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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Public Health Branch Department… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of   the   Public   Health   Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1948
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don MuDuiiMin, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1049.  Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., August 1st, 1949.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1948.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health. Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver, B.C., August 1st, 1949.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1948.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
W. H. HATFIELD, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control. <
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i/i  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Letter of Transmittal     3
Letter of Transmittal     4
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control     5
List of Tables     9
List of Charts  12
Introduction  15
(a)  Clinics  16
(6) Institutions  16
(c) Nursing  17
(d) Social Service ,  17
(e) Rehabilitation  18
(/)  Local Health Services  18
(g) Budget  18
(h) Conclusion    18
Statistical Section  19
(a) Clinics  21
(&) New Cases examined by Clinics  31
(c) General Summaries  34
(d) Institutions—Summaries  39
(e) Institutions—Discharges  52
(/)  Tuberculin Testing  55
(g) Known Cases of Tuberculosis  58
(h)  Notifications of Tuberculosis  64
(i)   Tuberculosis Mortality  79  INDEX.
LIST OF TABLES.
Clinics.
Page.
Table   1.—Clinics held in British Columbia, showing Time spent at each Centre,
1948  22
Table   2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1948  25
Table   3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1948  27
Table   4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the Years 1944 to 1948,
inclusive (excluding Indians)  28
Table 5.—New Cases examined by Clinics by Diagnosis, 1948 (excluding Indians) 31
Table   6.—New Cases other than Negative examined by Diagnostic Clinics by
Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-group, 1948 (excluding Indians)  32
Table   7.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1944 to 1948, inclusive 34
General Summaries.
Table   8.—General Summaries, 1948 — X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and
Institutions  34
Table   9.—General Summaries, 1948—Laboratory Report  35
Table 10.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive  37
Table 11.—General Summaries, 1948—Dental Report  37
Table 12.—General Summaries, 1948—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report  38
Table 13,
Table 14,
Table 15,
Table 16,
Table 17,
Table 18,
Table 19,
Table 20,
Table21,
Table 22,
Table 23,
Table 24,
Table 25,
Table 26,
Institutions—Sum m aries.
-Institutions—General Summary, 1948  39
-Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1944 to 1948, inclusive 41
-Institutions—Patient Status, 1948    41
-Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in each Age-
group, 1944 to 1948, inclusive  42
  44
  45
  45
  47
-Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1948	
-Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1948
-Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1948 _..
-First Admissions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1948	
-First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution) for the Years
1944 to 1948, inclusive     49
-First Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Time between Application and
Admission, 1948     49
-Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis Control for
the Years 1944 to 1948, inclusive _'_     51
-Admissions to Institutions by Year of Arrival in British Columbia,
Diagnosis and Type of Case, 1948     51
Institutions—Discharges.
-Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive     52
-Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1948     53
9 M 10 department of health and welfare.
Page.
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Last Stay in Institution, 1948     54
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Home
Condition, 1948     54
Tuberculin Testing.
Table 29.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Racial Origin and Age-groups, 1948    55
Table 30.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Type of Survey, 1948     56
Table 31.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Age-group and Diagnosis, 1948     57
Known Cases of Tuberculosis.
Table 32.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive     58
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1944
to 1948, inclusive     58
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive     58
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1948 (excluding Indians)     59
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1948 (Indians only)     60
Table 37.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1948 (excluding Indians)     61
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present Condition,
and Age-group, 1948 (excluding Indians)     62
Table 39.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive     63
Notifications of Tuberculosis (Form T.B. 1).
Table 40.—New Cases  of Tuberculosis  among the  Total  Population  of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     64
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     64
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948, inclusive    65
Table 43.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis among the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1948     65
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1948 (excluding Indians)     66
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1948 (Indians only)      69
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1939 to 1948,
inclusive     72 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948. M 11
Page.
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Racial Groups  (including Dead Cases reported for the First
Time), 1948     73
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1948     74
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1948 (excluding Indians)     75
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1948 (Indians only)     76
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis and Year
of Arrival in British Columbia, 1948 (excluding Indians)     77
Table 52.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     79
Table 53.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1948     79
Tuberculosis Mortality.
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive     79
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area,
1944 to 1948, inclusive     80
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive     80
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1948 (excluding Indians)     81
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1948 (Indians only)     82
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1948     83
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and Orientals,
1939 to 1948, inclusive :     84
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-groups, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     86
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-groups, Averages for Five-year Periods 1940-44 to 1944-48,
inclusive    87
Table 63.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     89
Table 64.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     90
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Sex and Age-groups,
1939 to 1948, inclusive     91
Table 66.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1948     95 M 12
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
LIST OF CHARTS.
Page.
Chart   1.—Showing the Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control       5
Chart   2.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by all Clinics during
the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive (excluding Indians)     29
Chart   3.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics
during the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive (excluding Indians)     30
Chart   4.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics
during the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive (excluding Indians)     31
Chart 5.—Showing the Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) made
by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1939 to
1948, inclusive     33
Chart   6.—Showing the  Number of Bronchoscopies given by Institutions and
Clinics, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     36
Chart 7.—Showing the Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1944 to
1948, inclusive     40
Chart 8.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Age on Admission and Percentage of Total Admissions in each Age-group, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive     42
Chart 9.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1948     43
Chart 10.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Institution and Diagnosis,
1948     46
Chart 11.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis  (Percentage
Distribution) for the Years 1944 to 1948, inclusive     48
Chart 12.—Showing the Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control for the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive     50
Chart 13.—Showing Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1944
to 1948, inclusive     52
tart 14.—Showing the Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tubercu
losis in British Columbia, by Age-groups and Sex, 1948 (excluding
Indians)     61
-Showing the Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the
the Other-than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1944
to 1948, inclusive       63
Chart 16.—Showing Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial
Groups (including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1939
to 1948, inclusive     71
Chart 17.—Showing Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1948       74
Chart 18.—Showing the Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in British Columbia, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     78
Chart 19.—Showing the Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and
Japanese Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and
Orientals, 1939 to 1948, inclusive     85
Chart 20.—Showing Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     86
Chart 21.—Showing Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, Averages for Five-year Periods, 1940-44
to 1944-48, inclusive     87 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948. M  13
Page.
Chart 22.—Showing Tuberculosis Deaths for the Other-than-Indian Population and
the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1948    88
Chart 23.—Showing Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population
of British Columbia by Age-groups, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     89
Chart 24.—Showing Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population
of British Columbia by Age-groups, 1944 to 1948, inclusive     90
Chart 25.—Showing Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for
the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-
groups, 1939 to 1948, inclusive     93
Chart 26.—Showing Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-
groups, 1939 to 1948, inclusive     94  Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1948.
W. H. Hatfield, Director.
INTRODUCTION.
The Division of Tuberculosis Control is pleased to report considerable
improvement in its programme during the year 1948. The most urgent problem
has been that of insufficient bed facilities. In order to handle the tuberculosis
problem in British Columbia adequately, it will be necessary to have approximately 500 more beds than are available at the present time. It is hoped that
the money that has now been allotted will complete 250 beds of the proposed
500-bed unit. Plans for this new institution in Vancouver have been completed,
and it is hoped that construction will be started early in 1949.
The addition to the Vancouver unit, which will house new surgical and
teaching facilities and an auditorium, is nearing completion, and it is hoped to
have this unit in full operation by March, 1949.
A number of additions and changes that have been previously recommended
for the Tranquille unit have been started during the year. New homes have
been provided for the medical staff, and an addition to the nurses' home is under
way. Further internal improvements have been carried out in the existing
buildings.
The announcement from Ottawa that grants are to be made to the Provinces
for expansion of services has allowed for certain new developments. A programme to cover a number of years has been planned and submitted to Ottawa
in connection with these new grants, and at the end of the year certain projects
have been planned to expand the work of the Division in the year 1949.
Projects that have been approved are:—
(1) Survey X-ray equipment to be loaned to local hospitals and health
units.
(2) Occupational therapy for patients in their homes.
(3) Equipment for the Tranquille unit.
(4) Equipment for the surgical unit in Vancouver.
(5) Postgraduate training.
(6) Medical library.
From time to time other projects will be submitted up to the amount of
the annual tuberculosis grant. All these new developments fit into a definite
pattern that has been planned over a period of time, and with the provision
of adequate beds in the Province the tuberculosis-control programme will be
completely rounded out. One of the most difficult situations with which the
Division has been confronted, however, is the problem of getting properly
trained medical staff to carry out the work of the institutions and clinics, and,
to this end, reports have been submitted indicating the necessity for a complete
revision of medical salaries.
In the over-all picture of tuberculosis control in the Province it is encouraging to note that there has been a greater drop in the death rate this year than
in any previous year in the history of the Province.    The 1948 preliminary
15 M  16 DEPARTMENT OF  HEALTH AND WELFARE.
tuberculosis mortality rate for the total population was 40.1 per 100,000, as
compared with 50.6 in 1947; for the other-than-Indian population, 28.5 in 1948
and 36.9 in 1947; for the Indian population, 485.7 in 1948 and 588.9 in 1947.
Also, despite approximately the same number of people being X-rayed in the
survey-work, there is a decrease in the number of new cases being found, and
a shift in these new cases from the younger to the older age-groups.
We are pleased to report at the end of the year that the Vancouver unit has
been certified by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada as a
postgraduate training centre in chest diseases.
CLINICS.
The clinics operated by the Division during 1948 remained the same as
in the previous year. It is unfortunate that it has been impossible to have
physicians attached to the travelling diagnostic clinics, except in one instance.
The employment of specialist physicians is necessary in order to carry out this
work, and with the salary rates that are presently paid it has been impossible
to obtain such physicians for the service. It has been necessary for consulting
services to be confined to the taking of X-ray films in the rural areas and forwarding these to the main units of the Division for interpretation.
The stationary survey clinics continue to increase in the number of examinations, which in turn throws an increasing load on the stationary diagnostic
clinics.    This is particularly apparent in the Vancouver area.
The mobile units have carried on in the same pattern as previously, doing
almost the same volume of work as in 1947. The preliminary total examined
by all survey clinics during the year was 184,509. Of that total, 1.7 per cent,
were referred to diagnostic clinics, which is slightly lower than the rate in
previous years. Of the group referred for further study, 428 or 14.02 per cent,
were diagnosed as tuberculous. These tuberculous diagnoses were as follows:
Primary, 1.6 per cent.; minimal, 65.4 per cent.; moderately advanced, 28.3 per
cent.; far advanced, 4.7 per cent. Thus 0.2 per cent, of the total examined
were found to be tuberculous. Of those diagnosed, 139 required active treatment and, of those, at the end of the year 78 had been admitted to hospital.
In the diagnostic clinics 37,543 examinations were made, which is an
increase of 10.5 per cent, over the previous year and 33.7 per cent, over 1946.
The out-patient pneumothorax-work remains at a fairly constant level of 8,617
treatments during the year. The total number of examinations, including
all clinics, both survey and diagnostic, was 222,318. Including out-patient
treatment-work, the total number of patient-visits to all clinics and survey units
was 231,121, which is a decrease from the previous year of 12,458.
INSTITUTIONS.
The acute situation in regard to the number of beds still remains the same,
although, as mentioned, plans have now been completed for the start of a new
institution in the City of Vancouver. There has continued to be a long waiting
list for institutional care. Even when the cases on the waiting list are limited
to acute, active pulmonary tuberculosis, there is still an interval of some months
between date of application and date of admission to institution. As new
institutions take time to build, it will probably be another eighteen months at a TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948. M  17
minimum before any relief in the bed situation can be foreseen. In the meantime, improvements have been made in the existing institutions so as to be able
to render more advanced forms of treatment and better service in general. The
most notable improvement is at the Vancouver unit, where the building provided by the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society will allow this institution to
carry out every form of active treatment for the tuberculous patient and will
make this one of the best-equipped and best all-round treatment units of its kind
in North America.
Many of the changes that have been recommended for the improvement
of the facilities at Tranquille have been accomplished during the year. New
homes for the doctors have been completed. The much-needed addition to the
nurses' home is well on its way to completion. The electric current has been
changed from direct to alternating. With further training of medical staff it
has been possible to do chest surgery again at Tranquille.
There have been no new developments at the Victoria unit.
It is necessary to report again that St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital, which is
considered by the Division as unsatisfactory for the care of tuberculous patients,
is still in operation. NURSING
Correlation of the various branches of the nursing service was effected on
a full-time basis approximately one year ago. It was necessary during the year
to devote much time and effort to projects dealing with standardization of
policies and routines on a Provincial level.
Programmes for staff orientation and patient education were outlined
and have been adapted to local circumstances in the various units. Further
improvement and expansion of the nursing service to meet present-day standards and progress in other phases of the tuberculosis programme will be possible
through central planning based on helpful suggestions from the nurses in institutional, clinic, and district services.
Recruitment of professional nurses has improved during the past few
months. A total of 102 nurses are employed in the various branches of the
Division. The shortage of nurses at the Tranquille unit is less acute, as shown
by the following comparative figures. In the Reports for 1946 and 1947 the
number of professional nurses ranged from twenty-five to thirty-two, while at
the present time there are thirty-eight full-time and four half-time nurses.
The educational programme for undergraduate and postgraduate students
is progressing favourably. Satisfactory progress is being made in reorganization of the course at the Victoria unit in accordance with recommendations for
uniformity of policies and opportunities for students in both centres.
The Division, through the Vancouver and Jericho Beach units, is cooperating in providing clinical experience for the practical-nurse students
enrolled in the one-year course at the Technical School in Vancouver. Participation in this project will benefit the various units of the Division by providing a
source of supply of auxiliary nursing personnel with uniform basic preparation.
SOCIAL SERVICE.
During 1948 the situation with regard to social service staff at the Tranquille unit did not improve, but it was possible to maintain staff in the other
units. M  18 ' DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
A short staff-training course was given, with the assistance of a member
of the medical staff, who gave a series of talks on psychosomatic aspects of other
diagnostic groups than tuberculosis. It was also possible during the year to
have a psychiatrist as consultant for some problem cases in Vancouver.
In November, 1947, the Provincial Supervisor of Social Service was
appointed to the Assessment Committee on Institutional Revenue. This contact
has proved very valuable in giving the Supervisor an opportunity to interpret
to the members of the Committee some of the problems facing patients in
tuberculosis institutions.
During the year the boarding-home for women was closed, and so far has
not been replaced. Placement problems, not only with regard to women
patients, but for long-term chronic patients who have intermittent positive
sputum, have reached the point where there does not seem to be any possible
place for many of these patients to go.
REHABILITATION.
It is planned during the forthcoming year for the Division to take over the
rehabilitation-work initiated by the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society.
LOCAL HEALTH SERVICES.
Further improvement in the local health service makes it possible to operate
the field-work of the Division more smoothly, and every co-operation has existed
between the Division and local services.
BUDGET.
There will be an increase in the Provincial expenditure for tuberculosis
during the forthcoming year, due to factors beyond the control of the Division;
namely, increased commodity prices and increased wages. Further increases
due to the expansion of facilities of the Division, such as routine X-ray examination of patients admitted to general hospitals, rehabilitation services, postgraduate courses, etc., will be provided under the new Federal health grants.
The only new facility to be opened during the forthcoming year which will be a
part of Provincial expenditure is the addition to the Vancouver unit, the operating costs of which will be part of the Provincial Budget.
CONCLUSION.
As reported in the previous year, all facilities of the Division are still taxed
to the limit. Clinics are becoming overcrowded. In Vancouver this will be
largely rectified with the opening of the new addition, but the New Westminster
clinic has reached a stage where additional space is essential.
In order to bring about further advances in the control of tuberculosis in
the Province, it is necessary to have a considerable number of additional beds.
It is sincerely hoped that by the end of another year it will be possible to report
that bed facilities are becoming more adequate to meet the need. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1948  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
CLINICS.
Map of British Columbia, showing Statistical Publication Areas.
M 21
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,082,000.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)■—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8,10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4, 7,9c, 9d, 9e.
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Survey Clinic No. 1—Vancouver and Interior.
Survey Clinic No. 2—Vancouver.
Survey Clinic No. 3—Vancouver Island. M 22
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 1.—Clinics held in British Columbia, showing Time spent
at each Centre, 1948.
Travelling Clinics.
Interior.
Centre visited. Days.
Allenby   2
Armstrong   2
Burns Lake  2
Copper Mountain  3
Dawson Creek
Enderby  	
Fort St. John .
Hedley  	
Kamloops  	
Kelowna 	
Merritt  	
McBride 	
Nickel Plate Mine
Oliver   	
3
2
3
1
32
14
2
1
1
2
Centre visited. Days.
Penticton   14
Pouce Coupe   1
Prince George   14
Princeton     6
Quesnel     6
Revelstoke     6
Salmon Arm   4
Summerland   2
Vanderhoof   4
Vernon     14
Wells     4
Williams Lake   6
Total (26 centres).... 151
Coast.
Centre visited.
Abbotsford 	
Alert Bay 	
Allco  	
Ashcroft 	
Days.
.. 7
. 6
_ 2
._ 1
1
Bridge River 	
Chilliwack   32
  4
  1
  1
  3
  1
Gibsons Landing
Hazelton 	
Hope 	
Lillooet 	
Lytton  	
Centre visited. Days.
Marpole Infirmary   2
Mission   6
North Vancouver   6
Ocean Falls  3
Powell River   15
Prince Rupert   14
Shalalth   1
Terrace   2
Total  (19 centres).... 108
Island.
Centre visited. Days.
Campbell River   9
Chemainus   8
Comox   20%
Cumberland   10
Duncan   28%
Ladysmith   12
Lake Cowichan   5%
Kootenay
Centre visited. Days.
Cranbrook   16%
Creston   9%
Emerald Mine   5%
Fernie   8%
Field    1%
Galloway   2
Golden   1%
Grand Forks  5
Greenwood    2
Invermere          %
Kaslo   2
Centre visited. Days.
Mount St. Mary   2
Nanaimo    44%
Port Alberni   28
Saltspring Island          %
Total (11 centres)... 168%
Centre visited.
Kimberley 	
Michel 	
Nakusp 	
Nelson  	
New Denver __
Rossland 	
Sheep Creek __
Trail 	
Days.
_      8
4
5%
32%
2
8%
2
16
Wardner        2
Total (20 centres).__. 135 tuberculosis cont
Table 1.—Clinics held in British
at each Centre, 1
Mobile t
Vancouver
Centre visited.                                   Days.
Bamberton                 1
rol report, 1948.
Columbia, showing Time
948—Continued.
Jnits.
Island.
Centre visited.
Lantzville 	
Mesachie Lake
M 23
SPENT
Days.
1
1
Belmont           	
       2
Bloedel 	
Chemainus 	
Cobble Hill	
      2
      3
Nanaimo  	
Northwest Bay      .   .. -
16
1
       1
Parksville 	
Port Alberni
2
18
.      2
Copper Canyon  	
       1
Cowichan Lake	
       2
Port Alice _     	
Duncan 	
Franklin River 	
Fulford Harbour 	
      8
       2
       1
Port Renfrew      .. 	
._      3
Qualicum 	
Rock Bay	
Shawnigan Lake   ..
4
1
...      1
Gabriola Island 	
Ganges ...    	
       1
       2
Sooke  	
Tofino 	
Ucluelet 	
1
2
_      1
81
5
__ 176
Days.
2
1
...    11
Great Central 	
Honeymoon Bay _. ..
       1
       2
James Island 	
Jordan River 	
Kelsey Bay .   	
       1
       2
       1
Victoria 	
Youbou	
Total (34 centres).
t.
Centre visited.
Matsqui 	
Newton 	
New Westminster 	
Ladysmith   	
Centre visited.
Abbotsford 	
       3
Coas
Days.
      5
Aberdeen 	
Aldergrove 	
Alert Bay 	
Ashcroft     	
      1
      1
       2
       2
Ocean Falls         _
...      4
Port Hardy 	
Port Kells _.       	
2
...      1
Boston Bar 	
Clayton 	
       1
       1
Port McNeill           	
._      1
Cloverdale
       4
Sardis  	
Sointula 	
Spences Bridge         	
2
2
1
Crescent Beach  	
       1
Englewood 	
Fleetwood   	
Fraser Mills    ___    _
      3
1
Tynehead 	
Vancouver .
1
238%
1
3
1
       5
Haney   	
Hope ...   	
       1
       2
Whalley's Corner 	
White Rock 	
Yale 	
Total (33 centres).
or.
Centre visited.
Little Fort.     	
Laidlaw 	
Langley 	
Lillooet 	
Lytton         	
       1
       6
       2
... 312%
Days.
___        1
       2
Centre visited.
Allenby               ... _
Interi
Days.
         1
Blue River 	
Canoe
         1
1
Louis Creek 	
Malakwa .           	
1
__        1
Celista 	
Chase             - - 	
         1
         1
Merritt     	
...      2
Notch Hill 	
Princeton   _       	
1
...      4
Clearwater  	
Copper Mountain
Elk River
       2
       2
       1
Salmon Arm
...      4
Savona 	
Sicamous ..          . 	
1
..      1
Falkland
1
Hedley               	
       1
Total (21 centres).
...    42
•
Kamloops
     12
Keremeos      	
       2 M 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 1.—Clinics held in British Columbia, showing Time spent
at each Centre, 1948—Continued.
Mobile Units—Continued.
Kootenay.
Centre visited.                                 Days.                            Centre visited.                                 Days.
Arrowhead         1               Golden                               2
Canyon      1               Revelstoke                              4
Crawford Bay
Creston 	
Edgewater
Elko  	
Wynndel
Yahk 	
Total (10 centres) __._    15 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 25
During 1948 the number of patient-visits made to the diagnostic and treatment
clinics was up 9 per cent., from 42,646 in 1947 to 46,518 in 1948. The number of
persons coming in for a routine check is still increasing, the actual figure being 29,053
in 1948, which is 4,395 higher than the figure for the previous year. The greatest
numerical increase in patient-visits (808) occurred in the 30-39-year age-group.
A considerable increase was registered in the number of Indians and half-breeds
examined, from 102 in 1947 to 387 in 1948. New cases of tuberculosis found by the
Division among all races declined from 1,610 in 1947 to 1,137 in 1948.
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1948.
Item.
I.S
Total patient-visits	
Total cases examined—
X-ray 	
Physical	
Specialist consultation	
Type of case	
New cases	
Re-examination	
Reason for examination	
Referred from survey	
Symptoms	
Routine check 	
Age-groups examined 	
0- 4   M.
F.
5- 9 M.
F.
10-14 M.
F.
15-19  M.
F.
20-24. M.
F.
26-29 M.
F.
30-39 M.
F.
40-49 M.
F.
50-59 M.
F.
60-69-..- M.
F.
70 and over M.
F.
Racial origins	
White	
Indian	
Breed	
Chinese	
Japanese	
Other	
Usual occupations	
Clerks	
Fishermen	
Hospital Workers	
Housewives	
Labourers—
Common	
Skilled	
Loggers	
Miners—
Coal	
Hard-rock	
Nurses—■
Graduate	
Student	
Teachers	
Other professional	
23,493
14,789
4,876
85
14,925
5,387
9,538
14,925
1,478
3,872
9,575
14,925
120
149
200
212
162
173
239
375
600
1,154
728
1,122
1,332
1,988
1,336
1.046
1,240
588
1,092
451
456
162
14,925
14,394
30
20
429
14
38
14.925
1,702
95
216
3,826
2,249
1,342
233
61
321
357
368
153
178
I
1,556  | 4,816
1,556
137
1,556
513
1,043
1,556
16
124
1,416
1,556
7
6
1
8
7
12
45
100
86
196
74
139
161
187
149
93
129
84
51
14
7
1,556
1,544
1,556
126
513
211
4,545
27
4,545
2,118
2,427
4,545
396
336
3,813
4,545
137
156
218
240
107
64
73
90
110
320
195
331
375
522
255
245
271
181
339
141
123
52
4,545
4,344
2
165
1
33
4,545
168
3
16
1,102
103
202
173    1,057
2
8
1
	
	
|  139
63
14
91
7
33
73
35
3,254
3,254
3,254
909
2,345
3,254
414
495
2,345
3,254
82
50
78
88
59
56
41
93
100
181
121
301
269
430
281
204
230
147
232
112
73
26
3,254
3,242
2
1
7
2
3,254
22
29
1,095
628
19
3
2,760
3,608
2,760
3,608 [
164
2,760
3,608
700
2,445 |
2,060
1,163 j
2,760
3,608 |
61
170 |
270
96 |
2,429
3,342
2,760
3,608 |
42
31 |
27
40 j
85
85 |
83
125 |
93
133 j
108
124 |
98
100 |
155
171 1
85
116 |
158
229 I
107
143 j
193
220 |
205
375 |
343
467 1
197
335 ]
210
194 ]
165
216 |
115
141 |
117
178
66
102 !
81
49 1
27
34
2.760
3.608 1
2,672
3,344 |
15
230 |
57
11
7 1
4
27 [
1
2,760
3,608
103
201
84
40
74 |
802
1,031 1
151
209 I
88
342 |
24
40 1
1
52 i
1
230 |
62
79 |
4
153
42
14 1
48
36 |
3,367
3,367     3,664
3,406
2,262
1,144
3,406
46,518
54
4,844
2,779
500
172
562 M  26 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1948—Continued.
Item.
OJ
>
3
O
u
C
>
s
ca
.2
o
u
>
£j_
S_
4J
Ul
CU
O
O
>>
&
c
QJ
.j
o
o
w
o
OJ
a
i-i
a
C/J
I-l
o
H
Usual occupations—Continued.
Students—
6
144
921
2,753
2
5,315
94
142
41
5,438
6,013
1,490
515
477
93
8
60
20
3
2
136
3
88
37
8
248
10
136
78
22
1
1
38
1
3
5
1
12
10
1
3
1
1
975
376
1
24
19
8
374
36
91
46
4
6.370
3
37
154
448
	
6
	
519
28
15
14
	
	
	
	
1
1
13
2
8
2
1
1
1
13
3
2
6
2
	
335
1
583
1,183
1,505
15
1,410
969
7
61
263
130
128
35
1
29
4
1
34
28
5
1
59
6
34
13
5
1
2
1
1
133
14
1
2
1
96
3
16
1,399
3
322
979
1,349
43
1,468
460
1
248
292
158
156
21
2
18
1
77
1
62
14
58
5
28
15
2
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
1
134
44
1
3
5
40
9
15
17
1,667
4
457
849
87
1,954
111
81
81
15
1
12
1
1
32
4
19
9
34
6
18
7
1
2
30
6
6
4
2
12
1
527
1
3
414
729
1
87
1
1
3
151
968
11
253
281
105
101
19
1
13
4
1
36
1
34
1
46
4
30
3
5
3
1
4
1
1
2
176
43
9
9
8
64
7
12
24
1
774
2
558
796
38
1,935
118
53
52
16
3
12
1
5
5
31
2
20
8
1
1
1
65
25
2
18
1
1
18
1
542
487
912
16
1,391
105
80
80
16
1
14
1
46
35
11
18
14
2
2
25
3
11
4
2
5
1
784
7
160
Other 	
3,779
8,355
Treatments and tests—
Pneumothorax—■
3
Refill                        	
8,704
Oleothorax—
1
Refill                     	
1
Pneumoperitoneum—
Refill	
94
148
102
8,986
8,410
X-rays referred to the Division—
160
Other                          	
5,842
New cases found (tuberculous and non-tuberculous)
2,688
1,137
1,089
Change of diagnosis, non-tuberculous to tuber-
215
17
158
32
5
2
1
367
9
272
76
10
507
35
288
128
37
2
13
1
Other tuberculosis of respiratory system....
1
2
48
Intestines	
2
5
6
Skin	
1
16
11
1
3
2
Other	
1
1,551
514
2
38
44
22
602
68
Undiagnosed -	
121
140
Change of diagnosis, tuberculous to non-
8
12 398
Source:  Ledger T.B. 71 ; Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 27
This year a total of 184,509 people were examined by the survey clinics, excluding
the 91 examinations by the Island Travelling Clinic surveys. Of the total examinations,
an increasing amount were done by the other-than-mobile survey clinics—57,428, as
against 44,196 in 1947. The number of new cases of tuberculosis discovered amounted
to 428, of which 223 were referred by the other-than-mobile survey clinics, as against
237 in 1947. The referrals from the mobile clinics showed a marked decrease, being
only 205 this year, as compared to 455 in 1947. Among the 428 new cases found, there
were 20 far advanced, 121 moderately advanced, 280 minimal, and 7 primary cases.
Table 3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1948.
Item.
Vancouver.      Victoria.
New Westminster.
Mobile.
Total.
Total examined*	
Total referred	
New tuberculous cases	
Primary	
Minimal—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested
Apparently cured	
Moderately advanced —
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured	
Far advanced—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested
Apparently cured	
Known tuberculous cases	
Minimal—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured	
Moderately advanced—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured	
Far advanced—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured	
Non-pulmonary	
Pleurisy	
Suspect	
Negative	
Other diagnoses	
Not yet diagnosed	
637
240
151
24
10
36
9
3
1
12
13
3
2
115
47
585
219
65
5,702
313
25
2
17
3
2
1
7
18
202
33
1,089
252
47
1
5
24
34
9
87
54
6
127,081
1,244
205
20
13
69
42
25
6
17
10
2
2
23
59
4
1
24
9
78
341
287
107
184,509
3,049
428
7
50
25
127
78
69
9
25
18
20
166
5
35
74
28
9
242
152
1,215
593
187
* Excludes 91 examinations by Island Travelling Clinic surveys, for which breakdowns are not available. M 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
A decrease was registered in the number of clinic examinations, from 235,121 in
1947 to 222,318 in 1948. The major part of this decrease was in the examinations done
by the mobile clinics, which decreased from 155,674 to 127,081. This was partly
balanced by an increase in the number of examinations by the stationary clinics, from
65,250 in 1947 to 81,708 in 1948. The number of re-examinations continues to increase,
amounting to 124,236 this year, compared to 86,470 in 1947. This increase is likely to
continue as more of the population of the Province is covered by the clinics.
Table 4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the
Years 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
Total Cases examined.
New Cases.
Old Cases.
Year.
Total.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile.
Total.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile.
Total.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile.
1944	
109,280
144,478
174,571
235,121
222,318
38,163
41,753
63,405
65,250
81,708
15,249
12,706
12,054
14,197
13,529
55,868
90,019
99,112
155,674
127,081
82,764
106,009
119,239
148,651
98,082
23,138
24,088
36,848
31,991
36,564
9,606
7,321
5,395
5,909
6,236
50,020
74,600
76,996
110,751
55,282
26,516
38,469
55,332
86,470
124,236
15,025
17,665
26,557
33,259
45,144
5,643
5,385
6,659
8,288
7,293
5,848
1945	
15,419
1946	
22,116
1947	
1948	
44,923
71,799
Source: Daily Report of Clinics, Form T.B. 71, and Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 29
Chart 2.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by all Clinics
during the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
NO. OF CASES
(IN   000'S)
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
\                    i
TOTAL
CASES
A
M  l\\
NEW
CASES
A
\   -'■
4
/
/
/       .
/      /
V /    \
1     i
/
+ TOTAL
MOBILE
/   1 Y
/ lA
/  > \
II
1
/
/           J
t       /
t     /
NEW
MOBILE
/
\/
A
1
1
1   1
*/
OLD     .
CASES/
•
•
/
/
1
1
/old
	
	
1/   ^
f   MUBILt
r''
*
**
**
**
20
1939 40 41 42 43
44
45 46 47 1948 Chart 3.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary
Clinics during the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
NO. OF CASES
(IN   000'S)
90
80
70
60
50
40
20
TOTAL
CASES
4
1
1
t
1
/
/
/
N
*
t
1
1
/ s
is
1           i
/
NEW  CASES
/
/
/             /
/
/
4>
t
*
f
CASES
---T*C-
/
*
t
OLD
i A
ty
. — —
^
1939 40
42
43 44
30
45 46 47 1948 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 31
Chart 4.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling
Clinics during the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
NO. OF CASES
(IN  OOO'SI
20
10
0
1939
TRAVELLING
CLINICS
TOTAL  CASES^,^-^
 I
r--—-
T
i       i
i
< „_  NEW   CASES
OLD CASES**
_» •* *~ ■»
' ' ' '       _ -1" —
1
1
40
42
43
45
47
'948
NEW CASES EXAMINED BY CLINICS.
While the number of new cases examined by the clinics declined from 148,567 last
year to 98,082 this year, the percentages of cases under the various diagnoses remained
substantially the same. The percentage of normal chests was slightly less favourable,
being 97.8 last year and 97.3 this year. The number of cases diagnosed as pulmonary
tuberculosis decreased to 1,073 from last year's figure of 1,454, but the percentage
increased from 0.98 to 1.09.
Table 5.—New Cases examined by Clinics, by Diagnosis, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis.
Number
of Cases.
Per Cent.
of Cases
examined.
Pulmonary tuberculosis	
Tuberculous pleurisy and other tuberculosis of respiratory system
Non-pulmonary tuberculosis	
Other pulmonary diagnosis	
Other (other non-pulmonary, undiagnosed and suspect)	
Normal	
Total new cases examined	
1,073
16
48
1,206
317
95,422
98,082
1.09
0.02
0.05
1.23
0.32
97.29
100.00
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. M 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
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7- TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M  33
For the first time since 1937 a decrease has occurred in the total number of X-rays
taken during a year. Last year there were 240,111, and in 1948 this figure dropped to
228,254. This decrease was accounted for mainly by the mobile clinics, which made
155,674 X-ray examinations in 1947 and 127,081 in 1948. The number taken by the
stationary clinics increased over last year's figure by 16,390, to a total of 81,572. X-ray
examinations by institutions increased from 5,196 to 6,111.
Chart 5.—Showing the Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) made
by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1939 to 1948,
inclusive.
NO  OF X-RAYS
(IN   000'SI
250
225
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
1939 40 41
TOTAL     J
MOB
UNI
ILE      /
TS      /
4
s
STATIC
CLIN
/
/
1NARY
ss.--—
4*
^
*
r*
	
/
	
."'
TRAV
ILLINC   CLIN
ICS
43 44 45 46 47 1948 M 34
department of health and welfare.
Table 7.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Institutions.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile
Units.
Total.
Diagnostic.
Survey.
Diagnostic.
Survey.
1944	
3,881
3,858
6,667
5,196
6,111
14,315
11,075
16,781
20,986
24,144
26,173
28,850
45,810
44,196
57,428
12,124
12,613
11,289
12,996
13,399
2,914
764
763
1,063
91
55,868
89,779
99,103
155,674
127,081
115,275
1945	
146,939
1946	
180,413
1947	
240,111
1948	
228,254
Source: X-ray Ledger T.B. 73 and Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41.
Generally, there has been an increase in the number of X-rays made by the
stationary clinics and institutions. With the exception of a fairly substantial increase
in the number of flat chest X-rays, no important changes are noted.
GENERAL SUMMARIES.
Table 8.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1948.
Vancouver.
Tranquille.
Victoria.
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital.
Jericho
Beach.
New Westminster.
Total.
X-rays taken	
Chest X-rays—
Flat-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Stereoscopic—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Planograph—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other chest—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Gastro-intestinal—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Bones and joints—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Other—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Fluoroscope—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Electrocardiogram—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Indian Department examinations..
Lipiodol injection—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
19,925
1,741
14,872
543
86
94
245
223
294
923
14
16
70
45
42
27
18
3,633
5,438
222
131
33
258
190
2
58
3,902
1,959
1,570
50
17
49
1
63
5
36
46
28
2
8,830
521
44
12
10
4
5,401
531
4,550
2
21
19
12
7
166
15
10
19
2,115
1,410
385
313
72
759
491
217
3,492
3,449
793
35
20
4
1,137
1,370
21
5,035
24,730
543
145
142
313
236
373
1,112
26
16
141
105
42
78
20
16,508
8,774
222
176
46
258
249
14
64
Source : X-ray Ledger T.B. 73. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 35
An increase has again been registered in the number of sputum tests, which
amounted to 23,351 in 1947 and 24,689 in 1948. Sedimentation tests have increased
fairly considerably over last year's figure of 19,590, the number this year being 22,749.
The number of blood tests other than sedimentations has increased from 11,204 in
1947 to 14,334 in 1948.
Table 9.—Laboratory Report, 1948.
Vancouver.
Tranquille.
Victoria.
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital.
Jericho
Beach.
New Westminster.
Total.
Sputum tests—
Routine—
10,459
3,580
20
86
345
155
378
1,000
13,861
331
1,232
601
716
435
114
392
599
124
410
588
122
358
377
3
551
1
343
116
2,340
450
363
812
1
135
17
378
271
66
97
40
164
709
47
2,971
368
355
27
370
127
1,999
434
730
280
668
136
1,229
37
1,229
37
71
365
236
205
2,471
233
122
127
603
544
8
941
1,620
1,220
311
56
49
89
4
66
318
1,216
160
27
155
28
157
32
157
31
4
11
78
5
288
2
3
6
4
9
5
5
5
4
10
350
1
7
58
235
8
240
3
69
101
86
80
2
56
1,042
5
2
4
818
25
18
518
67
57
83
45
2
128
4
128
4
1
47
48
720
49
23
2
43
1
8
2,762
3,497
11,727
Con centra ted—•
6,869
444
Stomach washings—
573
461
Guinea-pig inoculations—
547
571
Blood tests—■
Sedimentations—
4,070
18,348
331
Haemoglobin—
2,419
994
716
Red-blood count—
1,372
280
392
White-blood count—
2,214
197
410
Differential—
2.188
                  194
                  358
532
3
930
1
Kahn—
760
374
Urinalysis—
Routine—
6.861
                  734
363
Quantitative—
960
1
268
21
                  997
Cultures—■
Sputum—
321
71
Other-
647
52
1,127
Source: Daily Laboratory Ledger T.B. 72. M 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
As in 1947, the institutions are doing an increasing number of bronchoscopic
examinations, while the clinics continue to do less. The addition of a technician
trained in bronchoscopic work at Tranquille has had the effect of raising the number
of bronchoscopies done in that institution from 72 in 1947 to 258 this year. The total
in 1948 was 700, as compared to 452 in 1947.
Chart 6.—Showing the Number of Bronchoscopies given by Institutions
and Clinics, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
800
750
700
650
600
550
500
450
400
350
300
250
200
44     45     46      47      4
III!
44     45      46     47      48 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 37
Table 10.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics,
1944 TO 1948, inclusive.
Total.
Institutions.
Clinics.
Year.
Total.
Tran-
ciuille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
1944	
243
285
353
452
700
1
31    |    204
9    [    274
3    1    334
72     1     366
8
2
16
14
27
143
127
174
297
552
30
9
3
72
108
117
160
211
5
1
11
14
27
100
158
179
155
148
1
6
96
157
174
155
142
3
1945	
1946	
1947	
1
5
1948	
258
415
252
273
Source : Institutional Ledger T.B. 70 and Clinic Ledger T.B. 71.
A considerable decrease occurred in the number of patient-visits at Tranquille,
from 2,862 in 1947 to 1,836 in 1948. The number of visits at Jericho Beach increased
from 81 to 268, but the total for all clinics was down to 3,281 from 4,101 last year.
Table 11.—Dental Report.
Vancouver.*
Tranquille.
Victoria.
Jericho Beach.
Total.
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Extractions—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Fillings, including cement bases—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Prophylactic treatment—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Surgical removal, impacted teeth-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Denture fittings—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other	
830
240
253
45
14
1
276
117
219
120
29
7
6
4
291
112
5,139
1,836
65
60
398
18
247
39
385
6
625
347
10
69
1
33
218
7
48
4
49
43
268
53
190
16
3,281
315
513
46
760
135
1,191
131
340
50
15
4
915
118
5,823
* Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source : Ledger, T.B. 74. M 38
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
The number of patient-visits this year declined to 540 from last year's figure of 635.
Table 12.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report.
Vancouver.       Tranquille,
Victoria.
Total.
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Eye-
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Prescriptions—
In-patient	
Outj-patient	
Refractions—■
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other treatments—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Ear, nose, and throat—
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Treatments—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Ou1>-patient	
Surgical procedures.
285
139
10
112
2
221
1
146
73
118
1
74
1
34
11
18
14
540
87
266
10
124
1
184
2
270
75
76
1
2
10
Source : Ledger T.B. 75. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 39
INSTITUTIONS—SUMMARIES.
The full effect of the addition of the 90-bed hospital at Jericho Beach is
shown in
the figures on patient-days.    Last year Jericho Beach accounted for 13,807 of the total
number of 255,688.    This year the number at that institution increased to 33,062,
which brought the total up to 272,107, the figures for the other institutions remaining
substantially  the  same.    The  number  of  pneumoperitoneum  treatments
increased
considerably, from 68 to 685.    A decrease occurred in the number of light therapy
treatments, from 3,568 in 1947 to 1,949 in 1948.
Table 13.—Institutions—General Summary, 1948.
Item.
Vancouver.
Tranquille.
Victoria.
St. Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital.
Jericho
Beach.
Total.
Patient-days	
80,974
115,819
27,463
14,789
33,062
272,107
340
329
230
223
119
111
71
69
52
66
812
Discharges	
798
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
115
3,169
128
6,414
52
1,679
21
691
20
792
336
Refill	
12,745
Oleothorax—
4
Refill	
4
Pneumoperitoneum—
25
403
291
1
105
3
72
99
2
22
15
5
152
23
35
Refill	
650
533
Thoracoplasties—
Stage 1                   	
54
29
83
Stage 2	
53
30
83
Stage 3       	
22
25
47
Stage 4        	
1
7
8
2
2
1
2
3
Phrenic—
55
2
4
6
1
65
Recrush	
3
7
7
43
84
20
147
1
5
1
7
273
252
27
552
636
566
505
242
1,949
24
45
69
526
47
4
577
10
14
1
25
122
4
3
5
134
1
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70;   Admission Form
T.B. 78 and
Discharge Form T.B. 79. M 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
A decline in both initial and refill pneumothoraces occurred during 1948. The
number of refills done by the travelling clinics decreased considerably, from 251 to 87,
and this was enough to reverse the upward trend of total refills over the last few years.
Last year's reverse in the trend of total initial pneumothoraces continued, with a
decrease from 354 last year to 339 in 1948.
Chart 7.—Showing the Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given
by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive.
44       45      46       47       4
44       45      46       47       48 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 41
Table 14.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Total.
Initial.
Refill.
Year.
Total           Institu-
Initial.           tions.
Stationary
Clinics.
Travelling
Clinics.
Total
Refill.
Institutions.
Stationary
Clinics.
Travelling.
Clinics.
1944	
16,828
17,121
21,883
21,919
21,788
344                  337
327                  325
413        j        397
354                   350
2
1
5
1
5
1
11
3
1
16,484
16,794
21,470
21,565
21,449
10,375
9,678
12,347
12,698
12,745
5,841
6,892
8,799
8,616
8,617
268
1945	
224
1946	
324
1947	
251
1948	
339         1         336         1           2
87
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70.
Table 15.—Institutions—Patient Status.
(As of December 31st, 1948.)
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.*
Victoria.
Jericho Beach.
Item.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Cases on pneumothorax—
302
240
41.3
120
38.6
104
175
40.2
53
69.7
25
29.1
15    |    	
50    |    	
     1    	
Number.
Number.
Number.
Number.
Number.
Status of patients in residence—
Patients in residence, December
31st, 1948	
732
10
5
a
4
183
293
140
124
389
311
4
4
59
134
57
61
147
259
4
1
3
75
91
61
38
157
76
2
27
20
15
16
45
86
Cases with effusion with pneu-
Cases    with    effusion    without
Cases  of  tuberculous  empyema
with  pneumothorax	
Cases  of  tuberculous  empyema
without pneumothorax	
Cases with positive sputum with
2
1
22
Cases with positive sputum without collapse therapy	
Cases with negative sputum with
48
7
Cases with negative sputum with-
9
Cases  receiving  occupational
40
Cases supervised by teacher	
1
42
62
39
35
6
* Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.B. 41 and T.B. 71 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70. M 42
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
No great change has occurred in admissions to institutions during 1948. The
greatest percentage of admissions is still in the 20-29 age-group, but this has decreased
from last year's figure of 37.1 per cent, to 35.2 per cent. The total admissions decreased
9 per cent, to 814.
Chart 8.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Age on Admission and Percentage of Total Admissions in each Age-group, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
70    YRS.
0 OVER
JIM
il
44 45 46 47 48 44^5 46 4748 44 45464748 4445464748 4445464748 4445464748 44454647 48        4445464746
Table 16.—Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in each
Age-group, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Age-group.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number,
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
0- 9	
65
309
180
98
70
63
11
3
8.1
38.6
22.5
12.3
8.8
7.9
1.4
0.4
1
67
334
225
114
83
53
11
1
0.1
7.5
37.6
25.4
12.8
9.3
6.0
1.2
0.1
59
314
217
105
79
61
14
2
6.9
36.9
25.6
12.4
9.4
7.3
1.3
0.2
1
53
333
241
120
82
51
17
0.1
5.9
37.1
26.8
13.4
9.1
5.7
1.9
56
287
214
115
68
49
22
3
10-19	
6.9
20-29	
35.2
30-39	
26.3
40-49	
14.1
50-59                         	
8 4
60-69 :	
6.0
2.7
0 4
Totals	
799
100.0
889
100.0
851
100.0
898
100.0
814
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. f
In all age-groups, except 10-19 years and 60-69 years, moderately advanced cases
exceed minimal and far advanced. In the 10-19-year age-group minimal cases are
greatest in number, and in the 60-69 group there are as many moderately advanced
cases as there are far advanced.
Chart 9.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age
on Admission, 1948.
10-19   YRS.
20-29   YRS.
30-39   YRS.
40-49  YRS.
50-59 YRS.
60-69  YRS.
MINIMAL
MODERATELY   ADVANCED
FAR   ADVANCED
MODERATELY    ADVANCED
I I
FAR    ADVANCED
MODERATELY    ADVANCED
I I
FAR   ADVANCED
MINIMAL
I
70 C OVER   I MODERATELY   ADVANCED
r
FAR   ADVANCED
0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180
NO. OF  ADMISSIONS
43 M 44
department of health and welfare.
in the younger age-groups, female cases predominate in most categories, while in
the older age-groups male cases exceed female cases. For the 15-19 group, female
minimal cases exceed all others, followed by female and male moderately advanced cases.
In the 20-24 group, female moderately advanced cases lead, followed by female minimal
cases and male moderately advanced. The male moderately advanced cases are ahead
for the next age-group, 25-29 years, and females in the three categories of moderately
advanced, minimal, and far advanced come next in that order. Moderately advanced
male cases again lead in the 30-39 group, and female cases follow almost the same as
before, except that female minimal cases exceed female moderately advanced. From
40 to 70 years and over, male cases considerably exceed female in all categories except
one, the minimal in the 40-49 age-group. The greatest number of male admissions are
moderately advanced cases in the 30-39 age-group, the greatest number of female
admissions being in the same age-group, but with minimal tuberculosis.
Table 17.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1948.
Diagnosis.
Age-group.
a
|
el
J
s
g
>>
"OJ TJ
g o
«s
■a £
^ ca
•4
a
a
.   cfl
S >
B0
'u
A    -2
pa
'iH
■ag-8
_h SB
tfl
QJ
tfl
O
u a
A ci
+J -r-l
oo
aj
ia
O
H
o
H
c
O
0- 4 years	
 M.
F.
 M.
F.
10-14 years	
 M.
1
1
2
F.
2
2
1
l
6
8
15-19 years	
 M.
7
8
3
18
F.
13
10
4
1
2
30
48
20-24 years	
 M.
12
28
7
1
48
F.
2
35
39
13
1
1
91
139
25-29 years	
 M.
14
31
39
33
9
20
	
	
	
2
62
86
F.
148
 M.
13
49
55
48
16
26
3
4
87
127
F.
214
 M.
1
5
47
22
1
76
F.
6
18
14
1
39
115
50-59 years	
 M.
F.
11
24
5
22
6
	
57
11
68
60-69 years	
 M.
3
16
5
18
3
3
1
40
9
F.
49
 M.
1
12
7
      1     	
20
F.
1
1
2
22
Not stated	
 M.
F.
 M.
	
	
1
1
1
2
1
3
Totals	
2
66
229
106
1
8
412
F.
2
136
161
88
1
2
12
402
4
202
390
194
1       I            3
20
814
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 45
There has been a marked decrease in the number of British males admitted to
tuberculosis institutions, from 331 in 1947 to 223 in 1948. The number of Europeans
admitted, both males and females, has increased from 197 to 272.
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1948.
-
Diagnosis.
Racial Origin.
Primary.
Minimal.
Moderately advanced.
Far advanced.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion.
Other
Diagnoses.
Total.
British races*   M.
F.
T.
2       |        38
2        |        86
4               124
130
95
225
50
50
100
2
2
3
5
8
223
240
463
European races  M.
F.
T.
19      j         81
45      |        53
64              134
35
26
61
1
1
5
7
12
141
131
272
Chinese  M.
F.
T.
7 11
1                  2
8 |        13
19
3
22
37
6
43
Japanese M.
F.
T.
1
1
1
1
Hindu M.
F.
T.
....        |           1      |           2
....        !           1      |          2
1
1
3
1
4
Half-breed and Indian  M.
F.
T.
....        i           1                   4
3 |        10
4 14
1
7
8
1
1
6
21
27
Not stated  M.
F.
T.
••■•        1             1           1
1                  1
1       j           2
1
1
1
3
4
Totals    M.
F.
2        |         66       j       229
2               136              161
106
88
1
1
2
8
12
412
402
i                   l
4        1       202       1       390       1       194
1
3
20
814
* Includes United States.
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1948.
Diagnosis.
Type of Case.
Primary.
Minimal.
Moderately advanced.
Far advanced.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion.
Other
Diagnoses.
Total
by Sex.
Total.
New  case  M.
F.
F.
Readmission    M.
F.
2
1
1
52
96
2
25
12
15
130
96
19
20
80
45
55
43
2
12
49
33
1
1
2
3
5
7
1
243
243
28
65
141
94
486
93
235
Totals  M.
F.
2
2
i
66              229              106
136               161                 88
1
1
2
8
12
412
402
1                     1                     1
4        1       202       1       390       1       194
1       1         3
20
	
814
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B, 78. M 46
department of health and welfare.
It is encouraging to note that both the number and percentage of far advanced
cases admitted to institutions in 1948 declined considerably from the figures of 1947.
In 1947 a total of 145 cases, or 26.6 per cent., were admitted as far advanced; in 1948
the number decreased to 98, the percentage to 20.2. The percentage of both minimal
and moderately advanced cases increased.
Table 20.-
—First Admissions
by Institution and
Diagnosis, 1948.
Total.
Institution.
Diagnosis.
Trar
quille.
Vancouver.*
Victoria.
Jericho Beach.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
3
148
226
98
4
7
0.6
30.5
46.5
20.2
0.8
1.4
1
62
79
21
3
5
0.6
36.3
46.2
12.3
1.7
2.9
1
50
100
68
1
0.5
22.7
45.4
30.9
0.5
1
29
32
5
1
1.5
42.6
47.1
7.3
1.5
7
15
4
1
25.9
55.6
14.8
3 7
Totals	
486
100.0
171
100.0
220
100.0
68
100.0
27
100 0
1
* Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 47
Chart 10.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Institution
and Diagnosis, 1948.
NO.   OF FIRST
ADMISSIONS
250
200
150
100
50
TOTAL
TRANQUILLE
 i
VANCOUVER   j !
VICTORIA
MINIMAL MOD. ADV. FAR   ADV. OTHER   DIAG Chart 11.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage
Distribution) for the Years 1944 to 1948, inclusive. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 49
Table 21.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution) for the
Years 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Diagnosis.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
3
164
211
140
7
11
0.6
30.6
39.4
26.1
1.3
2.0
1
181
238
158
8
25
0.2
29.6
39.0
25.9
1.3
4.0
3
156
228
130
6
11
0.6
29.2
42.7
24.3
1.1
2.1
5
137
241
145
6
12
0.9
25.1
44.1
26.6
1.1
2.2
3
148
226
98
4
7
0.6
Minimal	
30.5
46.5
20.2
0.8
Other diagnoses	
1.4
Totals	
536
100.0
611
100.0
534
100.0
546
100.0
486
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
The situation noted last year, of a large percentage of the patients having to wait
longer than one month before admission to an institution, continues increasedly this
year.    The only remedy for this is the provision of more facilities for treatment.
Table 22.-
-First Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Time between Application
and Admission, 1948.
Length of Time between Application and Admission.
Diagnosis.
>
u
0)
JH.J3
■a c
a o
DS
•is
■si
fit
3
CO O
C
■* o
O.S
J3
c
•J.   o
oj
fit
Tg
oj
J3
A
■*->
C
CO  o
oj
OS
is
Oifi)
oS
j_cfl
r°  *»
*""S
o
EH
F.
F.
F.
Far advanced  M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion M.
F.
F.
1
4
10
13
9
11
8
1
1
1
1
19
28
54
34
26
19
1
1
1
14
29
34
28
10
7
1
1
1
8
13
16
10
4
4
1
1
6
5
11
4
4
2
i
4
2
6
2
6
2
1
2
l
l
l
2
1
52
96
130
96
55
43
1
1
2
3
4
3
148
226
98
1
3
7
F.
30
28
101
84
59  | 29
66  j 28
21
11
3
12
9
2
3
243
243
58
185
125   1  57
32
15
9
2
3
486
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. M 50
department of health and welfare.
Chart 12.—Showing the Institutional Patient-days of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control for the Years 1939 to 1948, inclusive.
280
260
240
220
200
180
160
140
120
80
40
20
- y.
TRANCU
HUE
A
*
4*
/'
— _ _
"^ 4sm
VANC
OUVER
.
\s*~
■"'
^
VICTO
RIA
I
1939 40 41 42
44 45 46 47 1948 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 51
The number of institutional patient-days continues to increase. The effect of the
opening of the Jericho Beach unit in July, 1947, was fully felt in 1948, that institution
accounting for 33,062 patient-days during the year.
Table 23.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control for the Years 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
1944	
1945	
222,822
226,994
244,264
255,688
272,107
122,298
117,866
121,197
118,545
115,819
75,562
83,111
96,503
110,584
128,825
24,962
26,017
1946	
1947	
26,564
26,559
1948	
27,463
Source: Institutional Summary, 1948.
Table 24.—Admissions to Institutions by Year of Arrival in British Columbia,
Diagnosis and Type of Case, 1948.
Diagnosis.
Year and Type of Case.
Primary.
Minimal.
Moderately advanced.
Far advanced.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion.
Other
Diagnoses.
Totals.
New—■
Prior to 1941	
2
1
	
97
3
8
2
3
9
15
6
3
2
166
4
5
3
7
12
12
10
4
3
79
2
1
3
2
5
2
2
2
1
2
1
6
1
351
1941	
1942	
7
16
1943	
6
1944	
13
1945	
23
1946	
1947                    	
34
18
1948	
10
8
Totals	
3
148
226
98
1
3
7
486
Review—
Prior to 1941          	
1
25
1
1
29
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
12
1
1
7
5
74
1941     . ..               	
1
1942	
1943                               	
1
1
1944	
1945    	
3
1
1946 	
2
1947    .               	
3
1948	
1
6
Totals       	
1
27
39
14
12
93
Readmission—
Prior to 1941	
21
1
1
2
1
1
103
6
4
3
1
2
3
2
1
72
1
2
2
1
1
3
196
1941	
1942              	
7
5
1943	
6
1944            	
3
1945    	
3
1946	
1
6
1947	
1948    ...
3
1
5
Totals	
27
125
82
1
235
Grand totals	
4
202
390
194
1
3
20
814
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. M 52
department of health and welfare.
INSTITUTIONS—DISCHARGES.
Chart 13.—Showing Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
1944 to 1948, inclusive.
PER  CENT
40
0
0
0
0
0
*"-...
QUIESCENT
0
0
0
"■I*
"""---
V^        APR    AR
/
RESTED /
/
.^
■N
ARRESTED
^^
-
DE
AD
IMPROVED
A\
UNIMP
\
•v
\
ROVED          \
A
4-
"->*	
,'              	
_„--• '
Table 25.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Condition.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
1946.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
1948.
No.
Per
Cent.
Arrested	
Apparently arrested..
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Dead	
Other diagnoses	
Totals	
27
109
273
124
62
158
28
781
3.5
14.0
34.9
15.9
7.9
20.2
3.6
100.0
23
104
269
126
78
182
36
2.8
12.7
32.9
15.4
9.5
22.3
4.4
29
79
269
154
32
818
100.0
839
3.5
9.4
32.0
18.4
10.5
22.4
3.8
28
125
265
79
89
195
29
3.5
15.4
32.7
9.8
11.0
24.0
3.6
100.0
810
100.0
20
112
313
106
86
148
31
816
2.5
13.7
38.4
13.0
10.5
18.1
100.0
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.                                        M 53
An increase occurred this year in the number discharged as quiescent.    Last year
265 in this category were discharged, while the number increased to 313 in 1948.
A percentage of 54.9 of the persons discharged were in a quiescent condition of tuberculosis or better.    Last year the percentage was 51.6.    The number discharged as dead
in 1947 was 195, compared to 148 this year.
Table 26.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1948.
Condition on Discharge.
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions.
Under 1
Month.
1-4
Months.
4-8
Months.
8-12
Months.
1-2
Years.
2-3
Years.
3-5
Years.
Over 5
Years.
Not admitted
before.
Total
by Sex.
Total.
Apparently cured       ...M.
F.
Arrested    M.
F.
Apparently arrested ...M.
F.
Quiescent   M.
F.
Active improved  M.
F.
Active unimproved    .  M.
F.
Dead    M.
F.
Non-pulmonary  M.
F.
Non-tuberculous    M.
F.
Undiagnosed  M.
F.
Totals  M.
F.
Grand totals	
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
5
7
3
2
1
4
2
1
2
4
4
22
9
3
1
5
4
7
6
5
3
8
11
4
2
5
1
7
5
1
1
1
3
5
15
24
1
3
9
6
10
6
1
1
2
2
1
1
11
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
6
4
2
1
7
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
6
5
51
26
101
84
34
47
31
18
60
26
3
2
6
11
3
2
2
1
10
10
70
42
160
153
44
62
55"
31
98
50
4
2
6
11
3
2
3
20
112
313
106
86
148
6
17
5
3
3
14
15
42
26
29
22
40
46
8
16
15
11
6
4
295
221
452
364
6
29
68
51
86    j     24
1
26
10
516
816
Source: Institutions,
Discharge
, Form T
.B. 79. M 54
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Last Stay in Institution, 1948.
Length of Last Stay in Institution.
Condition on Discharge.
Under 1
Month.
1-4
Months.
4-8
Months.
8-12
Months.
1-2
Years.
2-3
Years.
3-5
Years.
Over 5
Years.
Not
stated.
Total
by Sex.
Total.
Apparently cured M.
F.
Arrested    M.
F.
Apparently arrested ...M.
F.
Quiescent  M.
F.
Active improved  M.
F.
Active unimproved       M.
F.
Dead    M.
F.
Non-pulmonary  M.
F.
Non-tuberculous    M.
F.
Undiagnosed   M.
F.
1
1
3
4
10
12
33
2
5
15
7
27
13
2
4
7
2
2
1
3
5
2
24
26
9
9
13
8
14
9
2
1
2
3
1
3
7
6
38
34
10
14
11
4
15
6
1
1
3
1
15
8
33
29
13
13
5
6
9
6
2
2
29
10
41
1
1
1
3
7
3
3
3
1
7
3
....
3
2
5
2
1
2
1
10
10
70
42
160
153
44
62
55
31
98
50
4
2
6
11
3
2
3
20
112
24
9
16
7
5
18
10
...
...
3
1
2
1
7
2
1
1
1
313
106
86
148
6
17
5
Totals  M.
F.
69
81
71              84
61              66
78
63
106     j      24     j      17
67     |      14              9
3
3
452
364     |     	
Grand totals	
150       |     132
1
150
141
173           38           26
!
6
816
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79.
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Home Condition, 1948.
Condition on Discharge.
Active.
0J
o
UJ
OJ
Inactive.
-6
h
a
c
o
S
a
a
W*
3
O
u
u
CD
A
+->
0>
o
d
60
cS
OJ
to
>,
XI
*rt
Home Condition.
T3
>
O
T3
OJ
>
o
u
a
S
t
QJ
Is
n w
G
Ol
ri        .
n.T3
a o>
*3
1
a
X
s
a
ri
<
<§
OJ
P
o
X
O
X
a
X
O
o
Satisfactory 	
M
37
36
141
9
64
i
4
2
2
3
299
F.
50
20
144
10
39
i
1
1
7
2
275
574
M,
3
2
8
9
4
1
1
16
12
F.
28
M
4
10
11
2
15
8
1
5
3
i
94
49
2
1    ■
4
4
137
77
F.
M
214
Totals 	
44
55
160
10
70
2
98
4
6
3
452
F.
62
31
153
10
42
1
50
2
11
2
364
106
86
313
20
112
3
1
148     I       6
17
5
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 55
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M 57
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A M 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS.
The increasing trend in known cases of tuberculosis, which was noted last year,
has continued this year. In 1947 there were 15,408 known cases of tuberculosis in the
Province; the figure this year is 16,812. The known cases among the other-than-Indian
population increased 8.2 per cent., from 13,430 to 14,528, while the number of known
Indian cases increased 15.5 per cent., from 1,978 to 2,284.
Table 32.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Area
1.
1
Area   I   Area
2.             3.
|
Area  I Area
4.            5.
Area
6.
Area   I   Area   1   Area   1   Area         r*ia
7*       |      8*      1      9*       j     10*       sta?ed.
Total.
Total, 1944	
161
173
238
250
287
469     |     423
595    1    530
622     |     586
743    [    739
768    |    767
6,948  [ 1,608
7,757 [ 1,928
8,251  |  1,976
8,802  |  2,230
9,399  | 2,447
581
620
743
795
832
1         1         !
191     |     467     |     411     |       42
238    [    535     j    519    j      46
274     |     529     j     525     |       57
302    |    513    [    596    |      63
364    |    662    [    719    1      79
1               I               I
168
175
268
11,469
1945	
1946	
13,116
14.069
1947.           	
375     1   15.408
1948	
488
16,812
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1944 to
1948, inclusive.
Year.
1               1               1              1
Area   i  Area   [  Area      Area 1 Area
1.      !      2.             3.      1      4.            5.
1               I               1         ■     [
Area  [  Area   i  Area   1  Area   !   Area
6.             7.      I      8.      1      9.      1     10.
Area
not
stated.
Total.
Other than Indians—
1944	
1               1               1              1
I               I
109    |    464    |    380    | 6,634  | 1,312
115    j    590    [    483    [ 7,382 | 1,580
184    |    616    |    540    |  7,875  |  1,653
205    |    739    j    687    j 8,385  |  1,867
239    |    764    1    714    1 8,978  | 2,018
1               I                              1
360    |      86    j    163    [    163    j      38
369     |     100     |     181     |     213     [       39
501     |     137     [     217     [     229     |       48
516    1    157    |    237    |    231     [      48
546     [     179     |     285     |     274     |       57
i                 1                1                 1
162
160
254
358
474
9,861
1945	
11,212
1946..                  	
12,254
13,430
14,528
1947	
1948	
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Ill
Area   I   Area   I   Area   I   Area  ]  Area
1.       1      2.      |      3.             4.             5.
1                1                1
1
Area   1   Area
6.      I      7.
1
Area   1   Area   i   Area
8.      I      9.      i     10.
Area
not
stated.
Total.
Indians only—
1944	
52    |      5      |      43    |    314
58    j      5              47    |    375
54     |       6               46     j     376
45    [      4              52    |    417
48    |      4      |      53    [    421
1               1               1
296
348
323
363
429
231
251
242
279
286
105
138
137
145
185
304    j    248    j      4
354    |    306    |   .   7
312    |    296    j      9
276    |    365    |    15
377    |    445    j    22
6
15
14
17
14
1,608
1,904
1,815
1,978
2,284
1945	
1946...                   	
1947*	
1948t              	
* These figures include 141 Indians of white status,
t These figures include 84 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and Cm
and Sex, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
M   59
of Residence
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
124    1      115
239
3
54
56
24
102
764
5
36
22
2
177
67
46
58
5
5
25
143
173
714
22
2
13
49
20
157
12
14
8
99
2
40
124
152
8,978
38
311
86
117
380
36
1
4
27
18
25
100
108
33
39
33
633
230
47
8
22
20
.154
2
11
221
5,972
Area No. 4—Continved.
West Vancouver	
68
100
1,128
19
3
1
5
15
10
29
42
20
9
78
17
52
6
44
2
162
3
386
225
299
124
6
10
4
20
9
126
95
2
93
162
4
5
34
23
4
6
11
75
149
112
4
4
29
26
9
2
3
12
297
49
85
890
30
4
1
1
9
14
40
25
26
7
54
15
31
3
46
2
82
3
309
188
247
105
3
3
14
1
13
2
106
84
3
3
78
123
6
1
4
31
11
13
4
4
49
125
85
1
14
25
31
11
4
4
12
177
117
185
2,018
49
7
2
6
24
24
1
18
33
10
62
412
2
16
13
1
94
43
26
25
4
2
12
85
89
389
13
2
9
27
11
90
9
8
5
53
2
17
57
86
5,014
19
177
48
54
210
16
1
1
16
9
12
61
63
17
14
18
314
134
31
4
12
12
79
2
5
121
3.396
2
36
23
14
40
352
3
20
9
1
83
24
20
33
1
3
13
58
84
325
9
4
22
9
67
3
6
3
46
23
67
66
3,964
19
134
38
63
170
20
3
11
9
13
39
45
16
25
15
319
96
16
4
10
8
75
6
100
2.576
Alberni	
Campbell River	
Comox	
69
Nelson	
New Denver	
Esquimalt	
Ladysmith	
Lake Cowichan	
Nanaimo	
North Cowichan	
Oak Bay	
67
46
16
132
32
83
Parksville...	
9
Trail	
90
4
Saanich	
Toflno	
Victoria	
244
6
Coldstream	
Enderby	
695
413
Area No. 6	
546
229
Kelowna	
9
Lytton	
Merritt 	
North Kamloops	
3
Osoyoos	
Peachland	
24
5
33
Salmon Arm District	
11
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 7	
Cranberry Lake	
232
179
3
Westview	
5
Abbotsford	
171
285
Chilliwack City	
10
1
McBride	
9
Delta	
65
34
Smithers...	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake	
17
Gibsons Landing	
10
15
Kent	
124
274
197
Stewart	
5
18
Mission District	
54
Area No. 10	
Dawson Creek	
Fort St. John	
57
20
North Vancouver District
6
7
24
474
Squamish	
8,095
6,433
14,628
Surrey	
265
229
49 d
Source: Case Examination,
Form T.B. 1. M 60
DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1948.
(Indians only.*)
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
24
10
14
4
3
1
34
7
1
1
5
10
10
208
11
24
1
4
1
28
3
2
3
1
1
21
8
6
3
11
80
195
22
29
1
3
24
9
15
19
7
1
2
2
7
213
1
6
21
2
3
1
30
1
6
1
1
35
5
6
2
3
9
2
78
234
12
27
3
1
48
19
29
4
3
1
53
14
2
1
7
12
17
421
1
17
45
3
7
2
58
4
8
1
4
1
1
56
13
12
2
6
20
2
158
429
34
56
4
4
Area No. 5—Continued.
14
1
3
5
6
6
7
1
98
142
16
10
6
3
4
103
85
85
175
5
6
164
220
4
216
10
10
6
2
17
2
6
8
3
14
9
2
128
144
20
12
9
12
6
85
100
100
202
1
1
3
8
189
225
10
1
214
12
12
8
2
31
1
3
2
11
13
9
21
Toflno	
10
2
226
Area No. 6	
286
36
22
15
15
Delta                 	
10
188
Kent                 	
Area No. 7	
185
185
377
1
1
8
Williams Lake	
14
353
445
14
1
430
22
22
14
1,103
1,181
2,284
1
3
4
* These figures include 84 Indians of white status.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 61
Chart 14.—Showing the Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of
Tuberculosis in British Columbia, by Age-groups and Sex, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
LEGEND
MALE -
FEMALE ■
TOTAL    -
□
__JIIJ1
5-9 YRS 10-14 YRS.        15-19 YRS
24 YRS. 25-29YRS 30-39 YRS 40-49YRS. 50-_9YRS- 60-69 YRS.      70YRSGOVER
Table 37.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, by Age-groups and Sex, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
Population.
0-4
Years.
5-9
Years.
10-14
Years.
15-19
Years.
20-24
Years.
25-29
Years.
30-39
Years.
40-49
Years.
50-59
Years.
60-69
Years.
70-79
Years.
80 and
over.
Total.
Total	
75.1
75.1
75.2
303.3
330.2
275.9
364.7
347.5
382.2
504.7
467.9
542.7
I
1.114.8 1 1.871.0
2,203.6
1,937.5
2,470.0
1
2.195.0 1 1.715.7
1,866.0
2,373.9
1,181.4
1,310.6
1,669.8
836.2
1,190.9
1,540.7
758.4
1,378.4
Male	
Female.	
975.5
1,248.0
1,795.6
1,943.2
2,365.3
2,000.0
2,155.5
1,197.0
1,477.3
1,271.3 M 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
In two age-groups the number of known cases of tuberculosis has decreased from
84 to 80 in the 0-4 age-group and from 1,042 to 977 in the 20-24-year group. In all
the other groups the number has increased. The percentage of cases under the various
diagnoses remains in much the same position as last year.
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present
Condition, and Age-group, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis.
Primary	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested	
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated	
Minimal	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested	
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated	
Moderately advanced	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested	
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated	
Far advanced	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested	
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated	
Pulmonary tuberculosis
(type not stated)	
Pleurisy with effusion	
Pleurisy without effusion
Far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis	
Non-pulmonary	
Totals	
11
80
128
9
28
19
17
7
20
28
24
1
13
1
15
100
9
35
10
11
9
11
15
43
2
11
12
7
1
1
1
49
239
75
9
39
4
9
2
1
11
147
10
22
32
27
3
28
2
23
68
1
5
10
7
3
20
1
11
12
2
1
3
1
2
23
4
2
73
5
37
6
2
3
7
13
454
54
119
102
69
18
65
1
26
220
4
24
44
40
14
82
2
10
72
5
7
14
4
34
1
7
33
15
25
6
894
147
322
192
84
35
82
32
430
16
90
93
92
1
11
126
7
17
22
10
10
51
1
47
24
13
12
1,998
603
720
286
142
81
91
4
71
879
86
233
183
129
50
165
2
31
332
43
79
57
48
20
78
2
5
55
28
15
114  |      194
 I	
977
3
1,632
548
540
200
65
59
46
2
72
651
81
225
95
86
24
108
2
30
283
33
75
31
40
16
74
1
13
75
16
5
154
1,677  3,526  2,733
1,089
403
402
129
41
36
35
1
42
511
74
177
77
79
27
15
197
20
62
17
27
56
7
53
7
1
5
82
1
1
1,073
420
367
138
27
38
23
1
59
481
53
173
64
69
17
75
30
157
13
42
15
24
6
50
46
7
1
9
57
1,949
1,836
329
125
120
44
13
5
7
15
176
29
67
19
23
9
17 |
»l
64 |
•I
21 |
5 |
12 |
5|
10 |
I 	
5 j  4
I
13 | 14
3|  1
622
U
508
46
174
54
50
26
55
1
102
7,721
2,355
2,664
1,171
483
282
382
14
380
3,498
347
1,014
597
531
186
635
16
172
1,290
125
304
159
179
72
77
415
107
49
26
914
151 j 144 ! 14,528
I    I
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 63
Chart 15.—Showing the Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-
than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Hatio
I
I
n l
i
A considerable improvement has occurred in the ratio of known cases of tuberculosis to deaths from tuberculosis during 1948. The ratio for the total population
changed from 28.9 :1 to 38.5 :1; for the other-than-Indian population, from 35.8:1 to
48.4:1;  and for the Indian population, from 12.4:1 to 16.8:1.
Table 39.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Total.
Other than Indian.
Indian.
Known
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
Known
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
Known
Cases.*
Deaths.t
Ratio.
1944	
11,469
13,116
14,069
15,408
16,812
517
525
576
534
436
22.2: 1
25.0: 1
24.4: 1
28.9: 1
38.5: 1
9,861
11,212
12,254
13,430
14,528
1
346      [    28.5:1
363       [    30.9: 1
369       [    33.2:1
375      [    35.8:1
300       1     48.4: 1
1,608
1,904
1,815
1,978
2,284
171
162
207
159
136
9.4
11.8
8.8
12.4
16.8
1
1945	
1
1946	
1947	
1
1
1948	
1
* These figures include:
t These figures include :
1947, 141 Indians of white status; 1948, 84 Indians of white status.
1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status. M 64
department of health and welfare.
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS.
A decline from 2,616 to 2,108 was registered in the number of new cases of tuberculosis this year. The number in the other-than-Indian population decreased to 1,555
from the 1947 figure of 1,971, while the number of Indian cases was reduced from 645
in 1947 to 553 in 1948.
Table 40.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Area 1.
Area 2.
Area 3.
Area 4.
Area 5.
Area 6.
Area 7.
Total, 1944                               	
27
16
86
43
44
87
140
110
163
78
80
119
105
192
71
1,196
985
1,308
1,087
988
269
393
320
416
382
112
65
170
168
93
42
1945                       	
55
1946                      	
54
1947                      	
71
1948                               	
74
Year.
Area 8.
Area 9.
Area 10.
Not
stated.
Ex-Province.
Total.
Total, 1944                               	
103
108
80
175
179
178
153
66
201
139
28
11
25
34
35
8
14
9
10
7
16
20
40
56
18
2,146
2,079
2,373
1945                               	
1946                               	
1947	
2,616
1948 	
2,108
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Area 1.
Area 2.
Area 3.
Area 4.
Area 5.
Area 6.
Area 7.
Other than Indian—
1944	
12
11
82
34
40
86
140
110
162
78
58
112
97
171
58
1,131
916
1,266
989
913
164
314
269
327
276
36
27
133
83
50
9
1945	
1946	
1947	
18
29
30
1948	
24
Year.
Area 8.
Area 9.
Area 10.
Not
stated.
Ex-Prov-
inee.
Total.
Other than Indian—
1944	
1945	
25
29
41
50
50
42
66
31
45
36
16
6
12
16
14
2
3
7
10
3
14
20
40
54
13
1,595
1,662
2,117
1,971
1,555
1946            	
1947	
1948	 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 65
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Area 1.
Area 2.
Area 3.
Area 4.
Area 5.
Area 6.
Area 7.
Indians only—
1944	
1945       .                        	
15
5
4
9
4
1
1
22
7
8
21
13
65
69
42
98
75
105
79
51
89
106
76
38
37
85
43
33
37
1946	
1947*	
25
41
1948| : .-..'	
50
Year.
Area 8.
Area 9.
Area 10.
Not
stated.
Ex-Province.
Total.
Indians only—
1944  	
1945
85
79
39
125
129
136
87
35
156
103
12
5
13
18
21
6
11
2
4
2
	
	
2
5
558
417
1946                       	
256
1947*	
645
1948f	
553
Table 43.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1948.
Population.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Total.
Total	
1.68
1.55
10.00
1.41
1.42
1.00
0.80
10.80
1.61
1.49
20.83
1.96
1.46
20.38
2.57
1.58
9.56
4.90
1.80
27.78
5.70
1.87
27.45
6.12
2.13
17.76
3.04
1.30
30.00
1.95
1.48
Indian	
19.75
* Includes notifications of 21 Indians of white status.
t Includes notifications of 27 Indians of white status. m 66                          department of health and welfare.
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area
Residence and Sex, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
and City of
Place of Residence.
Alive.
Dead.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
3
3
9
5
4
9
3
6
3
2
1
13
1
2
1
6
3
19
2
1
8
4
4
10
6
2
2
7
3
1
3
2
2
11
8
2
1
6
2
4
2
2
16
5
6
5
23
2
1
8
2
10
21
2
8
1
7
3
8
3
5
5
5
20
13
2
5
15
5
10
5
4
1
29
1
7
1
12
8
42
4
2
16
6
14
31
2
14
3
9
3
15
3
1
3
8
1
1
3
2
1
	
6
1
2
2
1
	
	
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
10
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
Trail	
2
5
7
1
1
137
7
5
23
1
1
3
18
8
4
2
28
2
1
2
104
2
5
15
1
1
3
3
3
1
38
3
1
3
241
2
7
10
38
2
2
3
21
11
7
3
66
1
5
3
1
48
11
Chilliwack City                             	
Delta                             	
Kent                             	
1
3                      2
3
1
23
7
25
4 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 67
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1948—Continued.
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence.
Alive.
Dead.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
341
21
2
9
3
5
1
284
7
9
110
3
5
4
2
18
6
6
12
42
12
1
1
16
1
2
8
5
10
1
2
7
6
2
4
3
3
8
5
1
2
11
8
3
5
2
3
5
5
1
1
282
7
1
10
1
5
246
5
7
90
3
4
1
1
12
2
2
9
51
5
1
1
18
8
1
5
1
3
8
1
7
1
1
6
6
2
1
1
15
9
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
5
5
1
1
623
28
3
19
4
10
1
530
12
16
200
6
9
5
3
30
8
8
21
93
17
2
2
34
9
3
13
1
8
18
2
2
14
1
1
12
2
10
3
3
10
6
1
3
26
17
2
7
1
1
1
1
3
4
10
10
2
2
34
2
31
1
6
1
4
1
2
1
1
6
1
1
4
3
1
2
	
40
1
35
1
9
1
1
6
1
2
1
1 M 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 44.-
-Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1948—Continued.
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence.
Alive.
Dead.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Area No. 7c	
Westview	
6
1
5
12
12
3
2
1
7
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
20
17
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
3
6
2
4
8
7
1
1
1
6
1
3
1
1
4
4
5
2
3
1
1
13
9
3
1
1
1
3
3
5
3
2
12
3
9
20
19
1
1
1
9
1
5
1
2
11
11
6
2
4
1
1
2
2
33
26
5
2
1
1
4
4
8
*
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Williams Lake	
1
1
Area No. 9f	
1
1
1
1
787
684
1,471
54
17
71
Ex-Province	
8
5
13 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 69
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1948.
(Indians only.*)
Place of Residence.
Alive.
Dead.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1                    \
Male.     1   Female.   1     Total.
1
1
1
4
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
16
1
1
7
1
6
20
1
2
1
1
15
12
2
1
9
8
7
1
1
1
13
1
12
9
5
4
1
1
9
2
2
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
16
6
5
1
1
3
22
3
3
16
16
1
1
1
2
2
1
8
5
4
1
1
1
10
1
9
19
11
8
1
1
1
1
7
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
8
3
4
1
3
1
2
1
1
32
1
7
12
1
1
1
9
42
4
2
1
4
31
28
3
1
1
2
3
1
17
13
11
2
2
1
1
	
23
2
21
28
16
12
2
2
1
1
16
3
4
2
1              *
1
1
1
1
Area No. 3b	
Penticton	
1
1
Area No. 4a	
Chilliwack City	
1
1
Maple Ridge	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
	
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
Vancouver	
1
4
1
1
2
Area No. 5c	
2
1
1
3
Torino         	
3
3
1
2
1
1
3
Unorganized parts	
3
* Includes notifications of 27 Indians of white status. M 70
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1948—Continued.
(Indians only.)
Alive.
Dead.
Place of Residence.
1
Male.     1
1
Female,   i
1
Total.
Male.     1   Female.
1
Total.
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
12
12
11
11
3
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
22
22
7
2
5
19
19
1
1
3
3
8
8
16
16
11
11
8
8
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
4
5
9
9
10
10
4
4
1
1
2
1
1
41
41
11
1
10
13
13
2
2
6
6
25
3
1
21
8
8
10
10
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
2
2
2
2
12
5
7
21
21
21
21
7
7
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
1
1
1
63
63
18
3
15
32
32
1
1
5
5
14
14
41
3
1
37
19
19
18
18
2
2
5
5
1
1
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
        1       	
1
2
2
5
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
Area No. 9f	
1
1
Area No. 10b	
2
2
7
Fort St. John	
2
5
1
1
234
|        267
501
25
22
47
2
3
5 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 71
Chart 16.—Showing Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial
Groups (including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1939 to 1948,
inclusive.
no OF CASES
4,-000
	
i
i
!
TOTAL     :
!
1           ^"-■«
WHITE
*^~
s
N.
/
INDIAN
/
s
\
/
.-.-*
\
/
/
<**
N
f
/
CHINESE
\
/
•s
/
%
_ „ —- -
.>*■
_>_>^
/
^
— -
/
~*^-
---..^
JAPANESE
l
"*«»
I
%
%
1
3,000
2,000
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
1939
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
1948 M 72
department of health and welfare.
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1939 to 1948, inclusive.
Racial Origin.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Total	
1,438
1,568
1,342
1,451
1,688
2,153
2,079
2,373
2,616
2,108
White	
964
1,117
945
1,016
1,163
1,446
1,519
1,973
1,864
1,448
Indian	
322
295
270
327
419
558
417
256
645*
553t
Chinese	
87
74
66
59
62
108
111
120
81
88
Japanese	
65
82
61
49
44
41
32
24
26
19
* Includes notifications of 21 Indians of white status.
f Includes notifications of 27 Indians of white status.
Source:   Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 73
The highest percentage of new notifications continues to be in the 30-39-year age-
group for the total population and also for the white population. For the Chinese
population the greatest percentage of notifications occurs in the 60-69-year age-group,
as was the case last year, but there has been a decline from 28.4 per cent, in 1947 to
19.3 per cent, in 1948. A change occurred in the most important age-group for Indians,
from the 10-14-year age-group last year to the 5-9-year age-group in 1948. The
greatest number of new notifications of Japanese cases occurred this year in the 15-19-
year group, whereas last year it was in the 30-39-year group.
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Racial Groups (including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1948.
Age and Se
White.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
ChIjNESE.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
Japanese.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
Indian.*
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
Total.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
0- 4 years M.
F.
T.
5- 9 years M.
F.
T.
10-14 years. M.
F.
T.
15-19 years M.
F.
T.
20-24 years ...M.
F.
T.
25-29 years M.
F.
T.
30-39 years M.
F.
T.
40-49 years M.
F.
T.
50-59 years M.
F.
T.
60-69 years M.
F.
T.
70-79 years M.
F.
T.
80 and over .....M.
F.
T.
Not stated M.
F.
T.
Totals M.
F.
Grand totals	
15 I
18 1
33 |
17 |
16 I
33 I
17
10 |
27
17 |
44 |
61 !
64 I
98 !
162 j
77
104 [
181
117 I
160 j
277 |
135 i
87
222 I
118
63 |
181 !
121 |
48 |
169 |
48 i
23 |
71 |
15 !
5 I
20 |
1 I
7 !
11
765
683
1,448
2.0
2.6
2.3
2.2
2.3
2.3
2.2
1.5
1.9
2.2
6.4
4.2
8.4
14.3
11.2
10.1
15.3
12.5
15.3
23.5
19.1
17.6
12.8
15.3
15.4
9.2
12.5
15.8
7.0
11.7
6.3
3.4
4.9
2.0
0.7
1.4
0.5
1.0
0.7
100.0
ioo.o
2
10
3
13
4
3
7
3
5
8
2
3
5
11
1
12
13
13
16
1
17
7
7
2
2
1
72
16
1.4
1.1
2 8
2.3
13.8
18.8
14.8
5.6
18.8
7.9
4 2
31.2
9.2
2.8
18 8
5.7
15.3
6.2
13.6
18.0
14.8
22.2
6.2
19.3
9.7
2.3
1.4
1.1
100.0
100.0
100.0
12
7
14.3
5.3
8.3
57.1
26.2
16.7
28.6
21.0
5.3
16.7
10.5
5.3
25.1
15.8
8.3
8.3
34
30
64
39
50
89
34
42
76
30
41
71
29
36
65
15
19
34
18
31
49
24
19
43
17
6
23
10
11
21
5
2
7
3
i,
4
3
4
7
100.0
100.0
261
292
13.0
10.3
11.6
14.9
17.2
16.1
13.0
14.4
13.7
11.6
14.0
12.8
11.2
12.3
11.7
5.8
6.5
6.1
6.9
10.6
8.9
9.2
6.5
7.8
6.5
2.0
4.2
3.8
3.8
3.8
1.9
0.7
1.3
1.1
0.3
0.7
1.1
1.4
1.3
49
49
98
57
66
123
53
52
105
58
92
150
99
139
238
96
128
224
139
194
333
170
107
277
149
69
218
150
60
210
61
25
86
20
6
26
9
11
20
100.0
100.0
1,110
100.0
553
100.0
2,108
4.4
4.9
4.6
5.1
6.6
5.8
4.8
5.3
5.0
5.2
9.2
7.2
8.9
13.9
11.3
8.6
12.8
10.6
12.6
19.4
15.8
15.3
10.8
13.2
13.4
6.9
10.3
13.6
6.0
10.0
5.5
2.5
4.1
1.8
0.6
1.2
0.8
1.1
0.9
100.0
100.0
100.0
* Includes notifications of 27 Indians of white status.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. M 74
department of health and welfare.
The situation regarding diagnoses of notifications of tuberculosis is substantially
unchanged from that noted last year. The greatest percentage of notifications continues to be diagnosed as minimal for the other-than-Indian population and primary for
the Indians. A considerable decrease occurred in the percentage of Indian cases of
pulmonary tuberculosis unreported until after death, from 13.6 in 1947 to 5.4 in 1948.
This year 59.4 per cent, of the new pulmonary notifications of tuberculosis among the
other-than-Indian population were minimal (843 out of 1,418).
Chart 17.—Showing Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1948.
/■NDIANS ONLY
Table 48. — Notifications of
Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1948.
Diagnosis.
Excluding
Indians.
Indians
only.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
76
843
324
103
54
23
97
17
18
4.9
54.2
20.8
6.6
3.5
1.5
162
111
112
36
30
43
42
17
29.3
Moderately advanced.
20.2
6.5
5.4
7.8
Dead, pulmonary	
Tuberculous pleurisy.
Dead, tuberculous
6.2
1.1
1.2
7.6
3.1
Dead, non-pulmonary
Totals	
1,555
100.0
653
100.0
EXCLUDING INDIANS
DEAD NON-PUL l.iy.
'Pill.
'D£AP/ isoa.
TBC. PLEURISY l.5°/.^-5%'
t-NOT STATBD I.Z % tuberculosis control report, 1948.                             m 75
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis on Notification.
Age-group.
oj'
H
Ul
u
<*> g
■si
i  A
Si*
"2
fit
CAr*
• 2
*■? «
COr^1
Sis
o> £
»0!?H
f §
tor*
«si
o >
00  O
QJ
O at
X to
■3
o
H
Pulmonary—
Primary  M.
F.
Minimal  M.
F.
Moderately advanced  M.
F.
Far advanced  M.
F.
Far advanced with silicosis M.
F.
Type not stated  M.
F.
Dead*  M.
F.
Total pulmonary  M.
F.
T.
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion        M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion..M.
F.
Dead*    M.
F.
Total tuberculous pleurisy  M.
F.
T.
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges  M.
F.
F.
Vertebral column  M.
F.
Bones and joints  M.
F.
Skin  M.
F.
Lymphatic system  M.
F.
Genito-urinary system  M.
F.
F.
F.
Other respiratory system  M.
F.
Other non-pulmonary M.
F.
Dead*   M.
F.
Total non-pulmonary  M.
F.
T.
Total notifications  M.
F.
T.
12
11
15
8
7
3
4
5
1
1
1
5
10
34
6
9
1
2
i
12
31
54
22
20
7
8
2
45
63
20
20
4
9
67
107
31
32
8
9
86
52
29
23
14
2
2
1
1
7
74
42
33
11
9
2
82
35
31
10
9
2
1
23
13
13
5
5
4
1
8
3
3
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
40
36
431
412
134
1
39
4
1
 1	
1
2
1
1
3
1
 1	
1
1
3
8
5
8
2
1
12
1
1
1
1
1
10
1
4
1
2
1
9
13
13
26
15
9
24
14
9
23
23
46
69
63
94
157
70
96
166
110
150
260
139
78
217
125
58
183
136
49
185
53
23
76
16
5
21
5
6
11
782
636
1,418
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
2
11
10
1
1
 1	
1
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
3
21       1
1
1
2
2
2
12
5
7
1
2
2
2
23
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
4
1
1
3
4
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
2
3
4
1
1
1
1
7
1
 1	
1
1
1
 1       2
	
2
2
11       61       1
15
1
6
2
1
2
12
10
1
	
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
 |	
1
1
1
 I	
1|       1
1)      2
2
1
1
 ]	
21      1
 1	
2
9
1|      2
1
1
8
2|      3
6|      7
8[    10
41      3|      6
 1      «|      7
4       7|    13
9|    10]      6
8|    12]      9
17|    22]    15
5
5
10
2
2
3
1
1
1
2
55
59
3
1
114
15|    18
191    16
34|    34
191    28j    70
10]     51]  103
29|    79| 173
81]  121]  146]  132
109[ 163]    88|    63
190[ 284] 234] 195
140
49
189
56
23
79
17
22
6
7
13
849
706
1,555
* Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. M 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1948.
(Indians only.*)
Diagnosis on Notification.
Age-gkoup.
g£
Pulmonary—
Primary  M.
F.
Minimal   M.
F.
Moderately advanced  M.
F.
Far advanced  M.
F.
Far advanced with silicosis M.
F.
Type not stated  M.
F.
Dead*  M.
F.
Total pulmonary  M.
F.
T.
Tuberculous  pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion..M.
F.
Dead* M.
F.
Total tuberculous pleurisy  M.
F.
T.
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges ...,M.
F.
Intestines  M.
F.
Vertebral  column  M.
F.
Bones and joints M.
F.
Skin M.
F.
Lymphatic system  M.
F.
Genito-urinary system  M.
F.
Miliary  M.
F.
Peritoneum    M.
F.
Other respiratory system  M.
F.
Other non-pulmonary  M.
F.
Deadt    M.
F.
Total non-pulmonary  M.
F.
T.
Total  notifications   M.
F.
T.
1|
27] 24
40] 32
67|    56
4|
11
5        5
4       5
91     10
I       1| |-
-I I"
-I I-
I      »|      2
-I I I
-I I
2|
•I
21..
1|_
1|..
7|      7]      5|
4|       6]       5|
11|    13]    10J
34| 39| 34] 30] 29
30[ 50j 42] 41| 36
64|    89 j    76]    71|    65
I I
-I I
9|       9]
»l       »l       --I I
-I I-
!|     i\
12| 16| 24
18] 28| 15
30|    44j    39
I        I
J.
17|    10
6|    10
23!    20
1|      1| I-
-I I !•■
•I- ! I-
■I I-
2|_
21..
■■I I-
•I I-
-I I I-
■I I-
-I      2I I I
-I I-
-1 1 I-
-I I-
■I I-
-I I-
-I I I-
-I I I-
-I I I-
-I I I-
-I I I-
I I I-
I      1| I I-
2| I-
■I I"
■I I-
-I I-
-I I-
-I I"
2|       2
1        2|       2|
3       41      2[
I I I-
15| 18| 24] 17] 10
19| 31j 19] 6] 11
34|    49|    43]    231    21
5| 2] 2
2 If 4
7]      3       6
78
84
45
66
57
55
12
24
15
15
207
244
451
19
16
5
24
19
43
-I I I-
•I I I
-I I I
•I I I
10
7
-I I I
30
29
5| 3| 3| 261
2| 1] 4| 292
7|      4|      7|   553
* Includes notifications of 27 Indians of white status.
t Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 77
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis
and Year of Arrival in British Columbia, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis on Notification.
Prior
to
1939.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
Not
stated.
Total.
Primary	
13
379
152
62
4
4
8
36
39
2
8
3
1
1
13
3
2
1
5
1
1
10
3
1
1
1
5
15
6
2
1
6
1
3
12
5
2
1
4
2
5
17
6
1
1
1
2
1
1
21
13
4
1
3
1
6
36
19
6
1
1
1
4
2
3
75
29
7
2
1
7
2
3
52
34
6
5
1
1
7
2
33
205
51
7
3
5
2
20
19
76
843
Moderately advanced	
324
99
4
18
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion	
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion..
Other tuberculosis of respiratory sys-
21
2
2
95
Dead               	
71
Totals        	
697
14
26
17
36
29
34
44
76
126
111
345
1,555
Source :  Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. M 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Chart 18.—Showing the Katio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis in British Columbia, 1944 to 1948, inclusive,
ratio
6
44  45   46  47  48      44  45  46  47   48      44  45  46  47  48 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 79
The improvement which occurred last year in the ratio of new cases of tuberculosis
to deaths from tuberculosis among the Indian population has not altered this year.
The ratios for all three categories have remained the same as in 1947.
Table 52.—-Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
in British Columbia, 1944 to 1948, inclusive.
Year.
Total.
Other-than-Indian.
Indian.
New
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
New
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
New
Cases.*
Deaths.t
Ratio.
1944	
2,137
2,059
2,333
2,560
2,090
517
525
576
528
434±
4.1:1
4.0:1
4.1:1
4.8:1
4.8:1
1,581   •
1,642
2,077
1,917
1,542
358
352
369
369
298
4.4:1
4.7:1
5.6:1
6.2:1
5.2:1
556
417
256
643
548
159
173
207
159
136
3.5:1
1945	
2.4:1
1946	
1.2:1
1947	
4.0:1
1948	
4.0:1
* Includes notifications of: 1947, 21 Indians of white status; 1948, 27 Indians of white status.
t Includes deaths of:  1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status.
t 1948 tuberculosis death figures are preliminary only.
Note.—Notifications and deaths of ex-Province residents excluded.
Table 53.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1948.
Population.
i
Area   1   Area   1   Area
1.      1      2.      1      3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area j  Area  I   Area
8.            9.      I     10.
1               1
Total.
Total	
4.8:1  | 8.6:1
5.7:1  ]  8.6:1
2.0:1  [   	
3.3:1
3.8:1
2.1:1
5.3 :1
5.2:1
7.5:1
5.2:1
6.3:1
3.0:1
3.8:1
6.7:1
1.2:1
5.5:1
3.1:1
5.0:1
2.8:1
4.7:1
3.2:1
5.7:1
3.8:1
4.6:1
3.5:1
4.8:1
5.1:1
5.0:1   1  2.3:1
4.0:1
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY.
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive.
Total Population.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
»£.«■
Mortality—
1944	
4
5
3
9
9
17.7
22.4
12.4
35.6
34.4
22
18
22
21
9
39.9
32.7
42.3
39.4
16.3
23
20
26
30
21
38.4
33.3
38.4
42.3
28.5
228
242
266
247
185
44.5
45.6
46.6
41.6
30.1
93
87
77
62
73
53.2
49.6
43.2
33.0
37.5
26
35
40
35
31
77.9
.106.0
117.3
100.1
85.6
14
12
17
19
H
87.3
76.2
119.4
130.0
72.8
42
50
63
56
56
147.8
175.0
213.6
185.0
178.3
48
44
43
32
29
247.6
235.4
203.2
146.0
127.8
17
517
1945	
12
525
1946	
1947	
19
16
9
170.5
126.4
177.0
144.6
78.3
i
i
576
528
1948*	
Mortality rate per 100,000
population—
1944	
434t
55.5
1945	
55.3
1946	
57.4
1947	
1948	
50.6
40.1
* Preliminary figures.
f Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents. M 80
DEPARTMENT OF  HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate pee 100,000 Population for the
Other-than:Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area,
1944 to 1948, inclusive.
* Preliminary figures.
t Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents.
Other-than-Indian
Population.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Not
stated.
Total.
Mortality—
1944	
1945	
1946	
3
4
2
6
7
13.5
18.3
8.4
24.1
27.1
21
18
22
21
9
38.1
32.8
42.3
39.5
16.3
17
14
19
21
15
28.8
23.7
28.5
30.1
20.7
210
223
244
232
175
41.3
42.3
43.0
39.3
28.6
66
55
53
46
52
38.8
32.2
30.6
25.1
27.4
10
16
12
13
13
34.2
55.5
40.2
42.4
41.0
6
2
1
2
42.0
14.3
8.0
9
8
7
15
10
38.1
33.8
27.8
58.0
37.5
9
9
8
5
11
59.9
63.2
51.1
30.7
65.1
7
3
1
9
3
74.0
33.4
9.9
86.9
27.8
1
1
358
352
369
1947	
1948*	
369
298t
Mortality rate per 100,000
population—
1944	
1945	
39.5
38.1
1946	
37.8
1947	
36.3
1948            	
28.3
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1944 to 1948,
inclusive.
Indian Population.
Area   [   Ar
1.      1      2
ea   !   Area
1      3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
■
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Total.
Mortality—
1944            	
1
1
1      1        6
....  |        6
18
19
22
15
10
517.7
533.4
628.6
422.5
277.8
27
32
24
16
21
575.9
666.1
492.6
320.3
403.8
16
19
28
22
18
388.5
450.3
661.2
508.1
400.0
8
10
16
19
9
459.2
560.2
918.0
1,066.2
500.0
33
42
56
41
46
■ 688.4
855.0
1,295.1
927.0
978.7
39
35
35
27
18
895.1
784.1
634.5
478.5
310.3
10
9
18
7
6
1,968.5
1,730.8
2,682.5
981.8
857.1
159
173
207
,159
136
632.5
671.6
784.1
588.9
485.7
1945	
1946            	
1
.... ]       7
1947*	
3      ]   	
....  [       9
1948t	
2      ]
....   |        6
Mortality rate per 100,000
population—
1944	
261.8  |1,17
255.1
6.4   |    607.3
|   592.9
1945             	
1946            	
277.8  |
|   634 6
1947	
835.7  |
1    797.2
1948	
500.0  1
....  |   500.0
* Includes deaths of 9 Indians of white status.
t Includes deaths of 12 Indians of white status.
1948 figures are preliminary only. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 81
Table 57.-—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1948.
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence.
Male.   I Female.
I
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female. I   Total.
I
Area No. la	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. lb	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Area No. lc	
Fernie	
Area No. 2b	
Trail	
Area No. 2c	
Nelson	
New Denver	
Area No. 3a	
Armstrong	
Enderby	
Kelowna	
Summerland	
Vernon	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 3b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 3c	
Greenwood	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 4a	
Abbotsford	
Chilliwack City	
Coquitlam	
Langley	
Maple Ridge	
Mission	
New Westminster	
Port Moody	
Surrey	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 4b	
Burnaby	
District Lot 172	
Gibsons Landing	
North Vancouver City..
Richmond	
Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5a	
Esquimalt	
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
North Cowichan	
Oak Bay	
5
1
4
8
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
16
1
1
1
2
2
4
1
112
2
1
2
106
1
2
1
29
1
1
17
1
2
2
1
1
4
3
1
2
2
1
1
8
1
7
11
1
1
4
1
1
3
1
1
3
2
1
24
1
2
1
2
3
1
4
1
8
1
151
7
1
2
2
1
135
2
1
47
1
1
8
3
1
Area No. 5a—Continued.
Saanich	
Victoria	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5e	
Port Alberni	
Area No. 5d	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5f	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6a	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6b	
Salmon Arm	
Area No. 6c	
Kamloops	
Merritt	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6f	
Lillooet	
Area No. 7b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 7c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8a	
Prince George	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8e	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8f	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8g	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 9d	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 10c	
Fort St. John.	
Area No. lOd	
Dawson Creek	
Unorganized parts	
Area not stated	
Totals for Province..
Ex-Province	
10
5
207
91
18
7
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
6
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
1
1
3
o
1
1
1
1
11
8
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
298
Source: Death registrations, 1948  (preliminary figures). M 82
department of health and welfare.
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1948.
(Indians only.*)
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
I
Male.   I Female.
I
Total.
Area No. lb	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. lc	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 3a	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 3b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 4a	
Chilliwhack District....
Kent	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 4b	
North Vancouver City
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5a	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5d	
Courtenay	
Area No. 5e	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5f	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6a	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6d	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6f	
Lillooet	
Area No. 6f—Continued
Lytton	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 7a	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 7b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 7c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8d - ,
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8e	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8f	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 8g	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 9b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 9c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 9d	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 9e	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 9f	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 10b	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 10c	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. lOd	
Unorganized parts	
Totals for Province.
10
10
4
4
3
3
1
1
2
2
6
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
1
1
11
11
5
5
4
4
1
1
21
21
9
9
7
7
1
1
11
11
2
2
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
136
* Includes deaths of 12 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1948 (preliminary figures). TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 83
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1948.
Excluding Indians.
Age-groups.
_3
c
H
>>
u
o
■gig
.-a >•
b^oiai
■Q
e
n g
T.B. of
Intestines
and
Peritoneum.
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■ T*  5
m _a
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-rl
ca cH
• o 3
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ajfi-g
T.B. of
Genitourinary
System.
O          M
EH oO
is 5
5S5
Under 1 year	
1
	
1
1- 4 years	
3
3
5- 9 years	
5
2
3
10-14 years	
3
1
1
1
15-19 years	
5
4
1
20-24 years	
22
19
2
1
25-29 years	
23
23
30-39 years	
45
40
2
1
1
1
40-49 years	
49
48
1
60-59 years	
56
49
2
1
1
2
1
60-69 years	
52
49
1
1
1
70-79 years	
29
25
1
1
2
80 years and over	
7
6
1
Totals	
300
269
10
3
6
1
2
3
6
Indians only*
Under 1 year	
8
15
19
10
20
22
8
8
7
10
5
3
1
3
12
7
17
18
8
7
6
10
5
3
1
2
**
5
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
2
1
20-24 years	
25-29 years	
30-39 years	
1
136
105
15
1
2
2
1
1
9
* Includes deaths of 12 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1948   (preliminary figures). M 84
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Both the actual number of deaths and the mortality rate per 100,000 population for
all categories showed a considerable decrease this year. For all but the Chinese and
Japanese groups the mortality rate is the lowest ever recorded in British Columbia.
The mortality for the total population of the Province dropped a full 10 points, from
51.1 per 100,000 to 40.3 per 100,000. The Indian mortality rate was 588.9 in 1947,
which figure declined to 485.7 in 1948. The death rate for the white population was
down to 24.9 from last year's figure of 32.5.
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and Orientals, 1939 to
1948, inclusive.
Total Province.
Indians.
Excluding Indians.
Year.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
1939	
552
578
533
558
613
517
525
576
792,000
805,000
817,861
870,000
900,000
932,000
949.000
1,003,000
69.7
71.8
65.2
64.1
68.1
55.5
55.3
57.4
51.1
40.3
199      |       23,449
203                 23 K8S
848.7
862.4
736.4
705.9
848.2
672.2
671.6
1
353             768.551
45.9
1940      	
375
359
388
405
348
352
369
375
300
781,462
794,233
845,920
875,478
906,861
923,242
48.0
1941    	
174
170
208
169
173
23,628
24,080
24,522
25,139
25 758
45.2
1942    	
45.9
1943	
46.3
1944    	
38.4
1945
38.1
1946	
207
26,400
784.1
976.6nn
37.8
1947             	
534
1.044.000
159*
13Gt
27,000
28,000
588.9
485.7
1,017 000             36.9
1948	
436      |  1,082,000
1
1,054,000             28.5
1
Chinese.
Japanese.
Excluding Indians and
Orientals.
Year.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
1939	
1940	
42
45
23
44
36
41
40
44
40
33
20,323
19,471
18,619
17,767
16,915
16,063
15,848
15,600
15,400
15,200
206.7
231.1
123.5
247.6
212.8
255.2
252.4
282.1
259.7
217.1
18      |        22,118
29               9.9 107
81.4
131.2
293
301
321
320
345
297
296
312
323
257
726,110
739,884
753,518
809,053
842,460
875,188
892,699
954,000
994,600
1,031,800
40.4
1941	
15              22,096             67.9
24                  IP 100       !      125.6
1942	
1943    	
24               16,103
10      [        15,610
16              14,695
13                7,000
12                7,000
in              7nnn
149.0
64.1
108.9
185.7
171.4
142.9
1944	
1945 	
1946	
1947	
32.5
24.9
1948	
* Includes deaths of 9 Indians of white status.
t Includes deaths of 12 Indians of white status.
Note.—"Indian deaths" includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians
under the meaning of the " Indian Act " or not, except in 1943 to 1948 deaths, where the term applies only to
deaths of Indians under the meaning of the " Indian Act."
Source: Mortality—Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1939 to 1947, inclusive (1948 death registrations preliminary only).
Estimated population (1941 census figures) : Dominion Bureau of Statistics estimates of total population.
Division of Vital Statistics estimates of Indian population. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 85
Chart 19.—Showing the Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and
Japanese Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and Orientals,
1939 to 1948, inclusive.
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
.
INDIANS
+*
^
/
C
HINESE
-^
^^
\
\
\
/
/
/
/
JAP
4+
ANESE
\
\
/
/
/
/
■^
/
\
/
\
/
\
/
/
\
/
/
\
f
\
/
/
/
\
\
-«.         \
/
\
/
/
 —
	
EXCLUDING   INDIANS
■».
EXCLUDING
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90
80
70
60
50
40
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10
1939 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 194B M 86
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M 87
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Chart 22.—Showing Tuberculosis Deaths for the Other-than-Indian Population
and the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1948.
EXCLUDING   INDIANS
/        DEATHS IN
HOMES
"*•                               /
30.7 %
T.B.  INST/
42 DEATHS
.7%      /
/ DEATH id	
DEATHS IN
MENTAL INST.J,
HOSPITALS
2.2 % <r~
66.4 y.
3 DEATHS     \
31 DEATHS
INDIANS   ONLY
There was an increase this year in the percentage of other-than-Indian deaths
occurring in mental institutions and in the home. Deaths in mental institutions
increased from 6.4 per cent, last year to 9 per cent, in 1948, and deaths in the home
increased from 14.2 per cent, to 16.3 per cent. The other two groups showed a decrease,
deaths in hospitals declining from 28.9 per cent, to 27 per cent., and deaths in tuberculosis institutions from 50.5 per cent, to 47.7 per cent. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 89
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DEPARTMENT  OF  HEALTH AND WELFARE.
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TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 91
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Sex and Age-groups,
1939 to 1948, inclusive.
Age-group 0-9 Years.
Male.
Female.
Year.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
1939	
8
8
5
9
4
13
9
9
7
4
50.9
52.5
54.8
60.6
65.4
71.0
75.7
80.3
87.3
91.7
15.7
15.2
9.1
14.9
6.1
18.3
11.9
11.2
8.0
4.4
7
6
3
4
3
3
7
9
2
5
49.0
50.5
52.9
58.4
62.7
68.4
73.1
77.3
82.7
87.8
14.3
1940	
1941	
11.9
5.7
1942	
6.8
1943	
4.8
1944	
4.4
1945	
9.6
1946	
11.6
1947	
2.4
1948	
5.7
Age-group 10-19 Years.
1939	
1
11   |
3   !
10 j
13   |
11 I
6   1
2   f
6   1
*   1
1
63.0
62.5
61.7
63.2
63.3
63.4
63.2
66.8
68.7
68.6
17.5
4.8
16.2
20.6
17.4
9.5
12.7
3.0
7.3
5.8
19 |
20 |
11 !
9
10
10
3   1
5   1
12 |
4
1
61.6
61.1
60.4
62.6
63.1
63.6
63.5
66.2
67.9
66.5
30.8
1940	
32.7
1941	
18.2
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
14.4
15.8
15.7
4.7
7.6
1947	
17.7
1948	
6.0
Age-group 20-29 Years.
1939.
1940.
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944
1945
1946
1947.
1948
27
21
38
46
28
23
31
31
39
18
65.8
41.0
66.8
31.4
68.3
55.6
73.0
63.0
74.6
37.5
76.0
30.3
74.5
41.6
83.0
37.3
84.4
46.2
86.8
20.7
35
41
37
42
39
33
34
33
36
27
66.1
53.0
67.7
60.6
69.6
53.2
77.7
54.1
80.9
48.2
83.9
39.3
84.7
40.1
87.9
37.5
90.6
39.7
90.9
29.7
Age-group 30-39 Years.
1939	
1940	
1
36
30
31   |
36
46
32
35   [
33
33
25
1
60.1
61.2
61.9
66.7
70.6
72.5
73.4
79.9
83.1
80.6
59.9
49.0
50.1
54.0
65.2
44.1
47.7
41.3
39.7
31.0
16
31
28
21
33
26
27
33
25
20
50.1
51.9
53.3
59.2
63.2
67.4
70.4
76.5
80.5
80.9
31.9
59.7
1941	
52.5
1942	
35.5
1943	
1944	
52.2
38.6
1945	
1946	
1947	
38.4
43.1
31.1
1948	
24.7 M 92
department of health and welfare.
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Eate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Sex and Age-groups,
1939 to 1948, inclusive—Continued.
Age-group UO-^9 Years.
Male.
Female.
Year.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
1939	
30
43
54.8
53.6
54.7
80.2
21
18
46.0
45.9
45.7
1940	
39.2
1941	
48
34
52.7
54.9
91.1
61.9
12
13
45.8
47.6
26.2
1942	
27.3
1943	
40
56.2
71.2
14
48.5
28.9
1944	
38
58.1
65.4
14
49.6
28.2
1945	
35
59.1
59.2
14
50.3
27.8
1946	
36
43
62.9
66.1
57.2
65.1
15
16
53.3
56.0
28.1
1947	
28.6
1948	
38
66.9
56.8
11
58.6
18.8
Age-group 50-59 Years.
1939	
61
56
53
53
61.7
61.5
60.7
61.3
98.9
91.1
87.3
86.5
10
16
10
14
42.4
43.2
43.9
45.4
23.6
1940	
37.0
1941	
22.8
1942	
30.8
1943	
63
60.6
104.0
11
46.1
23.9
1944	
54
59.8
90.3
15
46.7
32.1
1945	
48
58.1
82.6
9
46.9
19.2
1946	
48
47
57.9
57.3
82.9
82.0
9
6
48.1
48.8
18.7
1947	
12.3
1948	
46
62.1
74.1
10
52.8
18.9
Age-group 60-69 Years.
1939	
1940	
40
48
40
54
50
49
47
65
60
43
37.7
39.7
41.8
44.2
46.0
47.8
49.1
50.0
51.6
57.3
106.1
120.9
95.7
122.2
108.7
102.5
95.7
130.0
116.3
75.0
7
14
9
9
12
6
15
12
5
9
25.6
27.4
29.0
31.6
32.7
34.3
35.4
36.8
37.9
42.0
27.5
1941	
1942	
1943	
28.5
1944	
1945	
1946	
42.4
32 6
1947	
1948	
Age-group 70 Years and over.
1939.
1940
1941.
1942
1943.
1944
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
20
19.1
15
20.4
13
21.1
12
22.4
27
23.7
22
24.9
25
25.4
24
27.5
30
30.3
30
34.3
104.7
73.5
61.6
53.6
113.9
88.4
98.4
87.3
99.0
87.5
14.8
6.8
15.6
19.2
16.4
42.7
17.5
40.0
18.7
42.8
19.7
35.5
20.6
19.4
22.1
27.1
23.8
37.8
26.0
23.1 f
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M 93
Chart 25.—Showing Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-groups,
1939 to 1948, inclusive.
RATE
1939 M 94
department of health and welfare.
Chart 26.—Showing Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-groups,
1939 to 1948, inclusive.
RATE TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1948.
M  95
Table 66.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1948.
U'Ngth op Residence in British Columbia.
Place of Death.
■d
A
in
fit
M
A
<JJ
fit
A
A
•
.
•
•
i»
4J
c
e
a
fi
a
a
*H
J.
rH
H
U
JO
__:
o
5
a
S
s
a
a
a
>i
rH
tH
>H
{x
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o
O
h
IM
OJJ
Xll
IO
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eg
CO
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o
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Eh
Hospitals and other institutions	
1
9:
^
1
1
3
47
17
7
81
1
1
2
4
82
18
45
4
8
5
143
Mental institutions	
27
3
1
28
15
2
49
Totals	
1
1
2
1
4
1
4
8
175
81
22
300
Source : Death registrations, 19
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by DON MoDlARMID, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1049.
545-949-3930 

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