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TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1944

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 TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
APRIL  1ST,   1942,  TO  MARCH   31ST,   1043
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed I)y Ciiaui.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-ninth Annual Report of
the Provincial Industrial School for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1943.
G. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1943.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial School for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
School for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.        ■   •
Honourable George S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the
Legislature the Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the Industrial School for Girls from
April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943.
We have had more of the younger group committed to our care this year. This
brings certain problems and is a challenge. We have often wished that girls would
be sent in earlier for training before they had become so definitely opposed to supervision and correction. The younger girls are as a rule more willing to accept school
attendance and their period of non-attendance previous to commitment has been
shorter. They have had no previous housekeeping training and must be taught even
the simplest phases of home-making. Being young, and in many cases quite small,
they must not be expected to perform heavy tasks or work for lengthy periods. They
need to play, and this must be planned for them. Encouragement must be given to
join groups for work and play, as this has been lacking previously. Many have had
little opportunity for play or other entertainment. They enjoy baseball, basketball,
and other games;   learning there, too, the value of self-control and fair play.
On release the younger group have to be specially arranged for, as they are not
old enough to take employment and in many cases their homes are not suitable for
return placement, making foster-home care necessary.
A little girl of 10 years was admitted this year, the youngest committed during
my fourteen years' residence. For a time she was a real problem and very difficult.
The older girls were inclined to tease her, spoil her by attentions, or ignore her—and
the latter was particularly displeasing to her. Her behaviour made it quite clear as
to why she could not function in a foster home, particularly in the city where her
family resided. She is making good progress in school-work and her physical condition has improved wonderfully; also her personal appearance, in which she is now
interested. Her duties are light, but she has definite tasks and thoroughness is
expected. If this child can be well placed on release from this institution, she may,
with guidance, continue to be happy and useful.
Another girl of 13 years, a child of an unmarried mother and adopted when a baby,
had been giving real anxiety for several years. She is attractive in appearance and
of average mentality, but bitter, suspicious, and anti-social, also an exhibitionist,
insisting on attention even if it is a reprimand. The Child Guidance Clinic has given
in this case, as in many others, valuable advice which we are endeavouring to follow.
Much patience is needed to convince her that the remedy for the wrongs and unfairness
she complains of is largely in her own hands. Her temper tantrums are less frequent,
and it is easier for her to accept responsibility for her own behaviour. She does quite
well for a short time then there is a serious lapse which is disappointing. Placement
on probationary release will be difficult, but will have to be considered, as a longer
term than the usual period would be resented and the bitterness resumed.
A small girl of 14 years, the youngest of a large family and with quite elderly
parents, has been " spoiled " by overindulgence, with lack of control and discipline.
When confronted with a problem she runs away; this has occurred several times.
She is not concerned for the anxiety of relatives or friends and is proud of her ability
to outwit authority. She enjoys being the centre of attention and in many ways has
the requirements to do so. Her parents are opposed to deprivation of privileges and
continue to coax and bribe with gifts. She is bright and attractive, so in time may
realize that she must earn and merit the approval of her associates. Q 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Our group, though smaller, has not been lacking in interest. Almost every girl
presents a different case. The lessened numbers are likely due to the rapid expansion
of social services, much attention to the neglected child, and the wide use of foster-
home care. Smaller classes make training placements easier in the School and a more
personal relationship between staff and girls. Five Indian girls were admitted this
year. As a rule they are not difficult in the School but on release revert to their former
way of living. Drunkenness is often the charge on commitment papers. One girl
was returned several times, each time declaring it would be her last offence, but the
temptation was too great. Given a few drinks she would proceed to find a police officer
and commence an argument.
There has been a larger percentage of average ability among our girls than formerly. The following will show the mentality rating of the present group: Superior,
1; average, 8; normal, 1; dull normal, 5; slow normal, 3; border-line, 7; and moron, 8.
One girl of 17 years had been moved on from grade to grade because of age and
size but had acquired little knowledge. She has a definite reading disability but is
unwilling to take advantage of a remedial reading programme. This girl is strong,
active, and a capable, willing worker, but her 9-year-old mental age does not provide
her with reasoning and good judgment. She will have to be released to be given a trial
on the outside, and will need supervision and advice, neither of which is necessary in
her opinion. Transfers have to be made at times to a senior institution or mental
hospital if a girl needs that type of care and if her presence here is detrimental to
other inmates.
Formerly the greater proportion of our graduates took positions as domestics, but
now many fields are open to them and the demand is greater than the supply.
Gaining the confidence of the parents is important in order that they may co-operate
during the period that the girls remain here, and better understand their responsibilities after release. Both example and precept will be conducive to a better standard
of living.
The experiment of allowing dependable girls the privilege of week-end visits to
their homes has been successful. Sometimes the home of a friend is allowed. In every
case the return to the School was according to instruction, and all reported a good time.
We are fortunate this year in having the services of a full-time social worker,,
a recent graduate of the University of British Columbia. This has been a real need
and request for several years, but there were not enough trained workers to fill the
positions requiring them. Miss Stevenson is making a real contribution to the successful training of our girls.
Spiritual as well as material neglect has contributed to the failure of committed
girls. Many of them, in fact the greater majority, have had little or no church
affiliation. Some are not quite sure if they are Protestant or Roman Catholic, and
further inquiry is necessary. Attendance at our services is voluntary but there is
seldom an absentee. We gather in the club-room for about twelve minutes each
morning, while the last-minute details are being arranged for breakfast, and there
they learn to sing the hymns that they in turn choose. We are appreciative of the
continued services provided by the representation of the churches and for the two
groups who come every Thursday evening to give instruction to Roman Catholics and
Protestants.
The monthly concerts given by the Women's Musical Society and the Philharmonic
Society continue to be most enjoyable and are eagerly anticipated by both staff and
girls. The Lions' Club gave its annual concert and provided music for the girls to
dance. This is always a highlight. The W.C.T.U. again provided each girl with a gift
and personal card to be placed on the Christmas tree.
To the Honourable George S. Pearson, our Minister; Mr. Walker, Deputy; Miss
Isobel Harvey, Superintendent of Child Welfare; and the members of the Advisory
Board we express our grateful thanks for their interest and co-operation. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1942-43. Q 7
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF SCHOOL,
MARCH 31ST, 1943.
Total inmate-days from April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943  11,859
Per capita cost, one year        $821.25
Per capita cost, one day  2.25
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries     13,453.67
Cost-of-living bonus       1,084.85
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies       $223.21
Telephone and telegraph        163.79
—  387.00
Travelling expenses :         559.81
Farm operations   873.47
Household equipment (other than furniture)   543.82
Clothing—
Clothing       $467.51
Boots and shoes       320.93
■ 788.44
Janitors' supplies  J  378.38
Fuel, light, and water—
Fuel   $1,685.10
Water         273.60
Light and power _        583.19
 2,541.89
Provisions—<
Groceries   $3,924.08
Meat   1,160.38
Fish   148.85
       5,233.31
Medical attendance, medical supplies, surgical and dental cost—
Medical attendance      $516.10
Medical supplies       186.16
Surgery 	
Dental cost        247.00
 .        949.26
Good Conduct Fund  :_  202.85
Incidentals and contingencies   162.41
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $27,159.16
Maintenance and repairs (expended through Public Works Department)  436.88
Air-raid precautions (expended through Public Works Department)  51.32
Inventory, March 31st, 1942  1,147.73
$28,795.09
_ Less rent      $469.23
Less partial maintenance for two inmates        154.70
Less inventory, March 31st, 1943     1,468.51
       2,092.44
$26,702.65 Q 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
POPULATION OF SCHOOL, MARCH 31st, 1943.
On roll, April 1st, 1942 1  51
Girls admitted during year April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943— 33
84
Released as wards of Juvenile Court  26
Transferred to Essondale Mental Hospital     1
Transferred to Oakalla Prison Farm     1
Sent to German internment camp     1
Released     4
— 33
Total in School, March 31st, 1943
51
GIRLS ADMITTED FROM APRIL 1st, 1942, TO MARCH 31ST, 1943.
Nn
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to School.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
English.— 	
Years.
17
14
18
13
16
5
15
11
6
14
14
11
17
16
14
16
13
17
10
16
17
16
16
14
16
16
14
15
16
14
16
16
15
Years.
17
14
18
13
16
14
15
17
16
14
14
14
17
16
14
16
13
17
10
16
17
16
16
14
16
16
14
15
16
14
16
16
15
635
638
New Westminster, B.C.
639
New Westminster, B.C...
Humbolt, Sask	
Herbert, Sask	
Vancouver, B.C	
Abbotsford, B.C.
641
642
Sec 20  J.D A.  1929
643
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
645
646
Quebec City, Que	
Vancouver, B.C	
Chilliwack, B.C.
French-English, French-Indian..
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20 J.D.A.  1929.
647
Undetermined period.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
648
649
Langley Prairie, B.C	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
650
651
Sec. 20  J.D.A.   1929.
652
Victoria, B.C	
Irish-Canadian, English-
Port Moody, B.C..
653
654
Swedish-English	
655
Chilliwack, B.C ,	
Regina, Sask	
Dysart, Sask	
Chilliwack, B.C	
New Westminster, B.C..-
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
656
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
657
658
Sec. 3, subsec. (1), J.D.A.
6.W
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
660
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
661
Vancouver, B.C..	
66'
English-Canadian, Scotch-
Saskatoon, Sask	
Barriere, B.C 	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
663
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
664
665
German-Dutch	
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
666
Chilliwack, B.C. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1942-43.
Q 9
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
English (both) 	
Irish (both) 	
Indian (both) 	
Russian (both) 	
Serbian  (both) 	
Unknown (both) 	
French-Canadian (both) _
American-French 	
Austrian-Canadian 	
English-Austrian  	
E nglish-Scotch 	
English-Canadian, Scotch-
Canadian  —.
French, French-Canadian
French-Canadian, Indian _
1
1
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
French-English, French-
Indian      1
German-American      1
German-Dutch
Irish-Scotch 	
Irish-English _.
Irish-Canadian, English	
Irish-Canadian, English-
Canadian —
Holland-Canadian, Russian-
Scotch-Canadian 	
Scotch-French 	
Swedish-English 	
Welsh-Irish	
Total  33
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
British Columbia
23
Saskatchewan      7
Manitoba      1
Ontario
Quebec .
Total.
AGES OF GIRLS.
10 years
13 years
14 years
15 years
1
2
9
3
1
1
33
11
16 years 	
17 years      6
18 years      1
Total.
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Vancouver   22
Victoria      2
New Westminster   1
Chilliwack      2
Cloverdale     1
Port Alberni
Port Moody _.
Trail ___,_	
Total.
33
1
2
2
33
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Incorrigible   16
Juvenile delinquency  1
Sexual immorality  5
State of intoxication  1
Theft      4
Unsatisfactory ward      6
Total  33
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929  17
Sec. 3, subsec. (1), J.D.A...    1
Industrial School for Girls
Act     3
Indefinite      1
Indeterminate      2
Indefinite  period,  not  less
than two years  1
Undetermined period   1
Undefined period   1
Unsatisfactory ward   6
Total.
33 Q 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Baptist    4 Presbyterian     4
Church of England    4 Roman Catholic  12
Foursquare Gospel  .    1 United Church     5
Greek Catholic      1 Unity Centre      1
Metropolitan Tabernacle ___    1 —
Total  33
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living  19
Number who have father living, mother dead ..     3
Number who have mother living, father dead     4
Number who have mother living, father unknown       3
Number who have mother dead, father unknown     1
Number whose parents are unknown _._     3
Total  33
Of the above, the parents of four girls are separated;   two parents are divorced;
four girls have stepfathers; three girls have stepmothers; and three girls are adopted.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officers:—
Superintendent and Nurse Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Assistant Superintendent and Teacher—..Miss Ayra E. Peck.
Clerk and Commercial Teacher Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
Teacher. Miss Marion D. Tulloch.
Social Worker Miss Helen M. Stevenson.
Matron..... Mrs. T. Walker.
Supervisor Miss Anna C. Martin.
Sewing Supervisor Miss M. E. Murray.
Night Supervisor Mrs. V. C. Travis.
Supervisor (Linen-keeper) Mrs. Elizabeth Paterson.
Cook Mrs. Isa Watt.
Supervisor Miss Victoria Moody.
Relief Supervisor   Mrs. Alice McCormack.
Engineer and Janitor Claude S. Gardner.
Gardener .—George B. Boving.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1942-43. Q 11
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st,
1942, to March 31st, 1943:—
Calls made by physician  41
Patients seen by physician, including treatments   197
Complete physical examination  33
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection   5
Smears taken for Neisser infection  73
Blood taken for Kahn tests  35
Girls treated for syphilis intravenously 7  2
Treatment for syphilis intravenously   30
Prontylin tablets for Neisser infection (5 grains)   820
Urine tests  * -— 50
Chest clinic .  1
Vaccinated  . . . —_ .  14
Admitted to Vancouver General Hospital—
Basal metabolism     1
Isolation ward (scarlet-fever)      1
Emergency  (cuts)     1
Maternity cases (1 boy)      1
Gynecology      1
— 5
Examination by eye specialist   6
Glasses provided   6
Upon admission girls receive a complete physical examination and remain in
quarantine for fourteen days. During the past year the general health of the girls
has been good.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
M. B. Campbell,
Medical Officer.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary dental work done for all. There was less dental work required than in former
years.
The following is the report of dental services rendered at the Industrial School
for Girls during the year ended March 31st, 1943:—
Visits to dentist  12
Number of girls seen  37
Amalgam fillings  59
Cement fillings  44
Extractions ____.  _,..,   31
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D. Q 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GENERAL REPORTS,
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—Movements of high school pupils from April 1st, 1942, to March
31st, 1943:—
Number in class, April 1st, 1942     7
Number enrolled during the term     0
Grade IX.      4
Grade X.      2
Grade XI.      1
7
Girls leaving during term     7
Girls in class, March 31st, 1943     0
This was an unusual year in that no new pupils were enrolled during the year
and all had completed or left by the end of the year.
As before, all Grade IX. and Grade X. pupils were enrolled in literature, grammar
and composition, health and social studies, and one Grade IX. girl completed the course
in mathematics as well.    The one Grade XI. girl chose social studies and grammar
and composition. __   __
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent and School-teacher.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—From April 1st, 1942, to March 31st, 1943, there was an average
daily attendance of nine pupils.
During the year Grade VIII. had an enrolment of twelve; Grade VII., ten; Grade
VI., three; Grade V., one; and Grade III., three. Ten Grade VIII. pupils and ten
Grade VII. pupils were enrolled in a partial course in the Government Elementary
Correspondence School. Of those thus enrolled eleven left this School or were withdrawn before completing their course, six are still continuing, and three were granted
certificates for having satisfactorily completed the prescribed lessons in literature,
language, spelling, health, and mathematics.
It was found possible during the latter part of the term to extend each pupil's
school period from three to five hours daily, the additional two hours being of great
benefit to those desirous of completing their course before leaving the School.
An industrious and co-operative spirit was evident throughout the year.
Marion D. Tulloch,
School-teacher.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—Our Red Cross work this year has been done to a great extent by
the girls in the elementary school, under the capable guidance of their teacher, Miss
Tulloch.    Material is supplied, along with their other school-work, by the Government REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1942-43. Q 13
Correspondence Course in Victoria. These girls have made utility bags of gay cretonne and hemmed quantities of handkerchiefs in khaki and air force blue. Some of
the other girls have fashioned numbers of cosy and attractive garments for children
from wool furnished by the School and the staff.
Owing to the scarcity of wool and the need for service, this year we have given
up our usual attractive knitted suits and twin sweater sets and each girl has knitted
for herself only a blue sweater coat for use while in the School.
The main floor has been in the capable hands of Mrs. Oxley. In this department
the girls receive training in general housework, and more especially in dining-room
work. They are taught the care of china, cutlery, and linen, and the setting of tables,
as well as becoming competent waitresses. This department is an important phase of
training, as many of our girls go into domestic work or become waitresses.
Housework is the theme of second-floor training too, with the emphasis placed on
care of bedrooms, bath-rooms, and floors. The girls in this department take care of
the laundering of the many sash-curtains as well as the other work entailed in keeping
our dormitories clean and attractive.
Nearly all girls receive their first training in the laundry, where all bed linen,
dining-room supplies, and personal garments are washed and ironed, some by electric
mangle and some by hand. During the past year forty-five girls received training in
the laundry, 3,570 articles were handled and a total of 4,038 hours of work recorded.
Sewing-room training is under the supervision of Miss M. E. Murray. Thirty
girls received instruction in sewing, mending, remodelling, and repairing. A large
number of articles were made in this room, including 30 uniforms; 10 morning dresses;
350 personal garments; 200 articles for kitchen use, including towels, aprons, holders,
and tea-bags; 70 household articles; medical supplies, which includes doctors' coats,
towels, bags, and dressings;   and 106 miscellaneous articles.
In the sewing-room, with the aid of most of the staff, three dozen dolls were renovated, repainted, and dressed for distribution among the needy children connected
with Neighbourhood House at Christmas-time.
Many new books were added to our popular library, which continues to be a major
attraction. We have books of all types, for reference and study, as well as entertaining fiction.
One group of nine girls completed a course in elementary first aid and received
certificates. Another group was immediately enrolled as the girls feel that this is
a very necessary and useful accomplishment at this time. I was most gratified to see
their interest and progress.
Kitchen training is a department to which all the girls look forward with
enthusiasm and eagerness. It is one of the final steps in household training, and most
girls spend an average of three months of intensive effort under the interested and
capable guidance of Mrs. Isa Watt. Vegetables, meats, desserts, tasty supper dishes,
nutritious substitutes for rationed articles, all receive attention and can be carefully
prepared by any girl who has completed her training in this department.
Four girls applied and were accepted for service in the C.W.A.C. Of these, three
were members of the high school group.
Ayra E. Peck,
Assistant Superintendent.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Industrial School for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following is as complete a written report as can be prepared
regarding my duties as a social worker from the second week in September, 1942, until Q 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the end of March, 1943. It is impossible, because of the nature of this work, to include
many statistics.
In the group-work field, which in such a brief period indicates perhaps the greatest
visible progress, two projects were begun—the club, arid the School paper. The
endeavour in both cases was to make the girls themselves take the initiative and the
responsibility, with, of course, the necessary guidance and council. It is believed that
this succeeded to a marked degree.
The club meetings, held twice a week for an hour each evening, included in their
programmes discussion groups, sewing projects, debates, and games, etc. The meetings
were conducted by the girls, who were the duly elected officers, in the formal prescribed
manner—the first half-hour was devoted to business and discussion, the second, to
recreation.   Membership was purely voluntary and there were fifteen names on the roll.
The School paper was first published in January, 1943, and, subsequently, editions
appeared in February and March. The papers varied in length from three to six
pages and were written entirely by the girls of the paper staff, with the exception of
one contribution from yourself on the history of the School. The actual printing was
done by the girls on the hectograph.
The three looms donated to the School by the Vancouver Junior League were put
in use under my supervision after I had received instruction, through the School, froiri
Mrs. W. S. Ellis. Unfortunately, because of the present wool shortage, the girls have
been unable to take the fullest advantage of the looms. Despite this, however, several
scarves and belts were made and it is felt those who were interested have attained
a useful knowledge of weaving.
For one hour two afternoons each week the girls were taken to the gymnasium,
or, if the weather permitted, to the blaying-field for games. It was a time eagerly
looked forward to, and presented, again, an excellent opportunity for group work and
instruction.
Case-work at any time is a very intangible thing and it is difficult to report in
this limited space any which I may have done, but I am fully convinced that it plays
a very definite part in the whole School programme. To be truly effective and constructive it must, I feel, be closely associated with family case-work while the girl is
in the School and follow-up when she has been discharged.
Respectfully submitted.
Helen Stevenson. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 1942-43. Q 15
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 3,295 lb  $95.55
Peas, 92 lb.   9.20
Beans, 745 lb.  I :  7.45
Beets, 809 lb  20.20.
Cabbage, 2,406 lb.   72.18
Carrots, 2,000 lb.   35.00
Cauliflower, 185 lb.   5.55
Corn, 492 cobs  8.20
Cucumbers, hothouse, 63  _.  6.30
Cucumbers, field, 389   9.75
Lettuce, 236 heads  23.60
Onions, green, 58 bunches   2.90
Parsnips, 500 lb.   12.50
Radish, 46 bunches   2.30
Vegetable marrow, 480 lb.  12.00
Spinach, 68 lb.   3.40
Squash, 329 lb  16.45
Tomatoes, green, 140 lb.  t — 3.50
Tomatoes, ripe, 114 lb.   11.40
Manure, 10 loads  _-___ 50.00
Lavender  5.00
$412.43
Fruit.
Apples, 500 lb.   $25.00
Cherries, 87 lb.   8.70
Red currant, 253 lb.  _ 42.20
Black currant, 135 lb  27.00
Gooseberries, 53 lb.   5.30
Raspberries, 194 lb.   32.35
Rhubarb, 186 lb  4.65
$145.20
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Ohaiu.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1943.
405-1243-7073 

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