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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY MENTAL HOSPITALS PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR 12… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1949

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
MENTAL HOSPITALS
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL  REPORT
FOR 12 MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31st
1948
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the General
Superintendent of the Mental Hospitals for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1948.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PART I.—MEDICAL.
Page.
Officers and Staff, List of     7
Report—General Medical Superintendent     9
Report—Laboratory  15
Report—X-ray Department  18
Report—Physiotherapy  19
Report—Psychologist  19
Report—Dentist  20
Report—Optician  21
Report—Beauty-parlour =  21
Report—Training-school j,  21
Report—Social Service  22
Statistical Tables—
1. Movement of Population during Year  33
2. Summary of Operations of Hospitals since Inception  35
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  36
4. Civil State of Patients admitted  37
5. Religious Denominations of Patients  37
6. Educational Status of Patients  37
7. Nationality of Patients  38
8. Districts from which Patients were admitted  39
9. Occupation of Patients prior to Admission  41
10. Age of Patients on Admission  42
11. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission .'  42
12. Alleged Duration of Attacks prior to Admission  42
13. Table of Heredity  43
14. Alleged Cause of Insanity in Patients admitted    43
15. State of Bodily Health of Patients admitted  44
16. Form of Mental Disorder in Patients admitted  44
17. Probation, Number allowed out on  44
18. Discharges, showing Alleged Duration of Insanity  45
19. Discharges, showing Length of Residence in Hospital and Condition at Time
of Discharge  45
20. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital, Essondale, New West
minster, and Saanich  46
PART II.—FINANCIAL.
Report—Business Manager  50
Expense Statement, Psychopathic Department  51
Expense Statement, Headquarters Department  51
Financial Tables—
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost for the Past Ten Years 52
B     )
M -. V Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years 53
Bl,j
C. Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in all Hospitals  55
D. Expense Statement, New Westminster  56
E. Expense Statement, Essondale  57
F. Expense Statement, Saanich ,  58
Revenue, Table of, for the Past Ten Years  59 BB 6
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PART UL—COLONY FARM.
Report—Financial, General—Business Manager	
Page.
_ 60
Profit and Loss Account  61
Dairy and Herds Department—Profit and Loss Account  61
Work-horse Department—
Sales and Deaths Account  62
Horse-labour Account  62
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  63
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account  64
Orchard and Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account  64
Crop Department—Profit and Loss Account, etc  65
Tractor Account  65
Truck Account  66
Maintenance and Administration, General  66
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.—
Produce supplied to Essondale  67
Produce supplied to New Westminster  67
Accounts receivable  67
Remittances to Treasury  67
Equipment  68
Orchard and Small Fruits  68 DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. George S. Pearson, Provincial Secretary.
R. A. Pennington, O.B.E., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. L. Crease, M.D., CM., Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry.
E. J. Ryan, M.D., CM., Medical Superintendent.
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
Frederick E. Matheson, Business Manager.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, ESSONDALE.
Medical:
U. P. Byrne, M.B., D.P.M., D.I.H., Director of Child Guidance Clinics.
J. M. Jackson, M.D., Radiologist.
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., Clinical
Director.
T. G. Caunt, M.D.
G. McK. Kirkpatrick, M.D.
A. J. Warren, M.D., D.P.M. (on Leave).
B. F. Bryson, M.D.
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM.
R. M. Rice, B.Sc, M.B.
A. L. Swanson, B.A., M.D., CM.
G. A. Nicolson, M.D., Pathologist.
P. D. Croft, M.D., CM.
A. E. Robertson, M.D., CM.
W. D. Love, M.Sc, PhD., M.D.
N. L. Richardson, M.D., CM.
W. P.  Fister,  M.D., M.R.C.P.   (Edin.),
F.R.C.P.  (Can.).
G. H. Stephenson, M.D.
Milton Jones, D.D.S.
C. B. Watson, M.A., Psychologist.
W. R. Brown, Director of Recreation.
K. Woolcock, Pharmacist.
W. Creber, Chief Attendant.
W. Pritchard, Head Male Instructor.
Miss M. Parsons, R.N., Director of
Nursing.
Miss E. M. Pullan, R.N., B.A.Sc, Instructress of Nursing.
Miss J. F. Kilburn, R.N., Social Service.
Miss G. Barber, B.H.E., Dietitian.
Miss E. Weekes, O.T.R., Charge Occupational Therapist.
Miss J. Irving, B.A., B.L.Sc, Librarian.
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Branch Secretary.
Miss A. Dingle, Senior Stenographer.
Business:
J. F. Anderson, Assistant Business
Manager.
L. Fox, Paymaster.
G. A. Grieve, Cost Accountant.
W. E. Skillicorn, Book-keeper.
W. Headridge, Steward.
Mrs. J. NESBITT, Stenographer.
Rev. J. Naylor, Protestant.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father J. P. Kane, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
H. Lonsdale, Foreman of Works.
J. Wilson, Engineer.
Wm.  P.  Dodgshon,  Outside  Overseer.
T. Harrison, Electrician.
G. Matthews, Plumber.
G. Nolan, Auto Mechanic.
D. Anderson, Laundryman.
A. L. Blair, Barber.
A. Cooter, Chief Cook.
J. G. Herrick, Baker.
R.   T.   Hall,   Charge  Occupational
Therapist. BB 8
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Medical:
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
C. E. Benwell, M.B.
K. B. Sunderland, M.B.
R. D. B. Herrick, M.D.
F. Gillard, Receiving Clerk.
E. Jones, D.D.S., Visiting Dentist.
Miss M. G. Coulson, Clerk-Stenographer,
Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses.
Busin
Miss E. C. Herchmer, R.N., Assistant
Superintendent of Nurses.
W. Dobie, Chief Attendant.
R. Palm, Male Nursing Instructor.
Mrs. E. F. Loree, School Principal.
J. Jackson, Industrial Arts Instructor.
J. Lynes, Recreational Instructor.
Mrs. K. Barnsdale, Occupational Therapist.
ess:
Rev. T. Murphy, Protestant.
C. M. Doyle, Foreman of Works.
C. Hauck, Engineer.
C. Stapleton, Head Gardener.
L. S. Davies, Electrician.
C. M. Doyle, Acting Plumber.
G. Coulson, Laundryman.
A. Fraser, Steward.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father G. ROGERS, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
J. McMillan, Shoemaker.
L. Arnold, Assistant Barber.
J. Fraser, Painter.
W. Jenkins, Head Cook.
V. G. Copp, Baker.
J. C Purse, Head Tailor.
COLONY FARM.
P. H. Moore, B.A., B.S.A., Superintendent.
T. A. Morris, Supervisor.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, COLQUITZ.
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.B., Medical Supervisor.
P. McLeod, Chief Attendant.  Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
■f$ ■•:*
i
Outdoor dance, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. Report of the Medical Superintendent
For the Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1948.
PART I.—MEDICAL.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., April 1st, 1948.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith for your consideration the Seventy-
sixth Annual Report of the Provincial Mental Hospitals at Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich.
The following table gives a brief summary of the movement of the hospital population during the fiscal year April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
In residence, April 1st, 1947	
On probation, but still remaining on registers	
New admissions during current year	
2,457
93
585
1,694
92
526
4,151
185
1,111
3,135
2,312
5,447
Discharged in full during year	
376
110
156
331
119
86
707
229
242
642
536
1,178
2,493
1,776
4,269
Increase in number of patients admitted this year as compared to last  231
Net increase in population  118
Rate of deaths to total treated       4.40%
Rate of discharges to admissions  (exclusive of deaths)     63.64%
ADMISSIONS.
An analysis of the birth column shows that, of the number admitted, 654 (or 58.87
per cent.) were Canadian born, 263 (or 23.67 per cent.) were from other parts of the
British Commonwealth, and 9 (or 17.19 per cent.) were of foreign extraction;   3 were
unknown.
DISCHARGES.
The following table indicates quite clearly that the earlier cases are brought to
the hospital for treatment following the onset of mental illness, the greater are the
chances for their recovery:—
Table showing Alleged Duration of Insanity, prior to Admission, in those discharged from the Three Institutions during the Year April 1st, 1947, to
March 31st, 1948.
Less than six months  301
Over six months  210
Without psychosis   23
Duration unknown  173
707 BB 10 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
During the year a total of 707 patients were discharged in full. Of this number,
124 were discharged as recovered, 291 were discharged as improved, 269 were discharged as unimproved, and 23 were discharged as without psychosis, and of that
number 3 were diagnosed as not insane.
There is now a more determined frame of mind toward further advancement in
the treatment of mental maladies. The study of the function of the brain and nervous
system is more intense. It has now reached back to the individual body-cell, which will
mean some of the causes of mental trouble will be exposed, with the result that the
treatment will be even more basic and also more effective. The body-cell has the same
functions, broadly speaking, as man has—namely, growth, reproduction, and function.
The cell is likened in its relationship to the body as man is in his relationship to the
society in which he lives. The chemistry of the body-cell is being closely studied in
reference to growth, function, and even to the chemistry of the all-important gene.
All this is indeed a step in the proper direction. Personally, I think the next step will
be the further study of the impregnated cell as it divides to form the human body in
the intrauterine stage of existence. It is in this phase that some real answers to the
field of the prevention of mental illness may be found.
There has been a world-wide tendency to reject the idea of expenditures toward
mental hospitals, and long periods of small progress in this regard have made matters
difficult. The recent adverse publicity given mental hospitals in America evidently has
changed this attitude. The Mental Hygiene Commission worked on standardization of
mental hospitals. The Canadian Mental Hygiene Commission did good work in this
regard. Dr. Clarence Hincks and Don LeBourdais were a great help to British Columbia. Our mental hospital was classified by them some years ago, then, later, by the
American Hospital Association. They encouraged us also to follow the standards set
by the American Psychiatric Association. We have followed this advice step by step
throughout the years. One must have first a classified hospital, then a classified mental
hospital, all in one, and this we have. Under the circumstances this has not been easy,
and could not have been accomplished had you not provided the clinic of psychological
medicine and the means of changing the Act. The latter has also given us the opportunity to apply for classification by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of
Canada, and we have been granted such approval by that body as up to the present time
it is able to bestow.
TREATMENT.
(a) Insulin.—The treatment by insulin is more favourable in the earlier stages
of mental malady. Fortunately, we were able to enlarge our scope of the number
under treatment, so that the waiting list has been greatly reduced and valuable time
saved. We placed two doctors on this service—one on the male side and one on the
female side. This plan has worked well; gratifying results have been obtained and
more patients have been treated. The following table shows briefly the results
obtained:—
Results— Totai. Per Cent
Recovered      19 14
Much improved      16 11
Improved      67 49
Unimproved      33 24
Total   135 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
BB 11
Disposal  Total. Per Cent.
Discharged    73 54
Discharged later   16 11
Discharge pending   5 3
Transferred to electroshock  6 4
Transferred to lobotomy :  6 4
Died   2 1
Remaining in hospital   27 20
Total   135
(b) Convulsive Shock Therapy.—The patients under shock treatment have been
selected ones, and, fortunately, we were able to make available this treatment for a
greater number.   The following table shows the benefit received by the patients:—
Male.
Female.
Total.
Per Cent.
Results—
7
24
73
28
19
33
133
82
26
57
206
110
6
14
51
27
Totals	
132
267
399
Disposal—
35
14
29
1
53
78
25
41
15
104
113
39
70
16
157
4
28
9
17
4
39
1
Totals	
132
267
399
(c) Lobotomy.—We have followed the same routine in suggesting for lobotomy
only those cases who have not benefited by other treatments first. The committee has
selected those with the most advanced psychotic symptoms. Dr. Frank Turnbull carries out the classical highly approved technique, which has shown the very satisfactory
results indicated in the following table. Even those classified as unsatisfactory have
shown more favourable conduct on the wards.
Lobotomy Records.
Result.
Disposal.
Diagnosis.
Number
of
Patients.
Much
improved.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Discharged.
Remaining in
Hospital.
Died
later.
Manic depressive	
1
4                    2
35                  10
6                    2
1
15
2
1
10
2
2
15
3
2
19
3
1
45                  14         |        18        |        13
1                     1
20
24        !          1
1                     1
Dr. Milton Jones has cared for the patients needing dental attention. It was a
large volume of work indeed. With his long study and experience, this service has been
well handled, thus giving the patients skilled treatment and relieving much inconvenience and suffering. BB  12 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
There was call for the services of our optometrist in refractions, repairs, replacements, etc.   This work is very necessary and is much appreciated.
The beauty-parlour has been active during the year. It is a great satisfaction
to the patients to have this service. The particulars of its operation will be found in a
separate table.
The Training-school for Nursing has continued to carry its usual active load.
Miss Pullan is completing her final course for her Bachelor's degree in nursing at the
University of British Columbia. Another nurse has gone to McGill University for
postgraduate study in psychiatric nursing. Miss Menzies has completed her course
at McGill and has returned to the teaching staff, which is slowly being built in a way
acceptable to the Nursing Association. Students coming to our school must have the
same standard of teaching as any other hospital. The shortage of accommodation for
nurses will soon be relieved by additional new buildings for the purpose. It will then
be possible to put in the straight eight-hour day instead of its equivalent. At times
this year it has been difficult to obtain staff.
The Child Guidance Clinic has functioned well. It is indeed not easy to obtain the
necessary staff for the extension of this important service. We have sent some away
for the required training and are training others ourselves. This all takes valuable
time. There is so much demand for staff in the mental-hygiene field in Canada and
the United States that it makes enlarging of facilities in this line increasingly difficult, even though the enhancing of services is all well planned. Detailed report of the
work of the Child Guidance Clinic is seen elsewhere in this Report.
The Occupational Therapy Department is being ably carried on by Miss Weekes
and Mr. Hall, and their interested and co-operative staffs. This is an important feature
and is much appreciated by the patients and relatives. It adds considerably to hospital
life and treatments. We are always trying to increase its application; slowly and
gradually this is coming about. The teaching of the study of occupational therapy is
also being taught in our Nursing School so that eventually all staff will be able to
assist.
The general laboratory has functioned actively during the year. It is not only of
great confirmatory diagnostic help, but is essential in teaching our staff, and allied
staff in other departments. It is preparing slides for use in teaching through the
medium of the screen. It is also busy getting ready museum specimens for teaching
purposes in the new clinic. It serves also for instructing technicians and undergraduate medical students and interns. Detailed report of the work accomplished is
found in a separate table.
The study of the X-ray report reveals a healthy growth. It is a very valuable
department and, even in spite of limited quarters, has served to throw light on health
and illness of both patients and staff. The figures shown demonstrate the fact that the
amount of pictures taken falls more in line with the number that should be taken in an
institution of this size.
The Physiotherapy Department really includes both hydrotherapy and electrotherapy. It is quite valuable in our treatments. Provision is also being made for the
extension of this work.
The Department of Psychology shows an encouraging advance. Even in the face
of many difficulties, Mr. Watson has accomplished a great deal. This Department
considers not only psychology, but also the basic and underlying all-important education
of staff in all its ramifications. It applies as well to our patients. Considering just
one phase, patients now take up studies through correspondence courses which may, or
may not, lead to certification.
The Department of Recreation for patients founded by William Brown is steadily
and surely building up and enlarging its scope.    It fosters many games, amusements, SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. BB 13
and picnics, etc., both outside and inside during the inclement weather. It really
makes hospital life more active, purposeful, pleasant, and causes the time to pass more
quickly.    Socialization is very important in this particular field of endeavour.
Guy Walker, who inaugurated our Audio-Visual Department, has worked hard,
and this Department has shown steady and studied progress. He supplies the patients
with splendid moving pictures in the 35-millimetre field and also those in the 16-millimetre size. Thus, all patients have good movies. Then, also, he has the audio-visual
still slides and movies for the education of staff and patients. This work even includes
the taking of pictures of splendid calibre.
The Social Service Department is gradually increasing its personnel, and is meeting now with the standard set for an organization of this size. Social Service is being
staffed by graduates of accepted university courses. There is an international shortage, so it is pleasing to see our own services keeping up its numbers. Miss Kilburn,
the supervisor, has also taken care of the demands placed on her by the Child Guidance
Clinic.
CHANGES IN STAFF.
Miss Johnston, one of our own Mental graduates and a registered nurse, has gone
to McGill University to take a year's course in psychiatric nursing, and on her return
will join our teaching staff.
Dr. U. P. Byrne went to the University of Toronto to take a degree in the study of
industrial mental hygiene.
We were all very sorry to hear of the passing away of Norman Baker, our Deputy
Provincial Secretary. We enjoyed working with him very much, and extend our
sympathies to his family.
Dr. d'Easum was transferred to Colquitz in June, 1947, to be attached to our staff
on the Island and to aid in the work being done in the Child Guidance Clinic at Victoria.
During the year we welcomed to our staff Dr. W. P. Fister, M.R.C.P. (Edin.),
F.R.C.P. (Can.), who has had wide experience both in Canada and England, and also
Dr. G. Stephenson, who, too, brings to our work valuable experience gained in outside
practice.
Dr. Herrick (late of the India Medical Services) joined our staff at the New
Westminster institution in September, 1947.
V. G. Warren, gardener, passed away in November, 1947, following a brief illness.
He was in charge of the vegetable gardens. Mr. Warren was always close to duty, was
a good provider, and ever anxious to see that the Hospital had seasonal and good quality
foods.    His loss has been greatly felt by the staff.
William Worrall also died during the month of November, 1947. He was an
upstanding, well-built man, athletically inclined. He was good natured and always
ready to lend a helping hand. He had long years of experience with the Hospital and,
latterly, had been chief laundryman. He had a host of friends, and it was with great
regret that we heard of his somewhat unexpected passing.
Another of our faithful employees died during the year in the person of D. C.
MacDonald. He was an old-timer here, yet not old in years. He was on the staff of
the Public Works. He was quiet and very efficient. It was a well-known fact that if
a difficult article had to be obtained, one would hear, " Oh, get Mac to make one." He
was most resourceful and always willing to help out. When the news of his death
came, there was silence—" Mac was gone."
The Hospital feels keenly the loss of these valued and tried employees. They
have been with us over the years and seen us through many difficult times, and it is
hard to realize they are no longer with us.
J. Renton, our head landscape gardener, was superannuated during the year.
He was a student of nature, and knew his work thoroughly.    He talked clearly about BB 14 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
plant and tree life, and their arrangement. He gave one the Latin name, the characteristics clearly, simply, and one knew he looked at the subject as a parent regarded
his child. He kept the grounds in splendid shape; plants grew well and in the right
place. He was a clear thinker, a great friend of horticulture, a splendid lecturer, and,
what is more, a capable, impartial judge. He gave freely of his time as a lecturer
and as a judge, and contributed a good share to life in the Province.
COMMENTS.
The forty-four-hour week was introduced on the male psychiatric nursing service.
Previously they had practically the equivalent, but all felt satisfied with the change
and considered it was really overdue.
Arrangements were started to take over the military hospital at Vernon, with the
idea of its housing some 160 of our elderly patients over 70 years of age. It is of
a temporary-building type, but can be made most attractive and useful for a few
years to come. It is in a splendid country—a progressive town with a good climate.
The building sits on a hill overlooking the whole valley, and is just immediately above
the large City Recreational Park, where the patients can both see and hear the
activities taking place there.
The property known as " The New Vista " was taken over by the hospital. The
staff here favoured this move being made, being of the opinion that it not only filled a
good purpose, but that the idea would be a growing one. It gives the female patients
an opportunity to take up life again, and has the added advantage of beginning their
rehabilitation gradually and at the same time providing them with shelter and guidance.
It was decided to adopt the idea of a cheaper type of building for mental patients,
a permanent structure, less adorned but pleasing in appearance. A new unit for the
elderly patients was erected at Essondale. Ramps were installed instead of stairways.
It was somewhat surprising to see it after it was completed and occupied. It looks
just as well as the more expensive type, and is very comfortable, bright, and cheerful.
The general buildings are steadily being more and more overcrowded. The
admissions are increasing; both old and young are coming in in spite of regulations
against accepting them. The overcrowding has now reached the level of a hazard;
one wonders just where the wheel will stop.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
I cannot close this report without making certain acknowledgments, and which it
certainly affords me much pleasure to do.
I wish to acknowledge to the fullest extent the splendid co-operation of all those
who have aided in the work of the Hospital. Our programme is ever widening, and
this naturally entails added endeavour on our part to meet the increasing needs, and
without the assistance of all we would in no way be able to face and overcome the
problems created. In this connection I would bring to your particular commendation
the diligent and efficient help at all times rendered by Dr. Ryan and Dr. Gee. They
have worked hard and patiently at all times, and the burden upon them has indeed
been great. I also wish to make favourable mention of Mr. Matheson, our business
manager. The responsibility of conducting the financial and logistical side of such
a large organization is truly great; the side-issues are many, and I would like to
commend Mr. Matheson and his assistants for the earnest and sincere manner in which
this task has been faced.
The returned-soldier organizations are very active, and continue to assist our
veteran patients in many ways. They are always willing to aid us in dealing with the
various problems which arise from time to time, and have assisted materially in their
rehabilitation. LABORATORY REPORT. BB 15
I would also like to make mention of the courteous services rendered the hospital
at all times by the British Columbia Police Force. Their assistance is frequently
requested and their response is immediate.
Our branch at New Westminster continues its valuable work for the subnormals
under Dr. Sauriol. Regular school classes are held under certified teachers, and the
progress made is remarkable. Special recreation and entertainment facilities are provided, and also calisthenics, all of which are of great benefit to the children. One feels
much credit is due to those in charge for their careful and patient work with this type
of patient.
At Colquitz the same careful treatment of patients has been carried on under
Dr. d'Easum. Here are housed our criminally insane, a more difficult type to treat
and care for, but progress here is to be noted in all fields, which is most encouraging
and is a pleasing reflection on those in charge. We are sorry indeed to report the
serious injury to his knee suffered by Mr. Morris, the supervisor, and which has necessitated his being off duty for some time. His absence has been greatly felt by both
patients and staff, and we wish him a speedy recovery and return to duty.
Finally, to you, sir, and the Deputy Provincial Secretary, I wish to tender my very
grateful thanks for your assistance and sympathetic understanding of our needs. It
has done much to stimulate us in our endeavours to help the mentally ill, and round out
a full programme which, we hope, one day will lessen the numbers requiring hospital
care. I would also like to convey my appreciation to the Public Works Department for
their consideration in our many problems and with whom we are so closely associated.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. L. Crease,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., March 31st, 1948.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratory at
Essondale from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948:—
Blood—
Kahn, quantitative   57
Kahn, positive   108
Kahn, negative  1,239
Red-blood count and hasmoglobin  1,976
White-blood count and differential   2,106
Sedimentation rate  889
Coagulation time  18
Bleeding time  22
Clot retraction   1 BB 16 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Blood—Continued.
Prothrombin time  3
Platelet count   59
Reticulocyte count   19
Grouping   4
Cross-agglutination    14
Fragility   2
Glucose   238
Glucose tolerance   15
Insulin sensitivity   2
Non-protein nitrogen   185
Urea nitrogen   14
Creatinine   12
Cholesterol   26
Bromide  50
Plasma protein  3
Chloride   2
Serum—
Total protein  -  9
Alb.-glob. ratio   2
Calcium   11
Phosphorus   3
Icterus index   30
Van den Bergh   37
Alkaline phosphatase   4
Acid phosphatase  2
Hanger flocculation   3
Sodium   2
Blood-
Culture   21
Widal   18
Agglutination for B. abortus   9
Paul Bunnell   15
Spinal fluid—
Kahn, positive   47
Kahn, negative   69
Cell-count   110
Colloidal gold  110
Total protein   102
T.B.  1
Urines—
Routine general .  6,588
Acetone  2,337
Quantitative sugar  608
Bromides   1,009
Benzidene    .... 765
Quantitative albumin   127
Two-hourly   6
Cone, and dilution  1
Ascheim-Zondek   25
Bile   11
Urobilinogen    23 r
LABORATORY REPORT. BB 17
Urines—Continued.
T.B.   10
Phenylpyruvic acid  2
Galactose tolerance  1
P.S.P  4
Barbiturate   2
Smears—
Miscellaneous   375
G.C.   55
T.B.     45
Vincent's angina  202
Malaria   33
Trichomonas   8
Diphtheria   217
Dark field  2
Fontana stain  1
Sputum—T.B.   191
Cultures—
Miscellaneous    52
Diphtheria   220
G.C.   2
Typhoid   931
Dysentery   1,157
T.B.   5
Faeces—
Parasites   18
Occult blood  82
Urobilin  3
T.B.   1
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine   741
Diphtheria vaccine   12
Pollen antigen   21
Scarlet-fever toxin  5
Brucellin   7
Skin tests—
Tuberculin (Vollmer)   255
Pollen sensitivity   2
Undulant fever  3
Dick test  1
Schick test :  52
Smallpox vaccinations   96
Gastric analysis   15
Gastric for T.B  33
Gastric for occult blood  4
Agglutination for typhoid  25
Agglutination for dysentery  235
Diphtheria virulence test  1
B.M.R.   95
Biopsies  _....-  6
Autopsies   135
Animal autopsies   38 BB 18 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Sections  1,823
Donors supplied   6
Water for bacterial count  21
Water for pH  1
Electrocardiographs   103
Ascitic fluid, routine  1
Pleural fluid, routine  3
Vitamin C determination  1
Total number of examinations ..  26,529
I have, etc.,
G. Nicolson,
Pathologist.
X-RAY REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the X-ray Department
of the Hospital from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948:—
Number of films taken  11,642
Number of patients X-rayed (including repeats)	
Patients.
Chests     ...        ...    ..    8,286
9,611
Films.
8,351
Gastro-intestinal    ......          .                            39
352
Pelvis         23
Teeth        20
28
98
Extremities      475
Shoulders            34
1,191
66
Sinuses .   ..     —      .. .    ..          .......       11
29
Heads                   ...              .     ...     163
510
Jaws    .... ...        28
61
Mastoid       ...      ..   ...         9
22
Spine          .      --....      .       441
706
Gall-bladder           8
Ribs          16
26
37
Kidney, urinary bladder         9
Nose         13
40
27
Colon     ...        1
3
Barium enema        12
Abdomen  •      ...      23
63
32
9,611                11,642
I have, etc.,
J. M. Jackson, M.D.,
Director of Radiology PHYSIOTHERAPY REPORT.
BB 19
PHYSIOTHERAPY REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments which were given in the Physiotherapy Department at Essondale from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948:—
Male.
Female.
Total.
293
21
80
126
456
558
972
530
36
294
76
567
31
222
9
231
656
870
3,069
88
860
31
248
89
357
1,112
1,428
4,041
618
36
Tub baths	
294
76
3,442
415
5,743
805
9,185
1,220
I have, etc.,
A. E. Davidson,
Clinical Director.
PSYCHOLOGIST'S REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1948:—
Gamin    3
Kuder Preference Record  4
Minnesota Multiphasic   29
S.T.D.CR.   2
Wechsler-Bellevue    74
Willoughby E-M Scale  1
Shipley-Hartford   55
Hanfmann-Kasanin Concept Formation   3
Kent Rosanoff Word Association  1
Proverbs    4
Reading and Arithmetic Tests  4
Otis Self-administering Tests   7
Porteus Maze Test  5
Culture-free Test -— 2
O. Co. Ag  5
McQuarrie Test for Mechanical Ability  1
General Clerical   1
Total
201
I have, etc.,
C. B. Watson,
Psychologist. 1
BB 20 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
DENTAL REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report of the Dental Department:—
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
All newly admitted patients able to present themselves were examined, and dental
charts filed. All acute conditions were given precedence, and relieved the same day as
reported. Dentures were made for patients recommended by members of the medical
staff, and dentures were repaired as required from day to day. Restorations of carious
teeth have been made as far as time would permit.
Summary.
Examinations   777
Extractions   517
Fillings inserted   272
Treatments ........ .  137
Local anaesthetics  371
Dentures repaired      74
Dentures rebased . %    21
Dentures made     34
Bridges repaired       7
Alveolotomy      2
Prophylaxis   118
General anaesthetics  .       3
Gingivectomy        1
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
Summary.
Examinations   185
Extractions   218
Local anaesthetics      78
General anaesthetics      27
Fillings inserted      49
Palliative treatments      53
Prophylaxis      92
Gingivitis and pyorrhoea treatments     27
We have, etc.,
Emery Jones, D.D.S.
Milton Jones, D.D.S.
■-.
-  -  . ■ • OPTICAL REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Enclosed please find optical report of work done at the Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale, from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948:—
Refractions, April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948:  Male, 46; female, 73;  total, 119.
Repairs and replacements sent to J. S. Hudson Optical Supplies, 132.
Minor repairs and adjustments at hospital, 50.
I have, etc.,
H. H. Woodbridge,
Optometrist.
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report of the appointments in the beauty-parlour from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948 :—
Marcels       557
Finger-waves   2,481
Shampoos   3,192
Manicures       811
Haircuts   3,107
Oil treatments        74
Permanents        347
We have, etc.,
E. Embree.
M. Townsend.
REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF NURSING.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1948.
This year ended with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 18; psychiatric
graduates, 44; psychiatric nurses-in-training, 192—making a total staff of 254. Resignations for the year were 229, and replacements, 240.
Again we have passed through a trying year with senior members accepting
greater responsibilities. This is particularly true of those in charge of wards, where
long hours, the continual turnover of personnel, overcrowded conditions, and new
therapies have made greater demands upon them. BB 22 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
There have been a few changes in the training-school office staff. Miss Jessie
Menzies returned from a year's course at McGill University and has taken over duties
of assistant instructress. Miss Menzies is a valuable addition to our staff. Miss Kirk-
ham replaced Mrs. Palvesky as Acute Building supervisor. Mrs. Palvesky resigned to
take up her household duties after capably filling this position for a year.
The School of Nursing has had another busy year. Twenty-nine nurses received
their diplomas in psychiatric nursing after a three-year course. Seven registered
nurses completed a six-month course in postgraduate study. Certificates were awarded
fifty-two male members and four from the New Westminster branch.
Five degree students from the University of British Columbia and twenty-three
degree students from the Vancouver General Hospital received two months' experience
and instruction. Unfortunately, the student affiliation with general hospitals, which
has been carried on since 1938, had to be discontinued because of the shortage of bed
accommodation for nurses. The degree students have living accommodation with the
Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster.
Sixteen nurses from the Public Health Division of the University of British
Columbia were given three days' instruction and observation, while special clinical
demonstrations were given to fifty psychology students, seventy public health students,
and forty-five educational students from the University of British Columbia.
This year we secured the services of Miss H. Warden, R.N., who not only took
charge of the sick nurses' infirmary, but accomplished a great deal toward a better
health programme for all students.
We are looking forward greatly to the eight-hour day, which will enhance the
welfare and happiness of both patients and staff.
For the nursing staff, I would like to thank all those who have given so freely of
their time and counsel, for their interest and help in the teaching programme during
the past year.
I have, etc.,
Mona E. Parsons, R.N.,
Director of Nursing.
SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith are consolidated summaries of the work done in the Child
Guidance Clinics throughout the Province from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
These tables are based on the complete examination or re-examination of each case.
Partial examinations are shown in the reports of psychiatric interviews, psychological
examinations, and in the social-work report.
Table 1 shows in summary the general activities of the Clinics.
Table 2 shows the number, sex, and status of all cases, both new and repeat,
examined at the Clinics.
Table 3 is an analysis of the sources of all cases referred to the Clinics. This
shows that while the largest percentage of our cases come from social agencies, signifi- SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT. BB 23
cant numbers are from other sources—parents, Courts, physicians, medical and health
agencies, and schools.
Table 4 is an analysis of the problems and disorders presented by the new cases
seen at the Clinics. The two largest groups are the primary behaviour disorders and
cases for adoption.
The advisability of adoption offers important opportunities for assistance from the
Child Guidance Clinics. It is still a truism that the earlier the adoption, the greater
the hazards, although the suitability of the child as to physical and mental health is
becoming much more satisfactorily defined. A careful history of early growth and
development tends to eliminate the hazard. The continuous contact of a child with a
stable environment places the value of early adoption beyond question.
The contact of the Clinic is usually with the parent who is placing the child for
adoption, and the opportunity is not usually provided to investigate the motivations
which prompt people to adopt children.
During the year the Borstal system of treatment of the young offender was reinsti-
tuted. Once again the Clinic is being used to assist in screening suitable candidates
for this type of retraining and rehabilitation.
Table 5 shows the number and types of tests carried out by the psychologists at
the Clinics.
The functions of the Clinic continue to be diagnosis, treatment, consultation,
training, education, and research. These various functions have been discussed in
previous reports.
The diagnostic, treatment, and consultation services function to assist in the
solution of personality problems of children so that they may become well-adjusted
members of society. It also co-operates with social agencies and others to co-ordinate
the services offered.
The training function is embodied in opportunities for postgraduate work by
members of the staff. The programme of clinical internship for graduates is proving
very successful. In addition, over fifty public health nurses, social workers, etc., have
had a period of observation and orientation at the clinic. Outside interest in the need
for and value of the clinic has been fostered by talks given by members of the staff to
groups, both professional and lay, requesting them. In addition, moving pictures
illustrating and explaining the emotional needs and growth of the child have proven
of great value.
Our research programme is embodied in a careful study and observation of each
individual with an evaluation of the treatment that has been carried out and of the
suitability of the various types of investigations that have been undertaken.
The most important and basic Clinic need is for increased professional staff.
Completion of the present psychiatric teams and the addition of another psychiatric
team is considered essential to the more adequate handling of the ever-increasing load.
It has not always been possible to give immediate services to all persons at the time
they have asked for them, as the current waiting list testifies. In addition, a number
of consultation cases would not have developed into treatment cases if they could have
been granted professional service at the time they sought it. A maximum benefit in
treating comes through the combined efforts of the members of the Clinic team, which
represents one of the most closely co-ordinated units which operate for the betterment
of human welfare and happiness.
Another urgent need is for increased accommodation at the Vancouver clinic.
A third need is the provision of a residential observation and treatment centre for
certain selected cases.    These include (1) the child who is unable to establish an adequate relationship with, or whose behaviour is beyond the tolerance of, his own family,
a foster home, the school, the neighbourhood or the community;   (2) the maladjusted BB 24
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
child who is reacting to inner disturbances of such duration that he is not able to
establish a positive relationship to adults or foster homes, but may be able to respond
in a group setting with other children; (3) children whose intelligence is average or
higher, but who are educationally retarded for a variety of reasons. These children
require observation and treatment. In-patient treatment of such children relieves the
tension caused by their presence in the home and provides an opportunity to work with
the adults in the home to prepare them for the return of the child under circumstances
more conducive to a total adjustment. Without adequate treatment the maladjustment
of these children becomes so marked that permanent institutionalization may be
required.
Once again I would like to express my appreciation of the co-operation of all those
who have made it possible for the Clinics to function in an adequate and satisfactory
manner.
Table i.—Summary of Clinics' Activity, April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
u
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227
25
11
5
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2
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279
Physicals	
515
83
42
18
6
4
8
5
6
3
4
694
461
26
13
4
3
7
1
5
3
1
524
Play-room observations	
174
174
637
219
51
15
43
4
19
4
6
4
1
8
3
4
6
6
1
4
1
4
1
786
255
Psychiatric interviews	
1,561
178
74
88
14
7
18
12
10
10
8
1,930
Table 2.—Number, Sex, and Status of all Cases examined at Child Guidance
Clinic, April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
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77
248
56
144
136
4
77
9
46
68
5
40
6
17
27
18
2
7
33
1
18
14
8
7
1
16
10
6
3
2
1
6
4
1
1
1
1
3
3
7
7
1
1
5
3
2
4
4
2
2
4
3
1
4
3
1
673
Males—
83
Children	
337
Females—
63
Children	
190
180
Males—
4
107
Females—
11
Children          	
58
661
95
41
19
6
4
8
5
6
4
4
853 SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
BB 25
Table 3.—Sources of all Cases referred to Child Guidance Clinic,
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Agency or Source.
Number of
Cases.
Total.
Percentage
Distribution.
137
268
66
1
8
39
1
1*
26
1
1
2
22
14
26
2
1
3
3
1
8
2
1
24
21
2
1
1
2
46
1
1
62
23
82
1
1
551
22
60
52
47
63
23
82
2
61.09
Y.M.CA	
2.44
6.65
Children's Hospital	
Public Health Nurse	
Victorian Order of Nurses	
T.B. Social Service Department	
City Health Centre 	
5.76
Public	
Other—
5.21
6. Adult Court	
6.98
2.55
9.10
9. Other	
0.22
Totals	
902
100.00
* Chinese Y.M.CA. BB 26
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table 4. — Problems and Disorders presented by the New Cases given full
Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1947, to March 31st,
1948.
Children.
Adults.
Total.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1. Primary behaviour disorders—
(a)  Habit disorders—
1
6
2
4
2
3
4
1
1
6
1
4
1
2
4
1
3
12
1
15
1
28
2
3
1
4
10
2
2
3
1
2
7
1
5
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
10
3
7
1
9
2
1
1
1
....
2
1
2
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
13
3
9
2
4
(b)  Personality disorders—
5
1
2
1
Other	
9
(c)   Neurotic disorders—
1
6
2
2
4
1
1
Other	
4
id)  Conduct disorders—
15
1
29
4
37
2
3
2
1
13
1
13
1
2
3
Other	
3
2. Psychotic and pre-psychotic—
4
1
Other	
3. Psychoneurosis and neurosis—
1
3
4. Convulsive disorders—
Other	
-
5. Psychopathic personality	
3                     1
1
1 SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
BB 27
Table 4. — Problems and Disorders presented by the New Cases given full
Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1947, to March 31st,
1948—Continued.
Children.
M.
Adults.
M,
Total.
6. Educational disability—
(a) Associated with Dull Normal or Border-line I.
(b) Special mental disability—
(1) Writing	
(2) Reading	
(3) Arithmetic	
(4) Other	
7. Behaviour disorder associated with Somatic D—
(a)  Habit disorder	
(6)  Personality disorder	
(c) Conduct disorder	
8. Mental deficiencies—■
(a) Famelial	
(b) Mongolism	
(c) With developmental cranial anomalies	
(d) With congenital spastics	
(e) Post-infectional	
(f) Post-traumatic	
(g) With epilepsy	
(h)  With endocrine disorder	
(i)   With other organic nervous disorder	
(j)   Undifferentiated	
(k) Other forms	
9. Mental retardation	
10. No ascertained mental deviation—
(a) Problem of physical health and development..
(b) Spastics	
(c) Speech problems	
(d) Hearing problems	
(e) School problems	
(/)   Social problems	
(1) Placement	
(2) Adoption	
(3) Other	
(4) Unmarried mother	
(5) Married mother	
(g)  Unascertained	
(h)  Normal personality	
11. Vocational guidance	
12. Borstal	
Totals	
12
1
11
337
30
13
1
8
11
3
1
1
2
6
*
1
....
29
20
77
51
1
1
17
56
39
4
190
16
1
11
1
45
1
19
4
2
2
10
1
49
128
2
42
4
1
10
26
59
673 BB 28
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table 5.—Psychologists' Report of Tests Administered in Child
Guidance Clinics, 1947-48.
B
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g
g
fi
r3
Rj
o
m
O
Stanford Binet	
Wechsler Bellevue	
Cattell Infant Intelligence	
Porteus Maze	
Betts Telebinocular	
California Personality	
Minnesota Multiphasic	
Bell Adjustment Inventory	
Bernreuter Personality Inventory
Brown Personality	
Rogers Personality	
P-S Experience Blank	
Mental Health Analysis	
Stodgill Behaviour Cards	
Monroe Reading	
Haggerty Reading	
Lee-Clark Reading Readiness	
Gray's Oral Reading	
Iota Word Test	
Ayers Spelling	
Stanford Arithmetic	
Strong Vocational Interest	
California Occupational Interest..
Kuder Preference Record	
Minnesota Clerical Aptitude	
N.I.I.P. Clerical	
Turse Shorthand	
Test for Ability to Sell	
Aptitude Test for Nursing	
Stanford Scientific Aptitude	
Meier Art Judgment	
Bennett Mechanical Aptitude	
MacQuarrie Mechanical Aptitude.
Minnesota Paper Formboard	
Crawford Tridimensional	
Minnesota Rate of Manipulation..
Purdue Pegboard	
Tweezer Dexterity	
Special Observation	
Vocational Guidance Interviews...
Reading Tuition	
481
115
58
2
109
152
24
1
3
5
1
126
58
13
3
3
5
11
13
43
19
21
8
1
2
1
1
2
19
1
18
2  !    1
643
124
58
2
109
216
28
3
1
6
6
1
189
97
18
7
20
14
53
20
22
8
1
2
1
2
4
22
1
43
7
20
7
20
I have, etc.,
Ultan P. Byrne, M.D., D.P.H.,
Director of Child Guidance Clinics. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT. BB 29
PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORK REPORT.
The Social Service Department of the Hospital in this last year has expanded, taken
on new duties, and tried to improve upon the services previously given. The trained
psychiatric social worker was a person impossible to secure, and in order to meet the
demand of our service, we had to train graduate social workers in the techniques
required to carry on the duties. This experience has shown results—the staff are more
alert, studious, and interested in their service.
With the turnover in the Welfare Field Service personnel through the Province
there has been a heavier load placed on the supervisor in giving orientation in the
psychiatric field. All new field-workers spend some time at the Hospital and at the
Child Guidance Clinic. This has repaid well, for we are receiving results already from
the Social Welfare workers through the Province. As most departments of welfare
have now decentralized, we have been unable to lessen our supervision, as the patients
are still in the institution and direction of the case must come through the psychiatrist
treating the patient.
The educational programme with public health nurses has increased and will pay
dividends. Team play in all our work has been our goal. All members of the team
must carry their weight and, to do so, must have a knowledge of the needs of the people
in the field of psychiatry.
This Department has taken part in and attended as many lectures and refresher
courses as have been available, but feel the need for more in order to use the social
science, which is part and parcel of their profession in helping the patients and their
families. It is most often the families of the hospital patients who need the real help.
The more help given in the area, the more successful will be the rehabilitation of the
patient.
The Vista Rehabilitation Home has been used for true rehabilitation; that is,
patients have enjoyed a period in this home-like atmosphere while they become
accustomed to living again in the community. The larger number of patients have been
post-leuctomy operation cases. Some have returned to their homes and families; others
have obtained work and are self-supporting. All have taken up their new duties with
added assurance. The assurance they have acquired has materially augmented the
hospital treatment. There has been a great deal of overtime and serious thought spent
on these patients, but this has been one of the most gratifying efforts of the year.
As our experience grows, the more scientific approach to the problem expands and
comes into practice; the more we know of the reactions of post-operative patients in
a controlled environment, the more successful will be this new hospital treatment.
Cases other than post-leuctomy have also been cared for in the Vista, and due to that
little extra help in adjusting to the community, they, too, have shown more security
and consequently have been more successfully rehabilitated. BB 30
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Provincial Mental Hospital Statistics, 1947-48.
Number of Neiv Cases referred to Social Service Department.
In Vancouver  475
Out of Vancouver  636
■  1,111
The number of new admissions was increased by 231 during the past fiscal year.
Disposition.
Discharged on probation—
In Vancouver  157
Out of Vancouver  243
  400
This is an increase of 31 cases which were referred for probation services.
There were 157 probation cases carried by the Vancouver workers.    This is an
intensive part of the follow-up programme, and each case is visited at least once a
month,  but   usually  requires  three  or  four  visits   during  the  first  month  and  in
diminishing numbers as the patient adjusts.
Report of Social Service Work carried out by Members of Social Service
Department at Essondale.
This Department was made up of six graduate (junior) staff members who received
intensive supervision on a limited number of cases.
Initial interviews to obtain social histories—
In Vancouver  479
Out of Vancouver     10*
■  489
Other interviews entailing case-work such as consultations with other social
agencies  (public and private), employers, school authorities, and other
resources in Vancouver  1,788
Out-of-town supervisory service by mail—
Letters to the Provincial field staff requesting social histories
and probation visits, and of a general supervisory nature 1,731
Letters to other social agencies in and out of British Columbia     336
  2,067
Incidental services of a supervisory nature  500
Orientation periods for twenty-four public health nurses, five post-graduate nurses,
thirty field service staff, and seven other visitors.
* These are cases referred to our Department for special work by trained psychiatric social workers under the
direct supervision of the psychiatrist. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT. BB 31
SOCIAL WORKERS' REPORT OF THE CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS.
In this last year we were fortunate in securing the services of a psychiatric social
worker of wide experience to act as supervisor of social work within the clinic setting,
accomplished.
Through  this  development,  more  intensive  work  on  the  treatment  level  has  been
The types of services rendered by the Child Guidance Clinics fall into three broad
groups:—
(1) The diagnostic and consultative service which is given to all who ask
it—namely, parents, private physicians, social agencies (voluntary and
public), public health agencies, institutions, public schools, educational
and custodial schools, and Courts.
(2) The continuing treatment service which is given to the private cases
referred to the Child Guidance Clinics. A private case may come to Clinic
referred by parents or physician, etc., within the area of the Cities of
Vancouver and Victoria. When no other agency is active and when the
case comes within the functions of the Clinic, the case is taken by the
Clinic and designated as a private treatment case—that is, the case-work
is done by the social worker attached to the Clinic and under the direct
guidance of the clinical psychiatrist.
(3) The Child Guidance Clinics are carrying out a broad programme of
mental-hygiene education which is basic to all its services. Through this
programme, the Clinics seek to co-operate with other agencies of the
community in advancing knowledge of the most promising methods of
preventing behaviour and personality disorders in children, and of dealing
with them when they occur. In this connection, this year the social
workers have had the added duties of arranging for orientation periods
for public health nurses and social welfare workers who are stationed
throughout the Province. There were fifty-four such observers during
this last year spending from one to ten days at the Clinic. In addition
to the above educational work, the Clinic has had two University of
British Columbia social science students obtaining their field-work
experience.    This is an exacting but a satisfying piece of work.
It is most important that the Clinic services become available to the people outside
of the larger city areas, and for this reason Travelling Clinic facilities have been
enlarged. In order that the areas in which the Clinics are held receive as much benefit
as possible, a social worker was assigned to receive the Clinic and to remain after the
Clinic for a few days to assist the district social worker and the public health nurse
in their work with the cases examined.
The statistical report of the social work within the Child Guidance Clinic setting
only shows part of the picture, as the social worker is one part of the total clinic team
and must, of necessity, lend her assistance to all areas participated in by the team.
For this reason this report should be read in conjunction with the Clinical Director's
report. BB 32 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Psychiatric Social Workers' Statistical Report,
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Case-work services—
Cases carried forward from previous fiscal year     94
Cases referred during year—
New   160
Reopened      21
Transferred in        19
Total number of cases carried      294
Cases closed during the fiscal year    155
Cases transferred out during fiscal year     41
Total number of cases closed during fiscal year      196
Cases carried forward to fiscal year 1948-49        98
Interviews—Patient and family  1,216
Other than case-work services—
Conferences—
Agency   1,061
Private       170
Supervision         434
Orientation         54
Other contacts      185
Histories taken       166
J. F. Kilburn,
Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work. STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 33
STATISTICAL TABLES.
Table No. 1,—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals—Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Total.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1,804
366
287
85
1
4
2
1
1,434
260
90
2
3,238
626
287
175
3
4
2
1
2,550
1,786
On probation, carried forward from 1946-47, New Westmin-
Escaped, carried forward from 1946-47, New Westminster
4,336
Admitted during the year 1947-48—
478
29
58
4
16
480
11
33
1
1
958
40
91
5
17
1
585
526
1,111
Total under treatment,  Essondale,  New Westminster, and
Saanich, April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948	
74
152
129
17
103
144
50
137
135
6
118
80
124
289
264
23
221
224
3,135
642
2,312.
536
5,447
Discharged during period of April 1st, 1947, to March 31st,
1948—
(a)  From Essondale—
As recovered	
Without psychosis	
Died	
619
526
1,145
(b)  From New Westminster—
2
4
7
3
1
6
5
5
13
Died	
13
10
23
(c)   From Saanich—
2
2
1
5
2
2
1
5
Died	
10
10
Total discharged from  Essondale,  New Westminster,  and
1,178   ■
Total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich
2,493
1,776
4,269 BB 34
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals—Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948—Continued.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Total.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Essondale—
Total on books, March 31st, 1947     	
1,891
585
18
1
1,524
526
7
3,415
1,111
25
1
2,495
663
2,057
543
4,552
619
35
9
526
17
1,145
52
9
1,206
367
35
262
17
629
52
1,832
1,514
3,346
New Westminster—
Total on books, March 31st, 1947	
402
31
279
17
681
13
18
10
.   7
23
25
48
292
9
292
9
371
262
633
Saanich—
Total on books, March 31st, 1947	
301
11
301
10
1
10
1
11
1,832
371
290
1,514
262
3,346
633
290
290
290
2,493
1,776
Grand total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Saanich, March 31st, 1948	
4,269
Daily average population  4,193.71
Percentage of discharged on admissions  (not including deaths)        63.64
Percentage of recoveries on admission        11.16
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment  4.40 STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 35
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Hospital since
its Inception.
CO
5
ID
CO
1
TO
Discharges.
CO
J3
HJ
CO
9
O
%
'£  °
QJ  0)
S£rC
oj
CO
CO
QJ
Jh
QJ
C
QJ*
CO
9
%
%
a
Jh
QJ
|
3
CD'S
11
IShj
£°»
bcgc
td-H.2
g2.2
Ipi
QJ   QJ TJ
BMK<i
Percentage of Discharges to Admissions (Deaths
excluded).
QJ
Year.
T3
QJ
Jh
oj
>
O
CJ
QJ
K
T3
OJ
>
^f> TJ
QJ1> (3+5
So. 3 S
HJ-ij   t,   QJ
ShS^HJ
cjhj C co
Jh  CO  £  QJ
OJ  QJ £  Jh
ft.QJZH
1872	
18
15
12
29
22
14
16
18
17
13
7
8
10
20
27
36
26
41
52
49
52
44
80
62
64
74
81
101
113
115
121
139
115
123
150
221
230
232
280
332
375
380
402
332
353
371
375
574
489
478
438
447
461
475
494
1
10
4
3
11
4
7
4
5
5
3
4
2
5
10
15
12
14
17
19
17
14
13
29
23
20
27
31
38
40
30
38
46
43
36*
48
68*
73t
84
67t
74*
90 §
58
83
73t
88
75
116
88
96
91
84t
63
571
761
2
3
3
4
3
1
3
1
1
4
6
5
6
5
6
4
10
18
19
11
2-5
8
13
32
27
20
31
37
26
33
43
43
56
77
82
114
128
146
126
91
96
78
95
221
173
178
167
121
242
240
171
1
5
3
10
5
3
8
8
5
5
2
3
2
5
6
5
3
4
12
20
13
14
19
20
9
14
19
21
29
25
25
26
26
27
28
39
57
40
41
60
76
67
74
89
80
106
132
132
122
114
133
163
138
142
161
16
14
19
32
35
38
36
41
48
48
49
49
51
61
66
77
82
100
117
123
135
133
162
164
171
203
221
234
258
284
311
349
321
348
388
461
507
536
595
690
752
919
1,027
1,090
1,205
1,301
1,347
1,458
1,566
1,649
1,697
1,784
1,884
1,995
2,125
5
13
3
3
5
7
1
2
10
6
11
5
18
17
6
12
29
2
7
32
18
13
24
26
27
38
27
43
73
46
29
48
105
62
167
108
63
115
96
46
111
108
83
48
87
100
111
130
2
2
2
28
	
18
31
26
48
54
49
54
54
58
61
55
57
59
71
88
102
103
123
152
166
175
179
213
224
228
246
285
327
356
377
413
466
480
505
652
666
765
816
896
1,034
1,065
1,264
1,364
1,437
1,527
1,650
1,753
2,025
2,043
2,137
2,180
2,234
2,327
2,434
2,565
5.55
66.66
33.33
10.34
50.00
28.57
43.75
22.22
29.41
38.46
42.85
50.00
20.00
25.00
37.03
41.66
46.15
34.15
32.69
38.77
32.69
31.81
16.25
46.77
35.93
27.03
33.33
30.69
33.63
34.78
24.79
27.34
40.00
33.33
23.03
21.30
28.30
31.00
30.00
19.57
18.90
22.63
14.43
25.00
20.68
23.72
20.00
20.20
14.17
20.08
20.77
18.56
13.66
12.00
15.38
5.55
80.00
33.33
26.89
63.63
78.57
62.50
27.77
29.41
61.54
57.14
62.50
60.00
25.00
59.25
55.55
69.23
46.34
44.23
46.94
51.92
72.72
40.00
64.51
75.00
37.83
49.38
62.37
57.52
52.17
50.41
53.96
62.61
61.78
52.06
41.20
53.90
64.60
59.28
54.42
53.80
62.10
45.77
52.41
47.87
44.74
45.33
58.71
72.60
57.32
59.36
64.20
66.16
62.53
50.00
5.55
1873	
16 12
1874	
11 53
1875	
20.83
1876	
9 35
1877	
6.12
1878	
16.16
1879	
14 81
1880	
8.62
1881	
8.19
1882	
3 63
1883	
5.26
1884	
3 33
1885	
6 94
1886	
6.81
1887	
4 80
1888	
2.87
1889	
3.25
1890	
7.64
1891	
11.69
1892	
6.95
7.60
1893	
1894	
8.92
1895	
8.92
1896	
3.94
1897	
5.69
1898	
6.66
1809	
6.42
1900	
8.14
1901	
6.63
1902	
6.06
1903	
1904	
5.57
5.42
1905	
5.34
1906	
5.04
1907	
5.08
1908.         	
7.44
1909	
6.40
1910	
4.57
1911	
5.83
1912	
7.02
1913      	
5.30
1914	
5.43
1916	
6.19
1916	
5.24
1917          	
6.42
1918         	
7.47
Jan. 1, 1919, to
March 31, 1920	
1920-1921	
6.51
5.97
1921-1922	
1922-1923 	
5.33
6.10
1923 1924 	
7.25
1924 1925	
5.93
1925-1926	
5.83
1926 1927 	
6.27
* Three not insane.
t One not insane.
t Two not insane.
§ Four not insane.
[ Six not insane. BB 36
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Hospital since
its Inception—Continued.
eo
a
o
'3
to
1
TJ
<
Discharges.
3
HJ
CO
QJ
O
d
CO
3.3
CO
V <u
jj Ojr*
Si=j=
Jj     °
.Chj co
A cj cj
OJ
CO
QJ
Jh
CJ
a
QJ
S
QJ
JH
O
QJ
P
QJ
ja
a
3
ojIJ
Is
J^HJ
*H   „
°S     ■
QJ J. M
ug a
ar.2
HJ  Jh  ~
CSS
QJ J> .-H
Cj O C
QJ §JTJ
ft.pH<:
Percentage of Discharges to Admissions (Deaths
excluded).
QJ
Year.
TJ
OJ
Jh
QJ
>
O
CJ
QJ
M
TJ
QJ
Jh
QJ
>
HJ   O
O QJ
■sll
j+i  Ih  QJ
ri  OJ  *  §
§■!■§*
CJ HJ   g   (3
QJ  QJ 3  Jh
ft.a&e-'
1927-1928	
542
543
602
632
562
635
610
653
679
783
834
827
869
864
834
803
840
822
834
880
1,111
75*
92t
118*
70*
581
44§
61*
71*
63*
78$
74
72t
111**
1071
71tt
91»
87
96§§
117ft
97§§
i24un
252
294
311
235
299
323
309
349
304
300
330
345
455
410
400
443
423
377
352
496
560
147
181
223
191
181
195
200
221
291
268
207
208
230
254
255
260
309
300
240
238
240
2,269
2.347
2,411
2,550
2,676
2,824
2,960
3,080
3,180
3,301
3,487
3,612
3,710
3,836
3,902
3,925
3,960
4,019
4,110
4,151
4,269
144
78
64
139
126
148
136
120
100
121
186
125
98
126
66
23
35
59
91
41
118
2,743
2,914
3,063
3,148
3,214
3,390
3,530
3,721
3,838
4,067
4,255
4,471
4,713
4,781
4,843
4,919
4,965
4,960
5,014
5,174
5,447
13.28
16.76
19.10
10.60
10.32
6.92
10.00
10.87
9.27
9.96
8.87
8.71
11.39
12.38
8.51
11.32
10.36
10.46
14.02
11.02
11.34
60.33
71.07
71.26
64.24
63.52
58.42
60.65
64.32
54.05
63.60
67.30
78.72
88.50
79.97
56.46
66.50
61.66
58.39
57.43
68.18
63.64
5.36
1928-1929	
6.21
1929-1930	
7.28
1930-1931	
6.06
1931-1932	
5.63
1932-1933	
5.75
1933-1934	
5.66
1934-1935	
5.94
1935-1936	
7.58
1936-1937	
6.59
1937-1938	
4.86
1938-1939	
4.65
1939-1940	
4.88
1940-1941	
5.31
1941-1942	
6.54
1942-1943	
5.31
1943-1944	
6.02
1944-1945	
6.04
1945-1946	
5.84
1946-1947	
4.59
1947-1948
4.40
* Three not insane. t One not insane. t Two not insane.
** Twelve not insane.       ft Ten not insane.       it Eight not insane.
HH Three not insane ; twenty without psychosis.
§ Four not insane.
§§ Seven not insane.
JI Five not insane.
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Months.
Admissions.
Discharges.
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1947.
April	
51
36
43
42
48
63
39
45
42
70
38
68
37
37
55
47
39
45
47
42
39
45
39
54
88
73
98
89
87
108
86
87
81
115
77
122
27
21
61
17
31
30
30
28
21
49
24
37
18
25
16
43
39
24
33
32
27
27
23
24
45
46
77
60
70
54
63
60
48
76
47
61
12
8
10
13
14
10
10
17
10
17
17
18
5
10
10
5
3
4
9
8
8
10
7
5
17
18
20
18
17
14
19
25
18
1948.
27
24
23
Totals	
585
526
1,111
376
331
707
156
84
240 STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 37
Table No. 4.—Showing the Civil State of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
168
330
13
39
34
1
247
154
15
79
31
415
484
28
118
66
1
Totals	
585
526
1,111
Table No. 5.—Showing Religious Denominations of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Religious
Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
4
2
13
3
2
11
5
1
3
42
4
4
2
365
1
108
1
1
3
2
1
1
4
	
1
1
2
5
1
1
5
3
2
28
4
1
3
5
375
80
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
3
2
13
8
1
3
16
8
1
5
70
8
1
7
7
740
1
188
1
5
4
Sikh	
3
1
1
Unity	
2
5
Totals.. 	
585
526
1,111
Table No. 6.—Showing the Degree of Education of those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Degree of Education
Male.
Female.
Total.
20
98
300
117
48
2
15
138
265
68
38
2
35
236
565
185
86
4
585
526
1,111 BB 38
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 7.—Showing the Nationality of those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
3
16
1
5
66
7
1
2
2
1
1
5
12
3
2
1
1
3
11
7
4
9
32
2
12
2
19
2
5
3
43
134
29
10
10
65
2
20
30
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
90
4
1
2
1
1
14
4
1
1
3
4
1
6
6
33
1
7
1
22
1
1
40
116
29
6
7
42
12
59
1
1
3
4
1
1
17
3
6
156
11
2
4
2
Holland.             	
2
1
6
26
Italy 	
3
1
2
6
15
1
Poland               	
13
4
15
65
3
19
1
2
41
3
6
3
Canada—
83
250
58
16
17
107
2
32
89
Totals	
585
526
1,111 STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 39
Table No. 8.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
3
2
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
3
1
1
3
5
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
12
1
9
2
1
i
i
i
i
3
1
1
1
1
13
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
10
4
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
9
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
23
4
1
3
1
1
6
6
1
1
1
1
2
8
3
2
1
3
2
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
2
5
1
1
3
1
2
1
3
1
22
1
13
1
3
2
103
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
7
3
59
6
10
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
1
4
1
1
1
2
3
6
2
2
3
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
78
4
1
3
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
10
54
7
2
1
1
4
1
3
4
1
2
1
5
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
181
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
1
Bella Bella	
4
4
Matsqui	
3
1
3
1
8
Nelson	
13
Canal Flats
113
13
Oakalla	
10
2
1
1
CobbleHill	
Oliver	
3
2
1
7
2
7
1
8
1
Port Kells	
1
2
2
2
4
11
2
1
2
4
1
1
2
3
4
3
1
2
1
1
1
1
South Westminster	
1
1
1
1
5
1
103
78
181
261
209
470 BB 40
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 8.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
261
2
1
1
267
1
3
37
1
209
1
1
1
3
1
1
241
2
10
43
470
1
1
1
2
4
2
1
508
3
13
80
1
574
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
513
1
1
1
2
6
1
1
1,087
2
Wells   	
1
2
1
Trail	
2
1
2
White Rock	
9
1
1
1
1
Totals	
574
613
1,087
585
526
1,111 STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 41
Table No. £
.—Showing the Occupations of those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
1
3
3
4
2
4
1
1
1
20
9
2
1
2
10
1
1
6
13
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
12
6
1
4
3
4
2
5
1
1
1
1
1
20
1
1
15
2
1
2
10
1
1
12
1
1
6
13
1
36
1
10
2
1
3
3
1
4
1
2
277
2
1
1
16
1
1
3
117
1
1
1
37
310
5
2
1
1
2
6
11
4
1
1
84
8
1
1
6
1
2
2
2
74
2
9
4
8
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
9
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
4
1
1
331
1
2
1
3
89
1
3
1
47
5
4
2
2
	
1
17
7
2
1
6
641
5
2
1
2
2
6
13
4
2
4
173
1
3
1
8
1
1
6
1
2
2
2
121
7
9
8
8
2
2
3
1
1
1
2
17
1
1
1
16
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
5
1
4
6
1
1
Bar-tender	
Merchant seaman	
Minister	
Clerk	
Cook	
       1           1
33
1
9
2
1
3
1
4
3
1
Florist...
1
1 | 1
| 277
[           2
1
1
1         16
1       [
1
3
Trapper	
117
1
37
1
1
Laundryman	
Carried forward	
310
331
641
585
526
1,111 BB 42
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 10.—Showing the Ages of those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
41
32
47
47
48
53
38
52
32
31
51
43
19
26
25
28
25
28
54
58
60
33
34
32
24
38
36
25
15
36
69
20    „    .                	
57
25     „                      	
75
30    „    	
101
„       35     	
106
40     „    .                	
113
45     „                      	
71
„       50     „    	
86
55     „                                                               	
64
60     „                      	
55
65     „                      	
89
70    „    	
79
75     „                 	
44
„       80     „                      	
41
Over     80    „    ...            	
61
Totals                  	
585
526
1,111
Table No. 11.—Showing the Number of Attacks in those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Number of Attacks.
Male.
Female.
Total.
First	
301
86
25
11
6
5
1
2
31
26
91
306
87
32
18
5
3
1
32
8
34
607
173
Third                           	
57
Fourth	
29
Fifth	
11
Sixth	
8
1
Eighth	
1
Twelfth	
2
63
Without psychosis.                                                      	
34
125
Totals	
585
526
1,111
Table No. 12.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Attack prior to Admission from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Duration of Attack.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Un
68
142
42
25
21
26
44
2
1
1
25
134
54
37
144
34
54
23
42
44
11
10
2
6
78
41
6      „      	
76
,     12      „      	
44
5    „     :	
,     10    	
,     15    	
13
Ov
No
Wi
Un
T,if
er   15    „    	
t insane	
3
212
Totals	
585
526
1,111 STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 43
Table No. 13.—Showing Statistics of Heredity in those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Heredity.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2
11
1
570
1
8
616
2
2
1,086
3
Totals	
585
526
1,111
Table No. 14.—Showing the Alleged Cause of Attack in those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Alleged Cause.
Male.
Female.
Total.
36
32
1
1
1
5
20
345
11
11
1
2
1
3
1
1
21
1
1
4
1
1
1
76
2
1
2
2
4
26
1
1
2
11
368
1
2
9
1
8
2
2
5
1
2
3
2
84
1
1
1
7
31
703
I
2
20
1
19
1
2
3
3
3
1
26
2
3
7
1
2
1
1
160
2
2
2
2
585
526
1,111 BB 44
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 15.—Showing the State of Bodily Health in those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Bodily Condition.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2,91
249
45
222
223
81
513
472
126
Totals     	
585
526
1,111
Table No. 16.—Showing the Form of Mental Disorder in those admitted from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Form of Disorder.
Male.
Female.
Total.
32
1
9
21
47
11
1
38
10
11
2
16
4
13
12
1
219
77
30
1
2
3
3
1
20
26
6
7
3
31
14
41
18
10
1
2
23
8
7
1
10
1
217
84
3
2
1
1
2
4
3
58
7
16
24
78
25
1
79
28
21
3
2
39
12
20
1
22
2
436
161
33
2
1
Traumatic psychosis	
3
Without psychosis—
3
4
3
4
23
Totals	
585
526
1,111
Table No. 17.—Showing the Number allowed out on Probation and Results from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Results.
Male.
Female.
Total.
74
154
131
17
33
110
50
137
138
6
46
119
124
269
79
229
Totals	
519
496
1,015 STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 45
Table No. 18.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Insanity prior to Admission
in those discharged from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Alleged Duration.
Male.
Female.
Total.
36
59
32
14
20
22
17
16
44
17
99
25
54
30
8
23
28
16
8
59
6
74
61
113
62
„    3      „      	
22
„    6      „      	
43
„ 12      „      	
50
33
„    3     „    	
24
103
23
173
Totals	
376
331
707
Table No. 19.—Showing the Length of Residence of those discharged from
April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948.
Length of Residence.
Discharged
recovered.
Discharged
improved.
Discharged
unimproved.
Without
Psychosis.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
16
15
7
17
13
1
3
2
6
14
18
8
3
1
9
17
21
30
35
20
10
6
6
9
16
18
29
26
16
11
5
1
6
55
2
2
3
7
7
7
3
5
40
54
7
6
2
3
13
5
3
5
40
8
5
1
2
1
2
1
„     3      „              	
„     6      	
2
„   12      „             	
„     3     	
„     4    	
„     5    „    	
1
Totals	
74
50
154
137
131
138
17
6 BB 46
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich.
Sex.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
F.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
Age.
54
79
79
45
76
50
83
69
79
72
49
51
60
56
65
82
57
71
67
65
63
52
69
49
23
77
59
70
54
73
61
69
79
67
67
81
59
65
72
63
59
69
43
58
60
88
57
81
46
67
64
77
38
61
68
59
69
67
19
58
Time in Hospital.
Years.
21
6
28
1
10
3
4
4
19
1
26
16
8
6
22
2
4
14
1
12
1
10
12
2
6
13
1
11
6
7
35
Months.    Days.
4
4
6
7
11
10
1
4
10
11
11
5
3
2
3
10
9
11
11
11
6
2
21
27
29
19
29
29
4
8
5
4
20
1
19
4
27
8
28
8
15
8
20
1
6
10
7
1
11
9
23
5
28
10
2
3
1
4
5
1
22
8
17
1
22
2
5
3
28
5
26
2
2
11
1
12
2
13
7
15
16
16
11
15
13
26
18
11
20
4
30
9
15
23
17
18
23
17
15
25
Certified Cause.
Bronchopneumonia.
Carcinoma of the pancreas.
Chronic myocarditis.
Tuberculous pneumonia.
Coronary sclerosis with occlusion.
General paresis.
Senile dementia.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Shock and haemorrhage; fibrosis uteri.
Bronchopneumonia ; cerebral apoplexy.
Asphyxia due to strangulation.
General paresis.
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
Bronchial pneumonia.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Chronic myocarditis.
Cardiac decompensation ; chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Coronary thrombosis.
Chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchial pneumonia.
Coronary thrombosis.
Intestinal obstruction due to volvulus.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Coronary occlusion ; lobar pneumonia, right.
Lovar pneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia ; cardiac decompensation.
Senility with dementia.
Uremia.
Exhaustion of senile dementia ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
Coronary occlusion ; myocardial infarction.
Bronchopneumonia.
Carcinoma of stomach.
Cerebral haemorrhage;  hypertensive and arteriosclerotic cardiovascular
disease.
General paresis.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Uraemia; malignant nephrosclerosis.
Acute intestinal obstruction due to volvulus.
Carcinoma of the rectum.
Sarcoma of the colon.
General paresis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Sarcoma   of   the   duodenum;    multiple   neurofibramatosis;    bronchopneumonia.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Cerebral thrombosis.
Cerebral oedema due to concussion due to accidental blow on head.
Diabetes mellitus.
Tuberculous enteritis (acute) with haemorrhage;   bilateral pulmonary
tuberculosis ; general paresis.
Coronary thrombosis.
Intestinal obstruction due to Hirschsprung's disease.
Lobar pneumonia.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Acute pulmonary oedema due to myocarditis (toxic).
Incarcerated left inguinal hernia. STATISTICAL TABLES.
BB 47
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Sex.
Age.
Time in Hospital.
Years.    Months.     Days
Certified Cause.
F.
69
F.
69
M.
68
M.
49
M.
26
M.
35
M.
76
M.
64
M.
66
M.
31
M.
70
M.
51
M.
34
F.
68
M.
62
M.
32
F.
23
M.
64
M.
67
M.
70
M.
44
M.
74
M.
69
M.
76
M.
52
M.
65
M.
76
M.
61
M.
51
F.
65
M.
78
F.
45
M.
66
M.
48
M.
77
F.
64
M.
41
M.
77
F.
79
M.
24
M.
59
F.
55
M.
67
M.
60
F.
55
F.
45
F.
60
F.
69
M.
75
M.
84
F.
57
M.
54
M.
55
F.
70
F.
74
M.
69
F.
38
M.
63
M.
81
F.
65
11
1
25
1
18
3
3
15
10
7
10
2
3
11
20
15
10
16
1
24
3
10
20
10
1
21
10
5
7
3
6
11
3
17
6
8
2
11
2
12
7
5
6
5
3
21
5
6
21
3
7
7
11
2
5
28
2
24
2
8
2
26
9
5
9
23
2
27
6
3
2
28
1
3
7
24
19
3
20
2
18
6
12
3
11
3
16
15
8
28
1
13
26
13
1
26
9
12
6
17
2
1  18
5
13
Chronic myocarditis ; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Uremia due to pyonephrosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Bronchopneumonia.
Epilepsy (status epilepticus and pulmonary tuberculosis).
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Coronary sclerosis.
Carcinoma, head of the pancreas.
Coronary thrombosis ; bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral oedema due to epilepsy.
Acute bronchitis.
Skull fracture with cerebral haemorrhage.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Pulmonary oedema ; coronary sclerosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Mesenteric thrombosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Exhaustion of senility.
Senility with dementia.
Bronchial pneumonia.
Cerebral spinal syphilis.
Cerebral arteriosclerosis.
Senility with dementia.
Uremia due to chronic nephritis.
Chronic myocarditis.
Cerebral haemorrhage due to hypertension.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Exhaustion due to general paresis ; chronic pyelonephritis.
Senility with dementia.
Acute pulmonary oedema.
Pleurisy with effusion ; bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral haemorrhage ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
Terminal bronchial pneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral arteriosclerosis with hypertension.
Exhaustion of schizophrenia associated with bronchopneumonia.
Chronic myocarditis.
Chronic myocarditis due to fatty degeneration of the heart.
Coronary thrombosis ; arteriosclerosis; death precipitated by intravenous anaesthesia ; far advanced pulmonary tuberculosis ; senile
dementia.
Coronary sclerosis and myocarditis.
Chronic pyelonephritis ; cirrhosis of liver.
Pulmonary embolism ; acute cholesystitis and acute pyelonephritis.
Acute pneumonic phthisis.
Lobar pneumonia.
Acute pulmonary tuberculosis.
Terminal bronchopneumonia (haemorrhage from cesophagal varices).
Bronchopneumonia.
Cerebe'lae degeneration ; bronchial pneumonia.
General paresis.
Uremia ; chronic glomeruli nephritis.
Bronchopneumonia ; lung abscess ; bronchiectasis.
Carcinoma of rectum; generalized metastasis of carcinoma, liver and
abdominal viscera.
Bronchopneumonia.
Right lobar pneumonia.
General paresis ; bronchial pneumonia.
Coronary thrombosis. BB 48
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Sex.
Age.
Time in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
Years.
Months.
Days.
M.
28
3
4
Extensive gunshot wound of head, involving destruction of most of
the brain tissue and extensive hsemorrhage.
M.
68
4
19
Pulmonary cedema due to chronic myocarditis.
M.
52
4
5
11
General paresis.
F.
66
2
8
29
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
64
5
16
Bilateral bronchial pneumonia.
F.
47
7
11
9
Acute pyonephritis.
M.
68
14
5
9
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
57
1
30
Terminal bronchial pneumonia.
F.
55
1
1
20
Cerebral hsemorrhage ; coronary thrombosis.
F.
18
7
22
Purpura, thrombocytopenic due to bronchopneumonia.
M.
53
8
9
7
Bronchial pneumonia ; duodenal ulcer.
F.
57
6
Pulmonary embolism ; pyonephrosis.
F.
67
4
3
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
48
2
19
General paresis ; bronchial pneumonia.
M.
59
18
3
10
Lobar pneumonia.
M.
36
4
11
9
Pneumonia; lung abscess with empyema.
M.
56
6
3
24
Perforated duodenal ulcer ; general paresis.
M.
50
1
Pulmonary infarct of both lungs due to pulmonary embolism;
pyelonephritis of both kidneys with nephrolithiasis.
M.
68
3
Coronary sclerosis ; coronary thrombosis.
F.
55
3
3
28
Extradural haemorrhage due to fall during epileptic seizure.
M.
3
2
23
Spastic cerebral paralysis ; pyelonephritis.
M.
48
12
29
Abscessed abnominal wall due to ruptured bladder; chronic bilateral
pyelonephritis due to paraplegia.
F.
60
17
15
Myocardial infarction due to coronary sclerosis.
M.
67
11
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
67
2
13
Coronary occlusion ; myocardial infarction.
F.
71
22
8
31
Bronchopneumonia ; carcinoma of the stomach.
F.
61
10
Uremia ; chronic nephritis ; hypertension with cerebral hsemorrhage;
generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
71
1
4
10
Senility with dementia.
M.
83
....
6
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
69
6
17
Pulmonary tuberculosis ; carcinoma of the caecum.
F.
71
38
4
11
Cerebral hsemorrhage.
M.
59
2
3
30
Multiple abscess due to chronic osteomyelitis; chronic myocarditis ;
chronic interstitial nephritis.
F.
50
7
6
29
Bronchopneumonia due to Huntington's chorea.
M.
74
1
29
Senility with dementia.
F.
70
2
27
Pneumonia ; carcinoma of rectum with abdominal metastasis.
F.
91
3
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
59
11
11
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
37
12
3
23
Bilateral pyelonephritis ; status epilepticus.
M.
76
11
7
4
Cerebral haemorrhage.
F.
61
9
11
6
Cerebral haemorrhage ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
F.
63
9
7
5
Coronary thrombosis.
M.
55
2
4
23
Generalized peritonitis due to perforated duodenal ulcer.
M.
83
2
4
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
70
32
10
16
Chronic myocarditis with decompensation.
M.
62
32
11
9
Pulmonary tuberculosis ; tubercular pneumonia.
M.
69
1
23
Lobar pneumonia.
F.
5
5
9
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
64
1
4
10
General paresis.
F.
45
11
Diphtheritic myocarditis ; diphtheria.
F.
65
12
29
Uremia due to pyonephrosis ; nephrolithiasis.
F.
16
....
9
28
Active and advanced bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
24
3
2
17
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
65
....
8
Bilateral pyelonephritis due to prostatic hypertrophy.
M.
62
....
1
11
Bronchial pneumonia.
M.
72
37
4
4
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
83
34
7
11
Chronic myocarditis ; bronchopneumonia.
M.
76
2
3
4
Cerebral thrombosis due to arteriosclerosis.
M.
69
....
9
Bronchopneumonia. STATISTICAL TABLES.                                                  BB 49
Table No.
20.—Record
df Deaths from April 1st, 1947, to March 31st, 1948,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Time in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
Sex.
Age.
Years.    Months.
Days.
F.
68
3
Cerebral haemorrhage.
F.
46
1
26
Chronic nephritis with cachexia ; active pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
69
1
5
10
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
66
15
11
24
Bilateral bronchial pneumonia.
M.
30
11
9
22
Pulmonary tuberculosis ; bronchopneumonia.
M.
27
6
Bronchopneumonia  associated   with  cerebral  congestion   and  cedema
due to hanging (suicide).
M.
61
9
22
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
32
13
Bilateral pylonephritis.
F.
62
5
20
Cerebral haemorrhage ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
79
3
11
2
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
88
28
2
24
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
M.
62
11
Pulmonary embolism.
M.
78
3
3
17
Bronchopneumonia due to cerebral hsemorrhage.
M.
72
12
10
14
Chronic myocarditis ; bronchopneumonia.
F.
46
20
Bronchopneumonia ; disseminated sclerosis.
M.
31
6
15
Intracerebral haemorrhage due to pre-frontal lobotomy (post-operative
portal cirrhosis with splenomegaly).
M.
56
2
11
Bronchial pneumonia.
F.
67
2
10
30
Coronary thrombosis.
M.
68
3
28
Bronchopneumonia ; cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
78
10
11
4
Lobar pneumonia.
M.
40
4
15
Bronchopneumonia;     chronic    pyelonephritis    due    to    disseminated
sclerosis.
M.
82
11
2
25
Bronchopneumonia ;   chronic myocarditis with cardiac decompensation.
M.
66
9
29
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
80
8
Bronchopneumonia ;   chronic glomeralonephritis ;   generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
44
6
2
1
Senility with dementia.
M.
70
3
6
16
Cardiac decompensation due to chronic myocarditis.
M.
58
15
7
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
68
15
10
Lobar pneumonia.
M.
71
3
3
14
Chronic myocarditis ; coronary sclerosis.
F.
43
1
23
Myocardial infarction ; coronary sclerosis.
F.
41
1
3
7
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
73
37
11
2
Coronary occlusion ; bronchopneumonia.
F.
26
2
7
17
Bronchial pneumonia.
F.
42
13
Bronchial pneumonia.
M.
30
3
10
30
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
.
M.
60
2
Toxic  myocarditis  due to bronchopneumonia and perforated appendiceal abscess (walled off).
M.
74
26
2
6
Bilateral lobar pneumonia.
M.
55
6
6
18
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis ; chronic myocarditis.
M.
83
7
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
65
17
2
20
Chronic myocarditis due to coronary sclerosis.
M.
66
2
9
2
Chronic myocarditis due to coronary sclerosis.
M.
18
11
19
Pleurisy with effusion ; leukaemia.
M.
59
2
Bilateral bronchopneumonia.
M.
68
6
8
Bronchopneumonia ; chronic myocarditis due to coronary sclerosis.
M.
83
41
10
14
Ruptured aortic aneurism ; arteriosclerosis.
F.
68
18
4
21
Chronic myocarditis ; coronary sclerosis ; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
F.
8
6
1
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
27
6
3
1
Myocardial insufficiency due to degenerative myocarditis.
F.
3
1
4
28
Exhaustion of idiocy.
M.
58
8
9
28
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
36
12
6
10
Polycystic kidneys.
M.
2
2
Septicaemia.
M.
10 mos.
4
12
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
5
6
10
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
7
1
7
27
Acute bronchitis.
M.
2
9
12
Acute bronchitis.
M.
7
4
5
5
Hydrocephalus.
F.
62
30
1
19
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
19
5
3
20
Status epilepticus.
4 BB 50 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
PART II.—FINANCIAL.
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT.
A. L. Crease Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith for your consideration the financial report of the
Provincial Mental Hospitals of British Columbia for the year ended March 31st, 1948,
which include various tables and reports.
The daily average population of the three hospitals for the year under review was
4,194, as against 4,130 in 1946-47, an increase of 64 for the year.
The gross operating costs (see Table C), including the cost-of-living bonus paid to
employees, amounted to $3,583,480.50, as against $2,847,403.64 in the previous year.
This is an increase of nearly 26 per cent, in our gross costs, and was due to increased
prices, salary adjustments, and adjustment in hours of work. The gross daily per
capita cost per patient rose from $1.89 in 1946-47 to $2.33.
Maintenance and sundry receipts amounted to $350,995.41, an increase of $11,597.47
over the previous year.
Child Guidance and outside clinic expenditures increased from $31,293.23 to
$50,144.29, while the Public Works Department's expenditure on our buildings' and
grounds' maintenance amounted to $239,416.63, as against $185,362.91 in 1946-47.
Both of these amounts are included in our statements and form part of our gross
operating costs.
Purchases from Colony Farm of milk, cream, vegetables, fruit, meat, etc., for the
Essondale and New Westminster hospitals amounted to $256,563.26, and form a part
of our dietary costs.
Expenditures on new equipment during; the year at Essondale included laundry,
$6,000; X-ray Department, $2,500; and Occupational Therapy Department, $3,400;
while at New Westminster $1,600 was spent on motion-picture equipment.
Financial tables in the report which heretofore have not included the cost-of-living
bonus paid to employees have been adjusted to include this figure as from 1942-43,
when such payments were first begun.
Patients' Sundry and Comfort Account funds held in trust amounted to $53,736.12
for the Essondale and New Westminster institutions, and $1,137.74 for Saanich.
On June 1st, 1947, the eight-hour day, forty-four-hour week was put into effect
in all departments except the female nursing staff at Essondale. Owing to the shortage
of nurses and accommodation for nurses at Essondale, it was not possible to start the
forty-four-hour week in this department. However, as soon as new nurses' homes are
available and the necessary staff can be recruited, the nurses will also be put on the
eight-hour day, forty-four-hour week schedule. The forty-four-hour week added considerably to our salary expenditure and is reflected in our per capita cost for the year.
During the year Colony Farm suffered a number of serious fires that have greatly
handicapped this department. Details of these fires are included in my report on the
Colony Farm. On February 3rd, 1948, a member of the Colony Farm staff was arrested
and charged with setting these fires and also the fire on December 10th, 1946, in which
the Colony Farm Arena Building was destroyed and a member of the staff lost his life.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager. ";
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Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.  PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT EXPENSE STATEMENT. BB 51
PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1948.
Salaries  .  $35,991.54
Office supplies  679.58
Telephone and telegraph  630.45
Travelling expenses  4,767.70
Fuel  306.40
Water    19.15
Light and power  113.47
Incidental expenses   4,486.16
Cost-of-living bonus   3,149.84
Total   $50,144.29
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population: Essondale, 78 per cent.; New Westminster,
15 per cent.;   and Saanich, 7 per cent.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1948.
Salaries  _-  $36,082.39
Office supplies  2,456.02
Travelling expenses  409.57
Incidental expenses  :  16.25
Cost-of-living bonus   3,978.13
Total   $42,942.36
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population: Essondale, 78 per cent.; New Westminster,
15 per cent.;   and Saanich_7 per cent. BB 52
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year,
the Total Amounts spent for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost.
(For Past Ten Years.)
Year.
Average
Number in
Residence.
Maintenance
Expenditure.
Per Capita
Cost.
1938-39, New Westminster..
1938-39, Essondale	
1938-39, Saanich	
1939-40, New Westminster..
1939-40, Essondale	
1939-40, Saanich	
1940-41, New Westminster..
1940-41, Essondale	
1940-41, Saanich	
1941-42, New Westminster..
1941-42, Essondale	
1941-42, Saanich	
1942-43, New Westminster*
1942-43, Essondale	
1942-43, Saanich	
1943-44, New Westminster..
1943-44, Essondale	
1943-44, Saanich	
1944-45, New Westminster..
1944-45, Essondale	
1944-45, Saanich	
1945-46, New Westminster..
1945-46, Essondale	
1945-46, Saanich	
1946-47, New Westminster...
1946-47, Essondale	
1946-47, Saanich	
1947-48, New Westminster...
1947-48, Essondale	
1947-48, Saanich	
596.25
2,710.32
261.62
603.03
2,796.69
271.35
611.17
2,884.96
279.95
607.40
2,976.62
286.40
605.17
3,042.06
284.06
601.15
3,047.75
279.61
606.25
3,072.84
277.87
610.36
3,163.61
283.67
626.29
3,217.03
286.48
628.00
3,275.41
290.31
$251,759.54
990,851.72
107,104.86
263,036.99
1,044,253.55
115,171.63
269,354.39
1,114,944.32
114,496.86
265,107.15
1,080,329.80
134,961.02
286,077.54
1,157,787.55
146,898.22
306,150.79
1,317,789.96
163,226.64
373,672.82
1,558,923.64
207,979.27
433,041.89
1,769,363.15
210,798.32
497,945.37
2,117,563.62
231,894.65
662,357.80
2,622,349.15
298,773.55
$422.24
365.58
409.39
436.19
373.38
424.43
440.71
386.46
408.99
436.46
362.93
471.23
472.72
380.59
517.14
509.28
432.38
583.77
616.37
507.32
748.48
709.49
559.29
743.11
795.07
658.24
809.46
1,054.70
800.62
1,029.15
* Maintenance expenditure includes cost-of-living bonus paid employees.    This is also included in all subsequent
years' reports. FINANCIAL TABLES.
BB 53
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Table C.—Summary Statement showing the Gross and Net per Capita Cost
of Patients in the Three Institutions.
Gross operating costs—
New Westminster     $662,357.80
Essondale   2,622,349.15
Saanich       298,773.55
Gross cost for the three institutions  $3,583,480.50
Less collections remitted to Treasury        350,995.41
Net cost for the three institutions  $3,232,485.09
Daily average population for the three institutions  4,193.72
Gross per capita cost, one year  $854.49
Gross per capita cost, one day  $2.33
Net per capita cost, one year  $770.79
Net per capita cost, one day  $2.11 BB 56
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a £     u; REVENUE OF MENTAL HOSPITALS.
BB 59
Remarks.
New
Westminster.
Essondale.
Saanich.
633
628
$1,054.70
$2,882
3,346
3,275.41
$800.62
$2,187
290
290.31
$1,029.15
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day	
$2,811
REVENUE OF MENTAL HOSPITALS FOR PAST TEN YEARS.
1938-39  $209,216.39
1939-40  245,837.55
1940-41  229,045.45
1941-42  238,532.90
1942-43  261,986.32
1943-44  $322,522.87
1944-45  317,735.15
1945-46  350,163.87
1946-47  339,561.71
1947-48  350,995.41 BB 60 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
PART III.—COLONY FARM.
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT ON COLONY FARM.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith please find profit and loss and various other financial statements
and reports covering operations of Colony Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1948.
It will be noted that the year's operations resulted in a profit of $59,842.54. The
statement, however, does not take into consideration loss from a number of fires which
occurred during the year and are referred to later on in this report.
Feed prices were higher and there was a falling-off in milk production owing to
fire loss of cattle-barns which resulted in lack of proper stabling during a period of
wet, cold weather. Despite this fact, the Dairy and Herds Department showed a profit
of $23,449.03. Other departments showing substantial profits were: Hogs, Cannery,
Orchard and Truck-garden, and Field Crops. Particulars are given in the profit and
loss account and statements attached.
Most of the Farm's produce was received by the Essondale and New Westminster
Hospitals, whose accounts totalled $229,768.16 and $26,795.10 respectively. Lesser
amounts were received by the Boys' Industrial School, Home for the Aged, Colquitz
Mental Home, Tranquille Sanatorium, and the Marpole Infirmary.
A series of regrettable fires of incendiary origin took place on the farm during
the year. On July 20th, 1947, two cow-barns, temporary horse-barn, blacksmith and
carpenter shops, implement-shed, oil-storage shed, hay-barn, and six silos were
destroyed, together with some farm machinery and tools and a considerable quantity
of feed.
A further fire on October 19th, 1947, did about $2,000 damage to the upper structure of the calf-barn, while still another fire on December 9th, 1947, resulted in bhe
loss of eight horses from smoke and suffocation, but with only minor damage to the
building. These fires, together with the loss of the Arena Building by fire on December 10th, 1946, has seriously handicapped the operation of the Farm, and until new
facilities are built, Colony Farm can be operated only under the greatest of difficulties.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager. COLONY FARM.
BB 61
Profit and Loss Account
Year ended March 31st, 1948.
Department.
Debits.
Credits.
Loss.
Gain.
$120,976.81
395.00
10,579.48
59,361.18
38,976.08
22,178.14
13,816.84
4,014.79
49,404.53
23,378.78
12,239.17
$144,425.84
320.00
10,763.00
80,017.52
46,921.64
50,567.82
14,316.75
4,556.00
1,526.03
61,748.74
$23,449.03
$75.00
183.52
20,656.34
7,945.56
28,389.68
499.91
541.21
47,878.50
38,369.96
12,239.17
Totals	
$355,320.80
$415,163.34     |       $60,192.67
1
$120,035.21
60,192.67
1                 	
$59,842.54
Note.—Fire loss of July 20th and December 9th, 1947, which has not been charged in the above statement, was
as follows:—
Feed for stock   $11,940.00
Work-horses          1,310.00
Total     $13,250.00
DAIRY AND HERDS DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
Receipts.
By sales—
Live animals ,  $32,426.10
Beef supplied to institutions  2,512.72
Dairy produce   106,187.02
By credit for manure  3,300.00
  92,004.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1948 .
Salaries and upkeep
Feed 	
$236,429.84
Expenses.
Horse-labour	
Trucking 	
Tractor-hauling 	
Inventory, March 31st, 1947
$46,650.98
67,102.10
678.00
1,004.00
1,228.50
96,317.23
212,980.81
Profit for year
$23,449.03 BB 62
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
WORK-HORSE DEPARTMENT.
Sales and Deaths Account, March 31st, 1948.
5 horses sold as discards-
1 horse died	
Gain on inventory	
Loss for year.-
Asset
Value.
$345.00
50.00
Selling
Price.
$200.00
120.00
$395.00
$320.00
395 00
$75.00
Work-horse Labour Account, March 31st, 1948.
Salaries and upkeep     $8,489.22
Feed and pasturage       2,090.26
Less credit for manure
Horse-labour charged to crop and other departments
Profit for year	
$10,579.48
100.00
$10,479.48
10,663.00
$183.52
Note.—Against cost of $10,479.48, 17,222 hours of horse-labour were performed
at a cost of 61 cents per horse-hour, including teamsters' wages. COLONY FARM. BB 63
HOG DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
Receipts.
By sales—
Live hogs      $4,747.11
Pork supplied Essondale Hospital    45,382.00
Pork supplied New Westminster Hospital      4,078.64
Pork supplied Tranquille Sanatorium       1,672.27
  $55,880.02
By credit for manure .  600.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1948     23,537.50
$80,017.52
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep  $6,713.42
Feed   _'_  29,319.56
Water   200.00
Light and power  720.00
Fuel   60.00
Horse-labour   1,148.00
Truck   1,468.00
Tractor   980.00
$40,608.98
Inventory, March 31st, 1947     18,752.20
     59,361.18
Profit   $20,656.34 BB 64 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
CANNERY.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
Production.
Supplies to Mental Hospital, Essondale  $34,643.39
Supplies to Mental Hospital, New Westminster       8,201.20
Supplies to Mental Home, Colquitz       2,659.40
Supplies to Tranquille Sanatorium       1,325.40
Supplies to Canadian National Institute for the Blind  92.25
  $46,921.64
Expenses.
Salaries   $4,348.76
Repairs   ....  1,554.28
Fruit and vegetables  20,526.79
Sugar, spice, etc  3,593.97
Cans, crates, and containers  5,889.28
Fuel  .  1,000.00
Water   500.00
Light and power.  720.00
Trucking   738.00
Tractor-hauling   105.00
     38,976.08
Profit      $7,945.56
ORCHARD AND TRUCK-GARDEN.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
Receipts.
Produce sold to Mental Hospital, Essondale  $28,653.68
Produce sold to Mental Hospital, New Westminster       1,313.20
Produce sold to Boys' Industrial School  301.04
Produce sold to Tranquille Sanatorium  24.00
Produce supplied to cannery .       2,552.30
$32,844.22
Inventory, March 31st, 1948     17,723.60
Expenses.
Salaries, seeds, etc  $5,019.54
Fertilizer, spray, etc  1,237.00
Tractor-work    3,020.50
Trucking   82.00
Fuel   40.00
$50,567.82
$9,399.04
Inventory, March 31st, 1947     12,779.10
22,178.14
Profit   $28,389.68 COLONY FARM.
BB 65
FIELD CROPS AND PASTURAGE.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
Crop.
Potatoes    	
Acreage.
69.00
Yield
(Tons).
713.86
13.00
16.00
390.00
837.00
16.66
176.00
26.98
Yield
per Acre.
10.34
0.81
1.00
3.86
8.95
5.55
25.14
8.99
Value.
$42,416.67
299.20
288.00
8,580.00
3,766.50
1,839.04
1,056.00
1,373.33
2,130.00
Oats	
Straw 	
16.00
......    16.00
Hay	
101.00
-    93.50
Ensilage              	
Onions	
......      3.00
Mangels 	
Turnips          	
7.00
3.00
Pasturage and green feed 	
213.00
Co
sts.
$61,748.74
Horse-labour  	
-   $4,251.00
Tractor-work 	
...    7,145.00
Trucking 	
382.00
Manure 	
...    3,300.00
Fertilizer and spray	
...    1,921.93
Seeds and sets.     	
...    5,164.35
- ,.
Supervision 	
...    1,202.50
Sundry expenses 	
12.00
23,378.78
Profit	
$38,369.96
TRACTORS.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
8,181 hours' work at $1.75	
Expenses.
$14,316.75
Salaries and upkeep
Gasoline and oil	
$12,643.69
1,173.15
13,816.84
Profit
$499.91 BB 66 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
TRUCKS.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
2,278 hours' work at $2     $4,556.00
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep  $3,429.29
Gasoline and oil       585.50
       4,014.79
Profit  -        $541.21
GENERAL EXPENSES OF MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1948.
Salaries and miscellaneous expenses  $35,935.02
Horse-labour   341.00
Trucking   882.00
Tractor-work   754.25
Gasoline, oil, etc.   92.46
Sundry   .... 346.00
  $38,350.73
Proportion, Headquarters expense     $2,100.00
General repairs through Public Works Department       8,953.80
 11,053.80
$49,404.53
Less sundry credits       1,526.03
$47,878.50 COLONY FARM. BB 67
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Produce supplied by Colony Farm
for Year ended March 31st, 1948.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 1,452,187 lb  $63,896.23
Cream, 923 quarts  784.60
Table cream, 7,924.7 gallons  15,883.75
     $80,564.58
Meats-
Veal, 381 lb  $76.20
Beef, 13,305 lb       2,382.44
Hearts, livers, tongues, 311% lb  54.08
Fresh pork, 187,059 lb     44,853.58
Pork plucks, 3,753 lb  528.42
       47,894.72
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh   $62,561.47
Canned       34,643.39
       97,204.86
Sundries—Horse-labour         4,104.00
$229,768.16
Mental Hospital, New Westminster—Produce supplied by Colony Farm
for Year ended March 31st, 1948.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 73,680 lb     $3,241.92
Cream, 285.5 quarts  242.72
Table cream, 1,089 gallons      2,178.00
Meats—
Fresh pork, 16,889 lb.._,_     $4,031.61
Pork plucks, 325% lb  47.03
$5,662.64
         4,078.64
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh      $8,852.62
Canned       8,201.20
       17,053.82
$26,795.10
Accounts Receivable, March 31 st, 1948.
Sundry amounts due from live stock, etc., sold     $70,764.07
Remittances to Treasury.
Sundry remittances to Treasury during year 1947-48, in payment of live
stock and produce  $329,047.18 BB 68
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1947-48.
MISCELLANEOUS  STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.—Continued.
Summary of Equipment Inventories, March 31st, 1948.
Equipment in dairy	
Equipment in cannery	
Horse and cattle barns and piggery-
Farm implements	
Pumping-stations and land-clearing-
Butcher-shop 	
Carpenter-shop 	
Blacksmith-shop 	
$4,485.50
4,412.70
3,471.00
18,588.80
2,188.00
99.00
1,033.00
586.50
$34,864.50
Orchard and Truck-gardens.
Apple-trees	
Pear-trees 	
Cherry-trees 	
Prune-trees 	
Plum-trees	
Strawberry-plants -
Raspberry-canes 	
Rhubarb-clumps _..
Garden tools 	
Vegetables on hand
Apiary 	
$730.00
1,523.00
444.00
1,950.00
1,925.00
300.00
2,000.00
3,300.00
1,599.00
3,800.00
152.60
$17,723.60
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiaksiid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1949.
490-249-7452

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