of the Annual
Women's Revue, which formerly had been held in May. However, several self-supporting
closing events were held in various parts of the Province under local auspices.
Gymnastic Competition
The Provincial Pro-Rec centres' annual gymnastic competition was held in April at
Kitsilano Community Centre, where gymnastic teams from several districts in the Province competed for the various championship awards.
The standard of performance and competitive spirit shown indicated the success of
the event and a proof of the need for the promotion of gymnastics for young men wishing
to achieve skill in this type of athletics.
Recreation for the Blind
Recreation programmes for the blind or partly blind have been greatly expanded
by the C.N.I.B. Recreation Department, headed by Mr. Joseph Lewis, a member of the
Pro-Rec staff, with headquarters at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind in
Vancouver.   Following is a brief sketch of some of the activities:—
Provincial and interprovincial cribbage tournaments have been developed—one of
the most popular activities in the programme; five- and ten-pin bowling; public speaking
proved successful from the standpoint of attendance and results; dancing classes were
well attended; a literature club introduced an innovation in the form of discussions based
on Citizens' Forum material; minor dramatic activities were carried on.
An annual country fair, at which approximately 500 blind men, women, children, and
escorts attended, attracted more attendance than any other single occurring activity
throughout the year. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
P 125
Other activities: A woodwork course, choral activities, salmon derby, first sports
day for the blind of British Columbia, camping, annual boat cruise, " yards "—football
league, women's gadabout service club, men's discus club, annual summer picnics,
lawn-bowling.
Leadership Training
Last summer two short courses were held in Vancouver for the purpose of training
volunteer and paid leaders in Pro-Rec physical-recreation activities. The curriculum
for the four-week men's course was broadened to include theory of community recreation
and sports education. The women held a two-week intensive refresher course covering
many phases of physical recreation. Thirty-six women and thirty-four men attended the
respective courses.
Travelling Clinics
The travelling clinic in basketball was again active, and John Willox, accompanied
by staff Sports Organizer J. Dickerson, conducted dual clinics in school and community
at Hope, Princeton, Merritt, Lytton, Kamloops, Ashcroft, Clinton, Duncan, Ladysmith,
Nanaimo, Courtenay, Mission, Gibsons, and Sechelt. In the North during May, our
regional supervisor, K. K. Maltman, worked with the Williams Lake School Board in
conducting track and field clinics at Horsefly, Williams Lake, Alexis Creek, Big Lake,
Lone Butte, Bridge Lake, Forest Grove. This type of service was felt to be very worth
while.
Other Services
The Branch Office continued throughout the year to dispense resource materials of
all kinds upon request, to handle and distribute a large amount of mimeographed material
received from the National Fitness Office, to give advice and guidance to community
groups, and to make its board room and stenographic facilities available to many amateur
sporting associations. Several of the staff served in executive or advisory capacities on
many boards and associations in order to develop better public relations with these
groups. It is felt that more good work could be done in this way, especially to prepare
and make available literature and programme materials needed to guide and stimulate
community recreation.
Trends
While it is too early to predict policy, it has already been made public that certain
basic changes in the present set-up will be effected:—
(1) Curtailment of staff, and appointment of nine regional consultants, who
will be responsible for specific areas.
(2) Centralization of administration: Moving the Branch Office to Victoria,
to facilitate administration.
(3) Community responsibility: Permitting full community control of recreation programmes, with financial and other assistance offered but not
imposed upon communities.
(4) Voluntary leadership: Emphasis on development of volunteers through
leadership training courses.
(5) Extension of night-school programmes to include more courses of a purely
recreational nature.
(6) Formation of Local Recreation Commissions, which will administer grants-
in-aid.
As this is to be my final report, I should like to take this opportunity to express my
deep appreciation of the co-operation and inspiration which I have received from Dr.
F. T. Fairey, Mr. H. L. Campbell, and Dr. H. P. Johns during these past years. P  126 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
School and Community Drama Branch
H. S. HURN, B.A., DIRECTOR
Two events of considerable significance took place during the past season—the
Dominion Drama Festival and the British Columbia One-act Play Festival.
Canada's most important drama festival was brought to our Province for the first
time since its inauguration in 1933. Victoria was chosen the host city, and a large
committee was formed to attend to the very many details consequent upon the holding
and financing of the project. Approximately 200 actors and technicians arrived from
several points representing the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario, the Prairie Provinces, and
Vancouver to take part in the stage work at the Royal Theatre. In addition, there were
many visitors from all parts of Canada and many parts of the United States who came
to share in what proved to be, in the opinion of many, the most successful Dominion
Drama Festival ever held. The festival was successful from the financial standpoint, too,
and this in spite of the large numbers of participants, whose billeting was the responsibility of the committee. The people of Victoria, after a comparatively slow start at the
beginning of the week, rallied to the support of the festival, having realized apparently
that the standard of entertainment was at a high level. Due to the absence from the
city of certain key figures, the election, etc., there was fear that the social activities might
suffer unduly, but, thanks to the Women's Canadian Club and the generosity of individuals, this aspect of the festival was very satisfying. Visitors left with a warmth of
affection for British Columbia, and Victoria in particular. The festival contributed much
to members of British Columbia's drama groups, who attended to see some good, and
even excellent, work. The winner of the festival was a French-Canadian company from
Montreal, " La Jeune Scene," with a play about French Canada dealing with cigarette-
smugglers in the Province of Quebec; it was a triumph of Canadian play-writing as well
as acting.
In the years preceding the war, a festival called the British Columbia Drama Festival
was held in Victoria every year. It was Provincial in name only, inasmuch as the entries
came from Victoria and Vancouver only; the other communities did not participate.
With the rapid growth of the cities on the Mainland and the increasing desirability of
bringing their groups into the Provincial pattern, this Branch organized the zones of
dramatic activity, and the entries in the Vernon Festival were those representing these
zones. Owing to the loss of key players, the North was not represented unfortunately,
but six groups were present to compete for the Provincial championship—Nanaimo,
Vancouver Repertory, North Vancouver, Kelowna, Kamloops, and Trail. The project
was most successful. The citizens supported the festival in a most commendable manner,
while the civic officials and others, whose help was much appreciated, rallied to the support of the excellent committee chosen to run the festival. Nanaimo, which has not
been prominent until this year, won first place.
Festivals were held with an increase in the number of entries in all cases. One of
the most prominent was the Vancouver Island Zone Festival held at the City of Nanaimo.
Since the abandonment of the music festival which was held in pre-war years, this most
successful function proved to be one of the best cultural projects Nanaimo has had in
many years.
In many cases, particularly in festivals including music, art, drama, speech, and
dancing, the number of entries has become a serious problem to the comparatively few
people who organize and run them, and this state of affairs has resulted in some cases in
the separation of drama from the rest of the activities, just as it has always been in the
large centres. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
P 127
The Fort St. John Drama Festival is worthy of special mention in view of the fact
that six of the plays presented were from original scripts, four of which were based on
Peace River themes.
The addition of the Dominion Drama Festival to the responsibilities of the small
staff of this Branch demanded much time and effort, and I should like to compliment
the staff for their efforts.
Contrary to expectations, the demand for curtains and other equipment increased
during the year. It is evident that in practically every area in this large Province,
theatre is prominent in the life of the people.
It has been of concern to this Branch that professional theatre survive in the
Province. As a consequence, reasonable assistance has been given to those who are
striving hard to succeed, especially directed toward moral assistance when circumstances
seemed to warrant such aid. The difficulties faced by those companies are not insignificant by any means. In the period reaching to a satisfactory audience support, they
will need the active support of all who believe that living theatre has a definite place in
the life of every city. P  128
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., DIRECTOR
The growth of the counselling services in the secondary schools of British Columbia
continued in 1952-53. Their development since 1948-49 has been consistent and, at
the same time, reasonably conservative by comparison with the increase in school population. The following table illustrates the development of the counselling services since
1948:—
Schools and Counsellors
Number of Schools
with Approved
Counselling
Service
Year
1948-49      _ 34
1949-50  36
1950-51  50
1951-52  55
1952-53  66
Number of Counsellors
(Engaged Half Time
or Full Time in
Counselling)
85
89
103
141
173
During the year 1952-53 a Province-wide survey was made to determine the percentage of total possible teaching time (that is, number of teachers X number of class
periods) in secondary schools being devoted to counselling, administration, classroom
instruction, and other assigned duties. This survey established several significant facts.
It showed, for example, that the average percentage of such time assigned to counselling
was 3.6 per cent. Apart from very small schools, this percentage in individual schools
was fairly consistent regardless of their size, varying in the great majority of cases from
3.5 to 4.5 per cent. The survey also indicated that a relatively high percentage of
teachers' time spent in counselling does not necessarily mean that a low percentage of
the total teaching time is being devoted to classroom instruction. For example, of the
nine schools with percentages of teaching time in excess of 5 per cent devoted to counselling, in seven classrooms instruction accounted for over 80 per cent of the staff's time,
or equal to the average for all secondary schools studied, including the very small ones.
On the other hand, there appeared to be evidence that counselling services in schools
decreased the amount of time consumed in administration.
The in-service training of counsellors and other guidance workers was continued,
both in connection with the Department's Summer School of Education and in evening
classes sponsored by the Vancouver and Trail School Boards. The following is a list
of courses and enrolments for the year 1952-53:—
Summer School of Education
Counselling  COUrseS  Enrolment
Occupational Information Techniques  28
Counsellors' Workshop  16
General guidance courses—
Principles of Guidance  117
Mental Hygiene  ■  95
Adjusting Work to Individual Differences  113
Evening Courses
Vancouver—
Individual Inventory    27
Use of Tests in Guidance     25
Trail—Mental Hygiene     20 EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
P 129
In February a conference of counsellors from Vancouver Island was held at
Nanaimo to discuss educational planning for students entering university. Dean Walter
Gage and Major J. F. McLean represented the University of British Columbia. Twenty-
two counsellors attended. A similar conference was held by counsellors of the Okanagan
Valley to consider administrative problems of the guidance programme.
During the school-year 1952-53 the Division of Educational and Vocational
Guidance continued to supply materials to counsellors and others engaged in guidance
work. Ten issues of " Pacific Tides," giving details of employment trends in British
Columbia, were sent to schools through the co-operation of the National Employment
Service. Two lists of " Guidance Pamphlets Currently Available " were distributed,
listing and classifying 162 guidance monographs. A direct issue of thirty monographs
was made to each secondary school. Three of these publications were made available
by the Federal Department of Labour.
The increasing interest of employers of youth in guidance and their growing appreciation of its importance to them has been amply demonstrated during the school-year
just past. In two cases—Trail and Vancouver—this is evidenced in co-operative experiments in which counsellors have been taken on the staffs of the personnel departments of
industrial establishments during the summer vacation for the purpose of familiarizing
schools with the employee needs of these firms. In all, twelve industrial and commercial
firms have been involved in this unique training programme.
Again this year the Vancouver Board of Trade and the Pacific National Exhibition
jointly sponsored the Vocational Guidance Job Study Competition. A total of 10,901
entries was submitted from the secondary schools of British Columbia. Winners of the
Provincial bursary awards were: First, Leila Long, of Cowichan Junior-Senior High
School, Duncan; second, Roger Purves, of Mount View High School, Victoria; third,
Beverley Pitt, of Kelowna High School. Cowichan Junior-Senior High School was
awarded the George Powell Shield as the school attended by the winning student. P  130 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1952-53
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR OF
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
Programmes
During the year, school broadcasts were on the air for thirty-one weeks, with a total
of 224 programmes. Of these, seventy-two were thirty minutes in length, thirty-five were
approximately twenty minutes, eighty-two were fifteen minutes, and thirty-five approximately ten minutes. About one-third of the broadcasts originated outside this Province,
while British Columbia contributed a number of broadcasts for listeners in the Western
Provinces.
Apart from the traditional series, such as music, French, art, social studies, etc.,
which were well received, a number of other series and individual programmes deserve
mention. A series of short safety programmes brought special comment, and also a series
of character education programmes for intermediate grades. Three special broadcasts
were arranged to make the background and meaning of the Coronation of greater significance to pupils. Worth special mention also is a series of individual programmes for
high schools, and a choral programme of Christmas music which linked together the
themes of the carols in an original manner.
From listening reports, here are the most popular ten series in order: Song Time,
Coronation series, Music and Things, Pictures in the Air, Let's Sing Together, Listening
Is Fun, Do What Sam Says (Safety), Easter Programme (one occasion), The Mighty
Fraser, Ecoutez.
From reports of high-school listeners, the Shakespeare and Canadian Painters series
were also popular.
Printed Aids
As a guide to teachers and pupils in the use of the broadcasts, the following printed
aids were available:—
Teachers' Bulletin (complete details of the year's programmes).
Pictures in the Air (for the art broadcasts).
Song sheets (containing words and music for pupils, to accompany Let's Sing
Together).
Ecoutez (for pupils—the text of the French broadcasts).
In addition, words and music for supplementary songs were made available to
teachers for the junior-grade music programmes.   Copies of the C.B.C. booklet " Young
Canada Listens " were also circulated to all schools.
Script Writing and Production
While production is the responsibility of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation,
the work of the School Radio Broadcasts Office is co-ordinated very closely with it. More
than twelve of the script-writers were either teachers or former teachers, and it is the
policy of this Division to encourage such participation further. A great many school
students were auditioned during the year, and approximately fifty took dramatic parts in
school broadcasts at one time or another.
Except in special cases, professionals are used for adult dramatic parts on school
broadcasts, but at all times care is taken to see that the special considerations necessary
for a suitable school production are kept in mind. DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
P 131
Coverage
The opening of a number of new repeater stations has meant some increase in the
number of schools listening. In addition, there is evidence that the number of pupils
per school is also increasing.
Annual returns from schools show the following percentages:   Schools listening,
51.44 per cent (54.33 per cent of those reporting); total pupils listening, 43.45 per cent.
Considerable variation as between school districts is evident, occasioned in large
part by varying efficiency of radio reception.   In two districts (Nos. 67 and 77) all the
schools report use of broadcasts.   The following figures show the general distribution:—
Seventy-five per cent or more of schools listening:   Districts Nos. 12, 23, 32,
33, 34, 35, 37, 39, 40, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 61, 63, 66, 67, 69, 75,
and 77 (total, 22).
Fifty to 74 per cent of schools listening:  Districts Nos. 2, 7, 9, 11, 19, 20, 21,
24, 36, 38, 42, 52, 60, 62, 64, 65, 68, 72, 73, 76, and 78 (total, 21).
Twenty-five to 49 per cent of schools listening:  Districts Nos. 3, 10, 14, 15,
17, 22, 25, 26, 27, 30, 48, 55, 56, 59, and 71 (total, 15).
Less than 25 per cent of schools listening:  Districts Nos. 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 13, 16,
18, 28, 29, 31, 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 57, 58, 70, 74, and 79 (total, 21).
Equipment
Reports show a total of 1,134 radios at present in school use, although there is still
a high percentage of schools without receivers. Fifty-five schools report using magnetic
recorders, and seventy-seven have some sort of sound distribution system.
Teacher-training
The usual contacts with teacher-training institutions were maintained. In addition,
visits were made to ninety-one schools in eighteen districts outside of Vancouver and
Victoria.   This is a service which could well be extended if time permitted.
Other Contacts
A considerable growth in interest was shown in school broadcasts by the parent-
teacher organization. Copies of printed material were sent to many groups, and addresses
were given to a number.
Useful contact was maintained with school radio broadcast officials in other Provinces.   A policy of mutual criticism and exchange of information proved valuable.
The thanks of this Division go to the many individuals and groups who have
co-operated so willingly with it during the year, and in particular to the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation for its continued interest and assistance. P  132 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P_ed., DIRECTOR
The 1952-53 school-year was one of the heaviest in the relatively brief life of the
Division so far as test investigations were concerned. Five tests were produced and
wholly or partially standardized. Over 31,500 tests were distributed, scored, analysed,
and reported from the office, in addition to about a quarter of a million tests that were
distributed to School Boards and teachers. At least one-fifth of the total office time was
devoted to University Entrance examination studies and other inquiries. Mere volume
is meaningless, of course, but the fact that this could be accomplished in one year with
a high degree of accuracy and without serious delay is a tribute to the permanent staff—
Miss Lorna Aitkens, Miss Ellen Brown, and Mrs. Gladys Forbes—and the markers and
other temporary employees.
Three Province-wide surveys involving five tests were carried out completely by the
Division; that is, they were designed, printed, shipped for administration, marked, typed,
tabulated, and validated. An additional investigation which was suggested by the Deputy
Superintendent of Education was carried out by most Inspectors in November and May.
Its purpose was to draw attention to weaknesses in computation that had become evident
and to indicate the concern of the Department with the follow-up work that should be
carried on after testing. In November, at the beginning of the study, Form A of the
B.C. Arithmetic Computation V-VI Test was given to Grade VIII classes. The tests
were marked by teachers, and the item-difficulties were recorded by Inspectors. Form B
was administered in May to check the progress that had been made during the six-month
period. The Division acted as co-ordinator by providing and shipping the tests and
accessories and by analysing the items and compiling the Provincial results. Approximately 13,500 Grade VIII pupils were tested and retested in this manner.
In Grades XI and XII (English 30 and 40) a special British Columbia modification
of the Dominion Group Test of Learning Capacity, Advanced Form B, was administered
to 11,820 University Programme and General Programme students. An extensive study
of the candidates enrolled in different programmes and courses was made, and data were
obtained that provided essential information for the establishment of differential standards
for University Entrance examinations.
In Grades X and XI (Social Studies 20) two forms of the new British Columbia
Social Studies 20 Test were administered to 4,856 and 4,958 students in May. It might
be pointed out that this test is the first of its kind to be produced in British Columbia.
It also is, to the best of our knowledge, only the third test in Social Studies that has been
standardized in Canada, the first since 1934, and probably the only one on the continent
that has as complete coverage of rural and urban pupils over a comparable area.
The second Terminal Course Test, a test in Mathematics with an accompanying test
in Arithmetic Fundamentals, was given to all Mathematics 30 candidates in public and
private schools on June 11th. This followed the procedure established in 1951 and
1952, when a Terminal Course Test in Science and a Composite Achievement Test were
given.
Results of the Surveys.—1. Attention has been drawn to specific weaknesses in
arithmetic that are carried forward through elementary school and act to the detriment
of further study in Mathematics. Principals of schools have been provided with
information regarding the relative standing of their pupils.
2. Two good tests with high curricular validity for the British Columbia Social
Studies 20 course have been produced. After the elimination of a few items and an
additional administration, these tests will be made available to teachers to measure
achievement in their classes. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
P 133
3. It was found that variations in the scholastic aptitude of students enrolled in
different courses were even greater than had been expected. The following table gives
the mean I.Q. and the percentage of students taking different courses who were above the
average of all Grade XII U.P. students; that is, University Programme students enrolled
in English 40.
Mean I.Q. of Grade XII Students Taking Various Courses and Percentage Whose
Scholastic Aptitude Exceeds the Grade XII University Programme Median (115)
Course
Per
Cent
Mean
I.Q.
Course
Per
Cent
Mean
I.Q.
Spanish 91, 92	
61,70
61
57,60
58
55
50
50
48
47
46
45
40
116
117
117
117
116
115
115
115
115
113
114
113
38
38
29,32
28
24
23
20
19
12
11
7
113
Physics 91 	
English 40 (U.P.+G.P.) _	
German 91, 92	
113
Latin 91, 92	
112
French 92... _ _	
110
Mathematics 91 	
Law 93
107
English 40 (U.P.) 	
107
English 91  	
105
French 91 _..__	
English 93
106
Chemistry 91  	
103
Economics 92_	
103
History 91 _..__	
102
Biology 91 _	
This study was the basis for the establishment of a completely new and probably
unique concept of standards for University Entrance. Not all problems have been settled, particularly the one of over-recommendation, and many modifications will be necessary, but the new techniques of scaling should provide at least a partial answer to the
oft-recurring criticisms that (a) the University Entrance examinations are too difficult
for candidates of average ability, and (b) they are so easy that almost any student can
pass.
One problem that has not been solved is the problem of variation of students from
schools of different types. Differences in achievement between accredited and non-
accredited schools are much greater than the mean I.Q. difference of 0.3 would indicate.
The differences between University Programme and General Programme students seem
to be increasing. The mean U.P. Grade XII I.Q. is 115.3 and the G.P. mean is 104.1.
This is desirable, but it makes it very difficult to establish a single standard for high-
school graduation that is applicable to all students and all types of schools. It is evident, however, that our standards of accrediting and of recommendation must be fundamentally sound. The marks obtained when all students are tested indicate that students
from the large accredited schools have definitely higher achievement than those from
non-accredited or private schools. Similarly, the students who are weak academically
are being guided to a much greater extent into the General courses. While the scaling
of University Entrance examinations this year was a complicated and arduous task, it is
felt that methods are being worked out which will be fairer than those that have been
used in the past. The new method that was used this year resulted in a lowering of the
standards in such highly selective courses as Latin 92 and Physics 91, but it was responsible for raising the standards in such subjects as Social Studies 30 and English 40 to
a more satisfactory level.
Future Enrolment.—Problems of accommodation and teacher-supply for the rapidly
expanding British Columbia population are still matters of great concern to the Division.
In 1935, the year in which most of this year's Grade XII graduates were born, the number
of British Columbia births was almost exactly 10,000. Preliminary figures for 1952
total 29,700. In addition, the immigration of children below the age of 16 has been
so persistent that it is hoped that few will refer to the forecasts of enrolment that were
made in this Division only a few years ago.    In 1952 there was a net gain of 3,640 P  134
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
BIRTHS   IN   BRITISH   COLUMBIA - 1933 TO   1953.
1953
1942 1945
YEAR   OF    BIRTH
E
BRITISH   COl
NROLMENT 11
UMBIA   PUBL
C  SCHOOLS
PRO
JECTED TO 1
964
PROJECTION
ON   B.C    BIRT
IMMIGRATION
BASED
HS   AND
TO 1953
150
125
100
1935 1940
Division of Tests  Standards  and Research
1955 1960
Division of Visual Education DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
P 135
school-age or pre-school children, and the total of child immigrants since 1940 now
exceeds 42,000. An estimate made in 1947, when the enrolment was 145,000, indicated
that it would increase to approximately 200,000 in 1954 and 230,000 in 1960. While
the estimate for 1954 has proved to be very accurate, the persistence of the high birth
rate and immigration have made the estimates from 1960 onward much too low.
Present indications are that we must be prepared for almost 300,000 by 1965. P  136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1952-53
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1st, 1952, to August 31st, 1953:—
Circulation Report
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Film-strips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1. Fernie
2.
3.
4.
5
6.
7.
Cranbrook	
Kimberley—
Windermere ..
Creston	
Kootenay Lake .
NeIson_	
Slocan 	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan-
Penticton 	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden   	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm _ 	
Armstrong-Enderby-
Vernon _ __	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere 	
Birch Island .	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel—	
Lillooet	
Ashcroft	
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam —	
North Vancouver..
West Vancouver....
Sechelt   	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte..
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace 	
Smithers —
. Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George—
McBride	
and 60. Peace River-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
422
53
398
513
1,055
398
491
54
859
358
249
113
232
585
84
192
279
476
582
309
1,655
736
299
31
4
1,042
415
1,557
7,007
3,690
924
587
1,053
6,424
5,900
1,826
1,100
658
2,270
92
243
43
625
722
4
165
464
60
26
22
143
1,691
5,765
434
53
233
18
152
459
487
160
201
22
360
131
109
49
117
274
23
93
117
212
262
161
731
396
169
6
4
834
179
1,032
4,190
1,774
388
219
441
3,087
2,693
816
457
231
1,427
80
114
16
340
381
3
72
205
40
26
10
63
505
3,357
208
25
211
84
20
113
205
92
3
201
32
134
41
30
55
148
100
153
140
160
201
6
24
203
10
300
1,264
1,772
305
245
106
110
506
4
501
377
911
29
50
46
11
87
44
16
54
528
5
93
202
61
20
91
162
67
3
164
27
99
25
20
50
132
69
135
115
144
122
6
17
141
10
252
1,183
1,448
204
202
89
86
443
4
410
305
774
24
39
42
10
71
33
15
48
438
5
76 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
Circulation Report—Continued
P 137
District Number and Name
64. Saltspring.. _.
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan..
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum .	
70. Alberni ___	
71. Courtenay 	
72. Campbell River-
73. Alert Bay __.
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland	
Unattached schools-
Miscellaneous	
Totals..
Motion Pictures
Film-strips
Number
Number
Number
Number
Requested
Supplied
Requested
Supplied
155
66
99
86
367
173
282
237
124
50
19
18
47
20
513
238
90
82
90
35
13
10
1,506
831
145
126
402
170
124
105
389
204
332
135
31
18
118
62
76
55
2,735
1,500
201
190
213
89
500
224
18
15
1,243
672
168
128
237
216
14
14
64,403
32,844
11,110
9,167
In some areas, schools co-operated with one another and pooled their demands.
They arranged locally the distribution of the material supplied to them by the Division.
This increased the effectiveness of the service to them. It reduced the wastage of time
resulting when material is being transported and increased the opportunity of securing
a greater percentage of the material demanded. Such " circuits" operated in the
following districts:—
3.
Kimberley.
35. Langley.
4.
Windermere.
40. New Westminster.
15.
Penticton.
44. North Vancouver.
21.
Armstrong-Enderby.
48. Howe Sound.
23.
Kelowna.
49. Ocean Falls.
24.
Kamloops.
52. Prince Rupert.
29.
Lillooet.
59 and 60. Peace River South
30.
Ashcroft.
and Peace River North.
33.
Chilliwack.
70. Alberni.
34.
Abbotsford.
75. Mission.
The Visual Education Department of the Victoria School Board administered a
similar service to District No. 61 (Greater Victoria).
The Director and staff of the Division of Visual Education appreciate the work
done by those teachers and officials who, through their fine co-operation, have made this
improvement in service possible.
From the registration cards submitted by 546 schools served during this past term,
the following information is revealed:—
Number of schools possessing motion-picture projectors  387
Number of schools borrowing motion-picture projectors  143
Number of schools possessing film-strip projectors  260
Number of schools borrowing film-strip projectors  143
On the shelves of the library were 1,369 motion-picture titles. Duplicate copies of
the more popular films brought the total to 2,070 motion pictures. This is less than the
2,115 copies on the shelves during the year 1951-52. This reduction resulted from
(1) the recall of certain National Film Board historical films, (2) the need to withdraw
some obsolete and badly worn silent titles, and (3) non-replacement of some films
damaged in use. Note should be made that there is an increased interest upon the part
of school districts toward the establishment of local libraries of film-strips. The use of
the Division's library of film-strips for preview purposes to aid local bodies in wise selection when purchasing film-strips is proving popular.
Other loan materials distributed included 501 picture sets and 88 dioramas on
Indian life.
J P  138 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1952-53
"EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT"
REPORT OF F. M. KINSMAN, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1952-53 a total of 214 applications was considered by the
Commission. Of these, twenty-three were turned down, the chief reason being that
family income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes. One
hundred and ninety-one applications were approved for grants, sixty-six receiving
assistance for the first time, sixty-eight for the second year, forty-six for the third year,
and eleven for the fourth year. Students were distributed by grades as follows: Grade
IX, 53; Grade X, 56; Grade XI, 41; Grade XII, 41. During the year thirteen students
dropped out and grants were discontinued.
Grants paid per student were as follows:—
September         $50.00
December  20.00
March   13.45
Total for the year, per pupil        $83.45
Total for the year, all pupils  14,967.90
Expenses amounted to $25.40, leaving a balance of $6.70 from the total vote of
$15,000 allocated to the "Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act" for the fiscal
year 1952-53. STATISTICAL RETURNS  STATISTICAL RETURNS
P 141
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1952
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