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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Seventy-eighth Annual Report 1948-49 By the Superintendent… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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 .
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Seventy-eighth Annual Report
1948-49
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTOHTA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiahmid, rrinter to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  To His Honour C A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg respectfully to present the Seventy-eighth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of the Province.
W. T. STRAITH,
Minister of Education.
February, 1950.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.
1948-49.
Minister of Education:
The Honourable W. T. Straith.
Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education.:
F. T. Fairey, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant
Superintendent of Education :
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
J. F. K. English, M.A
Greater Victoria.
C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
K. B. Woodward.
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister:
R. C. Grant, B.A.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
, B.Paad., John Gough, M.A
Greater Victoria.
William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
B.A., B.Pced., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schools in School Districts:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Victoria.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., E.D., Penticton.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Prince Rupert.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Telkwa.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., New Westminster.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Dawson Creek.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pasd., Nelson.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), Cranbrook.
W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.Pied., Trail.
V. Z. Manning, B.A., Vancouver.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Pasd., Kamloops.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Psed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Courtenay.
L. B. Stibbs, B.A., Salmon Arm.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Abbotsford.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Chilliwack.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS.
Vancouver:
A. R. Lord, B.A., LL.D., Principal.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Vice-Principal.
F. C. Boyes, M.A.
H. B. McLean.
E. B. Broome, M.A., B.Ed.
H. H. Grantham, M.A.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B. A.
Miss M. E. McManus, Mus.Bac, M.A.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
H. 0. English, B.A., B.S.A., Principal.
H. C. Gilliland, B.A., Vice-Principal.
D. B. Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus.
G. A. Brand, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland.
E. G. Ozard, B.A.
Miss Stella Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
Miss F. L. Burnham.
L. E. Brown.
Model School:
Miss Z. M. Manning.
Miss M. J. Macdonald, A.T.C.M., B.A.
Victoria:
F. H. Johnson, M.A., B.Peed.
H. E. Farquhar, B.A.
A. W. Johns.
Miss J. L. Eyres, B.Sc N  6 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS.
Registrar: T. F. Robson.
Assistant Registrar:  H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education:   H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes:   C. J. Strong, M.A.
Director of Home Economics:  Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc, M.A.
Inspector in Home Economics:  Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.Sc.
Director, Educational and Vocational Guidance:  H. P. Johns, M.A.
Director, Recreation and Physical Education:   Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E.
Director, Visual Education:  3. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc.
Director, School Radio Broadcasts:   Philip J. Kitley, B.A.
Director, Educational Reference and School Service:   Mrs. Muriel Scace, B.A.
Director, Summer School of Education:   H. P. Johns, M.A.
Director, Tests, Standards, and Research:  C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paad.
Director, School and Community Drama:  H. S. Hurn, B.A.
Director of High School Correspondence:  Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence:  Miss Anna B. Miller.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch:   P. G. Barr.
Accountant:   S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk:  R. D. Smith.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind:  C. E. MacDonald, LLB., B.S. in Ed., LL.D. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Superintendent of Education      9
Report of the Assistant Superintendent of Education    29
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver      32
Victoria     33
Report of the Director of Summer School of Education  35
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  41
Report of the Director of Home Economics  47
Report of the Director of the Division of Educational Reference and School Service 49
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  51
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61  (Greater Victoria)  61
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  69
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  71
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  73
School District No. 36 (Surrey)  74
Reports of District Inspectors     76
Report of the Superintendent, The School for the Deaf and the Blind  102
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  104
Elementary Correspondence School  108
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  110
Reports on Adult Education—
Industrial Education  113
Correspondence Instruction—
High School  120
Elementary School  120
Recreation and Physical Education  121
School and Community Drama  124
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  126
Report of the Director of School Radio Broadcasts  128
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  131
Report of the Director of Visual Education  137
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  139
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act"__ 142 N 8
PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
STATISTICAL RETURNS.
Page.
Number of Pupils enrolled by Type of School : —   9
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex -—.•_ ~———- 10
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools  10
Teachers' Certificates ■_  __  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education. __„___'_ __ .—..., 11
Comparison of Enrolment and Cost per Pupil to Provincial Government ^„_._^r 12
Cost per Pupil on Various Bases for the School-year 1948-49....- -..„- ,. — 13
Children of Foreign Parentage  14
Number of School Districts.— .'_ 1"1._1.1 .'„'. . __.___— 14
Number of High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District...______ :_ -15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each
District _ . _ ,  16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District _ 16
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in each District. .  17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, a-nd Pupils in
each District
18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
each District _______ __.  18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District.. 19
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  20
Summary of all Schools, showing number of Divisions, Teachers and Pupils  20
Number of Schools, Teachers, and Pupils in each Type of School  1_. 22
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  22
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  23
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1948-49 by Provincial Government  24
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1948-49 by School Districts __.___:______, 25
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts ~ _'__, 145
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  180 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1948-49.
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., Fehruary, 1950.
To the Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Seventy-eighth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1949.
ENROLMENT.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
146,708 to 155,515, and the average daily attendance increased from 129,859 to 138,941.
The percentage of the regular attendance was 89.34.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School.
Number of Pupils enrolled.
Municipal.    Mu^;rcfpal
Large
Rural.
Total.
Senior high schools..	
Junior-senior high schools	
Junior high schools	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools..... .-.
Totals	
7.804
6,018
3,407
422
1,629
37,674
6,423
13,617
1,546
1,475
3,135
1,335
48,254
56,854
74,785
491
2,925
891
5,920
12,884
221
544
765
13,718
22,560
4,953
2,366
9,698
2,864
99,356
155,515
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High Correspondence School classes, regular students
(exclusive   of   the   2,226   officially   registered   in   high,
superior, or elementary schools) r_i I     1,353
In  the  Elementary  Correspondence  School  classes,' regular
students      1,406
Under section 13   (g)  of the "Public  Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction  '_       [  48
2,807
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  3,673
Night-schools   14,292
Vancouver School of Art  738
Vancouver School of Navigation  206
High Correspondence School (adults only)   2,398
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)   208
Recreational and Physical Education classes   24,588
Carried forward
48,910
. N 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Brought forward .._
Adult education—Continued.
48,910
Summer School of Education (1948 session)   1,197
Normal School, Vancouver  316
Normal School, Victoria  170
Victoria College   416*
University of British Columbia  8,810f
59,819
* This figure does not include an enrolment of 92 in special evening classes.
t This figure does not include an enrolment of 1,678 in the summer session.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX.
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1948-49:—
Grade.
Boys.
Girls.
Total.
597
10,372
9,292
8,596
7,755
7,485
7,099
6,604
5,872
5,137
3,965
3,116
2,603
570
532
9,296
8,424
7,829
7,388
7,065
6,695
6,480
6,059
5,488
4,633
3,593
2,656
314
1,129
19,668
17,716
Grade III     	
16,425
Grada IV                                   	
15,143
Grade V                                     	
14,550
Grade VI                                   	
13,794
Grade VII    	
13,084
Grade VIII                                	
11,931
GradaIX                                    	
10,625
GradaX	
8,598
Grade XI	
6,709
Grade XII	
Grade XIII                      	
5,259
884
Totals	
79,063
76,452
155,515
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO THE
DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS.
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of
pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher
are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers.
Total
Pupils
Enrolled.
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment.
Average
Type of School.
Grade.
Special
Instructors.
Total.
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher.
431
698
174
245
605
943
200
88
351
93
3,157
59
13,718
22,560
4,953
2,366
9,698
2,864
99,356
8.82
14.51
3.18
1.52
6.24
1.84
63.89
31.83
32 32
144                     56
87                       1
325                     26
79                       14
Superior schools	
Elementary senior high schools	
27.19
29.84
2,995
162
59
Unclassified	
Totals               	
I
4.7K9         I               727
5.496
155,515
100.00
32.68 REPORT  OF  SUPERINTENDENT.
N  11
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Type of School.
Number  op  Teachers.
With
University
Degrees.
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools. ..	
Junior high schools...	
Superior schools	
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools
Elementary schools.	
Unclassified	
Totals	
491
669
143
11
123
38
305
19
1,799
Without
University
Degrees.
114
274
57
77
228
55
2,852
40
3,697
Total.
605
943
200
88
351
93
1,157
59
5,496
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION.
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year.
No. of
Teachers
employed.
No. of
School
Districts.
Aggregate
Enrolment.
Average
Daily
Attendance.
Percentage of
Attendance.
Government
Expenditure
for
Education.
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools.
1877-78	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3.956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4.833
5,116
5,496
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102.085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.66
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653.796.60
3,176,686.281
3,532,518.95:.
3,765,920.69.
3,743,317.08}
3,834,727.19.
4,015,074.37}:
2,849,972.02}
2,611,937.80.
2,835,040.741
2,972,385.04.
3,277,660.231
3,524,962.691
3,630,670.781
3,585,769.001
3,963,848.241
4,028,397.881
3,924,243.531
4,244,898.821
5,022,534.591
5,765,205.501
9,398,473.46}
12,468,653.18}
17,363,430.94}
1882-83	
1887-88	
1892-93       	
$215,056.22}
425,555.10
604 357 86
1897-98           	
1902-03            	
1907-08            	
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014 61
1912-13       	
1913-14	
1922  23        	
7,630,009.54}
1927-28      	
9,261,094.98}
1928-29          	
11,149,996.27}
10,008,255.66}
1930  31            	
10,061,387.99}
1931-32     	
9,719,333.81}
1932-33       	
8,941,497.34}
1933  34	
8,213,369.04}
1934 35            	
8,458,156.00}
1935-36           	
8,775,353.78}
1936 37         	
9,593,562.64}
10,193,367.08}
1938  39                	
10,640,740.47}
1939-40          	
10.521,684.92}
1940-41        	
10,982,364.49}
1941-42            	
11,120,801.94}
1942-43	
1943-44           	
11,502,291.35}
12,231,029.35}
1944 45           	
13,683,538.18}
1945 46            	
14,818,625.81}
1946 47        	
20,176,930.53}
1947-48            	
25,768,392.09}
35,538,079.88}
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
% This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. N 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL TO
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT.
The following table shows the enrolment during the last sixteen years and also the
cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year.
Total
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment.
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance.
1933-34               	
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119 043
$19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
27.82
28.51
28.82
$21.85
1934-35	
1935-36...	
1936-37	
1937-38	
1938-39	
27.92
27.14
32.25
33.13
35.59
34.46
39.51
41.67
66.17
84.21
109.42
1939-40	
1940-41	
1941-42	
1942-43	
1943-44	
1944-45	
1945-46	
1946-47	
1947-48	
1948-49	
125,135                          33.97
130,605                          36.56
137,827                          58.24
146,708                          74.54
155 515                                  0.7 7C REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. N 13
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1948-49.
Grand total cost of education .  $35,538,079.88
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment Victoria College      $21,975.90
Special grant to Victoria College        20,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  1,506,108.39
Normal School, Vancouver        92,906.17
Normal School, Victoria 1 i       72,048.90
Cost of night-schools        22,661.03
Correspondence schools—
High school     119,351.21
Elementary school        50,221.38
Adult education       251,870.13
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act  3,085.25
       2,160,228.36
Net cost for total enrolment of 155,515 pupils  $33,377,851.52
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  214.63
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on total enrolment  1.12
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 138,941  240.23
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on average daily attendance __ 1.25
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 155,515 pupils
for year  ($17,363,430.94—$2,160,228.36)     15,203,202.58
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  97.76
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (192 days) on
total enrolment  .51
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily
attendance   _'__ 109.42
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (192 days) on
average daily attendance  .57
Cost per capita for year on population of 1,114,000 (1949 estimate)  29.96*
Cost per capita per school-day (192 days) on population of 1,114,000.____ .16*
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
1,114,000   13.65t
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (192 days) on
population of 1,114,000  .07f
* Computed on the net total cost of $33,377,851.52.
} Computed on the net total cost to the Provincial Government of $15,203,202.58. N 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE.
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year 1948-49 was as follows:—
Type of School.
E
OJ
W
QJ
a
2
0
■§
O
to
C
a
J3
£
c
ed
-a
BQ
c
1
OJ
9J
QJ
a
a}
ft
QJ
w
C
.2
DO
3
C
.2
'>
ed
■3
c
oj
S
.2
'a
s
J_
Jh'
OJ
J2
i
<
o
0
St
fe
O
s
>■»
P,
«
CO
P
O
H
176
511
310
73
39
45
47
88
127
275
231
862
37
74
162
280
75
329
133
323
150
363
474
1,107
193
605
427
1,118
2,581
Junior-senior high schools	
6,053
Junior high schools	
72
41
11
12
35
27
14
24
4
23
35
111
53
67
529
37
200
2
59
22
8
11
37
30
145
328
320
3
1
12
189
45
201
21
117
33
107
117
383
31
130
212
292
904
Elementary-senior high schools..
2,189
Elementary-junior high schools..
34
17
10
31
12
2
15
21
29
128
29
58
386
Elementary schools ,
1,137
897
1,096
463
1,605
3,570
515
883
635
994
1,289
4,091
1,749
4,551
23,475
Totals	
2,167
1,399
1,221
668
2,248
5,350
646
1,565
1,289(1,632,2,006
1          1
6,411
2,790
6,725
36,117
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1948-49:—
Municipal school districts      7
Large municipal school districts  33
Large rural school districts  37
Rural school districts (unattached)   20
Total number of districts  97 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
N 15
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 13,718; of this
number, 6,614 were boys and 7,104 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1948-49 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
3
1
7
10
1
3
4
4
8
8
6
10
189
25
15
3
21
2
2
3
71
2
5
14
13
5
12
12
1
3
4
5
9
9
8
17
267
36
21
3
25
2
2
4
108
3
7
19
20
8
228
308
8. Slocan  	
30
101
99
116
156
240
150
326
6,466
845
493
43. Coquitlam	
72
649
46. Sechelt	
55
48
55
2,272
52
133
375
295
154
Totals	
40
431
605
13,718 N 16
PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
■■•■' The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 22,560; of
this number, 11,020 were boys and 11,540 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1948-49 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
15
19
4
3
38
18
28
7
31
38
22
6
42
24
54
11
22
78
27
22
21
14
16
15
14
11
9
16
14
11
22
20
6
22
23
4
3
52
22
38
10
40
47
31
9
57
35
68
13
28
115
35
28
28
26
25
22
21
16
11
21
17
14
29
27
7
482
521
86
96
11. Trail                         ....         	
1,327
473
805
197
22. Vernon       	
935
1,345
789
'   176
33. Chilliwack 	
1,50-4
771
1,820
37. Delta	
295
733
2,742
882
42. Maple Ridge	
723
612
595
47. Powell River	
495
456
441
384
62. Sooke Rural           	
256
63. Saanich	
423
423
316
70. Alberni	
691
609
157
Totals....	
42
698
943
22,560
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 4,953; of this
number, 2,464 were boys and 2,489 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1948-49 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
2
3
1
1
13
71
27
17
16
21
98
36
21
24
2,482
548
Totals	
8
144
200
4,953 REPORT OF  SUPERINTENDENT.
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS.
N 17
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,366; of this
number, 1,250 were boys and 1,116 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1948-49 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
2
3
3
3
6
2
3
3
2
3
26
11
6
3
3
4
6
3
3
3
6
2
3
3
2
3
27
11
6
3
3
4
6
75
83
72
13   Kettle Valley                                   	
128
18. Golden    ...                  	
37
60
80
49
59
946
16. Sechelt	
320
113
38
56
114
72. Campbell River	
136
Totals	
23
87
88
2,366 N 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 9,698;
of this number, 4,853 were boys and 4,845 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1948-49 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
31
5
6
6
15
6
6
4
11
10
10
5
8
18
12
14
8
4
13
15
17
3
3
5
5
6
11
10
19
9
13
5
4
8
38
5
6
6
15
6
6
4
12
11
10
5
8
20
12
14
9
4
17
15
19
3
3
5
5
6
12
12
21
10
13
5
4
10
991
158
151
13. Kettle Valley .         	
169
400
157
185
77
333
22. Vernon	
354
327
112
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel       	
272
616
315
30.  Ashcroft     	
387
31.  Merritt	
306
87
422
380
49. Ocean Falls	
540
61
67
133
173
58. McBride	
168
325
300
578
315
72. Campbell River	
433
73. Alert Bay	
106
79
221
Totals	
45
325
351
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 2,864;
of this number, 1,472 were boys and 1,392 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1948-49 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
2
2
43
36
52
41
1,529
1,335
Totals	
4
79
93
2,864 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS.
N 19
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 99,356; of this
number, 51,390 were boys and 47,966 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1948-49 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
6
6
6
5
7
7
10
13
13
7
11
5
7
3
3
3
4
5
6
28
8
9
13
27
8
8
25
11
8
5
3
8
14
13
17
30
6
8
47
6
17
8
12
7
3
8
8
3
5
3
1
7
9
8
15
6
29
10
30
7
27
22
7
23
7
37
24
26
13
82
21
9
25
32
4
11
6
18
39
20
40
65
51
8
9
27
11
12
6
3
15
65
47
48
97
20
58
727
57
115
35
49
52
28
16
32
4
5
3
1
26
16
16
17
8
52
11
46
7
28
25
7
25
7
38
24
26
13
85
21
9
26
34
4
11
6
18
39
20
44
66
53
8
9
27
11
12
6
3
15
66
49
48
97
20
59
833
62
121
35
49
52
29
16
32
4
5
3
1
26
16
16
17
8
53
11
47
150
943
886
185
94
1,249
613
849
414
11. Trail                      	
2,860
12. Grand Porks	
699
13. Kettle Valley	
155
876
1,197
88
342
16. Keremeos	
18. Golden	
115
1,045
22. Vernon	
1,565
23.  Kelowna	
1,452
26. Birch Island	
354
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
248
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt	
446
33. Chilliwack :	
2,342
1,740
1,645
3,845
744
36. Surrey           	
37. Delta	
2,328
42. Maple Ridge	
1 308
1,942
46.  Sechelt	
976
89
49. Ocean Falls	
93
53
12
849
404
387
252
158
1,324
58. McBride	 N 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued.
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
17
26
10
10
8
14
5
4
14
4
8
14
15
8
5
13
3
1
19
20
208
24
29
9
35
23
19
53
6
48
46
17
10
7
33
9
14
27
20
219
24
29
9
36
23
20
56
6
50
46
17
10
7
33
9
14
27
344
7,769
662
858
152
1,023
738
710
1,717
196
1,673
1,514
286
73. Alert Bay	
206
121
1,056
295
554
544
Totals	
816
2,995
3,157
99,356
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS.
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
39
1
19
Totals	
59
SUMMARY OP ALL SCHOOLS.
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
9
7
7
6
9
8
14
15
14
10
13
6
10
4
4
41
34
37
12
45
13
67
28
29
17
120
25
21
43
60
48
40
47
12
51
13
78
28
29
17
137
26
21
48
72     .
1,216.
1,171
1,368
1,312
6. Kaslo	
2,172
739
i     950
513
4,187
815
452
.,,1,349
2,002
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
15. Penticton	 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued.
N   21
No. and Name of School District.
Number of
Schools.
Number of
Divisions.
Number of
Teachers.
Number of
Pupils.
5
6
7
8
30
10
11
17
30
9
9
26
13
10
8
4
1°
16
17
18
33
7
9
60
11
21
9
15
10
4
12
11
19
24
14
29
51
37
81
113
81
10
12
35
29
24
20
11
25
107
83
72
151
31
80
1,078
109
200
57
73
109
42
29
54
19
27
14
30
52
40
95
123
92
10
'    12
35
31
24
20
12
28
123
93
83
165
33
87
1,369
134
229
63
80
118
54
29
63
19
24
6
4
.   48
21
20
22
16
74
17
64
32
367
35
50
21
60
30
34
99
27
79
76
36
15
11
60
16
22
37
488
696
337
761
1,362
1,168
2,854
4,094
2,433
168
207
626
806
563
480
354
709
3,846
3,012
2,416
5,665
1,039
2,850
37,765
4,098
7,296
2,031
2,430
3,926
1,629
810
1,584
469
633
114
50
1,305
519
442
385
387
1,765
337
1,502
669
10,589
918
1,281
452
1,612
871
1,026
,2,633
774
2,364
2,124
855
312
200
1,665
452
708
765 *
18. Golden....                     ,	
19. Revelstoke	
22.  Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
26. Birch Island   	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31.  Merritt	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford-Mission	
36. Surrey _	
37. Delta	
46.  Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
6
19
49. Ocean Falls	
7
4
2
8
11
9
16
22
6
4
41
21
19
22
53. Terrace _	
54. Smithers	
8
16
57.  Prince George	
30
11
31
18
66
17
57
31
58. McBride	
32
29<i
62.  Sooke Rural : :	
12                     33
12                     45
9                        19
63. Saanich '._ '...'	
64. Saltspring    ':.;. .
17
6
5
16
6
9
.; 18
18    .
9
6
14
4
2
20
55
28
30
83
25
70
68
36
15
11
53
15
19
35
67.  Ladysmith	
70. Alberni	
72. Campbell River '*.	
73. Alert Bay _ \	
Totals	
978
4,759
5,496
155,515 N 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, AND PUPILS IN EACH
TYPE OF SCHOOL.
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance
in each type of school for the school-year 1948-49:—
Type of School.
Senior high	
Junior-senior high	
Junior high	
Superior	
Elementary-senior high.
Elementary-junior high
Elementary	
Unattached teachers	
Totals	
Number of
Schools.
40
42
8
23
45
4
816
Number of
Teachers.
200
88
351
93
1,157
59
Number of
Pupils.
13,718
22,560
4,953
2,366
9,698
2,864
99,356
155,515
Boys.
Girls.
6,614
11,020
2,464
1,250
4,853
1,472
51,390
7,104
11,540
2,489
1,116
4,845
1,392
47,966
I
79,063 76,452
Average
Daily
Attendance.
11,711.61
19,855.57
4,477.17
2,146.56
8,686.23
2,630.61
89,433.71
138,941.46
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL.
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers showing less than $1,000
are excluded.
Grade Teachers.
Type of School.
Number of
Teachers.
High
Salary.
Low
Salary.
Average
Salary.
Senior high	
Junior-senior high	
Junior high	
Superior .*.....
Elementary-senior high..
Elementary-junior high..
Elementary	
Unclassified	
428
687
143
81
319
78
2,908
33
$4,500
4,300
4,220
3,800
4,840
4,070
4,780
7,284
$1,470
1,180
1,170
1,260
1,008
1,400
1,013
1,144
$3,394
2,734
3,131
2,117
2,383
2,299
2,226
3,614
SUPERVISING PRINCIPALS.
Senior high	
Junior-senior high 	
Junior high	
Superior	
Elementary-senior high..
Elementary-junior high..
Elementary	
Unclassified	
$4,594
4,367
4,580
4,016
3,790
4,387
Special Instructors.
Senior high	
Junior-senior high	
Junior high	
Superior	
Elementary-senior high..
Elementary-junior high..
Elementary	
Unclassified	
122
|  $4,380
192
4.402
45
|   3,808
|   	
15
3,534
7
3,392
83
3,392
1   	
$1,344
1,089
1.600
1,782
1,790
1,140
$3,133
2,765
2,903
2,645
2.448
2,508 report of superintendent. N 23
SALARY CLASSIFICATION.
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers and
teachers earning less than $1,000 per annum:—
Number of Number of
Salary Range. Teachers. Salary Range. Teachers.
$1,000-$1,099  13     $3,400-$3,499  110
1,100- 1,199  17      3,500- 3,599  78
1,200- 1,299  44      3,600- 3,699  87
1,300- 1,399  57      3,700- 3,799  65
1,400- 1,499  122      3,800- 3,899  65
1,500- 1,599  223      3,900- 3,999  64
1,600- 1,699  251      4,000- 4,099  65
1,700- 1,799  235      4,100- 4,199 :  34
1,800- 1,899  248      4,200- 4,299  71
1,900- 1,999  256      4,300- 4,399  37
2,000- 2,099  267      4,400- 4,499  17
2,100- 2,199  249      4,500- 4,599  19
2,200- 2,299  255      4,600- 4,699  23
2,300- 2,399  256      4,700- 4,799  10
2,400- 2,499  259      4,800- 4,899  15
2,500- 2,599  276      4,900- 4,999  8
2,600-2,699  268      5,000-5,099  7
2,700- 2,799  158      5,100- 5,199  2
2,800- 2,899  310      5,200- 5,299  1
2,900- 2,999  163      5,500- 5,599  6
3,000- 3,099  191      6,100- 6,199  1
3,100-3,199  126      7,000-7,099  1
3,200- 3,299  122      7,200- 7,299  1
3,300- 3,399  140 	
Total 5,293 N  24 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1948-49.
Minister's office  $16,018.07
General office  66,913.43
Text-book Branch   170,607.56
High Correspondence School 1  119,351.21
Elementary Correspondence School   50,221.38
Industrial education   57,981.61
Visual education  ;J  39,268.98
Inspection of schools . -  216,734.37
Normal School, Vancouver .  92,906.17
Normal School, Victoria .  72,048.90
School for the Deaf and the Blind I L 152,868.61
Basic grants _J  7,341,144.69
Boarding allowances — 8,676.55
Dormitory grants  '  5,747.50
Special salary grant paid under section 13 (g) of the Act  3,085.25
Teachers' superannuation (7 per cent.)  967,972.69
Special aid to school districts  4,000.00
Special aid to rural areas '.  1,212,121.93
School buildings and essential new equipment   4,158,511.13
Education of soldiers' dependent children  -  13,980.51
Examinations   49,601.56
Conveying children to central schools  ;  618,859.68
Summer School  : il'.  35,134.75
Adult education—
Extension and adult education  39,791.29
Recreational and physical education  .'.  91,650.77
Urban occupational training :  10,506.40
Rural occupational training  8,176.68
Student-aid bursaries   32,669.50
Re-establishment training  5,307.62
Apprentice-training    15,619.74
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement   48,148.13
School radio broadcasts  20,398.46
Division of Chief Inspector and Curriculum  12,448.98
Division of Educational Reference and School Service  15,740.15
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  29,805.02
Educational and vocational guidance  8,368.76
Incidentals and contingencies   24,934.52
University of British Columbia—
General grant  :  $1,448,520.86
Teacher-training    20,937.53
University Endowment Lands  36,650.00
       1,506,108.39
Special grant to Victoria College  20,000.00
Total expenditure by Government  $17,363,430.94
Amount expended by districts (including debt charges)     18,174,648.94
Grand total expenditure  $35,538,079.88 REPORT OF  SUPERINTENDENT.
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS.
N 25
.      :il     \. No. and Name of School District.       _   p
Total
Expenditure.*
Government
Grants.
District
Expenditure.
$212,472.54
188,010.78
395,541.81
55,620.68
501,028.28
46,348.75
380,786.65
j   -      144,329.10
146,706.03
72,508.40
540,940.16
115,283.83
144,383.44
555,005.15
418,636.15
108,814.80
93,493.75
48,378.74
137,963.49
198,499.21
167,388.03
481,840.23
481,327.08
358,773.48
37,427.92
46,805.66
156,143.51
149,823.67
106,046.63
148,052.45
60,892.32
182,860.54
870,267.29
374,849.24
867,481.55
834,755.26
151,802.39
552,306.08
8,248,133.99
1,434,266.02
1,304,435.43
257,428.64
309,290.63
479,260.29
474,706.87
115,295.59
523,911.11
74,745.12
231,433.50
•   18,294.19
11,638.58
.   i       201,428.68
79,510.93
84,955.09
72,736.46
81,504.48
397,825.61
65,942.15
7,12,883.95
207,172.37
2,128,220.59
212,637.67
204,626.28
62,917.45
$120,031.73
99,659.15
210,700.24
34,294.06
289,149.10 -
28,048.80
172,113.27
76.655.90
60,136.04
52,128.70
223,162.09
65,134.12
90,681.04
295,533.42
192,735:67
68,297.52
75,911.41
34,919.29
71,964.31
110,829.52
90,130.90
262,538.26
244,185.50
197,957.12
23,666.89
24,622.11
91,035.97
95,126.19
52,064.49'
84,652.34
30,003.04
112,190.51
414,995.40
219,764.08
429,311.99
426,890.92
60,451.64
252,988.80
2,335,859:59
569,061.67
570,056.48
122,833.56
131,175.42
231,024.30
163,395.61
50,958.19
240,033.93
28,857.65
94,931.41
6,462.96
6,772.86
67,801.99
56,729.42
58,333.86
50,958.03   .
56,764,91
201,884.22
46,053.68
378,518.19
.    .   .116,081.11
656,023.28
97,116.29
89,758.94
37,009.27
$92,440.81
88.351.63
184,841.57
21,326.62
211,879.18
18,299.95
208,673.38
8. Slocan     ..'  .'.'    :	
67,673.20
86,-569.99
20,379.70
11. Trail..... : ''::.	
317,778:07
12. Grand Forks !	
50.149.71
13. Kettle Valley	
'  53.702.40
259,471.73
225,900.48
40,517.28
17,582.34
18. Golden .....:	
13,459.'fe
65,999.l'8"
87,669.69
77,257.13
22. Vernon	
219,301.97
23. Kelowna	
'237,141.58
160,816.36
13,761.03
26. Birch Island	
22.183.55
27. Williams Lake	
65,107.54
28.  Quesnel	
54,697.48
29. Lillooet	
53,982.14
30. Ashcroft	
63,400.11
31. Merritt	
30,889.28
70,670.03
33. Chilliwack	
455,271.89
34. Abbotsford	
155,085.16
438,169.56
36.  Surrey .... :....
407,864.34
37. Delta	
91,350.75
299,317.28
5,912 274 40
865,204.35
734,378.95
134,595.08
42.  Maple Ridge	
178,115.21
248,235.99
311,311.26
46.  Sechelt *  	
64,337.40
283,877.18
45,887.47
49. Ocean Falls	
136,502.09
11,831.23
4,865.72
133,626.69
53. Terrace	
22,781.51
26,621.23
21,778.43
24 739.57
57. Prince George	
58. McBride ...: .....	
195,941.39 .
19,888.47
a34,365.76
91,091.26
1,472,197.31
115,521.38
114,867.34
* Includes debt and capital charges. N 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS—Continued.
No. and Name of School District.
Total
Expenditure.*
Government
Grants.
District
Expenditure.
264,665.20
366,164.43
133,321.55
465,419.84
115,925.11
325,331.24
361,949.20
202,333.42
96,380.13
48,995.33
304,545.91
84,229.20
185,952.97
2,942.79
11,091.05
2,511.67
1,802.58
2,693.02
3,388.60
2,242.62
2,000.00
2,319.88
1,346.57
3,250.00
9,460.38
2,411.61
2,510.00
4,082.69
4,617.13
5,168.63
7,373.83
58,280.10
11,813.97
116,649.15
166,356.86
72,654.97
220,045.05
66.176.52
152,092.40
213,838.41
102,809.64
43,658.95
11,368.13
135,737.93
35,836.65
90,694.74
1,435.03
6,483.11
323.93
1,659.89
2,197.91
1,823.93
1,923.67
1,814.60
1,148.78
820.62
1,760.45
4,290.95
510.45
2.267.50
2,889.05
4,095.36
3,943.43
3,974.24
24,971.98
6,295.82
148,016.05
199,807.57
60,666.58
68. Nanaimo	
245,374.79
49,748.59
70. Alberni    	
173,238.84
148,110.79
72. Campbell River	
99,523.78
73. Alert Bay	
52,721.18
37,627.20
168,807.98
48,392.56
95,258.23
Unattached.
Atlin	
1,507.76
Bamfield	
5,607.94
2,187.74
Camp Mile 163	
142.69
Camp 300	
495.11
1,564.67
318.95
185.40
1,171.10
525.95
1,489.55
5,169.43
1,901.16
242.50
1,193.64
521.77
Tofino	
1,225.20
3,399.59
33,308.12
5,518.15
Totals	
$31,625,317.39
«3,450,668.45
$18,174,648.94
.
* Includes debt and capital charges.
REVIEW.
The school-year 1948-49 has been one of steady growth both with respect to the
physical plant and in the improvement of the educational programme in our schools.
School Boards have given splendid and unselfish service. They have applied themselves
to the task of providing new and improved buildings to meet the needs of a greatly
increased school population, due in great measure to the increased secondary-school
enrolment in rural areas. Many hundreds of children who, because of their comparative
isolation, were formerly denied any secondary education at all now take advantage
of the opportunity which has come to them. The establishment of the large school
district has made possible the building of secondary schools and the expansion of
dormitory and transportation facilities.
Many more school buildings are needed. It is my duty to point out that, as a
result of a careful survey of the pre-school population, construction costs will continue
to be heavy for the next three years. Our chief concern is accommodation for new
beginners who will crowd our schools commencing about September, 1951. Primary-
and elementary-school enrolment will continue to be heavy for the next six years at
least.
In an attempt to improve the business administration of school districts, all
secretary-treasurers were brought to Victoria in January for a conference with officials REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. N 27
of the Department. Many suggestions for uniform procedures were presented and
adopted. The group also had the benefit of hearing Deputy Ministers and other senior
officials of other branches of the Government, thus bringing about a much closer and
more understanding relationship. It is planned to have such conferences once each
year until a satisfactory working pattern of procedures becomes the accepted standard.
With the development of the northern portion of the Province there will be a
demand for school services. Already new school districts have been established or are
planned in Atlin, Telegraph Creek, and Lower Post—the most northerly school in the
Province. In addition, districts were established during the year at Klahoose and
Sarita River, and schools at Kyuquot and Telegraph Creek, which had been closed for
a number of years, have been reopened.
RETIREMENTS AND APPOINTMENTS.
It is with some regret, but with a great deal of gratitude, that I record the
retirement during the year of the following officials of the Department: Mr. H. B.
MacLean and Mrs. Marjorie Lee, of the Vancouver Normal School; Miss J. L. Eyres
and Mr. J. F. Hammett, of the Victoria Normal School; and Mr. J. F. Meredith, who
for sixteen years had been on the staff of the Text-book Branch—all of whom have
rendered valuable service. I would also like to thank, in a personal way, these senior
teachers of the Vancouver school system whose names appear in such large numbers
in the report of the Superintendent of Vancouver City Schools. I know they have
enjoyed their long period of service and retire with a sense of satisfaction for work
well done. S
The corps of School Inspectors has borne a heavy burden during the past four
years. It is planned to increase the staff as occasion demands. During the year three
new appointments were made, as follows: Mr. I. H. R. Jeffrey, principal of the elementary school at Trail; Mr. J. J. McKenzie, principal of South Park Elementary School
at Victoria; and Mr. R. G. Williston, principal of the junior-senior high school at
Prince George. These men will take up their duties in the summer and be in the schools
with the commencement of the new term in September, 1949.
LEGISLATION.
A number of amendments to the " Public Schools Act " were approved at the 1949
Session of the Legislature. Most of them deal with minor matters of administration,
but there are two which merit special mention because they deal with changes in policy.
The most important concerns the adoption, commencing with the school-year
1949-50, of a text-book rental plan for the secondary schools. For many years the
Department, through its Text-book Branch, has provided all prescribed books for
Grades I to VI, inclusive, on a free loan basis. This principle is now extended to include
all grades, except that a small annual fee is charged those pupils in all grades above
Grade VI. The annual fee is $3.50 for all pupils enrolled in Grades VII, VIII, and IX
and $4 for those in Grades X, XI, XII, and XIII. To the sum collected in this way, the
Government is to add the necessary amount, so that all schools will have ample supplies
of the necessary texts at the commencement of each term. The vote for the first year
is $200,000. The announcement of this plan has been well received. Parents will no
longer be faced with the annual expenditure of significant amounts when their children
are in the secondary school.
The plan goes into operation in September, 1949, and its inception will call for
willing co-operation on the part of teachers, principals, Boards of School Trustees, and
the Text-book Branch.
INDIAN AFFAIRS.
The education of Indian children is the responsibility of the Dominion Government,
but in several parts of the Province it seems desirable, in the interests of economy, to N 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
arrange for co-operation between local Boards of School Trustees and the Indian Affairs
Branch for the construction and operation of schools, where both Indian and white
children could attend the same school.
An amendment to the " Public Schools Act" makes it possible for Boards of School
Trustees and the Indian Affairs Branch to enter into agreements for the sharing of
costs of the education of Indian children. The form of agreement must first be
approved by the Council of Public Instruction.
SPECIAL AID.
Last year it was reported that special aid was provided to reduce the costs of
education to those in rural districts. This aid has been continued, the objective being
to provide aid in such an amount as will reduce the local tax for ordinary expenditures
to a sum not greater than the yield of an 8-mill tax.
Because it is recognized that the excess over such an amount becomes the responsibility of the Government, an amendment to the Act provides that all school budgets in
those districts receiving special aid must be approved by the Superintendent of
Education.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. T. FAIREY,
Superintendent of Education. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION. N 29
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION.
REPORT OF H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., ASSISTANT
SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION.
During the year under review in this Report an important educational advance
was finally achieved. This consisted of a major adjustment to the secondary-school
curriculum, and was the result of an examination and evaluation carried on by the
Central Curriculum Committee of the Province for a number of years.
The proposals for adjustment advanced by the Committee were approved in turn
by the Honourable the Minister of Education, the Provincial Board of Examiners, and
the Senate of the University of British Columbia, which has statutory rights in respect
of the requirements for admission to the University.
The secondary school of to-day is no longer a selective institution for the
intellectual, cultural, or economic elite. It is a school for every man's child, and must
attempt to meet the need for that pupil guidance and development which will result
in happy and effective citizenship for all students.
Mass secondary education, however, presents a challenge. Can the school provide
adequate cultural and vocational training for the many and, at the same time, treasure
and develop to the full those superior minds to whom society must ever look for the
solution of its problems?    To these purposes this curricular adjustment is dedicated.
The purposes of this curricular adjustment may be listed as follows:—
(1) To make possible in the secondary-school programme a greatly increased
offering of elective courses designed to meet student and community needs.
(2) To increase the number of elective courses which may be studied by those
desiring High School Graduation (University Entrance Programme).
(3) To give to such fields of study as art, music, drama, home economics,
agriculture, commerce, and industrial arts equal status with other subjects
in respect of High School Graduation (University Entrance Programme).
(4) To permit students of high ability to take advanced courses in fields of
special interest and aptitude and to become highly qualified in those fields.
(5) To encourage in all students in secondary schools the development and
pursuit of strong intellectual and vocational interests.
Some of the major features of this adjustment are as follows:—
1. High School Graduation versus University Entrance.
In spite of the existing official titles, " High School Graduation without University
Entrance " and " High School Graduation with University Entrance," teachers and
others have continued to think of High School Graduation as being one programme
which students may follow and University Entrance as being another, a different and
a superior programme.
In the future, as in the past, two programmes will be offered in most high schools.
They will carry the official titles of " High School Graduation (General Programme)"
and "High School Graduation (University Entrance Programme)."
Principals and teachers should studiously avoid giving the impression that the
General Programme is inferior to the University Entrance Programme. The two
programmes meet different needs.
2. Introduction of New Area of Study.
For the lack of a better name this subject is called " Effective Living." It is
offered as a constant in Grades VII, VIII, IX, and in two of the Grades X, XI, XII.
The course content includes health, physical education, guidance, mental hygiene, home N  30 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
and family living.    In a word, it encompasses the more personal aspects of the young
person's living.
3. Increase in Credits.
The secondary-school credit system begins in Grade IX, as does the new course-
numbering system which yields those credits. There is an increase from the existing
minimum of 112 credits to a minimum of 120 credits for High School Graduation in
both the General Programme and the University Entrance Programme.
4. New Subject-numbering System.
In Grade VII, subjects will be referred to as English 7, Mathematics 7, Social
Studies 7, and recorded as En 7, Ma 7, and SS 7. The same principle will apply in
Grade VIII, as Science 8 (Sc 8), Effective Living 8 (EL 8), Home Economics 8 (HE 8).
In Grades IX to XIII, subjects are numbered in decades. First courses in a subject,
unless prescribed for an advanced grade, are numbered in the 10's, second courses in
the 20's, etc., as English 10 in Grade IX, English 20 in Grade X, English 30 in Grade XI,
English 40 in Grade XII. If, however, some of the courses provided in a subject are
advanced elective courses, they are numbered in the 90's, as Latin 10, Latin 20, Latin 91,
Latin 92; Mathematics 10, Mathematics 20, Mathematics 30, Mathematics 91; Science
10, Science 20, Physics 91, Chemistry 91, Biology 91.
5. Alternate Courses.
In time it is hoped that alternate courses may be provided in a number of subjects.
For example, under this adjustment some form of mathematics is a constant in Grade
IX. The basic Mathematics Course in Grade IX is Mathematics 10 (formerly called
Mathematics III). A new alternate course, Mathematics 11, is being provided for those
who can profit from a course which is not preparatory to more advanced courses in
mathematics.
6. Introducing the Plan.
It is planned that this adjustment shall go into effect in Grades VII, VIII, IX,
and X in September, 1950. Students entering these grades at that time will complete
their secondary-school education under the requirements of the new plan. The first
group of students to graduate from high school under the new requirements will be
those who complete Grade XII in June, 1953.
Students who are entering Grade XI or XII in September, 1950, will complete
their secondary-school education under the regulations and requirements which have
been in effect for some years.
7. Majors.
In order to ensure that students in high schools have the opportunity to study
intensively one or more fields of academic or vocational interest, the system of MAJOR
subjects has been introduced.
For example, in the University Entrance Programme a major subject is defined
as a subject of the student's choice in which he has chosen to study the prescribed
advanced elective courses numbered in the 90's with their prerequisites.   For example:—
Mathematics 10, 20, 30, 91.
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92.
English 10, 20, 30, 40, 91.
8. High School Graduation (General Programme).
In order to graduate from high school in the General Programme, students who
complete Grade XII in June, 1953, and succeeding years must present 55 credits in
prescribed constants and a minimum of 65 credits in electives. These constants and
(or) electives must include one MAJOR subject of their own choice. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND  SUPERVISION.
For High School Graduation (General Programme).
N 31
Subjects.
New Course Nos.
Old Course Nos.
Academic
Years.
Credits.
10, 20, 30, 40
Ill, IV, V, VI	
4
3
3
1
20
10, 20, 30	
10, 20, 30	
Ill, IV, V	
15
15
Ill	
5
55
65
Total	
120 +
9. High School Graduation (University Entrance Programme).
In order to graduate from high school in the University Entrance Programme,
students who complete Grade XII in June, 1953, and succeeding years must present at
least 85 credits in prescribed minimum constants and 35 credits in electives. These
constants and (or) electives must include three major subjects of their own choice.
For High School Graduation (University Entrance).
Subjects.
New Course Nos.
Old Course Nos.
Academic
Years.
Credits.
10, 20, 30, 40	
10, 20, 30	
Ill, IV, V, VI	
4
3
3
3
2
2
20
Ill, IV, V	
15
10, 20, 30	
15
10, 20, 30	
Ill, IV, V, VI	
15
10, 20	
111,1V	
10
10, 20	
I, II	
10
85
35
Total	
120 +
The foregoing presents in bare outline the major features of the curricular
adjustment. Administrative details will appear in a bulletin to be published by the
Department of Education shortly.
It is the hope and belief of all officials of the Department of Education that down
through the years this adjustment will make a valuable contribution to the education
of the youth of British Columbia. N  32 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VANCOUVER.
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., LL.D., PRINCIPAL.
The forty-eighth session of the Vancouver Normal School opened on September
13th, 1948, and closed on June 17th, 1949.   Attendance and results were as follows:—
Men.
Women.
Total.
94
85
"222
201
316
286
"Distinction" standing was awarded to Rose Marie Chisholm, Vancouver; Kenneth Noel Coutts', Vancouver; Frederick Alexander Gornall, Vancouver; June Margaret
Griffin, Vancouver; Alice Jean Halksworth, Grindrod; Donna Ruth Killick, Vancouver;
James Alexander Stirling Macdonald, Vancouver; Doris Roberta Norman, Vancouver;
Marion Louise Skelding, Vancouver.
__ -The attendance, the highest in twenty-five years, presented many problems. The
building was erected in 1908, when school architecture had received little attention, and
fails to reach present-day minimum standards in several important respects. Its actual
area is sufficient for 220 students, the number to which it was limited by the Department of Education fifteen years ago. The auditorium will seat 250, the cafeteria 150,
and there are seven classrooms. Perhaps the most serious deficiency is the inadequacy
of the library, which cannot supply both shelving for books and seats for readers.
The presence of over 300 students necessitated several makeshifts, but, despite
these, conditions were unsatisfactory. All classes were too large, and two of them
seriously so; the staffs of the Model and Simon Fraser Schools, who assist in the first
term's " participation," had to be asked to take more students and to take them more
frequently than was desirable, while the schools in New Westminster and Vancouver
were called upon for greater assistance in practice-teaching than in any previous year.
It would be remiss not to add an expression of appreciation for the generous help
given by Boards of School Trustees, administrative officials, and school staffs in Vancouver and New Westminster. They have never failed to give more than we asked.
Our students also deserve thanks for having endured much inconvenience with cheerfulness.
An analysis of the academic standing of students shows that 127 had full Senior
Matriculation or its equivalent, 45 had more (second-year U.B.C. to M.A.), 50 had
University Entrance only, and the remaining 94 from one to four Senior Matriculation
subjects. These proportions are substantially the same as in the past three years, as is
the relative ability of the various groups. The percentage of "A" graduates with University Entrance is as great as of those with Senior Matriculation, and the percentage
of failures is less. It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that some course, other than
Senior Matriculation or First-year Arts, would be of greater value in producing good
teachers.
The graduates of a Normal School are granted certificates which entitle them to
teach any subject or class in an elementary school. Because of this, since the inception
of Normal Schools in British Columbia, all students have been required to take all
courses, despite the fact that many men would never teach primary classes and many
women would teach nothing else. Unfortunately, there was no sure way of selecting
these from the group who must begin in an ungraded rural school.   This year it was PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS.
N 33
felt that such a selection was possible, since the increased birth-rate in recent years
meant that primary teachers would be needed in greater numbers. Accordingly, about
thirty women students, with special aptitude for the lower grades, were given additional
training and experience in that field. It is gratifying to report that all were appointed
to primary positions.
The resignation of Mrs. Marjory Lee, as instructress in physical education, is
reported with sincere regret. She is missed, not only because of the national reputation
which the department had attained under her leadership, but also for her own delightful
qualities of mind and heart.
Throughout the years the great and, I think, remarkable assistance given by the
school systems of Vancouver and New Westminster has been so consistent that only the
unusual has been mentioned in the reports. This year such an incident occurred. Mr.
Jack Hamilton, at the time of his retirement as principal of Lord Selkirk School, presented his complete library to the Normal School.
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOL, VICTORIA.
REPORT OF H. 0. ENGLISH, B.A., B.S.A., PRINCIPAL.
The thirty-fifth session of the Provincial Normal School, Victoria, opened September 13th, 1948, and closed June 17th, 1949. The following table presents a summary
of the enrolment:—
Men.
Women.
Total.
41
2
4
1
Ill
4
1
6
152
6
5
7
Failed                                         	
Totals	
48
122
170
Eight students—Loyola Marie Edwards (Sister Mary Hilda), Louise Gigliotti,
Robert Walter Hampton, Eileen Anne Kelly (Sister Mary Eileen), Marguerite Lalonde
(Sister Damian Marie), Trudabeth Ann McGill, Audrey Smith, and Robert Davies
Taylor—received honour standing. Robert Walter Hampton was the winner of the
Dr. V. L. Denton Memorial Award for 1948-49.
The St. John Ambulance Association issued certificates to forty-six students who
were successful in the course in First Aid.
Four new instructors joined the faculty September 1st, 1948. Mr. Hugh Ernest
Farquhar, B.A., assumed responsibility for instruction in Mathematics, Tests, and
Measurements, and men's games; Mr. Francis Henry Johnson, M.A., B.Psed., in Educational Psychology and English; Mr. Albion Wilfrid Johns in Art and School Accounting;  and Miss Jean Lillian Eyres, B.Sc, in Health and Physical Education.
At the end of the term, two instructors, Miss Jean Lillian Eyres and Mr. Joseph
Francis Hammett, resigned.
The health programme of the school was again enriched by a series of lectures on
health topics. This series was arranged by Dr. J. L. Gayton. Participating in this
series were Miss M. Frith, " Public Health Nursing Services "; Dr. McCombie, " School
Dentistry"; Dr. F. 0. R. Garner, "Tuberculosis"; Dr. A. B. Sinclair, "Venereal
Diseases "; and Dr. J. L. Gayton, " School Medical Services and Communicable Disease
Control." N 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Complete and effective health services at the Normal School throughout the session
were provided by Dr. Gayton. These services were appreciated by students and faculty
alike.
The continued increase in student enrolment over recent years necessitated provision of additional classrooms and a change in the prevailing arrangements for demonstration lessons. Whereas, in former years, Normal students were transported to the
elementary schools for demonstration lessons, during 1948-49 the process was reversed,.
and classes from the elementary schools were transported to the Normal School. With
the co-operation of the administrative officers and teachers of the elementary schools,
the required demonstration lessons were provided in the auditorium at the Normal
School. The Normal School recognizes and appreciates the co-operation and valuable
assistance rendered by the Greater Victoria School Board, the Municipal Inspectors, and
both the teachers and pupils who provided these vital demonstration lessons.
During the 1948-49 session approximately two months were devoted to observation
and practice-teaching. Almost every classroom in the Greater Victoria and adjacent
areas was used. Students used 329 classrooms in 112 schools. Members of the faculty
visited the various schools and observed the work of the students.
There were three periods of observation and teaching practice during the session:
November 15th to 26th, 1948; February 21st to March 4th, 1949; and April 25th to
May 13th, 1949. By distributing the periods of teaching practice in this manner, the
Normal School endeavours to prevent the segregation of theory and practice.
The one-year training programme offered at this school may be described as basic.
However, no one associated with the school will claim that this one-year programme
provides adequate training for all the candidates who register. More time is required
for every phase of the work, especially for the enrichment of student background and
the perfecting of technique. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
N 35
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., DIRECTOR.
The 1949 session of the Summer School of Education, held in Victoria and Vancouver from July 4th to August 5th, was attended by 1,308 teachers.
Many features combined to make this year's session a noteworthy one. Among the
more important innovations was the introduction of training courses for teachers of
deaf children. Conducted by Miss Mildred Groht and Miss Mary New, of the Lexington
School for the Deaf, New York, these classes enrolled forty-one teachers, among them a
number from the western Canadian Provinces and the United States, in addition to
British Columbia teachers. Equally significant was the Principals' Conference, held at
Victoria from July 18th to 29th. Ninety school principals were in attendance. The
conference was fortunate in having the Assistant Superintendent and Director of Curriculum, Mr. H. L. Campbell, act as its permanent chairman. Its success was largely
due to Mr. Campbell's excellent direction and to the enthusiastic co-operation of the
principals themselves. Mention should also be made of the extensive use made during
the session of demonstration classes and visual aids in class instruction.
The large number of teachers enrolled is indicative of the interest of the teachers
of this Province in in-service training. Added evidence of this interest is seen in the
number of in-service courses conducted during the school-year immediately preceding
the opening of Summer School. In-service courses under the direction of the Summer
School were offered in five centres. A total of 20 courses was given, attracting a total
registration of 390 teachers.
COURSES AND ENROLMENT.
The enrolment for all courses and the total enrolment are summarized below.
Instructors who taught for less than one week are not included in the tables.
Courses.
Instructors.
Enrolment.
52
33
35
17
1,115
Totals for 1949	
85
81
77
73
64
52
48
44
43
39
1,308
1,197
1,027
Totals for 1948	
Totals for 1947	
Totals for 1946	
Totals for 1945	
VICTORIA SECTION.
Methods and Philosophy of Education: „
1.   Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  150
9.   Visual Education Workshop (Non-projected Aids)  52
52.   School Organization and Administration in British Columbia 97
63.   Introduction to Educational Supervision  38
67.   Home, School, and Community Relations  108
100.   Philosophy and Methods of Secondary Education  56
103. Administration of Alcohol Education  52
104. Principals' Conference  90 N 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Psychology and Individual Development:                                                Enrolment.
110.   Educational Psychology   124
126.   Adjusting School-work to Individual Differences  127
128.   Remedial Education  129
155.   Principles of Guidance in the Personality Adjustment of
School-children  127
Fine and Applied Arts:
360.   Elementary Arts and Crafts  66
370.   Murals   34
381.   Introductory Drawing and Painting  53
392.   Advanced Design  19
401.   Teaching Aids in Secondary School Art  12
Counselling and Guidance Services:
189. Organization and Administration of the Guidance Services 23
190. Laboratory in Counselling Techniques (Beginners)  8
190a. Laboratory in Counselling Techniques (Advanced)  25
193. Occupational Information Techniques    30
194. Procedures in Vocational Guidance     13
Health and Physical Education:
501.   Organization and Administration of Physical Education..... 23
511. Methods in Health Education  57
512. Junior Red Cross Workshop  31
517.   Secondary School Health Curriculum  30
526.   Physical Education Activities  29
546. Dance Composition    23
547. Techniques of the Modern Dance    47
550. Rhythms for. the Secondary School     54
551. Gymnastics      63
Home Economics:
650. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics    30
651. Problems in Home Economics Education     16
Intermediate Grades:
32.   Intermediate Observation and Laboratory Class  143
200.   Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades  130
345.   Social Studies Workshop     33
Kindergarten-Primary Grades:
543.   Physical Education in the Primary Grades    42
582.   Play and Play Material in the Kindergarten    41
588. Methods in Kindergarten Education _'_     57
589. Kindergarten Demonstration Class     53
594.   Problems in Primary Methods  114
596. Language and Literature in Primary Grades  101
597. Arithmetic in the Primary Grades  108
Library Services:
410.   Library Procedures and Administration     30
414.   Book Selection and Reading Guidance     38
Music:
440.   School Music in the Elementary Grades     61
445.   Intermediate Harmony and Counterpoint     10 SUMMER  SCHOOL OF EDUCATION.
N 37
Enrolment.
446.   Advanced Choral Music and Conducting I ' 53
455.   Sight-reading and Ear-training    42
467.   Problems in Music Education (Seminar)     43
Senior Matriculation:
213.   Senior Matriculation English  111
313.   Senior Matriculation World History  104
Typewriting:
604.   Practical Typewriting      60
Vancouver Section.
Commercial Education:
620.   Stenography (Teaching Methods)	
626. Book-keeping Practice	
627. Applied Typewriting	
631.   Business Machines	
Education for the Handicapped:
701. Reading and Language Problems for the Deaf.
702. Speech Training for the Deaf	
12
12
18
22
39
39
Industrial Arts Education
220.
223.
224.
225.
227.
228.
229A.
229B.
229c.
231.
232.
234.
235.
236.
238.
241.
242.
243.
245.
246.
247.
248A,
248b.
249.
250.
254A.
254b,
Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School   10
Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  5
Freehand Sketching applied to the Industrial Arts  4
Draughting applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  10
Elementary Woodwork ,  9
Elementary Wood-turning  7
Farm Mechanics  4
Farm Mechanics  17
Farm Mechanics  4
Elementary Electrical Theory  17
Elementary Electrical Shop-work  17
Art Metalwork	
Elementary Sheet-metal Work	
Elementary Machine-shop Work	
Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School  l	
Practical Geometry 	
Freehand Sketching	
Draughting applied to Woodwork and Metalwork	
Advanced Woodwork (Bench-work)	
Advanced Wood-turning	
Practice in the use of Wood-working Machinery; Care and
Maintenance 	
Farm Mechanics	
Farm Mechanics 	
Advanced Sheet-metal Work	
Advanced Machine-shop Work     12
Arts and Crafts     44
Arts and Crafts     45
14
13
5
11
20
10
8
7
5
7
5
8
19 n 38 public schools report, 1948-49.
Student Courses.
Total in 1949  3,649
Total in 1948  3,618
Total in 1947  3,073
Total in 1946  2,613
Total in 1945  2,380
Courses per Student.
Courses in 1949  2.8
Courses in 1948  3.0
Courses in 1947  2.9
Courses in 1946  2.9
Courses in 1945  2.9
REGISTRATION.
The following tables give an interesting picture of the classes of teachers served by
the Summer School and the type of training sought by them.
Table I.—Teaching Experience of those registered.
13 or more years  272 1 to 3 years  590
10 to 12 years     80 Less than 1 year     74
7 to 9 years  111 Unreported     50
4 to 6 years  131
Table II.—Type of School in which Teachers taught in 1948-49.*
More than 10 rooms  512 3 rooms     75
7 to 10 rooms  162 2 rooms     89
4 to 6 rooms  175 1 room  124
* Certain teachers  registered at Summer School had not taught in the year  1948—49 ;    hence the totals of the
above will not agree with the total enrolment.
Grades taught by Teachers enrolled.
Grade V   282
Grade IV  306
Grade III  324
Grade II  325
Grade I  295
Unreported  163
Table IV.—Types of Certificates sought.
(Candidates for First-class Permanent Certificates are not shown.)
Art      63 Intermediate  117
Commercial    34 Library     30
Counsellor      40 Music      54
Education of Handicapped    28 Physical Education     63
Home Economics     38 Primary-Kindergarten ._ 157
Industrial Arts   101 Secondary Instructor     17
Table III.—G
Grade XII 	
rades t
  163
Grade XI 	
Grade X    	
192
  195
Grade IX 	
  215
Grade VIII	
Grade VII	
315
_____ 323
Grade VI 	
_____ 267 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. N 39
FACULTY.
Amess, Fred A., Dip. V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Blake, Miss M. N., Vice-Principal, Provincial School for the Deaf, Vancouver.
Brown, Denis W., B.A., Director, Audio-Visual Department, Greater Victoria School
Board.
Copeland, Miss Winnett A., Primary Specialist, Instructor, Provincial Normal School,
Victoria.
Creighton, Miss Ella H., Primary Teacher, Margaret Jenkins School, Victoria.
Czarnowski, Miss Lucile K., A.B., M.S., Associate Supervisor of Physical Education,
Division for Women, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.
Davis, C, Bedford Fine Leathers, Vancouver.
Dickinson, Miss Emelyn, M.A., A.T.C.L., Head Teacher, Kitchener-Trafalgar School,
Vancouver.
Dolmage, Miss Grace L., B.A., M.Sc. in Ed., Co-ordinator, Child Guidance Clinic, Winnipeg Public School Board and City Health Department, Winnipeg.
English, J. F. K., M.A., B.Psed., Senior Municipal Inspector of Schools, Greater Victoria
School System, Victoria.
Gibson, William Stewart, Machine-shop Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Grant, Alastair M., B.P.H.E., Teacher, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver.
Groht, Miss Mildred A., Principal, Lexington School for the Deaf, New York; Instructor in Special Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.
Harare, William Leslie, M.A., Head of English Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Harwood, Norris, B.A., Commercial Specialist, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Hatton, Mrs. Evelyn, B.Sc.(H.E.), formerly Home Economics Instructor, Victoria.
Henderson, Mrs. Ada L., Teacher, Mackenzie School, Vancouver.
Heywood, Robert H, B.A., Head of Commercial Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Ingram, Miss Christine P., M.A., Ed.D., Director of Special Education, Public Schools,
Rochester, N.Y.
Irvine, Miss Jean, B.Sc.(H.E.), Home Economics Instructor, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Johnson, Heber D., M.A., Principal, Ballard High School, Seattle, Wash.
Johnson, Mrs. Helen, Kindergarten Teacher, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, Wash.
Johnson, Miss Muriel, B.H.Sc, Dietitian, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Kurth, Burton L., Chief Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Lane, Edwin I., B.A., Art Instructor, West Vancouver High School, Vancouver.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Lythgoe, E. W., Industrial Arts Instructor, Mount View High School, Victoria.
Mahaffy, Miss C. Elizabeth, B.A., M.D., Assistant Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Meredith, John R., B.A., Research Assistant, Alcohol Education, Department of Education, Victoria.
Miller, Miss Bernice, R.N., Public Health Nurse, Victoria.
Miller, Edward P., B.A., Principal, Lonsdale School, North Vancouver.
Morrison, C. V., M.D., Director, Community Child Guidance Clinic, Portland, Ore.
MacDonald, C. E., LL.B., B.S., LL.D., Superintendent, Provincial School for the Deaf,
Vancouver.
McKenzie, J. J., B.A., Principal, James Bay Schools, Victoria.
McKie, A., B.A., B. Ed., Counsellor, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
New, Miss Mary C, Assistant Principal, Lexington School for the Deaf, New York;
Instructor in Special Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.
Ohlsen, Merle M., Ed.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Dean of Students and Associate Professor of Education, Washington State College, Pullman, Wash. N 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Palmer, Miss Margaret, Provincial Director, Junior Red Cross, Vancouver.
Pritchard,  Vaughan  G.,  B.A.,   Commercial  Specialist,   Central  Junior  High  School,
Victoria.
Quayle, Thomas A., Metalwork Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Radcliff, Mrs. Doreen, Kindergarten Teacher, Sir James Douglas School, Victoria.
Reid, C. M., Industrial Arts Instructor, Fernie Junior-Senior High School, Fernie.
Reynolds, Miss Louise, Librarian, Central Junior High Schoolj Victoria.
Rickard, V. E., Vocational Instructor, Coquitlam Junior-Senior High School, Coquitlam.
Ridley, J., Industrial Arts Instructor, Britannia High School, Vancouver.
Roberts, Ifor, Assistant Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Russell, Albert E., Sheet-metal and Welding Instructor, Vancouver Technical School,
Vancouver.
Simister, Norman M., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Smith, Gordon Appelbe, Dip. V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Speirs, Rae, B.A., Director of Physical Education, Toronto Board of Education, Toronto.
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Victoria.
Swainson, Neil A., B.A., Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Swanson, Olaf E., M.A., Ed.D., Principal, Van Asselt School, Seattle, Wash.
Thomson, Miss Isabelle, B.A., Assistant, Fairview High School of Commerce, Vancouver.
Wales,  Bertram  E.,  B.A.,  B.Ed.,   Counsellor,  Kitsilano  Junior-Senior  High   School,
Vancouver.
Wallace, Lawrence J., B.A., M.Ed., Counsellor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
White, John S., Draughting Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Woodward, Miss Helen, Vice-Principal, Provincial School for the Deaf, Vancouver.
Wright, Stanley J., B.Sc, Electrical Instructor, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Zeran, Franklin R., M.A., Ph.D., Dean, School of Education, Oregon State College,
Corvallis, Ore., and Director of Summer Session.
STUDENT ACTIVITY SOCIETY.
The following statement deals with the affairs of the preceding or 1948 session,
and is taken from the report of the auditors, Ismay, Boiston, Dunn & Co., chartered
accountants.
Receipts.
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $2,202.00
Additional income (cash receipts, cafeteria, etc.)       324.69
Total  $2,526.69
Disbursements.
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $1,267.00
Social affairs, dances, picnics, teas, etc       686.11
Miscellaneous charges, services, rentals, etc       221.00
Excess of receipts over disbursements       352.58
Total  $2,526.69 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. N  41
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.
This report is for the school-year 1948-49 and covers the work of the following :•—•
(a) Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b) Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in
junior and senior high schools.
(c) Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—"A" Woodwork and
Draughting, and " B" Metalwork and Draughting — for University
Entrance.
(d) Vancouver Technical School.
(e) High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses.
(/) Vancouver School of Art.
(g) Night-schools.
(h) Teacher-training.
(i) Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
(j) Vancouver Vocational Institute.
This year the Industrial Arts programme has been revised. The work was undertaken by several committees of teachers of Industrial Arts, and the courses now are
being followed.
In the past many schools in this Province have been unable to offer an Industrial
Arts Course because of the small number of students in the school. An Arts and Crafts
programme now has been worked out so that the smaller schools in the Province can
offer courses in one or more of the following crafts: Art Metalwork, Simple Jewellery,
Wood-craft, Leather-craft, Fly-tying, Shell-craft, and Metal Foil. It also is hoped that
the teachers who have taken training at Summer School will be able to offer Arts and
Crafts Courses to the adult population in the small schools of the Province who are
interested in craft-work.
Under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement vocational units have been
built in the following centres: Langley, Victoria, Creston, Chilliwack, and North
Vancouver, where vocational training will be given in the following areas of education:
Industrial, commercial, and agriculture. In addition, the Vancouver School Board has
been assisted in building a large Vocational Institute in the heart of the City of
Vancouver, which will be of great service to the people of Vancouver and to the
graduates of the high schools in this Province. The school has been carefully planned
with the assistance of many trade advisory committees, and the equipment is of the
very latest type.
The reports upon Industrial Arts which follow have been prepared by Lieut.-Col.
C. J. Strong, Inspector of Technical Classes.
INDUSTRIAL ARTS.
Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools.
During the past school-year the revised Programme of Studies for Industrial Arts
has been followed in our school shops. This course is a marked improvement on the
previous one, and comments from instructors have been favourable. Although criticism
and suggestions for improvement were invited, it was gratifying to find that none were
forthcoming.
The first course in Arts and Crafts was offered during the 1949 Summer School
session.    Over fifty Industrial Arts teachers and several elementary-school teachers
. N 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
took the course. The interest shown was great, and it is expected that Arts and Crafts
will be offered in many of our schools during the coming year. This course will have
a special attraction for those schools too small to provide for instruction in prescribed
Industrial Arts Courses.
Boards of School Trustees have continued to co-operate in improving the school
shops. An additional twenty instructors have been added to the teaching staff. This
expansion includes additional instructors in established schools, as well as those
teaching in new shops.
Our Vocational Teacher-training Unit in the new Vancouver Vocational Institute
is now well established and equipped with modern and up-to-date facilities for the
training of Industrial Arts and Vocational teachers. During the past year twelve
men have received sufficient training to enable them to accept teaching positions in
September, 1949.
There are fifty school districts in which Industrial Arts is established, as follows:
Abbotsford, Agassiz, Alberni, Armstrong, Burnaby, Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Courtenay,
Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta, Fernie, Fraser Canyon, Kamloops, Kelowna,
Kimberley, Ladysmith, Langley, Maple Ridge, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Peace River South, Penticton, Powell River,
Prince George, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Qualicum, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond,
Saanich, Salmon Arm, Saltspring, Smithers, Sooke, Southern Okanagan, Summerland,
Surrey, Trail, University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon, Greater Victoria, and West
Vancouver.
Senior High Schools.
The number of students taking Industrial Arts Courses continues to increase. The
High School Graduation Course provides an opportunity for students to take many of
the required credits in this work. Farm Mechanics Courses are increasing in popularity in rural communities. Our instructors are becoming better qualified and, as
a result, the quality of work done in school shops is showing a definite improvement.
Industrial Arts Options for University Entrance.
More students are taking advantage of the Industrial Arts Courses offered for
their University Entrance requirements. Fifteen credits may be obtained, and the
results indicate that the training received make many of the university courses more
realistic and attractive. In fact, the more academic-minded the students are, the more
they benefit from Industrial Arts Courses.
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school shops in the Province (of which fifty-
two are general shops) is        198
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school instructors is _..       173
The total number of pupils participating is—
Elementary school   3,742
Junior high school  8,945
Senior high school .  3,898
 16,585
VANCOUVER TECHNICAL SCHOOL.
The report which follows has been prepared by Mr. E. M. White, B.A.Sc, principal
of the Vancouver Technical School:—
" The attendance has been lower this year, due, perhaps, to several factors.
Employment, at good wages, lures many young people into early employment, since the
increased cost of living necessitates that many make contributions to the family budget. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. N  43
Secondary schools generally have reached the low point in the birth-rate of the early
thirties.
" During the year the work of the Canadian Vocational Training Programme
gradually was completed, and the work taken over as a nucleus to the Vancouver
Vocational Institute, under the principalship of Mr. Dean Goard, one of our highly
regarded teachers. We have provided facilities for a number of classes which will be
gradually moved to the new building at Pender and Cambie Streets. This will leave
us with ample room for future expansion.
" The work of the school follows much the same pattern of former years:—
"(1)   University Entrance with technical options.
"(2)   Technical Diploma Course.
"(3)   Special courses in one shop and allied subjects.
" University Entrance still attracts a fair group of students, but at the expense of
much practical training.    I look forward to the time when Technical Diploma students
of high mental calibre will be admitted to university.    However, we still believe that
our main aim is to train capable young men and women for industry and business with
a curriculum shaped to that end.    We do not lose sight of the fact that we must also
train in character-building, and a keen sense of citizenship combined with cultural and
assthetic values.
"A very notable part of our work this year has been our placement of students in
industry. With the exception of only a few whose own personal plans had been formulated, we placed all our graduates in good jobs. It is most heartening, indeed, to see
that industry is looking very seriously for our graduates, and many inquiries could not
be satisfied. This phase of our work has been capably looked after by Mr. W. Morgan.
" In conclusion, I should like to say that it is my hope to see more students from
other parts of British Columbia encouraged and assisted in attending this school in
Grades XI and XII. Our enrolment ' drop-out' still seems to be too great in Grades
IX and X, but no doubt for very cogent reasons.
" We also have added to our shop equipment during the year, and I trust will
continue to replace obsolete and worn-out machines. A course in Electric Welding will
be offered in addition to Acetylene Welding."
The total number of students attending the Vancouver Technical School during the
year 1948-49 was as follows:—
Day-school—
Boys   639
Girls   231
■      870
Night-school—
Vocational   824
Non-vocational      89
■      913
Total  1,783
HIGH SCHOOL COMMERCIAL AND AGRICULTURAL COURSES.
The commercial work in the high schools of the Province is still in great demand,
and the placement during the past year has been excellent. Many of the schools have
received special grants toward the purchase of the very latest type of commercial
equipment, and now are offering very efficient courses in the various branches of
commercial work. A number of students also are doing a certain amount of commercial
work in addition to their regular programme toward High School Graduation and
University Entrance. N 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
The enrolment in the following school districts was as follows:—
Students.
Abbotsford  91
Alberni   112
Burnaby  482
Chilliwack   146
Coquitlam  95
Courtenay   32
Cowichan  153
Cranbrook .  44
Creston  135
Fernie  50
Grand Forks  46
Kamloops  130
Kelowna  212
Kimberley  98
Ladysmith  56
Langley  124
Maple Ridge  280
Mission   164
Nanaimo  150
Nelson  58
Total  10,162
During the past year additions have been made to several composite high schools
to provide accommodation and equipment for the teaching of vocational agriculture and
horticulture. Surveys have been made of the Fraser Valley and the Okanagan Valley,
and practical farmers and horticulturists have been very enthusiastic about the plan.
Many of them are giving assistance in the form of advice to local School Boards in
order to make the courses practical and give the pupils an opportunity to carry on their
home projects and to pay visits to successful farms in the various districts.
Agricultural courses were offered during the last school-year in the following
school districts:—
Armstrong 	
Burnaby 	
Students.
New Westminster  254
North Vancouver  349
Ocean Falls  9
Peace River South  116
Penticton   141
Powell River  165
Prince George  73
Prince Rupert  115
Princeton   52
Revelstoke   33
Richmond   277
Saanich  53
Southern Okanagan  131
Surrey  570
Trail  86
Vancouver   3,806
Vernon  90
Greater Victoria   1,031
West Vancouver  153
Chilliwack        174
Courtenay 	
Cowichan	
Creston 	
Delta 	
Grand Forks
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Kettle Valley
Ladysmith _.
udents.
Students
13
Mission 	
36
61
New Westminster
66
174
North Vancouver	
43
5
Ocean Falls	
26
43
Peace River South
37
36
Penticton	
29
31
Prince George
15
22
Quesnel 	
23
17
Salmon Arm	
42
  30
  11
  46
Langley „            145
Maple Ridge  322
Southern Okanagan      136
Surrey         13
Vernon        22
Total  1,444
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF ART.
The following is an excerpt from a report prepared by the principal of the school,
Mr. Charles H. Scott, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A. (Lond.), Dip. G.S.A. :—
" Owing to the demolition of the old Central School, with the consequent loss of
four classrooms which we had been using as an annex, the school again was forced to INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. N 45
conduct its classes outside its own building. Accommodation was found in the city
Social Services Building, corner of Cambie and Pender Streets, Vancouver.
"The annual closing was held on May 27th, 1949. Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie,
president of the University of British Columbia, delivered an inspiring address to the
students and presented the diplomas and scholarship awards. Twenty students received
the diploma of the school, and forty-seven others received the elementary diploma."
The following was the student enrolment during the school-year 1948-49:—
Day-school  221
Night-school and Saturday classes  517
Total  738
NIGHT-SCHOOLS.
The night-schools in this Province are continuing to expand, as there are greater
demands by the adult population for more varied types of courses to satisfy individual
interests and needs. It is encouraging to know that, in addition to non-vocational
classes which are offered for leisure-time enjoyment, there are a greater number of
tradesmen attending night-schools after completing their apprenticeship in order to
gain further knowledge and skill pertaining to their trades. A great number of
students also are attending night-school classes in academic courses in order to obtain
credit toward entrance to university and Senior Matriculation.
All vocational night-classes receive additional grants to the regular night-school
grant if it is shown that the training given will assist the trainees in obtaining gainful
employment or promotion in the occupation of their choice.
The enrolment during the year 1948-49 was as follows:— students
Non-vocational ..    9,892
Vocational*      4,400
Total  14,292
* Also reported under section dealing with Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
TRAINING OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND VOCATIONAL TEACHERS.
Arrangements were made this year with the Vancouver School Board to loan to the
Department of Education space in the Vancouver Vocational Institute for the training
of shop instructors starting in September, 1949. In the meantime, instruction has
been undertaken at Slocan School, Vancouver, in temporary quarters, on a full-time
basis, after which the trainees attended Summer School for further training.
Vocational teachers who could not attend day-classes during the week attended
Saturday classes in the Principles and Techniques of Teaching, and Educational
Psychology.
All the teachers trained during the past year have been appointed to positions in
various parts of the Province.
This training was made possible by the co-operation of the Dominion Department
of Labour and the Provincial Department of Education under the Vocational Schools"
Assistance Agreement.
The enrolment during the past year was as follows:—
Industrial Arts and Vocational Teacher-training Unit—* Enrolment.
Part-time courses   10
Full-time courses  12
—   22
Summer School  118
Total  140
* Also reported under section dealing with Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement. N 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS' ASSISTANCE AGREEMENT.
Industrial, Commercial, and Agricultural Courses have been offered under this
agreement in both day and night schools. More than 50 per cent, of school-hours must
be devoted to vocational training before additional grants can be given. Academic
subjects are also required to " round out" the pupils' general education.
Several schools are now well equipped to offer Vocational Courses. Several new
vocational units have been built this year in various composite high schools and, in
addition, a special building has been erected by the Vancouver School Board known
as the Vancouver Vocational Institute.
The enrolment in day and evening classes operated under the terms of the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement, together with the number of vocational teachers,
is shown below :■—
Number of
Pupils.
Number of Teachers.
Part-time.
Full-time.
3,574
4,400
22
231
1
49
144
1
Totals	
7,996
232
194
VANCOUVER VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE.
This institute will be in full operation by the fall of 1949. The building is of
modern design and is located in the heart of down-town Vancouver, one block from the
central bus depot. Each department has been carefully planned, and all equipment
in the school is of the latest type. Various trade committees have given great service
to the School Board in the planning of each department. With the backing of the
workers and operators in the various trades, there is no doubt that the school will fill
a great need in this Province in providing trade and technical training for our young
people so that they will be able to fit themselves for better positions in the future
growth of our business and industry. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS. N 47
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS.
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc, M.A., DIRECTOR.
Total number of pupils in elementary and junior high schools taking
Home Economics   12,112
Total number in elementary schools     3,538
Total number in junior high schools     8,574
12,112
Grade VI  41
Home Economics I (Grade VII), girls  4,918
Home Economics II (Grade VIII), girls  4,999
Home Economics III (Grade IX), girls  2,118
Elementary-school boys   20
Junior high school boys  16
12,112
School for the Deaf and the Blind         30
Total senior high school students     5,262
Home Economics III     1,311
AH and A III (Foods, Nutrition, etc.)       189
BII and Bill   (Clothing,  Textiles,  Applied  Art,
etc.)         753
CC II (Combination Course)      1,562
CC III  (Combination Course)          690
Special " C " Courses        332
Home Relations         22
Senior Matriculation   5
Vancouver Technical        304
Senior high school boys        154
     5,322
Less—■
54 students take 2 courses in Home Economics          54
1 student takes 3 courses in Home Economics   2
1 student takes 5 courses in Home Economics    4
60
5,262
Private schools—
Elementary (Grades VII and VIII), girls        138
High school (Home Economics III, CC II, and CC III)        171
309
Total number of students taking Home Economics Courses 17,713 N  48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
The shift system, which has been used in some schools, due to increased enrolment,
has curtailed, to some extent, the Home Economics programme. High School Courses
cannot be offered in some schools; it is not possible to include Home Economics in
the programme for all Grade VII students in certain districts. This may be remedied
only when the new school buildings are completed. Thus the figures shown in this
report do not give the complete picture as to the number of students that would be
enrolled in Home Economics if the existing facilities were adequate.
There are 101 Home Economics centres in public schools and 6 private-school
centres throughout the Province. New rooms were opened during the school-year at
Agassiz, Langley Prairie, and Oliver.
Home Economics rooms are included in a number of the new school buildings,
which are expected to be ready for use in September, 1949. These are at Rutland,
Westbank, Hope, Grand Forks, Kelowna, Kimberley, New Westminster Junior High,
Sooke, and Surrey.
There are 154 Home Economics teachers on the staffs of the schools throughout
the Province. Twenty-eight of these are graduates in Home Economics from the University of British Columbia. Four Home Economics graduates were registered in
the teacher-training class at the University of British Columbia in 1948-49. The
majority elect the Home Economics teacher-training classes offered through Summer
School sessions.
The expansion of the work in the schools and the rate of turnover in the teaching
staff, which is high, continues to tax the teacher-supply.
Forty-five Home Economics teachers attended the Summer School sessions held
in Victoria during July and August. Twenty-four of these were beginning teachers
and were appointed to Home Economics teaching positions for the school-year 1949-50.
The four Home Economics graduates who completed the Teacher-training Course at
the University of British Columbia were also placed in teaching positions.
The courses offered at Victoria Summer School this year were Curriculum and
Methods in Home Economics and Problems in Home Economics Education, with Mrs.
Evelyn Hatton, B.Sc, and Miss Jean Irvine, B.Sc, as instructors. Miss Muriel Johnson, B.H.Sc, with Miss Margery Mackay, B.H.Sc, as her assistant, directed the work
of the cafeteria at the Summer School.
Miss Mildred Orr, B.A., B.Sc, Assistant Inspector in Home Economics, was given
the privilege of attending the four weeks' summer session in Home Economics Education offered at Mills College, Oakland, Calif., June 27th to July 22nd. The course
included attendance at the four-day conference of the American Home Economics
Association held in San Francisco. EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE. N  49
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL
SERVICE.
REPORT OF MURIEL A. SCACE, B.A., DIRECTOR.
The Division of Educational Reference and School Service is charged with the
responsibility of publishing British Columbia Schools, the official organ of the Department of Education, which is issued quarterly in elementary and secondary editions.
It is also responsible for the library of the Department of Education and for the
preparation of reference materials for Departmental officials, Inspectors of Schools,
teachers, and Curriculum Committees. The activities of this Division for the school-
year 1948-49 may be summarized as follows:—
"BRITISH COLUMBIA SCHOOLS."
British Columbia Schools, the official publication of the Department of Education,
is sent free of charge eight times during the school-year to all teachers in the Province.
It is designed to provide in-service professional aid, to assist teachers in keeping
abreast of the latest developments in the field of education, to list new teaching aids
and materials, and to acquaint teachers and officials with changes in the Programme
of Studies and with new regulations of the Department of Education.
The publication of a Departmental magazine for teachers was initiated in September, 1944, with the publication of The Rural School, which was sent to both elementary and secondary teachers in the rural areas. Many requests were made that this
magazine be available to all elementary teachers, and in February, 1946, The Rural
School was replaced by British Columbia Schools, Elementary Edition, which is currently issued on a quarterly basis to all teachers in the elementary grades. In October,
1946, the publication of a Secondary Edition of the magazine was also undertaken,
with a free distribution, on a quarterly basis, to all teachers in secondary schools.
During the school-year 1948-49, 11,100 copies of the Elementary Edition were published, and 7,150 copies of the Secondary Edition. This issue provided a sufficient
number of magazines to supply all teachers and principals, Inspectors of Schools,
Departmental officials, and School Boards throughout the Province. In addition, copies
were supplied, upon request, to teachers in private schools, Indian schools, and schools
supported by religious denominations. Copies of each issue of the magazine were
supplied to all students of the Victoria Normal School and of the teacher-training
department at the University of British Columbia. Complimentary copies were also
sent to all Provincial Departments of Education throughout Canada, to a number of
State Departments of Education across the Border, and to numerous educators, educational organizations, and libraries in both Canada and the United States. Files of
the magazine were 'sent, upon request, to U.N.E.S.CO. House in Paris for the use of
students at international seminars of education.
It is notable that fewer magazines were sent to teachers during 1948-49 than
during 1947-48. Curtailed budgetary appropriations made it necessary to limit the
number of issues to three during the school-year for both the Elementary and Secondary Editions. The Elementary Edition was published in September, in November,
and the February and May issues were combined in a single 48-page issue instead of
the usual 64-page publication. Similarly, the Secondary Edition appeared in October,
in a combined December-March issue, and in a 48-page issue in May. Lack of adequate
funds also meant that the use of illustrations was limited.
The greatly increased school enrolment, with the subsequent increase in the
number of teachers, is reflected in the number of magazines required to supply the
teachers of the Province.    The following figures are of interest:   In September, 1946, N  50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
3,300 copies of the Elementary Edition were printed; for September, 1949, 4,300 copies
of the Elementary Edition were required; in October, 1946, 2,000 copies of the Secondary Edition were printed; for October 1949, 2,700 copies of the Secondary Edition
were required.
There has also been a marked increase in the number of magazines sent upon
request to private and Indian schools, and to schools supported by religious denominations.
REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE.
Reference Library Services.
A reference library is maintained in the Department of Education under the
Director of this Division. The resources of this library are available to all Inspectors
of Schools, Departmental and Normal School officials, and teachers engaged upon
special research projects. It is stocked with a wide range of professional books in
the field of education, and is kept up to date through careful evaluation and selection
of the best current literature in the field. During the year 1948-49, 350 new books
were added to the collection. In addition, 131 regularly published educational periodicals, pamphlets, and bulletins are received annually. Of these, 91 are secured through
subscription and 40 upon a free or exchange basis. The library also contains a wide
selection of text-books supplied by publishing firms.
The Director of this Division is responsible for the selection of books for the
Teachers' Professional Library administered by the Public Library Commission.
Through this library service, teachers in all parts of the Province are provided with
free access to a wide range of the best and most up-to-date professional literature in
the field of education.
Text-books and Teaching Materials.
This Division maintains contacts with all educational publishers and evaluates
new text-books and supplementary books and teaching materials of all kinds. Notable
materials of this type are brought to the attention of teachers and officials through
British Columbia Schools.
Programmes of Studies and Curricular Materials.
The Director of this Division acts also as Assistant Director of the Division of
Curriculum and as secretary of the Central Curriculum Committee, and in that capacity is concerned with research in the field of curriculum, with the procuring and the
preparation of professional educational materials for use by members of committees
engaged in curriculum revision, and with the editing, final preparation for printing,
and actual publication of all Programmes of Studies and of numerous Departmental
reports. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39   (VANCOUVER).
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER).
N 51
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS.
ENROLMENT.
Table I.—Enrolment (October of each Year).
Year.
Elementary.
Junior High.
Senior High.
Total.
1929	
1930    	
27,522
27,663
27,953
27,593
26,723
26,335
25,978
25,833
25,348
24,338
23,556
23,032
23,091
22,014
22,383
22,394
22,737
23,338
24,217
25,834
4,363
4,351
4,382
4,417
4,639
4,635
4,578
4,454
4,266
4,165
4,080
4,149
4,354
4,175
4,540
4,396
4,294
4,113
3,906
3,902
6,012
6,801
7,614
8,051
8,131
8,493
8,772
9,131
9,506
10,016
9,856
9,471
8,741
7,166
7,139
7,913
8,295
8,375
8,098
7,799
37,897
38,815
1931	
1932                             	
39,949
40,061
1933                	
39,493
1934	
1935               	
39,463
39,328
1936	
39,418
1937	
1938	
1939	
39,120
38,519
37,492
1940	
36,652
1941            	
36,186
1942*	
33,355
1943	
34,062
1944  	
34,703
1945	
35,326
1946	
35,736
1947	
36,221
1948	
37,535
* Japanese withdrawal from Pacific Coast area.
Table II.—Enrolment Variation (from Table above).
Years compared.
Elementary.
Junior High.
Senior High.
Net Result.
1929 30                    	
141
290
— 360
-870
-388
— 357
— 145
— 485
— 1,010
— 782
— 524
59
— 1,077
369
11
343
201
879
1,617
— 12
31
35
222
— 4
— 57
— 124
— 188
— 101
— 85
69
205
— 179
365
— 144
— 102
— 281
— 107
— 4
789
813
437
80
362
279
359
375
510
— 160
— 385
— 730
— 1,575
— 27
774
382
77
— 274
— 299
918
1,134
1931-32	
1932 33                                   	
112
— 568
1933-34 ...               	
— 30
1934 35                      	
— 135
1935 36             	
— 90
1936-37	
1937-38	
— 298
— 601
1938 39 -	
— 1,027
1939-40	
— 840
1940-41 	
— 466
1941-42    ..            	
— 2,831*
1942-43	
707
1943-44	
641
1944 45 ...                    	
623
1945-46	
397
1946-47	
498
1947-48	
1,314
* Japanese withdrawal and war conditions. N  52 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Observations on Table I.
1. The maximum enrolment in the elementary school was reached in 1931, in the
junior secondary school in 1933, and in the senior secondary school in 1938.
2. For the entire system an all-time peak enrolment of 40,061 was reached in 1932.
3. This maximum was 2,526 above the October, 1948, enrolment of 37,535. From
these figures it might be construed that there should be sufficient accommodation for
the present school enrolment. This is not the case, however, since the school population within the city itself is moving into new areas. For example, the old Central
School once had an enrolment of approximately 700 pupils. In the spring of 1948 the
three small classes remaining were transferred to the Strathcona and Dawson Schools.
The Central School building was destroyed to make room for the construction of our
new Vocational Institute.
4. Because of this movement of school population within the city limits, and
because of the influx of new pupils from districts outside the city, some of the schools
in the southern and south-eastern parts of the city have had to operate on a double
shift to accommodate the enrolment. New school accommodation now being provided
in these areas will eliminate many of the overcrowded conditions.
Observations on Table II.
1. There was a continuous decrease in total enrolment from 1932 to 1942, inclusive.
This can be attributed to the following causes: (a) Removal of the Japanese from the
Pacific Coast area in 1942; (b) low birth-rates during the depression years of the early
thirties (see birth-rate graph below); (c) the withdrawal of a large number of senior
high school students to enlist in the armed services and to accept war-time employment
in industry.
2. There has been a continuous increase in total enrolment from 1943 to 1948,
inclusive. Most of this increase has taken place in the primary grades of the elementary school. There was, however, a large percentage decrease in the junior secondary
school.    A glance at the birth-rate graph will explain some of these variations. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39   (VANCOUVER).
N 53
Births in Vancouver, 1918 to 1948, inclusive.
10,500
10,000
K
COtOtXJCiiao^Ht'Ot-tOtO      tr-tr*COCiCQGiCOCa<-)tr-iarH£-rH\aCA*D**t<rHrH
Ciiacoco~<#m£-coiaciia    -*t<iair-cocA<o>cotr-iacAtooitr-ia*3<cii-HCiCiCA
CA    CA     O    W     OOOO     CTJ     H    O    rH     rP      to     to     M    (B    m     'J     Ifl    IO     Oi     NCOOtO'<DlOCOWOO     t-
MN't.I'MMMT.
■o.     CO    M     M     «    «     CO     "tf    •"#     1£)     lO<0     b-    fc-   fc"    ft
BIRTHS PER YEAR, 1918-48. N 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-4
3. In estimating school population, the influx of pupils from areas outside our
own school district must be studied also for noticeable trends. The table below, prepared by our Bureau of Measurements, under the direction of Inspector R. Straight,
gives the geographical origin of new pupils enrolled in our city school system between
September 7th, 1948, and November 30th, 1948:—
Origin.
Elementary.
Secondary.
Total.
846
148
160
132
7
156
35
116
16
43
23
3
6
2
318
55
72
58
4
61
16
35
9
13
1
5
1,164
203
232
190
11
217
51
151
25
56
11. China	
24
3
11
2
Totals	
1,693
647
2,340
This influx of school population has been carefully tabulated since 1936.
following table shows the trends:—
The
1936   2,012
1937   2,249
1938   1,865
1939   1,760
1940   2,294
1941   2,931
1942  3,372
1943
2,388
1944   2,420
1945   2,008
1946   2,451
1947   2,388
1948   2,340 SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39   (VANCOUVER).
N  55
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADES, SEPTEMBER 30TH, 1948, VANCOUVER.
cn
H
P.
D
Ph
XII      XIII
Number
of Pupils.
ACCOMMODATION.
During the past year we have faced a building problem probably unprecedented
in the history of Vancouver. Some of the schools were overcrowded, through no fault
of the school authorities, and a unique housing situation has been created by two
Government housing projects. Although the largest sum of money ever allotted for
school buildings in Vancouver has been available, a completely adequate building programme would have presented a task impossible of completion to our efficient architectural staff. The employment of outside architects decreases the burden somewhat,
but our staff must still prepare broad specifications and sketch plans and spend considerable time in consultations. Consequently, it has been impossible to accomplish all
that we would have liked to achieve, and it has been necessary to postpone some long-
projected constructions for more urgent ones.
We have attempted to attain two objectives this year: First, a more extensive
study of school-building planning because of our belief that with the large building
fund now available a mistake in school planning could result in the unwise expenditure
of a considerable sum of money, and, second, the construction of essential school
buildings as quickly as possible to relieve overcrowding and the provision of more
adequate educational facilities for some of the existing elementary schools.
The study of building planning has included the prediction of the school enrolment in each section of the city, an analysis of the methods of providing accommodation for peak enrolments, and the preparation of a suggested school building programme
for the immediate future.
To obtain a complete picture of the building requirements for each district, three
separate enrolment forecasts have been made—the immediate enrolment, the stable or N 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
permanent school population, and the peak enrolment. The prediction of each of these
has been based upon an analysis of the effect of the following factors: The trend in
school enrolment, the construction of new dwellings, Government housing projects,
the amount of vacant residential property, the zoning plans of the Town Planning
Commission, school boundaries, and the further introduction of the 6-6 system of
education. The taking of a census of preschool-age children and the calculation of an
index of the number of children per housing unit in the various socio-economic areas
of the city provided valuable additional data.
The importance of differentiating between stable and peak enrolments when preparing a school-building programme became evident with a cursory glance at the trend
in the school population of some of the older sections of the city. In three schools
alone the enrolment has dropped an average of 35 per cent, during the last two decades.
Hence, from a practical point of view, each of these schools has empty classrooms.
With permanent buildings now costing approximately $20,000 per room, we feel that
the most costly mistake we could make would be the construction of permanent buildings to house temporary enrolments.
It appears that the most serious overcrowding next year may be expected in the
Douglas School district. If the plans of the Central Mortgage Corporation to construct 1,100 homes in this area and rent them to families with at least two children
are carried out, then a unique peak-enrolment problem may be expected there in three
or four years. It will present as extreme an example as we may ever encounter of
the danger of overbuilding permanent structures.
Three methods of providing for peak enrolments were considered. These were
the use of swing shifts, the transportation of pupils to vacant rooms in other parts
of the city, and the construction of portable classrooms.
A careful study of each of these methods suggests the following general conclusions :—
Swing-shift classes may be justified where the overcrowding will last for
only a short period; for example, while an addition is being completed.
Transportation of pupils in this city should be used as a method of relieving
overcrowding only where the addition of portables is impracticable and the
use of swing-shift classes will not entirely solve the problem. The purpose
of portable schools is primarily the provision of accommodation for temporary peak enrolments and secondarily the provision of additional accommodation at schools where more extensive additions are not at present required.
Since a portable should cost considerably less than a permanent classroom
and should make unnecessary the construction of one or more permanent
classrooms, it appears that the construction of some portable units should
result in a considerable saving to the taxpayers.
Following this investigation, an experimental portable room was designed by our
architects, constructed, and moved.    The result justified its construction.
The building programme for the past year has provided additional accommodation in as many crowded areas as possible either by additions to existing buildings or
the construction of new schools in areas too remote from established schools. The
addition of auditorium-gymnasiums to several elementary schools has provided them
with facilities which should make possible the introduction of a more adequate educational programme. The construction of Gladstone Secondary School and an addition
to John Oliver Secondary School will change two additional areas to the 6-6 system
of education. The completion of the Vancouver Vocational Institute will be a milestone in the development of adult and vocational education in this city.
. school district no. 39 (vancouver). n 57
School Buildings completed during the School-year, 1948-49.
Begbie (addition) : Ten classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium, lunchroom, library,
artroom.
Lloyd George, Unit III:   Four classrooms, activity-room.
Maple Grove, Unit II:  Four classrooms, activity-room.
Alexandra:   Auditorium-gymnasium.
Carleton:   Auditorium-gymnasium.
School Buildings under Construction, 1948-49.
Gladstone Secondary: Twenty-two standard classrooms, fourteen special rooms,
four shops, double gymnasium, cafeteria.
John Oliver Secondary (addition) : Sixteen standard classrooms, sixteen special
rooms, double gymnasium.
Vancouver Vocational Institute: Seventeen training units (a training unit consists of a shop, classroom, and storeroom facilities).
Renfrew (addition) : First wing—seven classrooms, lunchroom; second wing—
six classrooms and provision for three additional.
Kitchener, Unit II  (addition) :   Two classrooms.
King Edward Secondary:   Gymnasium, cafeteria.
Cecil Rhodes:   Auditorium-gymnasium.
School Buildings for which Plans are being prepared.
Prince of Wales Elementary and Secondary:   Gymnasium.
Lord Byng Secondary (addition): Five classrooms, four special rooms, library,
auditorium-gymnasium, cafeteria, two shops.
Beaconsfield (addition) :   Four classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Douglas (addition) : Fifteen classrooms, library, auditorium-gymnasium, lunchroom.
Sexsmith (addition) :  Two classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Hudson:  Auditorium-gymnasium.
Van Home (addition) :   Six classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Portable schools:  Seven classrooms.
Administration building.
TESTING AND OTHER ACTIVITIES OF THE
BUREAU OF MEASUREMENTS.
1. Number of individual tests given, 814.
2. Number of pupils given group intelligence tests, 9,697.
3. Special intelligence tests were given to 229 prospective Grade IB pupils who
were under 6 years of age prior to December 1st, 1948. Eighty-eight of these were
admitted on trial to Grade Ib; the others were rejected as being unlikely to succeed
with work of Grade I.
4. At the commencement of the school-year the Detroit Beginning First Grade
Intelligence Test (revised) was given to all pupils of Grade I (4,500 approximately).
5. For promotion in June, 1949, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects
were given to approximately 2,900 pupils of Grades VI and VIII (the Grade VI pupils
were in junior high school areas for promotion to junior high school, and the Grade VIII
pupils in senior high school areas for promotion to senior high school). The results
of these standardized tests are of tremendous assistance to the teachers, principals, and
Inspectors in maintaining levels of achievement. N  58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
6. Primary Reading Survey.—In June, 1949, the Primary Department, in co-operation with the Bureau of Measurements, gave the Haggerty Reading Examination
Sigma I to 1,129 Grade I pupils and 1,085 Grade II pupils in certain schools of the city.
7. Metropolitan Testing Programme.—During the week of October 25th, 1949, all
pupils of Grade VII in the Vancouver schools were given two battery tests, as follows:—
(a) Intelligence (Pintner General Ability Tests, Verbal Series; Pintner Intermediate Test, Form B).
(b) Achievement   (Metropolitan   Achievement   Tests,   Intermediate   Partial,
Form T).
This is part of a continent-wide testing programme of the larger cities in Canada
and the United States. It is the outgrowth of co-operative thinking of a group of city
directors of research which began over a year ago. The Department of Education for
the Province sponsored the programme in Vancouver.
These tests were given to all Grade VII pupils in the following cities: New York,
Philadelphia, Detroit, Dallas, San Diego, Cleveland, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Portland, and Vancouver, B.C.
As a result of this survey, certain continent-wide standards will be available for
each test. The following progress report has been received from the Director of Tests
and Standards for the Province as a whole:—
" The final report on the large-city testing programme that was carried out in
October, 1948, has just been received.
" While a much more comprehensive report will be issued after further study of
the data, I thought that you would be interested in knowing that Vancouver stood
highest on the list in over-all achievement. The ranks achieved by Vancouver pupils
in relation to the other ten cities were:— Modal-age
All Pupils. Group.
Chronological age  11 or lowest
I.Q. (103)   1 (highest) __
Reading   2 2
Vocabulary  1 2
Arithmetic fundamentals   1 1
Arithmetic problems  1 2
English (punctuation, capitalization, language
usage)    1 1
Spelling   1 1
" While it is true that the average intelligence quotient of the pupils is among the
highest, the low chronological age reduces the mental age, and it is four months lower
than either of the other two cities having comparable achievement. The achievement
record for Vancouver pupils may be considered to be outstanding when compared with
that of similar American cities.    Further details will be forwarded later."
8. An analysis of the results of the University Entrance and Senior Matriculation
Examinations for June, 1948, was made and distributed to all the principals of the
senior high schools.
9. An outline of all the courses offered in the secondary schools (junior and senior)
was prepared and distributed to all elementary- and secondary-school principals. These
outlines were very valuable to the guidance and counselling staff.
10. The National Employment Service was assisted by the registration in the
schools of students who desired jobs during the vacation period, and also of those who,
on completing their secondary-school education, wished to procure permanent employment in industry and commerce.
11. Information issued by the Department of Labour, Ottawa, relative to employment was distributed to the students, counsellors, and principals of the system.
I wish to commend Inspector Straight, Director of the Bureau of Measurements,
and his staff for the excellence of many tasks performed. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39   (VANCOUVER).
N 59
HEALTH SERVICES.
Under the capable direction of Dr. Stewart Murray, Chief Medical Health Officer,
and his efficient staff of doctors, dentists, and nurses, our school health services have
been well maintained.
The excellent co-operation between the personnel of the medical department and
that of the teaching staff has developed a fine programme of health education and
practice.
To all the officials and staff of these departments I am most grateful for their help
and guidance.
SUPERVISION OF INSTRUCTION.
All schools have been visited at different times by the inspectorial staff as well as
by the special supervisory staff for Music, Art, Home Economics, Primary and Physical
Education. Reports which have been submitted by the supervisors and Inspectors
relative to the newly appointed teachers have helped as a check on teaching efficiency.
The entire staff on supervision of instruction have on all occasions endeavoured to assist
the teachers with their educational growth and development. A large number of
in-service group conferences have been held during the year. I am confident that
a high degree of teaching efficiency has been maintained.
The appointment of Dr. R. F. Sharp to the inspectorial staff in September, 1948,
assisted the headquarters staff considerably. He has been assigned to special duties,
all of which have helped our general plan of supervision of instruction.
The following members of the staff were granted superannuation. All are highly
commended for their many years of loyal and efficient service:—
Teacher.
School.
Date of
Appointment.
F. A. Armstrong	
Miss M. K. Cameron	
C. Crabb	
E. C. Duncan	
Miss O. E. Elliott	
J. Fraser	
J. A. Hamilton	
Miss H. M. Hesson	
Miss R. A. Kerr	
O. Lacey	
C. Logan	
T. J. Longhurst	
Miss E. M. Montgomery
G. W. MacKinnon	
W. G. Ramage	
Miss G. C. Riesberry	
Mrs. A. G. Russell	
Miss H. M. Smith	
Miss R. R. Wadleigh	
McBride (principal)	
Kerrisdale	
Templeton Junior High....
Lord Kitchener	
Kitsilano High	
Technical	
Selkirk (principal)	
Selkirk	
Psychiatrist	
Maple Grove (principal).
Beaconsfield (principal)..
Technical	
John Oliver	
John Oliver	
Laura Secord (principal)
Kitchener	
Special class	
Kerrisdale	
Special class	
January, 1916.
November, 1915.
February, 1920.
September, 1925.
September, 1927.
September, 1921.
January, 1906.
August, 1908.
January, 1910.
September, 1920.
January, 1917.
September, 1931.
September, 1925.
June, 1911.
August, 1912.
February,1925.
September, 1920.
October, 1910.
January, 1913.
I report with regret the death of the following members of the staff, who have
served the school system so faithfully:—
Teacher.
School.
Date of
Appointment.
Date of Decease.
H A Eckardt            .         	
September, 1938
January, 1933	
September 2, 1948.
August 30, 1948.
September, 1920
September 28, 1948. N 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
In conclusion I should like to pay particular tribute to the Mayor, City Council,
Library Board, Park Board, Fire Department, Police Department, and all officials of
these organizations for their excellent co-operation at all times.
To the press I extend my thanks for the fair and interesting presentation of the
schools' business for the year.
This excellent year's work could not have been accomplished or even undertaken
without the entire support and co-operation of the Board of School Trustees. These
men and women who give so freely of their time without remuneration are deserving of
special praise.
To you, sir, and the members of your Department I am particularly indebted for
your patience, advice, and support. I am pleased to be associated with you and your
Department in the administration of the schools of this district. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. N  61
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 61 (GREATER VICTORIA).
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.Pjed., SENIOR MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR, AND JOHN GOUGH, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR.
In many ways this has been an eventful school-year, with the usual problems,
chief of which has been school accommodation. During the month of February a
second school census was taken of all pre-school children, and the results show that
we shall require many more classrooms during the next five years than are at present
available. This means that the building programme planned in 1947 will have to be
carried out in full in the near future, or we shall have to resort to temporary units
or the shift system. Fortunately, the by-law submitted to the ratepayers in May for
extra money to proceed with the View Royal Elementary School and the Topaz Avenue
Junior High School passed with a substantial margin, and we are already in the
process of constructing these schools to provide for some relief in the more congested
sections of this district. The new technical unit has been completed and will be
opened officially in October, 1949. This is a splendid building and will fill a long-felt
need in Greater Victoria.
During the school-year, teaching efficiency, in most respects, has been maintained
at a high level. The work of the supervisory staff has been very effective. The
teachers, for the most part, avail themselves of the facilities and assistance provided by
the Inspectors and supervisors. One cannot speak too highly of the fine spirit of unity
and co-operation which prevails among the principals and staff in this system.
Victoria College.
(John M. Ewing, B.A., D.Psed., Principal.)
The 1948-49 session has been one of quiet development and consolidation. Facilities have steadily been improved, and academic standards have been maintained.
The matter of adequate accommodation is a perennial problem at the College.
Prior to the opening of the 1948-49 session, the College was required to give up two
classrooms and an office to the Normal School. The situation was met by renting a
room at the University School and by various unsatisfactory expedients within the
main building and the laboratories.
A start was made in 1948-49 in laying out a standard rugby field on land acquired
from the Greater Victoria School Board. This field should be ready for use in the fall
of 1950.
An evening division of the College was opened in September, 1948, and attracted
a large registration. Professor R. T. D. Wallace was appointed Director. Setting off
without grants of any sort, the evening division ended its first year of operation with
a sound credit balance. The evening division was warmly welcomed by the general
public and has a bright future.
A total of 416 day-division students registered at the College during the 1948-49
session. Of these, only 45 were student-veterans. It should be noted that the student-
veteran wave is over as far as the College is concerned. Altogether, 789 student-
veterans have attended the College since September, 1944.
The following table is of interest as showing ordinary (non-veteran) registration
over the past ten years:— N  62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
1939-40  235 1944-45  258
1940-41  240 1945-46  335
1941-42  238 1946-47  344
1942-43  264 1947-48  367
1943-44  194 1948-49  371
The number of evening-division students registered at the College in 1948-49
was 289.
Student enterprises and activities were carried on with the usual enthusiasm and
success. Athletics, drama, and music were the most prominent, but a great many clubs
were in vigorous operation.
The University naval training division was consolidated and expanded.
Under the capable presidency of Mr. William Levis, the Alma Mater Society coordinated all student activities, and provided excellent leadership throughout the year.
The annual assembly was held on the evening of Friday, October 22nd. Mr. J. B.
Clearihue, chairman of Victoria College Council, presided, and the address was delivered by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education. Twenty-seven scholarships and eight prizes were presented.
Secondary Schools.
Victoria High School.
(H. L. Smith, Principal.)
With the completion of the new Technical unit at the Victoria High School, greatly
improved facilities for the students of the Greater Victoria School District will be available when school reopens in September. For the first time in the history of the school
the complete comprehensive technical programme in operation can be given on the
immediate school premises. Valuable student time previously required in moving from
school to school will, in future, be conserved. Not only will specialized vocational training be made available, but instruction in Industrial Arts and Technical Courses will be
more accessible to all students who desire this training.
Although the construction of the Memorial Stadium was the outstanding achievement of the staff and students of the school during the year just concluded, other school
activities were well sustained. It is a source of satisfaction to report a fuller participation of the student-body in the athletic life of the school than in any previous year on
record. A high standard of excellence was reached in choral music, and excellent dramatic performances were given by our students, both at the school drama festival and
at the annual school play. A school orchestra that had been discontinued for some years
was reorganized. An increasing number of employers of labour in the community are
also availing themselves of the facilities of our Vocational Placement Department, under
Mr. R. Heywood's capable direction.
Oak Bay High School.
(D. H. Hartness, B.A., Principal.)
Enrolment in September totalled 359, as against 396 for September, 1947. This
large drop is nearly entirely accounted for by the small Grade IX classes enrolled last
year;  namely, 76, in September, 1948, as against 106 in September, 1947.
The school this year had the largest graduating class in its history—91 students.
The usual programme of sports and games has been carried on in the school and
has received encouragement and stimulus from the good work done by Miss F. M. Brown
and Mr. E. J. Costain, who carry the Physical Education programme. A highlight of
the year in this regard was the winning by the Oak Bay team of the Provincial track
and field championship in Vancouver. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. N  63
The students of the school have made satisfactory progress through the year in
most cases. They have taken an active part in the administration of their own affairs
through their Students' Council and some part in handling the discipline of corridors,
bicycle-sheds, and so on through the prefects and senior Students' Council members.
Their other useful activities have included the organization of various school functions
and the publication both of a school paper, the Oak Leaf, and a school annual.
Mount View High School.
(J. M. Thomas, M.A., D.Pa_d., Principal.)
The school opened in September, 1948, with the highest enrolment in its history.
The prospective enrolment for September, 1949, is somewhat higher than prospects at
the same time in 1948.
All required courses, as well as a number of Commercial and other optional courses,
were offered. No courses were put on unless enrolment was ten or over. Additional
Technical and Vocational Courses offered attracted a number of boys. Fourth-year
Commercial and Journalism Courses will be offered in 1949-50.
A full programme of interhouse sports was carried on. In addition, school teams
took part in inter-high-school activities. In drama and music the school showed encouraging progress and an active interest among a large number of pupils. Hi-Y Girls,
Junior Red Cross, and numerous other clubs had an active and successful year. Publication of the semi-monthly school paper and of the annual was a major project of one
group of pupils.
There is general improvement in physical and library equipment. The proposed
building of lockers will fill a great need of many years' standing. School Board contributions to the library, plus the contribution of the Parent-Teacher Association, have
improved our library facilities much.
In general, the good quality of service by the staff has been maintained. Several
changes in the staff, owing to death and other causes, have made things a little more
difficult in some departments.
The understanding co-operation of the Senior Inspector of Schools for the district
and of other School Board officials and department directors has been of the greatest
value to the principal and staff in their work.
Esquimau High School.
(Clive Kelly, B.A., Principal.)
The attendance at this school has been stationary for the last two or three years.
The greatest incidence of withdrawal occurs in the commercial-option division of the
school in Grade IX. Some of these are over-age pupils and leave to accept positions as
these become available.
In athletics the pupils participated in all interschool sports, with the exception of
rugby. For this purpose the school is organized into three houses—Neptune, Mercury,
and Jupiter—with appropriate crests and mottoes.
During the year some improvements were carried out on the buildings and grounds,
but this is an old building and needs redecorating both outside and inside.
Among special activities may be noted the prize-giving ceremony last October,
when trophies, school letters, and the I.O.D.E. scholarship were awarded. Prefect pins
were also presented at that time. The spring concert held at the end of March, entitled
" Entertainment Through the Ages," was an outstanding success, particularly from a
publicity and public-relations standpoint. Finally, the at-home for parents in June was
successful and did much to cement the good relations between the parents and the school. N  64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Mount Douglas High School.
(Eric Forster, B.A., B.Ed., Principal.)
During the year the following courses were made available: Drama, Music, and
Practical Arts. However, due to the relatively small enrolment it is difficult to give a
well-balanced programme which would include many of the optional subjects now available to high school students.
Student activities have been carried out under the guidance of the Students' Council. For purposes of competition the school is divided into three houses. Interesting
programmes in public speaking, short-story writing, and a poetry contest characterized
the work of the year.
Central Junior High School.
(A. T. Hunkin, B.Sc, M.A., Principal.)
The enrolment at this school was maintained satisfactorily during the present year.
We enrolled 158 pupils in Grade VII and about the same number in Grade VIII. The
plan this year of having a few pupils transferred to this school in Grade VII from most
of the elementary schools worked well.
Again this year the physical education has been carried out under the " exponent "
system, each pupil being classified as a senior, an intermediate, or a junior, according
to age, height, and weight. The pupils competed on this basis in an extensive intramural programme of organized games and in the annual track and field sports day. All
girls and boys are placed in one of three houses. They stay in the same house as long
as they remain in the school. The girls' house competition consisted of games in grass
hockey, basketball, and softball. The boys took part in games of soccer, basketball, and
softball. Altogether, there were no less than thirty-nine organized boys' teams. In
addition, the older boys and girls took part in the Inter-high-school League.
An innovation this year was a special dance programme also carried on during the
first term in the noon-hour, to instruct Grade IX pupils in the fundamentals of ballroom
dancing. Included in this was a certain amount of guidance in social behaviour. This
activity culminated in a very successful Christmas dance. The staff was highly
gratified by the good manners and courtesy shown by the pupils to each other.
Elementary Schools.
(John Gough, M.A., Municipal Inspector of Schools.)
The total enrolment at the twenty-eight elementary schools was 7,701 as at November, 1948. This represented an increase of 456 over one year ago. To meet this rise in
numbers, additional classroom space was prepared at Quadra, Tolmie, Cedar Hill, Victoria West, and Margaret Jenkins Schools; two rooms were added to the stucco annex
at Oaklands; an army hut was converted into a satisfactory classroom at McKenzie
Avenue; and a modern single-room unit was built at Willows School. Census returns
show that it will be necessary to reproduce four more of these attractive locally designed
units at Craigflower, Gordon Head, Willows, and Mount View High Schools to meet
anticipated attendance in September, 1949.
By and large the elementary schools have had a successful year; the faithful teaching of prescribed subject-matter has been accompanied by a relatively rich and purposeful programme of co-curricular activities. Reference might be made to the splendid
manner in which the pupils and staffs participated in community enterprises, the noncompetitive music meet, the drama festival, and the annual school sports—all of which
served, among other things, to cultivate a more unified spirit within this amalgamated
school district. The reports of the directors of various departments of the school
system, as given in the pages which follow, provide further details on school management and achievement. reports of municipal inspectors. N 65
Kindergarten-Primary Department.
(Miss Marian D. James, Director.)
During the school-year 1948-49 the Primary Department of the Greater Victoria
schools was organized as follows: Ninety-seven primary classes (Grades I to III),
eight kindergarten classes, and four crafts classes.
Every effort was made to raise the standards of work and to use intelligently the
resources available to the teachers of Greater Victoria School District No. 61. More
and more visits were made. Many of these visits were followed by interviews with
principals and teachers.
The instructional service centre operated by this department at the education
centre for the loan of books, magazines, and recordings was used extensively by teachers
of all grades. The following is a report on loans made, etc.: 389 loans of professional
books, 157 (at least) professional magazines, 629 sets (approximately 15 books) of
supplementary readers, and 300 recordings.
Regular primary meetings were held during the year. At these meetings the stress
was always on co-ordinating the work of the grade levels and on improving instructional
practices. Good discussions were held on current problems. Mr. Bigsby, Music Supervisor, and Mr. Grant, Physical Education Supervisor, met with the teachers during
March and April. Both of these supervisors gave very helpful talks and answered
numerous questions. Also, in May, a Reading Conference sponsored by the Provincial
Normal School was well attended and greatly appreciated by the teachers.
The eight kindergartens of Greater Victoria continue to prove very satisfactory.
Many teachers are becoming interested in this work and are eager to see the expansion
of the programme.   Parents from all districts are eager for kindergarten centres.
Primary-Junior-Intermediate-Senior Crafts Department.
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director.)
Between fifteen and twenty pupils attended each of the four Crafts classes again
this year. The age-groups represented were: Primary, 7 to 9 years; junior, 9 to
11 years; intermediate, 10 to 12 years; senior, 13 to 17 years. In all four classes,
handicrafts played an important part in instruction, and the three " R's " were related
to activities wherever possible.
Primary.—The children were given a new start in the fundamental subjects, and
an effort was made to establish confidence and pride in their work.
Art or practical arts was taken each day, correlated with reading, language, or
social studies. Raffia-work, paper-cutting, and making stuffed animals were among the
activities undertaken.
Junior.-—Until the end of January the pupils spent one afternoon a week in studying home economics at South Park School. The lessons stressed the importance and
preparation of essential foods for breakfast and lunch.
Mornings and afternoons in the classroom were spent on the basic subjects of
reading, spelling, writing, arithmetic, language, science, health, and some social studies.
They also had singing and practical arts. The latter included mask-making, papier-
mache bowls, potato-printing, finger-painting, and other smaller projects.
Intermediate.—Throughout the year special emphasis was placed on the basic
subjects, particularly comprehension in reading and oral and written language. In all
written work they aimed for neatness, and this showed a marked improvement in most
cases.
This year, for the first time, the junior and intermediate classes took their turn
along with the other classes in the school in presenting an assembly programme.
Senior.—In their home-room the boys received instruction in reading, writing,
spelling, arithmetic, science, language, social studies, and leather-craft.    In addition, N  66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
by platoon system, they had two lessons per week in each of the following: Remedial
reading, physical education, industrial arts, general art-work, sewing, and cooking.
When weather permitted, the class went outside once a day for a game of
football or baseball, according to the season. The time-table was arranged, whenever
possible, to alternate academic and activity periods. During the year the pupils made
educational expeditions to the Provincial Museum, the Provincial Legislature, Beaver
Lake, and the Astronomical Observatory on Little Saanich Mountain.
Leather-craft was by far the most popular subject on their curriculum and the
boys learned to make wallets, purses, belts, and key-cases. Through this hobby they
were able to earn some pocket-money, too. They had an exhibition of their leather-
craft work before Christmas.
Department of Physical Education.
(George Grant, B.A., Director.)
1. In-service Training Plans and Programme.—The in-service training of teachers
in physical education was carried out in a somewhat different manner from last year.
Instead of holding a series of meetings in one month and covering the year's activities,
as we did in October, 1947, it was decided to have four meetings throughout the year,
covering one-quarter of the year's work at each meeting.
These separate meetings were well attended and materials ably demonstrated by
committee members for each grade. A major undertaking was the assembling and
mimeographing of all the materials, three lots for each grade, and distribution to all
teachers.   This material should serve as an excellent course of study for this district.
2. Sports Associations.—The High School Boys' and Girls' Councils both carried
out a successful year's schedules of inter-high sports. The junior high entered teams
in the junior divisions of basketball, soccer, and softball. Junior and senior high
schools completed the year with outstanding track and field meets. The pick of the
high school athletes attended the Provincial track meet in Vancouver, where Oak Bay's
stars won the meet. Other Provincial competitions entered were Oak Bay in the soccer,
Victoria High in the boys' basketball, and Victoria High in the girls' basketball, the
Victoria High girls being hosts for the latter.
The elementary schools had an interesting and successful year also. All leagues
were open except the softball, in which the juniors also had a league.
The annual swim gala is the only interschool activity where all schools of the
district meet together. This year's gala resulted in overwhelming victories for Victoria High and Sir James Douglas in their respective divisions.
3. General.—A committee of teachers from this district was responsible for the
planning and carrying-out of the Physical Education Section meetings of the Vancouver
Island Teachers' Convention in November. The instructive and interesting meetings
were appreciated by all who attended.
In the swimming programme an attempt was made to contact Grade VII and VIII
students who had not had the opportunity to learn to swim in Grade V. Several classes
were organized, but attendance was spotty and very few were interested in trying the
beginner's test. Two classes from Willows School, organized by a high school Red
Cross instructor, were carried to a successful conclusion. The Victoria High girls'
classes (ten weeks of the physical education programme) were the usual success, with
a high percentage of passes in the Red Cross junior, intermediate, and senior tests.
Finally, the Grade V learn-to-swim programme was better than ever.
Strathcona Trust awards for the year's programme in physical education have
been awarded to Victoria High and Central Junior High, equal; Burnside, Lampson
Street, Oaklands, South Park, Strawberry Vale, Tolmie, and Victoria West, equal. reports of municipal inspectors. n 67
Child Study Department.
(Miss Verna Turner, M.A., Director.)
This year the Child Study Department continued the work of using tests and
measurements to improve instruction and direct remedial work. Many other purposes
were served at the same time by the same tests—purposes relating to educational
guidance, placement, promotion, and programming of individual pupils.
During the fall term of 1948 a programme of scholastic aptitude testing was
administered with class-teachers participating. Detailed, individual psychometric and
case studies of prospective crafts pupils were made, too. As an aid in carrying out
Provincial surveys for the Department of Education, Division of Tests and Standards,
aptitude and science tests were given in Grades XI and XII, as well as a spelling test
in Grade VII.
This year the Child Study Department directed a reading drive in Grade IV
through to Grade IX. One new error-study on work-type reading skills was discussed
and studied in detail with all teachers in Grades IV to IX. Reading tests were used by
principals as well as by this department to identify retarded readers early in the year.
The tests were all supplied by this department. Work-books in reading were made
quickly available for use with remedial-reading cases. The results reflected the fine
co-operation of the Greater Victoria teaching staff and were very gratifying indeed.
The spring testing programme in the Greater Victoria area revealed a significant gain
in general reading ability over all previous years both in Grade VI and in Grade VIII.
Audio-Visual Department.
(Denis W. Brown, B.A., Director.)
During the period September, 1948, to June, 1949, this department has endeavoured to provide services in all related forms of projected and non-projected aids.
These services were stimulated by the full-time appointment of the Director in January, 1949.
1. Projected Aids.—The co-operation of the Division of Visual Education, through
the Provincial Director, Mr. J. R. Pollock, has greatly enhanced the effective use of
films in Greater Victoria schools. Early in 1948 each school submitted its requirements
for the ensuing school-year. Where duplication of requests was encountered, arrangements were made for the circuiting of these motion pictures which were heavily in
demand. Requisitions for all schools were submitted to the Division of Visual Education, and films were booked for week periods where circuiting was not necessarily
by demand.
In addition to films, considerable use was made of epidiascopes and radio programmes, particularly in the elementary schools.
2. Non-projected Aids.—In the field of non-projected aids, considerable improvements have been brought about in the use and cataloguing of maps; eight schools were
equipped with a nucleus of school museums; the organization of school journeys has
been systematized in this department; models for use in science, health, and social
studies have been made available to all schools from a centralized depot; a flat picture
file comprising 3,000 mounted pictures is now available to supplement the work done in
the school, and, in addition, the Audio-Visual Department contains an index of 1,500
free sources of material of all kinds, which is always at the disposal of the teaching
staff of the Greater Victoria school system.
Speech Therapy Department.
(Miss Marie C. Crickmay, Director.)
During the school-year 1948-49 seventy-five children with speech difficulties have
been treated in the Speech Clinic. Ten of these were pre-school children reported
either by their mothers or by the health nurses in whose district they lived;   the N  68 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
remainder were attending the schools of Greater Victoria and ranged from Grade I
children up to those attending high school. All of these cases have shown considerable
improvement, and twenty-six are now restored to normal speech.
An interesting factor in this year's work has been the inauguration of a Speech
Therapy Course at night-school. This course, held between January and Easter at
Victoria High School, was open to both parents and teachers, three parents and thirteen
teachers enrolling. The course was designed primarily to give teachers some understanding of the principles underlying speech therapy, and the methods whereby they
could help some of the minor cases in their classes, cases which owing to lack of time
cannot be treated in the Speech Clinic.
Music Department.
(H. J. Bigsby, B.Mus., Acting Director.)
The classroom music programme this past year concerned itself with two phases—■
concentration at the primary level and a general survey of objectives and attainments
at the intermediate and senior levels.
At the primary level, meetings with the teachers were arranged by Miss Marian
James, Primary Director, and certain phases of primary music, such as methods,
remedial work for out-of-tuners, rhythm bands, and choice of song materials, were
discussed.   This was followed up in visiting the classrooms during the year.
A general survey of intermediate grades still shows the necessity of having more
class time if they are to accomplish a satisfactory programme. While some Grade VII
and VIII classes are producing part singing of high calibre—some utilizing alto-tenor
and bass for four-part singing—other senior grades will need a period of time to adjust
all the problems, such as the changing voice of the boy, etc., that exist at this level.
The instrumental portion of this year's music programme received major attention.
The number of band students advanced to and exceeded the totals taught during the
early years of the war. The plan of having two centres for instruction was maintained,
with the possibility of a third centre being formed sometime in the future. Mr. R. E.
Grant was appointed to succeed Mr. A. Prescott, who passed away last summer. Some
75 beginners were started at the two centres during the year and a total of 116 received
instruction.   The two bands combined for various functions during the year.
Home Economics Department.
(Miss B. T. Ramsay, M.A., Director (Part-time).)
All the eight Home Economics centres are now being used full time, with the
exception of Victoria West, with twelve full-time instructors and one part-time.
Some of the equipment in our centres is very old, but each year some is being
replaced, so that before long we hope to have all the centres properly equipped.
Several of the centres have been redecorated during the past year, and it is hoped the
others will be done this year, as they are in much need of it.
During this year we have been able to take advantage of several very fine commercial projects, such as Miniature Manikins, portraying costumes from the fifteenth
century to modern times, presented by the Lux Educational Services, and Clothes for
the Modern Miss by the Dominion Pattern Company. In most high schools these were
given to all-girl assemblies.
An interesting competition on home furnishings was promoted by the Standard
Furniture Company, of Victoria. Excellent lectures were given by trained interior
decorators, and the girls obtained much valuable information and practical help. reports of municipal inspectors. N 69
Industrial Arts and Vocational Training.
(George Anstey, Director.)
During the past year 1,453 boys have been taking shop-work in this school district.
The number is made up as follows:—
Vocational students, Grades X to XII      164
Industrial arts students, Grades IX to XII      381
Industrial arts students, Grades VII and VIII      908
Total  1,453
There are eighteen full-time and one part-time instructor on the staff, with eleven
shops in use.
The event of the year is the completion of the Vocational Building on the grounds
of the Victoria High School. It is anticipated that the formal opening will take place
in November, but two of the new shops have been in use since May 1st.
The Vocational Courses to be given in this school are open to all boys from Grades
X to XII throughout the school district. At present a very small proportion of students
of other high schools have asked for a transfer to the Victoria High. The principal
reason seems to be that, although many would like to take a Vocational Course, after
changing schools from Grades VIII to IX, they hesitate to make another change upon
entering Grade X. When the new junior high schools are all functioning, it is anticipated that this difficulty will be removed.
Evening Classes.
(George Anstey, Director.)
During the past few years the activities of the night-schools have increased considerably. Prior to the war two centres were used for this purpose. During the past
session ten were in operation. The number of courses offered has been increased,
especially Vocational Courses, and the training of apprentices (formerly undertaken by
the Department of Education) has been transferred to the School Board office. These
classes now come under the night-school organization.
This past session was the most successful one to date. The average attendance was
much higher than during former years. The number dropping courses was lower, and
student interest seemed to be retained well toward the end. The annual display of
work was well attended, and very complimentary remarks were made by many of the
visitors.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 40 (NEW WESTMINSTER).
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
This school-year, one of the most progressive in the school history of the city, saw
the partial completion of a comprehensive secondary-school building programme with
the consolidation of three junior high schools in one new building—the New Westminster Junior High School. Built at an approximate cost of $1,250,000, the new school is
a credit to the city, to the architects and builders, and especially to the Department of
Education and the new Westminster Board of School Trustees—Mr. Alex. Christie,
chairman; Mr. B. M. Bowell, chairman of management; Mr. Arthur Mercer, chairman
of building and grounds; Dr. W. A. Robertson; Mrs. Harold Culter; Mrs. Phillip
Amy;  and Mrs. I. G. MacFarlane. N  70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
The new junior high has everything desirable for the carrying-out of a sound
educational programme—the backbone of present-day citizenship: Thirty-eight classrooms, library, counselling offices, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Medical Department, modern auditorium, and a modern gymnasium. Provision has been made for the
opening of a cafeteria at a later date.
The principal, Mr. R. W. Adams, M.A., and the vice-principal, Mr. J. G. Kirk, M.A.,
are administrators of successful experience.
It is hoped the new school will be opened to the teachers and students September
6th and officially opened to the public sometime later in the fall term.
We regret to record the death of one of our most brilliant principals—Mr. P. E.
Govier, B.A., principal of Lord Tweedsmuir School and teacher in the city for twenty-
five years. Stricken suddenly, his passing came as a shock; his friends were legion,
his work excellent. Mr. W. 0. Hudson, B.A., vice-principal of Howay-Robson Junior
High, was appointed to fill the vacancy.
We record, too, the superannuation of Mr. R. B. Vaughan, M.A., principal of the
T. J. Trapp Technical High School, one of the most successful school administrators in
the West. His efficient method of organization, his pleasing personality, and intense
interest in the success of his pupils marked him as a leader. Capt. Ian Douglas, M.A.,
head of the English Department of the T. J. Trapp Technical, succeeds Mr. Vaughan as
principal. Mr. F. G. Morris, a teacher of long successful experience in the Technical
Branch of Trapp Technical, has been appointed vice-principal.
With the opening of the new junior high, staff changes were necessary among the
schools. Mr. W. T. Plaxton became principal of Sir Richard McBride Elementary; Mr.
W. D. Clarke, B.A., principal of John Robson Elementary; Mr. Hugh M. Campbell,
B.A., principal of Lord Kelvin Elementary; and Mr. James Hutchison, M.A., former
principal of F. W. Howay Junior High, at his own request, joined the staff of the new
junior high—he is chairman of the Mathematics Committee.
We were pleased to have on our staff this past year two teachers on exchange, Miss
Kathleen Judd, of Surrey, England, and Miss C. E. Campbell, of Toronto, Ont. Miss
Jean Fulton, of John Robson Elementary, went to Toronto, and Miss Marjorie Vick, of
Lord Tweedsmuir Elementary, to England.
All phases of school activity worked smoothly and efficiently; mention has been
made in former reports as to the increasingly efficient work of the Physican Education
Department; of the successes of Miss Pat Jones, of Trapp Technical, in the Olympic
and in the trials for the New Zealand games; of the increasingly high standard of
pupil health. May I mention here the scholastic successes of the two senior high schools
in open competition:—
Duke of Connaught High School, Mr. T. H. Calder, M.A., principal:—
New Westminster Rotary Scholarship ($75), Maurice Campbell.
New Westminster Rotary Scholarship ($100), Albert Knudsen.
Royal Victoria College Entrance Scholarship ($635), Mary Caldwell.
New Westminster University Women's Club Scholarship  ($100), Mary Caldwell.
University Entrance Scholarships:—
Kiwanis Scholarship ($150), Marion Delworth.
V.C. Memorial Scholarship ($150), Donald Hutchins.
Canadian Legion Scholarship ($75), Doreen Nettleton.
University Entrance Scholarship (Area 9)   ($175), Henry Engman.
T. J. Trapp Technical High School, Mr. R. B. Vaughan, M.A., principal:—
Navy League of Canada Scholarships to Royal Roads ($600 each), Arthur W.
Rowse and Clark A. Lowry.
V.C. Memorial Scholarship ($150), George Catherall. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. N 71
Canadian Legion Scholarship ($75), Joan Lillie.
Kiwanis Scholarship ($150), Claire Clarke and John Piskorick.
To the above pupils, their teachers and parents, we offer sincere congratulations.
Certain features of regular school activities were carried out most successfully and
with distinct educational profit to the students.
May Day, a children's day of many years' standing, was commemorated as usual,
a definite pupil-teacher contribution. In September approximately 1,500 secondary
pupils assembled with pupils from the American side of the Border in commemoration
of years of good-will between the United States of America and Canada.
The creation of an elementary pool library under Miss Hilda Smith has been a
forward step, and expected results are being felt throughout the school system. About
2,200 books are circulated among the elementary schools three times a year—September,
December, and April. Up to the present there is practically no loss or damage, and the
value of this feature of school-work is commented on most highly by the librarians of
the schools concerned; about 600 books are added each year. A later report on this very
necessary department will be given.
It is a pleasure to comment most favourably on the efficient work of our school
health services. The Medical Department, with Dr. E. W. Wylde in charge, and Miss
Doris Bews, R.N., and Miss Alice Engelstad, R.N., assistants, has kept the health of
our pupils at a very high level. About 8,000 pupil examinations were made, exclusive of
all the necessary work involved in any first-class clinic.
I regret to report the temporary closing of the Dental Clinic, necessitated by the
moving from the city of Dr. D. A. Sinclair. It is hoped the clinic will be reopened
with the beginning of the September term.
I wish to express my thanks and appreciation to the Department of Education for
its hearty co-operation at all times; to an energetic and constructive Board of School
Trustees that is conscious of its responsibilities; to a capable and progressive organization of teachers; and to those groups of Parent-Teacher Associations and service clubs
who are keenly interested in the welfare of our boys and girls.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 44  (NORTH VANCOUVER)  AND
NO. 45  (WEST VANCOUVER).
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Included in this inspectorate are three municipalities — North Vancouver City,
North Vancouver District, and West Vancouver—together with a large rural area. It
stretches from Horseshoe Bay in the west to Deep Cove in the east.
Enrolled during the school-year 1948-49 were 5,424 pupils—3,839 in North Vancouver and 1,585 in West Vancouver—an increase of nearly 10 per cent, over the preceding year.   The teaching staff numbered 171.
North Vancouver.
In School District No. 44 the general organization remained the same, there being
nine elementary schools, two small junior high schools, and one senior high school.
As indicated by the figures on enrolment, the growth in school population has not
been easy to cope with. The development of new subdivisions not previously anticipated
has necessitated changes in building plans, and this has been the main problem confronted by the School Board. N  72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Unlike most other school districts, North Vancouver has been unable to obtain
money for extraordinary expenses through the sale of bonds, owing to certain restrictions made at the time of the refunding of the debt. Consequently, new buildings have
been constructed with moneys derived from current revenue or surpluses previously
acquired. During the past year there has been excellent co-operation between the
Commissioner of the District Municipality and the City Council on the one hand and
the School Board on the other in this matter.
The building programme at present in hand includes a new junior high school of
ten rooms and additions to Capilano and Burrard View Schools. All pupils were accommodated without the use of double shifts, except for a short period during reconstruction, and it is expected that during 1949-50 a similar condition will exist.
The construction of the gymnasium-cafeteria adjacent to the high school has begun,
and its completion will relieve somewhat the congestion now existing in that school.
This building has been made possible from a financial standpoint through the efforts of
the North Vancouver Community Centre. This organization co-operated with the
School Board, also, in the successful operation of night-school classes, locally known as
the " Community College."
In connection with reconstruction an interesting experiment in lighting was carried out by the British Columbia Chapter of the Illuminating Engineering Society when
two classrooms in the high school were converted into model lighting areas—one room
with fluorescent, the other with incandescent lights. The rooms were also redecorated
and other changes made to provide optimum lighting conditions. The rooms became
demonstration areas and were inspected by numerous school officials from various parts
of the Province.
The pool library continues to function, sometimes under difficulties, and efforts are
being made to develop a pattern of library service suitable for this area. A supply of
suitable books does not in itself constitute a good library pattern. Physical equipment
and floor-space are equally necessary, but even more so are the understanding, co-operation, and assistance of the classroom teacher.
After long periods of useful service, Mrs. E. Osborne and Mr. E. Crute retired
from the teaching staff.
West Vancouver.
In School District No. 45 no major changes in organization occurred during the year,
the pupils in Grades VII to XII being accommodated in the West Vancouver Junior-
Senior High School;   all others in three elementary schools.
Growth in school population has been met by the construction of a new elementary
school. Ridgeview School, consisting of six rooms and auditorium-gymnasium, was
opened in December and relieved the congestion in the elementary grades at least for a
year.
This municipality is a very desirable residential area, and, in anticipation of continued increase in the number of school pupils, plans are now under way for the construction of additional classrooms. To provide for the increase in the high school,
there is at present under construction a building that will accommodate three departments—Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and Commercial. To supply more classrooms for elementary pupils, an addition to Pauline Johnson School is now in the planning stage, and under construction is a new elementary school of four rooms in the
extreme western section. As pupils at present come by school bus from Horseshoe Bay
and intermediate points, the erection of this school will eliminate or reduce the distance
now travelled by elementary pupils.
One other phase of the building programme involved the installation of a new heating plant and completely new lighting in the high school. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. N  73
The School Board has bent its efforts also toward the improvement of school-
grounds. An additional area of about 2 acres adjacent to Pauline Johnson School has
been cleared and graded, and is now in use, while two large playing-fields have been
constructed at the high school.
A change in the principalship of the West Vancouver High School occurred at the
end of the year when Miss E. Maycock retired from teaching after many years of excellent service both as teacher and principal.
General.
During the year the North Shore Health Unit was reorganized, and improved
facilities should result. The schools of both North and West Vancouver are very well
serviced by this unit. The services of a dentist are shared by both districts, and a
clinic is in operation in each school district. Dr. Gundry and his staff, of the Psychiatric Division of the Metropolitan Health Area, devote one day a month on the average
to examine pupils referred to him by the schools.
The teaching staffs of both districts performed their duties in the usual excellent
manner, and a high standard of achievement has been maintained throughout. This
has been borne out by the results of both the Department's testing programme and the
University Entrance and Senior Matriculation Examinations.
Tribute is here paid to the efforts of the members of both School Boards in making
it possible for the various teaching staffs to function at a high level of efficiency.
Appreciation is expressed for assistance in my work afforded by the officials of the
Department of Education at all times.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 41 (BURNABY).
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
School Enrolment.
The school enrolment shows a steady increase. In 1948-49 we registered 7,208
pupils, which was an increase of 656 over last year. During the coming term we
anticipate close to 8,000 pupils, which will require a staff of 247 teachers, as against
232 the present year. That the school population will continue to expand is evidenced
in the building expansion now going on in Burnaby. During 1948 the number of new
homes built was 1,453. During 1949 there have been 785 homes built up to July 30th.
The increase to be anticipated is also evidenced by the 1,096 births registered in Burnaby during 1948.
School-building Programme.
As elsewhere in the Province, Burnaby is attempting to cope with the problem of
increasing school population by a building programme. New school units are under
construction and will be ready for occupancy in the fall term. These buildings include
two junior high schools, one elementary school, and three primary units attached to
existing elementary schools. Plans are now under way to extend the building programme to meet further needs.
In keeping with the expansion of school building, the School Board has initiated a
progressive plan of grounds improvement. Present school-sites have been regraded,
and reserved properties adjoining present school-sites have been cleared and improved
for active use as playgrounds. In the new buildings the Board has made provision for
covered play areas wherever feasible. n 74 public schools report, 1948-49.
Burnaby Night-classes and Vocational Training.
During the past year some sixteen night-school courses were successfully conducted
under Mr. Fred Pratt, Director. A fairly wide range of options was given, and the
classes were well attended. Under the Provincial-Federal Plan for Vocational Training,
each of the high schools has equipped the Commercial Department with a machines'
room, and students are now being trained in the operation of the modern business
machines.
In-service Training of Teachers.
In co-operation with Mr. H. P. Johns, Director of the Summer School of Education,
two courses in the Language Arts were offered during the year. These courses
extended over the period October to April, and the instruction was given by Miss
Kathleen Collins and Miss Jean Bailey, Curriculum Consultants for Burnaby. A large
number of teachers availed themselves of these courses, and the results were readily
discernible in the classroom activities.
Medical Health Services.
The staff of the Metropolitan Health Unit in Burnaby has been increased by three
nurses to supplement the work of the present staff. The health services are administered by the unit director (Dr. E. B. Roach), nine nurses, two dental clinics, one eye
clinic, and a mental-hygiene consultant. In addition, pupils are referred to the children's hospital for orthopaedic treatments. Approximately 80 per cent, of the school
population was immunized against smallpox and diphtheria, and a number of pre-school
children were given whooping-cough and scarlet fever immunizations. The Board is
initiating a move to have the quarters of the Health Department improved, to provide
more adequate space and facilities for the enlarged staff.
School Sports Meet.
To encourage interschool relationships, a committee of teachers was formed to plan
friendly competitive games and events among the schools. As a culminating feature,
two interschool track and field meets were held in May. One was conducted at Central
Park for the South Burnaby schools and one in Confederation Park for the North
Burnaby schools. Great interest was stimulated, and the meets were decided successes.
In order to give opportunities for the younger pupils to participate in recreational and
sports activities, local sports days were held, and games and exercises suitable for primary and junior grade pupils were engaged in.   Parents were invited to these displays.
I wish again, in concluding this report, to express appreciation for the generous
co-operation of the Deputy Minister of Education and for the helpful and courteous
assistance rendered by the members of his administrative staff in all of our dealings
during the present year.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 36  (SURREY).
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.P_ed., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In School District No. 36 the enrolment increased during 1948-49 by 500 pupils to
a total of 5,500 and the teaching staff to 165.
During the year three new elementary schools were opened—Crescent Park of
two rooms and Bose Road and East Hjorth of four rooms. This helped to relieve the
crowded classrooms, but, when the year ended, forty-six classes were still on the double
shift.    The month of June saw the new North Surrey High School completed.    This REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS. N  75
will enable Lord Tweedsmuir to do away with the double shift and will perhaps relieve
the transportation difficulty slightly.
In December a by-law authorizing the building of five elementary schools of four
rooms, an addition of two elementary rooms, and one junior-senior high school of fourteen classrooms was passed. This additional accommodation will do away with the
double shift in the high schools and will greatly reduce the number of elementary
classes on shift. However, since the passing of the by-law other difficult situations
have arisen and more classrooms will still be needed.
When the West Surrey High is built, Surrey will have five junior-senior high
schools, each enrolling between 400 and 600 pupils. In the placing of these schools,
care has been taken to lessen the need for transportation as much as possible.
Transportation has always been a serious problem in Surrey. Although the high
schools have been placed in the most thickly settled areas, there are large numbers of
pupils living over 3 miles distant from them. All living over this distance are transported by seven school buses. These buses are working a full day because of the double
shifts. Some of them make two trips before and after school opening. This causes
some pupils who have left home before 7 a.m. to wait at the school over an hour while
the other load comes in before they can begin their classes at 9 o'clock.
The Board had hoped to take care of the worst of these cases this year by buying
another bus, but the Council cut their estimates by $22,000, and so the abuse continues.
There is no transportation problem in the elementary schools because the policy of
the Board has been to place small elementary buildings so that almost all children are
within 2 miles of a school.
The school-year 1948-49 again found about half the teachers new to Surrey.
There also was the large turnover of pupils which has become customary during the
past few years. Because of the housing shortage in Greater Vancouver, many families,
on coming to the Province, go first to the rural areas but leave as soon as they can get
accommodation closer to the city. This constant change in teacher and pupil personnel,
overcrowding, and double-shifting make it difficult to maintain satisfactory standards
in the schools. Each year the results have been evident when standardized tests have
been administered, in spite of capable and conscientious work on the part of most of the
teachers. This year for the first time definite improvement was noted. Apparently the
strong and stable group of teachers who remain with our schools is having an effect,
and we hope that improvement will continue.
In conclusion, I should like to express my appreciation for the co-operation and
help which I have received during the year from the Department of Education, and
from the School Board, the secretary-treasurer, and teaching staff of District No. 36. N 76
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 62 (SOOKE), No. 63 (SAANICH),
No. 64 (SALTSPRING), AND No. 65  (COWICHAN).
REPORT OF J. E. BROWN, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
During the past year all districts have continued to grow both physically and
educationally. Physical growth has been most marked in Districts No. 62 and No. 63.
In the Langford-Colwood, Sooke, and Sidney areas the increase in enrolment has been
over 90 per cent, during the last five-year period. Situations such as these are bound
to create accommodation problems. The Boards of the districts concerned are facing
their problems with earnestness and determination.
The number of teachers employed during the year was 168, an increase of 13 over
the preceding year. A breakdown by districts is as follows:—
District No.
62.
63.
64.
65.
Total.
High	
11
24
22
29
6
16
21
39
108
Totals	
35
51
22
60
168
Pupil enrolment for all districts has increased from 3,929 in 1948 to 4,263 in 1949.
This is an over-all increase of 334 pupils in elementary and high schools.
It is anticipated that District No. 62 will be enlarged to include Port Renfrew, a
small rural school district, and a considerable portion of unorganized territory which is
being opened up for settlement and in which new schools are being organized at Bear
Creek and Harris Creek. In the Metchosin and Colwood areas, classrooms are being
added to the existing schools. Home Economics rooms and Industrial Arts shops have
been completed in both high schools of the district. Provision has also been made for
offering Commercial Courses in the Belmont High School.
In District No. 63 a by-law has been prepared and will be submitted to the ratepayers for ratification early in the fall of this year. The passage of this by-law will
make provision for an eight-room elementary school at Sidney, a six-room school at
Brentwood, an auditorium at Mount Newton High School, and additions or repairs to
other elementary schools.
In District No. 64 (Saltspring) it has been recommended that a new school be
built at Fulford Harbour to replace the schools at Isabella Point and Beaver Point and
also to relieve the congestion being evidenced in Ganges Consolidated School. One of
the difficulties in administering this district is providing equal opportunity for children
living in the more remote and sparsely populated islands.
In District No. 65 (Cowichan) the contract for a new junior-senior high school at
Duncan has been let, the successful contractors being Bennett & White, of Vancouver.
Tenders have also been called for the construction of new schools at Bench, Mill Bay,
Shawnigan Lake, and Crofton.
During the year a testing programme was carried out in all districts. This included
the tests of the Division of Tests and Standards and a battery of Achievement Tests in
Fundamental Skills which was given to the pupils of Grades I to VI late in the year.
The results attained were generally satisfactory. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. N 77
Health services have been most satisfactory, which, with the exception of District
No. 64, are serviced by Provincial health units. It is hoped that in the very near future
health unit services will be extended to include all areas of this inspectorate.
Active Junior Red Cross Clubs were maintained during the year in practically all
schools of the inspectorate.
Programmes of physical education and school sports have continued to receive
enthusiastic support from both parents and teachers.
Drama Clubs have flourished especially in District Nos. 63 and 65.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 14  (SOUTHERN OKANAGAN), No. 15  (PENTICTON), No. 16 (KEREMEOS), AND No. 77 (SUMMERLAND).
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, M.A., E.D., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
During the school-year 1948-49 there were 15 schools operating, with a staff of
163 teachers.
The school population continued to increase in all districts and in the Southern
Okanagan was particularly rapid. This has naturally influenced the problems of (1)
transportation and (2) accommodation.
(1) Transportation.
In all districts bus schedules have had to be revised, and in the case of Southern
Okanagan, which operates its own system, new equipment had to be procured. Summer-
land and Penticton both had to provide new service routes, and Keremeos, by a reorganization of existing services, was able to carry on with its two district-owned buses.
Beginning September, 1949, further increased transportation facilities will be necessary
in all districts, with the possible exception of Penticton.
(2) Accommodation.
This continues to be a problem. District No. 14, at the beginning of the term,
resorted to part-time classes in both the Oliver and Osoyoos Elementary Schools. With
the opening of the new junior-senior high school at Oliver, the conditions in that village
were relieved. The situation at Osoyoos will be rectified next September when the
new elementary school opens.
District No. 15 operated twelve elementary classes at Penticton on the double-shift
system at the opening of the term, and it was hoped regular classes could be resumed
for all in February. The loss of the comparatively modern high school in January
created a critical situation for a short period, until two new six-room elementary units
were opened and used for secondary-school purposes. The Board acted with commendable speed and resolution in the face of this disaster, and although it will be necessary
to place both junior high and elementary classes on the shift system again in September,
1949, schools now under construction will be completed to provide normal tuition for all
students in January, 1950. The Board deserves the highest praise for its accomplishment in this regard.
District No. 16 was not troubled with accommodation worries, owing to the completion of the three-room addition at Keremeos in September.
District No. 77, by the use of two outside halls, was able to avoid curtailment of
the student-day, and the completion of the four-room and playshed addition to the
elementary school at Easter has relieved the situation for the present. N 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
The tabulation below gives a picture of the building progress throughout the
inspectorate:—
District.
Buildings completed during
School-year.
Buildings under or awaiting
Construction.
Buildings
approved and
By-laws pending.
No. 14 (Southern
Okanagan)
No. 15 (Penticton)
No. 16 (Keremeos)	
No. 77 (Summerland)...
Junior-senior   high,   complete   unit
(Oliver)
Two   six-room   elementary   schools
(Penticton)
1. Elementary  three-room  addition
and school reconstruction   (Keremeos)
2. Kitchen addition and reconstruction of elementary school (Olalla)
Elementary four-room addition with
playshed   and   school  reconstruction   (West  Summerland)
Elementary school, complete unit
(Osoyoos).
1. High school  classroom unit.
2. Industrial arts, home economics,   administration wing.
3. Cafeteria addition.
Junior-senior high,
complete   unit
(Keremeos).
complete   u nit
(West   Summer-
land).
This year the Division of Tests and Standards conducted a comprehensive Province-
wide testing programme. The tests given in this inspectorate included Pintner General
Ability, Metropolitan Achievement, and Spelling in Grade VII classes, Otis Self-administering (Ability), and Science in Grades XI and XII. Results of these were reported
to principals concerned during the term and were of great value for diagnostic and
grading purposes.
Teacher-supply improved greatly over previous years, and, with the exception of
Music and Commercial specialists, little difficulty was experienced in completing school
staffs. Salary arbitration was held in the Penticton District, and a salary increase
approximating 20 per cent, for all teachers was awarded. This pattern was adopted
throughout all the other districts in the inspectorate.
In general, there has been substantial educational progress throughout the year.
Trustee Boards, secretary-treasurers, and teachers have co-operated well with the
Inspector of Schools, and their efforts are herewith gratefully acknowledged.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 69 (QUALICUM) AND No. 70 (ALBERNI), AND
UNATTACHED SCHOOL DISTRICTS AT BAMFIELD, CLAYOQUOT,
CLO-OOSE, ESPERANZA, KILDONAN, KYUQUOT, PORT RENFREW,
SARITA RIVER, SYDNEY INLET, TAHSIS RIVER, TOFINO, UCLUE-
LET, AND ZEBALLOS.
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Several new schools were opened in this inspectorate during the past year, and the
number of teachers has increased from 110 to 126. Though not large in number of
teachers, the schools in the unattached districts are widely scattered and in some cases
situated in rather inaccessible places. Typical of the latter is the school at Kyuquot,
reopened this year after having been closed for a number of terms. It operates on an
island lying far out on the West Coast, and no passenger-boat or aeroplane calls there.
The C.P.R. steamer deposits passengers and freight at a sheltered point 6 miles away
and, weather permitting, the rest of the journey is made by fish-boat.    Teachers are REPORTS  OF  DISTRICT  INSPECTORS. N   79
not easily persuaded to go to these points, and this year, as in the past, it has been a
struggle to staff the schools. All schools were in operation during the year, but in
some cases poorly qualified teachers had to be employed.
District No. 69 (Qualicum).
Overcrowding and lack of accommodation remain the chief problems in this district. To add to the difficulties, the two-room school at Hilliers was totally destroyed
by fire, and, most unfortunately for the young people, a school by-law for the building
of a new high school was defeated by a narrow margin. The district has been more
fortunate in staff matters, some very valuable members having been added to the group.
District No. 70 (Alberni).
After some very distressing delays, a second by-law was passed this year providing
sufficient funds to proceed with the school building programme. Building has started,
and by September, 1950, at least one new elementary school should be ready to open and
the junior-senior high school should be well under way. A large turnover in staff was
experienced again and will probably continue until the makeshift buildings are replaced.
These two factors, of poor accommodation and changing personnel, have prevented the
best work being done, but, on the whole, educational progress has been satisfactory.
Unattached Districts.
A new school district was created this year at Sarita River, a logging camp near
Bamfield, and the closed school at Kyuquot was reopened. The school at Tahsis River
was burned, after which classes were held in the church. A new two-room school is in
process of erection there. As mentioned above, procuring teachers was the big problem
in these districts and will continue to give trouble until teacher-supply is much more
plentiful.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 47 (POWELL RIVER), No. 48 (HOWE SOUND),
No. 73 (ALERT BAY), No. 74 (QUATSINO), AND UNIVERSITY HILL
(UNATTACHED).
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, M.C., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In all my districts the school enrolment during the year continued to increase, and
the School Boards were hard pressed in providing sufficient accommodation. Some
schools resorted to double-shifting, and in several others temporary basement rooms
were in use.
District No. 48 (Powell River) has already accomplished much in fulfilling the
provisions of the by-law passed in June, 1948. New schools are under construction
at Blubber Bay, Cranberry Lake, and Westview, and good progress has been made on
the extensive addition to the Powell River High School. It is anticipated that these
buildings will be ready for occupancy next fall, and that the new schools for False Bay,
Lund, and Vananda will be completed before the summer of 1950. The programme for
improving the existing schools and for extending and landscaping the school-grounds
has been continued.
New schools have been planned for Alert Bay, Squamish, Port Alice, Port Hardy,
and Port McNeill, and by-laws covering these are to be presented to the ratepayers
during 1949-50. Several requests, too, have been received for the opening of schools
in small communities where such have not heretofore existed. N  80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
In general, the year was one of commendable progress throughout my inspectorate.
The members of the various School Boards continued to give generously of their time
in discussing and meeting the needs of their respective districts. Provision of adequate accommodation, appointment and housing of competent teaching personnel, and
selection and purchase of supplies and equipment in the face of steadily rising salaries
and other costs were but some of the problems they had to solve despite the limitations
of their fixed budgets.
My report would not be complete were I to omit mention of the several secretary-
treasurers with whom I have been associated. Without exception, these are conscientious, efficient, and energetic in carrying through the duties and responsibilities
assigned to them. I feel that my School Boards are very fortunate in the services of
such capable men and women.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 9   (CASTLEGAR), No.  12   (GRAND FORKS),
AND No. 13 (KETTLE VALLEY).
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The past year has seen considerable building expansion in this inspectorate. In
School District No. 9 (Castlegar) a new one-room school was opened at Gibson Creek,
a two-room school at Pass Creek, and three rooms at Kinnaird, while the new four-room
school at Tarrys was destroyed by fire the night before it was to have been occupied.
At Pass Creek and Gibson Creek, teacherages were also built. Further building has
been planned, and a by-law was approved by the ratepayers for a new high school and
a four-room elementary school at Castlegar. It is expected construction will start on
the high school in the fall. Accommodation for the high school students in this area
has been inadequate for some time, and a new school is long overdue.
In School District No. 12 (Grand Forks) an extensive programme has also been
carried on. The new junior-senior high school has been completed and will be occupied
in September. At Brown Creek a modern one-room, school has replaced the old log
building used there for so many years. The elementary school at Grand Forks is also
being remodelled and will be completed by September.
While the programme in School District No. 13 (Kettle Valley) has not been as
extensive as in the other two districts, it has met the needs of the areas in which new
schools have been built. Midway has a new three-room building, fully modern, while
Kettle Valley has a modern two-room school. Additions have been made to the schools
at Bridesville and Beaverdell. Fully modern teacherages have been built at Midway,
Kettle Valley, and Bridesville. The Board was able to purchase a residence at Beaverdell, and this will be used as a teacherage. Another school, Bridesville, has been raised
to the status of a superior school. This brings the number of superior schools in this
district to three. Rock Mountain School has been closed, and the pupils from that area
are transported to Bridesville by bus.
The teacher shortage is still acute and has been quite evident in this area. During
the year there have been twelve teachers with only temporary certificates employed.
All schools were able to remain open, and much credit is due to those people who taught
without any training.
All three School Boards have been very liberal in giving assistance to pupils in
outlying districts. This has been done by making grants toward their living expenses
or by arranging transportation for them.
There has been the best of co-operation between the staffs and the School Boards.
Increased cost-of-living bonuses have either been given or have been promised for the REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. N  81
beginning of the new term. This applies in all three districts. As well as administering the testing programme laid down by the Bureau of Tests, Standards, and Research,
intelligence tests were administered in many of the outlying schools as well as in those
of the larger centres. Reading tests were given to all pupils above Grade II in the
larger schools. These were followed by diagnostic tests for those below grade. Conferences were held with the teachers of these schools, and a remedial programme planned.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 42 (MAPLE RIDGE). AND
No. 43  (COQUITLAM).
REPORT OF C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Prior to December, 1948, this inspectorate also included District No. 48 (Howe
Sound). In that month this district was transferred to Inspector Carter, and from
then until June, 1949, I shared District No. 35 (Langley) with Inspector Thorsteinsson.
For many years this inspectorate had been in charge of Mr. E. G. Daniels, who
retired June 30th, 1948. It has been both a pleasure and a problem to follow Mr.
Daniels, whose unflagging energy and devoted service were sorely missed by the communities, teachers, and School Boards.
The past year has been one of familiarization and organization. Improved means
of transportation are rapidly converting sections of this inspectorate which were, a few
years ago, purely rural into urban extensions of Greater Vancouver. Areas which were
once farming lands or potential farming lands have been subdivided into city lots.
Whether this trend is inevitable or whether unproductive use of the land contributes to
this possibly undesirable development is a problem which the schools could assist in
solving.   Our secondary schools are not well geared to rural needs.
In common with other districts in the Province both Districts No. 42 and 43 are
confronted with the need for increased and improved accommodation. The gaps caused
by the exodus of Japanese from District No. 42 have been more than filled, and this
district is now giving thought to the need for more schools. In December of 1948 the
voters of District No. 43 rejected a by-law for new school buildings, but a revised
by-law giving a more even distribution of school and classroom accommodation was
passed by a five to one majority in June. As desirable as the reorganization of 1946
has been, it has not wholly succeeded in creating a community of interest within any
one school district. The experience of District No. 43 again demonstrated that sectionalism within a school district is still very much alive.
On being introduced to the inspectorate, I was much impressed with the desire of
the School Boards to see that their schools were well equipped and well supplied. Much
time has been spent during the year in assisting the secretary-treasurers and principals
in the standardization of equipment and supplies. While much still remains to be done,
the co-operative manner in which these officials have worked indicates that the backlog
will soon be overtaken. It is realized that even the best-paid teacher cannot work
efficiently in an ill-equipped school.
My sincere gratitude is extended to the School Boards, secretary-treasurers,
principals, and teachers for the many courtesies which have made my first year in this
inspectorate pleasant and, I trust, effective.
. N 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 1  (FERNIE), NO. 2  (CRANBROOK),
AND No. 5  (CRESTON).
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In common with the rest of the Province the East Kootenay is showing a steady
increase in school population. This is most marked in the elementary school grades
and in Districts No. 2 and No. 5. In contrast, the number of individual schools has
decreased since 1946, partially because of concentration of population around the larger
centres and partially because of the tendency to consolidate adjacent one-room schools
to form schools of at least two divisions.
Three new main transportation routes were established during the year: From
Moyie to Cranbrook, from Boswell to Crawford Bay, and from Galloway to Jaffray. In
addition, several minor transportation contracts were let. This conveyance of school
pupils, coupled with the granting of boarding allowance where transportation is uneconomic, has resulted in a steady increase in the number of pupils from rural areas
proceeding to secondary schools. This has been one of the most-marked advantages of
the large school districts.
Easing of the teacher shortage became apparent during the year. The number of
unqualified teachers was greatly reduced, while no school in the area remained closed
because of lack of a teacher. In some specialist lines in the secondary schools, however,
the supply of qualified teachers is still inadequate.
School-construction continues to be an immediate problem. The first unit of a new
junior-senior high school was opened at Creston in January, being put to immediate,
though temporary, use as an elementary school. The school at Jaffray was modernized
and a second room added. Canyon School was reconstructed and modernized. Schools
at Wynndel and Erickson are in the process of reconstruction and should be ready by
September, 1949. By-laws covering the cost of erecting a modern junior-senior high
school for District No. 2 at Cranbrook were ratified by overwhelming majorities of the
ratepayers in both city and rural areas. Boards are considering plans for completing
the new high school at Creston and for erecting extensive additions to the schools at
Fernie and Michel-Natal. A great deal of work has been done in all districts in maintaining and equipping the rural schools.
One school, at Galloway, was closed during the year, its student population being
consolidated with that of Jaffray. A new school was opened at Gold Creek, in District
No. 1, to care for the educational needs of a group of children at an isolated lumbering
operation.
A Vocational Course in Coal-mining was commenced at the Fernie High School,
this being made possible throught the co-operation of the Department, the school
authorities, and the local industry. Mention should be made, too, of the development
of the course in Vocational Agriculture at Creston High School. Accommodation and
full equipment were provided for this course in the new school.
Counselling services were inaugurated in both Fernie and Cranbrook High Schools
this year, with similar service beig planned at Creston.
Adequate standardized testing is carried out in all the larger schools by the principals. Provincial survey tests were administered, and the results analysed for use by
the teachers. In addition, a series of tests in arithmetic fundamentals was administered to all Grade III classes, with the primary purpose of demonstrating the effective
use of testing as a teaching tool.
The three district School Boards continue to perform their duties in a conscientious
and efficient manner. The various trustees have given unselfishly of their time and
energy to the development of the schools throughout their districts. They deserve the
thanks and support of the citizens of the area for their untiring efforts. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. N 83
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 59 (PEACE RIVER SOUTH) AND No. 60
(PEACE RIVER NORTH), AND UNATTACHED SCHOOL DISTRICTS AT CAMP MILE 163, CAMP MILE 300, FORT NELSON,
FORT NELSON AIRPORT, LOWER POST, TELEGRAPH CREEK,
AND ATLIN.
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., AND EARL MARRIOTT, B.A.,
INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS.
The past year has seen a continuation of the gratifying growth in attendance at
high school in the Peace River District. In their first year of operation, the dormitories established at Fort St. John and Dawson Creek have been very successful and
have met with the full approval of the district. The demand for accommodation in the
dormitories by prospective high school students has been so great that the Boards have
been faced with the problem of either providing additional dormitory accommodation
or extending the transportation routes. The latter alternative has been chosen by
the Boards as the most economical and the most satisfactory. The fact that the fairly
widespread bus transportation has proved successful under winter conditions existing
in the Peace River is due to the combined co-operation of the farmers of the area and
of the Department of Public Works in keeping the roads cleared of snow.
The school trustees in both Districts No. 59 and No. 60 directed their efforts
during the year to improving the situation existing in the many rural schools of the
area. A new salary schedule was entered into which brought about a substantial
increase in the salaries of the teachers. Maintenance procedures for the rural schools
were improved, and construction of new schools and renovation of others undertaken to
the extent that finances would permit.
While a substantial number of new classrooms has been constructed in the Peace
River, the very rapid growth in school population has left the districts with no net gain
in accommodation.
The addition of a second Inspector of Schools to this northern area has enabled our
Department to give much greater service to the teachers and pupils of the district.
This is particularly true with reference to the isolated schools in the unattached districts in the most northern part of our Province. It is gratifying to note that new
schools are being built at Lower Post and at Telegraph Creek. At Lower Post some
twenty youngsters will have their first opportunity to attend school, and at Telegraph
Creek approximately 100 youngsters require school accommodation.
The continued friendly and co-operative help given by the school trustees and the
residents of these northern districts makes working among them a distinct pleasure.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 19  (REVELSTOKE)  AND No. 20
(SALMON ARM).
REPORT OF L. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In this inspectorate the educational advantages which should result from the
establishment of large school districts are becoming evident. The pupils are enjoying
to a much greater extent schools which are more sanitary and adequate, while there is
a noticeable improvement in needed supplies and equipment.
The School Board of District No. 19 (Revelstoke) has concerned itself chiefly with
the task of improving, renovating, and modernizing as far as possible the school buildings and classrooms, with special attention being paid to the rural schools.    Splendid N 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
improvements have resulted from this policy. A very fine one-room structure was completed recently at Beaton, and the Arrowhead Superior School was completely renovated.
The Board is presently engaged in planning additions to the elementary and high schools
in the city.
Since the implementation of the Cameron Report the School Board, teachers, and
pupils of District No. 20 (Salmon Arm) have worked under most difficult circumstances.
Practically all of the twenty-eight small schools in the rural and municipal areas are in
very poor physical condition. Many of these classrooms, but especially those of the city
schools, are terribly overcrowded, and because of the changing educational needs, most
of the buildings presently used are nearly obsolete.
This School Board has planned for a long time to bring about a solution to the
problem. The ratepayers of the area recently approved a zone building programme
which will, it is hoped, mean the establishment of relatively small elementary-high
schools in four consolidated areas and a separate elementary and junior-senior high
school in the City of Salmon Arm. Thus, within a relatively short period, as work
progresses, District No. 20 should have the facilities to make for a much more effective
and efficient school system.
One of the interesting features of this year's happenings was the one-day meeting
arranged by the teachers and School Board of District No. 19 and approved by the
Department of Education. During the morning of the regular school-day the schools of
Revelstoke remained open and the rural teachers visited classes in action and discussed
their problems with the instructors. The afternoon was given over to short talks and
general discussions in which School Board members were invited to take part. A social
evening ended a very enjoyable and profitable day.
Some mention should be made in this report of the good work being done by the
staff of the North Okanagan Health Unit. The members are most co-operative, and
worth-while practices are being established through their efforts.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation of the co-operative way School
Board members, principals, and teachers have worked with me in this my first year in
the inspectorate.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 49 (OCEAN FALLS), No. 50 (QUEEN CHARLOTTE), No. 51 (PORTLAND CANAL), AND No. 52 (PRINCE
RUPERT).
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In submitting this report I am not unmindful of the efforts of the Boards of School
Trustees. They have unique problems, due in large part to scattered areas and the
difficulties of water transportation and communication. It is not always easy for
trustees to meet, and by the same token it is not easy for trustees, as a board, to visit
the schools of the district. It speaks well that they serve, and continue to serve, with
resourcefulness; that they think always in terms of increasing and improving educational opportunity.
District No. 49 (Ocean Falls).
During the year an ungraded school was opened at Bella Bella (airport). The new
one-room school at Namu, opened a year ago, already shows signs of overcrowding. An
interesting development in the year has been the establishment of a kindergarten at
Ocean Falls. It would appear that this extension of the school programme fills a real
need in this community.   The building programme in the Bella Coola Valley was begun, REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. N  85
and completion of this much-needed consolidated school is expected in the fall of 1949.
The academic achievement of Ocean Falls High School remains high. At the same time,
students from this school contributed much to community life in journalism, drama,
music, and swimming.
District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte).
This district has three ungraded schools (Sandspit, Queen Charlotte City, and
Port Clements) and an elementary-high school at Masset. The Board of School Trustees
has met the needs of secondary pupils by assisting in boarding costs in Masset for those
pupils who must live away from home.
District No. 51 (Portland Canal) .
District No. 51 has had a disturbed year, due to unsettled mining conditions. The
closing of Premier mine reflected itself in the closing of Premier ungraded school and a
sharp decline in the enrolment in Stewart. At the same time, in another part of the
district, the increased mining activity at Alice Arm brought an increase in school population. It is hoped that conditions will soon stabilize in this district so that secondary-
school facilities may become possible.
District No. 52 (Prince Rupert).
Increased industrial activity in this district, particularly at Port Edward, adjacent
to Prince Rupert, has resulted in an increase in enrolment. To meet this, and with an
eye to the future, the Board of School Trustees has had plans drawn for new and additional accommodation. The by-law will be presented to the ratepayers in the autumn of
1949. Teachers' salary adjustments were made at the beginning of the year, and it is
hoped that the new scale will attract well-qualified teachers. This is a vital concern in
the north. In the City of Prince Rupert a school patrol was established at King Edward
Elementary School. All schools contributed to community activities—in drama, music,
and athletics. The Junior Red Cross was especially active in the elementary schools.
Booth Memorial High School is developing a programme based on local needs, while at
the same time it continues to prepare candidates for University Entrance and Senior
Matriculation Examinations, this year with very satisfactory results. Also in the year
the high school offered an evening course for New Canadians. This was attended by
approximately twelve persons and well received.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 6 (KOOTENAY LAKE), No. 7 (NELSON),
AND No. 8 (SLOCAN).
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.Pjeb., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Buildings.
Some reconstruction in the Kaslo School and an adequate maintenance programme
in the rural schools of District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake) have been noted during the past
school-year. District No. 7 (Nelson) was able to complete four classrooms in the Salmo
area. The by-law failure made it impossible to complete this project in one year. The
rural schools of this district are much improved under the planned improvement of the
maintenance engineer. The Board in School District No. 8 (Slocan) has been forced
by circumstances to use temporary school accommodation in New Denver, Slocan City,
and Crescent Valley. Since the buildings in use are far from satisfactory, it is hoped
that an improvement may be obtained within a few years. This Board is preparing a
building programme for submission to the ratepayers within a few months. n 86 public schools report, 1948-49.
Transportation.
Districts No. 7 (Nelson) and No. 8 (Slocan) now have transportation arrangements that make secondary education available to most parts of the districts. It is
planned to limit the rural schools to the first six grades and to carry the older pupils to
larger centres. The increasing population on the outskirts of Nelson has taxed the bus
facilities and has made advisable the opening of a division on the West Arm. To bring
greater economy to the transportation administration, District No. 7 (Nelson) has purchased a garage and employed a full-time driver-mechanic.
The Learning Situation.
The School Boards, particularly in Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake) and No. 8
(Slocan), have endeavoured to bring up to adequate standard the supply of reference
and supplementary readers. Most of these rural schools are comparable in their " tools
of learning " with the larger city schools.
While a considerable number of the teachers in these areas lack full qualifications,
it has been a pleasure to meet the sincerity of professional interest and willingness to
co-operate. During the year an effort was made to stimulate teacher interest in
coping with pupil differences in interest and ability. The planning of instructional
time to obtain maximum pupil participation was emphasized. It was felt that some
improvements were made and foundations laid for further gains in future years.
In conclusion, may I say that my first year in the Kootenays has been made very
pleasant by the co-operation and friendliness of the School Boards, the teachers, and
the secretary-treasurers.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 53  (TERRACE), No. 54  (SMITHERS),
No. 55  (BURNS LAKE), AND No. 56  (VANDERHOOF).
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
During the year forty-four schools utilizing the services of seventy-nine teachers
were in operation in this inspectorate. Natural increase in population, implementation of recommendations in the Cameron Report, influx of New Canadians, and added
assistance to parents through their local Board and the Department of Education have
all been contributing factors to the increased enrolment. Through greater effort, continued co-operation, and a wise use of available assistance, it should be possible to
provide educational opportunity for a still greater number in the more scattered and
isolated areas.
The recent teacher shortage has resulted in possibly a too liberal use of transportation facilities. The one-room rural school, in spite of its many limitations,
fulfils a very necessary function in the small, compact community. In the case of
secondary education, too much centralization has tended to defeat its purpose. To
meet this situation, it is proposed to open superior schools where feasible and to
encourage the use of High School Correspondence Courses under the supervision of
the rural teacher. In this way the work of the last two years of high school would
be taken at the larger centres, to which the pupils would go for two rather than four
years, and at an age when they are more able to fend for themselves.
In all districts, considerable attention has been given to improving existing school
facilities and to planning and constructing new and modern buildings.
In November the ratepayers of District No. 53 (Terrace) authorized the modernization of their school plant. A ten-room elementary and two-room high school are
planned for Terrace.    Spacious grounds and the facilities of the Civic Centre will be
J reports of district inspectors. N 87
available for school purposes. Through the co-operation of the Department of Mines
and Resources (Indian Affairs Branch), the Provincial Department of Education, and
the Terrace School Board, it is planned to construct a six-room elementary-high school
in Hazelton to accommodate both native and white children. A one-room school in
modern design is planned for New Hazelton. This, together with certain reconstruction-work, rounds out the Terrace building programme.
In District No. 54 (Smithers) the building programme approved in May, 1949, is
rapidly nearing completion. A two-room addition to the Houston school will open this
fall. The new three-room school at Telkwa will be ready for occupancy in October,
and the two-room addition to Smithers High School will be complete by Christmas.
Generally, the schools in the Smithers District have been well maintained.
District No. 55 (Burns Lake), one of the largest and the most scattered of these
areas, possesses many schools of the pioneer type which have long outlived their
usefulness. The present Board has prepared a by-law for the modernization of its
facilities.   Most of the new schools will be of one- or two-room construction.
Tenders are being called in District No. 56 (Vanderhoof) for improvements and
new construction authorized by the ratepayers last July. A one-room addition to,
and modernization of, the two-room school at Fort St. James will provide for increased
enrolment in this area. New schools will be built at Fraser Lake and Mapes. The
Nechako Valley Senior High-Elementary School will be enlarged by two rooms and a
two-bay garage provided for the district buses.
All schools in the inspectorate were visited as frequently as time and road conditions would permit. Monthly bulletins were sent to all teachers. The staffs of all
districts co-operated whole-heartedly in a testing programme and in instituting uniform promotional policies. A very successful drama festival was held, and during
May and June district track and field meets rounded off the year's activities.
Because there has grown in the minds of parents a certain finality accompanying
the completion of Grade VIII, the field of secondary education offers a particular challenge in this area. The answer appears to lie in the effective handling of educational
and vocational guidance at the junior high school level, accompanied by a planned
educational campaign directed at parents and pupils. The small high schools will
have to assist by offering courses which are less academic and more in keeping with
the interests, aptitudes, and abilities of the students which they serve.
In closing, I should like to express my appreciation of the interest, effort, and
co-operation shown by School Boards, their secretary-treasurers, and teaching staffs.
Thanks are also extended to the many officials in the Department of Education, Victoria,
who, through sympathetic understanding, guidance, and assistance, make it considerably easier to administer to the educational needs of four large districts.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 10  (ARROW LAKES)
AND No. 11  (TRAIL).
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.P^ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The school population of this inspectorate continued to show a marked increase.
All regular classrooms and a number of temporary classrooms were put into use.
In Trail Central School and Annable School it was necessary to adopt a double shift
for those in the primary grades. This was discontinued in April, with the opening
of the James L. Webster School in the Warfield area. This modern elementary school
will provide accommodation for 400 pupils.    By-laws for new building construction, N 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
passed during the year, empowered the Boards of this inspectorate to provide all
needed school accommodation.
In April the ratepayers of School District No. 11 (Trail) approved a by-law for
school-construction as follows:—
(1) Rossland Junior-Senior High School.
(2) Trail Senior High School.
(3) Sunningdale Elementary School.
(4) Fruitvale Elementary-Junior High School.
(5) Reconstruction of East Trail Elementary School.
(6) Reconstruction of Trail Central Elementary School.
Construction of the Rossland High School and the Sunningdale Elementary School
will commence this year, and the work on the other projects will begin in 1950.
The ratepayers of School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes) approved By-law No. 4,
empowering the Board to proceed with the following construction:—
(1) Nakusp Elementary School.
(2) Arrow Park Elementary-High School.
(3) Burton Elementary School.
(4) Needles Elementary-High School.
(5) Edgewood Elementary School.
(6) Reconstruction of Nakusp High School.
Construction of these buildings was well under way at the close of the school
term.   The Board is planning to occupy all buildings in September of this year.
All schools in this inspectorate have participated in the Province-wide testing
programme directed by the Division of Tests and Standards. In addition, local testing programmes have been carried out by the various principals.
A well-attended night-school for Academic and Vocational Courses was conducted
in the Trail High School. The Kootenay Music Festival and the Kootenay Drama
Festival were held in Trail and proved to be very successful. Participation by the
different schools on a non-competitive basis has assured the continuance of these
festivals, from which the pupils derive much pleasure and profit.
The appointment of two full-time counsellors in the Trail High School and two
half-time counsellors in the Rossland High School has resulted in a good advance in
the educational and vocational guidance programmes.
Education Clubs were organized in the high schools of Trail and Rossland. These
were successful in interesting a number of good students in the teaching profession.
During the year the Honourable the Minister of Education and the Superintendent
of Education visited both the Arrow Lakes and the Trail School Districts. The
Boards of both districts were pleased to have the opportunity to discuss educational
problems with these distinguished visitors.
At the close of the school-year Carl Arthur Goresky, of the Trail High School,
brought honour to himself and the school by leading the Province in the Senior Matriculation Examinations.
In conclusion, I should like to express my appreciation to the school trustees who
have devoted so much time and thought to the problems of their districts, and to the
teachers and principals who have so faithfully maintained the standards of education. REPORTS  OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. N  89
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 37  (DELTA), No. 38  (RICHMOND),
AND No. 46 (SECHELT).
REPORT OF V. Z. MANNING, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
General.
This inspectorate contains the Municipal School Districts No. 37 (Delta) and No.
38 (Richmond) and the large Rural District No. 46 (Sechelt). Delta has 33 teachers,
Richmond 87 teachers, and Sechelt 29 teachers, making a total of 149 for the inspectorate. In the municipalities, secondary education has been carried on in central
junior-senior high schools and an effort is being made to place new elementary schools
so as to eliminate the conveyance of small children. In the large rugged area of the
Seechelt Peninsula there are still six ungraded schools, but this number will be
reduced with the completion of the Board's building programme.
Buildings.
In all three districts, building programmes are under way or projected. In Delta
I had the honour of opening the new modern elementary school at Boundary Bay and
a similar school is planned for Sunbury. The municipality's share of the cost of both
schools has been financed by the Delta Council without a money by-law.
In Richmond, the Garden City and R. M. Grauer Elementary Schools were formally opened by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education. These two
schools provide twenty additional classrooms. A primary wing is under construction
at the Sea Island School and will be available in September. Plans for a new secondary
school are being prepared by the Board's architect.
Most of the buildings in the Sechelt District are old and quite inadequate.
However, a by-law has been passed to provide a central secondary school, a superior
school, and two elementary schools.
Salary Schedules.
New salary schedules received the attention of trustees and teachers in all three
districts. In Delta and Richmond the issue was settled by arbitration with a minimum
of satisfaction. In Sechelt the trustees and teachers' committee negotiated a new
schedule with satisfaction to both sides.
Transportation.
In Richmond the School Board owns its fleet of seven large school buses. In
Delta the buses are owned partly by the Board and partly by private contractors.
In Sechelt all transportation is done by contract. Two water-buses operate in this
district.
Health Services.
All schools in this inspectorate receive the expert attention of the public health
nurses. Commendable preventive work is being done in vaccination, inoculation, and
immunization.
Teaching Personnel.
Owing to the nearness to the large centres of population it was possible to fill all
vacancies in the schools with trained teachers. I was particularly pleased with the
quality of the work done by the teachers this past year.
Conclusion.
As I am retiring from the Department's service this year, I wish to express my
appreciation of the leadership and support given at all times by the Deputy Minister N 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
of Education, of the unselfish efforts of Trustee Boards in their difficult tasks, and of
the co-operation and loyalty of the teachers with whom I have worked as Inspector
during the past twenty-eight years.
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 17  (PRINCETON)  AND  No. 23   (KELOWNA).
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
During the school-year, substantial progress has been made in meeting the major
educational needs and problems of this inspectorate. In common with most other parts
of the Province, these include:—
(1) The provision of more and better school accommodation and equipment
to relieve overcrowding and to care for the continued flow of new registrants.
(2) The expansion and enrichment of curricular offerings in the newly consolidated high schools and the introduction of Vocational Courses in the
senior high school grades.
(3) More adequate staffing in respect to the teacher-pupil ratio, the qualifications of new appointees, and the in-service training of the less-experienced staff members.
(4) The expansion of school health services.
Princeton.
Enrolment in this district has continued to increase at the rate of about 5 per
cent. per annum and now stands at 655; there are twenty-seven members on the
teaching staff.
With the aid of pupil conveyance, secondary-school facilities are easily available
to all elementary-school graduates, except those resident in the Coalmont and Tulameen
attendance areas. Because of adverse road and winter-weather conditions, daily
transportation of these pupils is not practicable. While some of them have been able
to find temporary homes or boarding facilities in Princeton, the provision of a small
dormitory at Princeton seems to be the only means whereby all can be assured of high
school privileges.
During the year, space was found for an additional classroom at Copper Mountain. In April the qualified voters approved a money by-law authorizing the trustees
to raise, by the sale of debentures, the district's share of the cost of the proposed
building programme outlined in my report of a year ago. Construction got under
way in June.
A public health nurse and a medical officer serve all the schools of the district,
and an experimental dental-service scheme has been launched in the Princeton Attendance Area.
Kelowna.
Enrolment has continued to increase by almost 10 per cent, per annum and stands
now at 4,091;  the teaching staff numbers 123.
While awaiting the completion of the three secondary schools described in my
report of a year ago, overcrowding has been serious, and the situation was much
aggravated by the loss by fire of the Mission Creek and Okanagan Mission Schools,
each housing three divisions. Many classes have been temporarily accommodated in
unfit basement rooms and rented halls. The buildings, now nearing completion, will
make adequate provision for the pupils of the secondary grades throughout the whole REPORTS  OF  DISTRICT  INSPECTORS. N  91
district, but additional classroom space for elementary-school grades is badly needed.
Plans are being developed for the erection of five two- to four-division schools and
additions to two others.    This will provide twenty new elementary-school classrooms.
All schools in the district are served by the doctor and nurses of the Okanagan
Valley Health Unit, and preliminary steps have been taken to bring the district into
the dental-service scheme now being developed by the Provincial Department of Health
and Welfare.
The public relations of the schools are good, and the parent-teacher movement is
expanding throughout the district. Recently a district-wide organization was formed
and incorporated under the " Societies Act" to raise and administer a fund of $10,000,
from which interest-free loans may be made to worthy students of the district who
need help in completing their higher academic or vocational training.
To the trustees, secretary-treasurers, and teaching staffs who have faithfully and
efficiently co-operated in the work of the year, often bearing very heavy burdens and
responsibilities, I wish to express my sincere appreciation.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 24  (KAMLOOPS), No. 25  (BARRIERE),
AND No. 31  (MERRITT).
REPORT OF H. McARTHUR, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Of the many problems that confront School Boards in districts with rural territory,
perhaps the most difficult to solve is the providing of school facilities for scattered
pupils in areas which cannot legally and conveniently be served either by a school or
by a regularly organized transportation system. During the past year this problem
has proved particularly troublesome in District No. 25, where the school population is
widely scattered and where poor roads restrict transportation. The adoption of any
measures that would enable Boards to pay parents a small sum to defray the cost of
gasoline used in conveying their children, without thereby incurring liability for
accidents, would be a great boon to this district.
The rejection last fall by the ratepayers of District No. 24 of a by-law to provide
several school buildings, of which the largest was to be a new junior-senior high school
in Kamloops City, has created a serious accommodation problem in Kamloops, North
Kamloops, Chase, and Westwold. A revised by-law embodying a number of important changes in the building programme is being prepared and will be submitted
shortly.
While the supply of teachers increased slightly during the year, it is still far from
adequate in this inspectorate. Boards have found it impossible to secure qualified
and competent teachers for many one-room schools, especially if their enrolment is
large and the community in which they are situated is somewhat isolated. The situation has been aggravated by the boarding-house problem, which is yearly growing
more acute in many rural communities. Added to the usual difficulty of finding for
the teacher accommodation which is comfortable and convenient is now that arising
from exorbitant charges for board. As a result of these difficulties, the three school
districts in this inspectorate have built or bought several teacherages recently at a
considerable cost. Many others are needed. It is becoming evident that in many communities the teacherage is almost as vital to education as the school-house.
In two of the districts of this inspectorate, Merritt and Barriere, salary scales
based on the Penticton arbitration award have recently been adopted by the Boards.
In the former district the teachers also adopted the scale, but in the latter district
they were not formally consulted after the scale had been drafted. N 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
In the three districts the chief efforts of the Boards have been directed, as in past
years, to the improvement of school buildings. Nowhere has this improvement been
more marked than in the City of Merritt, where, previous to the reorganization of
schools, the buildings had been allowed to become dilapidated and unsightly. Now
they are attractive in appearance, well lighted, and in good repair. Rural buildings
are receiving much attention. It is clear, however, that many of them are unsuited to
their purpose and will soon have to be replaced. The electrification of many areas
in Districts No. 24 and No. 25 and the advent of the pressure-tank have made it
possible to install modern conveniences in rural schools. The Kamloops and the Merritt
Boards have decided that they will erect no more buildings with outdoor toilets and
stove heating in well-established rural communities.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 26  (BIRCH ISLAND), No. 27 (WILLIAMS
LAKE), No. 29  (LILLOOET), AND No. 30  (ASHCROFT).
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.Pjed., INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
District No. 26 (Birch Island) .
During the year the principle of cost-of-living bonus up to $300 was introduced,
and a plan to construct a teacherage in each attendance area—approximate cost, including furnishing, $2,500—was initiated. The teacherages will be rented, supplied with
fuel. A building was purchased and converted to use for additional classroom in
Blue River. A policy of board assistance for parents was introduced. The construction of a School Board office in Birch Island, the centre of the district, was completed.
The purchase of 10 acres of land in a suitable location for eventual development of
a large consolidated school was approved. All janitors' salaries were increased from
$10 per classroom per month to $15. A new teacherage in Clearwater was completed
and occupied, the school-grounds were improved and fenced, and a sand point and
pump were installed. Extensive alterations, extensions, and decoration to the Birch
Island school were completed. The tenders for construction of the school and teacherage at East Black Pool and at Upper Clearwater were awarded.
District No. 27 (Williams Lake).
A new two-room school and teacherage were built at Horsefly in time for school
opening, and a five-room house and a duplex teacherage, authorized by the by-law,
were built in the Town of Williams Lake in December. In June contracts were
awarded for the construction of two-room schools at Lac la Hache, Lone Butte, and
Forest Grove, and for one-room schools at Bridge Lake, Forest Grove, and Dog Creek.
A two-room school is being constructed at Alexis Creek by day-labour, as no tenders
were received for the erection of this building. By-law estimates for a four-room
elementary school at Williams Lake proved insufficient. After making many changes
to the plans and specifications and making additional financial arrangements, a contract
has finally been awarded. It is expected that the work will commence at the end of
July and that the building will be completed by January 1st, 1950.
A teachers' primary reading service was held at Williams Lake in June, 1949,
which was attended by almost all of the teachers of the district, together with several
of the teachers of the Quesnel District. reports of district inspectors. N 93
District No. 29 (Lillooet).
This year has seen the beginning of an extensive building programme. The
greatly increased population caused a problem that resulted in the successful passing
of a by-law for $150,000. Plans have been approved for new four-room high schools
at Bralorne and Lillooet and for a one-room school and teacherage at Pavilion. Plans
for an addition at Gold Bridge are under way. Transportation of high school students
to Bralorne and Lillooet and of elementary students to Gold Bridge and Bridge River
has been successful. The teaching programme has been enriched by the purchase of
typewriters, radios, a piano, and projectors. Approval of the Department has been
obtained for the inclusion in the future of Home Economics and Industrial Arts.
Because of the lack of boarding facilities, the Board has purchased two teacherages
at Lillooet and one at Gold Bridge.
District No. 30 (Ashcroft).
During the summer of 1949 the Board was faced with the grave problem of possibly having to close some of the divisions in the high schools at Lytton, Ashcroft, and
Clinton because of the lack of living accommodation for teachers. To solve this problem, the Board built teachers' residences. Two houses were built at Lytton—one for
a married man and one duplex to house four single teachers; two houses were built
at Ashcroft for married men, and one duplex was built; and at Clinton one married
man's house and one duplex were built. With this accommodation the Board feels it
will have less difficulty in engaging and retaining good teachers in the future.
In May the first post-war interdistrict track and field meet was held in Kamloops.
Seventeen students from the Ashcroft School competed and were able to win second
place.
In closing, I wish to express my appreciation and sincere thanks to the trustees,
secretary-treasurers, and teachers for the assistance and co-operation they have shown
me in the past year.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 66  (LAKE COWICHAN), No. 67
(LADYSMITH), AND No. 68 (NANAIMO).
REPORT OF W. A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.Pjed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Staff and Enrolment.
During the school-year 1948-49, 30 teachers were employed in District No. 66,
34 teachers in District No. 67, and 99 teachers in District No. 68, making a total of
163 teachers for the inspectorate. This is an increase of 14 teachers over last year's
total staff. The increased enrolment for 1949-50 will necessitate the provision for
at least 15 additional teachers.
Buildings.
In all three districts the increased enrolment has resulted in the construction of
new buildings and in demands for additional classroom accommodation.
In District No. 66 the passing of a building by-law has resulted in the opening
of a ten-room elementary school at Lake Cowichan, a one-room rural school at Nitinat,
and a two-room addition to the existing school at Yount.
In District No. 67 schools were reconstructed and reopened at Saltair and North
Oyster, and additional classrooms were provided at Chemainus and Ladysmith. The
failure of a by-law for a new junior-senior high school at Ladysmith has resulted in N  94 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
formulation of a compromise plan which will provide an elementary-junior high school
at Chemainus and a junior-senior high school at Ladysmith. Plans for these schools
have been approved by the Department and now await the decision of the ratepayers.
In District No. 68 two of the three elementary schools approved in 1946 have been
completed and are now in use. Plans and specifications for a senior high school at
Nanaimo are being prepared.
TRANSPORTATION.
In each of the three districts in this inspectorate, where complete junior-senior
high school consolidation is in effect, transportation is'a very vital problem. District
No. 66 owns its own school buses and operates at a cost of 18 cents per mile. District
No. 67 hires its buses at the rate of 34 cents per mile. District No. 68 was faced with
a demand for 40 cents a mile, which the Board considered unreasonable. Therefore,
in order to have complete control of the school transportation system, the School Board
has purchased buses. It is expected that the per-mile cost of transportation will be
reduced to approximately 25 cents per mile under the new system.
Teaching Programme.
In Districts No. 66, No. 67, and No. 68 the supply of qualified and proficient classroom teachers has been adequate. Special teachers in Physical Education, in Commercial work, and in Home Economics are still in short supply, and for this reason
temporary appointments of unqualified instructors have had to be made in three cases.
Testing Programme.
All schools in this inspectorate have participated in the Province-wide testing
programme directed by the Division of Tests and Standards. In addition to this
programme, district testing programmes have been carried out by the three senior
principals and local testing programmes by the principals of the larger schools. The
results of these testing programmes indicate that the fundamental skills are well
taught to the pupils.
Audio-Visual Aids.
All classrooms in this inspectorate are equipped with radios to enable the pupils
to take advantage of the school broadcasts. The teachers report that there is a noticeable improvement in the pupil interest in the programmes.
The travelling phonograph-record library, established in 1942, continues to service
the schools in the inspectorate under the direction of a Teachers' Music Committee.
In each of the school districts there is at least one portable sound-projection unit
for visual-auditory education.
Health Service.
The health services of all schools in this inspectorate are provided by the Central
Vancouver Island Public Health Unit. The area in this health unit is now being used
for a pilot-study for Canada in connection with the use of the Wetzel Grid. Some of
our teachers are now able to co-operate with the medical staff in the diagnosis of
physical, mental, and emotional maladjustments that require remedial treatment. In
addition to the vast amount of work done by the personnel of the health unit, a very
thorough programme of preventive work in immunization, inoculation, and vaccination has been completed.
Conclusion.
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation to the principals, teachers,
and School Board members in these districts for the harmonious and efficient manner
in which they have worked together to attain the objectives suggested by the Department of Education. '• '• REPORTS of district inspectors. N 95
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 71  (COURTENAY)  AND No. 72
(CAMPBELL RIVER).
REPORT OF HAROLD D. STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF
SCHOOLS.
The school-year 1948-49 has been one of great activity for all persons associated
with the public-school programme. The responsibilities of trustees have become
increasingly onerous and time-consuming, but it is hoped that means of lessening their
responsibilities may be found.
In District No. 71 (Courtenay) the Board of School Trustees is confronted with
the necessity of presenting a by-law to authorize borrowings for a district building
programme.
In District No. 72 (Campbell River) the Board of School Trustees is engaged in
a building programme which was authorized by the by-law passed in the spring of
1948. Growth of population in this district will necessitate the submission of a second
by-law for school buildings in the near future.
Interest in problems faced by each school-teacher was particularly high during
this past year, and I am most happy to commend the teachers in my inspectorate for
their many hours of arduous work undertaken in connection with various special committees. Particular reference is made to the regular meetings attended by school
principals, to the work undertaken by the teachers on the Visual Aids Committee which
co-operated with the Provincial Department in evaluating many motion pictures, and
to the committee which evaluated new publications. It is through the co-operative
work of teachers on these and other committees that classroom instruction will become
increasingly effective.
It is a pleasure to report that there has been increased activity in the field of
in-service training of teachers. With the permission of the Superintendent of Education, two night-school classes were organized—one in primary reading conducted by
Miss A. J. Andrew, and the other in choral music and conducting instructed by Mrs.
C. Carman. Those who took this opportunity for professional growth are most appreciative of the instruction received.
A one-day workshop dealing with teaching problems peculiar to this area was well
attended and proved to be of great value.
Some of the teachers from School Districts No. 71 and No. 72 were privileged to
devote one day to an intensive study of reading problems in the primary grades.
Through the kindness of W. J. Gage & Company, publishers of the prescribed primary
readers, demonstration classes were conducted by Mrs. T. Gregg, reading consultant.
Through the co-operation of pupils, teachers, principals, and trustees, four events
were held during the year which focused the attention of parents and of the general
public on the cultural work of the schools: the first music festival held in this area
demonstrated the excellent choral instruction given in the schools; the school drama
festival was notable for the superior direction of the plays, and for the outstanding
potentialities of many student actors; the annual display of work done by pupils in
the Industrial Arts Department was combined with a fashion show displaying the skill
of the sewing section of the Home Economics Department.
A high school graduation ceremony and banquet was held in both School Districts
No. 71 and No. 72. These ceremonies are most appropriate, as they mark the culmination of the entire public-school programme, and serve to impress upon students and
parents the privileges of public education and the responsibilities which devolve upon
those who graduate from our school system.
In the light of experience gained by these ceremonies, future ceremonies of an
equally impressive nature will undoubtedly be held. N 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 28  (QUESNEL), No. 57  (PRINCE GEORGE),
AND No. 58 (McBRIDE).
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A.(TOR.), B.Ed.(Brit. Col.),
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The area included in the School Districts of Quesnel, Prince George, and McBride
is one which has, in the past three or four years, seen rapid development and settlement. Out of this development and the promise of its continuation in the future
has come the many problems with which School Boards in this area have been faced.
Perhaps the most constant and pressing obstacle with which Boards have had to
deal is that of securing competent, trained teachers. Because of its apparent remoteness, and its fancied less-desirable living and working conditions, teachers seem reluctant to take positions in this central portion of British Columbia. In order to staff
the schools completely, North Central Boards have been obliged to offer materially
better salaries than other districts and to practically guarantee suitable living conditions, as well as to almost conscript every local teacher, married or otherwise, into
active teaching. How far this policy will result in an improvement in securing fully
qualified teachers remains to be seen.
The problem of supplying school accommodation still continues to press, although
in all districts there are indications that School Boards are arriving at the point
where it is no longer urgent. In the Prince George District a total of twenty-two
new classrooms has been added in the past year, either replacing temporary buildings
or providing for increased enrolment. Two features of the policy of the School Board
in this district are worthy of mention. Firstly, the erection of portable schools in
communities where settlement has not yet become stabilized has enabled the Board
to provide education in small communities that have grown up around sawmill and
logging operations. The portable type of building is so designed that it may be placed
on skids or moved on wheels to a new location. The second noteworthy feature of
policy is the installation of schools in communities that have become permanently
settled. The main intent in this practice is to reduce the transportation of children
to a common centre and, at the same time, to provide community centres in each area
where there is a community of interests.
In the Quesnel District a fine new eight-room school now in process of erection
will greatly relieve a terrifically overcrowded condition in the Quesnel Elementary-
High School and will enable school authorities to reorganize on an elementary, junior-
senior high school basis. In addition to this, two steel Quonset buildings are being
used to replace existing dilapidated buildings, while a small portable school is being
provided for the growing community at Ahbau Creek. Some extension of transportation has also been effected in order to make schooling available not only to isolated
children, but to provide a finer grading within the schools.
In the McBride District, plans for providing additional accommodation have not
yet reached fruition, but the year has seen some fruitful discussions, and the Board
has a building programme planned which will meet adequately the district needs for
several years to come. Both here and in Prince George the necessity for providing
living accommodation for high school students has been urgent. McBride District
has done this by generously assisting with boarding grants, while Prince George District solved its problem by the erection of boys' and girls' dormitories.
The year has seen great improvement in the working conditions of teachers.
Maintenance crews in the Quesnel and Prince George Districts have been able to effect
many repairs and installations in their schools which have added greatly to the comfort and health of children and teachers. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. N  97
The North Central Branch of the Provincial Library Commission has rendered
an outstanding service in providing and servicing the school libraries in all one-room
schools in the inspectorate. It is hoped that in the near future this service may be
extended to all but the larger graded schools.
It is reasonable to think that the standard of education in the inspectorate has
been maintained at a fairly high level. School Boards and teachers have worked in
complete harmony toward the common end of providing the best education possible
for school pupils within the limits of their means. A very instructive and inspiring
teachers' convention was held in Prince George in November, attended by almost 100
per cent, of the teachers in the inspectorate. With the complete sanction, and almost
at the insistence, of the Boards in question, one-day teachers' institutes were conducted
in May in Prince George and Quesnel. The results of the Department of Education
testing programme, the University Entrance and Senior Matriculation Examinations,
and of the tests sent out from the office of Inspector of Schools would indicate that
scholastic achievement is being maintained at a fairly high standard. That School
Boards are looking to the future is evidenced in the discussions that occur at many
of their meetings.
In conclusion, I wish to state the real pleasure it has been to me to work with the
School Boards and secretary-treasurers of this inspectorate. The valuable contribution which they are making to the advance of education in this area at a very considerable sacrifice to themselves is an inspiration to all with whom they come in contact.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 21   (ARMSTRONG)   AND No. 22   (VERNON).
REPORT OF A. S. TOWELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The year 1948-49 was again dominated, especially in the Vernon School District,
by the problem of improvising accommodation for the steadily increasing numbers of
pupils. In the Vernon Central School, already the largest elementary school in the
Province, the enrolment passed the 1,300 mark, and the Vernon High School, by use
of the shift system, continued to accommodate twice the 500 pupils it was designed
to house.
During the year, however, definite steps were taken toward a solution of this
problem. Late in 1948 a by-law to provide funds for a building programme was passed
with a heavy majority, and within a few months construction-work was started on the
first of the new schools, most of which should be ready for use by September, 1950.
The trouble with this particular type of problem, though, is that it refuses to stay
solved. Present indications are that by the time the new buildings are all in use,
enrolment will have increased beyond their capacity, and additional accommodation
will be needed.
In the Armstrong School District the increase in numbers of pupils, while considerable, has been of more manageable proportions. Planning has been delayed there
by difficulty in finding a suitable site for a new high school, but presentation of a by-law
now appears probable some time within the next year.
In both school districts the trustees, during the year, successfully attacked another
problem; namely, that of rationalizing and systematizing their insurance coverage
of all types. When the new larger districts were set up in 1946, the Boards had
inherited, of course, a very mixed assortment of policies from their predecessors.
Rates, coverage, and valuations varied widely, and dates of expiry were scattered all
over the calendar. As a first step, replacement values of buildings and equipment were
established by professional appraisers, then blanket insurance was provided on an
. N 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
undepreciated replacement value basis. The school bus and the general liability
coverage were similarly revamped, so that both districts now have as good protection
against the usual hazards as insurance can provide.
A third problem dealt with during the year was that of teachers' salaries. It
became apparent during the summer of 1948 that recruitment of teachers was hindered
by the fact that salaries paid locally had failed to keep pace with increases elsewhere
in the Province. Early in 1949 arbitration proceedings were held at Penticton, and
neighbouring Boards agreed to abide by the outcome. As a result, salaries were
increased to the level generally prevailing, and, as a further result, it at once became
easier to secure teachers.
It is a pleasure again to accord recognition to the fine service rendered to the
schools by the trustees and teachers of both districts.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 34  (ABBOTSFORD), No. 75  (MISSION),
AND No. 35  (LANGLEY).
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., M.B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
In November, 1948, this inspectorate, which originally included only Abbotsford
and Mission, was enlarged by the addition of Langley.
As has been the case in so many other school districts in this Province, the
mounting increases in school population have continued to present their problems.
In Abbotsford and in Mission the Boards of School Trustees were busy during the
year in the planning of new schools.
Both districts had been seriously affected by the Fraser River flood in the spring
of 1948, and, as a result, planning was set aside for a period. Most of the summer
and part of the following fall were devoted to rehabilitating the schools affected by the
flood. With the exception of the Hatzic Prairie School, which was too badly damaged
to be repaired, all schools were put back into satisfactory condition, and school was
convened as usual in September.
To accommodate the general increase in the Abbotsford District, buildings were
acquired at the Abbotsford Airport, and a new temporary school of eight divisions
opened there.   By the end of the year, two more divisions had been added to this school.
At the Upper Sumas School, where new arrivals from Europe had been swelling
the enrolment figures, it was necessary to open two additional temporary rooms.
In all, throughout the Abbotsford School District, twelve additional rooms were added
during the year.
In Mission a similar situation obtained. Additional temporary rooms were added
as follows: Two rooms at the Mission Elementary, two rooms at Cedar Valley, two
rooms at Hatzic, and two rooms at the Mission Junior-Senior High School.
During the year, considerable progress has been made in school-building maintenance. The installation of running water, with satisfactory sanitary facilities, has
been completed in several schools. At Ferndale the one-room school was completely
redecorated and supplied with suitable new furniture. It has been well maintained and
serves now as an example of a satisfactory standard for rural schools of this type.
In Langley an extensive programme of school building is nearing its completion.
In the Langley District new permanent elementary rooms have been added at County
Line, Aldergrove, Willoughby, Otter, and West Langley. During the year the
secondary-school pupils who had been on double shift were transferred to the newly
constructed Langley High School and were placed on a regular attendance schedule. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS. N 99
It is expected that the gymnasium, the last unit to be added to the high school, will be
completed and ready for use early in the fall term of 1949.
The members of the Langley Board of School Trustees are to be highly commended
for the time, the effort, and the energy they have freely and willingly expended, and for
the foresight they have shown in being among the first Boards to take definite steps
to meet the school accommodation problems. At the same time it should be noted that
Langley is a favoured area which is still attracting families from elsewhere, and, as
a result, the school population is continuing to grow. It would appear that it will not
be long before further additional accommodation is required in this school district.
Throughout the inspectorate the educational standards have been well maintained,
and principal and teacher co-operation have operated on a very high level. Throughout
the year 104 formal reports were issued on teachers and 123 School Board evening
meetings were attended.
In conclusion, I should like to express appreciation to the various members of the
Boards of School Trustees for the untiring efforts they exert and the unselfishness they
display in the exercise of their energies for the welfare of the rising generation.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 3 (KIMBERLEY), No. 4 (WINDERMERE),
AND No. 18 (GOLDEN).
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
Enrolment increased in School District No. 3 by 6% per cent., with an addition
of 80 pupils to make a total of 1,318. District No. 4 showed an increase of 5% per cent.
for a total of 326, and District No. 18 an increase of 31/;. per cent, for a total of 322.
One additional teacher was added to the staff of District No. 3.
Construction of the new sixteen-room Kimberley Central Elementary School and
the addition to the Kimberley Junior-Senior High School proceeded throughout the
year. The elementary school was completed in June, ready for school opening in
September, 1949. During this year six elementary divisions had to be housed in
temporary quarters, causing much inconvenience. Teachers of these divisions are to
be congratulated on the work done under rather trying physical conditions. Plans were
made for a three-room elementary school to be built in Marysville, to replace the present
one-room school and ease transportation to Kimberley. District No. 4 opened a new
two-room school at Canal Flats in September, 1948, and preparation for a by-law went
ahead to build schools at Invermere, Brisco, Edgewater, and Windermere. District
No. 18 built a two-room addition to the Golden Senior High-Elementary School and
replaced the school at Harrogate.
The difficulty of obtaining qualified teachers was eased somewhat during 1948-49.
The teacher situation was as follows: Qualified teachers, 68; over-age, trained but on
temporary certificates, 2; incomplete training, 4. Ten beginning teachers were
employed, and with one exception the Normal School graduates developed well during
the year. Salary schedules pegged to the cost of living obviated the necessity of
negotiations for new schedules during 1948-49.
A testing programme was continued throughout the districts to supplement the
Provincial testing programme. Most schools showed good results, but a number of
weaknesses, especially in reading, were noted in the rural schools. Results of these
tests and of the tests given by the Division of Tests and Standards were discussed with
teachers, with suggestions for improvement. N   100 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Excellent health service was rendered by the public health nurses of these districts.
Districts No. 4 and No. 18, enjoying the services of a public health nurse for the first
time, were well cared for.
A note in this report must be made of the excellent effect of the Department-
sponsored secretary-treasurers' conference on the work of the secretaries. More
efficient and smoother operation of school business matters has resulted.
Again praise is due to the School Boards for their consistent work in the interests
of better education, and to the teachers for their loyalty and service in the good work
they do.
SCHOOL DISTRICTS No. 32 (FRASER CANYON), No. 33
(CHILLIWACK), AND No. 76  (AGASSIZ).
REPORT OF ALEX. TURNBULL, B.A., M.C., M.M., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
School District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon).
During the year, problems of accommodation and administration have been effectively handled, and conditions are on a sound basis for future progress.
The double shift at Laidlaw was eliminated by the opening of the new two-room
school in September. Plans for the high school at Hope were finally completed, and
construction of the classroom unit is well advanced. In January a new elementary
school opened at Ruby Creek.
Since the formation of the district, there has been steady growth in spite of many
difficulties. Educational opportunity is now available to all children at both elementary
and high school levels, under fully qualified teachers, in all sections of the Canyon.
School District No. 33 (Chilliwack).
The long period of planning has reached its culmination, and very pleasing
advances in the building programme have been made. On May 20th two elementary
schools were formally opened by Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister of Education.
At Vedder a new six-room school with large activity-room and all modern services was
built, while a similar four-room unit at East Chilliwack replaces the old school there.
Two rooms are almost ready at Rosedale, and extensive improvements are being
completed at Atchelitz.
The contract for a new high school was awarded during the winter, and this fine
building should be ready early in the fall. An important feature of this development
is the new agricultural unit, for which both Federal and Provincial assistance is being
received.
The accommodation problem is well in hand, and a few months more should see
the opening of schools which will be a great tribute to the foresight and initiative
of the school trustees of District No. 33.
Academic growth has been very pleasing. Public recognition of work being done
in Music, Art, Physical Education, Industrial Arts, and Home Economics was received
at the musical festival, exhibitions, concerts, and displays held during the year. An
active night-school served over 300 interested adults. Successful classes in Citizenship
were operated for New Canadians. Miss Charlotte Froese again brought honour to
herself and school by winning the district scholarship in the Senior Matriculation
Examinations.   A second scholarship was won by Harry Thiessen. reports of district inspectors. n 101
School District No. 76 (Agassiz).
Agassiz was still in the midst of rehabilitation from the spring floods when the
schools reopened. However, due to the untiring efforts of school authorities and
generous financial assistance from the Department of Education, classes were in
operation with little delay.
A determined effort to provide better facilities for the district resulted in the
construction of a new centre for Industrial Arts and Home Economics. Administration
offices were also built, and a new school will soon be ready for the primary pupils
at Harrison Hot Springs. Plans are now being considered to build a gymnasium-
auditorium at Agassiz High School.
General.
During the term, extensive tests were administered for the Division of Tests and
Standards, and a survey was carried out in Grades III, VI, and VIII. Achievement
results will be available for diagnostic and remedial purposes.
It gives great satisfaction to be able to report that the complete public health unit
has now been established in this area. The fine work carried on by this department has
a very direct bearing on the success of our school system.
It has been a year of progress, and I wish to convey my appreciation to teachers
and trustees in all districts for the co-operation and harmonious relationships which
have been so evident throughout the term. N  102 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
THE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.
REPORT OF C. E. MacDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D.,
SUPERINTENDENT.
Our enrolment for the year 1948-49 was 119, including four children from the
Province of Alberta and one from the Yukon Territory.
Blind or partial-sighted students enrolled  24
Deaf or hard of hearing students enrolled  95
Part-time students      4
Parents receiving our pre-school correspondence courses  19
Reference was made in my last report to a survey of this school having been made
in the spring of 1948 by Mr. H. L. Campbell, Assistant Superintendent of Education,
and Municipal Inspectors Gray and English. On the recommendation of the survey
committee, the Honourable the Minister of Education appointed the following gentlemen to serve on a Departmental Management Committee for the school: Mr. James
Gordon (chairman), Mr. H. L. Campbell, Mr. C. G. Brown, Mr. William Gray, and
Mr. Owen Thomas.
The achievement of higher standards of efficiency and effectiveness in the operations
of this school is directly related to the whole-hearted co-operation received from the
Management Committee. Individually and collectively the members of this Committee
have contributed invaluable service to the school.
The inadequacy of our accommodations was given serious consideration by the
Committee and the Department of Education. Having a full appreciation of our needs,
the Honourable the Minister of Education has taken appropriate steps to remedy the
situation. Plans for a new primary unit are now near completion, and construction
of the building will be commenced in the immediate future.
In accordance with a recommendation of the Survey Committee, a new policy
dealing with the recruitment and training of teachers has been instituted. Arrangements have been completed to offer courses for teachers of the deaf under the Summer
School of Education. Miss Groht, principal of the Lexington School for the Deaf in
New York, and her assistant, Miss Mary New, have been engaged as instructors for
courses to be offered at the school this summer, and forty-one students have been
enrolled.
The Management Committee has developed and presented to the Department of
Education for consideration a new teacher classification and salary schedule. It is
based on the advanced certification plan for specialist teachers in effect in this Province.
Greater emphasis has been given to the development of speech in the primary deaf
classes and its usage generally throughout the school. Lip-reading has been given
similar consideration. In order to provide the children with maximum opportunity for
the exercise of these skills, the full co-operation of all members of the staff was enlisted
in securing the desirable objectives of oral communication. By this and other means,
we expect to achieve new high standards of intelligible speech, lip-reading ability, and
language usage.
Children with usable residual hearing have been given intensive acoustic training
through the use of multiple and individual hearing aids. As in previous years, it has
been possible during the past term to readjust a number of hard-of-hearing students
with hearing aids into regular public-school classes and to improve the quality of the
speech of others.
Special consideration has been given to the extra-curricular activities of the
students by the vice-principal in charge, Mr. David Moir. Throughout the term, many
parties, excursions, sports events, and the like have been enjoyed by the students. SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND. N  103
Through the kind co-operation of the Officer Commanding the Royal Canadian
Signals a 25-watt transmitting and receiving station was completely installed for the
use of our older blind and partial-sighted boys. Classes in theory and practice were
conducted by members of the British Columbia Amateur Radio Association two nights
a week. As far as I know, our station (VE7NI) is the only amateur radio station
operated by a school for the blind on this continent.
The Junior League of Vancouver, the Stagette Club, and the Quota Club deserve
special mention in this report. Each organization, in its own way, has contributed
to the enrichment of our school programme by donations of equipment and by voluntary
services to the children.
In preparing this report, I am deeply conscious of the competent assistance
rendered by Miss Mabel Blake and Miss Helen Woodward, vice-principals. The skill
and zeal with which they exercised their duties and responsibilities have contributed
in a large measure to the progress achieved during the past year.
In conclusion, I wish to express my very deep appreciation to the Honourable the
Minister of Education, the Superintendent of Education, the Management Committee,
the entire staff, and volunteer assistants for their sympathetic understanding and
support. N  104 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS.
HIGH SCHOOL AND VOCATIONAL COURSES.
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. ES L., DIRECTOR.
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1948-49 was 5,951, which is an increase of approximately 8.5 per cent, over the enrolment during the year 1947-48. This increase is mainly in the number of students over
21, the increase in that category being 325.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in schools— Per Cent-
1. School-age students registered in high and
superior schools. Such students were permitted to take three courses by correspondence.
(Throughout this report the term " school-
age " refers to students under 18 years of age.)  1,418
2. School-age students registered in elementary
schools         13
Total number of school-age students  1,431
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 registered in their
local schools       769
4. Students  of  21   or  over  registered  in  their
local schools         26
Total number of students registered in their
local schools taking one or more correspondence courses   2,226       37.4
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school
because of physical disability        77
2. School-age students gainfully employed      117
3. School-age students studying courses at home
because of the distance factor      330
4. School-age students in institutions — Girls'
Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School,
Oakalla Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary          20
5. School-age students not registered in schools
for other reasons       39
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered
in their local schools      770
Total number of students under 21 not registered in their local schools and obtaining
their education by correspondence  1,353      22.7
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  2,372      39.9
Total number of students  5,951    100.0 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS. N 105
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:—
Per Cent.
1. Pupils under 18 years of age  2,014      33.8
2. Pupils of 18, 19, and 20  1,539      25.9
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  2,398      40.3
Totals  5,951    100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high school courses. Others
registered for only one or two courses. The number of students who enrolled in each
of the high school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature III, IV, V, VI  796
English Grammar and Composition III, IV, V, VI  1,021
Social Studies, III, IV, V  622
General Science III, IV, V   478
Mathematics III, IV, V, VI  '.  1,314
Latin I, II, III   304
French I, II, III  .  374
Spanish I, II, III  _,  138
Health and Physical Education III, IV, V  436
Agriculture I, II  _-__  80
Geography I, II  70
Home Economics   417
Art III   207
Record-keeping    465
Junior Business   136
Book-keeping I, II, III  390
Business Arithmetic   87
Shorthand I, II  160
Typewriting I, II   704
Secretarial Practice   2
Business English   72
Journalism   68
Biology A   98
Physics A   74
German A     97
Chemistry A   78
Bible Study  70
Total  8,758
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation Courses
was as follows:—
English Literature   110
English Composition      91
Algebra and Trigonometry  121
Geometry   112
French       85
Latin      40
World History      81
Chemistry I  .     37
Physics I      22
Home Economics        8
Agriculture        7
Total  714 N  106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT. 1948-49.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Technical-Vocational Courses
may also be classified in the following table:—
Mechanical Drawing I, II  149
Sheet-metal Work  15
Steam Engineering Ia, IB, Ha   408
Metal-mining    3
Automotive Engineering I, II   154
Diesel Engineering  '.  27
Practical Electricity _•__  132
Principles of Radio I, II   69
Aviation   12
Elementary Geology and Mineralogy  -  52
Forestry   65
Commercial Art  73
Building Construction  97
House Painting and Decorating   13
Industrial Mathematics  ,  103
Soils and Field Crops   14
Poultry-keeping   16
Practical Design   45
Glove-making   51
Air Navigation I and II  6
Mathematics for Steam Engineering IIa   38
Fruit-growing  i  20
Accountancy for Credit Unions  ■    44
Spherical Trigonometry  11
Home Furnishing and Decoration  54
English II for New Canadians  17
Total   1,688
All students, with the exception of patients in the Solarium, in sanatoria, or in
hospitals, and inmates of public institutions, were required to pay the annual registration fee of $2. Students paying tuition fees were those who have the privilege of
attending a high school having five or more teachers, high school students 18 years of
age or older, employed students over 16 years of age, students enrolled for Senior
Matriculation Courses, and students living outside this Province. Discharged service
personnel of World War I and World War II, and their unemployed dependents, were
charged half the usual fees (such dependents were charged full fees if they lived in
a district having a large high school).
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition
fees:—
1. Public institutions and hospitals—
(1) Hospital cases   258
(2) British Columbia Penitentiary  134
(3) Oakalla Prison Farm      65
(4) Girls' Industrial Home       8
(5) Boys' Industrial Home     11
(6) New Haven      32
Sub-total  508 CORRESPONDENCE  SCHOOLS. N  107
2. On relief or equivalent  2
3. Members of the staff   4
4. Students needed at home   25
5. Disabled students at home   15
6. Bible Study  70
7. Dependents of discharged service personnel   52
8. Discharged service personnel   475
Total  643
In the case of 306 students, their fees were paid by their local school district.
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers   352
Nurses  - .  322
Medicine   90
Science   62
Law  27
Art   99
Theology   17
Pharmacy   61
Miscellaneous  195
Commercial  ,  576
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 256
Aviation   15
His Majesty's Forces .  37
Civil Service   7
Agriculture and farming   89
Forestry  53
Mining   2
Journalism   70
Diesel and steam engineering  471
Radio   34
Miscellaneous   112
Not given   3,004
Total  5,951
Completion of Courses.
A total of 84,352 papers were marked during the year. The school-year showed a
slight increase in the number of courses completed.
Courses sold to Teachers.
A very large number of correspondence courses were sold at cost price to teachers.
Teachers who purchase courses must state the name of the school in which they teach
and must certify that they are actively engaged in teaching the subject in which they
wish to buy the correspondence course. They are not permitted to make mimeographed
copies of any part of the courses.
Staff of Instructors.
There were two " inside" staff instructors and fifty-six " outside" instructors.
The " inside " staff instructors were on salary, while the " outside " instructors were
paid on a paper basis. The volume of instructors' work fluctuates considerably during
the year. N 108
PUBLIC   SCHOOLS  REPORT,  1948-49.
New Courses.
Additional courses offered during the year were Mathematics 91, Record-keeping,
and English II for New Canadians. We offered also rewritten courses in the clothing
section of Home Economics CC II and in Latin I.
English for New Canadians.
During the year 533 copies of the available pages of English I for New Canadians
and 376 copies of the available pages of English II for New Canadians were sent out.
These were supplied to private individuals and to teachers of night-school classes. The
purpose of the English I course is to teach the English language. The English II
course is designed to teach the principles of English sentence construction and to
acquaint newcomers with our way of life. The latter papers of the course will deal
specifically with citizenship, although the ideals of good citizenship are stressed
throughout the course.
ELEMENTARY CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL.
REPORT OF ANNA B. MILLER, DIRECTOR.
The enrolment for the Elementary Correspondence School for the school-year 1948-
49 was 1,406 pupils. Of these, 117 were enrolled in the Peace River Branch at Pouce
Coupe; for the total enrolment, this is 130 fewer than last year. There were 162,137
lessons marked in Victoria and 14,093 lessons marked in Pouce Coupe.
The following shows the enrolment by grade for the year:—
Enrolled at Victoria.
Grade
I.
Grade
II.
Grade
III.
Grade
IV.
Grade
V.
Grade
VI.
Grade
VII.
Grade
VIII.
Total.
September
October	
November.
December-
January--.
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
144
139
107
87
83
92
63  |
178
156
115
103
98
98
81  |
197
174
125
114
110
103
91  j
222
182
129
118
120
110
99  |
229
193
137
131
127
114
108 |
243
197
145
130
132
113
110 |
260
204
148
137
138
116
118 |
271
201
165
136
143
120
122 |
266
208
169
139
143
117
126 |
262
206
172
144
146
122
124 |
49
68
75
79
85
92
97
103
109
764
897
989
| 1,059
| 1,124
| 1,162
| 1,218
j 1,261
| 1,277
113 | 1,289
Enrolled at Pouce Coupe (Peace River Branch).
September
October	
November.
December..
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
6
7
6
5
4
6
6  |
9
9
7
5
5
7
8 |
13
17
8
5
5
9
8 |
15
19
11
4
7
9
10  [
18
21
12
4
10
11
12  |
23
22
13
5
11
11
11  |
24
25
13
6
12
11
11  |
25
25
13
6
12
12
11  1
25
25
13
6
12
12
11  |
25
25
13
6
12
12
11  |
5
6
7
7
9
11
13
13
13
13
45
56
72
82
97
107
115
117
117
117 correspondence schools.
N 109
Correspondence pupils may work at varying speeds in completing the year's work.
Some require the full year, a few complete the grade in less than a year, and others take
more than the average time. The tabulation below shows approximate percentages of
pupils completing the grade as indicated:—
Grade
I.
Grade
II.
Grade
III.
Grade
IV.
Grade
V.
Grade
VI.
Grade
VII.
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
Per
Cent.
51
56
59
53
61
63
61
33
25
25
22
16
13
12
16
19
16
25
23
24
27
Grade
VIII.
Approximate percentage of pupils who completed the grade in average time	
Approximate percentage of pupils who completed the grade in less than average time
Approximate percentage of pupils who completed the grade in more than average time
Per
Cent.
72
9
19
This is the first year that " outside " markers have been used to any extent. Some
work was sent out and marked by qualified persons in their own homes. This has made
it possible to keep the marking up to date and is working out satisfactorily. It will be
put into more effective use this coming year.
A school magazine was published and sent out to all families. N   110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH.
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE.
This report must of necessity comment on an important change in the future
operations of this office, resulting from amendments to the " Public Schools Act "
passed at the last session of the Legislature. As a result of these amendments, the
Text-book Branch has been empowered to operate a Text-book Rental Plan throughout
the public schools of the Province, and since the Rental Plan is heavily subsidized by
the Government, there will no longer be free text-books beyond Grade VI. All of the
prescribed text-books will continue to be issued free in Grades I to VI, inclusive, and
in the senior grades they may be rented by the students for a nominal fee. The rental
fees for the year 1949-50 will be $3.50 for Grades VII to IX, inclusive, and $4 for
Grades X to XIII, inclusive. The Text-book Rental Plan is not compulsory, and students who wish to own their own books may do so and be excluded from the scheme.
In future, requisitions tb the Text-book Branch must be carefully prepared so that
a proper accounting of the many books which will be in our schools can be made from
year to year.
The launching of this new scheme is an operation of considerable magnitude,
involving large expenditures. In order to reduce costs, the Department of Education
has requested principals and Inspectors to scrutinize all requisitions and have text-books
used in classroom sets whenever feasible. The Text-book Branch has appealed to the
students in schools to donate used text-books to the new plan when they might otherwise be destroyed or discarded. Reasonable co-operation in these two requests will
result in more nearly achieving a financial balance during the first two years of operation of the Rental Plan.
The proper development of the Rental Plan will mean a saving for parent and pupil,
and should lead to better-equipped schools and classrooms. The Rental Plan will enable
the Department of Education to change and adjust the curriculum in accordance with
committee recommendations involving changed or revised text-books.
The complete success of the Rental Plan may not be apparent for a few years, and
its success depends to a great extent on the co-operation given by teachers and principals in (1) requisitioning only for the required books, (2) requisitioning for minimum
quantities, (3) use of classroom sets whenever feasible, and (4) supervision re care of
books issued to pupils or on classroom shelves, etc.
In addition to planning and arranging for the operation of the Rental Plan, the
more regular functions of the Branch have been carried out as usual.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies, issued during the school-year 1948-49
to public schools and in connection with correspondence courses, required an expenditure of $170,045.81;  4,745 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 20,267. From these
orders, the sum of $521,866.10 was collected by us and deposited in the Treasury.
Many of the report forms, etc., issued by the Department of Education were distributed by us to the various School Boards, when and where required.
ANNUAL REPORT  OF  THE   OFFICER  IN  CHARGE,  TEXT-BOOK  BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1949.
The seventeenth annual report of the Text-book Branch is another of bigger and
better things. Our volume of business reached an all-time high of approximately
$575,000, and, as it is impossible to handle that volume of business in our present
quarters, we were required to rent additional warehouse and office space up-town.
Cramped quarters do not make for efficiency, and, I repeat, this Branch requires new
and modern quarters. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH. N  111
In spite of the many difficulties we have had another good year, with 5 cents bad
debts and our clients throughout the Province satisfied with the services rendered.
Stock.
The stock on hand is in proper quantity to meet demands and is all live stock.
Deliveries from the publishers improve, but increasing freight and other rates result
in increased list prices.
Sales.
Our sales for the year amounted to $574,995.55, and the discount to dealers, School
Boards, etc., was $89,342.97.
Profit.
Our profit for the year amounted to $4,768.94. This amount was turned in to the
Consolidated Revenue Fund.
General Remarks.
This will be the final report of the Text-book Branch, whose operations for the
last eighteen years have, in the main, been similar to those of any large wholesale house.
The Branch has operated on business lines, covered its overhead, and made a profit each
and every year. During that period our accumulated profits total $93,906.03. We not
only quickly achieved our first objective, set in 1931, of stabilizing the resale price of
text-books throughout the Province of British Columbia, but we were instrumental in
having prices reduced and a steadier volume of supply maintained in large and small
centres.
We have had dealings with retail outlets of every kind and size, whose single
orders on us have varied from 15 cents to $18,000, and our associations at all times
have been pleasant and business-like. For all the co-operation we have received from
these many book-sellers throughout British Columbia and the Yukon, I wish to officially
record my sincere thanks. Without their friendly assistance, our task would have been
less easy and not nearly so pleasant.
To school officials of all kinds we also extend our thanks, and now, because of the
Text-book Rental Plan, we shall be more dependent on schools for proper ordering
and recording; we are hopeful that they will continue the happy relationships which
presently exist. The Text-book Branch will continue to give service to dealers and
others throughout the Province, but the major part of our business will in the future
be with schools and School Boards on the Rental Plan.
Reputations, such as this Branch has, are possible only when there is a happy, loyal,
and efficient staff. In this regard we have been most fortunate. There has at all times
been extended a true spirit of co-operation, and at the peak periods, which occur quite
frequently in this business, watches and clocks would seem to be out of favour.
In a report of this kind one hesitates to mention names, but during the year under
review Mr. Meredith, accountant, was superannuated after sixteen years of true and
faithful service. We wish him many well-earned happy days and good fishing. Mr.
Blair, head shipper, continues to do a yeoman service, perhaps at personal cost from a
health point of view. The others, from the most junior to the most senior, have at all
times been splendid, and for all of their services so cheerfully given I say most heartily,
thank you all again. n 112 public schools report, 1948-49.
Profit and Loss Statement, Year ended March 31st, 1949.
Gross sales  $574,995.55
Less discount       89,342.97
Net sales   $485,652.58
Stock on hand as at March 31st, 1948  $158,919.04
Purchases for year—
Cost      434,564.59
Freight and duty       10,698.31
■  $604,181.94
Stock on hand as at March 31st, 1949     176,490.37
Net cost of goods sold    427,691.57
Gross profit for year     $57,961.01
Expenses—
Salaries and wages     $42,215.20
Freight and delivery         7,016.62
Packing and general expenses         3,960.20
       53,192.02
Operating profit for year       $4,768.99
Bad debts written off  .05
Net profit transferred to Consolidated Revenue         $4,768.94
Certified correct. Certified correct.
W. Crothall, P. G. Barr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge.
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1949.
Assets.
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand        $100.00
Cash in bank  350.00
■  $450.00
Stock inventory .     176,490.37
Obsolete stock on hand       10,432.47
Accounts receivable   $23,102.39
Less credit balance       1,513.89
       21,588.50
$208,961.34
Liabilities.
Treasury advances   $450.00
Capital Investment Account     198,009.53
Reserve for obsolete stock       10,432.47
Accounts payable in suspense  69.34
$208,961.34
Certified correct. Certified correct.
W. Crothall, P. G. Barr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge. report on adult education. N 113
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION.
H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.
Under the general heading of "Adult Education," two groups of classes are administered by the Department of Education, as follows: (1) Those that are conducted
in co-operation with the Dominion Government, and (2) those that are the direct
responsibility of the Province. The reports of the responsible officers are grouped
here for convenience.
Industrial Education—H. A. Jones, Director of Technical and Vocational Education.
(1) Canadian Vocational  Training  Programme — Lieut.-Col.  J. W.  Inglis,
Regional Director.
(a) Classes   operated   under   the   Dominion-Provincial   Vocational
Training Agreement.
(b) Classes   operated   under   the   Dominion-Provincial   Apprentice
Training Agreement.
(2) Night-schools (see Industrial Education Report).
(3) Vancouver School of Navigation.
Correspondence Instruction—
*High School—Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.
*Elementary School—Miss Anna B. Miller, Director.
*Recreational and Physical Education—Ernest Lee, B.A., B.Sc. in P.E., Director.
*School and Community Drama—H. S. Hum, B.A., Director.
(1)   CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME.
The report which follows, with the exception of the sections dealing with Schedule
E (Rural Training), Schedule H (Student Aid), and Supervisory Training, has been
prepared by Lieut.-Col. J. W. Inglis, Regional Director, Canadian Vocational Training.
The end of the fiscal year 1948-49 saw the termination of the classes for ex-service
personnel. The decline was gradual during the last year, and the training programme
was completed by the end of the fiscal year. During 1949-50 any veterans who require
training will be referred to the Vancouver Vocational Institute, which is operated by
the Vancouver School Board. The fees involved will be paid to the School Board under
Schedule L. By the end of March, 1950, it is expected that all training under this
schedule will be completed.
Schedule C had a slight increase in activity, while Schedule M was started in a
minor way. Placement of trainees under all schedules has been extremely good, and
close relationship has been maintained with the Department of Veterans' Affairs and
the National Employment Service.
The apprentice training has been very successful, with attendance considerably
higher than for the previous year. The Building and Construction Industries Exchange has been particularly interested. The thanks of this department are due to
them for their work, especially to Mr. R. Lecky, the secretary. Very close liaison
has existed between this department and the Apprenticeship Branch of the Department
of Labour, and a great deal of the success of the programme has been due to the cooperation of the Apprenticeship Branch.
(a) Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement.
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training.
The purpose of this schedule is to provide young people within the age-group of
16 to 30 years with the opportunity of learning a basic skill to enable them to enter
* See separate report following. N 114
PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
gainful employment.    Young people leaving school can be given specialized training in
any vocation deemed advisable by the Province.
Two types of training were offered this year, as follows:—
(1) Power-machine Sewing.—Girls receiving this type of training are prepared for work in factories manufacturing such articles as tents, awnings,
pillows, cushions, and articles of clothing. Unlimited opportunity for
employment still exists in this field. All trainees have been successfully
placed on completion of their training.
(2) Diesel and Automotive Mechanics.—A school offering this type of instruction was opened in September, 1948, in buildings acquired on the site
of the army camp in Nanaimo. An extremely fine workshop building
was utilized for the mechanical training, which has been very well equipped. The courses are of one year's duration, and are divided into two
sections: (a) Automotive mechanics for garage and logging repairs, and
(6) diesel maintenance applied to logging machinery.
A group of thirty-five young men was selected from all over Vancouver Island, and already more than sufficient positions have been offered
to accommodate all of the graduates from the school. Approximately 50
per cent, of the class will go to garages on Vancouver Island, and the
remainder to logging camps in British Columbia. A great deal of interest
in the school has been shown by the automotive trade and by the logging
industry. A trade advisory committee has been formed, comprised of
representatives from the logging and automotive industries.
Due to the distance from home of some of the students, provision has
been made for living accommodation at the school. Meals are provided
for $1.50 per day per student. The citizens and service groups of
Nanaimo have been of great assistance in providing entertainment and
recreational facilities for the students.
The total enrolment during the fiscal year 1948-49 was as follows:—
Men.
Women.
Total.
Vancouver.
1
18
17
49
....
Nanaimo.
18
Totals 	
36
49
85
Schedide E—Rural Training.
The following report has been prepared by Gordon M. Shrum, O.B.E., M.M., M.A.,
Ph.D. (Tor), F.R.S.C, Director of the Department of University Extension, University
of British Columbia:—
" This year's eight-week Youth Training School was held from January 10th to
March 5th, 1949, at the University of British Columbia. The sixty-four men and
thirty-four women who enrolled made this the largest school since the war. The course
was the fifth to be offered to the rural young people of British Columbia under the joint
sponsorship of the Provincial Department of Education and the Dominion Department
of Labour. It was administered by the Department of University Extension of British
Columbia.
" The students ranged from 16 to 30 years of age, with an average of 19.3 years.
They were selected on the basis of recommendations submitted by local organizations REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION. N  115
or by responsible persons residing in the applicants' districts. Information regarding
the school was made available in all rural districts through District Agriculturists,
Farmers' Institutes, Women's Institutes, junior farm clubs, local papers, University
Extension field-workers, School Inspectors, churches, social service workers, and several
other agencies. As a result, students came to the school from all sections of the Province, including the Peace River.
" The Youth Training Centre made available by the University provided lecture-
rooms, specialized Home Economics and Farm Mechanics laboratories, and a recreation-
hall, as well as living accommodation. Students also made use of many of the University
facilities located on the main campus.
" Each student shared in kitchen and other camp duties, and thus helped to keep
down the overhead expenses of the camp. In order to make it possible for those living
in distant areas to attend, transportation costs in excess of $10 were paid by the Rural
Training Schedule.
" The curriculum, which placed major emphasis upon agriculture for the men and
household sciences for the women, provided a wide range of vocational experience. The
agricultural section of the course included work in motors, farm machinery, black-
smithing, carpentry, live stock, field crops, horticulture, poultry, soils, farm management and record-keeping; while the household science section treated home furnishing,
sewing, weaving, nutrition, cooking, and child care. Provision was made for women to
include some agriculture in their time-table if they so desired. Instructors included the
regular Youth Training staff, University professors, and visiting specialists. Field-
trips and educational films were used extensively.
"A broad programme of citizenship training was developed, with the aim of
making the students more effective in their individual and community lives. A course
entitled " Procedures in Rural Organization " presented lectures and discussions on the
problems of community life and of government at all levels. Practical application of
the principles discussed in this course was made in Student Council deliberations,
co-operative-store operation, social functions, and publication activities. Instruction in
public speaking, physical activities, practical crafts, and photography completed the
training programme.
" This is probably one of the most effective adult education programmes being
offered in British Columbia. Young people, especially those from some of the more
isolated districts of the Province, have found the training received in these courses to
be of practical value. As a result of their experiences at the school, many young men
and ,women are now assuming a share of responsibility for the social and cultural
development of their home communities, as well as putting into practice the vocational
training which they have received."
Schedule H—Student Aid.
The Dominion and Provincial Governments again have co-operated in providing
assistance to students of academic merit who, without financial aid, could not proceed
with their education beyond the level of the secondary school. Assistance is given in
the form of 60 per cent, bursary (or gift) and 40 per cent, loan which is repayable one
year after the recipient has entered gainful employment.
Awards are made by committees consisting of the Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education who acts as chairman, the Assistant Superintendent of Education,
the Registrar of the Department of Education, and the Director of Technical and
Vocational Education, as well as representatives of the various institutions concerned.
Where possible, the applicants are asked to appear before the committee for interview.
During the year 1948-49 awards ranging from $50 to $400 were made to 490
students attending the institutions listed below.   The total fund available was $100,000. N   116 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Number of Students
assisted.
376
Section I.—Students in any faculty and in any year—
University of British Columbia   274
Victoria College  1  13
Duke of Connaught High School, New Westminster  3
King Edward High School, Vancouver  2
Burnaby South High School  1
Chilliwack High School   1
John Oliver High School, Vancouver  1
Philip Sheffield High School, Abbotsford  1
University of Alberta   7
Dalhousie University   1
McGill University   15
University of Manitoba   4
University of Oregon, Medical School  1
University of Oregon, Dental School  18
University of Ottawa  4
Queen's University  4
University of Toronto   14
St. Michael's College, University of Toronto  1
University of Western Ontario ,  3
University of Saskatchewan   1
University of Washington   5
Ontario College of Optometry  1
Pacific University, Forest Grove, Ore  1
Section II.—Nurses in training at hospitals—
Vancouver General Hospital  1
Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops  1
Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria  2
St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria  2
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster  4
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver  8
Section III.—Students attending Normal Schools—
Victoria Normal School      58
Vancouver Normal School     35
Section IV.—Students attending public technical, vocational, or art
schools where fees are charged—
Vancouver School of Art       3
Total number of awards  490
Supervisory Training.
Mr. G. Mundie has been in charge of Supervisory Training for the past year.
Courses have been given to various British Columbia firms in (1) Job Instruction
Training, (2) Job Safety Training, (3) Job Methods Training, and (4) Job Relations
Training (Series 2). This form of training was discontinued at the end of March,
1949, but firms which have had trainers certificated under this scheme are provided
with printed material so that they can continue the training in their own organizations.
The number of persons trained during the past fiscal year was as follows:—
Job Instruction Training       232
Job Safety Training      737
Job Methods Training         28
Job Relations Training (Series 2)      148
18
93
Total  1,145 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION.
N 117
Schedule L—Rehabilitation.
Training under this schedule had already commenced to decrease at the beginning
of the fiscal year and, in March, 1949, only one class was in operation. This was handed
over to the Vancouver School Board to administer in the new Vocational Institute.
The last class for those desiring to obtain credit toward Junior and Senior Matriculation was completed in June, 1948.
Very little difficulty was encountered in the placement of the trainees. The Department of Veterans' Affairs has expressed great satisfaction with the training given and
the success of the training programme.
The enrolment during the fiscal year 1948-49 was as follows:—
Men.
Vancouver.
Ex-service personnel—
Cabinet-making and bench-work	
French polishing	
Bricklaying	
Cooking and baking	
Commercial	
Motor mechanics	
Photography	
Plumbing :	
Sheet-metal	
Shoe-repairing	
Welding	
Building construction	
Body and fender repairing	
Boat-building	
Draughting—architectural and mechanical...
Electricity....	
Diesel engineering	
Machine-shop	
Piano-tuning	
Log-scaling	
Watch-repairing..	
Barbering	
Jewellery-repairing	
Dressmaking	
Practical nursing ....
Hairdressing	
Tailoring	
Industrial arts	
Power-machine sewing	
Pre-matriculation	
Army personnel—
Welding	
Automobile mechanics.	
Sheet metal	
Nanaimo.
Ex-service personnel—Linemen	
Totals	
12
7
8
26
37
28
19
7
15
21
28
14
22
10
12
27
34
27
9
5
22
15
4
3
12
24
45
5
16
6
1
18
4
13
528
12
7
8
28
50
28
21
7
15
21
28
14
22
10
13
27
34
27
23
15
5
18
4
16
12
24
2
5
16
6
588
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training.
During the fiscal year 1948-49 training in power-machine sewing was given under
this schedule to eighteen students. N  118 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
(b) Apprentice Training.
Classes were operated at night-schools in Vancouver, Victoria, and Nanaimo, and,
in addition, correspondence courses were supplied to apprentices residing in outlying
districts.
Trade advisory committees have been formed and are functioning with vigour.
Most of the committees visited the classes in operation and gave freely of their time and
advice.
A total of 1,249 apprentices received training either at part-time classes or by
correspondence during the fiscal year 1948-49. The enrolment per course was as
follows:—
Vancouver  Enrolment.
Automobile Mechanics  62
Auto Body and Fender Repair  32
Boat-building   30
Building Construction   81
Cabinet-making  24
Electricity   88
Machine shop   103
Painting and Decorating  18
Pattern-making   16
Plastering   36
Plumbing   46
Sheet Metal   114
Marine Engineering  14
Steam-fitting   13
Industrial Mathematics (General)  69
Draughting (General)   70
Diesel Engineering II  11
Radar and Electronics  1
Men's Garment Draughting and Cutting  3
Moulding   10
Surgical Instruments  1
Show-card Writing  2
Welding  1
Victoria—
Auto Mechanics   51
Boat-building  4
Cabinet-making   5
Carpentry (Building Construction)  49
Commercial Art  3
Electricity  31
Horticulture  1
Machine-shop  15
Marine Engineering  12
Mechanical Draughting  52
Industrial Mathematics (General)  33
Plumbing   20
Sheet Metal   25
Steam Engineering  6
Radio Construction  1
Nanaimo—
Sheet Metal  .  6
Plumbing   4 REPORT on adult EDUCATION. N 119
Correspondence Courses— Enrolment.
Boat-building   1
Building Construction   19
Electricity   16
Machine-shop  5
Sheet Metal  5
Moulding  !:  1
Printing   1
Commercial Art   1
Industrial Mathematics A  6
Power-house Design    1
Automotive Engineering  22
Steam Engineering •;  3
Mechanical Drawing   2
Painting and Decorating  1
Principles of Radio  2
Total enrolment  1,249
(3)  VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF NAVIGATION.
This school is under the administration of the Provincial Department of Education
and subsidized by the Dominion Department of Transport. Instruction is given to
those desiring to qualify for the various certificates of competency required for the
Merchant Service.
On July 1st, 1949, it is proposed to transfer the school to the new Vancouver Vocational Institute, where it will be operated by the Vancouver School Board in co-operation
with the Dominion Department of Transport.
During the year 1948-49 the enrolment was as follows:—
Successful in examinations  127
Failed in examinations     13
Not examined     66
Total students   206
Of the total, seventy students were on foreign-going ships, and the remainder on
ships from our own coast, lakes, and rivers.
ATTENDANCE SUMMARY.
The attendance summary of classes administered by the Industrial Education
Branch during the year 1948-49 is as follows:—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement—   Enrolment.
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training        85
Schedule E—Rural Training       98
Schedule H—Student Aid     490
Supervisory Training   1,145
Schedule L—Rehabilitation       588
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training.___       18
  2,424
Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement  1,249
Vancouver School of Navigation     206
Total enrolment   3,879 N 120 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
HIGH SCHOOL CORRESPONDENCE ADULT EDUCATION.
EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. ES L, DIRECTOR.
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1948-49 was 5,951. Of this number, 25.9 per cent, or 1,539 were between the
ages of 18 and 20, and 40.3 per cent, or 2,398 were 21 years of age or over. Thus
66.2 per cent, of our students can be classified as adults. This is an increase of 5.9
per cent, over the figures for 1947-48. There was an increase of 320 students in the
number of students over 21 and 309 students in the number of students between the
ages of 18 and 20.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by
this department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
Our course in Steam Engineering continues to show the largest enrolment of adult
students.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age
and over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices       162
Army, Navy, Air Force         21
Civil Servants         46
Domestic  workers          57
Farming and ranching         40
Firemen,  engineers       268
Forestry         12
Housewives           64
Lumbering          49
Merchants           22
Mining         13
Office-workers        265
Professional—
Teachers   191
Nurses      62
Miscellaneous      28
      281
Railroad          17
Skilled labour ■      278
Unskilled labour  ,      250
Miscellaneous         96
Total   1,941
ELEMENTARY CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL ADULT CLASS.
ANNA B. MILLER, DIRECTOR.
For the school-year 1948-49 the enrolment in the adult class of the Elementary
Correspondence School was 208 students. The enrolment figures for the year are
given below:—
September      63 February   154
October      88 March   166
November  104 April   178
December  :  119 May  200
January   145 June   208
The heaviest enrolment occurred in Grades VI to VIII. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION. N 121
RECREATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION BRANCH.
ERNEST LEE, B.A, B.Sc. in P.E., DIRECTOR.
During the year the following training services were offered to teachers:—
A Modern Dance Clinic.—To provide in-service training for Physical Education
teachers in the field of rhythm, a group of seven teachers, directed by Mrs. Marjorie
Lee, toured high schools in the Fraser Valley, Victoria and vicinity, and the Okanagan.
In addition to the teacher's sessions, over 5,000 students attended the lecture demonstrations.
A Teachers' Sports-coaching School.—During the last week of August a coaching-
school was held in Vancouver. The latest coaching techniques and rule interpretations
were presented in basketball, grass hockey, soccer, and track and field. The staff consisted of Mr. Art Chapman, basketball; Mrs. Margaret McLean, grass hockey; Mr.
Murray West, soccer;   and Mr. James Panton, track and field.
Basketball Officiating.—Classes in basketball refereeing, score-keeping, and timing were conducted in Vancouver, Fraser Valley, Kamloops, Kelowna, Penticton, Victoria, Nanaimo, Port Alberni, and Courtenay. Mr. " Wink " Willox and Mr. Jock
Dickerson are to be commended for their liberal donation and for a task so well done.
PROVINCIAL INTER-HIGH-SCHOOL COMPETITIONS.
A most successful Provincial inter-high-school athletic programme.was concluded.
Thousands of high school students participated in the zone, interzone, and Provincial
play-offs. The competitions were athletically successful and the educational and social
outcomes were extremely high.    The winners were as follows:—
Sport. Host. Winner.
Girls' volleyball Queen Elizabeth High, Surrey—Fairview High.
Boys' volleyball  Queen Elizabeth High, Surrey _ Trapp Technical.
Badminton University Hill Port Moody High.
Curling Nelson High Trail High.
Ice hockey Kelowna High Kamloops High.
Boys' basketball Duke of Connaught and Trapp   Vancouver College.
Technical
Girls' basketball Victoria High King Edward High.
Track and field Department of Education Oak Bay High.
PROVINCIAL RECREATION PROGRAMME.
The Provincial recreation (Pro-Rec) programme has been very popular and highly
successful. More communities have been included and new types of programmes were
introduced.    The registration and attendance figures are most gratifying.
Pro-Rec centres: Number of centres, 197; registration, 17,283; attendance,
175,769.
Special events: Number of events, 120; Number of members, 6,305; Number of
visitors and spectators, 137,039.
Community centres: Number of centres, 8; registration, 7,305; attendance,
296,517.
Pro-Rec Centres.
Women.
Vancouver.—Alexandra Neighbourhood House, Arcadian, John Oliver Basketball,
Bowling, North Vancouver Bowling, Burkeville (2), Capitol Hill, Deep Cove, Grand-
view, Heywood, Rio Hockey, Displaced Persons, I.O.O.F., Kerrisdale, Kitsilano, Leaders, N  122 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT,  1948-49.
Little Mountain, Lochdale, Lord Kitchener, Lynn Valley, Macabee Lodge, Maple Hall,
Mitchell School, Normal, North Burnaby, Pender Auditorium, Queen Elizabeth, Renfrew, Rio, St. Augustine's, St. Margaret's, St. Paul's, St. Phillip's, Scout Hall, South
Burnaby, South Cambie, Sunrise, Swimming (2), Templeton, Trapp Technical, Valley
View, Van Home (2), Victoria Drive, West Vancouver, Canadian Daughters.
Fraser Valley.—Abbotsford, Brookswood, Fleetwood, Hjorth Road, Mission Gym,
Mission Choral, North Bend, South Westminster, White Rock.
Okanagan Valley.—Kamloops, Kelowna, Okanagan Landing, Penticton, Trail,
Vernon.
Northern British Columbia.—Prince George, Prince George Prison, Prince Rupert,
Quesnel, Smithers.
Vancouver Island and Coast.—Alberni, Victoria Bowling, Britannia, Cordova Bay,
Crystal Pool (3), Crystal Garden (3), Cranberry Lake, Esquimalt, Great Central Lake,
James Bay, Mount View, Port Alberni, Roberts Creek, Roller Skating, Sechelt, Sidney,
View Royal, Willows.
Men.
Vancouver.—Alexandra Neighbourhood House (2), John Oliver Basketball, Technical Basketball, Templeton Basketball, South Hill Basketball (junior and senior),
Blind School, Borstal Home, Burkeville, Burrard Lions Boxing, Burrard Lions Gym.,
Capitol Hill, Chinese Mission, Cricket, Dontenwill, Gibb's Boys' Club, Gordon House,
Grandview United, Henry Hudson, Heywood, John Oliver, Kimount, Kitsilano, Kivan,
Kiview, Lochdale, Mitchell School, Normal, Norquay, North Burnaby, North Vancouver
Indians, Point Grey, Port Moody, Queen Mary, St. Phillip's, Scout Hall, Burrard Lions
Soccer, South Cambie Soccer, South Cambie Gym., Templeton, Valley View, Van Home,
Weight-lifting, Y.M.C.A.
Fraser Valley.—Brookswood, Chilliwack (2), Fleetwood, Hjorth Road, Mission,
Port Kells, White Rock.
Okanagan Valley.—Kamloops, Kelowna Gym, Kelowna Hockey (5), Kelowna Boxing, Penticton, Vernon, Kelowna Business-men.
Northern British Columbia.—Francois Lake, Prince George.
Vancouver Island and Coast.—Central Junior High, Cordova Bay, Crystal Pool
(4), Esquimalt, Great Central Lake, James Bay, Queen Charlotte City, Port Alberni,
Victoria High, Willows.
Mixed.
Fraser Valley.—Abbotsford Badminton (2), Basketball, Brookswood, Cloverdale,
Coghlan Road, Crescent Beach, Langley Badminton, Mission Badminton, Mission Gymnasium (2), Sullivan, West Langley, West Townline.
Okanagan Valley.—Summerland, Vernon.
Northern British Columbia.—Wells.
Summer Activities.
Bowling, swimming, softball, tennis, refresher courses, flood evacuee aid, fencing,
cricket.
The names of community centres are as follows: Prince Rupert, Revelstoke,
Terrace, West Point Grey, Kimberley, North Burnaby, North Vancouver, Courtenay.
These centres received direct aid from the Branch.
The following members were appointed to the staff: Mr. James Panton, supervisor
of the Okanagan District; Mr. Joseph Lewis, recreation instructor for the blind
(C.N.I.B.);  and Mr. Lloyd Preston, instructor at Vancouver.
As a finale to the winter programmes, displays were held in various parts of
British Columbia. The annual Pro-Rec mass display at the Vancouver Forum proved
a highlight of the year.   Over 5,000 spectators witnessed 2,000 boys and girls, men and REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION. N 123
women, participate in a varied programme of games, dances, gymnastics, tumbling,
apparatus, and pyramids.
The Provincial Pro-Rec gymnastic competition, held the evening preceding the
Vancouver mass display, was one of the finest ever held in British Columbia. Teams
from Kamloops, Fraser Valley centres, Kimberley, Victoria, and Vancouver and district
competed.   The standard of skill and performance was extremely high.
Under the direction of Mr. Sid Greenwood, chief instructor for Vancouver, a group
of well-trained Pro-Rec gymnasts thrilled thousands of spectators at displays held
in Vancouver and district, Fraser Valley centres, Vancouver Island, Kamloops, and
through the Okanagan. They did much to popularize and to create further interest in
our Governmental programme.
The annual Pro-Rec picnic to Bowen Island was again very successful. Hundreds
of Pro-Rec members and their friends enjoyed a vigorous day of races, sports and contests, and swimming.   The crowning of the Pro-Rec Beauty Queen climaxed the outing.
A mixed class of men and women at the Normal School centre in Vancouver proved
extremely popular. Suitable activities for both sexes preceded a rousing period of
square and couple dancing. It is the hope of this Branch that more of these centres
can be conducted in the future.
A Summer School for Pro-Rec instructors and leaders was held in Vancouver for
both men and women. Pupils came from various parts of the Province. Arrangements
were made for billeting, and subsidies were granted to enable as many as possible to
attend from out of town. These instructors will carry on Pro-Rec classes in their home
communities during the fall and winter term.
Schools for referees and officials were conducted in soccer, lacrosse, track and field,
softball, and basketball. Softball equipment was supplied to needy teams on the advice
of the British Columbia Softball Association. The branch also organized softball
leagues for the "red feather" teams of the Vancouver Community Chest. A large-
scale promotional programme was initiated among juniors and juveniles in softball,
basketball, cricket, and lacrosse.
A Community Centre Conference was sponsored in Vancouver by this office for the
purpose of bringing together lay and professional people for discussion of various
phases of community-centre organization, administration, and facilities planning. The
contributions of Miss Marjorie Smith, head of the Social Work Department of the
University of British Columbia; Miss Elizabeth Thomas, professor of group work,
University of British Columbia; and Mr. Edwin Raines, Department of Architecture,
University of Manitoba, were invaluable and assured a most fruitful conference. Over
fifty delegates from widely diversified parts of the Province attended.
Leadership was provided to boys' clubs, community centres, neighbourhood houses,
Y.M.C.A, service-club classes, church groups, and the Canadian National Institute for
the Blind. Classes were also conducted for the Star class at Oakalla Prison Farm and
at the Borstal Home.
A well-rounded public-relations programme has been initiated to keep the people
of British Columbia informed of our services. A weekly radio programme over radio
station CJOR, daily and weekly press releases, circulars, posters, and pamphlets do
much to emphasize the Government's fitness activities. N  124 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY DRAMA BRANCH.
H. S. HURN, B.A, DIRECTOR.
One of the major developments during the past year in the field of drama and
dramatics has been the interest displayed by the Dominion Government. The appointment of Mr. Michael Meicklejohn as head of a Division of Drama, connected with the
Department of Health and Welfare, has been followed by the appointment of a Royal
Commission under the Chairmanship of the Honourable Vincent Massey. This Commission has been charged with the responsibility of investigating aspects of Canadian
arts, letters, and sciences. It would be difficult to prophesy the results of the investigations of this Commission, but it is probable that there will be an eventual development
of the living theatre in Canada.
The amateur theatre in Canada is slowly returning to the position it held in the
years before the war, and rural and community groups are being revived or new groups
are being formed in increasing numbers. Lack of competent leadership and accommodation are two factors which retard this post-war development, although in many cases
the zealousness, ingenuity, and initiative of the citizens have combined to overcome the
difficulties, and living drama takes its place in the communities. The standard of production varies considerably; groups fortunate enough to have a member with good
directional ability are producing worth-while drama in a highly competent manner and
are doing much to overcome the lack of professional theatre.
Approximately 200 amateur drama groups are operating in British Columbia;
some are play-reading groups which do not produce plays, while some of the others are
organizations which carry through a heavy programme of five or six public productions
each year. It is satisfying to report that all active producing groups strive to attain
as high a standard of production as their abilities and facilities permit.
Dramatics continue to be a popular part of the activity programme in our schools,
and in many the standard of production has been outstanding. In all schools, dramatics
provide a means of excellent group activity. The past year has been notable for the
increasing competence in the directing, the acting, and the production of elementary-
school groups. In some cases the plays have been written by, acted by, and at least
partially directed by pupils, and, because of the fact that the majority of these plays
are the fantasy type with costumes, costume-making has become a worth-while activity.
There is no time allotment for dramatics in the elementary school, but other subjects
are vitalized by occasional dramatization.
Speech receives considerable attention in some school areas, especially choral
speech, which may range from unison recitation to the simple form of choral drama.
This activity is calculated to help pupils to develop a pleasing speaking voice, without
an exaggerated formal elocutionary touch, to assist them in good English, and to help
those who by themselves might lack confidence and would gradually gain it in group
activity.
Teachers without any specific training in the field of school dramatics would benefit
greatly from summer-school courses, and many would appreciate the opportunity of
attending such courses.
In conjunction with dramatics in the school and community groups, twenty-four
festivals were held last year, with 220 productions. These twenty-four were divided as
follows: Seven were only school entries, eight were for adults only, five were mixed,
and four were comprehensive festivals for both schools and community groups involving
music, dancing, and speech, as well as drama.
The major festival, though by no means the most satisfying, is the British Columbia regional of the Dominion Drama Festival.    This festival, controlled by a regional REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION. N  125
committee appointed by the British Columbia Drama Association, under the direction
of the Central Committee at Ottawa, is for full-length plays. The best production in
British Columbia, as in all regions, may be invited to enter the final contest. Last year,
due to financial difficulties, there was a meagre response to the invitations to participate.
Fortunately, one of the productions reached a very high standard and was invited to the
finals at Toronto. There it won the trophy for the best production in English, apart
from the winning play. The play was produced by a competent cast and director from
a small group doing splendid work in New Westminster, known as the " Vagabonds,"
They were highly praised for their production of a difficult play, "The Glass Menagerie."
One outstanding festival was the Okanagan zone final, which drew the winners
from all the district festivals in the Okanagan region. The festival committee at Oliver
acted as hosts, and the prize-winning presentation was the first act of " I Remember
Mama," by the Summerland players.
In all festivals there was a noticeable increase in audience participation, and it is
obvious that these district festivals mean a great deal to the citizens, particularly in
the outlying parts of the Province. The part played by the adjudicators is worthy of
note, and it should be recorded that their participation in these festivals is motivated
solely by a desire to be of service.
The facilities of the School and Community Drama Branch of the Department of
Education have been used extensively—library, curtains, make-up, and lighting. These
services are a boon to those in the more isolated parts of the Province, and generally
there is keen appreciation for what is being done to assist in this work.
The library is being reorganized and books are being added thereto. A catalogue
is being compiled to send to all clubs. More material aid will be made available to
satisfy the needs of an increasing number of those engaging in drama, but the greater
measure of this aid will be directed to those groups distant from the big centres.
Under the auspices of the British Columbia Drama Association, the awards known
as the Canadian Drama Awards were made during the year. This project requires considerable correspondence, but is, in the opinion of the many who responded to our questionnaire throughout Canada, one that is well worthwhile. It will be continued until
there comes into being an all-Canadian association.
Under similar auspices, adjudicators' examinations were held, and the following
ladies and gentlemen were added to the adjudicators' panel: Mrs. J. Ferguson, Mrs.
Jessie Richardson, Mr. Arthur Broughton, Mr. Alex Hood, all of Vancouver; Mrs.
Eleanor Hewitt and Mr. Hugh Creelman, of Victoria.
The Drama Bulletin has been changed in format and now appears as a magazine,
and is published three times each year. The content is intended for both school and
community groups.
In co-operation with the Division of School Broadcasts, this branch held a radio
play contest, the winning plays being presented over the air in May as part of the
regular school radio programme. Both Divisions were disappointed with the response,
especially in view of the fact that there exists plenty of opportunity in the commercial
field for radio scripts.
In co-operation with the Division of Visual Education, this Division endeavoured
to obtain suitable films and film-strips for the teaching of drama techniques, but there
seems very little material available anywhere. However, there was every indication
that companies controlling these aids are interested in the work and intend to produce
visual-aid material.
The Director has visited some areas, assisted teachers in their classes or with their
dramatic clubs and the adult groups in session, and endeavoured to promote groups
where none existed. This personal contact is of the utmost importance in the development of this work, and only limitations of time prevent his extending his services so
that there will be a greater coverage throughout the year. During these visits the
Director has been greatly assisted by the Inspectors and principals, whose courtesy and
help have been much appreciated. N   126 PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT,  1948-49.
EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE.
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A, DIRECTOR.
During the school-year 1948-49 approved counselling schemes operated in thirty-
four schools. Of the eighty-five counsellors involved, almost all were engaged on a
half-time basis, the remaining portion of their teaching time being used in regular
classroom duties. It perhaps should be pointed out that this Division has encouraged
the use of half-time counsellors, except in cases in which special circumstances exist,
in preference to those engaged on a full-time basis.
The counsellor-training programme offered by the Department's Summer School
of Education again met with considerable success. A total of thirty-three counsellors
were enrolled in the classes conducted in July and August. The courses themselves
were ably handled by Dean Franklin R. Zeran, Oregon State College; Dean Merle
Ohlsen, Washington State College; Dr. C. V. Morrison, Child Guidance Clinic, Portland; Messrs. B. E. Wales and Archie McKie, counsellors, Kitsilano High School,
Vancouver;   Mr. L. J. Wallace, counsellor, Victoria High School.
An innovation of distinct success in the field of in-service training was the conference of counsellors held at Kelowna in November. Twelve counsellors, the principals of their schools, and two Provincial Inspectors of Schools were in attendance at
the day-long workshop.
As in previous years, this Division enjoyed the enthusiastic co-operation of various business, professional, and Government bodies. Noteworthy was the assistance
given by British Columbia Products and Industrial Bureau, Vancouver Board of Trade,
Pacific National Exhibition, Canadian Bankers' Association, Life Insurance and Casualty Insurance Associations, Chemical Institute of Canada, Canadian Nurses' Association, and the National Employment Service of Canada.
During the school-year 1948-49, the Division of Educational and Vocational Guidance continued to supply materials to counsellors and others engaged in guidance-work.
Twelve additions to the B.C. Occupations Series text were prepared and issued to all
secondary schools. The value of the active assistance of the British Columbia Products
and Industrial Bureau and that of its parent body, the Vancouver Board of Trade, in
this work cannot be praised too highly. Eleven copies of the " B.C. Employment
Trends," prepared in co-operation with the regional office of the National Employment
Service, and two " Lists of Available Materials," listing and classifying 279 useful
job analyses, were sent to counsellors. In addition, a direct issue of thirty-two brochures dealing with occupations was made to all secondary schools.
The Vancouver Board of Trade again donated $3,000 for bursaries, a sum which
was supplemented by the contributions of the Pacific National Exhibition. These two
organizations assisted in the holding of the annual job-study competition. A total of
12,321 job studies were made by students, a gain of 2,402 over the total number of
entries for 1947-48.
Bursaries were awarded to students in the following schools: King Edward, Kitsilano, Magee, Point Grey, Prince of Wales, and Templeton High and Junior High
Schools, Vancouver; Queen Mary Junior High School, North Vancouver; Lord Lister
Junior High and Duke of Connaught High Schools, New Westminister; North Burnaby and South Burnaby High Schools, Burnaby; Lord Tweedsmuir and Queen Elizabeth High Schools, Surrey; Esquimalt, North Saanich, Oak Bay, and Victoria High
Schools, Victoria; Duncan, Alberni, Chilliwack, Richmond, Langley, Port Coquitlam,
Britannia Mines, Armstrong, Vernon, Southern Okanagan, Kelowna, Penticton, Cranbrook, Fernie, Creston Valley, Kimberley, Rossland, Nelson, New Denver, Ocean Falls,
Terrace, Bella Coola, Nechako Valley, Salmon Arm, and Revelstoke High Schools. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE. N 127
The winner of the grand award was Robert Toews, of Chilliwack Junior-Senior
High School, who contributed a study dealing with jobs in the rope-making industry.
To Mr. Toews went the major bursary donated by the Vancouver Board of Trade and
the Pacific National Exhibition, and to his school, in recognition of its leadership, was
awarded the handsome challenge trophy donated last year by Mr. George Powell, of
Vancouver. N  128 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS.
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, B.A, DIRECTOR OF
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS.
AIMS.
School radio broadcasts in this Province are the result of the harmonious working
together of the British Columbia Department of Education and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Broadly, the former is responsible for developing programme
ideas, commissioning scripts, and hiring production talent; the latter for all that is
involved in putting the programmes on the air. In practice, the two co-operate very
closely. For example, office personnel are employees of the Department of Education,
and office space is provided by the C.B.C. in its regional offices at Vancouver.
Since the planning and preparation of school broadcasts are carried on at the production centre, a very real measure of mutual assistance exists at all stages.
PROGRAMMES.
During the year 141 half-hours of broadcasting were conducted over a period of
twenty-nine weeks. The programmes comprised twenty-two series (seven of which
were National School Broadcasts, the direct responsibility of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) and seven individual programmes.
The following gives a breakdown of grades for which programmes were planned,
in terms of percentage of the whole offering: Grade I, 20 per cent.; Grade II, 20 per
cent.; Grade III, 28 per cent.; Grade IV, 37 per cent.; Grade V, 57 per cent.; Grade
VI, 62 per cent.; Grade VII, 62 per cent.; Grade VIII, 45 per cent.; Grade IX, 45 per
cent.; Grade X, 27 per cent.; Grade XI, 19 per cent.; Grade XII, 19 per cent.; Grade
XIII, 15 per cent.
The average programme had a spread of at least three grades, thus accounting for
the fact that the percentages above total more than 100 per cent.
Of the total offerings, just over 40 per cent, of the time was spent on music, and
the remainder was distributed over such subjects as science, health, social studies, and
literature.
Somewhat greater attention than formerly was paid to senior grades. The French
series was, as usual, popular, and high praise was also given to a guidance series for
high school grades, entitled " My Neighbour and Me."
Of the National Series, one programme originated under the direction of the
British Columbia school broadcasts office, the remainder coming from Toronto. The
British Columbia offering was a programme of music by a Vancouver symphonic group
with commentary suitable for schools.
Three series of recorded programmes by the B.B.C. were released for British
Columbia school listening. One of these—a serialized presentation of " Pilgrim's Progress "—did not prove suitable, but the others were well received.
A total of eight stations and twelve repeater transmitters carried British Columbia
school broadcasts. In addition, transcriptions for delayed release were regularly sent
to Dawson Creek and Fort Nelson. Selected transcriptions were also sent to the Yukon
Territory for broadcast from Dawson City.
PRODUCTION.
Word that British Columbia school broadcasts this year won two international
awards at the University of Ohio's Institute for Education by Radio points to the fact
that considerable care is exercised in the planning and production of programmes. DIVISION OF SCHOOL BROADCASTS.
N 129
The script, properly edited and prepared, is turned over to the producer usually a
clear week before the broadcast. This is followed by close consultation with the producer in such matters as casting, and often involves considerable auditioning, try-outs,
and read-overs, particularly in the case of school students. The average production
calls for from two to four hours' rehearsal on the day of the broadcast.
One production of interest this year was the recording by Vancouver schoolchildren of a fifteen-minute dramatization of the story of their city. This was sent to
Cleveland, Ohio, for the use of station WBOE.
LISTENING.
Annual listening reports by schools are still voluntary and therefore give only an
indication of what is being done. This year 381 schools reported, as compared with
382 in 1942. Of these, 274 schools report using the programmes. This year, however,
577 radio licences were issued to British Columbia schools, as compared with 442 in
1942. The number of pupils listening, as indicated on the reports received, was 35,909,
compared with 28,610 in 1947 and 16,947 in 1942. Of the pupils listening this year,
just under one-quarter were in secondary grades.
The table below shows a listening comparison for the three special series, as indicated by the numbers of special bulletins sent out:—
1947-48.
1948-49.
Schools.
Number
of Copies.
Schools.
Number
of Copies.
Art	
105
H20
1
178        1        625
56                  155
62                     150
60                   225
132
394
Before Christmas regular evaluation reports were received from ninety teachers,
and after Christmas from eighty-three.
EQUIPMENT.
As indicated by the licences issued, schools of the Province are fast becoming
equipped with receivers, but there is still a good deal of leeway to take up. Two-speed
record-playing equipment, magnetic recorders, and central sound systems are becoming
commoner in the larger schools. A survey conducted in April showed 557 schools with
radios, 443 with record-playing equipment, and 45 with central sound systems. Eleven
magnetic recorders were in use. At least a 10-per-cent. higher figure in the matter of
radio equipment could be estimated for the close of the school-year. Seven school districts reported no radio equipment; for the most part, these are districts where reception is impossible.
An additional survey showed that seven school districts have in operation some sort
of phonograph-record lending library and that fourteen more are considering one.
PRINTED AIDS.
This year four issues of the regular Teachers' Bulletin were provided, and approximately 4,000 copies of each were distributed. One of these included a hectograph map
of the Fraser area for use with one of the programmes. Special bulletins have been
referred to above. In the case of the French, a large amount of the material was also
in hectograph form. During the year other mimeographed announcements and information have gone out to schools as required.
5 N  130 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
A wider use of the press has been made this year, as well as professional publications, in providing information for schools and others interested. Two special issues
of the C.B.C. Programme Schedule carried details of school broadcasts.
SCHOOL VISITS.
During the year six portfolios of drawings were circulated in connection with the
art programmes. These were distributed from thirteen main centres and were also on
display at five district conventions. Over ninety schools saw the exhibits and report
good results.
In all, eighty-one schools were visited during the year. On two occasions an
intensive programme of visits was carried on, and at the same time valuable contacts
were made with School Boards, parent-teacher groups, and other interested organizations. Talks were also given to a number of other groups and to three district conventions.
All three teacher-training institutions were visited, and several demonstrations
were given. A session was held also with the teachers' audio-visual evening class in
Victoria, and three days were spent in intensive work at the Summer School of Education at Victoria, where the Director met nine classes for demonstration and discussion. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH. N  131
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH.
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P^D, DIRECTOR.
A heavy testing programme was carried out during the school-year 1948-49. The
new Metropolitan Achievement Test, Form T, was being used in a large-city testing
programme that was being conducted in Grade VII in ten representative American
cities, and it was thought advisable to include Vancouver. This provided an opportunity to compare the rural and urban parts of British Columbia, and therefore several
rural districts also were tested. Financial considerations prohibited the testing of
every pupil with the complete series of tests, but the remaining half of the pupils
were given the spelling test that was included in the battery.
A revision of the high school science curriculum was under way, and it was an
opportune time to survey achievement in science. All students taking the General
Science V Course in Grades XI and XII and those taking various combinations of the
special sciences were tested.
Questions frequently had been raised in regard to the handwriting ability of
present-day pupils. The Ayres Handwriting Scale had been used to rate elementary-
school pupils during the Putman-Weir survey of 1925. Inspector E. G. Daniels had
done the rating at that time, and although he had retired, he and three other raters
were given the job of rating comparable modern handwriting specimens. They were
obtained by sampling reading and spelling tests that had been given to Grades V and
VII in 1948.
The total number of tests that have been administered, marked, and reported
since the Division was established has now reached 152,277. They have provided
187,668 ages or I.Q.'s and 251,948 achievement-test scores. Sub-test scores totalling
67,375 and based on 27,885 tests were typed, tabulated, and analysed during the current school-year. This constitutes a great mass of data. So far, no test survey has
been duplicated, but the time is rapidly approaching when it will be possible to repeat
some of the surveys to find out whether or not progress is being made or deterioration
has taken place.
SURVEYS CONDUCTED TO DATE.
Grade XII:—
Mathematics V (new course) and Mathematics VI (old course) :  Co-operative
General Mathematics for High School, Om.
Students taking Special Sciences:   B.C. General Science Survey, Form A.
Otis Self-Administering Test of Mental Ability, Higher C.
Grade XI:—
B.C.   (Co-operative)  Reading, S:   Vocabulary, Speed, and Level of Comprehension.
Students taking General Science V:  B.C. General Science Survey, Form A.
Grade X :—
Progressive Achievement Test, Advanced B.
Grade IX :—
B.C. (Co-operative) English Usage, Spelling, Vocabulary, Pm.
Henmon-Nelson Test of Mental Ability, High School B.
Grade VIII:—
B.C. (Co-operative) Science, X.
Henmon-Nelson Test of Mental Ability, High School B.
Otis Self-Administering Test of Mental Ability, Intermediate C. N  132
PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Grade VII:—
Metropolitan Achievement Test, Intermediate Partial, T.
B.C. (Metropolitan) Spelling, T.
Ayres Handwriting Scale (Sample).
Pintner General Ability Test, Intermediate B.
Grade VI:—
B.C. (Stanford) Arithmetic Test, Intermediate Dm.
B.C. (Stanford) Language Arts Test, Em.
Henmon-Nelson Test of Mental Ability, Elementary A.
Grade V:—
B.C. (Stanford) Reading, Intermediate D.
Ayres Handwriting Scale (Sample).
In addition to the above, the B.C. Arithmetic Computation and Reasoning Tests
were administered to approximately 6,000 pupils in Grades III to VI while they were
being standardized. Four additional tests are being administered during the fall of
1949: the B.C. Work-Study Skills and the Otis Beta Test in Grade VIII, and the B.C.
Primary Reading (Comprehension and Vocabulary) Test and the Otis Alpha Test in
Grade IV.
Science at the University Entrance Level.
A test of general science was administered to the students taking General Science
V, most of whom were in Grade XI, and the students taking various combinations of the
special sciences—Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. The special-science students formed
a more highly selected group than the whole of Grade XII or those who were taking
General Science V. When groups with equivalent distributions of I.Q.'s were compared,
it was notable that those who were taking more than one special science were definitely
superior in general scientific knowledge. But that was not true for boys taking Physics
only or girls taking Biology only. The scores of boys were found to exceed those of
girls in all categories.   The reliability of the test varied from 0.872 to 0.896 for different
Comparison of Science Test Scores of Groups of Equivalent I.Q. and Sex.
Subjects taken.
Boys.
Cases.*        Mean Score.
Girls-
Cases.*        Mean Score.
Biology-f-Chemis try-j- Physics
Chemistry-|-Physics	
Chemistry-f-Biology	
Chemistry only	
Physics only	
Biology only	
Science V, Grade XI	
Science V, Grade Xllf	
39
354
44
189
229
119
569
53
90.69
83.75
83.82
76.89
69.31
73.50
72.22
71.62
327
15
236
449
97
78.67
75.79
68.88
68.67
62.97
64.64
63.75
•The numbers of cases do not represent the proportions taking various combinations of subjects in British
Columbia. Varying numbers of pupils had to be excluded in order to obtain a series of distributions of scores for
pupils of equivalent I.Q.
f Repeaters not included. Since I.Q. is constant and M.A. practically so, this would indicate that nothing
would be gained by deferring present Science V to Grade XII.
groups, and the differences between groups are believed to be significant. The results
are given in detail in the accompanying table. A study of the individual items carried
out with the co-operation of Mr. H. H. Grantham, Vancouver Normal School, shows
the types of items in general science that are strengthened by an additional year in
a Special Science Course. Another investigation carried out by Mr. Grantham has
indicated that, while differences between boy and girl students are still noticeable,
they are much smaller than those that were found when the Putman-Weir survey was DIVISION OP TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH.
N 133
carried out in 1924-25.    Girls have shown greater improvement in science than boys
have during the past twenty-five years.
The science test contained sections on the Application of Principles and the
Interpretation of Data which were found to be rather difficult for the pupils.
General Achievement in Grade VII.
The Metropolitan Achievement Test, Partial Battery, Intermediate Form T, was
administered to the City of Vancouver and to twenty-seven other school districts.
It included tests in reading, vocabulary, arithmetic fundamentals and problems, English usage and spelling. A total of 5,485 pupils were tested on dates averaging November 1st; that is, when they were at the Grade VII-2 level. The remaining 5,600
pupils were given only the spelling portion of the battery. Urban and rural districts
were balanced according to school population and the results of previous surveys, and
they are believed to have formed a representative sample of the Province.
The same pupils were tested with the Pintner General Ability Test, Intermediate
Form B, to determine their scholastic aptitude. Their I.Q.'s were found to be slightly
above the United States norm in Vancouver, and slightly below in the rest of the
Province. The pupils of the City of Vancouver were second highest in scholastic aptitude and highest in achievement when they were compared with the ten United States
cities that co-operated in the survey. Results for the Province are given in the table
below. It will be seen that the Canadian pupils exceed the United States norms in
all subjects and that the least superiority is indicated in arithmetic fundamentals.
Nevertheless, it should be noted that the United States norms for Form T of the
Metropolitan Test are considerably lower than those that were issued for Forms A
to E. That means that it is now easier to obtain a higher grade-level. On the basis
of the older norms, both American and British Columbia students are below their
former levels of achievement. Complete British Columbia norms for the test are now
available to teachers and administrators, who will be able to compare the progress of
succeeding classes.
Pintner General Ability Test,
Intermediate Form B.
Number of
Pupils tested.
Mean.
Mental age (as on September 1st) —
2,774
2,792
5,566
260 Sample
309 Sample
569 Sample
2,739
2,807
5,546
13-0
12  6
12-8
Chronological age (as on September 1st)'—
12-6
12-9
12 8
Intelligence Quotient—
103.03
98.04
99.62 N  134 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Metropolitan Achievement Test, Intermediate Partial, Form T (Grade-level: 7-2).
Number of
Pupils tested.
Mean
Grade-level.
Percentage
of Pupils
below VI-0
Grade-level.
Reading—■
2,726
2,726
5,452
2,726
2,732
5,458
2,725
2,747
5,472
2,736
2,740
5,476
2,728
2,757
5,485
2,753
2,698
5,600
11,051
7-8.2
7-6.8
7-7.2
8-1.6
7-4.9
7-7.0
7-5.2
7-4.2
7-4.5
8-2.4
8-0.5
8-1.1
7-8.9
7-4.4
7-5.8
7-8.9
7-6.4
7-6.5
7-7.1
12.03
16.76
14.39
Vocabulary—•
11.18
21.88
16.54
Arithmetic fundamentals—
6.28
9.46
7.88
Arithmetic problems—
8.48
10.91
9.69
English—
12.90
16.61
14.77
Spelling—
8.89
9.44
Non-Vancouver—
28 districts given complete programme.
49 districts given separate spelling test only.
VancouverX38, Non-VancouverX82
Weighting:
120
- —British Columbia.
Spelling in Grade VII.
Very little difference was found when the results that were obtained for the
spelling portion of the Metropolitan Battery were compared with the results for those
who had taken spelling as a separate test. The spelling test has been thoroughly
analysed, and an analysis sheet has been issued so that teachers may compare the
results of their pupils with the percentages of error that were determined for the
Province as a whole. Suggestions for remedial treatment and improvement of
spelling have been issued.
Handwriting in Grades V and VII.
The spelling survey afforded an opportunity to compare the Grade VII handwriting of 1948-49 with that of 1924-25. In each case the Gettysburg edition of the
Ayres Handwriting Scale was used. A sample of 467 papers was selected at random
from 11,000 tests, and each pupil was rated by four persons, including the one who
originally had done the work for the Putman-Weir survey. As a little variation was
noticeable, the median of the ratings was accepted as the true rating of the handwriting ability of the pupils. Similar ratings were done by three persons on the answers
to a Grade V Reading Comprehension Test. The results of both surveys and the
United States norms for 1917 are given in the following table:— division of tests, standards, and research. N 135
Comparison of Ratings on the Ayres Handwriting Scale.
Grade.
U.S. Noems FOE 1917.
B.C. Medians.
Mean.
Median.
1925.
1949.
VIII                                	
62
58
54
50
46
42
38
63
58
54
60
66
63
62
59
53
49
42
VII	
47
VI	
V	
39
IV	
Ill    	
II         	
It will be noticed from our recent results that the grade-levels of British Columbia
pupils are now more than two grades below the United States 1917 norms. This represents a decrease of four years in terms of grade-levels since 1925. The medians for
1925 undoubtedly indicated overemphasis. The question arises as to whether or not
we have not swung too far and might not devote greater attention to handwriting
from the point of view of legibility.
CHIEF STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES REVEALED TO DATE.
The results so far have shown that there is a tremendous range in terms of grade-
levels in every subject and grade that has been tested. Ranges of three or more
grades measured in terms of ability are common in " normal" classes. There also
is a great deal of variation between schools and school districts, but many of the
differences disappear when scholastic aptitude is held constant.
Knowledge of science at the University Entrance level has not changed appreciably
since 1939, but girl students have shown a distinctly greater improvement in science
than boys since 1925.
British Columbia is above the United States norm in speed of reading and level
of comprehension in Grade XI; in mathematics in Grades XI and XII; and in reading,
mathematics, and language in Grade X. The students taking the old six-year course
in mathematics exceeded those taking the new five-year course in 1948.
Weaknesses are indicated in Grade IX in spelling, capitalization, sentence structure, and mathematical fundamentals. Grade IX students are above the United States
norm in vocabulary.
Grade VIII is distinctly above recent United States norms in science, as is Grade
VII in all of the fundamentals covered by the Metropolitan Achievement Test. The
norms have been lowered, however.
Achievement in science is higher in Grade VIII in junior high schools than in
elementary schools.
A weakness in language usage is becoming evident in the lower grades of elementary schools, as is a weakness in arithmetic computation. Reading comprehension in
Grade V has dropped to the United States modal-age norm.
The problem-solving ability of the pupils has been distinctly higher than their
computational ability in all grades.
Handwriting is now two grades below the United States 1917 norms.
FUTURE ENROLMENT.
Previous estimates of enrolment are continually being revised in the light of later
information. Those made between 1946 and 1948 are now known to be too low, chiefly
because immigration has continued much longer and at a higher rate than was believed
possible.    Immigration now appears to have decreased to a point of balance, and the N  136 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
birth-rate, too, has levelled off.    The effect of these decreases will not be felt in Grade I
until 1955, and total enrolment will not level off until 1962.
A study was made this year of the ages of children of families coming into British
Columbia. It showed that there are between 10 and 30 per cent, more children in each
immigrant pre-school age-group than among children of similar resident families.
The effect of this will be to increase primary enrolment to an even greater extent than
the rapid increase in the British Columbia birth-rate would indicate. Assuming that
the recent immigrants will not move away, the latest estimates of total enrolment are
over 225,000 in 1955 and over 250,000 in 1962. Such figures may be compared with
an enrolment of approximately 120,000 from 1937 to 1944—a potential increase of
4,000 classes, classrooms, and teachers. DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION.
N 137
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION.
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR.
Tabulated below are recorded the number of visual aids requested by and supplied
to each of the school districts from September, 1948, to June, 1949:—
Motion Pictures.
Film-strips.
District No. and Name.
Number
Requested.
Number
Supplied.
Number
Requested.
Number
Supplied.
326
97
128
132
34
46
11
11
•      40
54
28
20
368
213
43
15
208
183
23
19
269
138
24
9
102
120
	
1
9. Castlegar	
15
10
11. Trail    	
35
31
13   Kettle Valley
         1
253
63
85
26
92
33
78
301
351
221
79
397
4
115
26
78
8
41
17
60
165
169
207
85
130
4
23
32
18. Golden	
40
25
6
234
13
27
23
33
21
1
131
16
25
14
20
204
237
76
6
87
77
27
1          .....    .
219
228
429
536
195
282
250
284
7,368
618
575
110
568
365
118
98
81
268
223
145
150
150
278
5,147
434
458
96
261
235
68
78
31
88
52
22
70
154
1,120
158
30
64
57
14
37. Delta       	
52
213
1,040
152
37
745         |              482
200                     181
11                           9
46   Sechelt                            ..          	
39
49
31
211
16
175
142
187
14
73
107
1
6
46
90
11
77
72
10
66
29 N 138
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Motion
Pictures.
FlLM-
STRIPS.
District No. and Name.
Number
Requested.
Number
Supplied.
Number
Requested.
Number
Supplied.
20
73
26
97
15
35
17
38
8
11
..
2,181
80
323
38
99
180
106
150
1,527
45
189
12
64
76
46
97
128
159
82
8
281
73
62
155
15
53
216
97
62. Sooke	
137
63. Saanich	
90
6
156
43
51
122
15
70. Alberni	
166
134
44
177
67
507
115
50
56
87
17
119
39
197
53
28
61
71. Courtenay	
165
2
73. Alert Bay	
15
19
109
5
74. Quatsino..	
75. Mission	
46
93
6
6
Totals	
21,207
13,379
5,016
4,260
Total requests, 26,216;   total supplied, 17,639.
Total requests are incomplete—September 1st to March 31st, no record kept of requests received at the counter,
in correspondence, or over the telephone. It is not unreasonable to estimate that such requests would run the total
to approximately 30,000.
The above figures exclude visual aids circulated to other organizations affiliated
with the Department of Education, private schools, organizations, or other Provincial
departments.
During the school term an additional 68 sound-film projectors and 25 film-strip
projectors were purchased by the schools. This brings the total of sound-film projectors
in the schools to an estimated 393.
The Division screened 410 films and film-strips and arranged 280 such screenings
in co-operation with schools and other branches of the Department to determine the
suitability and subject-grade placement of the material concerned. THE  STRATHCONA TRUST. N  139
THE STRATHCONA TRUST.
REPORT OF T. F. ROBSON, SECRETARY, LOCAL COMMITTEE.
PHYSICAL TRAINING, 1948-49.
For the school-year 1948-49 sixty-four teachers were recommended for physical-
training awards and the sum of $520 was distributed as prizes.
CADET CORPS, 1948-49.
Cadet-training proficiency prizes were awarded as follows:—
(1) North Vancouver Senior High School Cadet Corps.
(2) Cranbrook High School Cadet Corps.
(3) Nelson Junior High School Cadet Corps.
(4) Nelson Senior High School Cadet Corps.
(5) Mount Lehman Cadet Corps.
(6) Rossland High School Cadet Corps.
(7) Salmon Arm High School Cadet Corps.
(8) Matsqui-Suma's-Abbotsford Cadet Corps.
(9) North Vancouver Junior High School Cadet Corps.
(10) Trail-Tadanac High School Cadet Corps.
(11) Maple Ridge High School Cadet Corps.
(12) Sumas School Cadet Corps.
(13) Armstrong-Spallumcheen Cadet Corps.
(14) Peachland High School Cadet Corps.
(15) Merritt School Cadet Corps.
The senior cadet-training officer reported a general increase in the interest and
efficiency of cadet corps in British Columbia. The authorized quota of 2,250 cadets
was filled, and many corps had numbers above the authorized strength. More equipment
was available, particularly wireless sets, and training showed a marked improvement.
A minimum of drill was given, emphasis being placed on military subjects of possible
value to cadets in future work.
Summer Camp.
A summer camp for Western Command cadets, held at Vernon from July 4th to
July 15th, enrolled 1,248 cadets from 82 corps, of whom 627, from 40 corps, were from
British Columbia. Fifty-three officers and civilian instructors of the Cadet Services
of Canada attended.
Training was divided into three groups—basic training for first-year cadets,
advanced training for cadets who had previously attended, and special training for
cadets showing ability as instructors, officers, and non-commissioned officers. About
40 per cent, of training comprised military games and sports. Instruction in swimming
and water safety was given all cadets by Red Cross instructors.
A sports day was held, and winners of events received crests.
Trades-training Camp.
A trades-training camp of six weeks' duration was held at Vernon for 150 specially
selected cadets, who took the first half of qualification as signallers—all arms, driver-
mechanics, operators of special engineering equipment (bulldozers, pile-drivers, pneumatic hammers, etc.), operators of fire-control equipment (anti-aircraft and radar).
In addition, 15 cadets took Part I of the Medical Assistants' Course at the camp hospital
of the Royal Canadian School of Military Engineering, Chilliwack. N 140 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
Of the above cadets, fifteen were returned to their homes as unable to complete
qualification. The remainder set a very high standard. The syllabus was in accordance
with army trades' specifications, and results of cadets compared favourably with results
obtained by Active Force soldiers.
All cadets qualified in recreational periods for junior, intermediate, and senior
swimming certificates under Red Cross instructors. A small number obtained swimming and water-safety badges.
These cadets will return in 1950 to complete qualifications. They will then be
eligible for enlistment in a Reserve Force unit as fully qualified tradesmen, entitled
to draw trades pay.
All cadets completing the six weeks' summer period are entitled to a bonus of $60.
In addition to those completing the second half of qualifications, 350 cadets taking
Part I will be enrolled with the object of graduating 330 cadets yearly in all trades
from 1951. Technical-school teachers employed to teach automotive and radio theory
and shop practice did an excellent job.
It is felt that trades training was very successful and should provide a partial
answer to the tradesman shortage throughout Canada.
Special Dominion Camp.
Fifteen British Columbia cadets attended a special camp for 150 senior cadets held
at Banff, Alta.
Shooting.
Forty prizes of $1.50 were awarded to the best shots in school cadet corps in
British Columbia.
General.
Twelve teams from British Columbia entered the R.M.C. Club inter-schools competition and twenty-four teams the D.C.R.A. competition. In first aid, twenty-two
senior and forty-eight junior certificates were awarded. In signalling, seventy-four
Morse certificates and eight Advanced Morse certificates were awarded.
Air Cadets.
The Group Commander of No. 12 Group Headquarters reported that the No. 257
(Ladysmith) Air Cadet Squadron, the only squadron in the area qualifying as a school
squadron, had a most successful year and was runner-up for the proficiency shield in
the area. The squadron strength is sixty-three boys, and the squadron efficiency was
rated 90 per cent, by the Inspection Officer.
The squadron carried out annual training prescribed in the Air Cadet Syllabus,
including first-, second-, and third-year training. The squadron entered the Strathcona
Trust competition and also the D.C.R.A. winter shoot and the Air Cadet League shoot.
A proficiency award of $25 was made to the squadron and an award of $2 for the best
shot for the year.
FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1948-49.
The funds at the disposal of the Local Committee amounted to $2,054.77, and the
expenditures for the year were $1,168.97, leaving a balance of $885.80.
Receipts, 1948-49.
Balance on hand, June 30th, 1948  $736.77
Annual grant  1,303.71
Annual grant for secretary's expenses  10.00
Interest on savings account  4.29
$2,054.77 the strathcona trust. n 141
Expenditures, 1948-49.
Awards for physical training  $520.00
Awards for cadet-corps proficiency  351.00
Cadet posters  36.45
Cadet sports   250.00
Spoons   11.52
$1,168.97
Balance on hand, June 30th, 1949        885.80
$2,054.77 N  142 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1948-49.
" EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT."
REPORT OF MISS F. M. WHEADON, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION.
During the school-year 1948-49, under the terms of this Act, 150 students received
$97 each. Of the total number, 17 were successful in attaining University Entrance
standing or High School Graduation, and 97.8 of those reapplying for aid for 1949-50
were promoted to a higher grade.
Awards were made to veterans' children attending schools in thirty-two of the
seventy-seven school districts in the Province, with the large majority of the grants
being paid in the more thickly populated areas, comprising School Districts No. 36
(Surrey), No. 39 (Vancouver), No. 41 (Burnaby), and No. 61 (Greater Victoria). STATISTICAL RETURNS  STATISTICAL RETURNS.
N 145
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N 147
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PUBLIC  SCHOOLS REPORT,  1948-49.
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