Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1942

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0314253.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0314253.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0314253-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0314253-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0314253-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0314253-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0314253-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0314253-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0314253-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0314253.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT
of the
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND
INDUSTRY
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st
1941
PRINTED by
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY'.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.  To His Honour W. C. Woodward,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for the
year ended March 31st, 1941.
WILLIAM JAMES ASSELSTINE,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Department of Trade and Industry,
Office of the Minister,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable William J. Asselstine,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and
Industry for the year ended March 31st, 1941.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
for the Year ended March 31st, 1941.
In the period covered by this report the war situation developed with a rapidity which
intensified our marketing problems to an unparalleled degree. Despite this fact, British
Columbia was still able not only to maintain its position in the fields of Trade and Industry,
but to show substantial gains over the previous year.
In the fiscal year 1940-41 all the basic industries—logging and lumbering, mining, agriculture, and fishing—did well, but in the secondary industries—manufacturing in all its
branches—the gains were particularly noticeable. In fact, from the industrial angle, British
Columbia found itself restored to the level of the banner years of 1928-29.
Naturally, there were substantial losses in certain directions, owing to the disruption of
foreign markets, and considerable readjustments have been necessary; but on the whole the
losses were largely offset by increased activity in other lines and the readiness with which
business accommodated itself to war-time changes.
Here it might not be out of place to express the Department's cordial appreciation of
the willing co-operation extended to it by industry in general and of the very evident desire
to assist in every way.
The several phases are discussed at greater length elsewhere in this report, and these
preliminary remarks confine themselves to stating that the three Bureaus between which the
Department's main activities are divided have covered their respective fields with an energy
and thoroughness which is highly gratifying.
Brief reference was made in last year's report to the efforts being made to further
British Columbia's interests at Ottawa. It was pointed out then that the results had been
more than satisfactory, and it only remains to be added that the results continue to give a
very lively satisfaction to all interested parties.
TRADE REPRESENTATIVE AT OTTAWA.
The Bureau of Industrial and Trade Extension has maintained continuously since the
outbreak of the war its Director, Mr. W. Lloyd Craig, as its special representative at Ottawa,
with the objective of furthering the interests of the Trade and Industry of British Columbia
incidental to the requirements necessitated as a result of the war.
Mr. Craig has maintained very close contact with the Department of Munitions and
Supply, the members of the British Mission, the various departments of the Dominion
Government and foreign legations, and has constantly brought before these various bodies
and organizations capabilities of the manufacturers and producers of British Columbia to
furnish war materials.
The result of the Director's activities have been very gratifying. In consequence of his
work, orders which in the aggregate total many millions of dollars have been received by the
manufacturers and producers of the Province.
British Columbia is being recognized to an increasing extent as being capable of producing a very wide range of commodities, which is evidenced by the fact of British Columbia
manufactured articles being supplied in considerable quantities to Eastern Canadian points
and the United Kingdom.
The effect of the maintenance of a liaison service at Ottawa by the Department is
reflected by the increased volume of employment in the manufacturing industry of British
Columbia; some thousands of men are now engaged in the ship-building industry; numerous
machine-shops, foundries, and other plants manufacturing sundry commodities are working
overtime and to full capacity; and many have been obliged to expand and extend their
facilities in order to cope with the increased business. As a further extension of his activities,
the Department has in preparation a new and revised Trade Index and this will shortly be
placed in the hands of the many Purchasing Agents in the Department of Munitions and
Supply and those of various other Government officials.
TIMBER TRADE EXTENSION WORK ABROAD.
The Department again made a grant of $40,000 to the Trade Extension Bureau of the
British Columbia Lumber and Shingle Manufacturers' Association. Following are some of
the concrete results of the Lumber Trade Extension work in various fields:— Q 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Owing to the war the Trade Extension Bureau was forced to realign its trade promotion
work somewhat, particularly in the United Kingdom; but in Australia and South Africa
their efforts continue undiminished, while in Canada they have accelerated their activities
particularly in the interests of Pacific Coast hemlock and Western red cedar.
The Trade Extension work in the Near East was unfortunately interrupted by the entry
of Italy into the war; but we are satisfied from the survey made that this territory is capable
of substantial development in our interests just as soon as conditions will permit.
It has been the privilege of the Trade Extension Bureau of the British Columbia Lumber
and Shingle Manufacturers' Association to co-operate with the Timber Controller by placing
the services of Major L. R. Andrews at his disposal, without cost to the Federal Government.
Major Andrews, in his present capacity, is not only rendering valuable assistance in Canada's
war effort but is also in a position where he can best serve the industry.
Canada.
During the first half of 1940, Major L. R. Andrews' time at Ottawa was occupied largely
with efforts to persuade specifying architects and engineers in the various Government
Departments to place British Columbia species on a more favourable basis in various specifications for war purposes. Many plans were being drafted for vast construction schemes
and, in addition to this, specifications were being revised for scores of military items involving
the use of wood. Tenders were being called by the Department of Munitions and Supply for
a wide variety of articles involved in bringing defence establishments up to strength.
In addition to buildings for the air training scheme, militia training camps, and internment camp, the Defence Permanent Militia establishments were being enlarged and munition
factories were being planned right across Canada.
The Joint Air Training Scheme included some forty types of buildings, ranging from
sentry-boxes to double hangars. A similar range of buildings for almost parallel use were
at the same time being designed for the militia training camps. These also ranged from
buildings for quarters to large structures, including hospitals, recreation-halls, drill-halls,
and overhaul workshops.
Ordnance specifications covering dozens of items were given a long revision. The list
included tent-pegs, mallets, tent-floors, tent-poles for different types of tents, munitions-boxes,
tool-boxes, camp tables and benches, lockers, truck bodies, and miscellaneous equipment.
In many cases specifications were based on species of timber available in Britain or in
Eastern Canada. Equivalent grades and species had to be worked out to enable British
Columbia fir, hemlock, and cedar to be used where these species were suitable and economical.
Work on the National Building Code and individual by-laws, including the City of
Montreal by-law, occupied considerable time early in 1940.
Major Andrews rendered valuable assistance in the revision of the Canadian Engineering-
Standards Association Grading Rules for structural timber, which was carried to a successful
conclusion. In co-operation with the Forest Products Laboratories, these rules were revised,
bringing them in line with recent developments in the use of steel-ring connectors in structural
timber design. Revision of our own Association Grade Rules during this period fortunately
enabled bringing these rules in line with Canadian Engineering Standards and co-ordinating
the two. This was of great assistance later on in connection with extending the field for
Douglas fir and also Pacific Coast hemlock in defence construction projects.
Construction on the various air training and defence projects had been following a fairly
normal course up to the June crisis when France fell. Immediately construction was stepped
up and an adequate supply of lumber and lumber products became a matter of extreme
urgency. The Timber Controller stepped into the picture at this crisis and purchased stocks
of dry lumber and construction timber across Canada to the extent of over 200,000,000 feet.
Contractors were instructed to secure their requirements through the Timber Controller and
specifications were immediately revised to fit available stocks of lumber and in commercial
grades strictly suitable for the job required. The policy followed was, in all cases, to put
suitable stocks on the job with the shortest haul. Where adequate stocks were available
locally, these were used. Where local timber was not suitable or available, stocks were
shipped in.
Some idea of the size of the construction programme is indicated in that for Government
account alone about 369,000,000 F.B.M. of lumber went into the 1940 construction programme
to erect around 5,000 buildings on about 160 sites.    Over 400 cars of shingles were used, of DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 7
which 70 per cent, were red-cedar shingles. About 3,500,000 feet of fir and birch flooring was
supplied. In addition to this, some 80,000 sash and doors and 750,000 panes of glass went
into these buildings.
Approximately 32,000,000 feet of treated Douglas fir structural timber was provided by
the mills of British Columbia for the construction of 335 hangars and drill-halls across
Canada. In no instance was serious delay caused throughout this urgent construction programme through failure on the part of the lumber industry to meet the demands placed
upon it.
Towards the end of 1940, extension of existing plants and construction of a large number
of new munitions plants got under way at a number of points across Canada. These were
all operated under the Allied War Supplies Corporation, and the various contractors concerned were instructed to purchase all their lumber requirements through the Timber Control
office. These arrangements were gradually extended to include all boxes and shooks for the
output of these plants, also motor-vehicle crates for shipment overseas. Co-ordination of
supplies of aeroplane spruce, aeroplane veneers, and boat lumber; in fact, all supplies of wood
and wood products required by the various services were also placed under the direction of
the Timber Controller.
The shortage of steel and necessity to conserve foreign exchange assisted to a certain
extent in influencing the authorities in favour of timber construction as opposed to steel. In
many cases buildings designed in steel were switched to timber, with the resultant economies
in the national interest, in addition to better deliveries and earlier completion.
Facilities set up by the timber preserving companies for prefabricating timber structures
were of great assistance in the successful completion of the 1940 programme. Credit is due
these treating companies, both for their efficient operation and prompt dispatch in supplying
this large number of prefabricated timber structures, knocked down and ready to assemble,
on time and under extreme pressure.
Before the end of the year, Mr. H. R. MacMillan resigned as Timber Controller to take
on greater responsibilities in the Wartime Requirements Board. Mr. Loren L. Brown, Deputy
Timber Controller, was appointed in his place. No change in policy is evident and the Timber
Control is continuing to function as an important cog in the vast war machine which has been
built up to help Canada do its part to assure victory for the Empire.
Special Trade Extension, Pacific Coast Hemlock and Western Red Cedar.
In July, 1940, Mr. J. C. Berto, who was engaged in Trade Extension work in the United
Kingdom, was re-employed and he was immediately dispatched to Eastern Canada to specially
promote greater utilization of Pacific Coast hemlock and Western red cedar. The experience
he gained in the United Kingdom furthering the usages of the two species mentioned has
proved very valuable in his new field of endeavour.
In addition to making the usual calls on consumers, lumber-yards, contractors, builders,
engineers, and others, he had devoted considerable time to furthering an interest in our
lumber among architects in Ontario and Quebec. In September, 1940, the Vancouver office
of the Trade Extension Bureau sent letters to 450 architects in Ontario and Quebec and a
special letter to the President of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Attached to
this letter was a copy of our new Grading Rules, and in the letter Mr. Berto's mission in the
East was fully explained.
While the Eastern Canadian market is a comparatively recent venture in Trade Promotion activities on the part of this Bureau, yet it is not new to many of the member mills. For
many years established connections in the East have been purchasing regularly from the
Pacific Coast, and the efforts Mr. Berto is putting forth are to develop a greater utilization
of our Pacific Coast hemlock and Western red cedar.
The war housing question is being given intensive study by various Government agencies
at the present time. Various proposals are being considered, including prefabricated portable
houses—entirely timber construction. Government policy on this housing question should be
announced shortly. Vast sums of Government money will be involved, and as this problem
cannot be financed under the present set-up of the " National Housing Act " special financial
arrangements will have to be provided. This war housing problem is in addition to an
estimated shortage of housing in this country of at least 30,000 units.
In the domestic field, under the pressure of shortages and emergency demands, British
Columbia species are gradually gaining in favour.    At the present moment there is a serious Q 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
shortage of dry lumber, both on the Prairies and in Eastern Canada.    Such dry lumber as is
available has passed out of the hands of the producers.
Many industrial plants, which previously were hard to interest as long as they could
secure their usual supplies, are now trying out Pacific Coast hemlock and British Columbia
cedar with good results.
United Kingdom.
During the year 1940 Trade Extension activities in the United Kingdom were subject to
the rigours of the all-out war which is being waged against the Mother Country. The conflict necessarily affected the very excellent work being done by Mr. R. Douglas Roe, who was
so ably assisted by Mr. J. C. Berto.
In view of the war situation, Mr. J. C. Berto's services were terminated at the end of
March, 1940.
The collapse of France in June brought about a very definite change in conditions in
Great Britain, which resulted in an even greater regimentation of business and precluded our
field representatives carrying on effectively. Mr. R. Douglas Roe advised us, both by cable
and letter, that in view of existing conditions he felt the continuation of his appontment in
the Old Country was not warranted and suggested that he be authorized to return to Canada.
He further recommended that the London office should be continued on a very modest scale
with Mr. Harward Craig, who had been employed in the London office for many years, in
charge.
In submitting this proposal Mr. Roe emphasized the fact that many of our friends in the
timber trade in the Old Country viewed with grave concern the complete closure of the
London office.
It was pointed out that unless business became completely demoralized it was desirable
to maintain some contact in order that when peace was restored there would be, at least, the
nucleus of an organization from which a fresh and more vigorous Trade Extension campaign
could be instituted. In these recommendations Mr. Roe was supported by Mr. W. McAdam,
Acting- Agent-General for British Columbia, and subsequently the plan was approved by the
Department of Trade and Industry.
Special efforts were put forward to develop a market for Pacific Coast hemlock, with
very satisfactory results, although this was not an easy task in view of the poor reputation
which hemlock suffered due to some early shipments of material which were not satisfactory.
It has been stressed by our former Timber Commissioners in Great Britain that if hemlock
is well manufactured and properly seasoned it will practically sell itself. This is an accepted
fact and, if the war had not interfered, hemlock shipments would have increased by leaps and
bounds, thus affording us another outlet for a species which is being produced in increasing
quantities. Hemlock, as we all know, is an excellent building material and is unquestionably
coming into its own, as it has good qualities and is suitable for a great many purposes not
previously recognized in many consuming territories.
The sale of Western red cedar was given a big impetus when the Solid Cedar Housing
Scheme was introduced in Scotland. It is hoped that through intensive field-work, following
the war, when vast reconstruction projects must be undertaken, red cedar will also enjoy
an expanding market.
Western red-cedar shingles were becoming better and more favourably known; but, of
course, with the promulgation of import restrictions placing shingles on the unessential list,
our business in this building material was suspended. There should be, upon the cessation
of hostilities, a great potential market in the United Kingdom.
Australia.
Lumber business with Australia suffered a serious decline in 1940 as the result of import
restrictions. The Australian Government found it necessary, at the outset of hostilities, to
curtail the importation of lumber from British Columbia to conserve foreign exchange. As a
result, this important outlet for our Pacific Coast hemlock has been very materially reduced,
while Douglas fir shipments suffered a small contraction. Imports of Baltic timber, normally
about 15,000,000 feet per annum, are not obtainable, and advice has been received from Mr.
R. E. Smith, the Trade Extension Bureau's representative, that the native timber industry
is working at, or near, full capacity, without being able to meet all the timber requirements
of the country. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 9
Mr. Smith has kept in very close touch with every phase of the problem confronting us
in Australia and has endeavoured to render assistance to the " trade " in every way possible,
compatible with a policy of avoiding interference in matters which are solely domestic.
Much of Mr. Smith's time has been devoted to the complex Import Control Regulations.
Mr. Smith contacted importers, box and case manufacturers, suburban timber merchants,
wholesale co-operative, architects, engineers, contractors, furniture and joinery factories,
agricultural associations, dried fruit interests, mine managers, Government departments
(whether municipal, State, or Federal), and, in fact, every existing or potential lumber-
consuming class of business.
As large defence projects were undertaken by both State and Federal Governments, and
as comprehensive studies were made on the Australian timber position, our representative
devoted a good deal of his time to calling on contractors and Government officials for the
purpose of aiding such authorities when requested. In maintaining constant contact with
those projects being undertaken he was able to render valuable assistance, which was
apparently definitely appreciated.
It should be realized that every effort is being put forth to keep our products constantly
before the consumer, bearing in mind that present conditions are not normal and that under
such circumstances certain regulations must be accepted. One thing that must not be overlooked, however, is that interest in our products and their suitability to Australian needs must
not be permitted to be forgotten during a period when other materials may serve temporarily.
Our hemlock, particularly, has gained a very good name in Australia and has many loyal
supporters in that market. It is obvious our Timber Commissioner has not lost sight of the
hemlock picture nor the possibility of other species or materials displacing our products.
We were advised last April that " practically the whole of the 1940 crop " in the Murray
Valley Dried Fruit District west and north of Adelaide would be packed in hemlock cases.
Douglas fir imported under licence represents the major portion of our lumber shipments
to Australia in 1940. Fir is much in demand for the huge industrial expansion that Australia
has put into effect since the commencement of the war.
Solid cedar construction created interest in Australia over the past year and many Local
Councils and the Housing Improvement Board in Sydney have this method of construction
under consideration. Cedar for boat-building is receiving more attention. This species has
also met with much favour for use underground in mines.
This market has been a substantial outlet for our products, particularly Pacific Coast
hemlock, and it is sincerely hoped that when normal conditions are restored, if not before, we
shall enjoy an increased volume of business.
New Zealand.
While this is not a large market, it has been a steady one up until the time the New
Zealand Government put restrictions on the importation of our lumber.
Due to the shortage of dollar funds, emergency regulations were instituted affecting
lumber, and shipments only go forward now under licence. It now seems that this market
is closed to the further importation of our woods, except for defence and Government purposes.
South Africa.
The year 1940 has shown some gain for us in the South African market. This is due in
part to the fact that other sources of supply, principally the Baltic, were cut off at the
commencement of hostilities, thus opening up to us a substantially increased outlet for our
woods, particularly hemlock. In this connection the shipments of hemlock have increased 200
per cent, over what they were in 1936. While it is true we were in a more favourable position
to supply lumber to this market during 1940, when other sources of supply were eliminated,
yet it is also true that since 1936 we have been actively interested in the development of the
South African timber trade. The Trade Extension work carried out by Mr. William Johnston,
the Timber Commissioner, and the amicable relationships developed between the trading firms
here and in South Africa have lent considerable aid to the increased lumber sales from British
Columbia.
It has been particularly noticeable that business from private sources, such as home
building, has appreciably fallen off.    However, in the main this did not reduce the volume of Q 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
business and, from information received, the merchant importers seem satisfied with the trend
since the larger share of their business is coming from the railways, mines, Public Works
Department, Department of National Defence, and municipal governments. This, of course,
is a war condition which may change in due course.
No small measure of our success in this market is due to the constant efforts put forward
in rendering service to merchants, their customers, and the many public bodies interested in
lumber consumption. That these efforts were repaid is proved by the volume of business
received.
One very satisfying feature of this market is the development of a steadily increasing
Pacific Coast hemlock outlet.
Cedar.
During the year under review shingles were introduced into many new districts.
Western red-cedar shingles are more in demand, and every effort will be put forth to
maintain and extend the South African market.
During the past year efforts were made to interest the railway authorities in our
creosoted ties. The Chief Civil Engineer and Purchasing Agent for the railways have shown
an interest in this class of material. The time may come when our creosoted material will
attain a competitive position, enabling us to develop this class of business.
British West Indies.
While we have not had a Timber Commissioner in this field since March, 1939, much
credit is due the Trade Extension Bureau for developing this market for our lumber. When
the Timber Commissioner was recalled in March, 1939, it was decided that this market could
be served for the time being by sending a representative when occasion demanded. A good
deal of the credit for achievements in this market is due to the efforts of Major Andrews and
the very able work put in by Mr. C. D. Schultz, who served as Timber Commissioner. It is
gratifying to note that this market is receiving the careful attention of major lumber trading
interests here and they are to be commended for the manner in which they are maintaining
this market for British Columbia.
Western red-cedar dimension shingles have been gaining in popularity throughout this
market and have shown a bigger increase in Jamaica. Up to the present time there has been
a reluctance to use anything but dimensions, but the odd lot of random width shingles has
been supplied.
The West Indies has proved a valuable outlet and is worthy of our best efforts to continue
it as such. It is interesting to note that the total footage shipped in 1940 exceeded 1939 by
approximately 2,500,000 F.B.M.
With the British West Indies as a nucleus, it is not improbable that we shall be able to
develop a greater market for our lumber throughout the whole Caribbean.
Any report submitted on this market would be incomplete without expressing very keen
appreciation of the constructive efforts put forth on our behalf by the several Canadian Trade
Commissioners who have rendered invaluable help at all times. Much of the credit for our
improved position in the West Indies is due these gentlemen.
Egypt, Palestine, Ceylon, India.
In the spring of 1940, Mr. W. W. Harvey left for the Near and Far East to promote,
for the second time, the use of our creosoted lumber and timber products in Ceylon, India,
Palestine, and Egypt. In 1939, Mr. Harvey sold two cargoes of creosoted sleepers in Ceylon.
In addition to this, the foundations were laid and connections established in Egypt and
Palestine which led to a very pleasing increase in business. The immediate returns from
the 1940 trip did not have such tangible results, due to unsurmountable war conditions.
However, immeasurable good-will was developed, and the outcome of our Timber Commissioner's recent survey reaffirmed all that had been said about our products and renewed
the personal contacts previously established, cementing relationships which no amount of
correspondence could accomplish.
We have not been able to participate, to any extent, in this market in recent years, but
the time will undoubtedly come when China will need vast quantities of lumber and creosoted
material. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 11
Japan.
In comparison with previous years, this market is small and it is not expected to show
any marked advance in the coming year.
South America.
Under present conditions involving exchange regulations and freighting difficulties, it is
not likely that we can achieve any material increase in these markets; but we should
certainly not lose sight of this field for expansion when the opportunity presents itself.
The Department is grateful for the valuable assistance given to the Timber Commissioners by the Canadian Government Trade Commissioners and Mr. W. A. McAdam, Acting
Agent-General for British Columbia in London, and we also wish to thank all those connected
with the lumber, logging, and shingle industry for their co-operation during the past year.
LOANS AND GUARANTEES.
(" Department of Industries Act, 1919.")
Following is a statement covering loans and guarantees outstanding under the " Department of Industries Act, 1919." Every effort is being made to collect these accounts and it
is expected that several substantial payments will be received in the near future:—
Statement of Loans and Guarantees outstanding, March 31st, 1941.
Loans. Principal. Interest.
Acme  Cabinet Works  $1,343.99 $468.08
B.C. Livestock Exchange  25,000.00 560.94
Canadian Western Woodworks     9,799.70 2,046.20
Gordon Campbell Investment Co., Ltd  28,420.23 46.41
James Canadian Seeds, Ltd  60,049.96 28,148.39
Fort St. John Flour Mill    16,898.38 5,317.05
T. H. Waters & Company  15,657.16 1,908.63
Guarantees.
Gray's Lumber Mills, Ltd  $2,698.35
Big Bend Cedar Pole Co., Ltd. (White Pine Lumber Co., Ltd.)  12,406.91
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF INDUSTRIAL AND
TRADE EXTENSION.
Pursuant to the policy adopted by the Department and successfully followed last year,
the Trade Commissioner has again co-operated closely with Federal and Provincial Departments and local organizations towards increased use of existing facilities and furtherance of
new contacts for industrial and trade extension.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
Producers and exporters in the Province have maintained close co-operation with the
Bureau. The Federal Trade Commissioner Service Overseas has continued to use it as a
clearing-house for problems affecting exporters in British Columbia. Assistance has been
given to visiting Trade Commissioners on tour, including the representatives from Kingston,
Jamaica; Port of Spain, Trinidad; Bombay, Shanghai, Hong Kong, the Commercial Secretary
from Tokio, and the Assistant Trade Commissioner from Lima, Peru, and the newly appointed
Assistant Trade Commissioner for Agricultural Products posted to Buenos Aires.
The Bureau has been associated with market programmes of interest to other Provincial
Departments at Victoria, and has attempted (as in the case of cascara bark) to co-ordinate
these efforts and to assist in placing responsibility for constructive programmes affecting
distribution of the product. Cases which may be cited include cascara bark supplies, medicinal plant cultivation, fisheries research programmes, and industrial application of laboratory
studies in forest and other products. Q 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The Federal departments at Ottawa, in particular the Department of Trade and Commerce, have increasingly used the services of the Bureau in special endeavours, noted in other
sections of this report, including approaches on market problems, sales promotions, induced
or affected by emergency conditions, claims adjustments, and special surveys.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
The Bureau has assisted in both development and extension programmes, in the location
of plant sites, supply of raw material, factory equipment, labour personnel, transportation
problems, and taxation.
The flow of European capital and the application of new methods introduced by those
who provided this capital, were noted in the report last year. The assistance given by the
Bureau in the earlier stages of this special development have been extended during the year
under review. In three specific cases the operations of the new " refugee " industries have
met with marked success, increasing pay-rolls, adding new types of production, and assisting
materially in the general industrial development of the Province.
With emergency restrictions on placement of capital, the industries under this heading,
and under other headings, have met and faced new problems on which the Bureau has been
able to assist them, strengthening production structure and providing guidance in surveys
and special problems for new lines of production or for increased manufacturing facilities.
The range of actual products covered is a wide one and includes such diversified materials
as copra, peat-moss, toys, rock wool, ply-wood, glucose, rayon, wood-pulp, animal glue, fish-oil,
and scrap-steel.
Results on branch factory work could not be expected under emergency conditions, but
co-operative contacts were maintained through the year for such possibilities with the Canadian Trade Commissioners' offices in the United States, the Department of Trade and Commerce at Ottawa, selected industrial commissions, and the industrial Bureaus of the Board
of Trade, where such Bureau forms part of the organization.
SUMMARY REVIEW OF TRADE EXTENSION EFFORTS.
When the Department was first formed it was felt that industrial effort in the establishment of new industries and the assistance to existing ones must be supplemented by active
trade promotion work, with particular reference to export possibilities; that this would
involve constructive production or marketing service on a wide variety of produce, as well
as assistance to promotion programmes in specific cases.
This expectation has been realized, and its importance has been emphasized, by war
conditions.
Under Trade Extension, the main headings of effort during the year under review may
be summarized as follows:—
(1.)   Contact with foreign markets through  co-operation with the  Federal  Trade
Commissioners Overseas.
(2.)   Special   export   surveys   in   co-operation   with   Ottawa   or   other   Government
departments.
(3.)   Independent export surveys arising from war conditions:
(a.)  Loss of existing.markets;
(6.)   Opportunities to replace exports from Germany;
(c.)   Survey  of  new markets  opened  by  disruption  of   Scandinavian   or
other sources of supply.
(4.)  Increased war-time co-operation with agricultural interests for special marketing problems.
(5.)   Assistance in mobilization of war industries of the Province.
(6.)   Co-operation for market problems with the committee for general industrial
survey of the Province.
(7.)   Assistance in Timber Trade Extension.
(8.)   Specialized assistance to unorganized producing and exporting groups. PARTICULARS OF TRADE  EXTENSION EFFORTS.
Timber Trade Extension.
A special section of the report as in previous years deals with Timber Trade Extension.
Surveys by Commodities.
The  Bureau  has  had  occasion  to  investigate  a  number  of  products  and  by-products
involving a full range of the commodities exported from the Province.    Some of these were
made at the request of the contacts overseas, some at the request of the exporters breaking
into new fields. _ _ _
Contacts for Overseas Co-operation.
Reference has already been made to the co-operative contacts established and maintained
with Trade Commissioners, and to these can be added the work undertaken by the Bureau
in conjunction with the Acting Agent-General in London on general trade inquiries and on
special investigations, in spite of the difficulties under which the office in London has been
operating under war-time conditions. Direct and effective contacts have also been maintained with Foreign Consuls in the Province and with the British Trade Commissioner in
Vancouver on inquiries relating to sales of United Kingdom material.
Special Investigations.
Related to the general scope of trade extension work has been the Bureau's assistance
in problems of transportation and rates; its representation on outside committees relating
to industrial endeavour and trade expansion; the assistance given investigation of factory
conditions affecting output; the co-operation extended for organization and display at exhibitions; the assistance extended in award to British Columbia manufacturers on public contracts; and the promotion and sales of British Columbia produce, of which special mention
is made elsewhere in this report.
SPECIAL EXPORT ENDEAVOUR.
The Bureau has been closely associated with the machinery evolved for war-time export
movement of foodstuffs from the Province, including eggs, fruit, fisheries products, and canned
milk—under contract to the Ministry of Food in the United Kingdom.
In particular, it has assisted in the matter of fruit-pulp contracts.
The shippers of processed berries had large tonnages held over in 1940 as a result of
refusal of United Kingdom licences. With the aid of the Bureau they were able to effect a
deal with the Ministry of Food in the United Kingdom which resulted in the movement of the
surplus. All space arrangements and details of financing against established sterling credits
were handled in Victoria.
From this has evolved a direct and effective basis of co-operation with the British
Ministry of War Transport, with the shipping companies, the banks, and the suppliers
themselves, under which the Bureau has been requested to act as a clearing-house in the
matter of all fruit-pulp contracts for the United Kingdom in 1941—a movement which may
run to many thousand tons of material. Machinery established for this assistance has
resulted in a centralized effort which affects many related industries not directly concerned
with the movement itself.
OTHER SPECIAL ENDEAVOURS IN WAR-TIME DISTRIBUTION.
Market Problems.
The Bureau has acted as a central source of information and as a centralized point of
effort in many similar (and peculiar) market problems presented by the confused channels
of war-time distribution.
In particular is this true of foodstuff lines. As an example, the loganberry-canners lost
the United Kingdom market, turned to the Bureau for assistance in finding new outlets, and
found them with the Bureau's help to considerable volume in Eastern Canada.
In peat-moss, complete disruption of European sources of supply presented exceptional
opportunities for British Columbia in the United States. The Bureau has given detailed
assistance in the organization necessary for stabilized production and effective distribution
to meet these changed conditions. Q 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Co-operation and Control of Industry.
Elsewhere in this report, under the notes on the work of the Trade Representative at
Ottawa, mention has been made of the mobilization of industry for war purposes in the
Province. At the production end the Bureau has been actively co-operating in this connection
by representation on war contracts committees and by the maintenance of contacts with
visiting or resident representatives of the various Boards and control units established at
Ottawa. It has attempted, where possible to assist the Department by acting as a clearinghouse for information and for direction of inquiries through centralized channels to avoid
duplication. It has assisted in special surveys, and the machinery established by the Bureau
has been placed throughout the year at the disposal of the non-profit organizations set up by
Government or war industry, the Boards set up for the control of commodities, for regulation
of commercial practice, and for the purchase of war materials.
Related to, but distinct from, this war effort has been the general work undertaken by
the Bureau on transportation problems, including rail rate adjustments and ocean space
difficulties. Ship movements during the year continued very irregular, but the Bureau was
closely identified with such measures as could be taken to improve the situation in relation
to export movement.
BRITISH COLUMBIA PRODUCTS.
The Bureau has co-operated closely with the British Columbia Products Bureau of the
Vancouver Board of Trade and with other organizations concerned in the increased sale of
British Columbia products. The Department has assisted in advertising campaigns, in
co-operation on special campaigns, in the production of an industrial film depicting industries
of the Province, and in assistance (already mentioned) towards participation by British
Columbia manufacturers in governmental and other contracts.
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND
STATISTICS.
War-time demands have continued to make it necessary for the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics to subordinate peace-time surveys in favour of projects which have assumed greater
significance under war conditions. The essential statistical services and economic studies in
progress prior to the outbreak of war have been maintained, but a number of peace-time
projects have been suspended for the duration.
Interdepartmental co-ordination plans, arranged previously, have worked with entire
satisfaction this last year. Agreements, or working arrangements, relating to the collection,
co-ordination, and publication of statistics now exist between this Bureau and the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa; the War-time Prices and Trade Board, Ottawa; as well as
the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, and the Provincial Secretary.
Although foreign trade statistics have been continuously compiled, it will not be possible
to publish—under Federal war-time regulations—the regular report on the trade of British
Columbia with other Provinces and with foreign countries for the year 1940.
A full description of the research projects carried on during the fiscal year, together
with a detailed account of the statistical services performed, has been described under the
appropriate divisions.*
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Business activity in British Columbia during 1940 exceeded the relatively high levels of
1939. Production in the basic industries reached an estimated net value of $293,000,000 in
1940,f compared with $257,450,113 in 1939.J Improvement was largely due to increased production in the forest, mining, fishery, and manufacturing industries. Salaries and wages
paid to employees in the leading industries have been estimated at $188,325,766 in 1940, an
increase of at least $23,000,000 over the estimated 1939 gross pay-roll of $165,683,460.§
Merchandising, both wholesale and retail, reflected the results of a rising price-level and
increased consuming power.    Bank debits, reflecting the volume of commercial payments and,
* A description of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, showing the internal organization, will be found in
the 1939 Report of the Department of Trade and Industry.
t Preliminary estimate by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
I Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
§ British Columbia Department of Labour. T\
DEPARTMENT. OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Q 15
as such, a useful guide to the tempo of business activity, were reported to have shown a 5.8
per cent, increase in 1940 over 1939. Employment, measured by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics' monthly index, showed an improvement of 5.4 per cent, in the same period. A brief
glimpse of other business characteristics during 1940 may be seen from Table I.
Table I.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1940, compared with 1939.
Percentage
Increase ( + ) or
Decrease (— ) .
Mining—
$
Oz.
i 1
Long ton
$
M.B.M.
Ton
$
Case
$
Box
Box
Box
Cwt.
M. ft.
Square
1935-39 = 100
1935-39=100
1935-39=100
$
000 gal.
Ton
000 k.w.h.
000 $
000 $
000$
No.
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
75,352,730
613,433
39,498,623
1,667,827
102,804,000
3,693,155
330,572
21,710,167
1,467,216
51,772,571
5,363,551
4,399,211
964,340
462,433
948,830
2,729,699
126.1
116.5
121.6
10,108,463
65,199
7,592,881
2,095,625
26,730
11,252
2,137,200
92,230
113.3
129.1
129.3
108.7
117.8
143.6
152.2
110.4
91.9
74.8
112.1
93.4
127.9
142.9
65,681,547
636,926
32,300,826
1,477,872
88,221,000
3,354,896
267,412
17,698,980
1,539,063
49,402,011
5,522,510
2,798,967
2,723,543
592,911
924,686
2,822,757
112.2
103.1
103.8
8,677,270
59,824
6,641,816
1,963,338
30,874
8,523
2,020,300
113,781
107.5
113.5
85.9
96.3
108.9
124.8
142.8
111.4
91.9
80.5
112.1
96.6
124.6
136.9
+ 14.72
—    3.69
4- 22.28
+ 12.85
Forestry—
Total value of production  ___ __
+ 16.53
+ 10.08
Paper production2  _ - —
Fisheries—
+ 23.62
+ 22.66
—    4.67
Agriculture—
+   4.80
Apples—
—   2.88
Domestic shipments5__ ____ _ ____ _
Export shipments^   	
External Trade—
+ 57.17
— 64.59
— 22.01
Exports of planks and boards, Douglas fir6 ____
4    2.61
—   3.30
Internal Trade—
+ 12.39
Index of retail sales6—
4- 13.00
+ 17.15
Automobile sales, newG_     __	
+ 16.49
+    8.98
Railway freight loaded in B.C.6— 	
+ 14.32
+    6.74
— 13.42
+ 32.02
+    5.79
— 18.94
+   5.40
+ 13.74
+ 50.52
+ 12.88
+   8.17
4- 15.06
4-   6.58
Sales of life insurance6    _	
Construction—
Building permits issued6   	
Finance—
Tourist Trade—
Automobile entries on 60-day permits6 	
Employment6—
4-   2.65
4-   4.38
Trade 	
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands, Forest Branch.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
4 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Q 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS.
In collaboration with the Department of Education and with the co-operation of School
Boards and teachers throughout the Province, the Bureau of Economics and Statistics has
conducted an annual occupational survey of students leaving Grades VII. to XIII., inclusive,
in recent years. The objective of the survey has been to ascertain the probable number
leaving school, their reasons for leaving school, and the nature of the occupations or special
training which the students would seek thereafter.
Preliminary tabulation has revealed tha.t 4,194 students were registered in the 1940
June survey. Of this number, 2,027 students were uncertain whether they would or would
not return to the public school system in September. The remainder, 2,167 students, were
definite in stating that they would not return. Students who knew definitely in June that
they would be returning to school in September did not complete the questionnaire.
The principal reasons given for leaving school, as shown in the 1940 survey, have been
compared with similar 1939 figures, in the following table:—
Reason.
Number of
Students.
Percentage.
1939.
1940.
1939.             1940.
1
1,728
846
18
849
325
21
23
20
144
1,873
1,075
23
716
275
36
35
31
130
43.5
21.3
0.4
21.4
8.2
0.5
0.6
0.5
3.6
44.7
25.7
0.6
17.1
6.5
0.8
0.8
0.7
3.1
3,974
4,194
100.0
100.0
Just how many students actually entered the labour market subsequently is, of course,
not definitely known. Excluding those students intending to seek special training, those
leaving the Province, the invalid, and those required to assist at home, we might reasonably
suppose that approximately 2,700 students did seek employment in the Provincial labour
market during the years 1939 and 1940.
In spite of the obvious difficulties confronting students asked to state the occupations
they intended to seek after leaving school, only 30 per cent, of the boys and 34 per cent, of the
girls were unable to indicate their intended occupations in the 1940 survey. It is probably
true to say that the particular occupations shown by the students were, in many cases, merely
indicative. For that reason the occupations have been consolidated into larger industrial
groups which, it is thought, provide a better picture of the actual situation. In the following-
table the occupations have been consolidated in this way: —
Boys.
Girls.
Industry.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Agriculture	
105
20
44
32
248
20
87
97
1
54
3
42
7
18
18
112
8
46
45
1
28
1
63
13
26
14
136
12
41
52
26
2
5
58
4
16
171
3
29
2
8
104
2
Mining, quarrying, etc  	
29
2
Transportation and communication	
8
67
Finance and insurance.  — DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Q 17
Occupational Survey of Public School Students—Continued.
Industry.
BOYS.
Girls.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Total.
Definitely
leaving.
Uncertain.
Service      	
Public administration   	
Professional     	
Entertainment and sport   .   	
506
246
83
5
10
162
13
535
251
123
38
2
4
84
9
206 .
255
123
45
3
6
78
4
329
606
24
6
156
420
458
410
13
1
79
317
210
196
11
5
77
103
Labourer ..    	
248
1,764
791
973
1,318
766
552
The Trade of British Columbia.
At the request of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, External Trade Branch, the Bureau
has complied with.war-time regulations and will not publish the regular annual report on
the trade of British Columbia with foreign countries and with other Canadian Provinces for
the year 1940. As soon as circumstances are again favourable, the Bureau will resume
publication of this report which will, in the meantime, be kept up to date.
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion Bureau
of Statistics, concluded in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under this arrangement,
a monthly coded statement has been sent regularly to the Bureau from Ottawa, showing in
detail the importation and exportation of every commodity, regularly listed in the Federal
trade reports, moving through customs ports in British Columbia. A brief monthly recapitulation of this authentic information has been released to the Press, but the detailed summaries
formerly released have been discontinued for the duration of the war.
During .the year a large number of foreign trade queries were received and acknowledged
from business groups. In addition, a number of special trade and market analyses were
prepared for interdepartmental purposes.
The Trade of British Columbia with other Canadian Provinces, the British Commonivealth,
and all Foreign Countries, 1938 and 1939.
Country or Province.
Imports into
British Columbia.
Exports from
British Columbia.
Total Trade.
Other Canadian Provinces—
1938..          ....  	
$66,361,743
70,970,002
18;628,470
17,021,692
19,926,329
39,813,668
104,916,542
127,805,362
$35,130,908
39,119,815
47,569,696
57,817,770
52,873,193
54,295,164
135,573,797
151,232,749
$101,492,651
110,089,817
66,198,166
74,839,462
72,799,522
94,108,832
240,490,339
279,038,111
1939*	
British Commonwealth (excluding Canada) —
1938    __	
1939*    _ -	
Foreign countries—
1938  	
1939*...	
Totals—
1938- -	
1939*   	
* Excluding gold exports to British Commonwealth and foreign countries.
The Cost of Living in British Columbia.
The advent of war-time conditions has brought the research-work of the Bureau in the
field of living costs into new prominence. Since 1936, the Bureau has compiled an index of
food prices in fifty-two cities, towns, and villages for the private use of the Provincial
Department of Labour. In 1939 this food index was supplemented by a new monthly full
cost-of-living index, which included clothing, rentals, fuel, and other essential household items
2 Q 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
in the four Coast cities of Vancouver, New Westminster, Victoria, and Nanaimo. Under
arrangements sponsored by the Provincial Department of Labour, this full cost-of-living index
has been adopted as a cost of living barometer by a number of British Columbia Coast firms.
The food index measures the change in prices as they occur in the case of forty-six
selected food items, forming a scientifically tested budget. At the suggestion of the late
Provincial Health Officer, Dr. H. E. Young, the food budget used was modelled on the plan
of the Sub-committee on Nutrition, British Commonwealth Scientific Conference, Ottawa, 1936;
this represented the latest information available when the food index was created in 1936.
The budget contains sufficient quantities of staple foods to maintain, in good health for one
month, a family of five; of which two are adults, one an infant—6 months to 1 year old, one
a child—6 years to 10 years old, and one a child—11 years to 13 years old.
The monthly full cost-of-living index, prepared for the Coast area, covers approximately
64 per cent, of the expenditures made by an average British Columbia family in receipt of an
income between $1,200 and $1,400 a year.    The index is made up as follows:—
Per Cent.
Food      44.05
Rent 	
Clothing  	
Fuel  	
Furniture ._.._	
Kitchen equipment
Electricity   	
Textiles, household
Water  	
25.25
14.93
5.37
2.59
2.39
2.13
1.99
1.30
Total   100.00
The Cost-of-living Indexes prepared by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics
for British Columbia.
Full Cost-of-living
(1936 = 100.) IndeArf°ffoast
1939  15th of Month.
August        99.27
September   104.18
October   104.89
November   104.80
December    104.03
1940-
January
103.94
February   104.45
March   104.66
April   105.45
May   105.18
June   105.38
July   106.48
August    106.79
September   107.02
October   107.84
November   108.58
December   108.79
1941—
January   108.66
February   109.33
March   110.21
Food Index.t
15th of Month.
94.48
103.90
104.38
104.74
101.51
100.43
100.97
101.22
102.53
101.77
101.51
103.47
103.84
103.33
104.92
106.30
107.39
107.03
107.93
109.02
* Weighted average of indexes compiled for the four Coast cities of Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminster,
and Nanaimo.
t Compiled for fifty-two cities, towns, and villages.  / 1
_H
P.
<!
W
O
P.
o
N
K
Eh
K
D
o
H
19
HH
m
o
S
8
3
o
o
«
o_
PS
o
Ph
xn
ti
/
<»
.   ;
t
* /
6)
/
-I*
■_____■
■v
_.v|
<J
<-'
■5
1 1
/^
1 1
5               3/
S ■
/ ^
^
^             v/
_/"                    VV
j"                 X" c
'                            _/        01
.          <     +-5
\ 81
M
5-
I.
C
leg DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Q 19
The Tourist Trade of British Columbia.
At the request of the Government Travel Bureau, this Bureau has undertaken the task
of compiling a reasonably accurate statistical summary of the Provincial tourist trade. In
view of the obvious importance of the automobile tourist traffic, it has been decided to concentrate in 1941 upon the problem of collecting suitable automobile statistics. If time permits,
the other important tourist movements, such as by rail and by boat, will be similarly studied.
When the project is in full operation it is expected that a large part of the tourist trade of
the Province will become measureable. It will be possible, under this system, to provide some
authentic information about the balance of payments arising from the tourist trade between
British Columbia and the other Canadian Provinces and between this Province and the United
States of America.
For some years the Federal authorities have published statistics showing (1) the movement inwards of foreign automobiles through customs ports in this Province, and (2) the
movement outwards of Canadian automobiles through British Columbia customs ports. This
information, while valuable, has not been entirely adequate as a measure of the automobile
tourist movement. To supplement the customs information, the Bureau has arranged to
establish car-counting stations at strategic points throughout the Province. As shown on the
accompanying map (Chart A), the Province has been divided into seven tourist divisions.
Motorists passing through from one zone to the next, between June 1st and September 30th,
will be tabulated as they pass the car-counting agents. The co-operation of the Provincial
Department of Public Works has been arranged to provide these records at Yale and on
Kootenay Lake. The Superintendent of Yoho and Kootenay National Parks has agreed to
furnish information at the two park gateways, Leanchoil and Radium. The Bureau will
establish its own agent at Crowsnest Pass, Boat Encampment on the Big Bend Highway, and
at Chasm on the Upper Fraser River. The B.C. Coast Steamships and the Puget Sound
Navigation Company have agreed to tabulate the motor traffic passing daily over their lines
at the three ports of Nanaimo, Sidney, and Victoria.
To evaluate the automobile tourist statistics collected in this way, the Bureau intends to
seek the co-operation of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Under the procedure now followed, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics collects a statement of approximate expenditures
from nearly every outgoing United States tourist and each incoming Canadian tourist. This
Bureau will attempt to secure the use of the information collected in that way by the Federal
authorities.
Foreign Cars entering British Columbia through Customs Ports, by Automobile
Tourist Zones, 1939 and 1940.
Zone.
On 48-hour Permits.
On 60-day Permits.
1939.
1940.
1939.
1940.
One 	
Cars.
7,212
12,026
23,263
Nil
Cars.
4,370
12,061
23,216
Nil
Cars.
6,064
11,322
86,890
9,584
Cars.
5,602
9,642
67,052
9,911
Two    	
Three  ...	
Six   	
3.885          !            3 481           I              JVV.
Nil Q 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Canadian Cars Touring the United States as reported at Customs Ports in British Columbia,
shown according to Automobile Tourist Zones.
On Permits of 24 Hours
OR LESS.
On Permits over 24 Hours.
1939.
1940.
1939.
1940.
One                       	
Cars.                   Cars.                    Cars.
4,618                     2,259                      6,182
11,569                    7,979                    7,521
67,336                  58,915                  35,645
64                         22                    2,287
Cars.
2,757
Two       ...  	
4,161
27,138
Four   	
958
7.522         1           6.125         1            Nil
Nil
Automobile tourists from nearly every state of the United States visit British Columbia
during the tourist season. A graphic illustration of this movement during 1940 has been
presented in the map  (Chart B).
Directory of Products manufactured in British Columbia.
Since the publication of a mimeographed directory of manufacturing establishments in
1939—prepared to assist representatives of the Department of Trade and Industry and to
inform the various war-purchasing authorities in Ottawa about British Columbia producers—
the Department has received many requests for a complete Trade Index. This Bureau undertook the preparation of a full Directory of British Columbia manufactured products early in
the year, and it is expected that the Directory will be ready for release about November, 1941.
The Directory will include the names of nearly all British Columbia manufacturers arranged
alphabetically under the individual products manufactured. Since this is to be a guide to
manufactured products only, the primary industries, construction, distribution, and the
various service trades and industries will not be included. The Bureau has received the
generous co-operation of the British Columbia Branch of the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association and the Vancouver Board of Trade in the task of compiling this new Directory.
Other Reports.
In addition to the projects outlined previously, the Bureau has prepared numerous
special reports and memoranda for officials of the Provincial Government. The Director of
the Bureau, Mr. G. N. Perry, served as a consultant to the Provincial Finance Committee
studying the Rowell-Sirois Report. Preparatory economic research has been continued in
the industrial survey commenced in 1939—designed to reveal opportunities in British
Columbia for the profitable investment of capital in new industrial enterprises. A number
of special reports have been prepared to assist officials of the Wartime Prices and Trade
Board and members of the Defence Departments. The Bureau has prepared special information, also, in response to written inquiries from corporations and from private individuals on
a wide range of subjects.
THE LABOUR DIVISION.
In accordance with an agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department
of Labour and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, the Labour Division of this Bureau
conducted and compiled the 1940 statistical survey of wage-earners employed in British
Columbia trades and industries. Detailed statistical information on this subject may be
found in the annual report of the Department of Labour for the calendar year 1940.
Work in this Division is largely concerned with statistical requirements of the Department of Labour and its various administrative bodies. Pressure of other war-time work has
prevented the Employment Division of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics from carrying out
an agreement made last year to provide this Bureau with regional employment indexes. At
the present time the Dominion Bureau of Statistics prepares an employment index for the
Province as a whole. Under the arrangement it is expected that ultimately indexes will be
made available on a regional plan. p.
Eh
<
a
o
Ph
o
O
HI
w
F-
«.
H
H
B
H
O
I-H
O
o
OS
s
P5
H
Ph
5
o
H
Q
%
OC
a
P
H
HH
z
XT
W
B
o
p
«.
D
15
a
o
!5
hH
CS
H
15
w
05
H
CO
o
S
o
H
P
<.
!5
a
o
I
z
t iff
j/
/
s
—-	
—.
N
.
ff£
/
<  (D
/
'n».
/
•••
/
.1
e
r
o
,C
GG
03
03
3
3
«
o
•i-H
U
rt
XI
■s
CJ
+3
Fh
pq
PHI
a
A
Sh
ca
O
r/l
>
bo
4^
"I
m
o
>
c
bo
u
03
tH
o
ftf;
Sh
Sh
o
0)
<H
J=
I
fa
3
03
.5
_H
	  DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 21
The study of labour turnover has been continued. The Bureau, in planning to provide
data of importance to the study of employment conditions in the Province, undertook the
task of collecting data on the question of labour turnover in basic industries in 1938. Since
that time, in spite of the difficulties involved, employers have been able, in most cases, to
provide fairly accurate annual returns on this subject. However, until the survey has had
the benefit of several years' experience, the study will be carried on a research basis. When
the data have been thoroughly tested, it is intended that regular reports on this question
should be published annually.
THE MINING AND METALLURGICAL DIVISION.
In accordance with an agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial Department
of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics,
the Mining and Metallurgical Division conducted and compiled the 1940 annual statistical
survey of the mining industry. Detailed statistical information on this subject may be
found in the annual report of the Minister of Mines for the calendar year 1940.
The work of this Division during the year has been largely concerned with the preparation
of statistical material for the Department of Mines, and the co-ordination of mining statistics,
with information collected and compiled in other divisions of the Bureau.
THE MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION.
This Division, which is operated as a service department, has continued to accept custom
work from other Provincial Departments in addition to statistical work arising within the
Bureau. The large volume of work made possible by this arrangement has permitted
efficient machine operation. The rapid preparation of large-scale statistical surveys and
reports depends upon the use of tabulating machinery. The Mechanical Tabulating Division,
utilizing punch-card equipment, is responsible for this phase of work in the Bureau. The
Division has been operated on a straight-cost basis, and each Department has been assessed
in proportion to the number of machine-hours required in the performance of its contract.
The volume of work referred to this division has shown a steady increase during the last year.
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
British Columbia's remarkable advantages for tourist travel are being recognized to
increasing extent each year, and notwithstanding handicaps imposed due to current conditions,
which had a deterring effect upon travel from the United States, the tourist trade during the
fiscal year ended March 31st, 1941, showed healthy progress. Hotels, stopping-places, and
other services catering to travel reported a satisfactory season. With continuing effect of
advertising and publicity the attractions and opportunities of the Province are becoming
more widely known to the many millions of potential travellers within the markets accessible
to the Province, and since travel of Canadians to the United States has been restricted owing
to regulations imposed due to the exigencies of war, the people of other Provinces, largely
due to advertising and energetic promotional activities of the Bureau, are being made more
aware of what this favoured Province has to offer, not only in summer but also during the
winter months.
British Columbia's tourist trade, largely in consequence of the activities of the British
Columbia Government Travel Bureau, with aid of local and other travel promotion bureaus,
transportation, and other interests which co-operate with it, is steadily becoming more valuable
and is now generally recognized as an important factor in the economic welfare of the
Province.
During 1940 various unforeseen handicaps affecting travel had to be confronted and
each was energetically dealt with by the Bureau. It had been anticipated by all travel
promotion bodies when the year opened that as overseas travel was largely stopped the year
would see record travel, and in the first part of the year these expectations gave promise of
being realized. Travel showed appreciable increase in the first half-year. The collapse of
France, however, caused conditions which resulted in general cancellation of travel plans
throughout the United States.    Though confidence was restored and travel again resumed Q 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
more normal conditions in the United States, imposition of regulations affecting travel and
misconceptions which arose concerning them adversely affected travel to Canada.
As the second half of the year opened regulations were made requiring that Canadians
must obtain passports and visas in order to visit the United States. Though the people of
the United States did not require passports to visit Canada, and no deterring measures were
imposed to interfere with travel to the Dominion, the imposition of the passport regulations
upon Canadians and later restrictions upon export of currency for pleasure travel was
followed by a period during which the United States immigration officials insisted upon
production of passports or birth certificates by returning United States visitors as proof of
citizenship, with result that motor travel from the United States declined during July to
about half of the normal volume. These requirements were subsequently eased and returning
visitors were called upon for production of ordinary documentation, such as voters' registration cards or other papers usually carried; but for a time there was widespread misconception that visitors would encounter difficulties when returning, and to the close of the year
travel was affected, though the decline was less with each succeeding month.
Energetic efforts were made to cope with these conditions and allay misconceptions,
which were accentuated to some degree by enemy propaganda then more active, though it
has since been reduced to minor proportions. The consequence of these conditions, however,
was that instead of a large increase in travel anticipated as the year began there was a
decline in the traffic from the United States—a decline which would have been greater but
for the activities of the Bureau and its allies. The number of motor-cars entering the
Province directly from the United States in 1940 was 135,457 (of which 92,278 had 60-day
permits) compared with 160,563 (including 113,862 with 60-day permits) in 1939. Figures
are not available for rail, steamship, bus, air, and other forms of travel, but reports from
transportation officials indicate that the decline was not as great as in motor travel.
Travel from other Provinces, on the other hand, broke all previous records and more
than offset the decline in travel from the United States, with the result that the tourist trade
of the Province in general showed an increase. Winter travel to British Columbia from other
Provinces was more important than in any previous year. Owing to restriction of Canadian
travel to the United States, coupled with the fact that nowhere else in Canada can evergreen
winter conditions be found to approximate those of the southern regions many easterners
had been in the habit of visiting in winter, the Bureau engaged in advertising and promotion
to develop this traffic, with good result. Also, British Columbians to increased extent enjoyed
vacation travel in their own Province. The net result was that British Columbia had a
satisfactory travel year and interests depending upon the tourist industry reported better
business than in the preceding year.
Conditions respecting travel from the United States have shown increasing improvement
since the close of the fiscal year, and it is anticipated that a considerable increase will be
recorded for the ensuing year. During the first six months, when travel showed increases
in 1940, the motor travel corresponded in volume and more than doubled in July. Further
increases can be confidently anticipated during the ensuing months. During the first seven
months of 1941 a total of 85,367 cars were reported entering directly—a further volume
also entered by way of the Alberta border—compared with 80,284 cars during the corresponding period of 1940. Larger increases were reported in rail and other forms of travel, and
hotels and resorts reported much better business than in the preceding year. It is also
anticipated, with a stronger promotional programme in which the railways will associate,
that there will be an increased volume of winter travel.
Recognizing that tourist travel has been steadily increasing and that the tourist industry
is an important economic factor, when the Department of Trade and Industry was established
the Government reorganized the Bureau, which had functioned for many years as the Provincial Bureau of Information and engaged incidental to other duties in travel promotion,
as the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau and charged it with the stimulation of
tourist travel and development of the tourist industry. This is its essential duty, though it
also serves as an information and publicity bureau to promote settlement, industrial and other
development, and as an agency for Government advertising. It has the advice of a Provincial
Tourist Council—a non-executive study and advisory board appointed by the Minister. The
Bureau is a vigorous and active agent in promoting the tourist trade and co-operates with, DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 23
and has allies in, the city and other tourist promotion bureaus, transportation, and other
related interests.
British Columbia has opportunities for a great tourist industry capable of increasing
expansion. Requisites for a successful tourist industry are adequate and attractive scenic,
recreational, sporting, climatic, and other resources; and the necessary equipment to provide
access, transportation, accommodation, comfort, and pleasure. The attractions capable of
alluring and pleasing visitors are available in abundance and wide variety, coupled with
romantic background, appeal, and charm. Equipment is available in considerable degree.
These resources are assets forming a great stock-in-trade which can be sold and resold
through the years without diminution to provide an income of many millions of dollars, which
are so widely circulated that practically every business, trade, profession, service, or person
in the Province is benefited directly or indirectly.
It is the exploitation and exportation of these resources which constitutes the tourist
industry, and the exploitation if profitable with relation to the resources and equipment
possessed, markets available, and extent of the promotional activities brought to bear upon
the exploitation. This is the task of the Bureau which forms the sales promotion branch of
this lucrative business, and it must needs use the methods and technique which experience
has shown to be requisite to any big business seeking customers by the millions. The
development of tourist travel has in recent years become a science requiring intervention of
special technical ability. The business is now a highly competitive one. All but four of
the States now have State Travel Bureaus, mostly engaging under Government auspices, and
several hundred communities also engage to attract travel.
The Bureau is charged with the documentation of information relating to the tourist
industry, advertising, publicity, and other miscellaneous promotional activities. As a basis
for its work as complete knowledge as is obtainable of the resources, facilities, and other
matters appurtenant to the tourist industry must be assembled, documented, catalogued, and
made available for ready use; and this information must be constantly revised. It must
also conduct research relating to actual and potential markets, changing conditions and
trends of travel, economic and other affecting factors, media available to reach potential
customers, and varied other related matters. Data respecting volume and value of travel
must also be assembled. In fact, wide range of study and documentation is required. The
Bureau is coping with these duties to the extent of its physical capacity and seeks to arouse
local interests to the benefits of co-operating in assembling local information.
As in any big business seeking sales in volume, direct advertising is essential, supported
by publicity, field-work, and other promotional activities and energetic follow-up. There are
millions of potential visitors within ready access, but they must be made aware of the
attractions and opportunities, and in a manner that will attract and allure them, else they
cannot be expected to take advantage of what the Province can offer. Consequently, the
Bureau conducts an advertising campaign, the benefits of which are becoming increasingly
apparent.
The advertising plan for 1940 was designed to cover the national field on a continental
basis through media of fifteen United States and five Canadian magazines, in which fifty-four
advertisements were used and circulated to 50,434,328 paid subscribers. In co-operation with
the Washington State Progress Commission and Oregon Highways Commission, the campaign
was inaugurated with joint advertisements occupying full bleed pages in four colours in Life
and National Geographic magazines, which evoked excellent response. The national advertising was reinforced by regional campaigns, utilizing newspapers of the Pacific, Mountain,
and Central groups of States and Canada, together with motor magazines and billboards in
the Pacific States. Excluding the twenty-five large roadside billboards, the regional advertising embraced 462 displays circulated to 62,113,496 paid subscribers. The advertising reached
an aggregate of 106,277,855 paid subscribers, and a much greater audience due to recirculation
of the various publications. The Vancouver Tourist Bureau co-operated by arranging its
advertising schedule to cover use of publications other than those reached by the Bureau, and
the Game Board aided by use of advertising in sporting magazines. Due attention was given
to local interests in addition to the general advertising. Local bureaus were consulted and
special advertisements were incorporated for regional advantage. In addition to the advertising for summer travel, a winter campaign, in co-operation with the transcontinental railways, Q 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
used sixty-five displays in five Canadian magazines and general newspapers and six city
newspapers reaching 4,979,099 paid subscribers. Also a " See British Columbia " campaign
with objective of developing travel within the Province used about 400 advertisements in
eighty local newspapers. A brochure was issued by the Bureau in which the advertising
plan was shown in detail and reproductions of the advertising displays were presented.
The advertising campaign for 1941 was planned on similar lines. The national advertising included displays in National Geographic, Saturday Evening Post, Colliers, Life, Time,
American, Cosmopolitan, Women's Home Companion, Ladies' Home Journal, Fortune, New
Yorker, Better Homes and Gardens, American Home, House and Garden, and Sunset magazines
reaching over 51,000,000 paid subscribers. It had been planned to again join with the
Washington and Oregon bureaus in combined advertisements to appear in Colliers and
National Geographic magazines occupying full pages in four colours, and although these
advertisements were designed the failure of the Washington Bureau to receive its budget in
time prevented this plan from being carried out. Use was made of the special travel editions
of two New York, two Chicago, and one Boston newspapers. The regional advertising used
newspapers in the Pacific, Mountain, and Central States, and in Canada. In the Pacific and
Western States displays were used in twenty-one newspapers and six motor magazines, and
twenty-five billboards were used, the publications reaching over 20,000,000 paid subscribers.
In the Central States twelve newspapers were used, the displays reaching over 12,000,000
paid subscribers. In Canada a monthly magazine, three general weeklies, and thirteen
newspapers were used; these displays reached more than 11,000,000 paid subscribers.
Advertisements placed by the Game Board in sporting magazines had circulation of more
than 4,000,000. The total advertising for summer travel was circulated to more than
100,000,000 paid subscribers. A winter advertising campaign has been planned, in which the
transcontinental railways will join, using magazines, general newspapers, and city papers
with displays which will reach upwards of 5,000,000 subscribers.
The advertising was supported by a well organized publicity campaign embracing many
lines of endeavour. Wide range of newspaper and magazine articles, photographs and
illustrations, radio scripts, and other material were prepared and circulated by the Bureau
and considerable proportion of publication obtained, as is attested by tear-sheets on file in
the Bureau. Under contract with the Gilliam Syndicate a series of eight three-column
illustrated newspaper feature layouts were prepared. The art work and engraving was
executed from sketches, photographs, and material provided by the Bureau, and matrices
made -which were circulated to about a thousand newspapers, covering a period of eight
weeks. Tear-sheets were furnished, indicating that a large proportion of publication was
received. In co-operation with magazines in which advertisements were used, window and
store displays and radio broadcasts were arranged.
Considerable extension was made in use of motion pictures for publicity purposes. Under
contract with the Bureau, Mr. Leon C. Shelly produced an excellent theatrical motion-picture
travellogue in colour with sound, including narration and incidental orchestral music. This
picture, produced with aid of outstanding talent in keeping with the most modern technique
and vying with the best pictures of its kind, was entitled " Beautiful British Columbia " and
was planned to be widely representative of the scenic beauties of the various sections of the
Province. It was released in February, 1941, and was distributed by two of the major
motion-picture companies. The picture has been in constant circulation since its release and
has been shown in several thousands of theatres. Many who saw the picture in various cities
have written warmly commending it. The narration was later translated into Spanish for
further showings in Latin America. The success achieved by this picture induced the Bureau
to make arrangements for production of another similar picture, which will feature hunting,
fishing, and other recreational and outdoor features.    This is now being made.
Much advance has been made in production by the Bureau of 16-millimetre films in colour.
A studio and projection-room was fitted up and the film library is stored and serviced there.
An official of the Bureau was detailed as photographer to specialize in making motion and
still pictures, and a number of pictures have been made by this officer, which with other
additions acquired by purchase and on loan from the National Film Board and other branches
of the Dominion Government and railway companies, has augmented the library. Wide
circulation has been given to these pictures abroad and at home.    Many demands are made '
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 25
upon the Bureau for showings and the pictures are used extensively by the field representative
of the Bureau in his field-work.
The photographic library has also been extended. Photographs are used advantageously
and are much in demand by editors of newspapers and magazines, and are also required for
advertising, literature, and other purposes. The Bureau is constantly adding to its stock, and
its library now includes several thousands of negatives which are catalogued and made
available for ready production of prints as they are required. In addition to black and white
pictures the Bureau's library also includes several hundred pictures in colour.
At the beginning of 1941 an attractive poster of window-display size—24 by 36 inches—
was designed and lithographed for the Bureau in five colours, and a photographic reduction
was made on cardboard with an easel mount for desk use. These posters have been largely
circulated to railway, bus, and other transportation offices, travel bureaus, and other organizations, and have been widely displayed. A number were framed and used for window
displays in passenger offices of the transcontinental railway companies in the United States
and Canada.
Displays at outing shows and exhibitions have been used with good effect. As in former
years, and with like good effect, a display was made in a prominent position at the annual
Outing Show of the Automobile Club of Southern California, held in the attractive and
spacious patio of the club at Los Angeles in April. It was attended by the Commissioner
and Field Officer of the Bureau, and was visited by more than a quarter million people. The
display was made up mainly of panels in which illuminated transparencies were inset and
attracted much attention. Several thousands who expressed desire or intent to visit the
Province registered at the booth to receive information, and hundreds who had made definite
plans were interviewed and advised in accordance with their desires. Officials of the Automobile Club co-operated closely with the Bureau's officials to make this display successful. A
very close liaison has been effected by the Bureau with this important motoring organization
which does much to aid in directing travel to the Province. It disseminates information and
distributes literature, including, in addition to the material provided by the Bureau, maps and
pamphlets dealing with the Province, which are printed by the Club.
In collaboration with the Pacific Northwest Tourist Association, the Bureau contributed
transparencies, literature, and other material for incorporation in displays made by the
Association at Outing Shows at Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, and other United
States cities. This Association, with which the Bureau associates in co-operation, arranged
field and contact trips and organized a tour of travel directors and travel editors of prominent
newspapers, and included British Columbia points in the itinerary. Early in 1941 the
Bureau arranged a display at an Outing Show at Walla Walla, which was attended by the
Field Officer who showed motion pictures to interested audiences. Displays were made at the
Vancouver and Victoria exhibitions, the striking display used at the San Francisco exposition
in 1939 being re-erected at the Vancouver exhibition.
Various other miscellaneous publicity features were used, both independently and in
association with other travel promotion agencies.
Literature is an essential factor. It provides the most efficient and most economic means
of satisfying inquirers, affords a valuable medium of publicity, and is requisite to follow-up
the general advertising, publicity, and promotion. The Bureau has steadily improved its
literature, which has to encounter much competition, and in design, technique, and production
it vies with that produced by most other travel promotion bureaus. Heretofore the range of
booklets and folders issued had been restricted to essential requirements, but owing to new
problems presented by current conditions and for other reasons new publications have been
added. To attract initial attention and for broadcast and rack distribution purposes a map
folder is used in which a map printed in four colours is presented, together with concise
information and a montage of striking illustrations. Another folder used for broadcast and
rack distribution is designed to offset misconceptions relating to war-time border crossing
arrangements. This publication with the caption " British Columbia Welcomes Visitors—=
Restrictions? Positively None! " conveys information that travel to and from the Province
is not restricted, concerning exchange and other matters.    It was given wide circulation.
" Alluring British Columbia " is a souvenir booklet with a concise resume of the attractions
and vacation  opportunities,  illustrated  profusely with  reproductions  of  scenic features  in Q 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
various parts of the Province and printed in four colours. It is intended to revise and
improve this publication. " British Columbia's Picturesque Highways " is an illustrated
guide-book to the highways of the Province with strip maps and descriptive material, including
historic notes relating to the various routes available to motorists. " Rod and Rifle in
British Columbia" is a well-illustrated booklet dealing with hunting, fishing, and other
recreational features. " Auto Camps and Stopping-places " lists the roadside accommodations
and particulars concerning them. Special folders have been issued dealing with highways,
notably the Big Bend Highway, and with Provincial Parks. A folder is in preparation dealing
with the Cariboo Highway and a booklet with Vancouver Island. A special folder, entitled
" Escape Winter, come to the Coast of British Columbia," in which dated reproductions of
newspaper illustrations depicting winter scenes are used, has been issued for circulation in
other Provinces to aid in informing potential winter visitors of the favoured climatic conditions
on the British Columbia seaboard.
With objective of augmenting attendance at conventions held by various organizations
in British Columbia cities, special pamphlets illustrated with photographs have been prepared
to publicize the locale of the conventions. The emblem of the convening body was incorporated
into the cover design and close circulation to potential visitors arranged in co-operation with
the organization, which distributed the pamphlets directly to their membership through the
local branches. These publications were effective in aiding to secure attendance at the
conventions.
For general purposes other than travel promotion a well-illustrated booklet, " British
Columbia," is published, dealing with resources and general features of the Province. With
objective of enabling British Columbia's soldiers abroad to intelligently answer questions
concerning the Province, a booklet covering a wide range of questions and answers, entitled
" Tell me about British Columbia " was issued. It is intended to reprint an edition of this
informative booklet for general circulation. A series of small pamphlets—the Land Series
Bulletins—deals with conditions prevailing in the several land districts and with regulations
regarding purchase, lease, and pre-emption of Crown lands.
In addition to these varied booklets and pamphlets, the Bureau also prepares and issues
many printed and mimeographed bulletins and circulars dealing with hunting, fishing,
customs, immigration, and other regulations; concerning canoe and water routes, and
miscellaneous other informative material. With co-operation of the Department of Public
Works, whose engineers assemble the information, and Provincial Police, who forward it
promptly by radio, the Bureau prepares and distributes fortnightly bulletins on current road
conditions during the travel season, and these are forwarded to some three hundred motor
clubs, travel bureaus, newspapers, boards of trade, and others. Many of these bodies widely
recirculate the information.
Field-work is a feature of the Bureau's activities to which increasing attention is being
given. The Field Officer of the Bureau engages similarly as a travelling salesman to sell
travel to the Province. In addition to publicizing the Province by showing motion pictures
and addressing gatherings, contacting travel agencies and arranging co-operation, organizing
distribution of literature and publicity material, interviewing prospects and generally
promoting travel, he also deals with situations which arise, such as misconceptions regarding
entry or exit or other circumstances, and reports on travel trends and conditions.
During the fiscal year under review the Bureau's field publicity work covered widespread
territory in the Pacific and Mountain States. In April the Field Officer attended the highly
successful Outing Show of the Automobile Club of Southern California, where the British
Columbia booth was the focal point for hundreds of intending visitors who received specific
information and literature directing them to the sections of the Province providing the types
of vacations they sought. Many of those interviewed subsequently visited the Province and
the files of the Bureau amply prove the value of participation in this attractive show.
Previous to, and following, the Outing Show the Field Officer was occupied with an
intensive schedule of motion picture showings before Service Clubs and varied other gatherings in all the main centres of California, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Coloured motion
pictures of British Columbia scenery and recreational features with accompanying narration
concerning them were received with gratifying enthusiasm by all audiences. Supplies of
literature were distributed from the Bureau's automobile and arrangements effected with DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 27
responsible persons in hotel and transportation offices, travel bureaus, automobile clubs,
leading sporting goods stores, well-rated auto courts and tourist resorts to place this material
before the travelling public. Also arrangements were made enabling renewal of supplies
as required on an organized basis. Newspaper and magazine publishers were visited, with
result that considerable publicity was obtained. Poster displays were installed and arrangements were made whereby information concerning the Province could be disseminated and for
speedy reference of all serious inquiries to the Bureau.
Acknowledging the great vacation appeal of British Columbia, the Black Hills and Bad
Lands Association of South Dakota honoured the Bureau by inviting representatives to
attend a convention of travel directors as guests of the Association. The Commissioner and
the Field representative made the trip to South Dakota and were favoured not only with the
opportunity of meeting leading travel editors and directors assembled from various States,
but also to speak on several occasions at public gatherings and to show motion pictures before
the assemblies; no other district represented being so honoured in like degree. En route
to and from this convention leading centres in eastern Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Utah
were visited and a number of new co-operating contact points were established to disseminate
information and distribute literature; also considerable volume of publicity was obtained
from newspapers of the centres visited.
As a special effort, in combination with other work of the Bureau in this connection, the
Field Officer was assigned to the Northwestern States to engage to offset the effect of false
rumours which had been widely circulated in respect of border regulations. Travel directors,
transportation offices, hotels and auto courts, service-stations, and leading restaurants catering
to tourists on the main arteries of travel were visited and support enlisted to correct erroneous
ideas about anticipated difficulties of entering or leaving Canada. Newspapers were visited
and their aid enrolled, and statements correcting false impressions were published. Some
special advertising was also placed by the Bureau in this connection. Considerable valuable
co-operation was obtained and a great deal of good work accomplished with marked effect
upon travel.
In addition to publicity and field-work in the United States, the Bureau's representative
engaged in an active interest in the British Columbia travels of several prominent visitors
representing substantial outlets for favourable publicity. These included newspaper and
publicity men, photographers and radio programme directors. With the Bureau's aid their
trips were made more enjoyable and they were enabled to secure a better idea of British
Columbia's vacation appeal than they would have obtained if they had been unattended, and
considerable valuable publicity resulted.
During the initial two months of 1941, publicity stories, photographs, and motion-picture
subjects were compiled in readiness for a spring trip to the Pacific and Mountain States, and
this journey, which covered the most comprehensive itinerary initiated by the Bureau, proved
very effective. At the close of the fiscal year the Bureau's representative was in San Francisco after having covered the highway routes of Washington, Oregon, and Northern California, and subsequently he spent some weeks in Southern California, including attendance at
the Outing Show at Los Angeles, where the Dominion Trades and Commerce Department
joined with the Bureau in a very striking display which attracted marked attention. During
his stay in Southern California the Field Officer made motion-picture showings on a schedule
comprising six to ten showings a week to interested audiences ranging from fifty to five
hundred. During the fiscal year more than 100,000 pieces of literature were distributed
through the Bureau's field service; motion pictures were shown to many thousands, and many
hundreds were spoken to personally regarding vacation trips to British Columbia.
Valuable co-operation is provided to the Bureau by numerous organizations—automobile
clubs, transportation offices, travel bureaus, oil companies, film producers, newspapers, publicity and advertising agencies, radio, hotel and other interests, and it is important that the
contacts made and built up through the years with the executives and officials of the several
concerns be maintained as closely as possible. With this end in view the Commissioner visited
centres of the Pacific Coast early in the year to confer and consult with the various officials.
Incidental to the development of these contacts a considerable amount of publicity was
obtained. A close accord has been made with publishers, editors, and advertising managers
of the newspapers, and they are readily willing to publicize the travel opportunities of the Q 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Province. Their co-operation was especially valuable in dispelling erroneous ideas, largely
prevalent during the year under review, regarding border conditions. A notable service was
afforded by Mr. W. R. Hearst, publisher of a chain of important newspapers with very great
circulation in the United States, who devoted the column contributed by him and published
on the front page of his newspapers, together with other publications, to a lengthy and
eulogistic statement concerning the vacation opportunities and frankly advised the people of
the United States to visit Canada. One of the paragraphs used by Mr. William Randolph
Hearst, which circulated to many millions, was:—
" The fact that vacation visits to Canada by our citizens of the United States may benefit
Canada and may cultivate still closer sentimental relations between our home folks and the
people of Canada is not the sole reason why this brutally practical and -materially minded
columnist advises his fellow citizens to consider Canada as a vacation ground this year. The
reason is because our folks will find an immense enjoyment there of a kind they will not be
able to find anywhere else."
Through the instrumentality of the Commissioner a number of other publicity articles
which had wide circulation were also used. Also some valuable arrangements for various
co-operative services were effected.
Under contract with the Bureau the " Ask Mr. Foster " service engaged on behalf of
travel to the Province through the agency of its seventy branches in city centres of the
United States and Canada. These offices acted as distribution agencies for literature,
exhibited posters, and advised inquirers concerning the vacation opportunities of the Province.
To facilitate the answering of inquiries the Bureau provided each of the offices with a comprehensive folio of answers to probable questions. Lists of inquiries were forwarded to the
Bureau to enable follow-up. The Bureau also contracted with the Peck-Judan Rack distribution service whereby its several hundred racks in the Pacific and Mountain States were
stocked with folders and serviced to renew supplies.
The Bureau has co-operated to great extent with city and regional bureaus, boards of
trade, and other travel promotion interests in the Province. During the year it aided local
interests in the establishment of the Upper Island Publicity Bureau at Nanaimo, which was
added to various regional bureaus previously established with instigation of the Bureau. In
the previous year considerable attention was paid to interesting localities with opportunities
to attract visitors to initiate local tourist bureaus supported by local enterprise to function
primarily for regional benefit, taking advantage of the Bureau's advertising and publicity.
The Commissioner then visited many of the cities of the Province with this objective, and a
number of local bureaus were formed which have since rendered valuable services to their
communities.
As local bureaus are dependent upon their own initiation and enterprise, their establishment cannot be imposed by the Bureau. It can only draw the attention to communities of
their advantage and advise. The development of local bureaus, however, is important not
only to the region but also to the progress of the tourist industry in general. There are many
functions with which the Bureau cannot deal effectively which require intervention of local
bureaus—notably the varied local receptive, improvement, and regulatory duties. It is not
to be anticipated that, apart from the Vancouver and Victoria bureaus, substantially aided
by municipal grants, that local bureaus will be able to conduct advertising or publicity on
any scale; but this is done for them, in common with other Provincial interests, by the
Bureau. With limited financial capacity they will be largely restricted to the publication of
a local pamphlet, the assembly of local information and publicity material, and conduct of an
information bureau to satisfy inquiries. Apart from seeking to make local attractions better
known, though, a regional bureau can afford a channel through which the Bureau can
co-operate with local interests, as it is eager to co-operate, and will afford a clearing-house
for the distribution of local literature, information, and publicity, and will relay inquiries of
local interest.
Functions which can engage attention of local bureaus advantageously include the welcoming of visitors; promoting improvement of access, equipment, and preservation and
development of attractions; maintenance of standards, checking undue exploitation; promotion of artificial stimulants, such as celebrations, sporting or other assemblies. They can act
as intermediaries between public administration, transportation, hotel, and other interests. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Q 29
In fact, there is a wide range of functions available to local bureaus which can be accomplished
best by them, which will not only further the development of the tourist trade of the region
but will also benefit the tourist industry as a whole.
Development of local bureaus is not as easy as might be imagined, considering that most
people are well apprised of the value of tourist travel to their communities. The hureaus
now operating, considering their financial ability, have performed excellent work for their
respective districts; but the role of the local bureau and its requirements needs study. It is
difficult to raise adequate funds, and as successful operation of a local bureau requires much
work, initiative, and often self-sacrificing public service, development is slow, and most
progress is being made where the initiation comes from the region without outside impulse.
Sound organization, looking to eventual establishment of a chain of regional bureaus
cohered into a homogeneous Provincial body co-operating with the central Bureau with each
unit functioning within its proper scope and sphere to engage for the common good as well
as for regional benefit, will probably require some measure of supervision and regulation;
and it may be desirable that the initiation of a local bureau should be made subject to the
sanction of the Minister and that regulations be made to define the powers and scope of local
bureaus. Otherwise it will be difficult, if possible, to bring about such cohesion as will best
serve the regional interests and those of the industry in general.
The Bureau has conducted research respecting historic sites and objects within the
Province and has prepared a comprehensive inventory, together with information relating to
methods adopted elsewhere for marking such sites and for preservation and renovation of
historic objects. Several sites were suitably marked during the year, notably the Craigflower
Schoolhouse, pioneer standing school building established by the Crown Colony of Vancouver
Island in 1856, and the site where the Semiahmoo Trail, used by gold-seekers journeying to
Fraser River in 1858 from Whatcom, now Bellingham, crosses the new King George VI.
Highway. These sites were marked with large boulders placed on a platform of cement and
rubble in which bronze plates with descriptions were inset. Arrangements have been made
with the Public Works Department whereby notable physiographic features will be marked.
Uniform markings, consisting of a panel cross-piece on a squared post, will serve as both
markers and pointers. For further markings of historic sites a marker has been devised,
consisting of a heavy rustic post and cross-arm with a suspended panel. These are under
construction and will be placed as the sites selected for marking are determined.
The Bureau collaborated with the Provincial Museum and Department of the Provincial
Secretary in the planning and establishment of Thunderbird Park, and prepared and published a well-illustrated booklet descriptive of this feature, which will attract much attention.
A suitable site was procured from the City of Victoria, located at the corner of Douglas and
Belleville Streets, and a number of excellent specimens of Indian totemry, house-fronts, and
other material which has been collected by the Provincial Museum from various native villages
of the Province were assembled. Due care was taken, with advice of a committee appointed
for this purpose, in laying out the plans, and erection of the totems, house-fronts and
" illahees " was well under way at the close of the fiscal year. The grounds were prepared
by the Public Works Department and lawns made. Arrangements were made for formally
opening Thunderbird Park in May, 1941.
In collaboration with the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, the Bureau is engaged in
developing improved statistical data relating to tourist travel. Statistics are compiled by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics in co-operation with the Customs and Immigration services
and monthly reports are issued. These figures are confined to entries of motor-cars from the
United States through the customs ports on the United States border of British Columbia,
showing numbers of cars entering with 48-hour and 60-day permits, and the numbers of
Canadian cars reported outward through these ports are shown classified as to stay for less
than 24 hours and for longer period. No figures are available, however, from this source
indicative of the further numbers of United States cars which enter by other Provinces and
subsequently continue via Alberta into the Province, or of the numbers of Canadian cars from
other Provinces which enter by way of the Alberta border. The Dominion statisticians also
present an annual report which purports to show rail and steamship travel from the United
States, but owing to the method of assembling these figures they are of little value as an
indication of the numbers who entered the Province by these forms of transportation.    Based Q 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
upon replies from a limited number of questionnaires forwarded to returning travellers, the
Dominion bureau also provides estimated averages of numbers of passengers per motor-car,
stay, and expenditure.
With absence of information concerning other forms of travel and the varied classes,
some of which have high average expenditures, no accurate computation of tourist travel can
be made except as to the numbers of motor-cars which enter direct from the United States
by customs ports. This traffic, though an important part, is but one of many forms and
classes of travel which contribute to the tourist trade. There is also a considerable traffic
comprising additional motor-cars from the United States and Canadian cars from other
Provinces which enter by the Alberta border, and there is a large volume of rail, steamship,
bus, and air travel to the Province embracing many varied classes. Varying degree of
contribution to the tourist income is made by these classes. For instance, hunting and fishing,
and yachting travel have high averages. There are, in fact, many classes of travel to be
considered, inclusive of ocean, coastwise, local and excursion steamship travel, tour party,
convention, and other forms. Until further information can be obtained relative to these
varied forms and classes, in addition to that relating to the direct motor travel, no closely
accurate statement is possible respecting the volume or value of the tourist trade.
The Director of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics visited a number of control
points where stations were established to furnish records denoting motor travel, and efforts
are under way with objective or securing closer information.
In addition to fostering tourist travel, the Bureau has engaged as an information bureau
and to publicize the resources and opportunities of the Province in general, notably to attract
residents; and it had considerable measure of success in this respect. Many persons with
substantial incomes have come from other lands to take up residence in the Province following
correspondence with the Bureau.
In previous reports, reference has been made to the settlement angle and to the Bureau's
activities in that regard, and sufficient emphasis has been laid upon them to indicate the
extent to which the Bureau has interested itself. It is not proposed here to go into this at
any great length; but simply to point out that this angle must become an increasingly
important function, and one to which the Bureau must expect to devote a substantial portion
of its time. Inevitably, with the cessation of hostilities, British Columbia may look for a
lively influx of settlers, not only of people who might be expected in any case to favour it as
a place to which to retire, but of people whose affairs have been so disrupted by the war as
to impel them to seek a new field for their re-establishment.
With that in view, it is felt that the Bureau might well begin to anticipate the demand
for information from the settlement angle, by arranging and compiling the fund of data
already on hand, collecting such additional data as it feels it may require, and in co-operation
with the other Departments proceed to prepare a comprehensive booklet, or booklets, to cover
the situation.
In previous reports, extensive quotations have appeared to indicate the widespread
interest in British Columbia, and the satisfactory results that have accrued from the Bureau's
careful and sympathetic handling of such inquiries. In this report, only one such quotation
follows, that one being sufficient to show the feeling with which the Bureau is regarded by
those whom it has been able to assist:—■
" I want to thank you for the very kind assistance extended to me by your Department
when I arrived in British Columbia. Without your help it would have been practically
impossible to find a suitable place. It was far beyond anything that we as strangers in a
strange land could expect, and it was given with such wholeheartedness that we will be for
ever grateful. Both my wife and myself are enamoured with the district and surrounding
country, which was certainly in no way overrated, and I am sure we are going to be very
happy in this valley."
During the calendar year 1940 the Bureau dealt with a total of 56,981 inquiries and
distributed 702,810 pieces of literature, as compared with 41,123 inquiries and 253,942 pieces
of literature during the previous year—an increase of 15,858 inquiries or 38.5 per cent, and
of 448,868 pieces of literature circulated or over 176 per cent. The inquiries dealt with in
1939 were exclusive of the special listings made at the exhibit at the San Francisco exposition
and forwarded to the Bureau for attention, totalling 147,137, of which 2,782 were special inquiries involving detailed response.    Exclusive of these the inquiries received and dealt
with, showing the sources, compared as follows:— 1939.                     1940.
Direct tourist inquiries   12,641 15,175
" Ask Mr. Foster " Service  5,003                    5,098
Game Board   1,056                    1,922
Canadian Travel Bureau   6,938                    7,415
Evergreen Playground Association   1,430                    1,577
Washington State Progress Commission  1,746                         72
Pacific Northwest Tourist Association, etc.   836                    1,394
Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau         1,866
Total tourist inquiries      29,650 34,519
General letters and circulars      11,473 22,462
Total      41,123 56,981
Literature distributed   253,942 702,810
The Bureau's activities, as evidenced by the preceding review of varying features, covers
very wide range. Much documentation has to be assembled, revised, and catalogued, dealing
with touristic and other resources and equipment and accessories relative to tourist travel;
markets and travel trends; media available for advertising and publicity, and various other
matters. Recording, filing, book-keeping, accounting, preparing, and placing advertising of
varied nature, both for the Bureau and other service, and checking advertising accounts,
circularizafion, packaging, mailing, and other duties involve a mass of office detail. Considerable increase took place in the numbers of personal inquiries made at the counter of the
Bureau. The office accommodation, now severely taxed, was improved. Large racks were
installed in which an array of literature dealing with various sections of the Province and
other regions was displayed and made available to inquirers.
Follow-up is an important feature. Toward the close of each season several thousand
letters are forwarded to persons who made inquiries asking if they had visited the Province,
and if not if they desired further information. A questionnaire was enclosed in which those
who had visited were asked as to numbers in their parties, stay, expenditure, and remarks,
with result that much valuable information was obtained. Also, in connection with winter
travel extensive personal mailing-lists have been prepared.
The Bureau co-operates with, and receives co-operation from, many organizations and
interests engaging in travel promotion. It has close association with the Vancouver, Victoria,
and other regional tourist bureaus, boards of trade, and other interests within the Province;
with the Canadian Travel Bureau and the Provincial Tourist bureaus of other Provinces;
United States Travel Bureau and various State Bureaus, notably those of Washington and
Oregon and the two serving northern and southern California. It co-operates with the
Canadian Association of Tourist Bureaus, Evergreen Playground Association, and Pacific
Northwest Tourist Association—the Commissioner being appointed a director of these bodies
and the Minister a Vice-President of the latter. Also it works in co-operation with the Redwood Empire and various other tourist travel promotion bodies. Various departments of the
Dominion and Provincial Government services provide co-operation, notably the Foreign
Exchange Control Board, National Film Board, Parks, Customs, Immigration, Statistics, and
Trade and Commerce department whose representatives at Los Angeles and Chicago have
furnished valuable services, and the Public Works, Provincial Police, Forest Branch, and
other Provincial services. The Bureau enjoys close co-operation with the railway, steamship,
bus, air, and other transportation interests, travel bureaus promoting tour parties, hotel,
resort, and other interests. Its associations with motoring organizations result in beneficial
co-operation, especially from the Automobile Club of Southern California, California State
Motor Club, Oregon, Washington, Intermountain, Chicago and other clubs, and the American
Automobile Association. Various other bodies, highway associations, newspapers, and other
interests also provide co-operation.
The British Columbia Tourist Council, a non-executive study and advisory body appointed
by the Minister, has, since its formation, considered many phases appurtenant to the stimulation of tourist traffic and development of the tourist industry, and has made recommenda- Q 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
tions based upon its studies. Its advice and counsel have been of much value in aiding the
development of the Bureau's activities. The Council met at Vancouver in February, 1941,
and many matters bearing upon the tourist trade were discussed. The advertising, publicity,
and other promotional plans suggested by the Bureau for the work during the ensuing year
were outlined and discussion followed, embracing various suggestions. Among these was a
proposal that the Bureau should engage in direct mail advertising to contact with a personalized letter influential citizens of Los Angeles and Hollywood. In accordance with this
recommendation the Bureau prepared a special mailing-piece and secured mailing-lists comprising persons with substantial incomes in the suggested localities, and subsequently mailed
direct letters to several thousands. Various other phases were discussed, including advertising methods, highway improvement, changes in motor licence plates, and other matters
relating to development of the tourist industry.
A preview of the theatrical travellogue motion picture, " Beautiful British Columbia,"
which had been produced for the Bureau was shown to the Council and was warmly commended. This picture was released a few days later for distribution by Columbia Pictures
and Warner Brothers for a contemplated run comprising showings in several thousands of
theatres. Some discussion followed, during which the plans of the Bureau for increased
production of 16-millimetre films in colour were outlined, and it was suggested that another
picture be made for theatrical showing. In accordance with this recommendation arrange^
ments were later effected for production of another travellogue with like high degree of
technique in production. Luncheon and dinner meetings were attended by a number of
executives of tourist bodies and others prominently identified in the promotion of tourist
travel, and addresses were given by the Hon. W. J. Asselstine, Minister of Trade and Industry,
and others.
The Tourist Council, which is composed of thirteen members, seven of whom are representatives of various Departments and branches of the Government service, and six representatives of local tourist bureaus and different sections of the Province, is made up as
follows: —
E. G. Rowebottom (Chairman)...Deputy Minister, Trade and Industry.
J. Gordon Smith Commissioner, Government Travel Bureau.
T. W. S. Parsons Commissioner, British Columbia Police.
C. D. Orchard Chief Forester, Department of Lands.
Arthur Dixon Chief Engineer, Department of Public Works.
John V. Fisher Assistant Deputy Minister, Department of Finance.
F. R. Butler Member, Provincial Game Commission.
E. H. Adams Director, Vancouver Tourist Association.
G. I. Warren Commissioner, Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau.
T. W. Brown Solicitor, Prince Rupert.
Sydney J. Smith Kamloops Board of Trade.
J. B. Spurrier Fish and Game Club, Kelowna.
W. G. Lanskail Nelson Board of Trade.
TOURIST TRADE IN 1940.
With absence of complete information respecting all forms and classes which in their
aggregate make up the tourist trade, an accurate statement of the volume or value is not
possible. The only accurate data available deals with motor travel from the United States
entering directly through customs ports on the International Boundary. Statements of the
numbers of United States motor-cars subdivided into those with 48-hour and 60-day permits
are issued monthly, together with numbers of Canadian cars reported outward through the
customs ports subdivided into those which remain across the border less than 24 hours and
for longer periods. Annually the Dominion statisticians publish estimated averages based
upon replies received from a limited number of questionnaires forwarded to returning visitors
of the numbers of passengers per car, stay, and expenditures in each class. These averages,
which are for Canada as a whole, form the only basis available for computation of the
numbers of passengers, length of stay, and expenditures of this motoring traffic.
Though this travel forms a substantial proportion of the tourist traffic there are, however, various other forms of travel which contribute measurably to the tourist trade—rail, DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Q 33
steamship, bus, air, yacht. There are differing classifications using the varied methods of
transportation—hunting, fishing, and other recreational classes, tour party, convention, and
others, with widely varying degree of stay and expenditure. The rail travel includes a
substantial number of winter visitors in addition to the summer travel. Steamship travel
includes local and coastwise, ocean steamship—inclusive of travel in transit and that destined
to the Province which has high average stay and expenditure—coast and trip excursion.
Also there is an appreciable further volume of motoring travel, including United States cars
which enter by other Provinces and Canadian cars from other Provinces which enter by way
of the Alberta border. Steps are being taken to secure greater degree of information
respecting the varied forms other than the direct motor travel of which the only accurate
information is now available, but until this information is more complete a closely approximate, estimate of the volume or value of the tourist trade cannot be made.
The volume and value of the direct motor travel from the United States shown by
computing the numbers of passengers, days' stay, and expenditures from the averages published annually for Canada by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics for the past ten years,
exclusive of 1940, were:—
Year.
Cars.
Persons.
Days' Stay.
Expenditure.
Mileage.
1930 	
185,418
169,475
143,879
102,863
110,041
116,883
144,108
156,398
160,504
160,563
593,486
507,170
447,466
293,466
329,051
366,987
445,774
470,051
476,955
472,887
826,798
788,855
832,927
426,933
488,032
614,120
757,517
931,026
935,642
871,879
$15,872,180
13,473,200
10,644,855
4,397,679
5,506,895
8,060,274
8,606,292
11,490,887
12,043,000
11,039,942
69,878,780
1931	
1932      	
1933 	
75,168,080
64,153,756
40,008,951
1934               	
46,473,012
1935..- 	
54,515,159
1936  	
73,515,417
1937   	
91,461,394
1938     	
87,317,080
1939	
87,582,582
Totals 	
1,450,132
4,403,293
7,473,729
$101,135,204
690,074,211
In 1940 the Dominion Bureau of Statistics drastically revised its estimates of tourist
expenditures in Canada. They were based on a much greater volume of information than in
previous years. Whereas, in previous years, the expenditure sample for estimation of the
value of motor travel constituted but a fraction of 1 per cent, the sample used in 1940 covered
over 50 per cent., and, with other additional information obtained, indicated that previous
estimates were too high. A preliminary report issued by the Bureau said that while it is
impossible to state what the estimates would have been in 1939 had the same amount of
information been available as in 1940, if the sample expenditures of 1940 were applied to
the count of tourists for 1939 the receipts would have been about $164,000,000, instead of
$274,000,000 as then estimated. A preliminary statement of expenditures in Canada based
upon the revised methods of estimation for 1940 was as follows:—
Travellers from overseas countries 	
From United States—
(a.)  By automobile 	
(6.)  By rail 	
(c.)   By boat 	
(d.)  By bus 	
(e.)  By air 	
Others (pedestrian, local bus, etc.)	
$6,500,000
62,500,000
38,500,000
6,000,000
6,800,000
1,300,000
6,250,000
Total   $127,850,000
The revised estimates presented for  1939  were:    Travellers  from  overseas  countries,
$12,000,000;   from United States, $152,000,000;   a total of $164,000,000.    Expenditures for
bus and air travel in 1940 were for the latter nine months, these being included with other
travel in the first three months.
This motor travel comprises  substantial proportion of tourist travel, but  appreciable
addition is made by the several other forms and classes of travel.    There were serious Q 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
detrimental factors affecting travel in 1940, mostly felt in the latter half of the year, notably
the effect of widespread misconceptions regarding border crossing arrangements subsequent
to the imposition of passport requirements upon Canadians travelling to the United States
at beginning of July. Though no change was made in the Canadian regulations to
impede unrestricted entry of United States visitors, for a time erroneous impressions were
circulated causing many potential visitors to believe that they would require passports and
that difficulties were likely to be encountered. Also, following imposition of the passport
regulations for Canadians the United States immigration officials stiffened their requirements
for proof of citizenship by visitors on their return to the United States. For a short time
they demanded passports or birth certificates as proof of right of re-entry, and though the
requirements were gradually lessened until such papers as travellers normally carried, such
as a voter's registration card or other easily-obtained document, were accepted as proof of
citizenship, the effect, coupled with erroneous ideas which were circulated, resulted in a
marked decline in travel. The Government Travel Bureau and all bodies engaged in promoting travel worked energetically to allay misconceptions, with result that the decline was
proportionately lower during the latter months of the year. Though accurate figures are
not available, reports from transportation companies indicate that there was much less decline
in the rail, steamship, air, and bus travel than in motoring travel. The loss in motor travel
from the United States was offset by greatly increased travel, both by motor and rail, from
other Provinces, and there was a substantial volume of winter travel with result that, in
the aggregate, the tourist trade compared favourably with that of the preceding year. Hotel,
resort, transportation, and other services catering to the tourist trade reported having done
better business during the year than in the previous year.
The totals of United States motor-cars entering by customs ports shown by months are
indicative of the effect of the conditions which prevailed. During the first six months
arrivals totalled 65,385 cars—21,744 with 48-hour and 43,641 with 60-day permits, compared
with 59,633 cars, including 20,834 with 48-hour and 38,829 with 60-day permits in 1939—an
increase of 5,722 cars, or 9.59 per cent. The increase was larger than in the rest of Canada.
In July, however, due to conditions which prevailed in that month, the arrivals totalled less
than half the number in the corresponding month of 1939. The decline was much less in
succeeding months, but the net result was a drop of 25,302 cars, or 15.7 per cent., including
21,654 cars with 60-day permits.    The figures shown by months were:—
1939.
1940.
48-hour.
60-day.
Total.
48-hour.
60-day.
Total.
2,581
2,366
3,098
3,637
4,340
4,812
6,429
4,997
4,159
3,603
3,357
3,322
3,352
3,376
4,168
6,164
10,698
11,071
22,761
19,969
13,426
6,967
5,915
5,995
5,933
5,742
7,266
9,801
15,038
15,883
29,190
24,966
17,585
10,570
9,272
9,317
2,728
2,431
3,275
3,694
4,927
4,689
3,667
3,640
3,447
4,741
2,964
2,852
3,642
4,380
5,686
6,083
9,790
14,060
11,223
15,036
7,584
6,055
4,124
4,543
6.370
6,811
8,961
9,777
14,717
18,749
July                                                             	
14,890
August 	
18,676
11,031
10,796
7,088
7,395
46,701
113,862
160,563
43,055
92,206
135,261
These conditions affected all parts of the Dominion. Statistics of tourist entries for
Canada compiled by the Canadian Immigration Branch showed a total of 5,768,432 persons
entering Canada for tourist travel during the first half of 1940, compared with 5,886,648 in
1939. In July there were 1,818,000 visitors, compared with 3,070,174 during that month in
1939; in August, 2,232,459 compared with 3,012,083. For the year the total was 13,592,429,
compared with 16,578,119 in 1939, a decline of 2,985,690. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Q 35
The entries of United States motor-cars through customs ports as reported by ports for
the calendar years 1939 and 1940 were:
48-hour.        60-day.
Total.
1940.
48-hour.        60-day.
Total.
Pacific Highway.....
Huntingdon	
Aldergrove....	
Boundary Bay	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Victoria 	
Sidney	
Osoyoos 	
Keremeos.  ...
Bridesville—	
Cascade	
Carson  	
Kingsgate	
Rykerts 	
Midway 	
Nelway .—	
Paterson	
Roosville 	
Stewart  	
Silver Heights...
Totals-
10,027
5,850
4,280
3,106
2,117
112
51
4,291
3,828
3,779
2,600
1,405
222
933
3,885
215
65,954
9,218
5,771
5,707
226
14
8,146
1,438
4,660
83
238
2,659
78
4,571
1,146
198
1,513
1,893
347
2
75,981
15,068
10,051
8,813
226
14
8,146
1,438
6,777
195
289
6,950
3,906
8,350
3,746
1,603
1,513
2,115
1,280
3,887
215
46,701
160,563
12,192
4,999
3,163
2,874
15
2,221
66
111
4,345
3,845
1,963
1,878
1,473
553
3,481
50,699
8,051
3,968
4,229
103
1
8,258
1,653
4,166
24
11
2,178
71
4,482
773
204
1,343
1,645
419
62,891
13,050
7,131
7,103
118
1
8,258
1,653
6,387
90
122
6,523
3,916
6,445
2,651
1,677
1,343
1,645
972
3,481
43,179
92,278
135,457
The State of origin of the 60-day cars entering British Columbia directly through customs
ports during the calendar years 1938-1940, inclusive were:—
State of Origin.
1938.
1939.
1940.
State of Origin.
1938.
1939.
1940.
Washington  	
79,214
17,323
6,976
1,924
1,100
595
550
423
922
372
545
407
278
315
296
316
247
238
210
151
229
168
211
147
156
124
79,526
16,017
6,506
1,646
916
803
615
569
565
464
417
411
396
388
337
315
295
287
255
213
252
209
202
188
178
150
64,507
13,157
6,058
1,387
813
552
415
451
299
333
350
257
227
257
225
184
202
169
111
143
159
222
174
129
85
135
Nevada 	
209
181
61
117
110
40
52
35
43
54
62
55
72
32
42
25
49
18
17
23
26
15
17
271
133
129
120
111
'105
87
80
79
73
73
68
58
45
43
43
37
32
25
24
24
23
19
302
182
88
Oregon.  	
Georgia.. 	
District of Columbia	
46
57
65
Illinois  	
Colorado 	
Virginia  	
Tennessee-  	
Kentucky	
Louisiana  	
Connecticut  _
39
44
32
Utah	
46
44
Ohio      	
24
19
101
Nebraska 	
Alabama  	
42
46
18
16
21
10
12
10
Others	
Totals 	
115,063
113,862
92,278
During 1940 the total United States cars entering Canada with 60-day permits aggregated
962,925 from all States—the 48-hour travel was not shown by States of origin. Of these,
92,072 entered by British Columbia, 13,316 by Alberta, 6,391 by Saskatchewan, and 13,781 Q 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
by Manitoba—a total of 125,560 or 13 per cent, by Western Provinces; and 582,548 by
Ontario, 193,585 by Quebec, and 61,232 by the Maritimes. Of the total, 800,395 cars or
83.12 per cent, were from States east of the Mississippi, of which 9,244 or 1.16 per cent,
entered by Western Provinces—3,098 by British Columbia; and 162,530 or 16.88 per cent,
came from States west of the Mississippi, of which 116,316 or 71.56 per cent, entered by
Western Provinces—88,974 or 54.74 per cent, by British Columbia; 46,214 by Eastern Provinces. Following is a tabulation showing the numbers of cars entering the several Provinces
from west and east of the Mississippi, with proportions borne to the total traffic:—:
Western States.
Eastern States.
Total.
88,974
10,123
5,674
11,545
43,244
2,412
558
116,316
46,214
Per Cent.
9.24
1.05
0.59
1.20
4.49
0.25
0.06
12.08
4.80
3,098
3,193
717
2,236
539,304
191,173
60,674
9,244
Per Cent.
0.32
0.33
0.07
0.23
56.00
19.85
6.30
0.96
92,072
13,316
6,391
13,781
582,548
193,585
61,232
125,560
Per Cent.
9.57
1.38
Saskatchewan.... 	
0.56
1.43
60.50
20.10
Maritimes    .—	
6.36
13.04
Eastern Provinces  	
791,151     |       82.16
837,365     |       86.96
Totals  	
162,530
16.88
800,395     j       83.12
1
962,925     |     100.00
1
Two States—New York with 250,441 and Michigan with 187,108—contributed over
45 per cent, of the total to Canada, mostly entering by Eastern Provinces—2,245 entered by
Western Provinces, 784 by British Columbia. Washington was third in rank with 66,642,
of which 64,507 entered by British Columbia, 774 by other Western and 1,361 by Eastern
Provinces. Vermont ranked fourth with 61,505, almost entirely entering by Eastern Provinces, mostly by Quebec. The cars from these four States reaching Canada totalled 565,696
or 58.74 per cent, of the total traffic; of these 65,301 or 11.54 per cent, entered by British
Columbia, 2,245 by other Western Provinces. Shown grouped according to ranges of volume
the entries of 60-day cars into the Dominion from the various States segregated by Provinces
of entry were:—
V
Canada.
British
Columbia.
Alberta.
Saskatchewan.
Manitoba.
Ontario.
Quebec.
Maritimes.
Over 100,000—
250,441
187,108
451
333
482
303
32
127
117
400
187,732
184,633
67,950
1,017
3,677
Michigan 	
295
437,549
784
785
159
517
372,365
58,967
3,972
Over 50,000—
Washington 	
Vermont.—	
66,642
61,505
64,507
10
583
7
100
3
91
1,214
730
113
60,548
34
207
Totals          	
128,147
64,517
590
103
91
1,944
60,661
241
25,000 to 50,000—
Ohio.....  	
47,108
46,707
44,067
41,024
30,078
25,107
227
181
129
202
552
13,157
242
106
208
820
1,663
45
131
1
31
52
765
367
44,466
676
9,491
34,246
26,109
8,622
1,602
8,834
22,383
5,258
1,370
812
395
37,170
Massachusetts	
8
26
208
267
11,919
1,032
Illinois.—.	
California	
254
219
Totals  	
234,091
14,285
3,047
554
1,347
123,610
40,259
50,989
10,000 to 20,000—
19,774
19,652
13,225
10,661
257
135
65
16
547
182
64
13
515
17
8
2
4,458
46
10
2
13,731
10,783
4,922
814
227
• 6,989
6,732
8,985
39
1,500
Connecticut	
New Hampshire	
1,424
829
Totals.	
63,312
473
806
542
4,516
30,250
22,933
3,792 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Q 37
Volume of 60-day Cars entering Dominion—Continued.
Canada.
British
Columbia.
Alberta.
Saskatchewan.
Manitoba.
Ontario.
Quebec.
Maritimes.
5,000 to 10,000—
Indiana  	
9,928
222
120
48
121
8,900
436
81
Wisconsin 	
9,820
159
281
139
424
8,484
293
40
8,493
88
120
2,769
4,976
509
19
12
Montana —	
7,240
813
4,689
1,303
94
301
36
4
Oregon   	
7,170
6,058
244
54
51
715
38
10
6,315
21
16
1
1,405
4,050
822
Iowa 	
5,214
169
191
186
333
4,149
158
28
Totals -- -	
54,180
7,530
5,661
4,500
5,999
24,463
5,030
997
2,000 to 5.000—
4,694
225
213
42
181
3,787
201
45
Florida ...- -	
4,319
143
53
7
45
2,876
928
267
Maryland  -	
3,878
44
57
2
5
2,547
1,016
207
Texas  -—	
3,300
299
210
47
95
2,387
225
37
District of Columbia	
2,724
57
51
9
6
1,677
741
183
Kansas - 	
2,279
257
157
57
189
1,510
85
24
Virginia   	
2,264
39
40
8
12
1,418
619
128
Nebraska  —	
2,065
184
155
78
250
1,304
79
15
2,036
1,387
273
27
21
290
35
3
Totals
27,559
2,635
1.209
277
804
17,796
3,929
909
1,000 to 2,000—
1,816
1,633
415
10
220
7
38
2
38
2
1,017
1,504
69
91
19
West Virginia .....*..	
17
Oklahoma	
1,614
111
117
27
113
1,171
68
7
Kentucky 	
1,584
32
18
4
17
1,409
80
24
Georgia  	
1,322
46
32
5
10
973
211
45
Tennessee 	
1,244
44
20
3
13
1,023
123
18
Utah 	
1,171
350
355
8
8
431
16
3
1,888
24
10
4
2
791
225
32
Totals 	
11,472
1,032
779
91
203
8,319
883
165
Under 1,000—
991
836
65
12
106
11
105
206
2
492
481
13
272
4
Delaware 	
58
789
744
19
44
11
28
3
2
2
12
381
544
333
94
40
Louisiana  	
20
Arizona   	
611
174
50
12
15
316
26
18
Alabama  	
608
42
9
1
5
493
51
7
Arkansas  -
535
101
16
4
14
332
59
9
Mississippi _ -	
467
46
22
5
15
340
36
3
422
85
130
26
23
141
15
2
Nevada —-	
357
182
36
4
2
118
14
1
255
46
20
3
8
163
10
5
Totals	
6,615
816
439
165
304
3,801
923
167
All States	
962,925
92,072
13,316
6,391
13,781
582,548
193 585
Others 	
755
206
32
3
14
369
90
41
Totals  	
963,680
92,278
13,348
6,394
13,795
582,917
193,675
61,273
1,025-1041-4797
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Chart.es F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1941.   

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0314253/manifest

Comment

Related Items