Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Fifth Annual Report of the Purchasing Commission January 1st, 1947, to December… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1948]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0340000.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0340000.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0340000-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0340000-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0340000-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0340000-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0340000-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0340000-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0340000-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0340000.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fifth Annual Report of the
Purchasing Commission
January 1st, 1947, to December 31st, 1947
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiaemid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1948.  Victoria, B.C., January 30th, 1948.
To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
Herewith I beg respectfully to submit the Annual Report of the Purchasing Commission of the Department of Finance for the period January 1st, 1947, to December
31st, 1947.
H. ANSCOMB,
Minister of Finance.
The Honourable Herbert Anscomb,
Minister of Finance, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit the Fifth Annual Report of the Purchasing
Commission, covering the period January 1st, 1947, to December 31st, 1947.
C. B. PETERSON,
Chairman.
E. W. GRIFFITH,
Member.
J. M. STEWART,
Member.  Fifth Annual Report of the Purchasing Commission
For the Period January 1st, 1947, to December 31st, 1947.
It has been customary, each year, when presenting the Annual Report of the
Purchasing Commission, to comment on the general conditions governing the purchase
of supplies. It might be supposed that with war restrictions removed, supplies would
be plentiful. There is, however, very little change, although the market may be
generally termed as easier. Many articles are still difficult to obtain, but others are
easier, so that competition is becoming keener, though far from normal. The normal
supplies for Government institutions have been maintained, though at the increased
cost. Quotas were removed three months ago and subsidies withdrawn, resulting in
increased prices. A prominent example of increase in price, due to withdrawal of
subsidy, was met with in the purchase of flour, the increase amounting to almost 100
per cent.
The Commission continued to avail itself of the opportunities created by the War
Assets Corporation to obtain materials and supplies on favourable terms. During the
year labour unrest at times threatened the normal flow of supplies for Government
institutions, nota"bly in the case of meat, but both management and labour co-operated
in maintaining vital supplies. The Commission has endeavoured to continue the policy
of purchasing supplies in the locality where they are to be used and to distribute the
business of the Government as widely as possible, consistent with economy.
Although the removal of Federal control no longest restricts activities in the
competitive field, the supply does not yet meet the demand, so that all costs increased.
An analysis of the statistical records of purchases shows an over-all increase in the
several categories. While a portion of the increase is undoubtedly due to advanced
prices, the increases in the restrictive, controlled, non-competitive, and emergency purchases are largely due to increased Government activity. It will be understood that the
period covered by the statistical records is wholly within the controlled period, and the
increased prices were mainly due to increases granted by the several Controllers. The
sharp advance in emergency buying is due to the fact that the various branches of
Government throughout the Province have had to secure their requirements immediately
they are available, as any delay, which might be met with in normal channels, might
result in loss of opportunity.
In the matter of coal-supply for Government institutions and buildings, no major
difficulty was encountered. Coal reserves referred to in previous reports were found
most useful in maintaining a steady supply.
In the case of motor-vehicles the supply is still limited, and although our urgent
requirements have been taken care of, deliveries are uncertain and frequently delayed
for long periods. In general, however, the situation has somewhat improved so far as
the supply is concerned, but prices, of course, have advanced considerably, although the
effect of this on the over-all cost of replacements is largely offset by the higher prices
obtainable for the used cars that are being replaced. In disposing of used cars and
trucks, the policy adopted by the Commission is to first give the dealer who is supplying
the new vehicle an opportunity of submitting an offer for the used one, but if the
amount offered is not considered acceptable in the light of current market prices, the
vehicle is then advertised for sale by public tender.
The supply of spare parts and tires has now assumed more normal proportions, and
this makes possible the re-establishment of our usual fleet-owner's discounts. W 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
During the calendar year 1947 a total of 403 motor-vehicles was purchased (227
passenger-cars, 173 trucks, 3 motor-cycles). During the same period a total of 171
used vehicles was disposed of, from which the sum of $89,282.91 was realized.
Miscellaneous items of surplus stock and equipment disposed of by auction or
advertised tender amounted to $42,369.50.
Cost data of the operation of all Government cars in service have been maintained.
STATISTICAL RECORDS.
During 1947 fifty-six meetings of the Commission were held.
Statistical  records  were maintained  under  the following  headings,  which,  for
information, are recited herewith:—
A. Competitive.—On contract, quotation (written or verbal), or prices awarded
on, and governed by, previous quotation.
B. Restrictive.—Specified commodities sold exclusively by a particular manu
facturer, wholesaler, jobber, or agent.
C. Controlled.—Includes set prices where no advantage accrues in calling for
competitive tenders on commodities sold at controlled prices.
D. Non-competitive.—Requisitions issued without stated prices and controlled
by checking or test-checking prices when invoices submitted.
E. Retail.—Includes semi-retail, or where prices are greater than might be
secured from manufacturer or wholesaler (local purchases).
F. Emergency.— (1) Retail.    (2)  Other than retail.
Comparative figures for the fiscal years 1944-45, 1945-46, and 1946-47 are set
forth hereunder:—
1944-45.
1945-46.
1946-47.
$1,097,175.70
668,411.90
359,531.68
590,814.43
66,751.10
286,490.08
$1,069,529.00
1,092,897.12
569,709.26
1,249,539.19
77,869.00
386,713.42
205,848.70
$1,224,889.62
C.   Controlled	
697,980.71
1,345,051.80
99,687.91
555,649.05
227,049.05
D. Non-competitive	
E. Retail	
F. Emergency	
Totals	
$3,069,174.89
$4,652,105.69
$6,063,819.40
18,899
22,485
The foregoing figures chart trends of present-day conditions governing the purchase of supplies. It will be noted that an increase of 30 per cent, over last year in
the volume of purchases is due to present-day conditions, and whereas a decrease was
shown in the competitive column last year, there is now a substantial increase.
"OFFICE FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT.
Shortages in the supply of office furniture and equipment are still very apparent,
and prices continue to increase, particularly in the case of oak and other hardwood
furniture, which has practically doubled in price during the period of the past two
years. For this reason locally constructed fir desks are being utilized to the fullest
extent possible, but even they are now priced higher than oak desks were two years ago.
Our cabinetmaker and his assistant in Vancouver are kept fully occupied with
maintenance and repair of furniture in the Court-house and adjacent offices. They have
also constructed many necessary cabinets to the specifications of the departments
concerned. REPORT OF THE PURCHASING COMMISSION. W 7
Inventory records show the value of office furniture in Government offices is now
$1,347,712.
The typewriter and maintenance service has undergone a process of reorganization
and, for administrative reasons, headquarters were moved from Vancouver to Victoria.
The staff consists of two senior mechanics and two service mechanics in Victoria, and
two senior mechanics in Vancouver. Machines in the Interior are serviced from
Victoria twice per year. Those on Vancouver Island and in the Fraser Valley are
serviced quarterly, while those in the cities of Victoria and Vancouver are serviced
every six weeks. There are now 2,375 machines to be serviced, and 127 overhauls and
rebuilds were completed during the year.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
194S.
365-248-8611 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0340000/manifest

Comment

Related Items