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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1952

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1951
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1951.
ALEXANDER DOUGLAS TURNBULL,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable Alexander Douglas Turnbull,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1951.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1951
The year covered by this Report could be termed outstanding in many ways, particularly in the direction of industrial development. During 1951 construction commenced
on the largest single undertaking in the history of British Columbia—the development
of power in the Tweedsmuir Park area for eventual production of aluminium at Kitimat.
Although this project dwarfs others by comparison, it should not be forgotten that the
sum total of other developments either under way or under consideration comes close to
equalling the reported over-all cost of the aluminium development. Construction
contracts awarded during 1951 amount to an estimated $385,000,000, compared to
$81,240,000 in 1950.
One of the chief features of this progress is the fact that areas outside the accepted
industrial centres are being opened up in the course of primary-resource extraction and
power-development. A natural sequence will be the growth of manufacturing and service
industries in new locations throughout the Province.
Significant progress was made during the year by all agencies concerned with the
promotion of British Columbia manufactures, in the home market and in the export
market. Our products are becoming increasingly better known throughout the world,
and any return to normal trading must result in increase in the variety and volume of our
exports. Already the stimulus of production for defence is evident, and this factor will
have a telling effect in the months to come.
British Columbia has received an unprecedented amount of favourable publicity
during the past year in Canadian, United Kingdom, and foreign publications. These
unsolicited testimonials reporting developments here have been a welcome addition to
the Department's regular schedule of industrial and travel advertising in nationally
recognized magazines and newspapers. Many inquiries have been received as a direct
result.
Oil discovery occupied the spotlight in the closing months of the year, and while
much remains to be accomplished in this direction, it appears certain that another
valuable asset has been added to our list of natural resources. Much credit is due to
those companies whose foresight and initiative made this development possible.
Following in this Departmental Report is a full account of the activities of the Office
of Trade Commissioner, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, the Regional Development Division, and the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee
This Committee meets at the call of the Chair to consider industrial problems which
affect various departments of the Government service.    The Committee has been
extremely helpful in furthering industrial development throughout the Province.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
I. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
E. S. Jones, Deputy Minister, Public Works Department.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
5 Q 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
J. T. Gawthrop, Director, Regional Development Division, Department of
Trade and Industry.
C. Hopper, Assistant Deputy Minister of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Branch of Public Health.
Dr. C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
G. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
W. H. Robertson, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and Industry.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
G. T. Hatcher, Director, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of
Trade and Industry.
Dr. H. Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Deputy Minister of Fisheries.
Col. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister of Education.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry the Research Council
held monthly meetings at which were considered many scientific problems of vital interest
to the Province.
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is very gratifying to the directors of the Council that industry is taking advantage of the services which
the Council provides.
The Council was organized in order to perform the following functions:—
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia:
(2) To initiate and undertake research work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province:
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in
the Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and industrial research:
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries, and rewards, and pecuniary and other aids, in order to facilitate and encourage original scientific
and industrial research:
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
During 1951 the board of management consisted of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Hon. Leslie H. Eyres, Minister of Railways, Trade and Industry,
and Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
G. P. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
Dominion Government—
C. E. Webb, District Engineer, Water Resources Division, Department of
Resources and Development, Vancouver, B.C.
Dr. R. E. Foerster, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B.C.
National Research Council—Dr. G. M. Shrum, University of British Columbia. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 7
University of British Columbia—
Dr. W. A. Clemens, professor and head of Department of Zoology.
Professor A. H. Finlay, Department of Civil Engineering.
Dr. G. F. Laird, Department of Agronomy.
Industry—
G. A. Barrat, British Columbia Fruit Board.
S.  J. Hammitt, manager,  Morrison Steel & Wire Company Limited
Vancouver, B.C.
Prentice  Bloedel, vice-chairman,  Bloedel,  Stewart & Welch Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
H. R. MacMillan, chairman, H. R. MacMillan Company Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
James Eckman, Canadian Fishing Company Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
M. M. O'Brien, managing director, Bralorne Mines Limited, Vancouver,
B.C.
Labour—H. Neelands, secretary, Typographical Union, Vancouver, B.C.
Ex officio—R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and
Industry.
To provide improved facilities required by the great demand for services, the
Council started construction in the spring of 1951 on the first unit of its permanent
laboratories; the new building will be ready for occupancy early in 1952.   While plans
for a future expansion of the new building called for the inclusion of pilot-plant facilities,
the existing huts are being retained for the present to provide the needed space for all
larger-scale experimental work.   The new building will provide for much more efficient
handling of the majority of the Council's activities and, in addition, a safe home for
a large part of the valuable laboratory equipment acquired in the years since the Council's
formation.
Combined with its better facilities is the ever-increasing background of experience
of the Council staff, which is a growing asset to the Province and one in which industry
can well place its confidence.
INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING
The Department continued to advertise the opportunities for new industrial enterprise in the Province. This advertising stressed the natural resources of the Province
and their relation to secondary production.
The advertisements were placed in the following selected publications in Canada
and United States: Fortune, Newsweek, Time, U.S. News & World Report, Nation's
Business, Business Week, Time (Canadian), Canadian Business, Industrial Canada,
Saturday Night, and Financial Post.
The results of this campaign have been most gratifying, and from the inquiries
received, it is evident that world-wide attention was drawn to the advantages of British
Columbia.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS
The Department has consistently co-operated with the British Columbia Boards of
Trade, Chambers of Commerce, and the British Columbia Division of the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association, and the assistance which these organizations have so
willingly and cheerfully provided is appreciated.
NEW INDUSTRIES AND PRODUCTS
The past year has brought additions to British Columbia's fast-growing list of
manufactured products, and if inquiries dealt with by the Department are any indication, Q 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the very satisfactory rate of increase will be continued. Mention has been made in
previous Reports of the general trend toward full utilization of waste material from
primary and even secondary production. Of interest in this connection is the production
of boiler compound from cedar waste. Experiments with this new material have proved
satisfactory, and it would appear that a use has been found for a by-product formerly
burned as waste.
First-class ladies' nylon hosiery is now being produced at Victoria for the first time
in British Columbia. Dry-ice production is another item of interest. This product may
quite possibly find an important market in the United States. Domestic and commercial
lock-sets are now being produced in quantity, with a good market locally and in Eastern
Canada. This plant started operation in 1951 on a partial manufacture and assembly
basis, but volume of sales has occasioned plans for full manufacture.
An interesting development is the plans of a large plumbing-fixture firm to establish
a manufacturing plant in this Province. Of outstanding interest is the coming into
production of the high alpha pulp-mill at Port Edward near Prince Rupert. High alpha
pulp is the raw material for rayons, plastics, cellophane, and explosives.
Lesser items, but nevertheless important from a production point of view, are
novelty lamp-bases, hammers, saws, television equipment, figurines, chemicals, sportswear, construction equipment, pottery, and lingerie. All these items point to an ever-
widening circle of diversified production—a diversity that will stand the Province in good
stead if there should be some recession from the high peaks attained in the past few years.
There is continuing interest in basic steel production from British Columbia iron
ores, particularly in view of shipments of this commodity to foreign smelters. A steel-
mill producing some forms of structural steel would be a great asset to the Province-wide
expansion programme.
During trips to Eastern Canada contacts were made by Departmental officials with
firms interested in establishing branch plants in British Columbia.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE, BRITISH
COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
The work at the London office of the Department of Trade and Industry at British
Columbia House maintained a high level of activity for the same reasons as pertained
in the previous year.   These factors are as follows:—
(1) The interest in the Province as a sphere for industrial enterprise;
(2) The continuing urge of those engaged in trade and industry to transfer
their present activities to other parts of the Commonwealth;
(3) The increase in purchases of British Columbia products by British
ministries and departments, and those firms who have been authorized
to conclude private trading agreements;
(4) The continuing trade and business emigration inquiries from Continental
countries.
Business Emigration
Many inquiries were received from prospective emigrants who wish to become
established in business or industry in British Columbia.
These inquiries were, in almost every case, made by people of substantial means
with a wealth of trading experience or industrial skill and mainly of the managerial type.
The regulations regarding the transfer of sterling to Canada were slightly relaxed
in May, 1951, where they affected individual monetary transfers. This helped to a small
degree in easing the problems of the business emigrant where the emigration of his family
was a factor. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 9
The British Treasury has recently been sympathetic toward the transfer of more
substantial blocks of sterling for the actual setting-up of branch plants or new businesses.
In the latter part of 1951 some applicants had already received authority for transfers
of this kind, and it is expected that more such authorizations will follow.
British Columbia-United Kingdom Trade
The flow of British goods to Canada was somewhat retarded in the first half of 1951
due to the shortage of raw materials created by defence commitments and the uncertainties of the political situation in Britain. However, the London office maintained
a constant search for British goods that have sales possibilities in Western Canada.
Up to the end of November, 1951r sixty-eight agency offers were forwarded to Victoria
for inclusion in the Trade and Industry Bulletin which is issued each month.
The year 1951 showed a substantial increase in the number of British firms who
have included British Columbia in their itinerary when making sales surveys of Canada.
During the year a number of representatives of British Columbia firms visited the
United Kingdom and the Continent. Introductions were arranged to manufacturers,
supply-houses, ministries, etc., to facilitate quick delivery of the supply of raw materials
to British manufacturers, so that British Columbia orders could be executed.
The Dollar Convention held at Eastbourne in March, 1951, laid the basis for an
increase in purchases for British Columbia food products and manufacture by British
ministries and by private traders. Purchases of British Columbia lumber were considerably higher than for 1950. Selected private traders in the United Kingdom were
permitted this year to purchase British Columbia apples direct. Indications are that
there will be an increase in purchases of metals.
Trade Fairs and Exhibitions
The Festival of Britain was responsible for a large increase in visitors from the
Province to London during 1951. Many of these visitors also availed themselves of the
opportunity of attending trade fairs and exhibitions in other parts of the country. Tickets
were provided and introductions arranged for such visitors.
The Industrial and Trade Representative in London attended all exhibitions and
trade fairs which had a bearing on British Columbia trade or requirements. These
exhibitions included agriculture, machinery, engineering, food, housing, machine tools,
textiles and clothing, public works, industrial management, etc.
New Industries and Branch Factories
The number of inquiries from manufacturers who are interested in British Columbia
as a location for a branch plant or the prospects for licence manufacture agreements
underlines the fact that the West Coast of Canada is favourably regarded as a sphere for
secondary industry.
Applicants of this kind are generally manufacturers of consumer goods which have
proved to be readily saleable in Great Britain and the Dominions, but who find that
scarcity of raw materials and other restrictions prevent an output sufficient to supply the
needs of agents in Canada and other export markets; hence their desire to locate
somewhere in the Commonwealth, and the reports of the rapid growth of British
Columbia lead them to consider the Province as an excellent sphere for this expansion.
Although the British Treasury is showing a more lenient attitude toward applications
for transfers of capital to establish branch factories in Canada, the amounts authorized
are still not sufficient to finance the building of factory premises. If building space could
be offered to these British firms at low rentals along the same lines as the industrial
estates now operating so successfully in Britain and at the Slough Trading Estate recently Q 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
established in Ajax, Ont, it is felt that a good number of smaller factories could be
established throughout the Province. These factories should be assets to the adjacent
community, ensure year-round payrolls, and, as they are mostly the secondary-industry
type, fill in the gaps of the economy of British Columbia.
Still the most feasible method for British firms to gain access to the Western
Canadian market is to conclude licence manufacture agreements with already-established
British Columbia firms. Details of such proposals were forwarded throughout the year
to Victoria for inclusion in the Trade and Industry Bulletin.
Inquiries from Continental firms—mainly from Holland and Switzerland—continue
to be received. These moves to expand their sphere of interest is prompted by the
uncertain European situation and because the post-war shortage of practically all
manufactured goods led to a remarkable degree of prosperity and the building-up of
capital reserves, especially in Holland, Belgium, Western Germany, and Switzerland.
Details of such inquiries were forwarded throughout the year to Victoria.
Liaison with Other Canadian Institutions in United Kingdom
Very close contact was maintained with Canada House, Provincial offices, branches
of Canadian banks, and Canadian business institutions. Especially through contacts
with banks, the emigration of business or professional men is facilitated. Branches of
Canadian banks in the United Kingdom are specializing in affording facilities for
industrial and trading moves into Canada.
Visit to the Province
The Industrial and Trade Representative from London visited British Columbia
during June and July, 1951. The visit was largely taken up with a group of prospective
British investors; the arrangements for this survey were made in the United Kingdom
prior to his departure. The visit enabled him to refresh his contacts with Government
departments and business organizations throughout the Lower Mainland, Vancouver
Island, and the Okanagan Valley.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FUND
Statement of Loans Outstanding at December 31st, 1951
Principal Interest
B.C. Livestock Exchange Limited  $3,000.00 $101.71 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 11
OFFICE OF TRADE COMMISSIONER
PRIME OBJECTIVES
The office has helped in a co-ordinated effort of detailed planning, as follows:—
(1) For new industrial establishment:
(2) For plant extensions:
(3) For overseas and domestic market surveys:
(4) For practical application of research results:
(5) For adequate regional participation  in prime  defence  contracts  and
defence sub-contracts:
(6) In selected phases of public relations.
Details under some of these headings are contained elsewhere in the Report.
All the work was carried out in co-operation with other Provincial departments in
British Columbia, Dominion Government departments, and departments of other Provincial Governments throughout Canada, and commercial organizations in the Province.
The objectives are definitely related to the functions of the Department's Regional
Development Division, and to background statistics and marketing data which are
available through the Department's Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
LIAISON WITH DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
Some of the liaison work with Ottawa is cleared through the office of the Western
Representative of the Dominion Department of Trade and Commerce (Foreign Trade
Service) in Vancouver. Other contacts are effected direct. The Vancouver office uses
the Office of Trade Commissioner, Victoria, as a central contact to ensure the closest
co-operation with Provincial units, and with Commercial Counsellors, Commercial
Secretaries, and Trade Commissioners overseas.
OTHER OTTAWA CONTACTS
Reference should also be made to other contacts, as follows:—
(1) Industrial Development Bank:
(2) Export Credits Insurance Corporation:
(3) Canadian Standards Association:
(4) National Research Council and Federal departments concerned with
industrial research:
(5) Purchasing Agents of foreign Governments:
(6) Purchasing structure of the Department of Defence Production:
(7) Defence Planning Staff.
NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS PROGRAMME
Contract Awards
The Trade Commissioner continued close liaison with the Canadian Commercial
Corporation in the matter of defence contract awards, to protect the interests of British
Columbia suppliers.
The Canadian Commercial Corporation, now a purchasing unit of the Department
of Defence Production, maintains direct contact with the Trade Commissioner's Office,
and general policy of contract awards is discussed and cleared through a small committee,
with headquarters in Vancouver and recognized at Ottawa. The Provincial Trade
Commissioner is a member of this committee. Effective contact at Ottawa is maintained
with the Director, Small Industries Division, Department of Defence Production. Q 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Information Available
The following types of information are now immediately available at Victoria or
can be secured on short notice, in co-operation with the committee in Vancouver:—
(1) Prime contracts awarded through the purchasing structure of the Defence
Production Department over given periods, where value exceeds $10,000
and listings of " letters of intent" for larger purchases and allocations:
(2) Smaller contract awards, foodstuffs, etc., cleared through the district
offices of the Canadian Commercial Corporation, which offices are now
known as liaison offices of the Department of Defence Production—one
in Vancouver and one for the Island in Victoria:
(3) Information for Canadian sub-contractors on United States procurement
in Canada:
(4) Lists of prime contractors who may have sub-contract work available:
(5) Equipment, facilities, etc., in selected plant locations, especially for
smaller industries or for proven idle facilities in larger plants:
(6) Selected "invitations to tender"—not published:
(7) Confidential " contract demands " by Department of National Defence:
(8) Information on priorities affected by the controlled-materials plan in the
United States:
(9) Information on priorities, controls, etc., for materials supply from
Canadian sources:
(10) Samples for inspection by prospective contractors. The most practical
way of handling sample displays was under regional consideration at the
close of the year:
(11) Charts, etc., covering the set-up of the new Department of Defence Production and the Associated Crown Company, Department of Defence
Construction:
(12) A listing of personnel and staff changes in the Department of Defence
Production.
Representations
The Office of Trade Commissioner and the Department of Trade and Industry have
stressed the following points as far as British Columbia is concerned:—
(a) Equitable basis of quotations, to allow prices f.o.b. places of delivery
where possible:
(b) Allocations to split larger volume purchases so that local deliveries can
be handled by local production, where practicable:
(c) Procurement of sub-contracting supplies, especially for the ship-building
industry and ship-repairs, from local sources.
Price differential has been a deterrent factor.
The Trade Commissioner's Office subscribed to an over-all interprovincial brief
presented to Ottawa by the Trade and Industry Council.
Allied to the efforts in connection with war contracts is the work of the Trade Commissioner's Office in assistance to firms to secure equitable allocations of controlled
materials for normal operations when the plant is not participating in war contracts.
INTERPROVINCIAL CO-OPERATION
The Trade Commissioner represents the Province of British Columbia through the
Department of Trade and Industry on the Provincial Governments Trade and Industry
Council, which was created at the Montebello meeting in September, 1950, following an
organization meeting at Lindsay, Ont., September, 1949. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 13
A successful meeting of the Council was held at Banff, September 17th to 20th,
1951, when the British Columbia position was reported under a number of headings.
Chief interprovincial items on the agenda included the following:—
(1) Future organization of the Provincial Governments Trade and Industry
Council:
(2) Impact of the defence programme on the National economy:
(3) Canadian International Trade Fair:
(4) Special co-ordinated industrial surveys:
(5) Co-operation with chartered banks and with industrial departments of
the railways.
Alberta, as host Province, extended many courtesies and full co-operation.
The Trade Commissioner presented a summary report of industrial progress in
British Columbia, which is included as appendix in the published proceedings.
EXPORT SURVEYS
A main function of the Office continues to be assistance to industry groups and
individual firms in connection with their export problems.
While the charting of our export trade during 1951 shows an all-time high for value
total, producers and manufacturers are still facing a number of difficulties, with particular
reference to the dollar situation and resultant curb on exports to the sterling area.
The Office of Trade Commissioner during the year made a survey by special letter
to a selected list of some 200 manufacturers. From this a table of exportable commodities is being compiled, and assistance and advice have been given in a number of cases
where problems have been presented.
INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
Committee Organization
The Trade Commissioner again served during 1951 as co-convener of the Fair
committee in charge of all British Columbia arrangements for the Canadian International
Trade Fair. This included survey and action for exhibitor, buyer and visitor participation, and for special phases of publicity and public relations connected with the Fair.
Reference is made elsewhere in this Report to the Department of Trade and Industry's
Departmental exhibit.
Plans for 1952 were well under way at the close of the year.
The Department of Trade and Industry had already agreed to active participation,
and the appointment of a field representative working with the local committee ensures
a cross-section survey of exhibitor and buyer prospects in the Province.
The Department, through the committee, has received the active co-operation of
trade groups, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and Boards of Trade. The administrator of the Fair from Toronto headquarters paid two visits to the Province during the
year.
Departmental Exhibit
For the second year the Department of Trade and Industry entered an exhibit at
the Trade Fair held at Toronto, May 28th to June 8th, 1951. The exhibit is constructed
with British Columbia plywoods and is a pictorial and statistical presentation of this
Province's industries and progress. It commanded marked attention and compared
favourably with other Provincial exhibits. Hundreds of inquiries were received for
information on all aspects of our economy. Many inquiries concerned settlement, travel,
and employment, while many valuable contacts were made for branch-plant, office, or
warehouse establishment. Sources of supply for British Columbia products were provided in many cases. Q 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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CUMULATIVE MONTHLY EXPORTS
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1951
1949
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JAN.
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JULY       AUG.
SEPT.        OCT.        NOV. DEC.
sh Columbia Bureau of Economics and Statistic). 650
600
550
500
450
400
i     350
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250
200
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19
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY                                  Q 15
BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXPORTS
Passing Through British  Columbia Customs Ports
1930-1951
j
0                   1932                1934                 1936                1938                 1940                1942                 1944                 1946                 1948                 1950    19
9.1 Figures Subject to Revision                                                                                                                  Y E ARS
51 Q 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Thirty-eight countries were represented by almost 3,000 exhibits, occupying a total
of 159,429 square feet. The total attendance was 79,889, made up by 35,364 business
registrations and 44,525 public admissions.
The Department organized a group of British Columbia business-men who visited
the Fair as a body. The British Columbia exhibit was headquarters for this delegation,
and direct results were obtained in business contacts with exhibitors. This delegation,
headed by the Deputy Minister, was suitably received and entertained by the Province
of Ontario and the Trade Fair administration.
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
The Trade Commissioner has continued to serve ex officio on the board of management of the British Columbia Research Council. He has assisted through the year in
advisory capacity on industrial panels. The Office continues to act as a clearing-house
for application of research results, and assists in acquainting industry with improved and
enlarged facilities offered by the Council.
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
The Trade Commissioner is Chairman of the British Columbia Industrial Design
Committee. Membership of the Committee includes representation from the Department of Trade and Industry, Department of Education, University of British Columbia,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade, Vancouver School of
Art, British Columbia Research Council, and the Dominion Department of Trade and
Commerce.
The Committee has co-operated with the National Industrial Design Committee in
local planning, and was directly responsible for a successful industrial-design exhibition at
Woodward Stores in Vancouver during February. It has assisted in publicity and public
relations, to encourage appreciation of industrial design and its importance as a factor
in production and marketing of British Columbia products.
In co-operation with the Department of Education and the Vancouver School Board,
the Committee organized a successful series of vocational classes during 1951, and a
special committee is laying plans for similar courses next year.
The Committee has started to build up reference libraries on industrial design.
It has assisted in local planning for two national design competitions sponsored by
industry.
Direct financial assistance was secured from the National Gallery, Ottawa, with
smaller contributions from British Columbia sources. Mr. R. D. Cameron has continued
as executive secretary of the Committee. Two members of the Provincial Committee are
members of the National Committee.
HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION
A revised edition of the Directory of Handicraft Producers and Products was published in 1951. As in 1950, this Directory listed producers in British Columbia known
to be interested in finding a market and in a position to supply reasonable demands.
Distribution of the Directory was made to retail and wholesale firms as a guide for any
handicraft items they might wish to purchase. Additional distribution was made in
Eastern Canada and the United States. Through the co-operation of a Vancouver supply-
house, the opportunity was taken to distribute an invitation to many handicraft workers
to send in particulars of production for listing in next year's Directory.
Contact was maintained by correspondence with Eastern Canadian Provinces, some
of which have extensive educational programmes for handicraft development. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 17
UNITED KINGDOM SURVEYS
The work of the Industrial and Trade Representative at British Columbia House
is covered in the general section of this Annual Report.
He reports to the Office of Trade Commissioner direct in a number of phases of his
work. In particular, the Trade Commissioner and the Administrative Assistant have
cleared the Representative's work under headings of Branch-plant Establishment, Investment Surveys, Special Industrial Surveys, Agency Inquiries, Itineraries, and Introductions.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
This Bulletin, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacture opportunities, and news of
general commercial interest, has been published for the past two years. It has been the
means of establishing contact between foreign firms and British Columbia importers and
manufacturers. Many of the trade inquiries reach us through our Industrial and Trade
Representative at British Columbia House, London, while the majority of licence manufacture opportunities are supplied by the Industrial Development Division, Department
of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa.
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMITTEE WORK
Co-operation
The year has been marked by a series of occasions on which the Trade Commissioner
represented the Department, including the special trip arranged in June for the dedication
of the cellulose plant in the Prince Rupert area.
The Trade Commissioner has attended a number of national and local conventions
and meetings, and has continued the effective basis of co-operation with foreign consulates and with the Trade Commissioners of Commonwealth countries. Once again
special reference must be made to the happy basis of co-operation with the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner Service and with the offices of the Australian Government
Trade Commissioner at Vancouver and Ottawa.
Itineraries and Committees
The Office of Trade Commissioner has been responsible for itinerary and other
arrangements for business visitors from Eastern Canada and overseas, and visiting trade
missions and special industrial-survey parties. It has worked in direct co-operation with
the Foreign Trade Service Office in Vancouver for the arrangements in British Columbia
for visiting Trade Commissioners and officials from Ottawa.
The Trade Commissioner is a member of several standing committees of the Vancouver Board of Trade, and the Office has continued financial assistance to the Transportation Bureau of the Board of Trade to help it serve the smaller Boards of Trade in
other parts of the Province in a very constructive programme. Q 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1951, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic
statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into the following
divisions: Economic research, market research, statistical, and mechanical tabulating.
To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the policy of
building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who could be relied upon to
perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the policy to make
the services of the technical personnel continuously available to all other departments of
the Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has
been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1951 the essential statistical services performed
for the other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department of Trade and Industry,
were maintained. Before proceeding with a description of the services performed by the
various divisions during the year, a brief review of business activity in British Columbia
is presented.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
It would appear from preliminary statistical returns that business activity in British
Columbia during 1951 continued upward after reaching new highs in 1950. The basic
industries will probably show moderate dollar-value gains over 1950 figures. In addition,
the dollar value of production in the manufacturing industries will probably run slightly
ahead of 1950 statistics. It should be mentioned that price increases have again contributed to most of the gains shown. There has been considerable activity in the heavy-
construction industry, with work progressing on many large contracts, such as the
aluminium plant, pulp-mills, schools, public buildings, and public utilities.
Incomplete returns indicate that the net value of production of primary and
secondary industries amounted to some $1,023,000,000* in 1950, as compared with
$869,201,000f in 1949 and $891,709,000f in 1948.
* Preliminary estimate.
t Dominion Bureau of Statistics. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Q 19
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Q 23
savmoa do snoitiiw Q 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ECONOMIC        INDICATORS       IN        BRITISH       COLUMBIA
EMPLOYMENT
a
a
2
2 '20
z
60
111=
-  100
1940 1942
1944        1946
YEARS
1948        1950
1
BANK DEBITS
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9
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RETAIL TRADE
1000
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1940 1942        1944 1946        1948 1950
YEARS
WHOLESALE SALES
/
S
1935-1939 =
10C
1940        1942        1944       1946
YEARS
1948 1950
1942        1944 1946       1948       1950
YEARS
6.0
CONSUMPT
ON OF ELECTP
ICAL POWER
a 4.5
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2
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1940 1942
1944 1946
YEARS
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10.5
1948        1950
SALES OF LIFE INSURANCE
1940 1942
9.0
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1944 1946
YEARS
1948        1950
FREIGHT LOADED
1940 1942
1944 1946        1948        1950
YEARS
1951 Figures Subject to Revision DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Q 25
ECONOMIC       INDICATORS       IN       BRITISH       COLUMBIA
250
225
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
RETAIL PRICES
PRICES
(INDEX NOS.)
193
-19
9 =
00
250
WHOLESALE PRICES
225
200
175
150
125
100
1935-1939 =
100
75
50
?5
0
1939   1941    1943   1945   1947   1949
1951
1939 1941 1943 1945 1947 1949
CONSTRUCTION
(in Millions of Dollars)
500
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
VALUE
OF
CONTRACTS AWARDED
■
___i ^	
VALUE
OF
BUILDING PERMITS
90
80
70
60
sn
/
40
/
30
?n
10
0
*
1939 1941 1943
1945 1947
YEARS
1949 1951
1939 1941        1943
1945 1947
YEARS
1949 1951
1938--58 Municipalities Reporting
1940-1946--204 Municipalities Reporting
1947-1951--507 Municipalities Reporting
1951 Figures Subject to Revision Q 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1949 and 1950,
with Preliminary Estimates for 1951
Unit or
Base
Period
1951
Preliminary
Estimates8
1950
1949
Mining—
Total value of production1..
Gold production1	
Silver production1 	
Copper production1	
Lead production1	
Zinc production1 	
Coal production1. 	
Forestry—
Total value of production2..
Timber scaled2	
Paper production2 	
Fisheries—
Total value of production6..
Pack of canned salmon3	
Agriculture—
Total value of production1..
Apples—
Total shipments4 	
Domestic shipments4—
Export shipments4-	
External trade—
Export of canned salmon5..
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir5..
Export of red-cedar shingles5	
Internal trade—
Index of wholesale sales5  	
Total retail sales5. _ 	
Department stores .
Food-stores	
Gasoline consumed6 .
Railway freight loaded in British Columbian-
Consumption of electric power5 	
Sales of life insurance5   	
Construction—
Contracts awarded5—.- _ _	
Building permits issued   _.	
Finance—Bank debits   -	
Tourist trade—
Automobile entries on sixty-day permits5 _
Employment—5
All employment   - 	
Manufacturing    _ 	
Iron and steel products _
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper __	
Textile products 	
Other manufacturing 	
Mining  	
Logging
Construction .	
Communication -
Transportation -
Services 	
Trade	
Salaries and wages7—
MB.M.
Tons
Cases
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
MFt.
Sq.
1935—39=100
000$
000$
000$
Gallons
Tons
000 Kwh.
000$
000$
000$
000$
Number
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
$
165,000,000
525,000,000
4,420,000
90,000,000
1,955,475
155,000,000
401.0
1,130,000
120,000
223,000
172,000,000
11,840,000
4,220,000
136,000
400,000
85,000
10,250,000
250,000
210.0
750,000,000
148,155,060
11,404,270
7,666,151
9,889,458
44,391,530
48,882,765
10,025,626
468,371,142
4,560,080
477,628
68,821,358
1,482,560
136,690,400
7,051,622
3,179,228
3,872,394
322,062
1,146,805
2,881,584
351.3
1,050,054
113,273
194,389
155,363,848
10,834,135
3,960,698
124,280
81,200
86,644
8,446,567
221,642
202.0
219.5
233.4
203.8
212.8
257.0
233.5
121.9
174.6
182.5
229.5
156.7
229.0
276.7
695,000,000
133,012,968
10,911,780
5,669,769
10,956,550
41,645,726
36,604,700
12,462,424
331,589,549
4,049,682
462,282
56,456,260
1,433,723
139,960,563
6,742,203
3,046,298
3,695,905
414,259
824,097
2,121,636
332.1
940,030
108,860
186,640
142,365,704
10,394,827
3,601,317
110,976
79,429
89,293
7,540,592
214,805
200.4
213.9
239.5
190.0
219.7
241.8
228.8
113.3
165.0
195.2
213.9
158.2
243.3
278.1
671,980,815
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests, Forest Service.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
4 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
6 British Columbia Department of Finance.
7 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division.
8 Subject to Revision. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 27
ECONOMIC RESEARCH DIVISION
One of the major functions of this Division is providing economic counsel to the
Government. In line with this objective, numerous projects and reports have been
completed during the past year for various departments. In particular, considerable
assistance was given to the following branches of the Government (involving in some
cases loan of staff): Regional Development Division, Department of Finance, Attorney-
General's Department, and the Department of Labour.
In addition to work done for Government departments, hundreds of requests of an
economic and statistical nature have been received from private individuals, corporations,
newspapers and business publications, and Boards of Trade. These requests covered
a wide range of topics, too numerous to detail individually. In some cases these inquiries
call for the provision of statistical information readily available from our files and library.
In other cases they require lengthy tabulations and a considerable amount of research.
The helpful co-operation of the staff of the Provincial Library and other departments of
the Government is worthy of mention in this regard.
As a means of providing statistical information indicating economic activity and
trends in the Provincial economy, this Division publishes the Monthly Bulletin. This
publication is circulated to various Government departments, as well as to libraries and
newspapers throughout the Province. It is also sent, upon request, to financial institutions and business and industrial firms.
In conjunction with the above publication, The Summary of Business Activity is
assembled each year. It presents annual statistics on production and trade within the
Province for the years 1920 to the latest available estimates and provides a historical
record of economic development within the Province.
Special Surveys
Wage-rate Surveys
Early this year, at the request of the Civil Service Commission, this Division conducted a survey of current wage rates and working conditions to determine the extent to
which terms of employment vary within the Province. The survey covered selected
occupations in sixteen major British Columbia centres. Questionnaires were sent to the
municipalities and a sample of business and industrial firms. Information pertaining to
hospital employees was obtained from the British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.
The returns of the Vancouver Board of Trade Clerical Salary Survey were again
compiled by this Division. This survey provides a most useful source of information
regarding clerical wage rates in the Greater Vancouver area.
During the past year, arrangements were completed with the Department of Labour
to provide us with the latest collective-bargaining agreements. From these we obtain
current union wage rates and information on working conditions. The information compiled in this regard is used by many departments.
Comparative Analysis of Provincial Government Expenditures
Again this year a short study was carried out comparing on a functional basis the
expenditures of the Canadian Provinces. As a means of improving the research in this
field, exploratory work was undertaken by two graduate students working during the
summer months. Their work will no doubt prove valuable in refining and extending
our research in the field of Governmental expenditures.
As in previous years, this Division has compiled for the Labour Relations Board
a directory of trade unions and other employee associations showing their membership
and affiliation. An analysis of the distribution of trade-union membership by industrial
categories and other significant characteristics of union membership is also provided. Q 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL DIVISION
This Division is responsible for the collection, compilation, analyses interpretation,
and publication of statistical information. Also, it is the duty of this Division to assist
other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to establish uniform
statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, this Division co-operates with
other statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries relating
to statistical data.   Following is a brief outline of the statistics compiled in this Division.
External Trade of British Columbia
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in
detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the Federal
trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province. While
these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British Columbia
nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province from the other goods passing
through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis for a very comprehensive
annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia customs
ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are now
published annually. Until June, 1950, detailed monthly statements were also published.
For reasons of economy, this publication has now been condensed and combined with
an abbreviated form of another discontinued publication, Business Activity, to form the
major components of the Bureau's Monthly Bulletin.
The discontinuance of fairly detailed monthly published external-trade figures has
resulted in increased requests for import and export information, which has been supplied
to all inquirers. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Q 29
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ft?^
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IH     C      C
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?1   rt
W   4)   c -™ H
rt <y C  g  u
C  0 fl  <u «
o o Oj:« Q 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Tables 2 and 3 give a brief insight into British Columbia's foreign trade for the
eleven-year period 1940 to 1950. The peak year for exports was 1950, there being
a slight drop in 1949 over 1948. Imports more than doubled since 1945. Preliminary
figures for the first six months of 1951 indicate substantial increases in both exports
and imports.
Table 4.—Eleven Leading Exports of British Columbia, 1950
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Planks and boards, Douglas fir  83.9
2. Planks and boards, hemlock  37.2
3. Newsprint   34.3
4. Lead in pigs, refined -  32.2
5. Shingles, red cedar  32.1
6. Planks and boards, cedar  28.7
7. Cattle   11.8
8. Zinc spelter  10.1
9. Ammonium sulphate  8.6
10. Copper, fine in ore     8.4
11. Nitrogen fertilizer     8.4
The above table indicates the importance of our lumber, mine, and smelter products,
pulp and paper, and live stock.
British Columbia products, exported through all Canadian ports, went to one
hundred countries in 1950; however, two of these, the United States and the United
Kingdom, bought over 85 per cent of these exports. The shift in our trading pattern
with these two nations is brought out by the fact that the United States received 57 per
cent and the United Kingdom 19 per cent of British Columbia's exports in 1949.
Further, ten countries took over 95 per cent of all our exports. These leading customers
are set out as follows:—
Table 5.—The Ten Leading Countries to Whom British Columbia
Exported in 1950
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States  $325,079,517 78.8
2. United Kingdom  34,036,217 8.3
3. Australia   6,752,297 1.6
4. Hawaii   6,619,748 1.6
5. Union of South Africa  5,003,097 1.2
6. Belgium  4,745,390 1.2
7. Japan   4,153,150 1.0
8. India   2,024,330 0.5
9. Panama  1,911,711 0.5
10. Hong Kong  1,839,742 0.4
All other countries       20,310,408 4.9
Total, all countries  $412,475,607 100.0
A continental breakdown of British Columbia exports shows North and Central
America and the West Indies bought 80 per cent, Europe 10 per cent, Oceania 4 per cent,
Asia 3 per cent, Africa 2 per cent, and South America 1 per cent. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 31
Table 6.—Eleven Leading Imports from Foreign Countries for Consumption in
British Columbia, 1950
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Crude petroleum, for refining....  21.7
2. Automobiles, passenger (under $1,200)...  15.8
3. Sugar, raw, imported direct  12.3
4. Coffee, green, imported direct  10.7
5. Ores of metals, n.o.p     8.8
6. Gasoline, under .8236 specific gravity     5.3
7. Diesel fuel     4.9
8. Copra, not prepared     4.8
9. Logging machinery and parts     4.4
10. Traction engines, gasoline     4.2
11. Heavy fuel-oils, Nos. 4, 5, and 6     4.1
The presence of four petroleum products among our eleven leading imports (continuing the 1949 trend) suggests that cheap water transportation is still making it possible
for California oil-producers to retain the major portion of the British Columbia market
for these items.
Although British Columbia imported from eighty-eight countries in 1950, three-
quarters originated in Britain and America. Accompanying the changing 1950 export
picture was an increase in our United Kingdom imports, which were 15 per cent of the
Province's total imports in 1949, and a decline in imports from the United States, which
represented 65 per cent of the total in 1949. The top ten countries listed below provided
90 per cent of all imports.
Table 7.—Ten Leading Countries from Whom British Columbia Imported in 1950
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States   $139,755,005 56.7
2. United Kingdom  44,248,255 18.0
3. Fiji   10,151,981 4.1
4. Brazil   5,761,315 2.3
5. Philippines   5,029,524 2.0
6. India   4,420,632 1.8
7. Peru   3,625,554 1.5
8. Colombia   2,997,255 1.2
9. Australia   2,590,430 1.1
10. Japan   2,456,089 1.0
All other countries       25,308,922 10.3
Total, all countries  $246,344,962 100.0
A breakdown of our imports by continents reveals that in 1950 North America
supplied us with over 59 per cent, Europe 20 per cent, South America 7 per cent, Asia
7 per cent, Oceania 6 per cent, and Africa under 1 per cent.
The gap between our total imports and exports widened slightly in 1950, compared
with 1949; in that year imports were 64.8 per cent of exports, but in 1950 were only
59.7 per cent, although the balance was still closer than in 1939, when the ratio was
around 50 per cent.
Transportation and Freight Rates
In February of 1951 the Royal Commission on Transportation submitted its report
to the Dominion Government.    Some of its recommendations have been placed before Q 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
that Parliament for enactment, the most important of which is Bill 377. The implications
of this Bill are of extreme importance to British Columbia shippers inasmuch as it effects
their transcontinental and terminal rates. Consequently, as much time as could be spared
has been devoted to a study of the situation.
The Canadian Railway Association's equalization proposals submitted to the Board
of Transport Commissioner's general freight-rates investigation, August 15th, 1951,
have also been given consideration, and studies have been made which will assist the
legal counsel in presenting the Provincial case before that Board. Other services rendered in this field include the preparation of material for the Province's case in opposing
the application of the Railway Association for increases in freight rates.
In line with the Bureau's policy of assisting industrialists where economic research
is required, the services of the Research Division have been made available to a group
of Victoria manufacturers and business-men who are attempting to have reinstated the
former parity in Victoria-Vancouver terminal rates. There has also been reference made
to the Bureau's library of freight-rate tariffs for prospective industries with locational
problems, etc. In this regard it should be mentioned that the library of over 100 tariffs
has proven adequate in dealing with most of the rate problems arising in Western Canada
and is available to any interested party. The senior staff man of the Statistical Division
was in Ottawa in November and December acting as adviser to British Columbia's legal
counsel in the equalization and the freight-rate increase cases.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and
other Federal offices increased during 1951. The fields of co-operation and the dates of
the original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926 (2) External-trade
Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost-of-food Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government Payroll
Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and Maintenance Expenditures for
Provincial, Municipal and Other Local Authorities, 1950; (6) Census of Construction
Statistics—Building Permits, 1951.
The Cost of Living
In 1952 the Dominion Bureau of Statistics will publish a new series of index numbers
measuring changes in price. Theretofore, this measurement of price changes has been
called, simply, the " Cost-of-living Index."
To clarify its function and to eliminate the ever-present erroneous idea of measuring
standard of living, the new series will be titled the " Consumer Price Index." This Consumer Price Index will remain in character and general purpose the same as the old
series, but will be the product of extensive basic revisions conforming with post-war
expenditure patterns. Such revisions are necessary to keep the measurement of price
changes adequate enough to cover present-day habits in commodity buying. Previous
series have been published relating to base periods, 1900, 1913, 1926, and, as at present,
1935-39.   A new base period will be adopted to replace the latter interval.
Commodity buying or expenditure patterns are being determined for the new series
through tabulation of the information provided by 3,100 representative families contacted
throughout urban Canada in 1948 and 1949 concerning the kinds and quantities of goods
and services which they purchased. The type and amount of commodities bought in this
twelve-month period will delineate appropriate items and weights to be included in the
new index.
On the fourth day of each month the Dominion Bureau of Statistics releases the
present Cost-of-living Index, and these figures are immediately relayed to a mailing-list
of 140 individuals and organizations by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. •SP
■■■'   ■ ■■      ■■■'■„■
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Q 33
This Bureau still computes quarterly a Cost-of-food Index utilizing British Columbia
prices, but has ceased to publish the report in which this information is contained. This
series is also undergoing basic change and will be published in revised form in 1952.
Table 8.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living
in Canada, by Years 1913—51 and by Months in 1951
Adjusted
to Base
100.0 for
August,
1939
On Base of Average Prices 1935-39=
100
Date
Total
Food
Rent
Light
and
Fuel
Clothing
Home
Furnishings and
Services
Miscellaneous
1913 	
79.1
1
79.7
88.3
74.3
76.9
88.0
70.3
1914  	
79.4
80.0
91.9
72.1
75.4
88.9
70.3
1915  	
81.0
81.6
92.7
69.9
73.8
96.8
70.9
1916   	
87.6
88.3
103.3
70.6
75.4
110.8
74.5
1917 	
103.7
104.5
133.3
75.8
83.8
130.3
81.5
1918 	
117.4
118.3
152.8
80.2
92.2
152.3
91.4
1919 	
129.0
130.0
163.3
87.6
100.7
175.1
101.2
1920                      	
149.3
150.5
188.1
100.2
119.9
213.1
110.3
1921 	
131.5
132.5
143.9
109.2
127.6
123.4
112.5
1922  _ _	
120.3
121.3
121.9
113.7
122.2
147.0
112.5
1923  	
120.7
121.7
122.8
116.6
122.2
145.1
111.7
1924  	
118.6
119.5
120.9
117.4
119.2
141.7
109.6
1925  ._	
119.6
120.6
126.3
117.4
116.8
141.3
107.5
1926
120.8
121.8
133.3
115.9
116.8
139.1
106.1
1927  	
118.9
119.9
130.8
114.5
114.4
135.6
105.1
1928 	
119.5
120.5
131.5
117.3
113.2
135.5
104.8
1929     	
120.7
121.7
134.7
119.7
112.6
134.8
105.0
1930      	
119.8
120.8
131.5
122.7
111.8
130.6
105.4
1931... .   	
108.2
109.1
103.1
119.4
110.0
114.3
103.3
1932 	
98.2
99.0
85.7
109.7
106.8
100.6
100.4
1933	
93.7
94.4
84.9
98.6
102.5
93.3
98.2
1934       ...    ...	
94.8
95.6
92.7
93.2
102.1
97.1
97.8
1935	
95.4
96.2
94.6
94.0
100.9
97.6
95.4
98.7
1936
97.3
98.1
97.8
96.1
101.5
99.3
97.2
99.1
1937 	
100.4
101.2
103.2
99.7
98.9
101.4
101.5
100.1
1938                               .
101.4
102.2
103.8
103.1
97.7
100.9
102.4
101.2
1939	
100.7
101.5
100.6
103.8
101.2
100.7
101.4
101.4
1940 	
104.8
105.6
105.6
106.3
107.1
109.2
107.2
102.3
1941.  	
110.8
111.7
116.1
109.4
110.3
116.1
113.8
105.1
1942   .        	
116.1
117.0
127.2
111.3
112.8
120.0
117.9
107.1
1943.	
117.5
118.4
130.7
111.5
112.9
120.5
118.0
108.0
1944   	
118.0
118.9
131.3
111.9
110.6
121.5
118.4
108.9
1945..      ..
118.6
119.5
133.0
112.1
107.0
122.1
119.0
109.4
1946.. 	
122.6
123.6
140.4
112.7
107.4
126.3
124.5
112.6
1947   	
134.4
135.5
159.6
116.7
115.9
143.9
141.6
117.0
1948  	
153.8
155.0
195.5
120.7
124.8
174.4
162.6
123.4
1949         	
159.6
160.8
203.0
123.0
131.1
183.1
167.6
128.8
1950
165.2
166.5
211.0
132.9
138.3
182.3
169.2
132.6
1951—
January. 	
171.1
172.5
220.2
136.4
141.5
187.1
179.8
135.8
February 	
173.8
175.2
224.4
136.4
141.7
192.4
185.1
137.0
178.3
180.4
179.7
181.8
233.9
238.4
137.6
137.6
146.5
146.7
196.3
198.8
188.6
190.7
137.8
138.8
180.6
182.6
182.0
184.1
235.4
239.8
137.6
139.8
146.2
146.2
201.5
202.5
194.9
197.1
140.7
June — .  	
141.0
July
186.1
187.4
188.3
188.9
189.7
187.6
188.9
189.8
190.4
191.2
249.7
251.4
251.1
249.7
250.2
139.8
139.8
142.7
142.7
144.8
147.2
148.2
149.5
150.2
150.8
202.9
204.6
206.9
213.8
214.6
197.4
199.0
199.1
200.1
199.9
142.2
143.7
144.0
144.3
November -    	
144.9
December    	
189.6
191.1
249.3
144.8
150.8
215.5
200.6
144.9 Q 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 9.—Food Indexes for Canada and British Columbia
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics food-group index adjusted to the base 1936=100
and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics British Columbia cost-of-food index also on
a base of 1936=100 are given below.
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
1939—
August	
September-
October	
November...
December...
1940—
January	
February	
March—	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
1941—
January..	
February—
Marcti	
April	
May	
June	
July.
August	
September-
October	
November-
December.-.
1942—
January	
February—
March	
April	
May	
June	
July-
August	
September-
October	
November...
December...
1943—
January	
February—
March	
April	
May..
June..
July...
August.
September-
October	
November.
December...
1944—
January	
February—
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
First of
Month
101.53
101.64
108.69
111.15
111.55
106.85
106.85
107.16
107.16
106.75
106.13
107.67
107.78
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
126.48
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.53
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
130.16
129.55
130.57
131.60
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
136.50
135.90
136.09
135.69
134.46
133.84
134.05
134.46
134.66
134.05
134.97
134.46
134.15
133.74
Fifteenth
of Month
94.48
103.90
104.38
104.74
101.51
100.43
100.97
101.22
102.53
101.77
101.51
103.47
103.84
103.33
104.92
106.30
107.39
107.03
108.93
109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
117.07
120.55
121.10
121.24
123.93
121.57
120.99
122.55
123.71
125.12
128.39
134.63
134.19
135.46
132.45
132.05
128.28
128.42
128.06
1944—Continued
November	
December.	
1945—
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November...
December...
1946—
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July-
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
1947—
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
1948—
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November _
December—
1949—
January	
February	
March	
April	
May.	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November ...
December	
First of
Month
134.56
133.23
133.13
133.54
133.95
133.95
134.66
136.40
138.65
139.26
137.22
136.30
137.01
137.32
135.79
135.48
136.09
138.14
140.80
145.30
147.44
147.96
146.42
149.80
149.90
144.69
148.77
150.31
152.04
155.01
158.38
161.25
163.39
164.21
169.02
175.15
177.51
182.72
186.30
190.29
190.08
191.00
195.50
198.26
205.83
207.16
208.49
210.02
209.30
206.54
206.75
204.91
203.58
202.97
203.99
207.46
211.86
213.91
211.66
209.61
207.87
206.44
Fifteenth
of Month
127.95
128.82
129.33
130.96
130.17
127.87
134.98
138.43
144.64
152.43
159.38
166.07
182.36
189.10
198.97
207.38
209.12
205.57
208.61
209.77
205.82
1 Adjusted to base 1936=100. __ ..
Table 9.—Food Indexes for Canada and British Columbia—Continued
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
First of
Fifteenth
First of
Fifteenth
1950—
Month
of Month
1951—
Month
of Month
203.89
225.15
February.    	
205.83
208.59
209.10
204.88
229.45
239.16
243.76
227.11
209.20
208.18
240.70
235.63
213.70
219.12
June...	
July        	
245.19
255.32
July   .
221.57
219.02 s
257.06      |      247.53
September   	
223.72
225.05
223.52
216.12
September 	
256.75      |       	
255.32      |
255.82      |      251.16
November ,	
November	
223.72
December	
254.91              	
1 Adjusted to base 1936=100.
2 Revised.
Table 10.—Index Numbers of the Cost of Living at Vancouver, B.C., by Years 1940-51
and by Months in 1951
(Base: August, 1939=100.)
Home
Date
Total
Food
Rent
Fuel
Clothing
Furnishings and
Services
Miscellaneous
1940 ..     -
103.7
109.1
114.2
105.9
117.0
128.8
99.6
99.8
100.6
108.8
109.5
111.5
108.8
114.8
119.2
104.3
109.5
112.9
100.4
103.4
105.2
1941	
1942       	
1943      	
117.3
134.8
102.0
111.3
121.6
114.1
107.8
1944 	
117.9
133.5
103.4
114.2
123.6
115.7
108.7
1945     	
119.2
136.0
104.8
114.2
125.5
115.7
108.8
1946   —  	
123.0
142.2
106.2
116.1
128.9
122.1
111.1
1947.. 	
134.9
161.9
109.4
128.6
146.6
137.0
115.8
1948     	
155.6
198.7
112.1
135.1
182.5
157.4
126.2
1949  	
162.0
208.7
113.9
139.5
192.7
161.3
131.3
1950  	
1951—
January     	
167.8
218.2
122.7
141.0
191.0
163.7
135.8
172.6
225.7
125.4
142.6
195.2
173.2
137.7
February	
175.8
230.6
125.4
145.7
201.1
178.6
139.2
179 2
236.6
127.4
145.7
206.4
181.2
140.1
182 6
244.6
127.4
145.7
208.9
183.6
142.0
240.0
162.1
187.8
143.7
185 3
245.5
129 4
162.1
210 8
189.9
143.7
July 	
188.8
255.5
129.4
162.6
211.6
190.0
144.8
August 	
189.8
255.2
129.4
162.6
215.7
192.1
146.5
190.2
252.7
130.8
166.6
220.0
192.2
146.5
190 0
250.9
130 8
167.2
224.5
193.0
146 5
192 0
255 5
131 9
167.2
226.7
193.1
146.8
192.8
257.7
131.9
169.2
227.2
192.9
146.7
Source:   Canada, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, " Prices and Price Indexes."
Mining Statistics
This section collects and compiles mining production statistics with the exception of
coal, and same are made available to the Provincial Department of Mines, the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, and to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.   The information,
when collected, is made available for general use in a form which preserves the confiden
tial aspects of individual company's or operator's returns when it is requested.   Mining
statistics in detail will be found in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines.   Many
special compilations dealing with data not readily available were provided to other
departments and outside agencies.   Contact is maintained at all times with the officials
of the Department of Mil
ies, const.
lting with
and pro1
/iding mu
:h data fc
)r specia:
bulletins Q 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
issued by that Department. This Division also maintains up-to-date records on mining
statistics, which are kept in the Central Records Branch of the Department of Mines.
These records represent years of research and compilation by the Mining Division, and
are considered to be an integral part of a most comprehensive Departmental source of
information on the production from every British Columbia mine reported to have
shipped ore for treatment at a smelter or refinery.
The Division continues to provide the mineral production value on a census-division
basis (see Chart 1), and Table 11 shows the production for the years 1947, 1948, 1949,
and 1950 on the several regions involved. In order to provide a handy reference, the
essential mineral production statistics as originally published in the Department of Mines
Annual Report are given in Table 12. A brief recapitulation of mineral production
figures discloses that the value in 1950 was $148,155,060, which is greater than any
previous year except 1948, for which the value was $152,524,752. The product of
greatest value in 1950 was zinc, valued at $48,882,765, followed by lead at $44,391,530,
lode gold at $10,805,553, and an additional value of $598,717 for placer gold. Copper
production had a value of $9,889,458. Miscellaneous metals, minerals, and materials
had a total value of $5,689,271, and structural materials had a value of $10,205,989.
Coal, with a production of 1,542,404 tons, was valued at $10,025,626.
The average number employed in all branches of the mining industry in 1950 was
16,612. Some of the larger expenditures in the industry were for salaries and wages,
$42,738,035; fuel and electricity, $6,775,998; process supplies, $17,500,663; freight
and treatment on ores, etc., $22,113,431; Dominion taxes, $14,877,802; Provincial
taxes, $3,442,932; municipal and other taxes, $540,620; workmen's compensation, silicosis, unemployment insurance, and other levies, $1,670,252. Dividends paid amounted
to $34,399,330. -
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND
INDUSTRY
Q 37
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13                 B Q 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 12.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1949 and 1950
Quantity,
1949
Quantity,
1950
Value,
1949
Value,
1950
Metallics
Antimony.
Bismuth—..
Cadmium...
Copper
Gold, lode ....
Gold, placer
Indium 	
Iron ore	
Lead	
Platinum	
Silver	
Tin .	
.lb.
...fine, oz.
. crude, oz.
. lb.
.lb.
Tungsten concentrates.
Zinc 	
.lb.
Totals.
Fuel
Coal (2,000 lb.).
NON-METALLICS
Fluxes—limestone, quartz	
 tons
Sulphur               	
 tons
Totals _
Clay Products and Other Structural Materials
Brick-
Common 	
Face, paving
Clay Products
sewer brick..
Firebricks, blocks	
..No.
..No.
Clays  	
Structural tile—hollow blocks	
Drail tile, sewer-pipe, flue-linings.
Pottery—glazed or unglazed	
Other clay products	
Totals	
Other Structural Materials
Cement	
Lime and limestone .
Sand and gravel	
Stone 	
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock.
Totals	
Total value.
54,856,808
288,396
17,886
263,580,549
7,636,053
276,324,451
42,212,133
283,983
19,134
307,122,803
9,507,225
324,263,778
61,020
210,972
1,364,170
10,956,550
10,382,256
529,524
1,550
27,579
41,645,726
7,468
5,669,769
633,047
36,604,700
108,094,331
1,917,296
1,542,404
12,462,424
108,531
5,941
144,325
7,886
160,435
143,343
19,783
213,773
79,661
616,490
23,301
517
1,546,798
2,500,323
3,220,000
509,560
3,910,500
1,974,380
95,075
24,793
135,391
22,339
145,512
265,098
5,176
9,676
703,060
179,400
2,287
1,112,272
221,454
26,758
1.164,049
3,029,425
1,295,087
3,967,132
44,345
916,841
9,252,830
133,012,968
216,229
369,138
1,535,274
9,889,458
10,805,553
598,717
12,132
44,391,530
9,239
7,666,151
828,259
281,1601
48,882,765
125,485,605
10,025,626
22,925
268,411
104,590
620,108
1,421,806
2,437,840
103,840
54,503
254,262
32,264
191,016
428,418
5,860
11,335
1,081,498
3,088,296
1,133,776
3,723,487
188,675
990,257
9,124,491
148,155,060
1 Tungsten: 1950 sale of products accumulated before 1949.
Labour Statistics
Under the terms of a continued interdepartmental arrangement the Labour Section
of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics was again responsible for the collection and
compilation of the annual labour statistics for the Provincial Department of Labour.
A summarization of the 1950 data resulting from this survey is published under the
heading of " Statistics of Trades and Industries " in the Annual Report of the Department
of Labour for that year. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Q 39
As a valuable source of information relative to labour and its problems, the Labour
Section continues to prove of assistance to the Bureau in the handling of the many
inquiries and requests for labour information received from industry and business. In
addition to the routine preparation of Department of Labour statistics, the work of the
Section also includes such special assignments as the completion of current reports and
Table 13.—British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the
Comparative Years 1946 to 1950
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
No. 1
$8,792,650
15,409,997
11,047,243
158,098,206
52,609,451
4,477,339
10,680,963
4,132,464
5,592,647
1,279,858
835,686
$13,089,910
20,065,572
15,407,310
196,814,172
73,305,625
7,068,034
14,091,695
7,287,683
8,260,298
8,385,552
2,421,303
$13,731,856
23,578,250
16,857,531
245,729,208
85,360,435
6,070,725
15,593,568
8,009,315
7,170,882
1,557,047
2,731,389
$14,196,272
25,465,483
17,162,800
268,168,929
69,824,047
6,709,107
13,991,506
7,109,097
7,793,375
2,586,330
1,156,849
$14 730,880
No. 2  	
No. 3 _ 	
28,152,569
17,986,918
No. 4   _ 	
No. 5               	
No. 6 	
No. 7 _  	
No. 8          	
276,660,854
87,321,304
7,793,958
17,053,224
11,492,745
No. 9  	
No. 10
9,749,718
1,352,763
2,139,119
Totals 	
$272,956,504
$366,197,154
$426,390,206
$434,163,795
$474,434,052
Chart 1.—Census Divisions Q 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
statistical tables for various business interests, banking institutions, Boards of Trade, and
other Governmental departments.
Periodic surveys of occupational wage rates in various industries enable the Bureau
to keep pace with the demand for information as to rates currently in effect, and a file is
maintained to include the latest information obtainable dealing with union agreements,
wage-scales, and conditions of work. With the co-operation and assistance of the inspection staff of the Department of Labour in this work, much valuable data has been obtained
and placed on record, to be made available to the proper authorities as required.
Regional development throughout the Province as reflected in the industrial payroll
is presented in the attached Table 13 showing the comparative annual totals attributable
to each of the ten census divisions (see Chart 1) for the years 1946 to 1950. The totals
are of necessity restricted to an industrial coverage only, and as such must not be considered as representing the extent of all salaries and wages paid in British Columbia. The
comparative yearly record, however, serves as an indication of gradual changes which
occur in the concentration of the labour force in each section of the Province.
Health and Welfare
In October, 1949, arrangements were completed with the Department of Health and
Welfare to transfer to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics the compilation of monthly
statistics covering the disbursement of Social Allowance and the maintenance of records
for all phases of Social Assistance.
During the year 1950 the many intricate factors covering Social Assistance were
co-ordinated and the above Section established within the Bureau to maintain close
liaison with the Comptroller of Expenditure, Department of Health and Welfare, through
whose office the major portion of the work of this Section is channelled.
Because of new Dominion-Provincial agreements covering social problems and
especially those applying to Old-age Pensions, the year 1951 has been one of intense
activity for this Section, for, in addition to the compilation of monthly statistics and the
maintenance of records, a detailed analysis of Old-age Pension numbers and costs with
projections to 1956 covering age-groups 65 to 69 years and 70 years and over has been
completed.
To obtain accurate figures on which to base these estimates and projections, it was
necessary to record all Social Allowance cases on punched cards and establish machine
records. It is expected that these machine records will be maintained in the future after
the transfer of cases within the 65-69-year group from Social Allowance to Old-age
Pension has ben completed.
All ancillary services, such as hospital services, medicals, drugs, cost-of-living bonus,
etc., were also analysed and included in reports submitted.
This Section is also charged with the collection, assembly, and dispatch of monthly
statistical reports for the Dominion Bureau of Statistics covering the issuance of building
permits by 100 municipalities and regulated areas within the Province, also the submission of monthly reports on employment and payroll statistics for Provincial Government
employees.
The steady rise in the Cost-of-living Index was reflected in an increased allowance
to Social Allowance cases. This increase necessitated a revision of monthly statistical
forms and methods of compilation in order to accurately reflect Provincial and municipal
costs.
Civil Defence
The Research Statistician in charge of this Division was a member of the first Civil
Defence Instructors' Course held in Victoria, August 6th to 24th, and, it is anticipated,
will take an active part in the organization and training of Civil Defence personnel within
the Provincial Civil Service. '
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 41
Tourist Trade
The tourist movement to British Columbia has continued the general upward trend
of the post-war years to an all-time record in 1950.
For convenience in statistical analysis, these tourists have been divided into the
following four categories, of which the first and second are of major importance because
this travel across the International Border is in greatest volume and lends itself to
thorough research: (1) From the United States in automobiles; (2) from the United
States by rail, steamer, and air; (3) via ocean ports; (4) interprovincial, via trains,
highways, and air.
The reciprocal tourist trade between Canada and United States is undoubtedly
greater than that between any other two countries in the world, with a substantial net
income accruing to Canada. In order to accurately measure the magnitude of this
important source of revenue, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics has systematcially collected data and periodically published its reports in its brochure, currently called " Travel
between Canada and Other Countries." By consulting the following revenue figures, we
find that a fairly consistent rise is evident for Canada as a whole to a peak in 1948, with
a slight reversal in trend for 1949 and 1950.
Expenditures Expenditures
Year in Canada Year in Canada
1941  $107,000,000 1946 $216,100,000
1942   79,000,000 1947  241,100,000
1943   87,000,000 1948  267,400,000
1944  116,600,000 1949  267,100,000
1945  163,300,000 1950  259,700,000!
1 Subject to revision.
Extensive programmes of highway construction and greatly increased and improved
tourist accommodation have done much to speed up the growth of tourist travel in British
Columbia to a point where it has become one of the Province's great " service " industries.
Available figures take into account only those tourists entering British Columbia
from the United States but take no cognizance whatever of the influx by interprovincial
movement, which has never been measured by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics because
the money they spend on tour has been earned in Canada and does not admit of ready
evaluation. However, this source of revenue is important to the individual Provinces and
British Columbia in particular. .
Preliminary estimates of the number of tourists entering British Columbia from the
United States, based on statistics for the first few months of the year, seem to indicate
that the total for 1951 will exceed that of 1950 (see Table 14).
Chart 2 shows the distribution of American tourists visiting this Province in red
figures as compared with those visiting Canada in black figures, by State of origin. Q 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Q 43 Q 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION
This Division is responsible for market research studies, industrial and location
surveys, the collection of market statistics, and statistics relating to new industries, new
plants, and additions to existing plants.
This Division assisted in the preparation of two publications during the year,
namely: Industry and Markets in the Okanagan, Similkameen, and Kettle Valleys and
the Regional Industrial Index of British Columbia, 1951 edition. In addition, work is
progressing prior to publication of the 1950-51 edition of the British Columbia Trade
Index.
Also many miscellaneous requests pertaining to market statistics were answered.
Preliminary work has been done relating to a market survey of the Greater New Westminster area and also for the establishment of annual surveys of operating results of
various retail businesses.
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
During 1951 the Mechanical Tabulation Division continued to provide tabulating
service for several Government departments.
The following list sets forth the diversified nature of the work carried out:—
Department of Attorney-General—Motor Accident Statistical Reports.
Department of Education—
Statistical Report of Pupils and Teachers.
Teachers' Records.
Department of Finance—Furniture Inventory.
Department of Health and Welfare—
Cost of Drugs Survey.
Social Allowance Statistics.
Department of Labour—Annual Statistical Report.
Department of Lands and Forests—
Forest Inventory.
Gazetteer Files.
Department of Provincial Secretary—
Civil Service Personnel Statistics.
King's Printer Job-cost Records.
Department of Trade and Industry—
Labour Statistics.
Trade Statistics.
Trade Index File.
Special Surveys.
British Columbia Liquor Control Board—
Warehouse Audit Control.
Store Audit Control.
Licensee Beer Records.
Payroll.
Price Lists.
Interdiction Lists.
The organization of the Mechanical Tabulation Division was changed during the
year and is now divided into three main sections handling the tabulating section of the
work. One is reserved for statistical and research applications, another deals exclusively
with the work of the British Columbia Liquor Control Board, and the third section is
concerned directly with new projects and procedures. In this manner it is possible to
maintain established routines while still providing service to new tabulating projects. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 45
The personnel establishment of the Division is composed of a supervisor, three
senior machine operators, eight machine operators, a senior key-punch operator and eight
key-punch operators, a senior clerk-stenographer, and two clerks. Two members of the
staff of the British Columbia Liquor Control Board are attached to the Division, acting
in an advisory capacity.
The Division is equipped with a complete set of tabulating-machines, including
alphabetic tabulators, sorters, reproducing gang-punches, an end printing document
punch, a collator, an interpreter, and an automatic multiplying punch, as well as alphabetic key-punches and verifiers.
It is anticipated that with the present equipment and level of staff efficiency the
existing projects can be augmented and the service extended to other Government departments not at present using mechanical tabulating methods.
Mention should also be made of the fact that the Mechanical Tabulation Division of
this Bureau co-operated with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in the processing of the
1951 Census.
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin
This publication has been continued, with an ever-increasing demand from businessmen, universities, and libraries. It contains a statistical summary of business indicators
relating to British Columbia's economy.
External Trade
Monthly statistics relating to external trade are contained in the Monthly Bulletin.
A statement of external trade through British Columbia customs ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index
Work is progressing on a new edition of this publication, which will be released in
1952.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics
This publication was first issued in 1948; the fourth edition was released early in
1951. A second printing of the 1951 edition was required to meet the demand for this
publication. This publication provides general facts and statistics relating to British
Columbia under the following headings: Population, education, government, banking,
transportation, communication, retail sales, agriculture, fisheries, forestry, mining, manufacturing, tourist, and economic activity. Q 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
Industrial development projected in British Columbia and under way at the close of
1951, embracing new industry in all regions of the Province, reached the impressive total
of approximately one billion dollars. Of this sum, over $350,000,000 of new construction has commenced during the year under review, the largest annual figure recorded in
the Province's industrial history. '
Industrial expansion on a scale of this magnitude has focused widespread attention
on British Columbia, which has resulted in a surge of industrial inquiries from all parts
of the world. It has been the continuous concern of the Department, through the
Regional Development Division, to keep abreast of the rapidly changing industrial scene
by taking effective measures to record our industrial growth and to provide factual
information on the pattern of resources, industrial facilities, and services available in each
community.
Industry location is becoming more and more highly competitive and complex and
is governed by well-defined basic location factors. Regional areas seeking to keep in the
forefront of industrial expansion must take cognizance of these factors and provide
up-to-date information, which can only be portrayed by comprehensive area surveys,
mapping, and analyses. Industry to-day looks to official channels for this information
and service, and to keep pace with these demands the Division launched during the year
the first of a series of area surveys, at the same time initiating the second phase of its
programme of regional development in the Province.
FIELD OFFICES
The augmented industrial expansion in the Province during the year has resulted in
greatly increased activity being reported from the field offices of the Division, which have
been called upon to handle a large volume of inquiries and to render a wide diversity of
assistance to industry. The field offices have continued to grow in importance and value
in co-ordinating and furthering industrial inquiries within the Provincial service and
various branches of Government.
The regional offices of the Division are located as follows:—
Nelson: Region 1—East Kootenay; Region 2—West Kootenay.
Kelowna:   Region 3—Okanagan;   Region 6—Kamloops and South Central
British Columbia.
Prince  George:   Region  8—Central British Columbia;   Region  9—North
Coastal Area (Prince Rupert and Queen Charlottes); Region 10—Peace
River.
Victoria:   Region 4—Lower Mainland;  Region 5—Vancouver Island and
Gulf Islands.
FIELD SURVEYS
Nelson Office—Region One (East Kootenay) and Region Two
(West Kootenay)
Industrial development in the Kootenays during the year continued to gain
momentum. Announcement of a $75,000,000 pulp and paper mill at Castlegar only
slightly overshadowed the $62,500,000 expansion programme announced by Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada. Both developments will have far-
reaching effects on the mining and forest industries in the region. Despite shut-down of
the forests due to fires, the sawlog scale for the district is expected to increase approximately 10,000 M B.M. over last year.
Mining activity in the area continues to show healthy growth, with a number of new
mines being brought into production during the current year and total mining production
in the area increasing approximately 15 per cent over 1950 production. ^^^mm
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 47
A number of executive meetings of the Regional Advisory Committee were held
during the year. The Committee continued its efforts toward exploring the possibility
of increasing tourist travel by the development of parks, camp-sites, and vistas in the
Kootenay regions. A report was prepared for the visit of the Vancouver Board of Trade
Transportation and Communications Bureau on industrial development in Regions One
and Two for the past three-year period.
Specific Assistance to Industry
The Nelson field-service office has reported the following assistance to industry
during the current year.
Hop-growing.—The establishment of a substantial hop-yard in the Creston area was
reported in 1950, and our field office has continued to assist this industry in obtaining
information concerning available labour, frost data, and location of materials for this
operation.
Manufacture of Ceramics.—Furnished data and information through Federal channels at Ottawa regarding the proposed establishment of a small ceramics industry in the
Nelson district.
Manufacture of Pencils.—Information and data supplied through the Technical
Information Service of the National Research Council regarding the establishment of a
pencil-factory utilizing local cedar.
Lino-cut Pictures.—This industry was established in late 1950 and additional information was obtained relating to the procurement of picture-frames.
Cranberries.—Data and information supplied to a party interested in cranberry-
growing in the Creston district.
Manufacture of Charcoal.—Information supplied regarding the establishment of a
small charcoal plant.
Peppermint.—Arrangements made for an experimental plot of 2 acres on the
Creston flats, and information supplied to determine feasibility of establishing a peppermint industry.
Drive-in Theatre.—Information obtained from trade for proposed drive-in theatre
for the Trail-Rossland area.
Field Surveys in Course of Completion
(a) A survey was conducted to determine the probable additional labour-supply
required by the recent industrial expansion in the region.
(b) A report was completed for the International Columbia River Joint Engineering
Committee following a two-year survey of industrial relocation on the British Columbia
side of the Border and related to the proposed hydro-development in Washington and
Montana.
(c) Survey continued on industrial potentialities of the region in co-operation with
the Associated Boards of Eastern British Columbia.
Our field office maintained close liaison with other Departmental officials in the
region and with other field offices in contact work as between the respective regional areas.
Conduct of several parties throughout the territory was arranged, including the Colombo
Plan party mentioned elsewhere in this report, the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner,
and the Trade Representative of the Department from British Columbia House, London,
England, who visited the area during the summer months. Our field official attended
hearings of the International Joint Commission on the proposed dam at Libby, Mont.,
and the Waneta Dam south of Trail.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C. Q 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Kelowna Office—Region Three (Okanagan)
The Regional Advisory Committee has continued its surveys during the year covering
the third phase of an over-all study of the region related to park areas and camp-sites.
Thirty camp-sites were investigated and recommended, and twelve additional sites are
awaiting further inspection. The Committee has implemented its report on park areas
in the southern portion of the region in the Oliver-Osoyoos district.
The Committee has co-operated actively with the Okanagan Agriculture Club on a
special study initiated by the club on diversified agriculture. Studies have also been made
on increasing the output of small fruits and vegetables in the fruit-growing areas of the
region. A brief on the power situation relating to industry is in course of preparation and
will be completed early next year, and the Advisory Committee proposes to give early
consideration to certain phases of public health in the region as related to the tourist
industry.
Additional matters considered by the Committee during the year were furtherance
of the Grandview Flats irrigation project, soil conservation, Black Mountain new ditch
project, berry culture, regulations pertaining to eating establishments, acquisition of
Indian reserve property at Kaleden for establishment of a fruit-demonstration booth, etc.
Irrigation Survey. — The brochure entitled " Facts about Irrigation and Irrigable
Lands in the Tree Fruits Area of the Okanagan and Similkameen Valleys," published by
the Division in 1950, has been in continuous demand. The annual irrigation survey
conducted by our field office has added considerable data, covering forty-four improvement districts. This year a further survey of the Kettle Valley River area has been undertaken and 143 individual water-licence holders contacted. As time and staff limitations
allow, the irrigable areas under survey will be extended to Region Six. Data secured
under this heading is of vital importance to the study of power requirements, sources of
water, estimate of pumping costs, etc., for the important agriculture industry in this region.
Trade Waste.—Our field office has actively co-operated with other departments in
bringing together sections of industry in the chief centres of the region to study problems
related to trade waste and the utilization of waste materials surplus to the fruit-processing
industry. Good progress has been made toward a solution of cannery problems under
this heading. A meeting of all interested concerns will be called early in 1952 to consider
plans of a leading organic-fertilizer company which is contemplating entering this field.
Specific Assistance to Industry
The volume of industry inquiries through the Kelowna office during the year has
maintained a high level, and basic and secondary industry assisted under a wide diversity
of headings.   A cross-section follows.
Fine Pulp from Apple Prunings.—A number of meetings were held with Eastern
interests and investigations undertaken leading to the installation of a pilot plant for the
manufacture of fine pulp used in cigarette-paper making.
Pasteurization Plants. — Various data assembled and meetings held with dairy
industry and Dairy Inspection Branch. A plant has now been installed at Grand Forks,
and further plants contemplated at Princeton and elsewhere.
Brick-making.—Efforts were made to revive this industry in the Falkland district.
Boat-building.—Assistance in solving material-supply problems to this industry have
been continued and sources of yellow cedar located.
Burners for Stoves.—Investigation of export difficulties made for a firm manufacturing this article.
Grape-growing.—Manufacturing and market data secured for a grape-grower. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 49
Cold Storage.—Contacts were made with the meat-packing trade regarding offseason use of fruit cold storages.
Ceramic Industry.—Samples of clay from the Giscombe deposit were forwarded to
Luxembourg for testing, and negotiations continued with a large European china-manufacturer contemplating locating in British Columbia-
Canneries.—Possibilities of new plants at Revelstoke and Westbank were discussed
with representatives of a large canning industry. Discussions were also held regarding a
community cannery in the southern part of the region.
Zircon Deposit.—Information supplied to interests in Armstrong.
Our field office continued to maintain close relations with all the Boards of Trade
throughout the region and, during the period of activity of the Division since 1947, has
built up a very satisfactory relationship with these agencies. Several monthly and
quarterly sessions were attended by our field representative and assistance given many
local Boards under a variety of industrial headings, and particularly in connection with
the compilation of individual brochures in some localities, and providing Departmental
mailing-lists for distribution.
Work on the economic survey of the region, dealt with elsewhere in this report,
entailed considerable time and effort of our field office in this region in arranging contacts with, and canvassing of, industrial and business concerns throughout the region,
and the assembling of a vast quantity of material for the market survey of the area.
Contacts with industrial firms concerned in defence contracts were made, and information
circulated to appropriate firms on "Nine Helpful Hints re Defence Contracts."
Many distinguished persons visited the Okanagan region during the course of the
year, including the High Commissioner for Australia, His Excellency the Ambassador
for the Free State, and several groups of industrialists and engineers. Appropriate industrial tours of the region were arranged by our field office.
Region Four (Lower Mainland), Region Five (Vancouver Island and Gulf
Islands), and Region Seven (Central Coast)
During 1951 industrial activity in Regions Four, Five, and Seven centred principally
on the tremendous expansion of the pulp, paper, and forestry industries. Highlighting
this development was the $16,000,000 expansion programme of the pulp industry at
Nanaimo, the allocation of $6,000,000 for modernization of the dissolving sulphite mill
at Port Alice, and the expected completion by early 1952 of the $40,000,000 newsprint-
mill at Duncan Bay near Campbell River. Added to this activity were the $12,000,000
modernization plan of the pulp and paper plant at Powell River and $5,000,000 expansion of the pulp-mill at Port Mellon. During the year, construction of a $2,000,000
plywood-factory in Victoria was commenced, which will employ approximately 225 men.
In Port Alberni, plans were revealed for construction of $1,500,000 plywood plant.
A new $1,500,000 Swedish gang-saw unit, one of the most modern in British Columbia,
also commenced operation in Port Alberni. The economy of the coastal regions was
further stimulated by the proposed expansion of the hydro-electric plant at Campbell
River, the $2,000,000 expansion project of the cement plant at Bamberton on Vancouver
Island, and by an extensive industrial building programme in the metropolitan areas of
Vancouver, Victoria, and New Westminster.
Business Inquiries
During the year an increase in the number of inquiries directed to this office was
noted.   Some of the inquiries handled are listed hereunder:—
(1) An Eastern manufacturer of waxed-paper containers requested information on availability of paper-board in British Columbia.   This company Q 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
is interested in establishing a plant on the Pacific Coast, but plans are
temporarily held in abeyance due to the current shortage of bleached
sulphite.
(2) Request for information on the possibilities of establishing a woollen-sock
industry in Victoria. Complete information on markets, supply of wool,
and manufacturing methods were supplied.
(3) Inquiry concerning possibilities of obtaining special grade Western red
cedar for construction of racing-shells. Various business firms interviewed, and the interested firm was placed in touch with a source of this
material.
(4) Inquiry from an Eastern manufacturer requiring a supply of special paint
and varnish to finish manufacture darticles. Contacts of paint-manufacturers arranged, and necessary information forwarded.
(5) Inquiry from United States interests wishing information to establish in
British Columbia in the lumber business. Inquiry referred to appropriate
forestry officials, and other special contacts arranged.
(6) Inquiry from a United States citizen wishing to establish a business in the
Yale district. Complete details on the entire district and also on Hope
were sent forward.
Itineraries were arranged and data supplied to several business executives and
industrialists visiting the coastal regions during the year. A group of industrialists from
England, interested in Vancouver Island and Mainland centres, was furnished with
comprehensive reports on the localities in question, and business contacts and personally
conducted tours of the areas arranged.
Region Six (Kamloops and South Central British Columbia)
(under Kelowna Office)
The Industries Committee continued its study of several matters of concern to the
region already outlined in the Annual Report for 1950. The Committee is maintaining
a close interest in the activities of the Fraser River Basin Board as applied to the upper
reaches of the Fraser, with particular reference to a survey of the Clearwater watershed
and a power route to the Nicola District.
The Committee has again stressed the importance of a survey being undertaken on
Region Six of irrigable lands as a prelude to an over-all expansion of the agriculture
industry in the region.
The Committee has had under review during the year the subject of country killing
and central meat-inspection depots, and recommendations have been referred to the
appropriate authority for consideration. Recommendations have also gone forward
from the Committee on the desirability of establishing a plan of restaurant rating and
inspection. Close liaison has continued with officials of the P.F.R.A. administration and
Dominion and Provincial agriculturalists in the region, and valuable assistance has been
given to the Committee and our field office from these sources. Our field representative
during the year has made regular visits to this region, dealing with a substantial increase
of inquiries and personal interviews.
Region Eight (Central British Columbia), Region Nine (North Coastal Area,
Prince Rupert, and Queen Charlotte), and Region Ten (Peace River)
General
The entire development and activity in Regions Eight and Nine have been stimulated
by the Alcan Development. All centres in these areas are showing marked growth as a
result. Hotels and auto courts have enjoyed capacity business and have not depended
on the tourist traffic in the past year.
! DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 51
Transportation facilities in the region have been greatly improved during the year.
The Canadian National Railways has increased passenger service on the Jasper—Prince
Rupert line to a daily (except Sunday) service. Freight service has been increased as
required, affecting all railway points, and employment of railway-workers is high. Central
B.C. Airways has inaugurated a daily return service from Prince George to Terrace, and
there is now a bus service from Prince George to Burns Lake, as well as increased freight
trucking services. All of these are largely the result of increased travel and shipping
originating from the aluminium development.
A detailed inspection trip was made during the summer of the Alcan project activities at Burns Lake and south, and the Nechako Dam site, 67 miles south-west of Vanderhoof. Officials of the Alcan project have welcomed the interest and co-operation of
the Department in this vast industrial undertaking.
Many new settlers have come to these areas, not only labourers and workers on the
various construction projects, but others seeking to establish themselves in a new and
growing district.
This has resulted in increased retail business at all points but has emphasized an
acute housing shortage over the entire region.
Prince George and District
In the Prince George district, logging conditions continued good during the past
year, and prices, while experiencing some recession, are still satisfactory. This condition
is reflected in the growth of the city and surrounding district. Many fine new homes are
under construction, and retail sales remain at a high level.
Municipal improvements continue, and cement sidewalks have been installed on
most of the down-town streets, and all roads between Third Avenue and Seventh Avenue
are now paved, between Vancouver and George Streets. This has greatly improved the
appearance of the city.
The school population continues to show marked increase. New rooms were provided this year at Central and Connaught Schools, and three rooms connected with the
high-school dormitory are in use as elementary-school accommodation. Connaught
School recently burned to the ground, throwing 230 children on to the already crowded
facilities of King George V, and necessitating a shift system being put into effect for
Grades III to VI, inclusive. A new school of twelve rooms to replace the seven-roomed
school destroyed is planned.
Vanderhoof district has shown great activity. Property values have increased considerably, and retail business has boomed. The contractor on the Nechako Dam project
has built prefabricated houses for some of its employees, but the housing shortage is
still acute.
There are some sixty mills in operation in the district, and prices have been good
and work steady in the camps and mills.
Construction in the village, while showing an increase, has not kept pace with the
needs of the community.
Burns Lake
Burns Lake is booming; a road has been built from the Francois Lake Road to the
eastern end of Tahtsa Lake, and supplies are barged to the western end of the lake, where
the Alcan tunnel operations are going on, and all supplies and equipment are taken in
over this road.   Contractors for the project have established headquarters here.
Lumbering and logging operations in this district continue at a high level of production. Farming, while not producing the financial return of the lumber industry, is
forging ahead and may take precedence over lumber and logging as the population
increases and agricultural markets develop. Q 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Smithers-Telkwa
At Telkwa the local coal mine has stepped up its capacity to 150 tons per day,
supplying the cellulose operation on the coast.
In the Smithers district several new mining operations are being opened up, and some
older developments are showing signs of life, indicating that great interest is still being
shown in the mining possibilities of this area.
Terrace-Hazelton
Terrace is enjoying a great measure of prosperity as the headquarters of logging
operations for the cellulose plant at Port Edward. Terrace is situated some 42 miles from
Kitimat, the townsite of the Alcan project, and a road will be built connecting the two
points in the near future. Railway surveys between Kitimat and Terrace are now under
way, and a connection will be made to the townsite of Kitimat, scene of the Alcan
undertaking.
Real-estate values in Terrace have doubled, and a settlement scheme under way
about a mile from the village is opening up very well. Land is being sold in acre lots, and
homes are under construction.
Due to a considerable increase in population in the area, agriculture activity is
increasing. A number of small farms are starting up, with the expectation that farm
produce can now be sold advantageously, due to proximity of the Alcan operation. Some
farm produce is disposed of in Prince Rupert, but there is not sufficient market for
the quantities which could be grown, as the land and climate conditions are ideal for small
mixed farms.
Efforts have been made by our field office to interest suitable persons in the Lake
Lakelse hot springs. The lake is 12 miles south of the Village of Terrace, on the road
to Kitimat, and it is ideally suited for a luxury hotel.
Prince Rupert
The city is taking steps to improve its facilities for industry by undertaking a survey
of possible industrial sites. This action follows discussions with city authorities by our
field official during the year. Certain advantages will most certainly accrue to this
northern port through the current large-scale industrial programme taking place at its
door. A gradual increase in population may be expected, and it is anticipated the already
acute housing shortage will become aggravated unless steps are taken to provide housing
for industrial workers. After many idle years, the 1,250,000-bushel-capacity grain-
storage elevator is again in operation, and vigorous efforts are being made by local
agencies to ensure permanency of operation by handling a portion of Western Canada's
grain-crop through the port. Our field representative was on hand at the official opening
of the cellulose plant, which highlighted the year's industrial activity in this area, and was
attended by a large number of leading industrialists-   The plant is now in full operation.
Dawson Creek and Fort St. John
The district has shown little activity for two years past, and population of the area
has decreased. With recent oil-developments the picture will now change very rapidly.
The reported oil-strike at Peace River Crossing recently has prompted a tremendous flurry
of lease-buying, and practically the entire country surrounding the well-site has been
blanketed. Several oil companies have indicated intention to test out their holdings, and
an all-out drilling campaign seems imminent for this district. Gas is now being piped into
Dawson Creek from Alberta, cutting fuel costs to 25 per cent, and a full servicing of the
area is to be completed in 1952.   Opening of the Hart Highway is awaited anxiously by DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 53
residents of the district, but tourist accommodation is required both along the highway and
in the Peace River to provide for the traffic expected to travel this new route.
Cariboo
Several centres in the Cariboo have experienced steady growth and increased
industrial activity during the year under review. This is especially applicable to Quesnel,
where the logging and lumbering industry is showing rapid expansion. Numerous planer-
mills are active, employing up to 500 men, and the plywood plant with 200 employees.
Cattle-raising both here and in the Williams Lake district, nevertheless, still plays an
important part in the district's economy, and cattle sales reached a high figure during
1951. Drilling for oil has been added to the district's activities, and power-development
on a major scale and linking up of transportation and rail facilities will transform the
industrial picture in this section of the Province within the next few years.
NEW INDUSTRIES
The substantial volume of large-scale industrial construction commenced during the
year under review and referred to earlier in this report has been supplemented by
numerous smaller industries reported by our field offices in all regions of the Province.
A partial list is appended:—
Region One (East Kootenay)
Cranbrook: (a) Lumber-conditioning kiln; (b) sawmill; (c) auto courts; (ca)
automatic electric-welding plant.
Fernie: (d) Oil-drilling in Flathead area; (e) sixty new houses under construction
for coal company; (/) hotel and beer-parlor (enlargement).
Golden:   (g) Sawmill operation employing thirty-five men;  (h) auto court.
Kimberley: (i) Fertilizer plant costing $9,000,000, employing 150 men; (/) 150-
ton mill, estimated cost $300,000; (k) 50-ton base-metal mill, estimated cost $150,000;
(/) power-line construction, Riondel to Kimberley concentrator.
Windermere: (m) Auto court and hotel; (n) new Federal aquacourt at Radium,
$1,000,000.
Region Two (West Kootenay)
Castlegar: (a) Pulp and paper mill, $75,000,000 (projected, construction to start
in 1952);   (b) automatic telephone exchange, estimated cost $110,000.
Creston: (c) Auto court; (d) power-line, Kootenay Bay to Creston, costing
$375,000  (e) concrete-block factory, employing five men.
Kaslo: (/) Construction of Riondel townsite and 500-ton mill estimated at
$3,000,000; (g) 100-ton base-metal mill, estimated cost $150,000; (h) 150-ton lead-
zinc mill, estimated cost $200,000;  (i) dry-ice pilot plant established.
Nakusp: (/) Sawmill; (k) Whatshan power project commenced operation 1951;
(/) several logging and pole operations-
Nelson: (m) Mine-development and mill-construction estimated at $2,750,000;
(n) tungsten mine and townsite and 350-ton mill, estimated cOst $1,000,000; (o) mine
and 50-ton mill, estimated cost $50,000; (p) bus depot, $37,000; (q) mining and
equipment company; (r) janitors' supplies manufacturing plants; (s) power-line project
to Kimberley, estimated cost $2,850,000.
Rossland-Trail: (0 Hydro-electric power plant and dam (Waneta) on Pend
d'Oreille River, estimated cost $30,000,000; (u) modernization of lead-smelter,
$12,000,000; (v) zinc-plant enlargement, $3,200,000; (w) newspaper-plant enlargement, $75,000. Q 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revelstoke: (a:) Sawmill; (y) 60-ton mill, estimated cost $100,000; 150-ton mill,
power plant, mine buildings, projected, cost estimated at $2,000,000.
Region Three (Okanagan)
Grand Forks:   (a) Dairy, Keremeos;  (b) box-lumber manufacturing.
Kelowna:    (c)   Specialty  house;    (d)   cabinet-shop;    (e)   grocery  warehouse
(expansion)..
Osoyoos:   (/) Machine-shop.
Penticton:   (g) Bakery;  (h) sawmill;  (i) cannery (expansion).
Princeton:   (/') Frozen-food plant;   (k) lumber plant;   (/) brewery (expansion).
Vernon:   (m) Lumber company;  (n) ice-cream plant.
Region Six (Kamloops and South Central British Columbia)
Ashcroft: (a) Ten new lumber plants; (b) feed and seed supply-house; (c) cannery (expansion).
Clinton:   (d) Shoe and saddlery shop;  (c) bakery.
Kamloops: (/) Sash-and door-manufacturing plant; (g) roofing plant; (h) frozen-
food plant;  (/) seed plant.
Merritt:   (/') Sawmill, Lytton; (k) sawmill.
Lillooet:   (/) Hop-yard;   (m) electric shop;   (n) two sawmills.
Salmon Arm:   (o) Planing-mill;  (p) sawmill;  (q) co-operative dairy (expansion).
Region Four (Lower Mainland)
Burnaby:   (a) Glazed-fruit factory;  (ft) coffee-milling plant.
Chilliwack: (c) $397,000 departmental store (under construction); (d) Yarrow
fruit- and vegetable-processing plant.
Milner:   (e) Factory manufacturing neon signs and baked enamel signs.
Mission City:   (/) Furniture-factory.
New Westminster: (g) Factory manufacturing aluminium precision instruments
(proposed);  (/.) carbide-tipped saws plant;   (/) sash and frames factory.
Port Coquitlam:   (/) 15-acre factory-site cleared.
Steveston: (k) Boat-building plant-
Surrey: (/) Factory manufacturing prefabricated houses, farm buildings, etc.;
(m) bumperettes and bulldozer-blades plant.
Vancouver: (n) Lock manufacturing and assembly plant; (o) printing-supply
manufacturing; (p) tire-recapping plant; (q) hammer-manufacturing plant; (r) bleach
and soap factory;  (s) umbrella plant.
Region Five (Vancouver Island)
Courtenay:   (a) Fish-plug factory.
Crofton:   (b) Oyster-packaging plant.
Tofino:   (c) Crab-meat packing company.
Victoria: (d) Nylon-hosiery factory; (<?) veneer plant, $300,000; (/) office equipment and furniture plant; (g) artificial-ice company plant; (h) plywood plant, estimated
cost $2,000,000.
Region Eight (Central British Columbia) and Region Nine
(North Coastal Area)
Prince George: (a) Eight-unit motel; (b) propane-gas storage plant; (c) first unit
of large dairying operation, $200,000; (d) variety store; (e) hotel expansion, $15,000;
(/) hardware warehouse;  (g) equipment warehouse. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 55
Quesnel:   (h) Plywood-plant expansion.
Burns Lake: (/) Hotel expansion; (/') equipment yard and warehouses (Alcan
project);   (k) airways floats;   (/) mechanical garage.
Smithers and Hazleton:   (m) Several new mining operations.
Terrace:   (n) Four new mining operations opened in 1950.
Region Ten (Peace River)
Dawson Creek:  Natural-gas installation and distribution.
ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRIAL SURVEY OF REGIONAL AREAS
The report of the Division's activities during 1950 made reference to the decision
to undertake certain economic and industrial surveys by regional areas as a follow-up
to the analysis and cataloguing of industrial facilities and resources of the Province as
outlined in the Regional Industrial Index. The first of this series of area analyses was
commenced in Region Three (Okanagan) in October, 1950, and completed during the
year under review. Extensive market surveys were carried out in co-operation with the
Boards of Trade and other agencies in the various centres of the region, whose help
and assistance proved of considerable value to the success of the survey. The survey
embraced an intimate study of industrial-location factors, the manufacturing industries
of the region and their markets. A wealth of data was also assembled on employment,
wages, and production; income and purchasing power; labour-supply; transportation
and power. This material, gathered from all centres in the region, was forwarded through
our field office to Victoria for analysis by a special staff assigned to the survey and assisted
by the Department's Bureau of Economics and Statistics, and later compiled in an
economic-survey report and published under the heading " Industry and Markets in the
Okanagan, Similkameen, and Kettle Valleys—Region Three." Following wide distribution of the report, most favourable comment has been received from all branches of
industry and business concerns across Canada, urging further studies of this kind be
made in other regional areas. Extension of these regional surveys will be given early
consideration as time and staff permit.
INDUSTRIAL MAPPING OF REGIONAL CENTRES
In the Annual Report, reference was made last year to the completion of the composite industrial map of the Lower Mainland and maps covering the three Okanagan
centres of Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton. This series of maps was especially designed
to define existing and potential industrial areas in the larger cities of the Province, with
information outlining the acreages available for light and heavy industry, rail terminals,
highway routing, and other data. Publication of these industrial maps has filled a gap
in certain essential information, concerning the larger cities, of special value to industry,
judging by the numerous requests received for the maps from all sections of industry and
business following their initial distribution. Further distribution of the Lower Mainland
map will be made by inclusion of this map in the next issue of the Industrial Index.
A key industrial map of the Lower Fraser Valley, covering the area from the eastern
boundary of Greater Vancouver to Hope, is now under preparation by the draughting
office of the Division, to be published in conjunction with the report of the industrial
survey of communities in the Lower Fraser Valley carried out by the Division during the
current year.
REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL INDEX
Over several months of the year our field offices have been engaged in a revision of
all data pertaining to the seventy-nine districts covered by the Index.   A revised edition Q 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of the Index (1951-52), with factual and statistical information relating to the industrial
facilities and natural resources of the Province broken down by all seventy-nine district
areas, will be published toward the end of 1951.
The demand for this publication has been steadily increasing over the past two
years, many business firms ordering several copies for branch establishments, and the
supply of the 1950 edition of the Index has long been exhausted. A large number of
advance requests for the revised edition have been received, with a particularly heavy
demand from Eastern Canada, indicating a national interest in the current industrial
progress of British Columbia. A considerably augmented printing of the next edition
will therefore be necessary. The revised edition will incorporate several new features
and will contain a series of industrial maps of several of our larger cities, which should
prove a valuable guide for industry to many of our industrial areas. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 57
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT TRAVEL BUREAU
GENERAL
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau reports another record year in
recreational travel to and through the Province in 1951. Twelve per cent more vehicles
entered Canada through British Columbia Border points than in 1950, accenting a trend
which has been constant since 1948. In 1951, 247,712 traveller's vehicle permits were
issued to visitors staying forty-eight hours or more, compared with 221,642 in the
previous record year of 1950.
In addition to the foregoing, some 110,000 car entries were made under the non-
permit class; 242,000 persons who might be classed as tourists made direct entry into
the Province by rail, steamship, bus, or air, and approximately the same number destined
for British Columbia vacation areas entered Canada through customs ports in other
Provinces, crossing the Alberta Boundary by private or public carrier.
Thus, with an average of three persons admitted with each car, British Columbia
played host in 1951 to close to 1,500,000 visitors, and, basing estimates on figures
determined through several official surveys, it is very conservatively held that British
Columbia's tourist industry benefited the Province to the following extent:—
Those entering on traveller's vehicle permits spent an
estimated  $28,640,000
Visitors arriving direct by public carrier     20,817,000
Visitors arriving indirectly, domestic and interprovincial tourists     13,542,000
Total tourist expenditures (estimated)  $62,999,000
While tourist traffic in British Columbia showed an increase of approximately 12
per cent over 1950, this increase is not reflected in the estimated dollar return (1950,
$60,000,000). The visitor industry is a natural barometer of the continental economy,
and the average visitor, having less to spend than in previous years, was more rate-
conscious and more conservative in his purchases. There was a marked increase in
the number of inquiries with respect to camping. Generally, however, tourist accommodation in the larger urban centres or on main through-travel routes enjoyed an
excellent year.
That British Columbia is able to review the tourist-year with a degree of satisfaction
may be attributed in large measure to the continuity of its advertising and the cumulative
effect behind the current campaigns. A great deal is also due to appreciation by the
Automobile Clubs and oil-company direction bureaux of the improved highways and
accommodations, to which considerable publicity has been given. It is also interesting
to note that while only modest gains were made in the first five months of the year, April
falling off very slightly, the June returns on the traveller's vehicle permits showed a traffic
improvement of 32 per cent over 1950. At this time the full impact of the national and
regional advertising would be felt.
The local tourist or information bureaux throughout the Province and the Canadian
Customs offices at Border points, where the Bureau maintains folder-racks, were again
very co-operative in the programme designed to encourage longer stop-overs and increased
mileage within the Province. Up-to-date road reports were furnished all tourist contact
points, and the Bureau's travel extension work was only limited by the quantity of
regional folders and other directional aid available.
Once again the Bureau carried on a modest campaign to encourage British Columbians to see their own Province first, and there was every indication through the resort
areas that this programme has proven successful to a noticeable degree.   Special seasonal Q 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ft
events which were promoted at home and abroad by local interests at Chilliwack, Mission,
New Westminster, Revelstoke, Nelson, Vernon, Kelowna, and Penticton, and to which
the Bureau was able to extend helpful co-operation, were also given considerable advance
publicity, which encouraged attendance from a wide circle.
The tremendous increase in the industrial population of the Western States has
widened British Columbia's market among those who enjoy vacations with pay. Most of
our resort areas are able to cater to this new business, and the steady increase in traffic
over the past few years is due in no small degree to the population increases of the west-
coast States. This market, however, has been appreciated by other tourist areas, and of
the more than $35,000,000 spent in community, travel, and transportation advertising in
the United States annually, a very large amount must be considered directly competitive
with British Columbia in this particular field.
In the main, British Columbia's resorts and tourist accommodations have been
flexible enough to adjust themselves to the changes in vacation trends and the requirements imposed by competitive areas, but in anticipation of any future levelling off in
tourist traffic, and in view of the increasing intensity of our competition, the Bureau
proposes to encourage, with all facilities at its disposal, the development of a different
Canadian atmosphere, the restoration and preservation or marking of historic sites, the
development of Canadian cuisine, and local features and attractions which may be
blended into a composite but distinct appeal.
While fishing is a strong attraction to the Province, the improved highways and other
factors have made this a less important consideration over all, and there is a growing
awareness through the tourist industry in British Columbia that " romance " coupled with
full resort amenities must be furnished if the full potential of the industry is to be realized.
The romance of the Cariboo country, for instance, is considered ripe for appreciation and
capitalization. In other words, that era has passed when catering to the tourist meant
merely providing bed and board for people who were content to enjoy the scenery or do
a little fishing along the way. More accent must now be placed on the aesthetic, cultural,
and historic features, which can be used to give distinctive colour to our promotions and
satisfaction to the visitor who, with his colour-camera and notebook, seeks the odd,
indigenous, and different in his vacation travels.
With its limited budget, the Bureau does not propose to embark upon any ambitious
programme, but to encourage the appreciation of this facet of tourist-development among
local organizations, whose consciousness of it will go a long way toward the further
development of a distinctive British Columbia atmosphere and appeal.
ADVERTISING
As in 1950, the 1951 advertising was influenced by the fact that the majority of
American tourists now visit Canada for touring and sightseeing. This is very definitely
indicated by a survey of tourist travel which revealed that the American tourist comes to
Canada to do the following: Fishing, 17 per cent; hunting, 5 per cent; cruising and
sailing, 3 per cent; resort relaxation, 13 per cent; touring and sightseeing, 51 per cent;
and city-visits, 11 per cent.
The campaign laid some emphasis on the totem theme, which was used to a limited
extent last year to emphasize the different or foreign features which are of importance to
tourist-and-sightseeing visitors, and also to establish a symbol. This supplemented the
invitation " Visit Beautiful British Columbia."
The schedule of magazine and newspapers was developed after a careful analysis
was made of all data available. It included both small-space advertisements in leading
United States magazines and a regular newspaper appropriation for the Western States.
Approximately 84 per cent of United States visitors to Canada are classed as short
term (stay was less than three days), but the total travel expenditures in Canada of this DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 59
group is only 19 per cent of the total. The long-term group (16 per cent of the total)
accounts for 81 per cent of all expenditures.
The majority of short-term visitors (especially week-end tourists) are from the
State of Washington. For this reason a special regional campaign directed to Washington
dailies promoted short holiday trips to British Columbia at times when most people were
thinking of taking a short trip—before Memorial Day, before the Fourth of July, before
Labour Day, and before Thanksgiving. In other States such as Oregon, California,
Texas, etc., daily newspapers were selected in the larger centres. This advertising at the
community level supplemented that placed in high-circulation magazines. It was designed
to reach the lucrative long-term vacation group. Here again copy themes were appropriately designed to appeal to this particular potential.
Altogether some forty-eight newspapers were used with a total circulation of
5,892,000, and a total of 22,460,000 impressions was purchased. Sixteen national
magazines with a gross circulation of 16,000,000 were used to give a total of 33,950,000
impressions. Thus a total of over 56,000,000 impressions was secured, the newspaper
copy running from April through to July, with the bulk of the magazine impressions being
made in the April, May, and June issues.
In addition to the foregoing, the stream-lined painted bulletins which had been
strategically placed under contract, in the vicinity of Seattle, Portland, Tacoma, Grants
Pass, and Spokane, were repainted with fresh design and the message " Visit Alluring
British Columbia  miles north! " Gross traffic count past these boards approximates 11,680,000.
A winter advertising campaign was conducted through the Prairie Provinces and
Eastern Canada as in previous years and following a similar pattern. Inquiry returns
from this promotion were quite as high as in 1950 despite economic factors which, it
was expected, would lessen the interest in British Columbia as a haven for winter
months. Here again it is felt that the continuity of our advertising has had a cumulative
effect, as the interest shown was out of proportion to the small amount invested.
During the height of the season, inquiries in response to advertising averaged 325
per day, with the highest day's mail reaching 731. The Bureau endeavoured to respond
to each letter within twenty-four hours of receipt, and in all cases answers were made
within forty-eight hours, additional help being acquired for this purpose and all efforts
of the entire staff being devoted to this end.
The preparation and ordering of general advertising, including special editions, are
.also undertaken by the Bureau, which further acts as a clearing-house for all Government
advertising, checking advertising invoices for all departments.
RADIO
For the purpose of encouraging British Columbians to spend their own vacations to
a greater extent within the Province, a series of thirty-two spot announcements was begun
early in the season and concluded with every indication that this was a contributing factor
to an increase in domestic travel. Stations used were CHWK, CJDC, CKOV, CKLN,
CJAV, CKOK, CFJC, CKNW, CKPG, CFPR, CJAT, CJOR, CKMO, CKWX, CJIB,
CJVI, CKOA, CKDA, and CHUB.
In addition to carrying the scheduled spot announcements, most of the stations gave
supplementary ones without billing, and all of them supported the programme with
announcements and features of their own which complemented the basic message.
Sponsors of the commercial programmes were also encouraged to adopt the theme where
practical, and the measure of co-operation from radio-station management generally
deserves a very special mention in this report. Q 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
LITERATURE
Last year more than half a million pieces of informative and promotional literature
were distributed through various channels into the hands of potential and actual visitors.
Some thirty standard folder publications were revised, in addition to a number of miscellaneous pieces, such as road reports, hotel listings, and calendars of events, which were
run off from time to time as required. The standard publications cover general informative
literature, regional promotional pieces, maps, and two pieces of particular interest to
settlers.
New publications included one featuring the " Okanagan-Fraser Canyon Loop."
" Vancouver Island " was revised and appeared in an improved format. While quantities
ordered were as generous as the budget would allow, supplies again fell short of demands,
which were particularly heavy. Automobile Clubs and other directional bureaux in the
United States made an unprecedented demand for regional and general literature on
British Columbia, and there were heavily increased requests for supplies from Border
points and Travel Bureaux in the Interior, where Chambers of Commerce and other
interests support the Government Travel Bureau in its efforts to encourage extra days
and extra mileage within the Province.
While the Bureau has concentrated on the production of practical rather than
prestige pieces, " British Columbia, Canada," a booklet which discusses all phases of
British Columbia's life and economy, has been revised in context and format to serve the
multiple purposes of encouraging industrial development and investment, settlement, and
tourism, as well as being a generally informative publication with universal interest.
With the co-operation of the Department of Public Works, the Bureau was able to
produce a series of current road reports in map form, which had an acceptance beyond
anticipation. These reports carried detours and surface conditions in a secondary colour
over a base map. Automobile Clubs throughout Canada and the United States made very
effective use of them. Travel counsellors in every State requested additional copies of
each issue, and every oil company received supplies which enabled them to keep their
service-stations informed. The reports were issued at intervals, usually bi-weekly, during
the tourist season commencing May 21st. The King's Printer afforded forty-eight-hour
service on this production, with the result that all reports were timely when they reached
their ultimate destination.
Apart from a small folder on the Cassiar region, no new literature is contemplated
for 1952, but all current material will be revised as required and every effort made to
introduce colour into those pieces which are competitive.
PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH
Two new 16-mm. colour-sound films were added to the film library during the year;
" Vancouver Island," a revision of an old original, and " Peachtime in the Valley," featuring the Hope-Princeton Highway and Penticton. Both of these were produced by the
Chief Photographer. In addition, four films were readied for editing—" West by Nor'-
West," covering the west coast of Vancouver Island, " Peace River and Alaska Highway,"
"B.C.'s Potato Industry," and the "Inside Passage," highlighting the Mainland coast
from Vancouver to Ketchikan.
A 16-mm. special film was taken of the election of the Primate of the Church of
England in Canada; another film was taken of the visit of Princess Elizabeth and the
Duke of Edinburgh to Victoria and Nanaimo; and work was almost completed on a film
featuring British Columbia's basic and secondary industries.
Approximately 172,000 people viewed the Bureau's films in 1951 through audiences
distributed as follows: British Columbia, 90,000; other Provinces, 2,000; United States,
40,000; and United Kingdom, 40,000. ■■■^^
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 61
The office of the Agent-General in London screened twenty-two films to a total of
435 showings at British Columbia House, Tourist Bureaux, clubs and schools, and at
private showings for commercial firms and other interests.
The still-photograph production totalled 55,900 prints. Of these, 9,700 were forwarded to writers, publishers, advertising agents, and others for publicity and illustrative
purposes. The balance represents prints made for stock purposes and a large volume for
other departments, notably Archives, Public Works, Health, and Agriculture.
This work for other departments also accounted for a large proportion of the 3,900
negatives which were also processed. Those negatives which were exposed in the Department's own interest cover practically every industrial, scenic, and recreational interest,
and have added to a very comprehensive library of many thousands of pictures depicting
all phases Of life in the Province.
FIELD WORK
The Assistant Commissioner made a two-month contact trip in the spring of the
year through the States of Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, and Nevada. This
annual trip enables a personal contact to be maintained with numerous travel counsellors
and others actively engaged in the industry. Of the wide variety of offices called on,
particular attention was given to the Automobile Clubs, touring departments of oil
companies, transportation companies, Travel Bureaux, and Chambers of Commerce.
In addition to the foregoing, considerable time was spent with staffs of Canadian and
British consulates and other groups, all of whom, during the course of their duties,
require up-to-date knowledge of travel conditions and facilities in our Province. Arrangements were made with most of the large daily newspapers for the publishing of articles
and pictures on British Columbia's vacationing features. The principal tourist directional organizations, Automobile Clubs and oil companies noticeably, were especially
interested in particulars on highway conditions and accommodations available.
Exhibits at the travel and vacation shows in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle
were sponsored by the Canadian Government Travel Bureau. The Assistant Commissioner attended these shows, assisting the personnel accompanying the exhibits in answering the heavy volume of inquiries on British Columbia. Approximately half a million
persons paid admission to the three shows.
In the early summer further work was carried out in Washington State by calling
on travel counsellors of Automobile Clubs and travel agencies. The large amount of
detailed travel information required on British Columbia in this area was supplied and
brought up to date at that time.
Information centres, travel agents, customs ports, and interprovincial border-
crossing points within the Province and Alberta were called upon, with the British
Columbia points receiving a number of visits.
With the continual increase in the Province's tourist traffic, particularly on the
highways, information centres are increasingly popular, and the communities supplying
this facility received excellent returns. The Assistant Commissioner was able to correlate
many of the valuable services rendered on a community level and also advise with respect
to pertinent matters affecting the travel industry on Provincial and international levels.
Meetings with the Auto Courts and Resorts Association and other local and
Provincial groups connected with the tourist industry proved most beneficial.
The field work of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau, coupled with
the interest, understanding, co-operation, and assistance of the many local Chambers of
Commerce, Boards of Trade, and service clubs, plus that of the larger Province-wide
organizations, such as British Columbia Automobile Club and the Auto Courts and
Resorts Association of British Columbia, have been large factors in producing a new
record year in vacation travel. Q 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
CO-OPERATIVE ACTIVITIES
Operating as it does almost entirely on a Provincial level, the Travel Bureau must
rely a great deal on local and regional organizations, international agencies of various
kinds, and other official bodies to extend its interest to the potential and actual visitors.
It is with pleasure and gratification, therefore, that recognition is given in this report
to the many individuals and organizations without whose full co-operation British
Columbia's annual investment in tourist promotion would not make such handsome
returns. In one field, particular reference should be made to the intelligent interest in
British Columbia shown by the officers and staff of the Automobile Club of Southern
California, the National Automobile Club, and the California State Automobile Association. The Oregon and Washington State Automobile Associations also co-operated with
the Bureau to the fullest possible extent. They all were very careful to see that the information passed on to their members and patrons was accurate and detailed, and it is felt
that much of the gain in motor traffic previously reported is due to the appreciation of
our highway system by the associations mentioned.
The British Columbia Automobile Association also co-operated very closely with
the Bureau, and its secretary-manager, H. F. Bird, found many occasions to discuss
mutual problems with the Commissioner and to offer timely counsel.
While its general promotions are designed to encourage visitors to the Province, the
Travel Bureau is also definitely interested in what happens to them when they get here,
in seeing that they are properly advised and treated, and in encouraging longer stays and
extra mileage. In this interest the support and co-operation of local and regional organizations have been invaluable. As they have developed in number and size over the past
few years, so have they broadened their own fields of activity and their measure of cooperation with one another and with the Government Travel Bureau, thus making a great
contribution to the advancement of tourism throughout the Province. In this connection
the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau and its staff, under the direction of George I.
Warren, and the Vancouver Tourist Association personnel, under M. McCormick, warrant particular recognition for an interest in the tourist trade which is Province-wide, and
for a tourist service extending far beyond their local or regional concerns.
The visitor industry has gained such recognition and appreciation that virtually every
Board of Trade and Chamber of Commerce in the Province is now equipped to give
tourist advice, and it is difficult to single out any for special mention. At centres close
to the Border entry points and at main highway junctions, such as New Westminster,
Penticton, Osoyoos, Kamloops, Chilliwack, Kimberley, Revelstoke, Nanaimo, and Courtenay, the local interests have done a great job and rendered useful and effective service
to many thousands of visitors. The same holds true for a score of other centres whose
co-operation with the Bureau has enabled it to round out a more comprehensive programme of promotion and service.
At all Border points the Canadian Customs and Immigration Officers have also
worked as closely with the Bureau as their duties will permit, and their co-operation and
appreciation of the value of the visitor industry have also contributed in no small way to
its development.
Through its Provincial and regional officers the British Columbia Auto Courts and
Resorts Association has extended much assistance to the Bureau, and the relationship
between the Bureau and this representative body is a source of keen gratification. Any
problems arising were met with a mutual desire to serve the tourist industry best, and
Dr. A. H. Bayne, president, and his officers devoted considerable time and effort to
matters concerning the business as a whole.
While British Columbia maintains but a token membership in the Evergreen Playground Association, the Department has had a voice in the advertising placed by the DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 63
association which features the Pacific Northwest.   As in the past, every courtesy and
consideration has been extended by the officers of the association.
With the Canadian Government Travel Bureau, a continuous exchange of corres-
dence is maintained, and British Columbia's interest in Canada-wide promotions originating in Ottawa has been well protected. Statistical material and large quantities of
literature dealing with immigration and customs matters and the National Parks have
been made readily available, and through conference and correspondence, many basic
problems affecting Canadian and Provincial tourist traffic have been brought to successful
conclusions.
The Canadian Consul-General and his staff in San Francisco and the Canadian Trade
Commissioner in Los Angeles have at all times placed the facilities and resources of their
offices at the disposal of the Bureau. Calls upon their services were frequent, but in every
case the response was prompt and whole-hearted-
The tourist industry has many and constantly varying problems and complexities.
It deals, more than any other, with personalities and human relations. It is, therefore,
a source of keen gratification to the officers of the Bureau that its relationship with all
those associated in the development of the industry has been maintained at a high
co-operative level.
TOURIST COUNCIL
The annual meeting of the advisory body, held in February under the chairmanship
of the Deputy Minister, discussed a heavy agenda and was productive of many constructive suggestions and recommendations. The current situation in the tourist industry
was reviewed by the Chairman, the advertising programme for 1951 approved, and
general policy considered at length.
Major recommendations arising out of the meeting dealt with road-signs, proposed
amendments to the Tourist Camp Act, park utilization, and the establishment of tourist
information bureaux or reception centres under Government auspices.
The Bureau was able to implement all recommendations of the Council except the
latter, which was also supported from time to time by resolutions and letters from Boards
of Trade and other organizations. However, expansion of service through reception
centres, which has proven profitable to other Provinces and States of the Union, has
been deferred by budget considerations in view of the capital investment required.
During the meeting regional problems were discussed, but regional members of the
Council had co-operated with the Travel Bureau throughout the year when any problems
were given immediate attention, and the Council was able to devote the major part of
the session to matters of Provincial scope.
The personnel of the Council was as follows:—
Full Membership.—James T. Hunter, Kamloops Board of Trade; George I.
Warren, Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau; Howard Faulkner, Kelowna Board of Trade; C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests;
F. R. Butler, Commissioner, British Columbia Game Commission; J. V.
Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance; E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister
of Trade and Industry; Superintendent G. H. Archer, Royal Canadian
Mounted Police; Ernest Evans, Commissioner, Government Travel
Bureau; Neil McCallum, Assistant Chief Engineer, Department of Public
Works; P. E. Robertson, Prince George Board of Trade; T. D. Rosling,
president, Nelson Board of Trade; Dr. C. H. Worthington, Vancouver
Tourist Association.
Associate Members.—Earle Dickey, Revelstoke Board of Trade, Revelstoke;
J. Pound, Auto Courts and Resorts Association, Vancouver; J. S. Brown,
Burns Lake Board of Trade, Burns Lake; E. Ely, British Columbia Hotels Q 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Association, Vancouver; D. F. Shaw, Chilliwack; Les Young, manager,
Odeon Theatres, New Westminster; Ralph Williamson, Dawson Creek
Terminal Company, Dawson Creek; H. Kraupner, Prince Rupert Chamber of Commerce, Prince Rupert; W. H. Wilson, Associated Boards of
Trade of East and West Kootenay, Cranbrook; Dr. A. H. Bayne, Williams Lake and District Board of Trade, Williams Lake.
THE CANADIAN TOURIST ASSOCIATION
The Bureau supported the Sixth Tourist Service Educational Week campaign sponsored by the Canadian Tourist Association in May, and a large amount of editorial
material contributed by the press emphasized the value of the tourist trade to the
Province and did much to awaken a greater public tourist consciousness.
At the annual meeting of the association in September, which was attended by the
Honourable Robert H. Winters, Minister of Resources and Development, particular
emphasis was laid on interprovincial travel and its development, and also on matters
concerning the actual catering to visitors. A number of resolutions were passed which,
when acted upon, will have the effect of keeping the Canadian tourist dollar at home
and of encouraging longer stays in Canadian vacation areas.
" TOURIST ACCOMMODATION REGULATION ACT "
At the last regular session of the Legislative Assembly the " Tourist Camp Regulation Act" was amended to cover all accommodations catering to the tourist other than
those regulated by the " Government Liquor Act " or operated by welfare or charitable
organizations. The original Act, applying only to tourist camps or premises equipped
with cabins, was considered discriminating in that competitive establishments were not
inspected under the same regulations. The revised Act and regulations are designed to
assure clean and sanitary standards in all types of tourist accommodation.
Full implementation of the regulations has not yet been achieved, but it is hoped that
by the end of 1952 a greater percentage of accommodation will be inspected and
approved. A major obstacle to the complete coverage under the regulations is the fact
that certain cities issue rooming- or lodging-house licences to premises catering to tourists.
While the municipalities are responsible for the enforcement of the Tourist Accommodation Regulations, to recognize a large number of rooming-houses as transient accommodation would be to admit tacitly that commercial enterprises were being conducted in
restricted zones. In some cases the situation can be relieved only by amending the
zoning by-laws.
The Bureau's interest in the Act is the protection of the tourist in respect to sanitation, etc., the maintenance of reasonable standards, and the encouragement of improved
standards. It is felt, however, that the minimum requirements should be met throughout
the tourist industry, and every effort will be made to see that all premises posting a
" tourist " shingle are approved by civic inspectors or inspectors appointed under the Act.
Appointment in October of a Tourist Accommodation Inspector has not relieved
the Assistant Commissioner of responsibility in this connection but has assured a continuity of the work throughout the year and a quicker response to requests for classification and for inspections prior to licensing.
During the calendar year over 65 per cent of premises licensed Or registered were
inspected once or more by officers from the Bureau or by district sanitarians. It is
hoped that in 1952 and thereafter all premises catering to the tourist will benefit from
an annual inspection. In some instances it has been found necessary for the Inspectors
to check premises' more than once during the season, but standards have generally
improved to the point where only two licences or registrations were suspended for any
period in 1951. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY Q 65
At present 1,196 tourist accommodations are licensed or registered under the Act-
In addition, some eighty-four permits covering new construction are outstanding. Of
these premises, 27 per cent rate four stars, 23 per cent three stars, 17 per cent two stars,
15 per cent one star, and 18 per cent, while approved, do not qualify for a star rating.
Reinspections during the year improved the rating of twenty-one premises and lowered
the standing of four, the majority of accommodations maintaining standards with their
star ratings unchanged.
The turn-over in tourist accommodation is perhaps greater than in any other business. In one wide resort area all but two auto courts and resorts changed hands at
least once in one eight-month period, and over 70 per cent of premises listed have had
at least one new owner in the past two years.
As very few of the new operators have had any previous experience in the business,
the work of the Inspectors in the educational field and in the maintenance of standards
is continuous throughout the year.    However, notwithstanding adjustments which many
operators had to make, complaints from the travelling public were very few and, on the
other hand, many complimentary letters were received by the Bureau on the standards
achieved.
SETTLEMENT
Settlement inquiries were handled by the Bureau in unprecedented volume in 1951
and ranged in interest from homesteading through practically every trade and profession.
About a third of the inquiries were from the Prairies and Eastern Canada, and a high
percentage of these were addressed by new Canadians who had first settled elsewhere
and wished to pioneer in a country which, they thought, would offer greater opportunities.
It was quite obvious from the inquiries originating in the East that the advantages
of British Columbia's social legislation have been discussed in wide circles. Schools,
hospital insurance, and old-age pensions featured many letters, but a large proportion
were from skilled tradesmen who could contribute a great deal to the development of
British Columbia. From Africa, India, and South America a steady flow of inquiries
came from the executive and professional fields. Most of the applicants are younger
men who wish to establish themselves in an Anglo-Saxon community with economic
stability, but there is also a great interest among those who are approaching retirement.
Inquiries from Britain reflect the interest of agricultural workers, unskilled and
young skilled tradesmen. Many ask about any available scheme of passage assistance.
The difficulties associated with the transfer of sterling discourage many potential settlers
from the British Isles.
The Canadian Immigration Branch is actively interested in settlement work of all
kinds and, once the prospective settler from overseas has been satisfied in respect of
matters which are purely Provincial in scope, is able to render complete service. Thus
the Bureau has more and more confined its interest to furnishing such facts and figures
as might be requested, the Immigration Branch doing any finalizing. The Bureau is not
always appraised of ultimate settlement action on the part of prospective immigrants to
the Province. In a large number of cases, however, both in connection with inquiries
originating in Canada and abroad, a chain of correspondence is carried on which indicates
positive action on the part of the inquirer.
In the furtherance of settlement interests of all kinds, the Bureau has been pleased
to co-operate with the Canadian Immigration Department, the National Employment
Service, and the Colonization Departments of the Canadian National and Canadian
Pacific Railways. In England the office of the Agent-General for British Columbia has
supported our work in this field, as has the London office of the Canadian Department of
Labour- The Bureau has also been advised by the Department of Agriculture and the
Department of Lands and Forests in Victoria, and all agencies mentioned have cooperated to the end that the prospective settler has been given all information and all
assistance authoritatively and speedily. VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
1,220-1151-2059  

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