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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1935

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL EEPOET
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR  THE
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST
1933
PHINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,   B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfielo, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty,
1934.  To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1933 is herewith respectfully submitted.
GEORGE S. PEARSON,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
July, 1934. The Honourable George S. Pearson,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Sixteenth Annual Report on the work of the
Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1933.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
ADAM BELL,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1931,. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of the Deputy Minister      7
Provincial Pay-roll     7
Wages and Purchasing-power      7
Strikes     7
New Legislation     8
"Male Minimum Wage Act, 1934"      8
Order No. 1, Logging Industry   11
Order No. 2, Sawmill Industry  11
Order No. 2a, Tie-cutting Operations   12
Order No. 6, Taxicab Drivers   12
"Hours of Work, 1934"   12
Regulations  15
" Female Minimum Wage Act "   16
Order No. 3, Fruit and Vegetable Industry  20
Order No. 3a (Emergency), Fruit and Vegetable Industry   20
Order No. 4, Office Occupation  21
Unemployment Relief Report   23
Statistics of Trades and Industries '.  31
Total Industrial Pay-roll   31
Pay-roll Comparison by Industries   32
Changes in Wage-rates   33
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry   35
Increased Employment   37
Nationality of Employees   40
Statistical Tables   41
Summary of all Tables   54
"Hours of Work Act"   55
Average Weekly Hours of Work by Industries   55
"Male Minimum Wage Act"   56
Labour Disputes and Conciliation   56
Summary of Disputes   59
Employment Service  60
Business transacted   61
Handicap Section   61
Tables    62
Inspection of Factories  64
Accident-prevention   64
Hours of Work   65
Freight and Passenger Elevators   63
Preface to the Minimum Wage Board Report   68
Report of the Minimum Wage Board   69
Practical Benefits   60
Court Cases   69
Public Hearings   72
Findings    77
Statistical Section   78
Wage Trend, 1918, 1931, 1932, 1933  86
Minimum Wage Legislation   87
Administration  88
Summary of Orders   89
Association of Employers   93
Trade Union Directory   95  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1933.
The year 1933 has been a particularly arduous one for the Department of Labour. Conditions have tended to multiply our problems and add to the work of the Department in all its
branches.
During the year under review the record of the Department in administering our labour
laws has been well maintained despite circumstances of extreme difficulty brought about by
industrial depression and widespread unemployment.
Since 1929 our industrial pay-roll has shown a gradual decline, which has been further
accentuated during 1933.
The decline in our industrial pay-roll is consequently reflected in reduced earnings of wage-
earners, while, at the same time, the average working-hours of employees in industry also show
a decrease.
PROVINCIAL Po\Y-ROLL.
The total pay-roll of the Province for the year under review, including various estimated
amounts, as shown on page 31, amounted to $99,126,653,28, a reduction of $3,830,420.72 from
the 1932 figures, due entirely to wage reductions, as there were more people employed in 1933
than during the previous year.
WAGES AND PURCHASING-POWER.
With each succeeding year of the slump it has become abundantly clear that reduced
earnings of those in employment have not had the effect of causing even a slight improvement in
business conditions, but, on the other hand, has resulted in further restriction of output.
Comparing 1929 with 1933, the average number employed per month decreased 41 per cent.,
and in the same period the amounts paid to wage-earners decreased 57 per cent.
A study of the statistical section of this report reveals in many ways the seriousness of the
times through which we are passing.
During the year 1929, $145,120,325.98 was paid in salaries and wages by the firms reporting
to this Department, and for the year 1933 the amount decreased to $68,028,424.61.
The 106,012 adult male employees reported during the week of employment of the greatest
number in 1929 earned an average of $29.20, while in 1933 the number of adult males reported
for the same period numbered 61,891 at an average rate of $22.30; thus each of the 61,891
employed were in receipt of $6.90 less than the average weekly wage paid during 1929, and the
remaining 41,121 adult males were out of employment and, in all probability, forced to apply
for relief.
The average weekly wage shown above is for the week of employment of the greatest
number, the Department having no means of ascertaining the annual earnings of any employee.
Recent developments have made it clear that, of the many measures proposed to bring back
better business conditions, the process of wage reduction as a means of reducing production
costs is being gradually discarded.
It would be a quicker route to ultimate recovery to consider the question of overhead
charges, which have become so large a part of the total cost of production.
The opinion of those who are responsible for the payment of wages is undergoing a change,
and the belief that high wages was one of the principal causes of our present condition is rapidly
disappearing. The tendency of many employers in recent months to increase wages would
appear as though it was now being realized that increased purchasing-power is the very centre
of any industrial recovery.
STRIKES.
Recognized by all as a waste of energy, the strike method of settling a dispute should only
be used when all other means of conciliation fail.
Unfortunately, we have a section of our workers who believe that, in order to be successful,
the men should walk off the job the moment new demands are presented. We have instances,
during the last few months, when men have walked off the job and did not have enough wages
due them to pay transportation to their homes. Trade unions of long standing realize the futility of a strike until all other avenues of
mediation have failed.
APPRENTICES.
The continued decrease in the number of apprentices, as reported in our statistical section,
is a matter which should engage the earnest attention of employers' organizations and those
having the interest of the youth of our Province at heart.
During 1927 there were 1,554 apprentices recorded; in 1929 they numbered 1,676, and this
number had decreased to 621 in 1933, a drop of approximately 63 per cent, from the peak year.
NEW LEGISLATION.
At no previous session of the Legislature has so much legislation benefiting the workers
been passed as was done at the session held in 1934, and while mention of this belongs rightfully
to the report of 1934, it is felt that in the interest of all concerned a brief statement should be
made in this report.
" Interpretation Act."—Section 24, clause 18, was amended by including the day immediately
following Christmas Day (Boxing Day) as a legal holiday.
" Male Minimum Wage Act, 1934"—Since the above Act came into force the Board of
Industrial Relations—composed of the following members: Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of
Labour, Chairman, Helen Gregory MacGill, William Alexander Carrothers, James Thomson,
and Christopher John McDowell—have been appointed: several sessions have taken place, and
four Orders made: Order No. 1, covering the Logging Industry, and Order No. 2, covering the
Sawmill Industry, effective April 27th, 1934; Order No. 2a, affecting Tie-cutting Operations, and
Order No. 6, relating to the Occupation of Taxicab Drivers.
Since the formation of the above Board, Mrs. Helen Gregory MacGill has been made a Judge
of the Juvenile Court and tendered her resignation. Mrs. Fraudena Eaton has been named to
fill the vacancy thereby created.
The Acts and Orders are printed below:—
"MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
24 George V.
CHAP 47.
An Act to amend and consolidate the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
[Assented to 29th March, 1934.]
His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:—
" Board " means the Board of Industrial Relations constituted under the provisions of this
Act:
" Employee " means any adult male person who is in receipt of or entitled to any compensation for labour or services performed for another:
"Employer" includes every person, firm, corporation, agent, manager, representative, contractor, sub-contractor, or other person having control or direction of, or responsible,
directly or indirectly, for the wages of, any employee:
" Minimum wage " means the amount of wages fixed by the Board under this Act:
" Wage " or " wages " includes any compensation for labour or services, measured by time,
piece, or otherwise.    1929, c. 43, s. 1.
3. (1.) Subject to subsection (2), this Act shall apply to all employees in any industry, business,
trade, or occupation, and to their employers.
(2.)  This Act shall not apply in respect of farm-labourers or domestic servants.     (New.)
4. (1.) For the purpose of the administration of this Act, there shall be a Board known as the
" Board of Industrial Relations," which shall consist of five members, of whom the Deputy Minister
of Labour shall be one, and shall be Chairman of the Board, the Chairman of the Economic Council
constituted under the " Economic Council Act," being an Act of the present session, shall be one, and
the other members, of whom one shall be a woman, shall be appointed by and hold office during the
pleasure of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
(2.)  The presence of three members of the Board shall constitute a quorum.
(3.) The existing or continuing members of the Board shall have and may exercise all the powers,
duties, and functions of the Board, notwithstanding any vacancy in the membership thereof.
(4.) The three appointive members of the Board shall be paid such allowance as remuneration
for their services and for the expenses necessarily incurred in the performance of their duties as may
be fixed by the regulations.     (New.) ,. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 9
5. (1.) After the holding from time to time of such inquiry as the Board considers adequate, the
Board may make an order fixing a minimum wage for employees at such rate and in such manner as
the Board in its discretion considers advisable.
(2.) Without limiting the generality of the provisions of subsection (1), the Board may by its
order:—
(a.)  Apply the minimum wage so fixed to all employees or to any group or class of employees
in any industry, business, trade, or occupation, or to any group or class of employees
.--.., in all or in any two or more industries, businesses, trades, or occupations:
(5.)  Fix a different minimum wage to be paid to employees in the same industry, business,
trade, or occupation in different parts of the Province:
(c.)   Fix a minimum wage applicable only in the part or parts of the Province designated
in the order:
(d.) Fix the minimum wage upon an hourly, daily, weekly, or monthly basis.
(3.) The Board may from time to time inquire into the wages-and conditions of labour and
employment of all or any male persons over the age of eighteen and under the age of twenty-one years
employed or working in any industry, business, trade, or occupation; and may, in the like manner
and with the like effect as provided in subsections (1) and (2), make an order fixing a minimum wage
for those male persons at such rate as the Board in its discretion considers advisable.
(4.) Every order of the Board fixing a minimum wage shall apply throughout the Province,
unless its application is by its terms restricted to some designated part or parts of the Province.
(New.)
6. In the case of any employees classified by the Board as handicapped, or as part-time employees,
or as apprentices, the Board may by permit in writing authorize the payment of a wage less than
the minimum wage fixed under section 5 ; and may in any case limit and define the number of handicapped employees, or part-time employees, or apprentices to whom the lesser wage fixed under this
section may be payable by any employer.     (New.)
7. Where board or lodging is furnished by any employer to an employee to whom a minimum wage
fixed by the Board applies, the Board may investigate the matter; and, if in the opinion of the
Board the price charged by the employer for the board or lodging is excessive and unduly affects the
wages of the employee, the Board may make an order fixing a maximum price to be charged by the
employer for the board or lodging.
8. (1.) The Board may from time to time hold an inquiry for the purpose of investigating the
facts with respect to any persons engaged or working in or about any industry, business, trade, or
occupation as members or alleged members of any partnership or association or in the execution of
any agreement or scheme of profit-sharing or co-operative or joint contract or undertaking, including
the investigation of the contractual and other relations of the persons so engaged or working, as
between themselves or as between them and their master or employer; and if, after the holding of
such inquiry as the Board considers adequate, the Board is of the opinion that the partnership,
association, agreement, or scheme and the engagement or working of those persons in connection therewith as aforesaid are intended or have the effect, either directly or indirectly, of defeating the true
intent and object of this Act in respect of the payment of a minimum wage, the Board may, notwithstanding the provisions of any other Act, make an order prohibiting the carrying-on of the partnership,
association, agreement, or scheme in whole or in part, and prohibiting the doing by any person of
any act or thing in connection therewith set out in the order; and the order shall be published in the
Gazette, and thereupon shall take effect and be binding on all persons so engaged or working and on
their master or employer  (if any).
(2.) Every person who contravenes any order made under subsection (1), or does any act or thing
prohibited by an order so made, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not less than fifty
dollars nor more than five hundred dollars, and in default of immediate payment of the fine shall be
liable to imprisonment for a period of not less than two months nor more than six months.
9. For the purpose of any inquiry held pursuant to the provisions of this Act, the Board shall, in
respect of the inquiry, have the like powers as are by law given to commissioners appointed under the
"Public Inquiries Act."    1929, c. 43, s. 5  (altered).
10. Every order of the Board fixing a minimum wage shall be published in the Gazette and shall
take effect at the expiration of fourteen days after the date of publication.    1929, c. 43, s. 7  (altered).
11. Upon the petition of any employers or employees, or upon its own motion, the. Board may
review, suspend, vary, or rescind any order made by it pursuant to the provisions of this Act.
12. The Board shall supply copies of every order fixing a minimum wage to any employer
requesting the same, and every employer of employees affected by any such order shall post and keep
posted in a conspicuous place in his establishment or plant a copy of the order, so that all employees
affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.    1929, c. 43, s. 10.
13. (1.) Every employer shall keep in his principal place of business in the Province a true
and correct record in the English language of the wages paid to and the hours worked each day by
each of his employees, together with a register in the English language of the names, nationalities,
ages, and residential addresses of all his employees.
(2.) Every employer shall, on demand of the Board or any person authorized in writing by the
Board, or by the Chairman of the Board, produce for inspection all records kept by him relating to
the wages, hours of labour, or conditions of employment affecting any of his employees. 1929, c. 43.
s. 11. G 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
14. The Board may, either by any member of the Board designated in writing by the Chairman
thereof, or by any person authorized in writing by the Board or the Chairman :—
(a.) Inspect and examine all books, pay-rolls, and other records of any employer which in
any way relate to the wages, hours of labour, or conditions of employment affecting any
employees:
(6.)  Take extracts from or make copies of any entry in such books, pay-rolls, and records:
(c.) Require from any employer full and correct statements respecting the wages paid to
his employees, and the hours of labour and conditions of their employment, duly
verified on oath:
(d.) Require any employee to make full disclosure, production, or delivery to the Board,
or to the person so authorized, of all records, documents, statements, writings, books,
papers, extracts therefrom, or copies thereof as the employee may have in his possession
or control, or other information either verbal or in writing, and either verified on oath
or otherwise as may be directed, as may in any way relate to the wages, hours of
labour, or conditions of his employment:
(e.) Require any employer to make full disclosure, production, or delivery to the Board, or
to the person so authorized, of all records, documents, statements, writings, books,
papers, extracts therefrom, or copies thereof as the employer may have in his possession
or control, or other information either verbal or in writing, and either verified on oath
or otherwise as may be directed, as may in any way reiate to the profit and loss and
the production and operating costs in the industry, business, trade, or occupation
carried on by or under the control or direction of the employer as, in the discretion of
the Board, are considered necessary for the purposes of this Act.
15. (1.) Every employer who contravenes any order of the Board made under this Act by the
payment of wages of less amount than the minimum wage fixed by the Board, or by the charging
of a price for board or lodging in excess of the maximum price fixed by the Board, shall be liable,
on summary conviction, to a penalty of not less than fifty dollars nor more than five hundred dollars
for each employee affected; and, in addition thereto, shall upon conviction be ordered to pay to each
employee the difference between the wages actually paid to him and the minimum wage fixed by the
Board; and in default of payment of such penalty or difference shall be liable to imprisonment for a
period of not less than two months nor more than six months.
(2.) Every employer and every employee who neglects or fails to perform any duty imposed on him
by this Act, or who refuses or neglects to permit of any inspection or examination authorized by this
Act, or who refuses or neglects to disclose, produce, furnish, or deliver any information or thing
required under this Act, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a penalty of not less than ten
dollars nor more than five hundred dollars.    1929, c. 43, s. 13   (altered).
16. Where an employee by collusion with his employer or otherwise works for less than the
minimum wage to which he is entitled under this Act, or directly or indirectly returns to his employer
any part of his wages which has the effect of reducing the wages actually received and retained by the
employee to an amount less than the minimum wage to which he is entitled, the employee and the
employer shall each be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not more than one hundred dollars,
in addition to all other penalties to which he may be liable under this Act. For the purpose of any
prosecution for an offence under this section, proof of the fact that any moneys were repaid or paid
by the employee to his employer shall be prima facie evidence as against the person charged that the
moneys were so repaid or paid for the purpose and had the effect of reducing the wages actually
received and retained by the employee to an amount less than the minimum wage to which he was
entitled.
17. (1.) Any employer who discharges or in any other manner discriminates against any employee
because the employee has made a complaint under this Act or has testified or is about to testify,
or because such employer believes that the employee may testify, at any inquiry or in any proceedings
relative to the enforcement of this Act, or because the employee has made or is about to make any
such disclosure as may be required of him by virtue of the provisions of this Act, shall be liable, on
summary conviction, to a penalty of not more than five hundred dollars.
(2.) For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act without prejudice to any complainant, in any case where the complainant requests that his name and identity be withheld, the name
and identity of the complainant shall not be disclosed to any person by the Board, except where disclosure is necessary for the purposes of any prosecution under section 15 or this section or is considered by the Board to be in the public interest.    1929, c. 43, s. 15  (altered).
18. If any employee is paid less than the manimum wage to which he is entitled under this Act,
the employee shall be entitled to recover from his employer, in a civil action, the difference between
the amount paid and the amount of the minimum wage, with costs of action; but in the case of an
employee whose services with the employer have terminated, no action shall be brought by the
employee under this section unless the action is commenced within sixty days next after the termination of the services.    1929, c. 43, s. 14.
19. For the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions of this Act according to the true intent
and meaning thereof, or of supplying any deficiency therein, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may
make such regulations not inconsistent with the spirit of this Act as may be considered necessary,
advisable, or convenient.    1929, c. 43, s. 16.
20. The "Male Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 43 of the Statutes of 1929, is repealed;
and all orders made thereunder fixing a minimum wage are annulled.     (Netc.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 11
ORDER No. 1.
Order establishing a Minimum Wage in the Logging Industry.
Pursuant to the provisions of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," being an Act of the 1934 session
of the British Columbia Legislature, the Board of Industrial Relations, having held such inquiry as
the Board considers adequate, hereby orders:—
1. That where used in this Order the expression " logging industry " includes all operations in or
incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie, shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile cutting, and all
operations in or incidental to driving, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-
props, and piles.
2. That, subject to the exemptions granted from time to time under section 6 of the said Act and
to the provisions of paragraphs 3 and 4 of this Order, the minimum wage for all employees in the
logging industry shall be the sum of forty cents (40c.) per hour.
3. The minimum wage for all employees engaged in grade and track occupations within the logging
industry shall be the sum of thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.)  per hour.
4. The minimum wage for all employees engaged in cook- and bunk-house occupations within the
logging industry shall be the sum of two dollars and seventy-five cents   ($2.75)   per day.
5. This Order shall not apply in respect of the logging industry carried on east of the Cascade
Mountains.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 7th day of April, 1934.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
William Alexander Carrothers.
James Thomson.
Christopher John McDowell.
The above Order was published in the B.C. Gazette on April 12th, 1934, and becomes effective at
the expiration of fourteen days after that date.
This Order must be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place in your plant or establishment,
so that all employees affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
ORDER No. 2.
Order establishing a Minimum Wage in the Sawmill Industry.
Pursuant to the provisions of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," being an Act of the 1934 session
of the British Columbia Legislature, the Board of Industrial Relations, having held such inquiry as
the Board considers adequate, hereby orders:—
1. That where used in this Order the expression " sawmill industry " includes all operations in or
incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills and planing-mills.
2. The minimum wage for all employees in the sawmill industry shall be the sum of thirty-five
(35c.) per hour, with the exceptions provided by paragraph 3 hereof.
3. Until further ordered, it shall be permissible for an employer to employ a percentage of
employees in his plant at a rate less than that fixed in paragraph 2 of this Order, but in no case shall
the rate so paid be less than twenty-five cents (25c.) per hour, nor shall the percentage of employees
paid at such rate (inclusive of employees in respect of whom a permit has been obtained under
section 6 of the Act) be in excess of twenty-five per centum of the total number of employees in
the plant.
4. Pursuant to the provisions of the said Act, every employer in the sawmill industry shall furnish the Board, not later than the fifteenth day of each month, with a complete and certified statement
of the names, ages, nationalities of, and wages paid per hour to every male person in his employ
during the last preceding month.
5. This Order shall not apply in respect of the sawmill industry carried on east of the Cascade
Mountains.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 7th day of April, 1934.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
William Alexander Carrothers.
James Thomson.
Christopher John McDowell.
The above Order was published in the B.C. Gazette on April 12th, 1934, and becomes effective at
the expiration of fourteen days after that date.
This Order must be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place in your plant or establishment,
so that all employees affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same. G 12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
ORDER No. 2a.
Order respecting a Minimum Wage in Tie-cutting Operations.
Pursuant to the provisions of section 11 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," being an Act of the
1934 session of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of British Columbia, the Board of Industrial
Relations hereby orders:—
That with respect to the Order of the Board of Industrial Relations establishing a minimum wage
in the logging industry and published in the British Columbia Gazette on April 12th, 1934; and with
respect to the Order of the Board of Industrial Relations establishing a minimum wage in the sawmill industry, and published in the British Columbia Gazette on April 12th, 1934, all tie-cutting
operations shall be exempt from the said Orders from the time of the taking effect of this Order until
midnight on the 30th day of September, 1934;  and the said Orders are respectively varied accordingly.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 2nd day of May, 1934.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
James Thomson.
Christopher John McDowell.
W. A. Carrothers.
This Order must be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place in the employer's establishment,
so that all employees affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
ORDER No. 6.
Order respecting a Minimum Wage in the Occupation of Taxicab Driver.
Pursuant to the provisions of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 47 of the Statutes
of British Columbia, 1934, the Board of Industrial Relations hereby orders:—
(1.) That where used in this Order the expression " taxicab-driver" means and includes an
employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation for seven passengers or
less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the public and which is driven or operated for
hire.
(2.) The minimum wage for every employee employed as a taxicab-driver shall be the sum of two
dollars and fifty cents  ($2.50)  per day.
(3.) This Order shall apply to taxicab-drivers and their employers in the City of Vancouver, the
City of Victoria, the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality of the District of
Oak Bay, and the Municipality of the District of Saanich.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 13th day of June, 1934.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell,  Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
William Alexander Carrothers.
Christopher John McDowell.
James Thomson.
The above Order was published in the B.C. Gazette on June 14th, 1934, and becomes effective at
the expiration of fourteen days after that date.
This Order must be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place in the employer's establishment,
so that all employees affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
"HOURS OF WORK ACT, 1934."
This Act, proclaimed June 14th, 1934, by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, will be administered by the Board of Industrial Relations.
The definitions under the new Act greatly extend its scope and can be made to cover any
industry, business, trade, or occupation, in addition to those set out in the Schedule.
24 George V.
CHAP. 30.
An Act to amend and consolidate the " Hours of Work Act, 1923."
[Assented to 29th March, 1934-1
His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Hours of Work Act, 1934." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 13
2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:—
" Board " means the Board of Industrial Relations constituted under the provisions of the
" Male Minimum Wage Act," being an Act of the present session:
" Employee" means any person who is in receipt of or entitled to any compensation for
labour or services performed for another :
" Employer" includes every person, firm, corporation, agent, manager, representative, contractor, or sub-contractor having control or direction of, or responsible, directly or
indirectly, for the employment of any employee :
" Industrial undertaking " includes any establishment, work, or undertaking in or about any
industry, business, trade, or occupation set out in the Schedule as contained herein
or as amended from time to time by the regulations.
3. Subject to the exceptions provided by or under this Act, the working-hours of an employee in
any industrial undertaking shall not exceed eight in the day and forty-eight in the week.
4. The provisions of section 3 shall not apply to persons holding positions of supervision or
management or employed in confidential capacities. In case of dispute, the Board may determine
whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he is employed is such as to
bring him within the scope of this section, and the decision of the Board shall he final.
5. Where by custom or arrangement between employers' and workers' organizations, or, where
no such organizations exist, between employers' and workers' representatives, the hours of work
on one or more days of the week are fewer than eight, the limit of eight hours may be exceeded on
the remaining days of the week by agreement between such organizations or representatives; but in no
ease under the provisions of this section shall the daily limit of eight hours be exceeded by more than
one hour, nor shall the weekly limit of forty-eight hours be exceeded.
6. The limit of hours of work prescribed in section 3 may be exceeded in case of accident, or in
case of urgent work to be done to machinery or plant, or in case of force majeure, but only so far as
may be necessary to avoid serious interference with the ordinary working of the undertaking.
7. The Board may from time to time hold an inquiry for the purpose of investigating the facts
with respect to any persons engaged or working in or about any industrial undertaking as members
or alleged members of any partnership or association, or in the execution of any agreement or scheme
of profit-sharing or co-operative or joint contract or undertaking, including the investigation of the
contractual and other relations of the persons so engaged or working, as between themselves or as
between them and their master or employer; and if, after the holding of such inquiry as the Board
considers adequate, the Board is of the opinion that the partnership, association, agreement, or
scheme, and the engagement or working of those persons in connection therewith, as aforesaid, are
intended or have the effect, either directly or indirectly, of defeating the true intent and object of this
Act in respect of its due and equable application in limiting hours of work, the Board may make
regulations for applying the provisions of this Act in respect of the partnership, association, agreement,
or scheme, and to all persons engaged or working therein, with like force and effect as if the partnership, association, agreement, or scheme were an industry set out in the Schedule, and the persons
so engaged or working were employees therein.
8. For the purpose of any inquiry held pursuant to the provisions of this Act, the Board shall,
in respect of the inquiry, have the like powers as are by law given to commissioners appointed under
the " Public Inquiries Act."
9. (1.) Every employer shall keep in his principal place of business in the Province a true and
correct record in the English language of the hours worked each day by each of his employees, together
with a register in the English language of the names, ages, nationalities, and residential addresses of
all his employees.
(2.) Every employer shall, on demand of the Board or any person authorized in writing by the
Board or by the Chairman of the Board, produce for inspection all records kept by him relating to
the hours of labour of any person employed by him.
10. The Board may, either by any member of the Board designated in writing by the Chairman
thereof, or by any person authorized in writing by the Board or the Chairman :—
(a.) Inspect and examine all books, pay-rolls, and other records of any employer which in
any way relate to the hours of labour of any employees :
(6.)   Take extracts from or make copies of any entry in such books, pay-rolls, and records:
(c.) Require from any employer full and correct statements respecting the hours of labour
of his employees, duly verified on oath:
(d.) Require any employee to make full disclosure, production, or delivery to the Board, or
to the person so authorized, of all records, documents, statements, writings, books,
papers, extracts therefrom, or copies thereof as the employee may have in his possession or control, or other information either verbal or in writing, and either verified on
oath or otherwise as may be directed, as may in any way relate to his hours of labour
as an employee.
11. (1.) For the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions of this Act according to their true
intent, the Board may make such regulations as are considered necessary or advisable.
(2.)  The regulations shall determine:—
(a.) The permanent exceptions that may be allowed in preparatory or complementary work
which must necessarily be carried on outside the limits laid down for the general
working of an industrial undertaking, or for certain classes of workers whose work is
essentially seasonal or intermittent;   and all permanent exceptions made by the Board G 14 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
shall forthwith be published in the Gazette, and thereupon shall have the same force
and effect as if incorporated in this Act:
(6.)  The temporary exceptions that may be allowed so that industrial undertakings may
deal with exceptional cases of pressure of work :
(c.)  The extent to which the hours of work prescribed in section 3 may be exceeded in those
processes which are required by reason of the nature of the process to be carried on
continuously by a succession of shifts;
but regulations under this subsection shall be made only after inquiry, and the Board shall fix the
maximum of additional hours in each instance.
(3.) In exceptional cases where it is recognized that the provisions of section 3 cannot be applied,
but only in those cases, agreements between workers' and employers' organizations, or between workers'
and employers' representatives, concerning the daily limit of work over a longer period of time may be
given the force of regulations if confirmed by the Board. The average number of hours' work per
week over the number of weeks covered by any such agreement shall not exceed forty-eight.
(4.)  The regulations shall:—
(a.) Require every employer to notify his employees, by means of the posting of notices in
conspicuous places in the works or other suitable place, or by such other method as
may be approved by the regulations, the hours at which work begins and ends, and,
where work is carried on by shifts, the hours at which each shift begins and ends.
These hours shall be so fixed that the duration of the work shall not exceed the limits
prescribed by this Act, and when so notified they shall not be changed except with such
notice and in such manner as may be approved by the regulations:
(6.)   Require every employer to notify in the same way such rest intervals accorded during
the period of work as are not reckoned as part of the working-hours:
(c.)  Require every employer to keep a record in the form prescribed by the regulations of all
additional hours worked in pursuance of section 6 or in pursuance of any regulations
made under subsection   (2)   of this section, and to furnish the Board with a copy of
the record.
(5.)  The Board may, subject to the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, by regulations published in the Gazette, amend the Schedule by adding thereto or deleting therefrom  the
whole or any branch of any .industry, business, trade, or occupation :
12. The Board, after due inquiry, may from time to time exempt any industrial undertaking or
class of industrial undertakings in whole or in part from the operation of this Act, or for such
seasons or portions of the year as it may consider necessary or expedient having regard to the nature
and conditions of the industrial undertaking, the conditions of employment, and the welfare of the
employees.
13. (1.) Every employer who neglects or fails to notify his employees of the hours of work
as required by the regulations made under clause (a) of subsection (4) of section 11, or who employs
any person outside the hours fixed in accordance with that clause, or during any rest interval fixed
in accordance with clause (6) of said subsection (4), shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a
fine of not less than twenty-five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars for each employee affected.
(2.) Except as provided in subsection (1), every employer and every employee who neglects or
fails to perform any duty imposed on him by this Act or the regulations, or who refuses or neglects to
permit of any inspection or examination authorized by this Act or the regulations, or who refuses or
neglects to disclose, produce, furnish, or deliver any information or thing required under this Act
or the regulations, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not less than ten dollars nor
more than five hundred doflars.
(3.) Every person who violates any provision of this Act or of the regulations, for which violation no penalty is otherwise provided in this Act, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine not
exceeding five hundred dollars.
14. The provisions of this Act shall not in any way limit or affect the provisions of the " Coalmines Regulation Act," or the " Metalliferous Mines Inspection Act," or the " Labour Regulation
Act."
15. In the absence of any special vote of the Legislative Assembly for the purpose of this Act,
all expenses incurred in the administration of this Act shall be fixed by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council, and shall be payable out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
16. The "Hours of Work Act, 1923," being chapter 107 of "Revised Statutes of British
Columbia, 1924," is repealed.
17. This Act shall come into operation on a day to be fixed by the Lieutenant-Governor by his
Proclamation.
SCHEDULE.
(1.)  Mining, quarrying, and other works for the extraction of minerals from the earth.
(2.) Industries in which articles are manufactured, altered, cleaned, repaired, ornamented,
finished, adapted for sale, broken up or demolished, or in which materials are transformed; including
ship-building and the generation, transformation, and transmission of electricity or motive power of any
kind, and logging operations.
(3.) Construction, reconstruction, maintenance, repair, alteration, or demolition of any building,
railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer,
drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork, waterways, or other
work of construction, as well as the preparation for or laying the foundations of any such work or
structure. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 15
REGULATIONS.
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the Board of
Industrial Relations by the said Act, the said Board has made the following regulations, namely :—
Lumbering East of the Cascades.
1. (a.) Persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills situate in that part of the
Province lying east of the Cascade Mountains may work one hour per day in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but the total hours worked in any week shall not exceed fifty-four (54).
(6.) In the industrial undertakings referred to in clause (a) of this regulation, the limit of hours
of work thereby fixed may be exceeded by one hour per day on five days of each week for the purpose
of making a shorter work-day on one day of the week, but the total hours worked in any week shall
not exceed fifty-four (54).
(c.) In sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills situate in that part of the Province lying east
of the Cascade Mountains, and which are operated with a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers,
the engineers, firemen, and oilers may work overtime to the extent of one and one-half hours per
day, to cover preparatory and complementary work, in addition to the said fifty-four (54) hours per
week set forth in clauses (a)  and  (6)  of this regulation.
Lumbering, Night Shift.
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may work a total
of forty-eight (48) hours each week in five nights, in lieu of forty-eight (48) hours each week in six
nights, but the number of hours worked in any night must not exceed ten  (10).
Logging.
3. Persons employed in :—
(1.)  The logging industry in:—
(a.)  Booming operations; or
(6.)  Transporting   logs   by   logging-railway,   motor-truck,   flume,   horse,   or  river-
driving ;  or
(c.)  Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d.)   Or in the operation and upkeep of donkey-engines:
Fish-canning.
(2.)  Canning fish or manufacturing by-products from fish, but not those engaged in salting
fish;   and in
Cook and Bunk Houses.
(3.)   Cook and bunk houses in connection with any industrial undertaking,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed by section 3 of the said Act to the extent necessary to
surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
Engineers, Firemen, and Oilers.
4. In all industrial undertakings which use steam as a motive power and which are operated with
a single shift of engineers, firemen, and oilers, the engineers, firemen, and oilers may work overtime
to the extent of one and one-half hours per day to perform preparatory or complementary work, in
addition to the maximum hours of work prescribed by section 3 of the Act.
Shipping Staff.
5. Persons employed as members of the shipping staff in industrial undertakings where shipping
operations are of an intermittent nature may work such hours in addition to the working-hours limited
by section 3 of the said Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to surmount extraordinary
conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome.
In determining extraordinary conditions the decision of the Board shall be final, and where the
Board is of the opinion that, under the provisions of this regulation, the working-hours limited by
section 3 of the Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the industrial undertaking from the provisions of this regulation for such period of time
as the Board considers advisable.
Emergency Repairs.
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed in shipyards, engineering-works, machine-shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal works, belt-works, saw-
works, and plants of a like nature may work such hours in addition to the working-hours limited by
section 3 of the said Act as (but not more than) may be necessary to prevent serious loss to, or
interruption in the operation of, the industrial undertaking for which the repairs are being made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks.
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment
or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables may work during the months of June, July, August, and G 16 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
September in each year such hours in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as
may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders.
Seasonal Soft Drinks Delivery.
8. During the months of May, June, July, August, and until the 15th day of September in each
year, delivery salesmen engaged solely in the distribution of non-alcoholic bottled beverages may work
such hours in excess of the hours limited by section 3 of the said Act as may be necessary to surmount
exigencies of the trade.
Laundries. ,
9. Persons employed in laundries may, in any week in which a public holiday (other than Sunday)
occurs, work on each of the remaining working-days of the week such hours in excess of the limit of
hours prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as may be necessary to avoid serious interference with
the business of the industry, but the total hours worked in any such week shall not exceed forty-*
eight  (48).
Seasonal Lithographing.
10. During the months of May, June, July, August, September, and October in each year persons
employed in the lithographing industry may work such hours in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders. This exemption
shall only apply when sufficient competent help is not available.
Temporary Exemptions.
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied by application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of the urgency and
necessity for the exception, that it is of a temporary nature, and that no other means of adequately
overcoming such temporary urgent condition is, or has been, reasonably available, and that the additional working-hours applied for will not be more than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
. Overtime Record.
12. Every employer shall keep a record in the manner required by subsection (1) of section 9 of
the said Act of all additional hours worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said Act or in pursuance
of any regulation.
13. Every employer shall notify, by means of the posting of notices in conspicuous places in the
works or other suitable place, where the same may readily be seen by all persons employed by him, the
hours at which work begins and ends, and, where work is carried on by shifts, the hours at which
each shift begins and ends; also such rest intervals accorded during the period of work as are not
reckoned as part of the working-hours; these hours shall be so fixed that the duration of the work
shall not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not be changed except upon twenty-four hours' notice of
such change posted as hereinbefore specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted
by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the Act or Regulation 11 above,
a like notice of the change in working-house shall be posted, which notice shall also state the grounds
on which the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia, this 14th day of June, 1934.
By BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill, Member.
James Thomson, Member.
Christopher John McDowell, Member.
W. A. Carrothers, Member.
" FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
The above Act was amended to prohibit the employment of male persons in work usually
performed by female employees at a wage less than the minimum wage fixed by the Orders of
the Board, except male apprentices duly apprenticed by indentures approved by the Board and
who are receiving proper instruction from the persons to whom they are apprenticed.
The Board of Industrial Relations is charged with the administration, and have promulgated the following Orders :—
Order No. 3, relating to the Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
Order No. 3a (Emergency), varying Order No. 3, relating to the Fruit and Vegetable
Industry.
Order No. 4, governing Office Occupation.
Order No. 5, governing Public Housekeeping Occupation. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 17
The Act and new Orders follow:—
24 George V.
CHAP. 48.
An Act to amend and consolidate the Act respecting a Minimum Wage for Women.
[Assented to 29th March, 1934.]
His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
2. In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:—
" Board " means the Board of Industrial Relations constituted under the provisions of the
" Male Minimum Wage Act," being an Act of the present session:
" Employee " means any female person who is in receipt of or entitled to any compensation
for labour or services performed for another:
" Employer" includes every person, firm, corporation, agent, manager, representative, contractor, or sub-contractor having control or direction of, or responsible, directly or
indirectly, for the wages of, any employee:
" Minimum wage " means the amount of wages fixed by the Board under this Act:
" Wage " or " wages " includes any compensation for labour or services, measured by time,
piece, or otherwise.
3. (1.) Subject to subsection (2), this Act shall apply to all employees in any industry, business, trade, or occupation, and to their employers.
(2.)  This Act shall not apply in respect of farm-labourers, fruit-pickers, or domestic servants.
4. (1.) After the holding from time to time of such inquiry as the Board considers adequate, the
Board may make an order fixing a minimum wage for employees at such rate and in such manner
as the Board in its discretion considers advisable.
(2.) Without limiting the generality of the provisions of subsection (1), the Board may by its
order:—■
(a.)   Apply   the   minimum  wage   so   fixed   to   all   employees   or   to   any   group   or   class   of
employees in any industry, business, trade, or occupation, or to any group or class of
employees in all or in any two or more industries, businesses, trades, or occupations:
(6.)   Fix a different minimum wage to be paid to employees in the same industry, business,
trade, or occupation in different parts of the Province:
(c.)  Fix a minimum wage applicable only in the part or parts of the Province designated in
the order:
(d.)  Fix the minimum wage upon an hourly, daily, weekly, or monthly basis.
(3.)  The Board, either by the order fixing a minimum wage or by a subsequent order, may specify
such maximum hours of labour and such  conditions of labour and employment in  respect  of  the
employees to whom the order applies as the Board in its discretion considers necessary or expedient
for the welfare of the employees.
(4.) Every order of the Board made under this Act shall apply throughout the Province, unless
its application is by its terms restricted to some designated part or parts of the Province.
5. In the case of any employees classified by the Board as handicapped, or as part-time employees,
or as apprentices, the Board may by permit in writing authorize the payment of a wage less than the
minimum wage fixed under section 4; and may in any case limit and define the number of handicapped
employees, or part-time employees, or apprentices to whom the lesser wage fixed under this section may
be payable by any employer.
6. (1.) In the case of an employee over eighteen years of age who is desirous of learning any
industry, business, trade, or occupation in respect of which a minimum wage has been fixed, and in
which apprentices are not usually employed, and who has not had sufficient experience, in the opinion
of the Board, or as defined in any order of the Board relating to that industry, business, trade, or
occupation, to qualify her as an experienced employee therein, the Board may issue to that employee
a special licence authorizing her employment in that industry, business, trade, or occupation at a
minimum wage according to the rate fixed in the order for inexperienced employees, or, if no rate has
been fixed therein for inexperienced employees, at a minimum wage, to be fixed by the Board in the
licence, less than the minimum wage fixed under section 4.
(2.) Every special licence under this section shall be issued only in the discretion of the Board,
and in cases where the Board is satisfied that the application therefor is made in good faith, and
shall remain in force for such period as is fixed by the Board.
(3.) The number of employees holding special licences under this section employed in any plant
or establishment shall not exceed one-seventh of the whole number of the employees in that plant or
establishment: Provided that in any plant or establishment where less than seven employees are
employed one employee holding a special licence may be employed
(4.) The aggregate number of employees holding special licences under this section and employees
under eighteen years of age employed in any plant or establishment shall not exceed thirty-five per
centum of the whole number of the employees in that plant or establishment.
7. (1.) Where a minimum wage has been fixed by order of the Board under this Act for
employees in any industry, business, trade, or occupation, no person shall employ in that industry,
business, trade, or occupation in or about any work usually done by the employees within the scope
of the order any male person over eighteen years of age at a wage less than the minimum wage so
2 G 18 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
fixed, except male apprentices who have been duly apprenticed by indentures approved by the Board,
and who are receiving proper instruction from the persons to whom they are apprenticed.
(2.) Every person who employs any male person in contravention of subsection (1) shall be
liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not less than twenty-five dollars and not more than one
hundred dollars; and, in addition thereto, shall upon conviction be ordered to pay to each male person
so employed the difference between the wages actually paid to him and the minimum wage so fixed by
the Board.
8. (1.) The Board may at any time inquire into the wages and the hours and conditions of labour
and employment of all or any employees under eighteen years of age employed in any industry,
business, trade, or occupation in the Province, and may determine the wages and the hours and conditions of labour suitable for those employees; and may, in like manner and with like- effect as provided in section 4, make an order fixing a minimum wage for those employees, and specifying such
maximum hours of labour and such conditions of labour and employment in respect of those employees
as the Board in its discretion considers necessary or expedient for the employees.
(2.) Where a minimum wage has been fixed by order of the Board under subsection (1) for
employees under eighteen years of age employed in any industry, business, trade, or occupation, no
person shall employ in that industry, business, trade, or occupation in or about any work usually
done by the employees within the scope of the order any male person under eighteen years of age at
a wage less than the minimum wage so fixed; and every person who employs any male person in
contravention of this subsection shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not less than
twenty-five dollars and not more than one hundred dollars; and, in addition thereto, shall upon
conviction be ordered to pay to each male person so employed the difference between the wages actually
paid to him and the minimum wage so fixed by the Board.
9. Where board or lodging is furnished by any employer to an employee or other person to whom
a minimum wage fixed by the Board applies, the Board may investigate the matter; and, if in the
opinion of the Board the price charged by the employer for the board or lodging is excessive and unduly
affects the wages of the employee or person, the Board may make an order fixing a maximum price
to be charged by the employer for the board or lodging.
10. (1.) The Board may from time to time hold an inquiry for the purpose of investigating the
facts with respect to any persons engaged or working in or about any industry, business, trade, or
occupation as members or alleged members of any partnership or association or in the execution of any
agreement or scheme of profit-sharing or co-operative or joint contract or undertaking, including the
investigation of the contractual and other relations of the persons so engaged or working, as between
themselves or as between them and their master or employer; and if, after the holding of such inquiry
as the Board considers adequate, the Board is of the opinion that the partnership, association, agreement, or scheme and the engagement or working of those persons in connection therewith as aforesaid
are intended or have the effect, either directly or indirectly, of defeating the true intent and object
of this Act in respect of the payment of a minimum wage, the Board may, notwithstanding the provisions of any other Act, make an order prohibiting the carrying-on of the partnership, association,
agreement, or scheme in whole or in part, and prohibiting the doing by any person of any act or thing
in connection therewith set out in. the order; and the order shall be published in the Gazette, and
thereupon shall take effect and be binding on all persons so engaged or working and on their master
or employer  (if any).
(2.) Every person who contravenes any order made under subsection (1), or does any act or
thing prohibited by an order so made, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not less than
fifty dollars nor more than five hundred dollars, and in default of immediate payment of the fine shall
be liable to imprisonment for a period of not less than two months nor more than six months.
11. For the purpose of any inquiry held pursuant to the provisions of this Act, the Board shall,
in respect of the inquiry, have the like powers as are by law given to commissioners appointed under
the " Public Inquiries Act."
12. Every order of the Board fixing a minimum wage shall be published in the Gazette and shall
take effeet at the expiration of fourteen days after the date of publication.
13. Upon the petition of any employers or employees, or upon its own motion, the Board may
review, suspend, vary, or rescind any order made by it pursuant to the provisions of this Act.
14. The Board shall supply copies of every order fixing a minimum wage to any employer
requesting the same, and every employer of employees affected by any such order shall post and keep
posted in a conspicuous place in his establishment or plant a copy of the order, so that all employees
affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
15. (1.) Every employer shall keep in his principal place of business in the Province a true
and correct record in the English language of the wages paid to and the hours worked each day by
each of his employees, including each male person in his employ to whom section 7 or 8 applies,
together with a register in the English language of the names, ages, nationalities, and residential
addresses of all his employees, including each male person in his employ to whom section 7 or 8 applies.
(2.) Every employer shall, on demand of the Board or any person authorized in writing by the
Board, or by the Chairman of the Board, produce for inspection all records kept by him relating to
the wages, hours of labour, or conditions of labour and employment of any person employed by him.
16. The Board may, either by any member of the Board designated in writing by the Chairman
thereof, or by any person authorized in writing by the Board or the Chairman:—
(a.) Inspect and examine all books, pay-rolls, and other records of any employer which in
any way relate to the wages, hours of labour, or conditions of labour and employment
affecting any employees: REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 19
(6.)  Take extracts from or make copies of any entry in such books, pay-rolls, and records:
(c.) Require from any employer full and correct statements respecting the wages paid to
his employees, including each male person in his employ to whom section 7 or 8 applies,
and the hours of labour and conditions of their labour and employment, duly verified
on oath:
(d.) Require any employee or other person to whom this Act applies to make full disclosure,
production, or delivery to the Board, or to the person so authorized, of all records,
documents, statements, writings, books, papers, extracts therefrom, or copies thereof as
the employee or person may have in her or his possession or control, or other information either verbal or in writing, and either verified on oath or otherwise as may be
directed, as may in any way relate to the wages, hours of labour, or conditions of her
or his employment:
(e.) Require any employer or other person to whom this Act applies to make full disclosure,
production, or delivery to the Board, or to the person so authorized, of all records,
documents, statements, writings, books, papers, extracts therefrom, or copies thereof
as the employer or person may have in his possession or control, or other information
either verbal or in writing, and either verified on oath or otherwise as may be directed,
as may in any way relate to the profit and loss and the production and operating
costs in the industry, business, trade, or occupation carried on by or under the control
or direction of the employer or person as, in the discretion of the Board, are considered
necessary for the purposes of this Act.
17. (1.) Every employer who contravenes any order of the Board made under this Act by the
payment of wages of less amount than the minimum wage fixed by the Board, or by the charging of a
price for board or lodging in excess of the maximum price fixed by the Board, or who employs an
employee for whom maximum hours of labour have been fixed under this Act, for longer hours than the
maximum so fixed, or who neglects or fails to comply with any order made under this Act as to
conditions of labour and employment, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a penalty of not
less than twenty-five dollars nor more than one hundred dollars for each employee affected; and, in
addition thereto, shall upon conviction be ordered to pay to each employee the difference between the
wages actually paid to her and the minimum wage fixed by the Board; and in default of payment of
such penalty or difference shall be liable to imprisonment for a period of not less than two months
nor more than six months.
(2.) Every employer and every employee or other person who neglects or fails to perform any
duty imposed on him or her by this Act, or who refuses or neglects to permit of any inspection or
examination authorized by this Act, or who refuses or neglects to disclose, produce, furnish, or deliver
any information or thing required under this Act, shall be liable, on summary conviction, to a penalty
of not less than ten dollars nor more than five hundred dollars.
18. (1.) Any employer who discharges or in any other manner discriminates against any employee
because the employee has made a complaint under this Act or has testified or is about to testify, or
because such employer believes that the employee may testify, at any inquiry or in any proceedings
relative to the enforcement of this Act, or because the employee has made or is about to make any
such disclosure as may be required of her by virtue of the provisions of this Act, shall be liable, on
summary conviction, to a penalty of not more than five hundred dollars.
(2.) For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this Act without prejudice to any complainant, in any case where the complainant requests that his or her name and identity be withheld,
the name and identity of the complainant shall not be disclosed to any person by the Board, except
where disclosure is necessary for the purposes of any prosecution under this Act or is considered by
the Board to be in the public interest.
19. Where an employee by collusion with her employer or otherwise works for less than the minimum wage to which she is entitled under this Act, or directly or indirectly returns to her employer any
part of her wages which has the effect of reducing the wages actually received and retained by the
employee to an amount less than the minimum wage to which she is entitled, the employee and
the employer shall each be liable, on summary conviction, to a fine of not more than one hundred
dollars, in addition to all other penalties to which she or he may be liable under this Act. For the
purpose of any prosecution for an offence under this section, proof of the fact that any moneys were
repaid or paid by the employee to her employer shall be prima facie evidence as against the person
charged that the moneys were so repaid or paid for the purpose and had the effect of reducing the
wages actually received and retained by the employee to an amount less than the minimum wage to
which she was entitled.
20. If any employee is paid less than the minimum wage to which she is entitled under this Act,
the employee shall be entitled to recover from her employer, in a civil action, the difference between
the amount paid and the amount of the minimum wage, with costs of action; but in the case of an
employee whose services with the employer have terminated, no action shall be brought by the
employee under this section unless the action is commenced within sixty days next after the termination of the services.
21. The provisions of sections 19 and 20 applicable to employees and employers shall apply,
mutatis mutandis, in respect of male persons who are within the scope of section 7 or subsection (2)
of section 8, and to the persons by whom they are employed.
22. For the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions of this Act according to the true intent
and meaning thereof, or of supplying any deficiency therein, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may G 20 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
make such regulations not inconsistent with the spirit of this Act as may be considered necessary,
advisable, or convenient.
23. The " Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 173 of the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia,
1924," is repealed.
24. All orders made under the Act repealed by this Act and subsisting at the time of its repeal
shall continue, subject to this Act, and shall be deemed to be orders duly made and in force under
this Act.
ORDER No. 3.
Order relating to the Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
Pursuant to the provisions of the " Female Minimum Wage Act," being an Act of the 1934 session
of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of British Columbia, the Board of Industrial Relations,
having held such inquiry as the Board considers adequate, hereby orders:—
1. That where used in this Order the following expressions shall have the following meanings
respectively:—
(a.) " Fruit and vegetable industry " includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use any kind of fruit or
vegetable:
(6.) "Experienced female employee" means a female employee who has worked in the fruit
and vegetable industry for a period of two months :
(c.) " Inexperienced female employee " means a female employee who has worked in the fruit
and vegetable industry for a period of less than two months.
2. That subject to the other provisions of this Order the minimum wage for every experienced
female employee in the fruit and vegetable industry (except women to whom special licences are issued
under sections 5 and 6 of the said Act) shall be:—
(a.)  The sum of twenty-seven cents (27c.)  per hour .for every hour up to eight  (8) hours
in any one day:
(6.)  The sum of forty cents (40c.) per hour for every hour in excess of eight (8) hours and
up to twelve  (12)  hours in any one day:
(c.)  The sum of fifty-four cents  (54c.)  per hour for every hour in excess of twelve  (12)
hours in any one day.
3. That subject to the other provisions of this Order the minimum wage for every inexperienced
female employee in the fruit and vegetable industry (except women to whom special licences are issued
under sections 5 and 6 of the said Act) shall be:—
(a.)  The sum of twenty-five cents  (25c.)  per hour for every hour up to eight  (8)  hours
in any one day:
(6.)  The sum of thirty-seven and one-half cents (37%c.) per hour for every hour in excess
of eight (8) hours and up to twelve (12) hours in any one day:
(c.)   The sum of fifty cents  (50e.)  per hour for every hour in excess of twelve  (12)  hours
in any one day.
4. This Order shall become effective at the expiration of fourteen days after its publication in the
British Columbia Gazette of May 3rd, 1934, and upon the taking effect of this Order, the Order of
the Minimum Wage Board made under the " Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 173 of the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1924," governing the fruit and vegetable industry, which was published
in the British Columbia Gazette of September 16th, 1926, shall be rescinded.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 2nd day of May, 1934.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
James Thomson.
Christopher John McDowell.
W. A. Carrothers.
This Order must be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place in the employer's establishment,
sc that all employees affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
Order No. 3a (Emergency), varying Order No. 3, relating to the Fruit and
Vegetable Industry.
Pursuant to sections 4 and 13 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 48 of the
Statutes of British Columbia, 1934, the Board of Industrial Relations hereby orders that Order No. 3
of the Board relating to the Fruit and Vegetable Industry, dated the 2nd of May, 1934, be varied as
follows:— REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 21
1. By adding to clause 2 thereof the following proviso:—
" Provided that in cases where experienced female employees in the fruit and vegetable industry
are required to work in excess of eight (8) hours but not exceeding ten (10) hours in any one day, in
order to handle or deal with perishable fruits and (or) vegetables which have been delivered to the
plant or plants of their employer or employers in larger quantities than can be handled or dealt with
within eight (8) hours in any one day, the minimum wage for every such employee shall be not less
than the sum of twenty-seven cents (27c.) per hour."
2. By adding to clause 3 thereof the following proviso:—
" Provided that in eases where inexperienced female employees in the fruit and vegetable industry
are required to work in excess of eight (8) hours but not exceeding ten (10) hours in any one day, in
order to handle or deal with perishable fruits and (or) vegetables which have been delivered to the
plant or plants of their employer or employers in larger quantities than can be handled or dealt with
within eight (8) hours in any one day, the minimum wage for every such employee shall be not less
than the sum of twenty-five cents (25c.) per hour."
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 12th day of June, 1934.
BOARD OP INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
William Alexander Carrothers.
' Christopher John McDowell.
• James Thomson.
The above Order was published in the B.C. Gazette on June 14th, 1934, and becomes effective at
the expiration of fourteen days after that date.
This Order must be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place in the employer's establishment,
so that all employees affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
ORDER No. 4.
Order governing Office Occupation.
Pursuant to sections 4 and 13 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 48 of the
Statutes of British Columbia, 1934, the Board of Industrial Relations hereby orders:—
1. That where used in this Order the expression " office occupation " includes the work of females
employed as stenographers ; book-keepers ; typists ; billing clerks ; filing clerks ; cashiers ; cash-girls
(not included in other Orders) ; checkers; invoicers; comptometer operators; auditors; attendants
in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices;  and all kinds of clerical help.
2. That, subject to the other provisions of this Order, the minimum wage for every female employee
eighteen years of age or over that age in the office occupation (except women to whom special licences
are issued under section 6 of the said Act) shall be $15 a week of forty-eight hours, or 31,4 cents
per hour.
3. The minimum wage for every girl under eighteen years of age in the office occupation shall be
as follows :—-
$11 a week during the first six months' employment in such occupation.
$12 a week during the second six months' employment in such occupation.
$13 a week during the third six months' employment in such occupation.
$14 a week during the fourth six months' employment in such occupation.
$15 a week of forty-eight hours, or 31% cents per hour thereafter.
4. The minimum wage for every female apprentice eighteen years of age or over that age in the
office occupation shall be as follows:—
$11 a week during the first three months' employment in such occupation.
$12 a week during the second three months' employment in such occupation.
$13 a week during the third three months' employment in such occupation.
$14 a week during the fourth three months' employment in such occupation.
$15 a week of forty-eight hours, or 31% cents per hour thereafter.
5. Licences must be obtained from the Board before such female apprentices eighteen years of age
or over that age may be employed at the rates set forth in section 4 of this Order. Application forms
for such licences may be obtained from the Board, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
6. No woman or girl shall be employed in the office occupation for a greater number of hours than
forty-eight in any one week unless a special permit in writing has been obtained from the Chairman
or Secretary of the Board.
7. Every woman or girl employed for a greater number of hours than forty-eight in any one week
shall be paid pro rata for such excess time according to the legal rate to which she is entitled as
provided by sections 2, 3, or 4 of this Order.
8. Every woman or girl employed for a lesser number of hours than forty-eight in any one week
may be paid pro rata for such time according to the legal rate to which she is entitled as provided
by sections 2, 3, or 4 of this Order.
9. This Order shall be published in the British Columbia Gazette on the 10th day of May, 1934,
and shall take effect at the expiration of fourteen days thereafter, and shall be in substitution for the Order of the Minimum Wage Board governing the Office Occupation published in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 17th day of July, 1919, which is hereby rescinded.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 2nd day of May, 1934.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
William Alexander Carrothers.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
James Thomson.
Christopher John McDowell.
This Order must be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place in the employer's plant or
establishment, so that all employees affected thereby may have ready access to and see the same.
"BARBERS ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1934."
Subsection 4 (a) of section 6 gives the right of any person who has failed to pass the
examination, or whose certificate or permit has been revoked, or who feels himself aggrieved or
is affected by any order, finding, action, or decision of the Board, the right of appeal to the
nearest County Court, within one month from the date of such order, finding, or decision, or the
publication or express notice thereof.
Section 7 prohibits any person whose name is not on the register to engage in the occupation of barbering.
Proprietors may employ one apprentice for every four duly qualified persons working in
his establishment.
" FACTORIES ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1934."
Section 3 (2) now brings every laundry run for profit and every laundry run by a person
who holds a licence therefor, issued by any municipality, within the scope of the Act.
" INCOME TAX ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1934."
Raises the exemption of a married person whose wife or husband resides in the Dominion,
or a householder, widow or widower with dependent children, to $1,000, and $600 in the case of
a single person, widow or widower without dependent children.
Exempts wages of $50 per month from payment of the 1-per-cent. tax.
DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES.
Among the various activities administered by this Department are: " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act," " Female Minimum Wage Act," " Hours of Work Act," " Male Minimum
Wage Act," " Inspection of Factories," " Employment Service," conciliation and settlement of
strikes, and unemployment relief, and the collection and compilation of statistical information
relating to industry within the Province.
Reports covering these will be found in the following pages. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 23
UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF BRANCH.
THE " RELIEF ACT, 1933."
Survey.
At the expiry of the 1932 Act the unemployment situation in the Province still continued to
present an acute problem, with very little (if any) noticeable improvement in industrial employment opportunities, and it was quite evident that relief assistance to the unemployed would have
to be continued. By this time there were many who, having struggled along on their own efforts
through the preceding years of depression, now found themselves at the end of their resources
and compelled to apply to the Government for assistance; in addition, many of the private
charitable organizations which had been operating in assistance for the unemployed throughout
this period now found their resources almost exhausted.
1933 Act.
Federal contribution to this assistance was continued in the form of direct relief only under
authority of the " Relief Act, 1933," assented to March 30th, 1933, under which an agreement
was entered into between the Province and the Dominion dated May 1st, 1933, covering Dominion
contribution to expenditures for this purpose effective as from April 1st, 1933, to July 31st, 1933,
for Municipal and Provincial responsibilities; with additional provision to " homeless " men for
relief on work projects throughout the Province under responsibility of the Federal Government,
or contribution for this class in placer-mining camps.
Following urgent representations by the Province to the Dominion for continued relief
assistance by Federal contribution to Municipal and Provincial responsibilities, a further revised
agreement was entered into between the Province and the Dominion dated August 1st, 1933,
covering Federal contribution to expenditures from that date to March 31st, 1934; the governing-
regulations under these two agreements being set forth as below.
The previous agreement of November 1st, 1932, covering the " Special Relief Commission,"
continued in effect up to June 30th, 1933, for relief to single " homeless " men as shown under
this heading.
Registration.
At April 1st, 1933, the number of registered unemployed had reached a mark of 98,289, with
registration still continuing as under previous regulations throughout the period of the above-
mentioned Act; and at the end of December, 1933, this number had increased to a grand total
of 114,279.
Provincial Transients.—Under previous regulation of the Unemployment Relief Committee
all applicants for relief were required to be registered on a Provincial registration form; a later
regulation providing that any person entering the Province subsequent to September 30th, 1932,
would be ineligible for registration or relief. It was the policy to endeavour to persuade these
drifters into the Province to return from whence they came and assistance to this end was
extended by the Province in many cases; but, in the meantime, it was considered these people
could not be allowed to starve, as many of them were absolutely destitute and without any means
of providing themselves with even food, and for this purpose a special form of registration was
introduced, under authority of the Committee, providing for a measure of temporary assistance
only for this class. This was inaugurated originally, under date of August 11th, 1933, for
especial use in the City of Vancouver, but was later extended to cover similar cases throughout
other sections of the Province, and continued in force during period of the 1933 Act, as, despite
the educative and protective methods which had been adopted, these people still continued to
find their way into the Province.
Administration.
Direct relief under this Act continued to be administered as before by the relief organization
under authority of the Unemployment Relief Committee (with exception of the Special Relief
Commission and " homeless " men shown elsewhere) up to the first week of August, 1933, when
a reorganization of the administration took place. Prior to this date the Minister of Public
Works had been in charge of the workings of the Relief Acts, with the Unemployment Relief
Committee responsible for the policies set—the administration being carried out by the relief
organization under authority of the Committee, the Minister of Labour acting as Chairman of
the Committee. G 24 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Under the reorganization the Minister of Labour became directly responsible to the
Provincial Executive Council for the working of the Act and the policy of the entire relief
administration to be carried out thereunder—with exception of the continuing Special Relief
Commission and " homeless " men, the administration of which is treated under that heading.
The Unemployment Relief Committee automatically relinquished its duties as such, this administration being placed in the hands of an Administrator acting under authority of the Minister
of Labour.
Direct Relief.
Definition.—Direct relief under the above-mentioned agreements was defined as covering
food, fuel, clothing, and shelter—or the equivalent thereof as recommended by the Province and
approved by the Dominion.
Municipal.—In municipalities direct relief was continued to be dispensed under this Act by
the municipal officials as heretofore, each municipality being held responsible for its own costs
of administration for such, except as hereinafter set forth.
Municipal Residents.—The basis of Federal contribution to direct relief expenditures under
the May 1st agreement to persons in municipalities classed as " municipal residents "—being
those other than under the classification of " homeless " men and those classified as " transient
families" (treated elsewhere)—was 33% per cent, for the months of April and May, 1933, 20
per cent, for the month of June, and 10 per cent, for the month of July, with provision, upon
application, for increase in such contribution equal to Provincial contribution, as recommended
by the Province and approved by the Dominion. Upon advice to the municipalities accordingly,
urgent representations were made by them to the Province for continuation of the 33%-per-cent.
contribution by each of the Governments for the months of June and July, as many of the
municipalities were facing a financial crisis at this time and utterly unable to bear more than
one-third share of such costs (a few even less) in addition to administration costs ; recommendations were accordingly made by the Province to the Dominion for continuance of Federal contribution in municipalities for the months of June and July on similar basis to the previous
months of April and May, with special consideration for certain municipalities as recommended.
Federal contribution was finally set as 33% per cent, under May 1st agreement for classification
as above; this was continued likewise under the August 1st agreement for all " municipal
residents "—this classification under the August 1st agreement being defined as those other than
"homeless persons" and "transient families" (as shown elsewhere)—the balance of contribution for municipal residents being borne one-third by the Province and one-third by the
Municipalities.
Transient Families.—Under the agreements of May 1st and August 1st, " transient families "
were defined as those families living within the Province with no settled place of abode therein
and deemed by the Province to be ineligible for relief within a municipality.
Direct relief to this class in municipalities was on the basis of equal responsibility of the two
Governments for the period covered by agreements as above.
Single " Homeless " Women in Municipalities.—Under the agreement of May 1st, the single
" homeless" women in municipalities were on a similar basis of contribution as municipal
residents shown above up to July 31st, 1933. From commencement of the August 1st agreement
to expiry of the Act these single " homeless " women were classed on the basis of an equal
responsibility of the two Governments—for a contribution not in excess of 40 cents per person
per day.
Single " Homeless " Men in Municipalities.—The single " homeless " men in municipalities
under the agreement of May 1st were on a similar basis of contribution as municipal residents
shown above up to July 31st, 1933 (with exception of those receiving relief in approved urban
centres and hostels under administration of the Board of Administration for Single Men—as
shown under "Special Relief Commission"). Under the agreement of August 1st, these men
were classified separately as " fit" and " unfit " cases, according to medical examination, for
relief camps, and from that date these two cassifications were placed on the basis of equal
contribution by the two Governments—for a contribution not in excess of 40 cents per man
per day.
Provincial.—Direct relief in unorganized territory under this Act was dispensed as before
by the local disbursing relief officers in the various districts throughout the Province, and was
continued on the basis of equal responsibility of the two Governments   (including "transient REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 25
families") for the period covered by the above-mentioned agreements. The single "homeless"
men were classified separately as " fit" and " unfit" cases from date of the August 1st agreement ;  the contribution for both classifications being 50 per cent., Dominion and Province.
Special Relief Commission.
The agreement of November 1st, 1932, covering the appointment of a Special Relief Commission for the care of certain of the single homeless destitute persons in the Province, was
continued in effect following expiry of the 1932 Act by extension of time granted under Order in
Council up to June 30th, 1933, at which date this Commission was dissolved and a representative
of the Federal Government (Colonel D. W. B. Spry) appointed by Order in Council as Administrator to take over the functions and duties of the " Board of Administration for Single Men."
Colonel Spry continued in office as Administrator of this Board until early November, when he
was recalled to Ottawa by the Dominion Government.
Farm Placements.—Farm placements were continued as under the agreement of November
1st, 1932, up to the end of June, 1933, with one cancellation; when this policy was automatically
discontinued. This was reopened under the agreement of August 1st, but later applications
being rejected owing to later discontinuance of the policy, only one placement (effected in
September) remained in force to expiry of the Act.
Camps—National Defence.—The 1933 agreements provided for the taking-over by the Federal
Government without charge (under jurisdiction of the National Defence Department) the established Provincial relief camps throughout the Province—including camp equipment, stores and
supplies therein at time of taking over—for the purpose of executing certain relief projects in
the Province as set forth in the agreements of May 1st and August 1st; the single homeless men
in these camps classified as " fit" cases to become a total Dominion responsibility thereafter,
and to receive food, shelter, and clothing and a cash allowance of 20 cents per man for each
eight-hour working-day (Sundays and Saturday afternoons and holidays to be observed). It
was understood that no military discipline would be enforced in these camps, and these were
taken over by the National Defence Department from the Board of Administration for Single
Men (under whom they were being administered) progressively as from June 1st, 1933, as and
when the various relief projects throughout the Province were instituted for commencement.
All rights-of-way for such projects were required to be provided by the Province, together with
road machinery and operators for same, and engineering staff where available, the Province to
transfer to the Dominion free of charge all Provincial Crown lands as required, with any
timber or water rights thereon, and to co-operate in forest-fire protection where required.
All applicants for National Defence camps were required to be medically examined, and
only those classified as physically " fit" were accepted by the Dominion for work on relief
projects under these camps, as provided under the agreement of August 1st (the May 1st agreement providing for the care of "homeless" men in these camps) ; medical examination and
transportation being provided through the offices of the Employment Service of Canada, admin:
istering these services as representative of the Federal Government. These "■ fit" cases were
accepted for transport to National Defence camps as and when accommodation was available;
the Federal Government finally ruling that these men would only become a total Dominion
responsibility upon actual arrival at camp.
The number of men receiving relief in Provincial camps during the month of May, 1933, was
shown at 5,509; during the month of December, 1933, the National Defence camps showed 7,520
men accommodated (including supervisory staff and labourers), which figure comprised both
military units known as Military Districts Nos. 11 and 13.
Camps—Provincial.—Camps not taken over by the National Defence Department were continued under administration of the Board of Administration for Single Men on the basis of the
agreement of November 1st, 1932, providing for a 100-per-cent. Federal contribution (not to
exceed 40 cents per man per day) up to July 31st, 1933, for food, clothing, and shelter, and other
permissible charges as shown under this agreement for light, water, etc.
Provision was made under the agreement of August 1st for contribution to Provincial non-
work camps for "unfit" cases of single homeless men under equal contribution by the two
Governments not in excess of 40 cents per man per day for food, fuel, and clothing; the permissible charges against such allowances being light, heat, water, wages of cooks and assistants,
and one superintendent for all camps—all other administration charges for such camps being
borne by the Province.    This continued in effect to expiry of the Act. G 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The number of men receiving relief in Provincial non-work camps during the month of
December, 1933, has been shown at 346.
Works Projects, etc.
Municipal.—Municipal works projects were carried out in the Municipality of Penticton and
the City of Cranbrook, as provided by the agreement of August 1st, 1933, under one-third contribution each by the Dominion and Provincial Governments and municipalities concerned, such
Government contribution to cover direct labour charges only for such works. Covering schedules
were submitted to the Dominion for approval and work commenced in the late fall, the projects
to be carried out comprising irrigation reservoir and park improvements. Work schedules were
also submitted for projects in the City of Vancouver and Municipality of Kent, but no work was
undertaken thereunder during the period of the 1933 Act.
Work in Return for Direct Relief.
The policy of requiring relief recipients to make some return in public service for direct
relief administered in municipalities and unorganized territory (with exception of the non-work
camps) was continued throughout the period of the 1933 Act; refusal to perform such work or
to go to camp constituting ineligibility of such persons for further relief elsewhere. In the case
of families of such men, however, relief in kind was provided for these dependents, as it was
considered that the women and children should not be allowed to starve.
Seeds (Grain and Vegetable).
In the spring of 1933 arrangements were also made for distribution by the Province of a
limited number of collections of vegetable-garden seeds to needy settlers on relief in unorganized
territory;  similar distribution was also made in the spring of 1934 to Provincial cases on relief.
Land Settlement.
A number of families were placed on the land under the land-settlement policy of the agreement, to which contribution was made by the two Governments and municipalities equally.
Summary showing Numbers receiving Relief for Period January 1st, 1933, to
December 31st, 1933;
(Figures shown for each month separately.)
(Including direct relief in organized and unorganized territory; also works projects undertaken in certain municipalities; also farm placements and Provincial and National Defence
camps.)
Numbers.
Classification.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
January only, 19S3.
Municipal—
14,353
1,109
47,453
3,497
61,806
4,606
2,944
874
2,944
874
Provincial—
6,705
48
20,081
172
26,786
220
5,857
48
6,141
1,651
' 10,299
2
5,857
48
Special Relief Commission—■
6,141
1,651
10,299
2
22,215
71,203
27,816
121 234 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 27
Summary showing Numbers receiving Relief -for Period January 1st, 1933, to
December 31st, 1933—Continued.
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
February only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Special Relief Commission—■
Camps	
Hostels	
Urban centres	
Farm placements	
Total, February	
March only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Special Relief Commission—
Camps	
Hostels	
Urban centres	
Farm placements	
Total, March	
April only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Special Relief Commission—•
Camps	
Hostels	
Urban centres	
Farm placements	
Total, April	
15,388
1,320
6,851
52
23,611
15,932
1,408
7,584
45
24,969
15,677
1,287
6,905
74
48,884
4,038
20,526
187
73,635
46,287
3,718
23,133
164
73,302
23,943
44,334
3,431
20,896
235
68,896
3,656
1,035
70
6,045
1,612
10,854
4
29,656
4,116
1,059
0,410
87
6,058
1,439
11,407
5
30,587
3,301
1,036
0,575
82
5,634
1,868
10,644
6
29,206
64,272
5,358
3,656
1,035
27,377
239
6,380
70
6,045
1,612
10,854
4
120,902
62,219
5,126
4,116
1,059
30,717
209
6,416
87
6,058
1,439
11,407
5
128,858
00,011
4,718
3,301
1,036
27,801
309
6,575
82
5,634
1,868
10,644
6
122,045 G 28                                                 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary* showing Numbers receiving Relief for Period January 1st, 1933, to
December 31st, 1933—Continued.
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
May only.
Municipal—
13,906
1,244
40,087
3,396
54,593
4,640
3,140
1,027
28,682
327
7,740
86
5,509
2,160
8,598
6
3,140
1,027
Provincial—
7,029
77
•   21,653
250
7,740
86
5,509
2,160
8,598
6
Special Relief Commission—
Total, May           ..       .          	
22,256
65,986
28,266
116,508
June only.
Municipal-—
12,915
1,198
36,417
3,314
49,332
4,512
2,650
988
27,549
307
7,799
97
4,080
2,593
7,860
6
1,344
2,650
988
Provincial—
6,786
72
20,763
235
7,799
97
4,080.
2,593
7,800
6
1,344
Special Relief Commission—■
Urban centres	
20,971
60,729
27,417
109,117
July only.
Municipal—
12,327
1,093
32,291
2,831
44,618
3,924
2,404
927
25,669
223
6,171
96
2,725
2,252
5,739
Single men '	
2,404
927
Provincial—
6,321
52
19,348
171
Single men	
6,171
96
2,725
2,252
5,739
Special Relief Commission—
2,432
2,432
Total, July	
1 9 79R
54 641
22 746
07 ISO
I REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 29
Summary showing Numbers receiving Relief for Period January 1st, 1933, to
December 31st, 1933—Continued.
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
August only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Single homeless men—
Camps (Provincial)	
Hostels ....
Farm placements	
Homesteaders	
National Defence Camps	
Total, August	
September only
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Single homeless men—
Camps (Provincial)	
Hostels	
Farm placements	
Homesteaders	
National Defence Camps	
Total, September	
October only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Single homeless men—
Camps (Provincial)	
Hostels	
Farm placements	
National Defence Camps	
Total, October	
11,668
1,141
5,907
40
19,109
32,102
2,817
18,240
144
54,060
5,427
1,003
4,015
97
1,486
1,467
451
3,848
43,830
3,958
5,427
1,003
24,147
184
4,015
97
1,486
1,467
451
3,848
18,756
53,363
17,794
89,913
11,520
31,730
2,746
43,250
1,109
3,855
5,441
844
5,441
844
5,904
18,221
104
24,125
29
133
3,210
92
1,125
1,669
1
551
4,074
3,210
92
1,125
1,669
1
551
4,074
18,562
52,801
17,007
88,370
11,629
31,908
3,042
•
43,537
1,206
4,248
5,926
831
5,926
831
6,249
19,021
89
25,270
25
114
4,497
97
1,063
2,527
1
6,536
4,497
97
1,063
2,527
1
6.536
21,478
94,647 G 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Summary showing Numbers receiving Relief for Period January 1st, 1933, to
December 31st, 1933—Continued.
Classification.
Numbers.
Heads of
Families.
Dependents.
Single
Individuals.
Total.
November only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Single homeless men—
Camps (Provincial)	
Hostels	
Farm placements	
National Defence Camps	
Total, November <„.
December only.
Municipal—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Provincial—
Resident families	
Transient families	
Single men	
Single women	
Single homeless men—■
Camps (Provincial)	
Hostels	
Farm placements	
National Defence Camps	
Total, December	
12,358
1,377
6,514
21
20,270
13,556
1,490
6,932
28
33,298
3,456
19,764
74
56,592
36,945
8,766
21,158
108
61,977
7,454
826
4,741
104
436
2,318
1
7,093
22,973
9,813
852
5,081
103
346
1,844
1
7,520
25,560
45,656
4,833
7,454
826
26,278
95
4,741
104
436
2,318
1
7,093
99,835
50,501
5,256
9,813
852
28,090
136
5,081
103
346
1,844
1
7,520
109,543
Note.—Urban Centres included in municipal single men.
shown for municipal resident families.
Municipal works included in the numbers REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 31
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
A study of the statistical section reveals a condition in industry, although pleasing from
the point of view of increased employment, is far from satisfactory in the case of remuneration
to the wage-earner.
3,530 FIRMS MAKE RETURNS.
The firms who forwarded their returns in time to be included in the tables numbered 3,530,
one more than for 1929. We have in previous years reminded firms that a report covering their
operations is obligatory under the "Department of Labour Act," and would again point out that
failure to reply promptly necessitates added expense at a time when every effort is being made
to keep the cost of administration at a minimum. The Department has no desire to enforce the
penalty provision of the Act, but it has been observed that the delinquents are the same employers each year, and other methods may be adopted in the future to ensure compliance with our
request.
TOTAL PxW-ROLL.
The total pay-roll of the 3,530 firms amounted to $68,028,424.61, a decrease of $4,577,949.96
from 1932, or 6.3 per cent., and from a careful study of the forms received we are convinced that
1934 will show a favourable turn in the total pay-roll of the Province. Wages paid for relief-
work have not been included in the above amount, our tabulations being purely industrial. The
figures are therefore comparable with the years when relief-work was not necessary.
The pay-rolls and number of firms reporting since 1921 are as follows:—
No. Total
Year
reporting. Pay-roll.
1921   2,275 $79,742,380.10
1922   2,809 86,192,190.73
1923   3,375 106,796,958.96
1924   3,566 107,798,771.30
1925  '.  4,138 115,943,238.60
1920   4,521 129,420,599.55
1927   4,597 130,047,021.92
1928   4,846 136,784,484.18
1929  5,063 145,120,325.98
1930   4,704 127,160,407.53
1931   4,088 96,296,567.77
1932   3,529 72,600,374.57
1933   3,530 68,028,424.01
TOTAL INDUSTRIAL PAY-ROLL.
The figures already given do not represent the total pay-roll; to these must be added
$966,249, representing forms received too late for classification, and $1,000,000 as an estimate of
those who have failed to make a return. Transcontinental railways sent in pay-rolls amounting
to $10,031,979.67, a welcome increase over the 1932 total of $220,000; Dominion and Provincial
Government workers, $5,000,000; wholesale and retail firms, $2,500,000; delivery, cartage, teaming, warehousing, butchers, moving-picture operators, wood and coal yards, and auto transportation, $3,000,000; ocean steamships and express services, $7,500,000; and $1,100,000 for miscellaneous work not covered by any of the above.
The total pay-roll of the Province, with the addition of the above, would therefore be:—
Pay-roll of 3,530 firms making returns to Department of Labour   $68,028,424.61
Returns received too late to be included in above summary   966,249.00
Employees in occupations included in Department's inquiry, not sending in
returns (estimated pay-roll) _  1,000,000.00
Transcontinental railways   10,031,979.67
Dominion and Provincial Government workers  5,000,000.00
Wholesale and retail firms  2,500,000.00
Delivery, cartage and teaming, warehousing, butchers, moving-picture operators, coal and wood yards, and auto transportation     3,000,000.00
Ocean services and express companies  -  7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous  -  1,100,000.00
Total  $99,126,653.28 G 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The percentage changes in the amounts paid to officers, superintendents, and managers; to
clerks, stenographers, and salesmen; and to wage-earners, shows a slight increase on behalf of
the wage-earning group, as will be noted in the following table:—
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Per Cent.
9.48
9.53
80.99
Per Cent.
10.38
11.03
78.59
Per Cent.
11.57
13.45
74.98
Per Cent.
12.77
14.93
72.30
Per Cent.
12.08
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen....	
13.62
74.30
Totals        	
100.00
100.00
100.00     1     100.00
100.00
PAY-ROLL COMPARISONS.
Six of the twenty-five tables register an increased pay-roll for 1933, headed by Coast shipping
with an increase of $1,925,000; the lumber industry with $1,118,000; metal-mining, $885,000;
cigar and tobacco manufacture, $17,000; breweries, $13,000; and oil-refining with $10,000. It is
a sign of better times when we see two of our basic industriess—lumbering and metal-mining—
show an increase.
The decreases vary from $17,000 in jewellery-manufacturing to $2,337,000 in the general contracting group, followed by the public utility group with a loss of $1,100,000; printing and
publishing, $928,000; coal-mining, $822,000; metal trades, $562,000; food products, $555,000;
miscellaneous trades and industries, $506,000; pulp and paper manufacture, $287,000; explosives
and chemicals lost $257,000—more than half of last year's gain; laundries, cleaning and dyeing,
$255,000; wood-manufacture (N.E.S.), $230,000; builders' materials, $221,000; garment-manufacture, $211,000; ship-building, $100,000; leather and fur goods, $94,000; smelting, $61,000;
house-furnishing, $33,000;   and paint-manufacture, $25,000.
The pay-rolls covering the past three years can be conveniently compared in the following
table :—
Industry.
1931.
No. of
Firms
porting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1932.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1933.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries	
Builders'  materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing...
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Manufacturing jewellery	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous	
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building '.	
Smelting	
Street-railways, etc	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
37
81
9
25
107
988
10
466
64
49
8
82
49
712
690
158
162
12
8
130
15
42
2
96
86
1,717
26
4,671
6,902
12,534
266
9,425
717
823
194.
1,562.
387.
12,904;
6,699.
5,103,
2,762,
1,083,
217,
3,425,
4,702,
1,244,
5,920,
10,532,
1,574,
,220.28
974.02
389.75
819.52
829.90
.934.72
,411.14
,376.67
166.22
,488.92
,744.37
.167.21
,314.96
,625.88
.501.54
.304.96
949.55
745.80
519.99
.317.87
906.14
179.26
029.71
761.26
888.13
4,088
$90,296,567.77
34
83
9
27
104
736
8
352
52
44
8
77
4S
555
663
170
156
22
7
137
12
33
2
102
88
$708,598.88
845,388.07
26,213.95
3,684,582.87
4,969,953.55
6,916,656.31
876,974.39
8,640,814.40
521,428.81
539,027.06
154,144.55
1,279,086.40
343,104.43
9,162,387.48
4,683,727.11
4,090,145.20
2,520,170.90
1,327,883.43
195,093.23
3,700,983.84
3,504,110.12
693,969.27
3,341,108.46
8,743,713.45
1,131,111.41
35
07
9
23
104
633
8
447
56
39
8
68
41
573
631
253
140
24
9
132
14
34
3
101
$721
024
43
2,862
6,894
4,579
619
8,085
310
506
137
1,024
249
10,280.
4,121
4,975
2,014
1,337
170
2,778
3,217,
593
3,280
7,696,
902,
445.41
,512.19
225.51
277.99
,408.92
,849.07
,253.45
,066.07
,313.96
,986.77
,137.79
,494.35
,121.93
,524.76
,325.58
,317.92
,858.38
,874.48
,716.27
,310.25
,532.03
,0S1.30
,520.98
.598.46
070.19
3,529
$72,606,374.57
3,530
8,028,424.61 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 33
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
In tabulating the various returns received for the last four years, they have been segregated
according to the areas in which the industrial operations were being carried on, thus giving a
comparative view of the industrial progress made in different sections of the Province.
As predicted in our last Annual Report, the renewed activity in lumbering and mining
increased the percentages in the Mainland division from 36.86 per cent, to 38.37; in the Island
section the increase was more pronounced, being from 16.31 in 1932 to 19.59 in 1933; while the
Greater Vancouver area decreased 4.76 per cent., the 1933 percentage being 42.04.
These percentages were based on the 3,530 returns received, with a total pay-roll of
$62,028,422.61, and by applying the same proportion to the other figures making up the total
industrial pay-roll we arrive at the following apportionment for the three sections:—
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Greater Vancouver..
Rest of Mainland
Vancouver Island
$68,730,605.09
83,790,637.05
39,571,007.37
$192,091,249.51
$65,031,706.92
70,290,482.05
31,805,564.74
$58,964,436.78
52,143,080.62
20,833,485.28
$48,183,910.64
37,980,804.59
16,792,298.77
$41,831,447.67
37,965,508.24
19,329,697.37
Totals	
$167,133,813.71
$131,941,008.68
$102,957,074.00
$99,126,653.28
APPRENTICES DECREASE IN NUMBER.
The apprentices reported number 621, a decrease of 101 from the 1932 total. During 1929
there were 1,676 apprentices reported, the loss in the intervening years being 63 per cent.
There are no doubt various reasons for the severe drop in this class of employee, but it
presents a condition which should have the earnest consideration of industrial leaders and
employers' organizations.
Increases are noted in printing and publishing, 52; food products, 26; pulp and paper, 16;
garment-manufacture, 15; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 6; wood (N.E.S.),6; coal-mining, 3;
and in the manufacture of jewellery, 1.
Decreases in the number are led by contracting, 79; followed by public utilities, 40; smelting, 36; metal trades, 21; miscellaneous trades and industries, 13; ship-building, 12; leather
and fur goods and explosives and chemicals, 6 each ; house-furnishing and metal-mining, 2 each;
and builders' materials, 1.
CHANGES IN WAGE RATES.
A glance at the following table is sufficient to show the severe decline in the wages paid to
adult male employees; the 1933 figures reveal that 22,972 adult male workers were in receipt of
less than $19 per week, being an increase of 2,541 over the previous year. The purchasing-power
lost by a continuous policy of wage-cutting is only prolonging our present depressed condition.
If, as has been often stated, prosperity, or even normal times, will return when wages have
been greatly reduced, we should now be at the point where every person who wants work could
find it, the average weekly wage for all adult males being $9.01 below the peak year of 1920, when
it stood at $31.51 per week.
Adult Male
AVOKKERS  EMPLOYED   AT  LOW
Rates
op Wages.
Weekly Bate.
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Under $6   	
49
45
37
158
139
297
382
1,249
867
1,454
1,635
2,695
1,796
3,806
2
3
12
53
54
97
204
359
528
965
1,438
1,311
1,952
2,520
1
11
10
9
44
72
194
171
317
619
502
1,199
1,260
1
3
10
26
70
44
214
143
283
679
574
1,092
1,252
1
97
27
49
110
494
588
1,207
1,550
1,409
3
47
57
88
182
184
816
- 954
1,024
1,950
1,948
3
35
81
79
147
526
550
1,174
953
1,973
2,675
3,322
1,989
2,757
107
167
420
367
683
914
810
2,145
1,809
2,204
3,159
2,754
2,318
2,574
96
405
$6 to  $6.99	
7 to    7.99	
8 to    8.99	
592
9  to    9.99	
1,187
1,063
809
10 to 10.99	
11 to 11.99	
12 to 12.99	
2,550
2,145
2,436
2,965
2,780
2,280
2,927
13 to 13.99	
14 to 14.99	
15 to 15.99	
16 to  16.99	
17 to 17.99	
18 to 18.99	
Totals 	
14,609
9,498
4,409
4,391
5,592
7,253
16,264
20,431
22,972
3 G 34 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
-      The following shows the various industries as represented in the tables, with the number of
adult males employed and the percentage who are in receipt of less than $19 per week :—
Number Per
Industry.                                                                                         employed. Cent.
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing    63 87.30
Lumber industry  16,727 64.14
Wood-manufacture   (N.E.S.)     985 63.65
House-furnishing    313 57.51
Builders'  materials    772 52.72
Food products   ,  8,151 45.30
Leather and fur goods  156 42.31
Garment-manufacture  115 40.90
Explosives and chemicals  424 39.62
Paint-manufacture  63 36.51
Metal trades     2,750 36.36
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing  418 33.50
Contracting  5,777 32.16
Miscellaneous     1,003 28.71
Street-railways,  etc  2,989 20.00
Oil-refining     1,067 25.77
Pulp and paper  2,220 25.50
Breweries  470 19.00
Printing and publishing  849 17.31
Ship-building  653 17.00
Jewellery-manufacture     46 15.22
Coal-mining   2,716 12.85
Smelting     2,307 12.48
Coast shipping  5,341 10.48
Metal-mining  5,508 9.24
The average weekly wage fluctuated considerably during the past year; seven of the tables
show a wage increase and eighteen a decrease. The method adopted is the same as in previous
years.
Using the summary of all tables as an example, we find 1,187 males over 21 years of age
receiving from $9 to $9.99 per Week. In our calculations we set the weekly rate at $9.50. The
same applies to all other rates up to $30 to $34.99 class; as many of the 5,087 would be in
receipt of sums varying from $30 to $34.99, we have set the rate at $32 per week; or, in other
words, where steps of $1 were shown in the table, such as $9 to $9.99, we have calculated at
$9.50, and where steps of $5 appear, such as $30 to $34.99 and $45 to $49.99, the calculations
were $32 and $47 respectively.
The 656 receiving $50 and over was taken to mean $50 only.
The following table shows the average weekly wage earned by adult males in the various
industries, and is for the week of employment of the greatest number; this would usually mean
a full week's work, but we have no means of ascertaining the employees' annual earnings, as
there would be broken time, weather conditions, and temporary out-of-work periods. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 35
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry   (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1920.      1927
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast  shipping	
Contracting 	
Explosives  and  chemicals	
Food products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Jewellery,  manufacture  of ,
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods	
Lumber  industries..  	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil-refining 	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp  and paper  manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting .'.	
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,   telephones,  etc	
Manufacturing of wood  (N.E.S.)	
$27.32
27.38
22.24
30.06
29.59
29.06
23.79
26.20
29.48
25.67
36.69
27.00
26.90
25.56
27.92
33.34
24.61
31.48
21.94
38.25
27.47
28.74
32.90
29.26
25.26
I
$27.62
26.96
22.36
29.79
29.79
30.24
25.38
26.00
29.15
27.46
31.41
26.44
29.42
25.93
29.76
32.89
25.99
30.96
24.95
36.72
27.11
29.11
31.15
28.83
25.60
$28.85
20.28
22.97
30.50
31.89
30.58
26.24
27.70
28.00
27.44
32.49
26.96
27.88
26.53
31.04
33.27
27.15
30.23
23.62
40.94
26.82
28.85
32.54
30.04
25.02
$27.70
28.04
26.58
30.18
32.84
30.57
24.61
26.56
28.68
26.74
36.61
23.16
29.03
26.54
29.50
35.24
26.21
30.50
25.58
40.81
27.87
30.25
33.00
30.70
25.49
$27.40
27.38
25.06
29.03
31.36
30.34
26.66
27.79
28.34
25.54
37.85
27.16
28.31
25.69
29.96
33.31
25.88
29.78
25.85
39.34
27.39
30.35
30.05
30.02
26.03
$27.58
25.81
20.40
28.40
29.63
27.41
26.78
23.43
22.51
23.18
31.29
25.29
25.81
21.09
27.74
30.02
23.43
31.24
26.11
39.78
25.94
29.58
30.44
29.11
23.67
21.95
14.28
28.04
26.50
24.78
23.34
21.88
24.07
20.05
23.40
23.26
21.62
18.73
24.24
25.50
22.78
29.34
25.00
37.05
24.63
26.17
22.98
28.89
20.01
J25.70
20.54
14.67
26.80
27.62
23.37
20.66
21.12
25.29
18.91
30.55
21.78
20.73
18.00
22.70
25.02
22.13
23.78
22.53
32.82
21.21
25.25
23.83
24.51
18.05
_
The increases and decreases in the average weekly rate are shown in the following
Increase.
Breweries   $0.05
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing.. .39
Coast shipping   1.12
Garment-making    1.22
Jewellery-manufacture      $7.15
Metal-mining  12
Smelting  85
Decrease.
Builders' materials    $1.41
Coal-mining       1.24
Contracting       1.41
Explosives and chemicals     2.08
Food products  76
House-furnishing        1.14
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing     1.48
Leather and fur goods 89
Lumber industries   73
Metal trades      1.54
Miscellaneous trades and industries  $0.65
Oil-refining      5.56
Paint-manufacture       2.47
Printing and publishing     4.23
Pulp and paper manufacturing     3.42
Ship-building  92
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
telephones, etc     4.38
Manufacture of wood   (N.E.S.)     2.56
AVERAGE INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average weekly wage covering adult males, and numbering 61,891, was $22.30, a
decrease of $1.32 when compared with 1932, and a loss of $9.21 from the peak year.
The following are the figures since the Department commenced the compilation of
statistics:—
1918   $27.97
1919   29.11
1920   31.51
1921   27.62
1922   27.29
1923  .' 28.05
1924   28.39
1925   27.82
1926   $27.99
1927   28.29
1928   28.96
1929   29.20
1930   28.64
1931   26.17
1932   23.62
1933   22.30 G 36
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
AVERAGE   WEEKLY WAGES PAID TO ADULT   MALE  EMPLOYEES
1918—1933
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
WAGES
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
$      '
32.00
3 1.00
30.00
29. OO
28.00
27.00
2G.OO
25.OO
24.00
23.OO
22. OO
A
/
/\
/
\
\
/
/
\
\
\^
*v. -
\
\
\
\
\
\
Chart showing Fluctuation in Industrial Wages.
307.
25%
207.
15%
IO?i
57.
1930
-1931
1932
1933
■ 1
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G 37
INCREASED EMPLOYMENT.
The following chart is one of the pleasant items in the statistical section and shows that a
decided upswing in the number employed occurred during 1933; from 42,000 in January a
further decline took place during February, which may in future be looked upon as the low
point; a steady climb up to 60,000 occurred in eight months, falling off to 51,468 for December,
thus having a net gain of 9,301 over the month of January.
It is interesting and gratifying to note that the 1933 curve is well above the starting-point.
The following cut is only applicable to the industries making returns to this Department.
AVERAGE    MONTHLY    NUMBER  °" WAGE-EARNERS  (MaleSFemale)
1331-29-30-31-32-33
JAN.
FEB.
MAR
APL
MAY JUNE JULY
AUG. SEPT.
OCT.
NOV.
DEC.
100,000
95,000
90,000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
GO.OOO
55,000
50.000
45,000
40,000
1929
'••..
_^_ -
—.
s.
1930
— - —
■^
X
s
-—-
,-*■--
s
>-
'M-..^.
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•>-
x-
1931
1933
*>*
y
V,
^
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I9ZI
193Z
X
o*
REFERENCE
^
^
y
Employment   in 	
1921    shewn  thus
1929
19 30
19 31
1932
»•
•o~.  ,w
1 G 38 DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
EMPLOYMENT FLUCTUATION.
The peak month of employment changed to September, from June in 1932, with an increase
of 4,857 gainfully employed.
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers had a fairly steady number
employed during the year, and exceeded the figures for 1932; builders' materials reached the
low iu February and increased steadily for the remainder of the year, up to November, closing
the year with 137 more on the pay-roll than at the beginning; contracting, inseparably linked
with builders' materials, had a bad year, but developed the usual seasonal employment period.
Coal-mining experienced another disastrous year, the average number employed being 700 below
the previous year; Coast shipping evidenced a return to normal conditions, showing increased
employment throughout the year; explosives and chemicals registered a decline, food products
also increased its employment figures; unfortunately the rates of remuneration paid did not
reflect the increased employment in the pay-roll figures; house-furnishing began the year in a
weak condition, but improved gradually throughout the period; laundries, cleaning and dyeing,
and leather and fur goods remained fairly steady.
The lumber industry staged a rapid recovery after reaching the low point during February,
the year closing with a gain of 6,500; the metal-trades table showing increased employment
towards the end of the year; metal-mining also recovered to the extent of an additional 2,109
employed during December, in excess of February, the month of least employment; oil-refining
again registered an increase in the number employed, which was reflected in an increased payroll ; paint-manufacture, printing and publishing, pulp and paper industry, and ship-building
were all below last year's figures; smelting, after a poor beginning, felt the benefits of renewed
mining operations and increased monthly during the balance of the year; wood-manufacture
(N.E.S.) also made a poor start during 1933, but was showing signs of recovery. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 39
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aaacrHferHTJMcE G 40
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
NATIONALITIES OF EMPLOYEES.
Several changes are made in the table showing the nationalities of employees. Natives of
English-speaking countries accounted for T6.30 per cent.; natives of Continental Europe, 14.62
per cent. The employees from other countries and nationalities not stated, 1.28 per cent., and
for Asiatics 7.80 per cent. The actual number of Asiatics employed was 5,941, as compared with
6,594 for 1932. The percentage figures for the four divisions will be seen in the following
table:—
1928.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Natives of English-speaking countries ....
Per Cent.
72.65
17.02
9.33
1.00
Per Cent.
70.34
18.56
10.01
1.09
Per Cent.
72.01
16.07
8.97
2.95
Per Cent.
73.60
15.48
7.07
3.85
Per Cent.
75.26
14.57
8.40
1.77
Per Cent.
76.30
14.62
7.80
Prom other countries, or nationality not
1.28
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAY-ROLL.
When tabulating firms with a total pay-roll of over $100,000, we do not include public
authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale or retail firms, transcontinental
railways, or vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
During 1933 there were 98 of these firms, as compared with 110 for 1932.
The peak year was 1929, when 262 firms had a pay-roll exceeding $100,000.
The lumber industry continues to head the list, with 26 firms; followed by the food
products and metal-mining groups with 10 each; coal-mining and Coast shipping, 7 each; the
public utility and printing and publishing, 5 each; oil-refining and packing-houses, 4 each;
pulp and paper manufacture, 3; breweries, garages, general contracting, miscellaneous metal
trades, miscellaneous trades and industries, ship-building, and smelting, 2 each; and 1 each in
explosives, laundries, and paint-manufacture.
Four of these firms had an annual pay-roll of over $1,000,000, one of these exceeding
$3,000,000 and two in excess of $2,000,000. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 41
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material, etc. -Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lirr.e, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock.
No. 3. Cigar and Tobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. -Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing axd heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' out-
fitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.—Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts   and   bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries. — Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturiny.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing. —This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.—Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.—Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.— This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, &nd supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of {not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No.  1.
BREWERIES, DISTILLERS, AND AERATED
WATER MANUFACTURERS.
Returns covering 35 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $217,178.40
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     85,588.31
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    418,678.70
Total $721,445.41
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
367
352
352
362
106
105
58
19
25
39
July	
August
September
October...,
November
December.
341
341
349
345
357
377
37
46
33
29
101
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00.
to   $6.!
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
27
18
5
12
17
27
18
28
3
12
20
21
38
11
13
95
66
17
Under
21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
1
2
41
16
53
25
ii'
14
1
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Halkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
580
155
9
1
1
3
13
10
2
i
150
14
1 G 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No.  2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF.
Returns covering 67 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $157,023.37
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         82,222.31
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       385,266.51
Total     $624,512.19
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February  ...
413
412
472
478
476
471
April	
May	
Month.        Males.    Females.
July	
August.   ..
September .
October	
November ..
December...
487
620
610
555
617
580
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00...
to   $6.9
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to   44.99.
49.9
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
3
12
18
15
52
44
63
63
53
68
25
28
56
26
26
23
32
34
7
28
9
4
36
18
24
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary arid Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers.,     $7,619.76
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     10,006.99
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     25,598.76
Total      $43,225.51
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June....
Males.
Females.
12
13
26
22
29
27
19
23
20
23
26
23
July	
August	
September .
October
November..
December ..
26
55
64
39
31
33
14
19
16
18
24
23
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
18
$6.00 to   $6.99
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8.99..
6
7
25
8
6
9.00 to     9.99 .
1
1
2
10.00 to   10.99..
1
5
2
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
2
14 00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99 .
3
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
1
2
4
2
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99.
1
20.00 to   20.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
1
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
26.00 to   25.99..
1
27.00 to   27.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34 99
35.00 to   39.99
40.00 to   44.99
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
440
234
4
1
21
26
2
1
Italv	
24
2
7
31
1
53
29
Italy	
24
Central European and Balkan States....
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finluid, etc.
7 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 43
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 23 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $149,108.32
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       135,924.29
Wages-earners (including piece-workers)    2,577,245.38
Total $2,862,277.99
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February....
2,958
2,880
2,808
2,524
2,489
2,446
July	
September .
November...
December.
2,480
2,461
2,603
2,729
2,776
2,712
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12 99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27 99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
6
4
9
21
24
46
58
34
36
95
54
80
103
68
51
333
225
117
163
85
112
791
129
42
12
2
Under
21 Yrs.
5
3
3
13
13
11
11
12
6
20
5
4
18
6
4
7
3
2
5
IS Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
794
1,248
40
2
6
5
214
122
241
42
3S
4
110
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 104 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $639,262.20
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       310,020.82
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,945,125.90
Total $6,894,408.92
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
4,197
4,168
3,802
4,059
4,459
4,576
23
23
22
24
35
43
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August	
September..
October	
November..
December ..
4,178
4,467
4,893
4,545
4,473
4,534
40
45
32
25
24
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to     9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99
26.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
78
1
4
4
14
19
15
25
33
127
60
64
116
97
330
285
420
298
203
498
82
75
995
97
452
242
423
127
157
Under
21 Yrs.
20
2
18 Yrs.     Under
over.    18 Yrs.
2
2
3
25
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc,
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China     	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
2,510
1,911
90
24
7
12
103
20
8
223
4
2
246
60
46
161
19
25
1 G 44
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 633 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $955,795.58
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       674,919.03
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2,949,135.06
Total  $4,579,849.67
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
2,975
2,837
2,986
3,082
3,256
3,398
44
35
31
44
50
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August
September
October ...
November.
December..
3,173
3,353
3,530
3,572
3,453
3,099
82
76
60
88
25
33
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
F.mployment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
to 20.99.
to   21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28 99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44 99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
10
8
11
44
41
211
47
162
242
448
400
23S
432
272
647
389
140
487
136
95
182
109
48
294
286
191
71
140
ES.
Females.
Apprentices.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21
14
13
11
7
11
14
20
8
4
7
6
1
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
4
9
2
8
3
24
11
8
14
4
9
3
5
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia.	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States 	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
2,823
2,157
76
14
81
45
35
205
56
13
7
40
19
63
18
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 8 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $69,693.76
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  124,258.92
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  425,300.77
Total $619,253.45
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January 	
February...
400
390
382
355
351
362
September..
October	
November ..
December ..
384
385
399
384
347
258
1
1
1
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
-Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6 00.
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99
25
9
3
9
11
14
13
12
13
9
19
13
18
29
20
22
40
11
13
24
10
21
6
6
31
17
2
4
4
8.00 to     8.99..
1
10.00 to   10.99..
12.00 to   12.99 .
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99
16.00 to   15.99
16.00 to   16.99
17.00 to   17 99
18.00 to   18 99.
19.00 to   19.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
3
23.00 to   23.99
24.00 to   24 99
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99  .
27.00 to   27.99.
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40 00 to   44.99
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
145
197
15
2
3
10
7
5
15
2
5
2u" REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 45
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 4-il Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,119,994.72
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,224,385.45
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   ....   5,741,285.90
Total .    $8,085,666.07
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
April	
May	
June   	
3,427
3,453
3,608
4,1.05
4,423
5,960
808
773
762
779
995
1,755
July	
August	
September .
October ....
November..
December ..
6,588
6,473
6,363
6,246
4,824
3,760
3,227
3,489
3,405
2,672
2,027
899
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21 00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
3.00 .
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
26
142
59
44
258
69
77
500
258
339
529
375
365
651
363
614
389
305
278
390
375
210
289
213
74
466
211
82
98
112
Under
21 Yrs.
51
39
34
60
46
45
14
53
22
60
41
17
24
24
7
21
12
16
3
4
7
4
2
3
1
1
2
1
18 Yrs.  Under
over. 18 Yrs.
257
303
278
92
199
200
205
623
539
667
299
183
135
131
86
71
56
42
32
29
34
14
7
9
8
18
5
86
21
71
13
13
24
24
33
26
11
13
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States ....
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
3,708
2,196
94
14
19
13
55
100
65
499
95
47
266
69-2
Apprentices.
25
9
12
7
13
6
8
1
1
Females.
3,392
632
47
7
17
20
64
126
31
64
60
3
10
446
37
Table No. 9
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 56 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $88,029.70
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         29,572.43
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       192,711.83
Total     $310,313.96
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February-
March ...
April.  ..
May	
June
109
122
129
125
134
131
247
283
297
314
340
Month.       Males.   Females,
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December .
133
133
139
141
133
115
329
324
276
228
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22 99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
&over.
4
3
9
4
5
5
3
5
4
7
4
6
3
1
4
9
10
9
2
3
1
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
2
5
13
6
62
47
75
35
18
16
15
5
8
4
7
1
2
4
Under
18 Yrs.
4
1
3
11
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
61
50
2
4
13
206
105
6
10
7
14 G 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No.  10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 39 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $97,494.60
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     82,012.48
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   327,479.69
Total $506,986.77
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June	
342
344
360
344
360
377
48
49
49
47
51
50
July 	
August...
September
October   ..
November.
December.
378
420
433
452
465
422
45
61
67
66
74
65
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number:
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11 00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00..
to   $6.:
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29 99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
5
1
6
12
9
6
21
8
46
15
38
14
22
17
11
15
10
2
15
1
16
11
14
25
4
2
22
4
4
2
1
2
Females.
18 Yrs.
&over.
2
4
7
4
8
8
13
4
9
5
3
1
1
3
1
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy    	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan  	
Japan    	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
385
129
8
1
4
1
7
6
11
12
15
50
19
Table No.  11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering S Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $17,914.06
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc   55,076.02
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)   64,147.71
Total .'. $137,137.79
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
April	
May	
June	
51
51
51
51
51
51
1
1
1
1
1
1
July	
August	
September..
November..
December...
51
51
51
50
51
62
1
1
1
1
1
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
1
$6.00 to   $6.99..
8.00 to     8.99
9.00 to     9.99..
2
1
10.00 to   10 99
11.00 to   11 99..
2
12.00 to   12 99..
13.00 to   13.99..
1
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
4
16.00 to   16.99
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18 99..
3
6
20.00 to   20.99
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22 99
2
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
4
3
1
1
3
25.00 to   25.99 .
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99
30.00 to   34.99..
4
4
2
35.00 to   39.99..
40 00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99 .
9
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland,
Great Britain and Ireland..,
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc,
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated    	
18
32
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 47
Table No.  12.
LAUNDRIES,  CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 68 Firms.
Salary aitd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $111,490.71
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       178,834.68
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       734,168.96
Total $1,024,494.35
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January...
February..
March....
April	
May	
June	
Males.
Females.
434
758
437
760
441
762
449
774
446
770
444
778
July	
August ...
September.
October ...
November.
December .
471
459
449
441
444
436
784
789
789
774
744
755
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
IS. 00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to     9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
16
7
11
28
21
28
24
24
26
35
41
17
18
22
9
2
2
1
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
7
5
9
20
43
88
65
97
291
82
32
19
18
9
4
5
2
1
1
Under
18 Yrs
Apprentices.
10
4
1
4
1
2
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia    	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
199
191
10
2
2
2
6
4
2
12
432
362
1
4
10
2
1
19
20
Table No. 13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS
MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 41 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $52,316.23
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     29,259.79
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  167,545.91
Total $249,121.93
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April....
May	
June. ...
Males.
Females.
162
40
163
35
137
31
157
42
175
45
172
48
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December .
179
177
186
181
188
181
49
54
58
71
68
58
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.09
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to   49.99.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
2
3
15
15
8
1
4
9
10
7
11
7
1
4
4
5
7
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
12
9
3
1
6
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia.	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
60
1
10
23
3
5
11
7
61
15 G 48
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 573 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $879,693.46
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       462,559.83
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    8,939,271.48
Total $10,2S0,524.76
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.       Males.    Females.
January..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
6,314
5,595
7,709
9,829
11,591
12,128
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December..
13,427
13,237
13,559
13,600
13,117
12,092
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
to
$6.99..
to
7.99..
to
8.99..
to
9.99..
to
10.99..
to
11.99..
to
12.99..
to
13.99..
to
14.99..
to
15.99..
to
16.99..
to
17.99..
to
18.99..
to
19.99  .
to
20.99..
to
21.99...
to
22.99...
to
23.99...
to
24.99...
to
25.99...
to
26.99..
to
27.99..
to
28.99..
to
29.99..
to
34.99..
to
39.99..
to
44.99..
to
49.99..
and over ..
21 Yrs.
& over.
52
124
555
451
732
659
448
1,248
1,227
1,215
1,159
1,271
575
1,013
729
347
776
574
232
739
394
199
389
246
116
792
265
81
55
74
Under
21 Yrs.
6
27
22
38
33
21
27
49
26
31
28
11
1
10
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France     	
Italy 	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries   	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
6,708
1,702
488
17
18
39
121
230
416
2,880
613
70
1,395
. 487
1,214
385
Table No.  15.
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 631 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $744,681.77
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       993,349.27
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2,383,294.54
Total     $4,121,325.58
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March..
April	
May..
June
2,372
2,329
2,426
2,450
2,642
2,811
55
69
63
68
74
July	
August. ...
September
October ...
November .
December..
2,833
2,861
2,909
2,840
2,833
2,706
76
78
72
68
62
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
P'or Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
S6.00to  $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99 .
5
11
17
28
37
70
48
108
54
95
149
128
122
128
136
152
123
147
74
126
135
99
60
91
82
307
126
61
18
13
35
45
39
28
38
34
24
44
18
12
10
14
4
5
1
1
3
2
1
11
27
15
14
7
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99.
12.00 to   12.99  .
13.00 to   13.99
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17 99..
1
2
18
10
11
22
4
1
2
2
16
4
15
10
2
1
2
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99
2
2
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
1
22.00 to   22.99
1
24.00 to   24.99
1
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99
1
27.00 to   27.99..
1
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality oi Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France ,
Italy	
Germany and Austria :	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated   	
Males.
3,321
1,133
69
2
31
12
45
12
16
45
16
Females.
46
16 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 49
Table No.  16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 253 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $394,803.54
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        343,117.09
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     4,237,397.29
Total  $4,975,317.92
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March. .
April
May	
June
2,411
1,978
2,170
2,578
2,862
3,247
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August...
September
October .
November.
December.
3,767
4,132
4,318
4,479
4,282
4,090
11
9
11
9
7
7
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
4
1
1
1
$6.00 to   $6.99...
1
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
3
4
10
19
6
37
19
57
65
26
106
157
140
168
696
427
250
693
307
559
107
414
200
517
337
73
19
32
1
9.00 to     9.99    .
10.00 to   10.99...
1
1
1
1
11.00 to   11.99.
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
5
2
3
16.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99
3
18.00 to   18.99...
15
2
5
2
1
1
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
1
21.00 to   21.99...
2
22.00 to   22.99..
23 00 to   23.99  ..
24.00 to   24.99...
1
25.00 to   25.99.
26.00 to   26.99...
1
1
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
1
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
2
2
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
2,155
1,292
173
7
10
14
175
96
266
978
130
35
53
5
15
244
Females.
Table No. 17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 140 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $470,671.48
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc '....     372,105.72
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,172,081.18
Total $2,014,858.38
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.        Males.   Females
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
823
793
824
829
849
915
199
210
218
212
231
227
July	
August
September
October...
November.
December .
969
942
910
902
228
221
235
243
250.
224
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99
15.99.
16.99.
17.99
18.99
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
2
8
39
28
6
34
14
12
60
30
22
34
45
73
46
122
19
190
40
14
20
19
11
74
17
9
6
10
26
15
22
5
14
23
Females.
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
11
3
10
10
11
18
24
111
10
16
9
2
2
4
8
4
29
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Male
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of oVmerica	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria    	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland   	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
525
433
18
1
2
2
7
40
15
53
14
■ 4
63
7
13
1
Apprentices.
222
61
1
1
13 G 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 24 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $103,647.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       404,956.77
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       829,270.71
Total    $1,337,874.48
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.    Females.
January.
February
March...
April	
May	
June	
579
564
544
588
787
917
18
17
18
17
17
18
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
982
978
880
724
768
739
18
17
17
19
17
18
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
7.99.
8 99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over..
21 Yrs.
&over.
3
31
3
3
42
9
21
5
23
23
24
48
40
25
72
78
58
149
20
65
27
24
33
12
129
47
32
12
9
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium    	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria   	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan  	
lapan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated   	
Males.
505
336
37
3
1
2
1
52
10
1
40
55
12
Females.
10
7
Table No. 19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers   $42,921.66
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     50,901.37
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     76,893.24
Total $170,716,27
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March	
70
70
72
71
78
74
11
11
11
11
11
11
July	
September..
November .,
December,..
74
71
70
66
68
69
11
11
12
11
10
11
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
46.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
to 7.99.
to 8.99.
to 9.99.
to 10.99.
to 11.99.
to 12.99.
to 13.99.
to 14.99.
to 15.99.
to 16.99.
to 17.99.
to 18.99.
to 19.99.
to 20.99.
to 21.99.
to 22.99.
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
&over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy.
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan 	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
45
33
1
Females. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 51
Table No. 20.
PRINTING- AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 132 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $452,215.74
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      964,252.59
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      1,361,841.92
Total $2,778,310.25
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January 	
February....
April	
935
955
965
942
934
960
137
158
160
138
138
136
July	
August	
September..
November ..
December...
961
939
978
1,023
1,003
941
131
148
148
163
June	
150
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Fkmalks.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
tfcover.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
12
9
13
8
6
16
5
10
6
1
1
1
1
6
$6.00 to  $6.99.  .
7.00 to     7.99...
8.00 to     8.99...
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12.99...
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
.......
6
8
17
5
16
9
15
21
14
14
14
12
26
11
23
8
■ 7
29
9
12
8
8
90
139
198
81
41
1
1
38
6
13
6
17
9
38
15
9
5
4
1
19
7
3
3
4
1
2
2
i"-'
17
S
16
10
8
1
9
5
4
1
1
4
5
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99.
3
1
1
25.00 to   25.99...
1
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99...
1
28.00 to   28.99...
9
29.00 to   29.99...
1
30.00 to   34.99...
2
35.00 to   39.99.
2
40.00 to   44.99...
46.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries  	
Nationality not stated	
675
356
23
4
24
26
139
50
5
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER^MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 14 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $325,597.21
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      298,612.56
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  2,593,322.26
Total  $3,217,532.03
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females. Month.       Males,   Females.
January...
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
2,248
2,202
2,286
2,254
2,265
2,291
50
49
49
49
46
46
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November .
December..
2,321
2,337
2,323
2,332
2,305
2,288
48
60
50
51
57
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to   $6.
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
25
34
104
89
55
26
116
117
411
190
233
141
55
117
63
66
37
20
84
126
51
9
25
26
Under
21 Yrs.
12
4
1
17
18 Yrs.
& over.
21
17
4
4
2
1
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan   ..    .
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
798
68
11
132
3
66
31
9
56
28
382
16
8
1 G 52
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 34 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $121,901.68
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         78,092.02
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       393,087.60
Total '     $593,081.30
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June	
308
321
337
387
544
424
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
371
351
386
365
409
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over
1
25
14
17
8
5
10
45
19
109
9
50
10
5
35
8
48
132
56
5
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
County of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France .-	
Italy ...:	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China .   	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
33i
253
23
6
18
Table No. 23.
SMELTING;
Returns covering 3 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $182,213.75
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       542,722.73
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    2,555,584.50
Total $3,280,520.98
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
2,284
30
July 	
2,184
30
February...
2,059
30
August	
2,271
30
March..
2,161
30
September..
2,310
31
April	
2,252
30
2,368
31
May	
2,206
30
November ..
2,404
31
June	
2,249
30
December...
2,406
31
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&. over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99..
3
2
5
8
5
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8 99
1
2
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
1
1
4
2
2
3
7
10
18
9
13
16
9
4
2
1
2
11.00 to   11.99..
5
9
11
14
31
37
43
78
237
269
172
212
217
195
150
120
78
145
36
178
62
6
1
1
2
2
2
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
1
1
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17 00 to   17 99..
4
2
1
2
3
18.00 to   18.99..
2
4
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99.
r
2
22.00 to   22 99..
2
24.00 to   24.99..
25 00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland ,
Great Britairrand Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
755
1,049
57
3
7
4
358
48
95
92
41
52
23
34
11
1 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 53
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 101 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $608,725.95
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,654,297.98
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     5,433,574.53
Total  $7,696,598.46
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.       Males.    Females.
January.
February
March...
April....
May. ...
June ....
3,258
3,165
3,213
3,397
3,399
3,273
1,373
1,366
1,369
1,366
1,364
1,409
July	
August....
September.
October...
November .
December..
3,331
3,398
3,417
3,357
3,265
3,285
1,423
1,445
1,463
1,321
1,308
1,360
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   $6.99.
to     7.99.
to     8.99.
to     9.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
11
3
7
9
22
116
58
133
146
96
109
62
123
157
142
147
68
92
85
193
233
101
110
543
142
38
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
37
10
207
90
70
217
213
280
59
44
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
732
322
144
19
1
6
69
28
14
78
14
3
1,154
412
65
1
1
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 78 Firms.
Salary artd Wage Payments, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $185,806.90
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        59,956.60
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      656,306.69
Total      $902,070.19
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.       Males. Females.
January.
February
March. ..
April....
May	
June
678
6S7
690
728
845
875
45
55
45
70
91
97
July	
August	
September.
October...
November..
December .
955
1,033
1,037
902
887
108
82
62
52
74
55
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to  $6.99 .
7.00 to    7.99..
5
8
10
19
13
30
27
38
152
64
86
74
39
62
60
29
38
30
26
48
24
24
17
14
8
12
19
7
1
1
15
35
35
31
35
23
6
19
7
1
7
2
2
5
9
1
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
13    .
19
4
3
1
1
5
2
3
4
3
1
2
....
2
1
2
5
4
18
3
1
19.00 to   19.99 .
1
21 00 to   21.99
24 00 to   24.99.
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
40 00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France ....   	
Italy	
Germany and Austria	
Central European and Balkan States	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia and Poland	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
710
294
20
1
1
5
13
14
31
70
15
2
15
112
15
2 G 54
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 3,530 Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended
December 31st, 1933.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $8,195,801.54
Clerks, Stenographers, and Salesmen, etc     9,247,006.05
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)  50,585,617.02
    $68,028,424.61
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary      $966,249.00
Estimated   pay-roll   of   employers   in   occupations   covered   by   Department's
inquiry, and from whom returns were not received  1,000,000.00
Transcontinental  Railways    10,031,979.67
Dominion and Provincial Government workers   5,000,000.00
Wholesale and Retail Firms  2,500,000.00
Delivery,   Cartage   and   Teaming,    Warehousing,   Butchers,    Moving-picture
Operators, Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation  3,000,000.00
Ocean Services and Express Companies  7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous   -  1,100,000.00
      31,098,228.67
Total     $99,126,653.28
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners
only.)
During the Month of
Males.
P^emales.
4,010
4,045
3,997
4,030
4,340
5,160
6,637
6,962
6,897
5,984
5,257
4,170
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
33,157
36,353
38,845
42,305
46,004
48,914
51,084
51,777
53,017
52,794
60,358
47,298
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Under $6.00 ....
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   16.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99  .
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over..
Totals	
96
405
728
592
1,187
1.063
809
2,550
2,154
2,436
2,965
2,780
2,208
2,927
3,024
2,989
3,884
3,304
1,971
3,819
2,750
1,902
1,806
2,552
1,176
5,087
2,202
1,293
676
656
61,891
193
223
208
232
214
230
143
264
126
156
137
90
52
108
47
45
52
39
10
11
10
7
3
5
1
3
2
1
264
318
310
170
278
338
391
927
936
1,333
550
439
439
479
177
160
75
56
43
41
51
17
12
12
10
21
6
116
32
89
28
29
43
36
77
36
14
15
10
14
13
6
3
2
1
1
2
56
67
63
57
38
Nationality of Employees.
32
14
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
12
12
29,742
18,551
1,471
119
231
141
1,379
846
1,295
5,298
1,111
271
2,357
499
2,594
875
20
6,167
1,772
150
10
19
33
81
142
35
105
108
19
26
11
3
Italy	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
10
465
56
16
2,612
7,903
567 REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 55
" HOURS OF WORK ACT."
Administered by the Board of Adjustment consisting of Adam Bell, Chairman ;  Robert
Morrison and Norman deW. Lyons, members.
The question of reducing the hours of labour is one occupying the attention of every person
interested in industrial recovery.
The hours worked by employees in British Columbia are, we believe, the lowest in any
Province in the Dominion of Canada.
Under a new administrative arrangement noted elsewhere in this report the " Board of
Adjustment" will cease to exist upon promulgation by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council of
the " Hours of Work Act, 1934," being replaced by the " Board of Industrial Relations " ;   this
Board will also be charged with the administration of the " Male Minimum Wage Act, 1934,"
and the " Minimum Wage Act for Women."
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS.
The average weekly hours worked by the 71,185 employees reported by the 3,530 firms who
made returns in time to be classified was 47.35, a decrease of 0.34 compared with 1932;  77.95 per
cent, of all workers reported working forty-eight hours or less per week, 10.93 per cent, between
eight but not more than nine hours per week, and 11.12 per cent, were working in excess of nine
hours per day, or fifty-four hours per week.
It may be asked why hours of work in some cases exceed forty-eight in the week when it is
supposed the Act establishes an eight-hour day, and it should be again pointed out that the
"Hours of Work Act, 1923," affected only certain industries, and that those affected are all
within the required limit and only those outside the scope of the legislation exceed the limit of
forty-eight hours.
As will be noted in the new " Hours of Work Act, 1934," printed elsewhere, the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council may bring any industry, business, trade, or occupation within the scope of
the Statute by additions to the Schedule which is now part of the Act.
The following table  shows the average weekly  hours worked by all  employees  and  by
industries:—
Average Weekly Hours of AVoek, by Industries.
Industry.
1929.
1930.
1931.
1932.
1933.
46.77
46.96
44.40
47.18
47.09
45.00
46.98
45.64
44.82
46.17
40.64
46.00
45.81
42.19
42.71
Builders' materials, etc.         -	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining                         	
48.03
48.03
46.75
46.44
47.93
Coast shipping	
51.05
53.94
53.69
51.11
51.82
Contracting	
45.16
45.16
44.08
43.97
43.42
Explosives, chemicals, etc	
46.04
45.30
44.80
49.70
42.00
51.01
52.23
48.84
49.25
47.83
Garment-making	
44.87
44.08
44.53
46.58
43.68
House-furnishing	
45.53
45.25
44.29
41.53
43.33
44.24
44.07
43.06
39.16
42.00
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
46.62
46.06
45.93
46.44
44.40
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of	
46.70
46.67
46.07
46.69
41.33
Lumber industries—
Logging	
47.31
48.44
48.46
48.28
48.41
Logging-railways	
48.61
50.09
49.13
49.34
50.36
Lumber-dealers	
47.63
47.59
47.65
45.80
45.28
Planing-mills	
49.14
48.68
47.33
48.55
48.26
Sawmills	
49.12
47.86
48.95
47.84
47.39
47.52
48.48
47.12
49.15
45.50
Shingle-mills	
Metal trades	
45.87
53.96
46.10
45.88
52.29
47.32
45.85
51.46
48.89
45.70
50.34
46.51
45.85
52.11
44.96
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil-refining	
51.61
45.00
45.44
54.61
44.40
45.52
50.47
44.33
45.29
47.03
44.07
44.61
46.29
Paint-manufacturing	
43.68
Printing and publishing      	
44.09
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
48.35
48.32
48.11
44.79
48.30
Ship-building      	
44.15
44.35
44.13
42.81
43.53
52.72
44.61
52.01
46.25
52.04
44.85
53.24
45.43
46.47
44.87
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc	
Wood-manufacture (not elsewhere specified).
47.03
45.92
45.20
44.72
45.33 G 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT."
Chairman, Adam Bell; George H. Cowan, K.C., and Norman deW. Lyons, members. Owing
to certain weaknesses in the legislation passed during the legislative session of 1929, very little
was accomplished under this particular legislation, the only Order promulgated covering
Stationary Steam Engineers.
A new Act was passed at the 1934 session of the Legislature, printed elsewhere in this
report, which places the administration under the " Board of Industrial Relations."
By the passing of the 1934 Act the legislation of 1929 was repealed and the Order covering
Stationary Steam Engineers was cancelled.
LABOUR DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION.
Fourteen disputes regarding wages or working conditions occurred during 1933, involving
2,397 employees and a total loss in working-days of 25,760.
While the number of strikes exceeds 1932 by three, it is gratifying to record that the number
of employees affected and the time lost decreased considerably, as will be seen by the following
table:—
Year.
No. of Strikes.
Employees
affected.
Time lost in
Working-days.
1931	
11
11
14
2,322
4,136
2,397
79,310
37,740
25,760
1932	
1933	
The strike at Anyox accounted for 14,000 of the working-days lost during the year.
There never was a time when the interests of employer and employee were so interwoven as
they are to-day, and we suggest a closer contact, coupled with a more sympathetic understanding
of the difficulties confronting employer and employee, which will react to the benefit of both
parties.
SMELTER AND COPPER MINERS, ANYOX.
On February 1st, 1933, some of the employees of the above Company ceased work, demanding
increases in wages of 50 cents per day and a 20-per-cent. reduction in the rates charged by the
Company for board and rent. Recognition of the Mine Workers' Union of Canada was also
demanded and certain improvements in working conditions.
The primary reason for the disconent was undoubtedly the fact that the Company during
the previous eighteen months made three reductions of 10 per cent, on the wage scale, the second
and third cuts being of the original or basic rate. Board was charged at the rate of $1.10 per
day and was not reduced until February, 1933, when it was reduced to $1 per day. Rents were
also reduced at the same time in amounts ranging from $1.50 to $3 per month.
The wages paid at the time of the strike being: Common labour, $2.40 to $2.50 per day;
muckers, $2.75; and miners, $3.25 per day. There can be no doubt that the above facts, coupled
with a recent order that all single men should board only at the Company's boarding-houses and
that employees purchase all goods at the Company's stores, was sufficient to cause the strike.
It became apparent upon investigation that the local Union had been in process of organization since the first wage reduction. The Company claimed that the operations had been carried
on at a loss owing to the low price of copper, and that should the strike be prolonged the plant
would be permanently closed.
A clash between strikers and police took place on February 3rd; several of the strikers
and police were injured, necessitating their removal to hospital. A number of strikers were
arrested on charges of assault, but upon being tried were found " not guilty."
Numbers of the prime movers in the strike movement left Anyox, and toward the middle of
the month, after the Company had reduced board and rent charges, work was resumed on a
restricted scale by the employees who were only indirectly affected. At the same time new
employees began to arrive from various localities.    Clashes between the police and strike sym- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 57
pathizers occurred at Prince Rupert and Vancouver when men were leaving these points for
Anyox.
At the end of February work was being carried on on a fairly extensive scale.
The Deputy Minister of Labour made a special trip to Anyox, and his report was laid
before the Legislature, then in session, by the Minister of Labour. Work was resumed March
27th, 1933.
CUSTOM TAILORING, VANCOUVER.
Employees numbering fifty-three, members of the Journeymen Tailors' Union, ceased work
on March 3rd, 1933, as a result of new piece-rates instituted by the employer, caused by the introduction of a new method of manufacture. Joint conferences were held between the interested
parties, when an agreement was entered into between the Company and the Union, granting
a slight increase in the piece-rates. Work was resumed March 10th; ended in favour of
employees.
COAL-MINERS, PRINCETON.
Members of the Mine Workers' Union of Canada became involved in a dispute, resulting in
a stoppage of work on May 1st, 1933.
One colliery having proposed a reduction of 10 per cent, in the wage-rate, because existing
trade conditions did not justify the higher rates during the summer months; this in spite of the
fact that an agreement was in force which did not expire until December 1st, 1933. Conferences
were held between the affected parties, after which a secret ballot by the men was taken, the
miners voting against the reduction. On May 8th the management suspended operations; the
employees alleging a lockout. Further conferences happily resulted in a settlement being
reached, the miners agreeing to a modification of the seniority rule in employment, and gave
the understanding not to demand a wage increase on the expiring of the existing agreement.
Work was resumed May 19th.
SHIPYARD-WORKERS, NEW WESTMINSTER.
On May 8th a number of workers under the leadership of the Workers' Unity League employed at three shipyards ceased work, demanding an increase in wage-rates from $4 to $5.25
per day for shipwrights and caulkers and 40 cents per hour for labourers.
A strike committee was elected and the plants picketed. The men, however, drifted back
to work and by May 12th all had returned at the rates prevailing prior to the strike.
LOGGERS, DUNCAN.
Some sixty employees engaged at Hillcrest ceased work on May 12th, demanding an increase
in wage-rates. The rates covering riggers, donkey engineers, loaders, etc., ranged from $1.80 to
$4 per day and they demanded a scale between $2 to $4.50 per day. Work was resumed on May
15th on the understanding of the employer that wages would be increased later if business
conditions should warrant it.
SALMON-TROLLERS, VANCOUVER ISLAND.
Salmon-trollers numbering 250 in the employ of three firms operating on the west coast of
Vancouver Island were called out on May 16th by the Fishermen's Industrial Union in sympathy
with the efforts of the fishermen in Washington and Oregon, U.S.A., to curtail the supply of fish
which is marketed fresh. Gill-net fishermen and seiners did not cease work, nor did fishermen
in other parts of British Columbia take any part in the strike. Work was resumed June 16th
after adjustments had been completed on the American side of the boundary-line.
PILE-DRIVERS, NEW WESTMINSTER.
On June 5th, 1933, ten bridgemen, pile-drivers, etc., members of the United Brotherhood of
Carpenters & Joiners, ceased work in protest against a reduction in wages from 90 cents per
hour to 75 cents. Settlement was made on the 90-cents-per-hour basis and work was resumed
the next day.
SAWMILL-WORKERS, DURIEU DISTRICT.
Sawmill-workers and loggers, members of the Lumber Workers' Industrial Union of Canada,
employed in two mills in the Durieu District, ceased work on June 6th, 1933, demanding an G 58 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
increase of 5 cents per hour, the prevailing rates being from 15 to 35 cents per hour. The plant
was picketed by the strikers. Work was resumed June 17th, 1933, the hourly rate being
increased by 2% cents per hour.
RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES, VANCOUVER.
Seven employees ceased work on August 1st, 1933, demanding an increase in wages. After
seven days the employer had replaced the employees and the strike lapsed.
LOGGERS, SPROAT LAKE.
A logging crew numbering thirty-two men went on strike on September 9th, 1933, because of
a report that a 20-per-cent. cut was to be put into effect by the management: the men countered
by requesting a 10-per-cent. increase in prevailing rates. After four days' shut-down the
employees returned to work at the old rate.
SHINGLE-WEAVERS, FRASER MILLS.
The shingle-weavers at one plant ceased work because of an apparent misunderstanding on
the rates of wages under the N.R.A. scale, the management desiring that the men continue to
work until the scale to be paid in the State of Washington had been fixed; the rate being paid
at the plant was 18 cents per square. When the scale in the State of Washington had been
fixed under the N.R.A. code the men returned to work, the rate being 25 cents per square.
DIVERS AND CAISSON-WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
Eighty employees engaged in connection with the construction of a bridge ceased work on
November 9th, demanding increases in wages, the supply of equipment by the employer, and
recognition of Submarine Divers' and Tenders' Union of Canada.
The Deputy Minister of Labour and the Representative of the Federal Department of
Labour, after conferences with representatives of both parties, arranged a settlement, the terms
of which were made retroactive to the commencement of the work. The rates provided were:
Divers supplying their own equipment, $25 ; divers without equipment, $20; divers' tenders, $7;
valve-tenders, $5; compressed-air workers (caisson), $10; shiftbosses, $1 over compressed-air
workers, all per working-period in accordance with the regulations of the Workmen's Compensation Board for British Columbia; lock-tenders $8 and lock-tenders' helpers $4 per day of
eight hours.
The Union had demanded $10 for lock-tenders and $5 for helpers. The employer agreed to
reimburse employees for rubber boots, and to have weekly pay periods, and to permit an
accredited representative of the Union access to the work, provided operations were not interfered with.    Work was resumed November 18th, 1933.
HOP-PICKERS, FRASER VALLEY.
Hop-pickers numbering 1,200 ceased work on September 9th, 1933, demanding an increase
from 1% cents per pound to 2% cents per pound in the rates paid and better living conditions.
The Company granted an increase of % cent per pound, bringing the rate to 1% cents, and also
installed a water system to Japanese camp.
BOX-FACTORY WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
Thirty-five employees of a box-factory ceased work on October 26th, 1933, protesting against
the introduction of a new system and grievances against the plant foreman. After being out
three days the men returned to work on the employer's terms. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 59
SUMMARY OF LABOUR DISPUTES, 1933.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost
in
Working-
days.
Commenced  February  1st,  1933,  for increase  in
wages and decrease in charge for board; board
reduced; wages remained the same.    In favour
of employers.     Work resumed March 27th, 1933
Commenced March 3rd, 1933, against reduction in
piece-rates;    new   agreement   negotiated   with
Union, granting slight increase in rates.    Work
resumed March  19th,  1933.    In favour of em-
450
45
80
20
60
250
10
7
32
50
80
1,200
35
Custom tailoring, Vancouver
14,000
292
Alleged  lockout  commenced   May  1st,   1933,   decrease in wages;  terminated May  19th,  1933,
960
Shipyard-workers, New Westminster
Commenced May 8th, 1933, for increase in wages ;
terminated May  12th,  1933, in favour of em-
100
Loggers, Duncan	
Ceased   work   May   12th,   1933,   for   increase   in
hourly  rate;   terminated  May   15th,   1933,  in
120
Salmon-trollers, "Vancouver
Island
Commenced  May  16th,  1933,  in  sympathy  with
fishermen's  strike  in   Washington  and  Oregon,
U.S.A.; terminated June 16th, 1933, in favour
6 500
Bridgemen, pile-drivers, etc.,
New Westminster
Commenced June 5th, 1933, against reduction in
wages;  terminated  June 6th,  1933,  in favour
10
Commenced   August   1st,   1933,   for   increase   in
150
Commenced   September  9th,   1933,   because   of  a
report that wages were to be  reduced 20  per
cent. ;   men   demanded   10   per   cent,   increase;
terminated September 12th, 1933, in favour of
128
Shingle-weavers, Fraser Mills
Ceased  work August  30th,   1933,  pending settlement   of   wage-rates   in   State   of   Washington,
under  N.R.A.   code;   wages  increased from  18
675
Divers and caisson-workers,
Vancouver
Eighty   employees   ceased   work   November   9th,
1933, demanding increase in wages and recognition of the Union ; terminated November 18th,
1933 ;  partially  successful	
720
Commenced  September  9th,  1933,  demanding increase in wages and better housing conditions ;
terminated  September 11th, 1933, in favour of
employees   	
1,500
105
Box-factory workers, Vancouver-
Commenced October 26th, 1933, in protest against
new  system  and  grievances  against  the  foreman ; terminated October 30th, 1933, in favour
Totals	
2,397
25 960 EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner Homer and
Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets 1
Vancouver (Women's Branch), cor. Homer and Dunsmuir j. Jas. Mitchell,  Superintendent.
Streets J
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets )„„,,,.        •  ..    j    4.
...  .    .  '.„.   _    ,_        . .  T       , , »,        ,t      c.      .    \ H. Cnsford, Superintendent.
Victoria (Women's Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets j
New Westminster , Robt. MacDonald,  Superintendent.
Nanaimo J. T. Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops J.  H.  How, Superintendent.
Penticton A.   Gilley,  Superintendent.
Nelson J.  M.  Dronsfield,  Superintendent.
Prince Rupert J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
• . Handicap Section.
f G. S. Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets \ R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
[ H. Parry, Clerk.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets W. A. Turner, Clerk.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This is the fifteenth annual report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment
Service of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the calendar
year 1933.
There are ten offices in operation in the Province, as follows: Vancouver (2), Victoria (2),
New Westminster, Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Nelson, Kamloops, and Penticton. Separate offices
are provided in Vancouver and Victoria for the employment of women, and separate sections for
dealing with the employment problems of men handicapped through service overseas or in
industrial occupations. Owing to the reduced opportunities for employment, the offices, with
the exception of Vancouver and Victoria, were operated on a half-time basis.
CONDITIONS  DURING THE YEAR.
Industrial conditions did not improve to any appreciable extent during the period. With
the exception of lumbering, which showed signs of improved conditions during the latter part
of the year, practically all branches of the basic industries were less active than during previous
years. The Dominion Bureau of Statistics in its summary shows the 1933 index averaged 78,
as compared with 80.5 in 1932, 95.5 in 1931, 107.9 in 1930, 111.5 in 1929, and 106.4 in 1928.
There was a large surplus of every class of labour and it was necessary to continue relief
measures on a large scale, the cost being divided between the Dominion, Provincial, and
Municipal Governments. At the close of 1932 the relief camps for single men were being used
for the purpose of direct relief, road-work having been discontinued. Early in the current year,
as the result of a new agreement between the Dominion and Provincial Governments, the camps
were gradually taken over by the Department of National Defence, that Department having
already opened a number of camps within the Province for the purpose of providing emergency
landing-fields for aeroplanes. Under the new arrangements, men for camps were required to be
" single, homeless, and destitute " and medically fit. They were required to work, and for their
labour received food, clothing, tobacco, medical and hospital services, and 20 cents per day in
cash. The arrangements for the medical examination and shipment of the men were in charge
of the Employment Service officers. Men who were physically fit were required to proceed to
camps, and during the winter months the accommodation was not sufficient to meet the demand
owing to the large number of transients who came to the Coast on account of the milder climate.
There was considerable agitation against the camps as administered by the Department of
National Defence, with the result that a number of strikes and evictions occurred. As the camp
officers came to understand the problems better and the men saw that the reports of militarism
in camps were without foundation, a much better feeling existed in the area west of Revelstoke,
although conditions were not so favourable in the Kootenays. REPORT OP DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 61
In addition to carrying on the usual employment activities, the Employment Service cooperated writli many branches of Governments, both Dominion and Provincial, and also with
municipal authorities, a number of our offices being entrusted with the assignment of all men
employed on municipal projects carried on by relief labour.
The arrangement whereby the Employment Service co-operates with the Department of
Immigration in the consideration of applications for permission to import workers from foreign
countries was continued during the year. Considering the large surplus of labour in this
country, it is remarkable the number of applications received from employers for permission to
import labour from the United States. Although but a small number of citizens of that country
were admitted, the number of deportees arriving in British Columbia from the United States
continued to be quite a problem, as the majority of them became an immediate charge on the
Dominion and Provincial Governments.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED DURING THE YEAR.
The business transacted is shown by tables, the figures showing the work by offices and
months. Although the Cranbrook, Prince George, and Revelstoke offices were closed, the number
of placements show an increase of 10 per cent, when compared with the previous year's work.
Owing, however, to the shipment of men to relief camps and the assignment of men to municipal
works carried on by relief labour, the results cannot be compared with those of any normal
year, when the placements were made exclusively in industrial employment. The registration
of applicants for employment or relief and the shipment of men to camps operated by the
Department of National Defence, which requires an extensive system of records to reduce the
possibilities of fraud, threw an additional load on the members of the staff, and particularly on
those in the Vancouver offices. The number of placements was 41,318, all but three being within
the Province. Of this number, 156 .were transferred from one employment zone to another, the
Vancouver offices being responsible for the greater part of this movement. Of the 41,318 placements, 18,927 were sent to " regular " positions, where the duration of employment ranged from
one week to permanence. The balance, 22,391, were given " casual " work, where the duration
was expected to be less than one week. Of the 4.841 women placed, the Vancouver office sent
3.706, the balance, 1,135, being the work of the Victoria office. The placements were about
equally divided between " regular " and " casual" positions and the greater part being in the
domestic service branch.
WORK IN THE HANDICAP SECTIONS.
The official responsibility for the care of handicapped ex-service men rests with the
Dominion Government, but with a view to increasing the opportunities for employment an
agreement was made in December, 1924, between the Dominion and Provincial Governments,
whereby the former supplies additional staff and the latter special facilities in Vancouver and
Victoria for providing employment for handicapped workmen. Under this arrangement disabled
men secure a much wider range of opportunity of employment than if they were dependent on
offices dealing exclusively with orders intended to be filled by handicapped men. Despite the
work of the Handicap sections and the hearty co-operation of members of the Employment
Service staff throughout the Province, the greater portion of whom are ex-service men, many of
them with severe handicaps, it is impossible to find work for but a small percentage of the
applicants. Many of them are suffering from the disabilities of age, aggravated, no doubt, by
war service, and in the constantly overstocked labour market they are virtually unemployable.
In October, 1930, the Dominion Government provided for unemployable ex-service men by the
passage of the " War Veterans' Allowance Act," in which provision is made for an allowance
to men of 60 years or over, provided they are pensioners or were engaged in a theatre of war.
Men under 60 who are " continuously unemployable through physical or mental disability, or
both," are, subject to the same service qualifications, similarly dealt with. There are 1,567
ex-service men in this Province in receipt, of this allowance.
A better idea of the extent to which handicapped ex-service men have affected the unemployment situation in this Province is obtained from the figures showing the number of pensioners.
In January, 1925, there wrere 5,410 former members of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces in
receipt of pension resident in British Columbia. In 1927 this number had increased to 6.189,
and again increased to 7,550 at December, 1930.    At the end of 1933 there were 9,330, and to this G 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
must be added approximately 1,500 Imperial Army pensioners who have made their homes in
this Province. About 75 per cent, of these men are residing on the Lower Mainland and the
southern end of Vancouver Island. These districts, because of favourable climatic conditions,
are also a Mecca for physically fit men, and the nature of our major industries requires men of
this class rather than those disabled as a result of war service or industrial accidents. An
excessive number of handicapped men, the number having nearly doubled in a period of nine
years, a large surplus of labour of all kinds, and industries of a primary extractive nature at
present suffering from the universal depressed industrial conditions, form the setting in which
the Handicap sections of the Vancouver and Victoria offices must carry on their work. In
addition to the primary duty of assisting ex-service men, every effort is made to procure employment for those whose efficiency has been impaired by industrial accidents. During the year
726 positions were found for handicapped men, the work being about equally divided between
Vancouver and Victoria, all but 88 being of an expected duration of less than one week. With
the exception of 196 jobs which went to industrial handicaps, the handicapped ex-service men
received the balance.
OTHER BRANCHES OF ACTIVITY.
Reference was made in a previous report to the importance of the Employment Service
maintaining the proper relationship between public employment work and social service. If a
public employment office becomes known as a relief agency or closely associated with the distribution of direct relief, employers conclude that vacancies are being filled from the ranks of
the most necessitous rather than from those best qualified by experience for the work to be
performed. The two fields are separate and distinct. The view-point of persons engaged in
relief-work or any other branch of social service is not necessarily in accord with that of the
employer in need of qualified employees. To maintain the correct balance is, owing to the
extent to which the experience of Employment Service officers is being utilized, difficult of
accomplishment, but in this Province the two roles have been kept clearly separated. It has
been the view, however, that special registrations, where this work is connected with the shipment of men to relief projects or of women to industrial or domestic employment, is a legitimate
employment service work which in no way impairs the general efficiency of the Department in
its dealings with employers and workmen. There has, however, been the fullest co-operation
with all branches of Government in meeting the many difficult problems which have arisen out
of the existing industrial situation.
The employment offices have continued to act as information bureaus for employers, workers,
public and semi-public bodies, and citizens generally in all parts of the Empire, and after fifteen
years of service has gained the confidence of the employers and workmen and is now recognized
as an essential factor in our industrial system.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1933.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
Kamloops	
Nanaimo	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
Penticton	
Prince Rupert	
Vancouver	
Vancouver (Women)
Victoria	
Victoria (Women)....
Totals	
3,144
6,620
4,919
3,402
3,571
6,580
58,924
29,702
14,427
4,547
135,836
1,868
5,838
4,885
565
1,220
1,534
8,535
3,686
12,219
1,135
41,485
1,786
5,838
4,852
561
1,197
1,534
8,518
3,684
12,213
1,135
41,318
127
22
156 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 63
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1933.
Month.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October..	
November	
December	
Totals
.410
554
.360
,061
.984
664
416
.362
015
,668
523
.819
135,836
2,625
2,481
3,814
3,183
2,915
4,373
2,979
2,880
4,402
4,060
3,332
4,441
41,485
2,624
2,481
3,802
3,173
2,924
4,351
2,956
2,851
4,405
3,978
3,369
4,404
41,318
15
17
15
12
23
20
21
16
156 INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Vancouver, B.C., June 8th, 1934.
Adam Bell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Factory Inspection Branch for the year
1933.
In giving a resume of the activities of this Department for the above year, we report that,
in addition to our regular inspections of industrial plants throughout the Province, we have
covered what to us is new territory.
We refer to the Bridge River Mining District. The recent remarkable development of the
mines in this portion of the Province has meant the construction and operation of concentrators, sawmills, power plants, and other related industries.
During the year 1,148 inspections and reinspections of factories were made. Any infractions of the several sections of the " Factories Act," where found, were covered by written orders
specifying measures to be taken which would bring the factory in conformity with the statutory
requirements.
In view of the fact that we are required to visit all manufacturing plants where three or
more persons are employed, we are enabled to form a fairly accurate estimate as to the industrial
activity throughout the Province.
Towards the latter part of the preceding year indications gave us reasonable cause to hope
. that industry as a whole was at last on the upward trend, but the year under review has passed
into history as a very difficult one for both employers and employees.    Our visits of inspection,
with the exception of seasonable industries, reveal a large number of plants operating beneath
their capacity.
It is indeed discouraging to enter plants w'hich in former years were large employers of
labour and find a large portion of the costly machinery idle, with consequent reduction in staff.
Regardless of these conditions, the owners and managers of these plants have faith in the
Province and the Dominion and look to the future with confidence.
In addition to adverse industrial conditions under which industry is labouring, each succeeding year discloses further Oriental penetration into the manufacturing life of the Province.
That this penetration is rapidly becoming a serious factor in competition with long-established
businesses cannot be denied.
In proof of this statement we will cite one particular instance where we made an inspection
of a plant which to our knowledge has for eighteen years been manufacturing a product, the
production of which in the past required the services of a considerable number of male and
female employees. At the time of our inspection they were operating with a depleted staff
owing to lack of orders.
Following our departure from this plant, we visited a factory owned and operated by
Orientals which manufactures the same product, and found the factory a scene of great industrial activity.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
Only a few decades ago factory inspection was unknown. The worker sold his services at
the current rates of pay and assumed the risks of his employment. He took working conditions
as he found them, safe or unsafe. There was little or no protection afforded him: gears were
left unguarded; projecting set-screws were everywhere in evidence; unguarded saws were
rendering men incapable of making a living, and privation for him and his family was the all
too frequent result.
The loss of an arm, a leg, a finger, or a hand seemed to be looked upon as the price of
industry, and was largely attributed to carelessness on the part of the workman.
Factory inspection and workmen's compensation laws have made it obligatory in the conduct
of industry to provide safe working conditions for employees, and it is only reasonable to expect
the employee, for whose benefit these laws were placed in the statute-books, to co-operate and
see that all guards are kept in place, reporting any defective guards or machinery promptly to
the foreman.
It is now generally agreed that successful accident-prevention is a co-operative proposition
and co-operation in all that the name implies;  that is, both receiving and giving help.    If those in authority take the attitude that the only safety precautions taken will be those specified by
the Inspector following his visit, it will mean a higher accident-rate. In other words, safety
must be a continuous process and can only be really successful when the owner, superintendent,
foreman, and each individual employee enter into the processes that save lives and limbs.
Owing to the prolonged period of industrial inactivity, we have been somewhat concerned
over the possibility that, in the name of economy, there would be a tendency to curtail plant
safety activities, but our visits of inspection reveal that, with few exceptions, such is not the
case. Our activities in connection with industrial accident-prevention have during the year
included the impressing upon workmen and management of industry the necessity of maintaining
in place mechanical safeguards which have been provided in former years. That our efforts in
this respect have in a considerable measure been successful can be gauged by the fact that we
were not called upon to investigate as large a number of accidents.
HOURS OF WORK.
Although it is lawful to employ female factory employees forty-eight hours per week, personal observation and the returns from factories employing this class of help indicate a shorter
working-week, the operating hours being governed by the demand for the product.
Where there is a large seasonable demand for the goods manufactured, but not a sufficiently
stable demand to warrant increased equipment being installed, either an extra shift has been
employed or a request made for an overtime permit.
With so many at present unemployed, it may be thought that requests for overtime permits
should not, especially under prevailing conditions, receive any consideration. To those who are
not conversant with the conditions which prompt these requests a word of explanation may be
in order. With few exceptions, permission to work overtime is the result of buyers, for a
variety of reasons, deferring the placing of their orders for an abnormal length of time, and
when at last placing the order specify a very limited time for delivery. This results in the
manufacturer, in his desire to give service and to retain his connection and preserve an outlet
for his commodity, making a request for an overtime permit. Unfortunately this procedure,
which seems to be a condition born of the times, reacts unfavourably for both employer and
employee, as it permits of only intermittent employment for the worker and forces the employer
to work his plant to capacity for short periods during the year and the remaining time is comparatively idle.
Following our usual procedure, we first visit the factory before a permit is granted and
endeavour to have additional help employed instead of working overtime. Upon this suggestion,
the statement is usually made that skilled help is not available. It is proven that there is some
merit to this contention by the fact that four years of economic stress has forced the skilled
workmen to seek other occupations. However, out of numerous applications for overtime
permits, only ten were granted.
Each succeeding year brings better observance from the proprietors of Oriental laundries
of the hours during which a laundry may operate.
Police Court proceedings were taken against the proprietor of one of these laundries for
operating after 7 p.m.    Upon pleading guilty, he was fined $50 and costs by the Magistrate.
SANITATION AND LIGHTING.
In order that the health and comfort of employees working in a factory may be ensured,
it is necessary that there is plenty of daylight coming through clear and clean windows on all
sides; that the working-room is airy and roomy, not overcrowded, and properly ventilated;
that the electric light is of adequate strength and effectively guarded against glare; and that
proper and adequate toilet facilities are provided for the workers.
Certain sections of the " Factories Act" specify the above requirements, but it quite frequently results in a controversy between landlord and tenant as to who is responible for
providing same, particularly in the case of the provision of sanitary conveniences for both sexes.
Take, for example, a factory comprising three male and two female employees, the working
conditions of which are as good as the location of the working-room will permit, with the
exception that we find on our visits of inspection one toilet only is provided. When this infraction of the Act is brought to the employer's attention, he very often attempts to evade his
5 G 66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
responsibility in this matter by stating that he is not the owner of the building, and the landlord
or his agents are the ones to whom we should address all communications in this connection.
As the " Factories Act" specifically states that it is the duty of the employer to conform
to the statutory requirements in this respect, we have no alternative but to hold him responsible
for doing so.
Our insistence on the installation of proper sanitary conveniences is at times met with a
threat from a certain type of employer that he will dispense with the services of his female
employees rather than comply with our instructions, and in one instance actually did so; but
if the price of employment means the acceptance of such conditions it is our duty, as servants of
the State, to prevent either the employee from submitting to them or permitting the employer
to impose same.
During the year ten factories which lacked proper sanitary conveniences were, after a
reasonable time-limit, forced to comply with the regulations.
COMPLAINTS.
The usual number of complaints, anonymously and otherwise, were received during the
year; some of which, investigation proved, were justified; others were, however, greatly
exaggerated; and in a number of cases the conditions complained of did not or could not have
possibly existed. The nature of these complaints received would indicate that they came largely
from persons engaged in highly competitive business, as investigation and interview with
employees proved that the matters complained of were not founded on fact.
We are, however, grateful for any information given us relative to infractions of any
section of the " Factories Act," believing it is done so in a co-operative spirit.
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER ELEVATORS.
Upon entering an elevator a person has the right to assume that all necessary provisions
have been made for ensuring his or her safe transportation to and from any floor in the
building in which this service is provided, and it is one of the responsible duties of this Department to see that the elevators are safe and reliable for the transfer of freight or passengers.
Once installed, an elevator becomes a fixed feature of the building and remains in service
for a long term of years, and in the course of time a great many different persons with varying
degrees of ability are placed in charge of the maintenance of the equipment.
In the year under review 500 freight and 353 passenger elevators were inspected. The
operation of three passenger-elevators was suspended, when inspection revealed them to be
unsafe for the carriage of passengers; and the carrying capacity of one freight-elevator was
limited to 500 lb., pending the replacement of major parts.
While no fatal or serious accidents occurred to the public on passenger-elevators during the
year, I regret to report that two persons lost their lives on passenger-elevator installations
through no defect in the equipment; and one boy was crushed to death while attempting to
board a moving freight-elevator.    The following are the particulars in each case:—
A maintenance-man, whose duties consist at times of making minor repairs and adjustments
to the elevator, requested that the elevator operator run him up and down several times on the
passenger-elevator. In explanation of making this request he told the operator he did not
think the elevator was operating satisfactorily. After making several return trips he asked
the operator to let him off at the main floor, with instructions to run to the top floor and down
again, while he stood at the landing entrance with the hoistway-door open, in order that he
might better detect what he thought was an unusual noise in the hoistway. While the operator
was descending with the car the maintenance-man, who must have been standing with a portion
of his body inside the hoistway, was struck by the descending car, receiving injuries which later
proved fatal. Examination and operation of the elevator after the accident revealed it to be in
perfect working condition.
The wife of a licensed elevator operator in an office building in which he was employed, and
in which he had housekeeping-rooms on one of the upper floors, had been down town shopping,
and upon returning to the building found a mother and daughter, who wished to be conveyed to
one of the upper floors, standing in front of the passenger-elevator. As it was after regular
office-hours, the elevator service had been discontinued and the car was parked at one of the
upper landings.    When the elevator operator's wife found the hoistway-door closed and locked, she took from her purse a nail or some other small article, inserted it in a small hole in the
hoistway-door, and lifted the locking-bar, which permitted the door to be opened.
Investigation showed that this instrument was supplied to her by her husband, the elevator
operator. Being under the impression that the car was at that landing, she stepped into the
open shaftway, falling a distance of approximately 15 feet, receiving injuries which later proved
fatal.
At considerable expense to the owner, upon recommendation of this Department, interlocks
had been placed on all hoistway-doors of the passenger-elevator in this building, but they were
rendered ineffective by the above-mentioned hole being drilled in the door.
A 16-year-old boy apprentice in a clothing-factory, who had occasion to go to an upper floor
with an armful of material, instead of using the stairway provided, opened the hoistway-gate,
and in attempting to board a moving freight-elevator, in some undetermined manner tripped and
fell on the car-platform and in falling was crushed between the car-platform and the side of
the elevator-hoistway, causing him to receive injuries which later proved fatal.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS.
During the year 1933, 546 males and 197 females renewed their licences; 108 males and
41 females wrote examinations and obtained licences as elevator operators. Thirty men and
eight women applied for and received temporary licences, but for some reason did not appear
for examination at the end of the probationary period.
As in former years, a number of applications were refused because the applicants were
either under the age of 21 or not British subjects.
CONCLUSION.
We desire to extend the thanks of this Department to all officials and employees connected
with industry for their co-operation with us during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Douglas,
Factories Inspector. G 68 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PREFACE TO THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD REPORT.
While the report officially covers the calendar year 1933, the material to be collected for
statistical and other purposes cannot be assembled until the early part of the following year.
At the 1934 session of the Legislature the " Women's Minimum Wage Act" was repealed, and
a new Statute, called the " Female Minimum Wage Act, 1934," received the assent of the
Lieutenant-Governor on March 29th of that year. At the same time a " Male Minimum Wage
Act" became law, and the Board of Industrial Relations was established, under the latter Act,
to administer several labour laws. This new Board was entrusted with the work previously
done by the Minimum Wage Board, which, since 1918, had striven earnestly to carry out the
provisions of the original " Minimum Wage Act " as they applied to women and girls of the
Province.
This report, therefore, is the final record of the original Board and a forerunner of reports
of the new Board of Industrial Relations.
It will be noted that, while three members constituted the former Board, their number
has been increased to five under the newer Statute. The Deputy Minister of Labour is designated Chairman as before. The Act provides that one of the five members must be a woman,
and Helen Gregory MacGill, who had acted on the Board since its inception, working tirelessly
in the interests of the employees covered by the regulations, was named to represent women on
the Board of Industrial Relations. However, shortly after this announcement, Mrs. MacGill
was reappointed Judge of the Juvenile Court in Vancouver. She thereupon resigned her position
on the Board.
Mrs. Rex Eaton, who has taken a very active interest in social and labour legislation for
many years, has been named to succeed her.
The Board is fortunate in having on its personnel Dr. W. A. Carrothers, Chairman of the
Economic Council. His recognized ability and wide grasp of economic problems should prove
extremely helpful to the Board in its deliberations.
Mr. James Thomson has an intimate knowledge of the employees' needs, having been
connected with trade-union organizations over a period of years.
With Mr. C. J. McDowell, a practical business-man, the proper balance of representation
is maintained.
The Board is looking forward to a very active year, and commences its new duties with
a keen realization that the difficulties to be encountered will be many, but with a hope, also,
that its efforts to help British Columbia's women and girl workers will be far-reaching in
beneficial results.
Adam Bell, Chairman. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 69
REPORT OF THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
Members of the Board.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Helen Gregory MacGill 1492 Harwood Street, Vancouver.
3. Herbert Geddes 322 Water Street, Vancouver.
Superseded by
Board of Industrial Relations,
March 29th, 1934.
1. Adam Bell, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Helen   Gregory   MacGill   (resigned   June   22nd,   1934,   when   appointed   Judge   of   the
Juvenile Court, Vancouver).
Succeeded by
2. Fraudena Eaton 24 Seventh Avenue West, Vancouver.
3. William Alexander Carrothers Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
4. James Thomson 1830 Tenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
5. Christopher John McDowell 1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Officials of the Board.
Mabel A. Cameron, Secretary Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Essie Brown, Inspector 411  Dunsmuir  Street, Vancouver.
Anna B. Suckling, Assistant Inspector 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit the sixteenth annual report of the Minimum Wage
Board of British Columbia for the year ended December 31st, 1933.
PRACTICAL BENEFITS.
The year 1933 has set a record in the history of the Board for collection of moneys to which
employees were entitled under the regulations, and which their employers had failed to pay
them. The sum of $6,835.81 tells a story of diligent activity on the part of the Board and its
officials, but also reveals that the stressful conditions, still prevailing, lead many employers
to attempt to evade the law.
The sum mentioned was made up of varying amounts, from less than a dollar in some
instances, to very substantial figures in other cases. While the bulk of the money was distributed to workers in the larger centres of Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminster, and Nanaimo,
girls in the Interior of the Province also received very practical evidence of the protection of
the Act, when their employers were required to make up shortages in wages. All classes of
occupation were affected; for establishments which, either knowingly or unwittingly, had paid
employees below the legal minimum included mercantile concerns; hotels, restaurants, and
apartments ; business and professional offices ; fruit and vegetable canneries and packing-houses;
beauty-parlours;   factories of various types;   and laundries.
A table of arrears of wages collected for women and girl employees since 1927 follows:—
Year. Amount collected.
1927      $2,384.17
1928   3,202.11
1929   2,838.61
1930   3,059.10
1931  3,581.44
1932   2,840.58
1933   6,835.81
COURT CASES.
The collection in 1933 of the sum mentioned above entailed numerous investigations and
interviews. For, while some employers make the necessary wage adjustments promptly and
with good grace, others are reluctant to settle with the girls.
The board exerts its best efforts to administer the Act and resultant Orders without recourse
to legal proceedings, for obviously it is unpleasant for all concerned to be compelled to go to
Court for a settlement.
There were cases, however, which could not be adjusted amicably, and informations had
to be laid in the Police Court in such instances. G 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The following summary gives the details of these cases:—■
Order and Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
(1.) Public Housekeeping—Aurora Confectionery, 2501 Main Street, Vancouver ;  S.  C. Panasis, proprietor
(2.) Public Housekeeping—Cameo Cafe\
56 Powell Street, Vancouver; M.
Matsuyama, proprietor
(3.)   Public Housekeeping — Castle
Hotel, 750 Granville Street, Van-
couver ; Mrs. Karlan Larsen, proprietress
(4.) Public Housekeeping — Common
Gold Cafe\ 50 Hastings Street
East, Vancouver; Chinese proprietors
(5.) Public Housekeeping — Corner
Lunch, 897 Granville Street, Vancouver ; E.  J. Gillette, proprietor
(6.) Public Housekeeping — Dominion
Cafe\ 954 Granville Street, Vancouver ; Lew Fini, proprietor
(7.) Public Housekeeping—Dunsmuir
Hotel, 500 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, J. C. LaBelle, proprietor
(8.) Public Housekeeping—Exchange
Caf6, 1033 Granville Street, Vancouver ; Jung Jan Foo, proprietor
(9.) Public Housekeeping — Liberty
Cafe, 330 Carrall Street, Vancouver ; Wong Poy, proprietor
(10.) Public Housekeeping — Newest
Caf6, 1145 Granville Street, Vancouver ; Henley (Chinese), proprietor
(11.) Public Housekeeping—Paris Caf6,
438 Pender Street West, Vancouver ; S. Mavromatis, proprietor
(12.) Public Housekeeping — Patricia
Cafe\ 403 Hastings Street East,
Vancouver; Hy Lew, proprietor
(13.) Public Housekeeping—Ritz Hotel,
83 Pender Street West, Vancouver ;   W. J. Tucker, proprietor
(14.) Public Housekeeping — Speedie's
Cafe, 629 Broughton Street, Victoria ; Mrs. Jessie Speedie, proprietress
(15.) Public Housekeeping—Winifred's
Ice Cream and Pastry Shop, 2822
Granville Street, Vancouver ; Paul
Udeson and Nels Neilson, proprietors
Paj'ing   less   than   minimum wage to waitress
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
Paying less than minimum wage to three
chambermaids
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
Paying   less   than   minimum  wage  to  two
waitresses
Paying   less   than   minimum   wage to  two
waitresses
Paying   less   than   minimum  wage  to  two
chambermaids  and
working   them   excessive hours
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
(girl forced to sign
for higher sum than
she received)
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
Paying less than minimum wage to four
waitresses (girls had
to sign receipts for
higher amounts than
they received)
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
Paying less than minimum wage to chambermaid
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
Paying less than minimum wage to waitress
Case adjourned from week to  week  as
settlement   was  made   in  instalments.
Total   arrears   paid,   $30.85.    No   fine
imposed.
Settled out of Court on payment of $25
arrears and Court costs.
Arrears of $36.10 ordered paid to each
of the three employees. No fine imposed.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay $78.50
arrears. Matter of payment for overtime was to be taken by employee to
a Civil Court.
Case heard after many adjournments,
and settled out of Court on payment
of $87 arrears to one girl and $63 to
the other girl.
Fined $25 or ten days in prison on each
charge and ordered to pay $198.50
arrears to each girl. Accused refused
to make settlement and was arrested.
After being in prison a short time he
settled the accounts and was released.
Fined $25 or ten days in prison on
charge of underpayment of wages.
Settlement of $97 arrears made to
each employee.
Fined $25 or one month in prison and
ordered to pay $132.75 arrears of
wages.
Fined $25 or one month in prison and
ordered  to  pay  $12.58  arrears.
Fined $25 on each of four charges;
in default, distress ; and in default of
distress ten days in prison on each
charge or forty days in all. Order
for wages pending for one girl. Arrears ordered for two in the sums of
$117 and $99 respectively, and if not
paid accused to serve twenty-one days
on each order. Fourth girl out of
town, so no order made yet in her case.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay $23.62
arrears.
Fined $25 or ten days in prison and
ordered to pay $79.75 arrears.
Case adjourned from week to week as
employer paying off arrears due in
periodic instalments.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay $12.62
arrears.
Settlement pending. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 71
Court Cases—Continued.
Order and Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
(16.) Public Housekeeping — Wishing
Well, Georgia and Cardero Streets,
Vancouver; C. Marshall, proprietor
(17.)   Office   and   Mercantile-
derson, Prince George
-Karl   An-
(18.) Office — Victor M. David, 266
Second Avenue East, Vancouver
(information laid in Victoria for
work done there)
(19.) Office — Ker's Batteries, Ltd., 5
Second Avenue East, Vancouver;
Messrs. Ker and Marshall, proprietors
(20.) Office—Professional Service, 810
Vancouver Block, Vancouver; W.
G. Ferris, proprietor
(21.) Office—St. Regis Caf« and Cabaret, Seymour and Dunsmuir
Streets Vancouver; P. McCul-
lough, proprietor
(22.) Mercantile — Ezzy's Chocolate
Shop, Ltd., 4136 Main Street,
Vancouver; A. K. Ezzy, proprietor
(23.)  Mercantile—John Clausen, florist,
910 Pacific Street, Vancouver
(24.)  Mercantile — Hamilton     Grocery,
699 Hamilton Street, Vancouver;
Mrs. E. Stalmans, proprietress
(25.)  Mercantile — Kwong   Loy   Chong
Co., 306 Main Street, Vancouver;
E.  C.  Kwong,  proprietor
(26.)  Mercantile—Rae's Leather Goods,
583 Granville Street, Vancouver ;
G. A.  Share, proprietor
Paying   less   than   minimum wage to waitresses and working
them excessive hours
Paying less than minimum rate to girl who
worked part time as
stenographer and part
time as saleslady
Paying less than minimum wage to stenographer
Paying less than minimum wage to stenographer
Paying  less  than  minimum wage to office
employee
Paying   less   than   minimum wage to cashier
Paying less than minimum wage to salesgirl
and working her excessive hours
Paying   less   than   minimum wage to salesgirl
Paying  less than  minimum wage to salesgirl
Paying  less than  minimum wage to salesgirl
Paying  less than  minimum  wage  to  two
salesladies
Fined $25 or one month in prison on
the long-hour charge. On being examined by employer's lawyer, witness
admitted low wage was on account,
and employer swore he had told the
girls they would be paid later. This
fact was not known to prosecutor and
minimum-wage official, and Magistrate
said he would have to dismiss the case.
Two employees took matter for collection of arrears into Civil Court and
judgments for $126 and $44.13 were
obtained.
Fined $25 and costs, or fifteen days in
prison, and ordered to pay $86.36
arrears.
On service of summons, cheque for $5
arrears delivered to Board for employee and case withdrawn.
Case argued and employee agreed to
settle for $30. Same paid and no fine
imposed.
Evidence disclosed employer had promised more than minimum wage if business improved, but Inspector had not
been advised of this or information
would not have been laid. Case dismissed from Police Court and employee intended to take matter to Civil
Court for collection.
Case adjourned from week to week to
permit settlement. Employer failed to
appear one week and bench warrant
issued, bail being set at $25. Employer arrested. Next time he appeared in Court he asked for remission
of bail, which was refused. Arrears
of $20 paid to employee.
Case partially argued when witness decided she did not wish to proceed
further as settlement for $100 had
been made. As the Board could not
finish without girl's evidence the case
had to be dismissed.
Fined $25 or five days in prison. Girl
withdrew her charge for arrears pending decision in the Appeal Court re
wages by commission. If appeal case
favourable, employee was to sue in
County Court for wages due.
Settled out of Court on payment of $150
arrears of wages.
Settled out of Court on payment of
$48.85 arrears.
Settlement out of Court on request of
employees, who had been paid $32.65
and $21.79, respectively, arrears in
full. G 72
DEPARTMENT OP LABOUR.
Court Cases—Continued.
Order and Name of Employer.
Charge.
Sentence and Remarks.
(27.) Personal Service—Maison Henri,
Ltd., 550 Granville Street, Vancouver ; Henri Gautschi, proprietor
Paying  less  than  minimum wage to three
beauty-parlour    operators
One case argued in Police Court and
fine of $25 imposed. No order made
for payment of arrears. Appeal taken
to County Court by accused, and appeal allowed. Taken to Court of Appeal by Minimum Wage Board and
appeal allowed.
PUBLIC HEARINGS.
As the Board had received some requests from employers for reductions in the wages
prescribed by its Orders, it was decided to give all concerned a chance to submit their views.
With this object in mind, the Board arranged for a series of public meetings in May and
June, the majority being held in Vancouver, which is the centre of employment for the Province.
To accommodate those engaged in the fruit and vegetable industry the Board travelled to Penticton, spending two days there.    Sessions were also held in Victoria.
The meetings were convened to deal separately with occupations covered by the Orders, and
were well advertised in advance throughout the Province, to give all interested a chance to be
heard or submit written statements to the Board.
A schedule of the hearings is set out below:—
Occupation or Industry.
Date of Meeting.
Place of
Meeting.
Mercantile	
Manufacturing	
Office	
Telephone and telegraph
Fruit and vegetable	
All occupations	
Public housekeeping	
Laundry and dyeing	
Personal service	
All occupations	
1933.
Wednesday,
Thursday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Monday,
Thursday,
Friday,
Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Monday,
May 17
May 18
May 19
May 20
May 22
May 25
May 26
June 5
June 6
June 7
June 12
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Penticton.
Penticton.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Sessions were held in the afternoon and evening on each of the above dates. The meetings
were well attended by employers and representatives of labour and women's organizations, the
latter of whom voiced the opinions and ideas of the employees, who, with few exceptions, preferred to send in their requests in writing rather than appear in person before the Board.
At each and every session the Chairman intimated that the Board would treat in confidence
any written memorials received by it, in this way aiming to protect employees in case they
wished to place their views before the Board without feeling they might jeopardize their positions by appearing personally. A few groups and individuals accepted the invitation of the
Chair to submit their requests in writing, but the bulk of evidence obtained came from the
employing class and the organizations previously mentioned.
Mercantile Industry.— (Wage for experienced employees, $12.75 a week.) The chief points
covered in the discussions pertaining to the Mercantile Industry were:—
(a.) Request by some employers to lower the wage.
(&.)  Recommendations to lengthen the training-period to four years.
(c.) Inclusion of boys under the regulations.
(d.) Short-time work.
(a.)  Under the first heading it was argued that if wages were lowered more persons could
be employed.    Opponents to this suggestion advocated maintaining or raising the present rates REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 73
to increase spending-power and so stimulate trade. They also pointed out that when the $12.75
rate was set for experienced workers it was really a compromise on what was supposed to be the
lowest amount on which a prudent self-supporting woman could live. There was a tendency
towards a rise in commodity costs at the time of the meetings, and for this reason the Board
was urged to refrain from reducing an already low wage-rate.
(6.) Those who favoured lengthening the training-period stated that a girl would have a
better chance to retain her position if she did not have to be paid the rate for experienced
employees until she had completed four years' training. Opposing this view, some one pointed
out that one organization had considered asking that the training-period for girls over 18 be
reduced from a year as at present allowed. The contention was that an employer should know
in less time than that if a girl were going to be suitable for that particular branch of work.
If he kept her a year and then decided she was in her wrong niche, he did her an injustice
in using up that much of her life before he suggested her talents lay along other lines.
(c.) It was felt by some present at the meeting that boys should he included in the provisions of the Act, for two reasons, namely: (1) To benefit from the protection of this legislation, and (2) to prevent replacement of women and girls by boys at lower rates than were
required to be paid under the " Women's Minimum Wage Act" and Orders, as the question of
remuneration for boys at the present time was one of arrangement between employer and
employee and was not controlled by any Provincial Statute or Order. (It might be noted here
that the 1934 Act covers this point and prohibits the employment of men and boys at rates
less than those prescribed for women and girls, where the males are doing work that is usually
done by women and girls, and the Board has power under the 1934 " Male Minimum Wage Act"
to make Orders for males irrespective of existing Orders for women and girls.)
(d.) The advantages and disadvantages of part-time employment were freely discussed.
The Board was asked to assist in preventing employers requiring some of their help to come
to work for an hour or two only in the morning, and perhaps again for a brief period in the
afternoon. This worked a decided hardship on girls who lived so far out of town that car-fare
was necessary and distances too great to allow them to return home for lunch. The time was so
broken they could not obtain work at other places to augment their part-time wages.
Manufacturing Industry.— (Wage for experienced employees, $14 a week.) Various groups
of manufacturers appeared before the Board with written statements affecting their individual
groups. The Secretary of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, introducing the delegations,
explained that the industry was highly competitive and was placed at a disadvantage on account
of the fact that British Columbia's wage requirements were considerably higher than those in
Eastern Canada. He stated that as the industry included so many diversified branches it could
not be dealt with as a unit. Different groups of manufacturers, therefore, had arranged to
present written statements dealing with their respective classes.
The first to be submitted was on behalf of the silk-dress industry. This drew attention to
the fact that the Orientals are gradually controlling this line of work, doing some of it in their
private homes, where regulations regarding sanitation and licence fees do not apply.
An urgent plea was made to lengthen the apprenticeship term to three periods of one
year each, in order to give employees an opportunity of learning the business, as the tendency
at the present is to dispense with apprentices and take on experienced help whenever possible.
Another employer, representing the alteration departments in mercantile business, advocated
starting apprentices under 18 years of age at $5 a week for the first six months, raising them $2
a week thereafter every six months, until they reached $13 during the fifth six-month period.
For apprentices over 18 years it was recommended that their training-period be divided into
four periods of six months each, at weekly wages of $7, $9, $11, and $13 for the respective
periods. This employer did not wish the rate for experienced workers to be lowered, but
believed it might be raised.
The biscuit and confectionery group requested a reduction in the weekly wage to $10 a
week, and stressed their competition from the East, where wages were lower than in British
Columbia.
To maintain the wage-levels required by law, they stated they had been forced to reduce the
wages of their male employees, and they thought the women and girls should share in the reduc- G 74
.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
tion as well. They also asked that the training-period of six months be increased to a year
before a girl became entitled to the $14 rate.
In support of their claim they submitted a cost-of-living budget which worked out at $10
a week.
The macaroni-manufacturers also desired a reduction to $10 weekly for experienced workers,
and a lengthening of the training-period to twelve months, instead of six as allowed by the
Order.
Their competition came from France and Italy, where, in some places, wages were as low
as 50 cents a day. While they did not advocate coming down to that low standard, they
thought the spread between this figure and $14 a week was too great. If they were allowed to
pay the $10 rate they felt they could expand their business and take on more girls.
The cotton dresses, smocks, and lingerie group presented its brief, asking for a reduction
to $10 a week in order to compete with Eastern Canada and Orientals in British Columbia.
They favoured starting beginners at a wage " much lower than $8 a week," and asked for tjie
training-period to be two years instead of one.
Bookbinders presented a brief, stressing that the learning-period was too short and that it
should be made three years instead of eighteen months before a girl should be paid the $14 rate.
They emphasized that theirs was a skilled trade requiring a comparatively long time to learn.
In addition, the risk of spoilage was so great they could not afford to employ any but the most
experienced help for the greater part of their operations. Girls are often let out before they
complete their present eighteen months' training. Under existing conditions, they declared, no
girls are receiving complete training in this line of work. When vacancies occur skilled workers
who acquired their knowledge outside of the Province, or married women who have worked for
them before marriage, are taken on.
The group interested in the manufacture of wooden veneer boxes for the fruit industry presented its request to have the wage reduced to $10 a week, and a flat rate of $8 a week for
three months as part of the learner's wage, the whole period to be extended to two years.
Realizing the difficulty of dealing with Oriental competition, the employers hesitated to mention
this increasingly alarming factor in their business, but they wished to bring it to the attention
of the Board.
Representatives of labour organizations opposed the reduction of wages, and asked that
hours be shortened and wages raised, thus enabling more employees to be taken on to gradually
reduce unemployment and improve working conditions. Speakers also condemned the piecework system.
Office Occupation.— (Wage for experienced employees, $15 a week.) The Union of Stenographers, Typists, Book-keepers, and Assistants submitted a recommendation that the minimum
wage for experienced office employees be raised from $65 a month to $75 a mouth. They asked
that these rates be based on at least a maximum of forty hours per week, instead of forty-eight
as permitted by the existing Order. Their primary object in shortening the working-week was to
provide employment for more girls. They said that the principle of the forty-hour week was in
conformity with the pronouncements of the International Labour Office at the League of Nations,
and that a tendency towards the shorter week was already noticed in many industrial plants.
There was no demand on the part of employers for a change in the regulations.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.— (Wage for experienced employees, $15 a week.)
When the telephone and telegraph occupation came up for consideration, neither employers nor
employees appeared to present any reasons for changing the existing Orders. The Chairman
explained that the Board has had very little trouble in this class of work, which is a well-
established business in the hands of a few employers who seem to have it running under systematic management. They have always co-operated with the Board, and that apparently was
the reason the meeting was not a large one. The Board felt, therefore, that conditions seemed
to be so satisfactory no one saw the necessity of asking for changes in the Order.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.— (Minimum wage for experienced employees, 30 cents per
hour, with 10 per cent, reduction from June to December.) In contrast to the few demands for
a revision in the office occupation were the numerous requests for changes in the Order relating
to the fruit And vegetable industry. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 75
As the preliminary sessions dealing with this occupation were held in Penticton, they enabled
representatives from surrounding neighbourhoods, as well as local residents, to be present. It
was gratifying to the Board that so many employees appeared at the meetings and gave their
views.    Employers from all parts of the Province were in attendance.
The representation of certain packing and shipping houses in the Okanagan Valley submitted a written request that the hourly rate for experienced workers in the industry be reduced
to 20 cents.
Other employers stressed the Eastern competition, where wages were lower than in this
Province, and the effect of the Doukhobor Community being in the jam business was a factor
against which one employer had to contend.
The women and girls argued that an hourly rate of 20 cents for a season of a few months
was too low to live on when it had to be spread over the whole year, and their work was worth
30 cents an hour in their opinion.
A very frank discussion touching on all phases of the industry took place, and from the
standpoint of attendance and first-hand information from the women and girl workers the Penticton meetings were the most successful of the series.
The Chairman put forth a special plea that overtime be reduced to a minimum in order to
ensure the employment of as many workers as possible and to eliminate long hours that are
very fatiguing.
While an opportunity was given in Penticton to discuss the other Orders of the Board,
comments eventually came back to the fruit and vegetable industry, which is the primary occupation in the valley. The percentage of workers in other classes of employment is comparatively small, and no representations for changes in the regulations were made to the meeting.
When the hearings were resumed in Vancouver to deal with the fruit and vegetable industry
the employers had engaged legal counsel to present their case. He presented evidence to the
Board relating to the trend in cost prices since 1926 and to Eastern competition. He followed
up these remarks by examining witnesses at length, the witnesses being employers in the
industry.
While the actual growing and picking of the products do not come within the scope of the
Act, the view-points of certain persons actively engaged in that phase of the industry were
given to the meeting, as they affected the industry as a whole.
Problems of marketing, freight rates, and other overhead expenses other than labour were
stressed by witnesses, but, naturally, these employers had to be told the Board was not responsible for, nor could it deal with, such factors.
Had it not been for some of the women's organizations, whose members took up the cudgels
on behalf of the employees, they would have been rather timid in presenting their side of the case
to the meetings, after listening to the battle waged through legal counsel by their employers.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.— (Minimum wage for experienced employees, $14 a
week.) When the above-mentioned occupation came up for hearing a delegation of about
fifteen women, who represented the Women's Labour League and Girls' Club, appeared before the
Board. Instead of offering suggestions for the improvement of the regulations or expressing
their approval of the Order as it stood, the group registered some personal grievances, specific
and general, about working conditions during the depression and prior to that time. Criticism
was levelled at the Board for apparently favouring the employers. Refutation of this charge
was made by the Chairman, who quoted figures to show what help the Board gave to underpaid
employees, and the efforts it had exerted for several years to keep the wage on a level that
would assure a living wage to the employee, in face of periodic demands from employers for
reductions.
The appointment of additional Inspectors was urged to enable adequate investigations
throughout the Province.
Several speakers advocated bringing domestic workers within the jurisdiction of the Act,
and told the meeting of the hardships in the way of low wages, poor accommodation, long hours,
and humiliating treatment suffered by this class of help. Upon being informed that the Legislature was the only body that could amend the Act, one of the ladies present, on her own G 76 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
volition, drew up a letter to be submitted to the Government, pleading for the inclusion of
domestics in the " Women's Minimum Wage Act." Signatures were obtained from several
persons present at the meeting.
Discussions ensued regarding the length of time necessary to become qualified in public
housekeeping occupations, and the question of split and straight shifts in restaurants, meal-hour
problems, the quality of meals, and tips, all came in for their share of comment.
No employers appeared to state their case.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industry.— (Minimum wage for experienced employees, $13.50
a week.) During the sessions devoted to this industry the Board had the gratification of listening to a most representative group of employers, who went on record as being satisfied with the
rates set in the Order, and, in spite of the fact that business had slumped, none of the speakers
suggested a lowering of wages.
Their testimony disclosed the competition they encountered from Oriental concerns and
establishments operating cut-rate places. One of the employers was emphatic in requesting more
rigorous methods in dealing with offenders who were convicted more than once for violation of
the law. He suggested increased fines, publication of the trade-name of violators of the law,
and, in addition, suspension of their trade licences.
Personal Service Occupation.— (Minimum wage for experienced employees, $14.25 a week.)
The information brought out at the sessions dealing with the personal service occupation revolved
largely around the status of employees who were trained in bona-fide beauty-parlours, or who
paid for their tuition in so-called " schools." Advocates of the two methods of teaching
expressed widely divergent views. It was evident that the " Hairdressers Act" had not solved
all the problems that arose in this occupation.
Proprietors of beauty-parlours stated they were anxious to help some of the unemployed
girls obtain positions, but on account of the rate prescribed by the Order were powerless to do
so. They requested a minimum wage of $10 a week, plus 50 per cent, of all that they doubled.
For apprentices it was recommended that for the first three months the girl would be under
tuition and receive no pay. At the end of that time she might he worth $5 a week and gradually
work up to the minimum in a year. Other employers thought a two-year training-period
necessary.
Under the " Hairdressers Act " a girl may sit for examination any time she wishes. Examinations are held four times a year. When a girl passes all the theoretical and practical tests
she receives her diploma and is allowed to go to work. If she fails she has to come back again
for examination.
The Board was told that trade had fallen off to a tremendous extent recently and the
parlours did not have sufficient business to warrant many girls being kept at the $14.25 rate.
They therefore wished the wage reduced to $10, in the hopes that they would be able to give more
girls work and keep their businesses running smoothly.
It was suggested by one of the speakers that perhaps too many girls had been trained
in the schools and the proper ratio of supply and demand for employees had been upset. The
speaker acknowledged the temptation to take in girls as students at $25, $50, or $100 tuition
fees was very real, and they had been unable to regulate the matter by the " Hairdressers Act."
It was admitted by another employer that too many operators were being thrown on the
market. The proper course to pursue in training beauty-parlour operators, one employer suggested, was to indenture them as apprentices.
The drop in price for services for various lines of beauty-work was dealt with at length.
The custom of paying employees on a commission basis was fully discussed, but it was made
clear to the listeners that commission earnings must reach the figures prescribed by the Order
or be made up to the required amount by employers.
As the meetings dealing with the personal service occupation concluded the series in Vancouver, the Board was tendered a vote of thanks for having convened the hearings, at which
much information had been given to employers, employees, and the general public. The Chairman, in expressing the Board's appreciation for the tribute by the audience, took the opportunity
of publicly thanking those who had attended the sessions and supplied information. He felt
the meetings had created a spirit of understanding that was most desirable, and gave his REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933. G 77
hearers the assurance that the Board would assess carefully the evidence submitted before any
action was taken to change the existing Orders. He reminded those present (as he had done
at all the previous meetings) that they could still put in additional data in writing if they
so desired, and in cases where the correspondents wished their identity held in confidence by
the Board their wishes would be respected.
General Inquiry.—At the sessions held in Victoria, which were arranged to hear evidence on
any of the nine occupations covered by Orders of the Board, the major portion of the time was
taken up with the Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
The Vancouver Island employers and employees presented data along somewhat similar
lines to those in Vancouver and Penticton, regarding competition from the East and high production costs. Loganberries presented the chief difficulties on the Island, and an abundance
of figures was submitted by canners and growers and a few employees. They all pleaded for
a temporary reduction in the wages in order to enable them to continue working. Hourly rates
of 25 cents and 20 cents for experienced and inexperienced workers were mentioned as being
satisfactory, and the Board was urged to come to a decision as soon as possible so that
employers could figure their costs before orders were obtained.
No evidence was presented relative to changing the Mercantile Order, but certain employers
in the Laundry Industry expressed themselves as being quite in accord with the present Order.
The Public Housekeeping, Office, Personal Service, and Telephone and Telegraph -Orders
were summarized by the Chairman, but no one voiced any desire to alter any of them.
When the Manufacturing Industry was reached on the list a plea for.a lengthening of the
training-period in the garment-manufacturing branch (overalls, shirts, etc.) from one year to
eighteen months was made, to be accompanied by a reasonably lower weekly wage. It developed
later that the firm that wanted the change had not employed learners for several years, but
their experienced employees had all been retained during the slack business period by being put
on short time.
A biscuit-manufacturer was in attendance, but as he had signed the brief presented by his
group at Vancouver he did not wish to add anything further verbally.
When no other evidence was forthcoming the public hearings were declared adjourned.
FINDINGS.
The Board immediately convened at the close of the evening's public session, and dealt with
the Fruit and Vegetable Order, as the industry it governed appeared to be in urgent need of
help.
As a result of its deliberations an Emergency Order was made, whereby a reduction of
10 per cent, in the rate prescribed for experienced workers by Order No. 17 became effective
from June 15th, 1933, to December 31st, 1933. A summary of said Order No. 17 appears in the
Appendix to this report.
The text of the Emergency Order is as follows:—
Order No. 17b (Emergency).
RELATING TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
Effective June 15th, 1933, to December 31st, 1933. .
Whereas on the 3rd day of September, 1926, an obligatory Order was issued by the Minimum
Wage Board relating to the fruit and vegetable industry under the provisions of the " Minimum Wage
Act," being chapter 173 of the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1924," by paragraphs 2 and 3
of which Order a minimum wage in respect of the said industry was fixed for experienced female
employees therein :
And whereas the said Order became effective in sixty days from the date thereof, and has since
been continuously in force, subject during the period from the 15th day of June, 1932, to the 15th day
of November, 1932, to the provisions of Emergency Order No. 17a, dated the 14th day of June, 1932:
And whereas the Board, under the provisions of section 6 of the said Act, has held public meetings
in Penticton on the 25th and 26th days of May, 1933; at Vancouver on the 27th day of May, 1933;
and at Victoria on the 12th day of June, 1933, at which employers and employees in the said fruit
and vegetable industry and the general public were heard :
And whereas, in the exercise of the discretion vested in it by the said Act, without reconvening or
calling any conference, the Board has reopened the question respecting the minimum wage so fixed by
the said Order, and has considered the question:
Now the Board doth order, in amendment of the said Order of the 3rd day of September, 1926,
that for the period from the 15th day of June, 1933, to the 31st day of December, 1933, both dates G 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
inclusive, the minimum wage fixed by the said Order for experienced female employees in the fruit
and vegetables industry (including the respective rates per hour or per piece fixed in respect thereof)
shall be reduced by the deduction therefrom of ten per centum of the amount thereof; and that
except to the extent and for the period herein provided the said Order of the 3rd day of September,
1926, shall continue in full force and effect as if this Order had not been made.
Dated the 14th day of June, 1933.
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen  Gregory  MacGill,
Herbert Geddes,
Members of the Minimum Wage Board.
Each employer shall post, and keep posted, a copy of this Order in each room in which employees
affected by the Order are employed.
(Early in 1934 the Board of Industrial Relations promulgated Order No. 3, dealing with the
Fruit and Vegetable Industry, and later issued Order No. 3a (Emergency) to take care of contingencies that arose subsequent to the issuance of Order No. 3. Summaries of these Orders,
which are in force during 1934, appear in the Appendix to this Report.)
The Board subsequently weighed all the other evidence, and after careful study and deliberation concluded the time was not propitious to make changes in the other Orders.
STATISTICAL SECTION.
As a gauge to business conditions, nothing is quite so graphic as comparative figures pertinent to wages and hours of labour. Since the Board started to compile statistics in 1918
British Columbia has passed through normal, prosperous, and depressed periods.
When the report was written for 1932 it was hoped the 1933 record would depict brighter
conditions, but from actual figures sent in by employers this year's story is still somewhat
unpromising.
Pay-roll returns were received from 3,152 employers, whose staffs totalled 17,895 women and
girl employees. While the number of employers reporting is thirty-two less than in 1932, there
were only eight less employees, so some establishments must have had more workers on their
pay-rolls than during the previous year, and this is one bright aspect of a situation that in
most other respects is rather discouraging.
We have always aimed to keep our tables as simple as possible, and in presenting statistics
covering working conditions in the nine occupations governed by our Orders we follow the form
used for several years. It lends itself to a handy comparison, and for this reason alone commends itself to busy readers.
Mercantile Industry.
1933.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under IS years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years..
Average hours worked per week	
379
3,930
3,604
326
$46,074.00
$2,622.50
$12.78
$7.12
8.30%
41.03
1932.
402
3,810
3,436
374
$45,984.50
$3,169.00
$13.38
$8.47
9.82%
42.30
1931.
1930.
374
3,813
3,398
415
$48,293.00
'$3,738.50
$14.20
$9.07
10.88%
43.58
435
4,223
3,670
553
$54,384.13
$5,177.00
$14.82
$9.36
13.09%
44.05
1929.
458
4,314
3,723
591
$56,065.22
$5,367.50
$15.06
$9.08
13.70%
43.16
A study of the above figures will reveal that, while there were 23 firms less from whom the
Board received returns, they employed 120 more workers than were reported for 1932. To cope
with slack business conditions mercantile establishments have put their staffs on shorter hours,
with a corresponding decrease in wages.
The weekly average wage for salesladies over 18 years of age worked out at just 3 cents
over the $12.75 set by the Order for a 48-hour week. It will be noted, however, the average
hours were considerably below 48, standing as they did at 41.03. So, taking both factors into
consideration, the wage is still appreciably in advance of that set by law. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 79
Laundry Industry.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
65
846
785
61
18,964.00
$470.00
$11.42
$7.70
7.21%
37.92
62
864
818
46
$9,979.00
$351.00
$12.20
$7.63
5.32%
39.49
52
991
924
67
$12,721.50
$635.00
$13.76
$9.48
6.76%
42.87
64
1,114
991
123
$14,451.00
$1,181.00
$14.58
$9.60
11.04%
45.24
70
1,203
1,056
147
$15,420.50
$1,444.50
$14.60
$9.83
12.22%
45.30
In this occupation the reverse of what occurred in the mercantile industry took place. Three
more firms reported than in 1932, but there were 18 less employees.
The average weekly hours have been falling steadily for a number of years, until in 1933
we reach the extremely low figure of 37.92.
While this shore-time work may not be as desirable as a longer working-week in these
abnormal times, the employees are probably better pleased to be allowed to earn the correspondingly lower wages than for some of them to be laid off altogether. When conditions warrant, it
is hoped that firms may be able to offer full-time employment to their workers.
There was a slight increase in the percentage of employees under 18 years of age, and in
this respect also the laundry industry differs from the mercantile.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
1933.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
352
1,895
1,797
$24,763.00
$901.50
$13.78
$9.20
5.17%
42.30
361
1,871
1,830
41
!6,448.00
$504.00
$14.45
$12.29
2.19%
43.26
I    -
375
2,206
2,152
54
$34,079.50
$455.00
$15.72
$11.67
2.45%
45.46
394
2,456
2,345
111
$36,582.50
$1,538.00
$15.60
$13.86
4.52%
44.90
431
2,608
2,496
112
$41,291.00
$1,565.50
$16.54
$13.98
4.29%
45.61
It will be noted that 24 more employees were reported in 1933 than in 1932. These 1,895
workers were on the pay-rolls of 9 less firms than sent in returns for 1932. There is a decrease
of 67 cents in the average week for employees over 18 years of age, but the average working-
hours also dropped from 43.26 to 42.3 per week.
This occupation has always been the most difficult to deal with from an administrative
angle, as the question of allowances for meals, and room, and the time consumed in eating
meals are apt to be matters of dispute.
Out of 27 Court cases, 16 were laid under this particular Order. G 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Office Occupation.
1933.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over IS years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
1,S10
4,708
4,660
48
$80,947.00
$484.50
$17.37
$10.09
1.02%
38.95
1,772
4,614
4,575
39
$83,938.50
$408.00
$18.35
$10.46
0.85%
41.18
1,771
4,696
4,611
85
S8.346.50
$966.50
$19.15
$11.73
1.31%
41.48
1,935
5,187
5,029
158
$102,354.05
$2,050.00
$20.35
$12.97
3.05%
42.02
1,985
5,259
5,077
182
$104,340.19
$2,322.00
$20.55
$12.75
3.46%
42.02
A gain in both number of firms reporting and employees reported is revealed in this year's
figures relating to the above-mentioned occupation—38 more employers and 94 additional workers.
The average wage in the office occupation has always held well above the $15 weekly
minimum for experienced workers. While the 1933 average of $17.37 is lower than in former
years, it is still $2.37 over the legal minimum, which is really based on a 48-hour week. For
a week of 38.95 hours the wage could be calculated on an hourly basis at $12.17, which means
that the year's average is $5.20 in advance of what the law demands.
A very low percentage of girls under 18 is found in this occupation.
Personal Service Occupation.
1933.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over IS years.	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
90
305
298
7
$4,319.00
$48.00
$14.49
$6.86
2.30%
38.93
122
393
380
13
$5,302.00
$100.00
$13.95
$7.69
3.31%
36.82
111
361
347
20
$5,190.50
$219.50
$15.22
$10.97
5.54%
40.72
110
391
349
42
$5,829.85
$396.00
$16.70
$9.43
10.74%
39.34
106
371
338
33
$5,885.00
$270.00
$17.41
$8.18
8.89%
40.28
A big drop in the number of firms from whom the Board received reports is noticed in this
classification, with a corresponding decrease in the total of employees for 1933.
This occupation, however, reveals an increase in the average wage for women over 18 years
as compared with the 1932 figures, the rise being from $13.95 to $14.49 a week.
As theatre ushers are included in this group, much broken time is the rule, and the hours
are usually short, although there was an increase in the length of the working-week in 1933 as
compared with that in force during the previous year. REPORT
DF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 81
Fishing Industry.
1933.       [        1932.       1        1931.
1                          1
1930.
1929.
6
15
10
5
$164.00
$50.50
$16.40
$10.10
33.33%
51.60
1
1                          2
3
71
67
4
$1,473.50
$55.00
$21.99
$13.75
5.63%
57.68
8
55
48
7
$592.00
$42.00
$12.33
$6.00
12.73%
45.64
98
96
2
$1,351.50
$24.00
$14.08
$12.00
2.09%
23.48
22
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
22
$498.75
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
$22.67
Percentage of inexperienced employees
50.18
As women engaged in canning fish are explicitly excluded from the scope of the Order, this
industry does not include very many employees protected by the regulations.
Those reported on for 1933 showed a substantial increase in average wages, the figures for
experienced employees standing at $10.40 per week and at $10.10 for the unskilled employee.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1933.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
Number of firms reporting	
104
1,601
1,536
65
$22,622.00
$606.50
$14.73
$9.33
4.06%
38.42
112
1,646
1,628
18
$28,013.00
$139.00
$17.21
$7.72
1.09%
39.77
112
1,806
1,789
17
$32,770.00
$133.50
$18.32
$7.85
0.94%
39.90
154
2,028
1,871
157
$34,057.42
$1,671.50
$18.20
$10.65
7.74%
41.02
142
2,023
1,781
242
Total weekly wages—
$32,418.50
$2,719.00
$18.20
$11.24
11.96%
40.94
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
Besides the commercial companies supplying telephone and telegraph service, the firms who
kept operators at private switchboards are counted in the total of employers reporting.
A drop in average weekly wages for experienced operators rather out of proportion to the
reduction in working-hours was discovered when the tabulations were completed.    The average
of $14.73 per week is very much lower than averages of former years.    There was an increase,
however, from $7.72 to $9.33 in the wages for inexperienced girls.
Manufacturing Industry.
1933.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
284
2,123
1,745
378
$25,627.50
$3,145.00
$14.68
$8.32
17.80%
41.92
290
2,188
1,838
350
$26,036.50
$3,340.00
$14.17
$9.54
16.00%
41.23
274
2,308
2,045
263
$31,610.00
$2,540.00
$15.45
$9.66
11.39%
38.07
310
2,507
2,076
431
$34,082.60
$4,455.50
$16.42
$10.34
17.19%
44.48
351
2,760
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
2,243
517
$37,550.80
$5,216.00
$16.74
$10.09
18.73%
44.90
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees	
Average hours worked per week	
6 G 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
It is gratifying to note a slight increase in weekly wages for experienced employees in the
manufacturing industry. In 1932 the wage worked out at $14.17 weekly, but for the year under
review it appears at $14.68. This is higher in proportion than the increase in weekly hours.
The 41.92-hour week is still considerably below that permitted in the industry—namely, 48 hours.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1933.
1932.
1931.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
62
2,472
2,009
463
$31,116.00
$4,635.50
$15.49
$10.01
18.73%
48.33
62
41
Time.
2,360
1,807
553
$27,873.00
$4,702.50
$15.43
$8.50
Piece.
102
76
26
$1,119.50
$178.50
$14.73
$6.87
23.52%
46.58
Time.
1,705
1,559
146
$28,028.00
$1,956.50
$17.98
$13.47
Piece.
170
164
6
$3,006.00
$71.00
$18.33
$11.83
8.11%
45.08
The returns received for the 1933 season were in such form that we were enabled to amalgamate all the figures. In other years some firms omitted to report the hours their pieceworkers put in. But we are glad to state that the pay-roll information was in better shape than
for many years, so our table is not so complicated.
AVith the number of firms being identically the same as in 1932, there were exactly 100
more workers reported.
The averages for both experienced and inexperienced employees showed gains over the
previous years.
While the 1932 and 1933 averages seem so much lower than those in 1931, it must be borne
in mind the Board put in Emergency Orders allowing a reduction of 10 per cent, for the women
and girls classed as experienced, and this would naturally result in lower averages.
Almost 5 per cent, fewer employees than in 1932 were paid at the inexperienced rate, as
many employers are not bothering to make the distinction and put all their women and girl
workers on an even basis.
Summary of all Occupations.
1933.
1932.
1931.
1930.
1929.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years, or experienced	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18 years,
or inexperienced	
Average hours worked per week	
3,152
17,895
16,444
1,451
S244,596.50
$12,964.00
$14.87
$8.93
8.11%
41.33
$12
3,184
17,903
16,436
1,467
i,286.00
934.00
$15.53
$8.82
8.19%
42.07
3,112
18,154
17,079
1,075
$285,396.50
$10,739.50
$16.71
$9.99
5.92%
43.03
3,456
20,461
18,450
2,011
$320,517.66
$21,266.00
$17.37
$1.0.57
9.83%
43.95
3,602
20,766
18,390
2,376
$324,376.19
$24,757.00
$17.64
$10.42
11.44%
43.87
A weekly average pay-roll of $244,596.50 for women and girls over 18 and experienced, and
a weekly average pay-roll of $12,964 for the younger and less skilled class, make a total of
$257,560.50, a figure to be reckoned with in the business and industrial world. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 83
In the Province of British Columbia, with a population at the last census in 1931 of roughly
700,000 persons, women and girls to the number of 17,895 are a factor to be reckoned with. This
total does not represent all who are gainfully employed, for the reader should remember that
the Act exempts farm-labourers, fruit-pickers, and domestic workers from its scope. These
three classes, with bank employees and Federal workers, are not included in the figures.
The tables were compiled from returns sent in by employers for the week of greatest
employment during 1933.
The lowest legal wage for women over 18 in the nine occupations is $12.75, which is set for
the mercantile classification. The average for all women over 18 or experienced figured out
at $14.87, while the inexperienced younger girls' average was found to be $8.93.
Taking all occupations together, the percentage of lower-paid help is slightly less than
in 1932.
Average hours are also low.    The working-week for every one reported averaged 41.33 hours.
* Forty-eight hours a week.
The above table is a conclusive refutation of the oft-quoted statement that a minimum wage
tends to become the maximum in the industry or occupation for which it is set.
A study of the figures shows that 4,185 or 23.38 per cent, were listed as receiving the actual
minimum wage set for experienced workers in the various groups. It is encouraging to realize
that 7,204 or over 40 per cent, of all women and girls reported were paid more than the amount
prescribed by the regulations. This is ample proof that the minimum has not become the
maximum wage, neither has it become the standard.
Studying the table by callings, the telephone and telegraph stands out with the greatest
number receiving the higher salaries. Over 62 per cent, in this line of work were drawing pay-
cheques in advance of what the order requires.
Office-work was second on the list, showing employment of a nature that is well paid in
comparison with the other lines of women's work.
The figures reveal that the fruit and vegetable industry comes third, but it must not be
forgotten that, while those engaged to look after the perishable products and prepare them for
market in jam-factories, canneries, and packing-houses may earn fairly high wages, their season
is extremely short. During the time the fruit-crop is available they work long hours and their
duties are highly intensive while they last. Their earnings for a few months are often all
they have to spread over the whole year, so the apparent advantage of appearing third on the
list of high wages is a nominal one only.
We turn towards the last columns and find the figures include employees under 18 years of
age, those over 18 who are inexperienced in their respective positions, and women and girls
who are working short time.    For the first two classes lower rates are set in the Orders, and in the case of those working broken time their wages are calculated pro rata on an hourly basis.
Since employers have been faced with very real problems caused by general abnormal conditions in the realms of trade and commerce, many employees have been placed on a part-time
basis.
The table shows, that from the employees' standpoint this has become particularly serious
in the laundry industry, where over 82 per cent, of the women and girls were receiving less than
the $13.50 rate.
As conditions improve, the Board hopes that employers will endeavour to provide full-time
work for their staffs. Employees have appreciated being retained on the pay-rolls for intermittent work, but such employment cannot ensure a living wage to these part-time workers. The
inevitable result is that some one else has to supplement their earnings.
The other side of the picture should not be overlooked. The wage-earners are the buyers,
curtailed wages mean diminished purchasing-power, and sluggish trade is the natural consequence arising from depleted pay-envelopes. AVe would be pleased, therefore, to know that
managers and other executives are turning their thoughts towards eliminating short-time
employment wherever possible. \Are do not wish employers to feel that their efforts to retain
as many on their pay-rolls as they can are not appreciated, for they are. Their co-operation in
making the next step towards ultimate recovery of good times is not only urged, but the Board
has faith that this can and will be done. Employers who have had the courage and ability
to continue in business during these past few years undoubtedly have the intellectual capacity
and ambition to bring their affairs up to their former flourishing standards.
Table showing Labour Turnover in each Group—Number of Employees in
Continuous Service of Employer reporting.
Name of Industry.
2
'o
m
o
f5
u
a
cj
N
rH
OJ
T3
P
to
3
at
tH
04
o
rH
to
r-l
a
Oi
(H
CO
o
to
u
cl
CJ
rH
rH
O
CO
to
u
ci
0J
H
IO
o
H-l
rH
to
u
a
eo
o
to
sj
CJ
!H
o
CD
to
a
CJ
CC
o
tr
to
■~.
a
CJ
X
OS
0
CC
to
d
o
rH
O
03
o
u
o
u
a
CJ
i*
CD
O CJ    .
ill
IIS
r^l£
th ■
(H
Oft
m2
CJ "
5 a
si
ZSh
Mercantile	
104
1,501
363
333
301
353
254
172
144
104
52
249
3,930
379
Laundry	
33
99
59
82
113
101
69
68
38
27
23
74
846
65
105
590
230
197
202
160
123
79
49
38
20
102
1,895
352
Office	
106
705
360
383
492
576
424
323
276
194
142
727
4,708
1,810
Personal service	
33
62
64
30
31
18
24
17
8
10
3
5
305
90
Fishing	
15
15
6
Telephone and telegraph..
4
147
36
67
188
285
236
91
116
108
81
242
1,601
104
Manufacturing	
235
552
150
200
238
198
157
95
68
53
28
149
2,123
284
749
815
228
162
203
123
66
42
46
17
6
15
2,472
62
Totals	
1,369
4,486
1,490
1,454
1,768
1,874
1,353
887
745
551
355
1,503
17,895
3,152
A word or two of explanation should suffice in connection with the above table. One reason
for the apparently large number of mercantile employees being on the staffs for less than one
year is that the returns are made up for the week of greatest employment. Obviously the
Christmas season is the one recorded, and at that time of year the stores have an augmented
body of assistants to handle the extra trade. These additional hands are not regular employees,
and the firm rightly reports them as being on the pay-roll for less than twelve months. It will
be noticed, however, that many girls remain in this line of work for two, three, four, and five
years, after which time the figures drop until the column containing the long-service period—
ten years or over—is reached. There is an appreciable percentage shown for this lengthy
service.
The office occupation ranks first for being able to retain its workers in largest numbers for
long periods.
The two occupations relating to seasonal activities—namely, (1) the fishing industry, and
(2) the fruit and vegetable industry—must always be looked at in a different light than the
others dealt with by the Board, and if it were practical and possible to spread their operations
over a whole year the figures in the above table would be distributed otherwise than at present. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 85
Girls in hotel, restaurants, and cafes, coming under the public housekeeping order, have
usually in normal times been able to move from place to place and obtain employment fairly
readily. Recently, with workers in other lines, they have been more reluctant to give up a sure
position for the sake of a change of environment and the chance of being unable to find a place
in the new field.
In 1932 there were 1,310 employees with a service record of ten years or over. This year
the figure has risen to 1,563.
The surplus of persons wanting positions over the number of posts available has had a
steadying effect on the labour turnover throughout the Province.
Table relating to Marital Status.
Name of Industry.
Married.
Widowed.
Single,
Total.
Mercantile	
Laundry	
537
226
547
460
80
4
134
427
1,114
143
48
165
134
10
21
73
57
3,250
572
1,183
4,114
215
11
1,446
1,623
1,301
3,930
846
1,895
Office	
4,708
305
15
Telephone and telegraph	
Manufacturing	
Fruit and vegetable	
1,601
2,123
2,472
Totals	
3,529
19.72%
651
3.64%
13,715
76.64%
17,895
100%
Merely to mention the topic of married women earning their living in the business world
is certain to provoke a lively argument. So many people resent the right of such persons to
draw salaries, without ever inquiring into the many phases that enter into the question.
The first statement is sure to be that she is keeping some one else out of a job. In
many instances the critics do not know that a trained married woman is often earning her
living and at the same time paying another woman to act as housekeeper in her home. Should
the married woman be forced to relinquish her position and remain at home the houseworker
would be without her wages.
The Board is sometimes asked why a certain employer is allowed to have married women
on his pay-roll. The answer is that the Board has no power to force any employer to dismiss
such workers and replace them with unmarried employees. Most employers are alive to this
oft-times unjust criticism of their policy of employing married women, and if the matter were
probed it would be found that in almost every case valid reasons exist for their being on the
pay-roll. Husbands and sons being out of work, or earning wages too small to keep the whole
family in comfort, are contributory factors to the necessity for married women being active
wage-earners.
Without further comment on this contentious subject, it should be realized that the percentage of married women holding positions in British Columbia to-day is not rapidly increasing,
as many people believe.
The figures portraying the proportion of married, widowed, and single women gainfully
employed for the past four or five years have remained almost the same. Obligations of the
women are very real to-day, and men are by no means the only ones who have dependents to
support. This is less generally admitted than it should be, but women workers are rightly
entitled to be treated more on a footing with men than they were years ago, whether these
same women be married, widowed, or single.
COPING WITH PRESENT CONDITIONS.
An analysis of returns received by the Board shows that employees are still experiencing
wage decreases in one way or another, and staffs are still being reduced in numbers. From our
forms it was learned that, while one employer might put in a wage cut, another would place
his staff on short time, and still another would dispense with the services of one or more G 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
employees. Some firms resorted to two of these methods to reduce overhead, and in quite a
number of cases all three expedients were resorted to.
But in comparing results with 1932 it is pleasing to note that there were about only half
as many firms who laid off employees during 1933, and the total number of women and girls
who were let out was 526, as against 1,478 the previous year.
Wage cuts were reported by 305 employers, as against 541 in 1932, but to brighten the
picture 11 cases were noted of firms showing either additions to their staffs or increases in
wages paid to employees.
Speaking of reductions, it must be remembered that the Emergency Fruit and Vegetable
Order allowed a 10-per-cent. decrease in the wages for experienced employees, and figures for
this seasonal industry have not been included in the details noted in the preceding paragraph.
During 1933 there were 1,483 women and girls affected by wage cuts (exclusive of those in the
fruit industry), as against 2,548 in 1932.
Without wishing to leave too dark an impression in the minds of our readers, we must,
in fairness, add that many individual employers and firms recorded no adverse changes in
working conditions.
The percentages of wage decreases ranged all the way from 2-per-cent. reductions to as
high as 50 per cent., 5 employees suffering the latter cut; 710 women and girls had their pay
reduced by 5 per cent, and 362 had to take 10-per-cent. cuts; 20-per-cent. reductions were
experienced by 73 workers. The remaining decreases were spread in smaller groups from 11 at
2 per cent, to the 5 whose salaries were cut exactly in half.
Office-workers to the number of 720 had curtailed cheques, and the mercantile industry
accounted for 615 employees whose wages were reduced in 1933.
These reductions would have been more general had it not been for the steadying effect of
the minimum-wage regulations.    In establishments where a general percentage cut was ordered
it could not apply in cases where it would have brought the wage below the Board's prescribed
figures.
AVAGE TREND, 1918, 193.1, 1932, 1933.
The following table depicts the trend of wages in non-seasonal occupations from 1931 to
1933, and enables a comparison to be made with rates prevailing in 1918, the first year during
which minimum-wage legislation was in force. Owing to recent abnormal and singular conditions it will be noted that the current figures more nearly approach those of 1918 than ever
before. The reader is asked, while studying the table, to bear in mind that shorter hours were
the general rule in 1933, and this fact has a distinct bearing on the wage question.
Mercantile Industry.
1918.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
$12.71
$7.70
15.49%
$14.20
$9.07
10.88%
$13.38
$8.47
9.82%
$12.78
$7.12
8.32%
Percentage of employees under 18 years	
Laundry Industry'.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
$11.42
$7.70
7.21%
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
$14.23
$11.77
5.51%
$15.72
$11.67
2.45%
$14.45
$12.20
2.19%
$13.78
$9.20
5.17% REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 87
Office Occupation.
1918.
1931.
1932.
1933.
Average weekly wages—
$16.53
$10.88
7.45%
$19.15
$11.73
1.81%
$18.35
$10.46
0.85%
$17.37
$10.09
1.02%
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
$14.49
$6.86
2.30%
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation,
Average weekly wages—
Experienced  employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
$14.73
$9.33
4.06%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced  employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
$14.68
$8.32
17.80%
MINIMUM-AVAGE LEGISLATION.
All Provinces of Canada, with the exception of Prince Edward Island, have minimum-wage
laws on the statute-books, although the New Brunswick Act is still inoperative.
British Columbia has always been most progressive in its policy of labour legislation. It
was in 1918 that the original " Minimum Wage Act" was passed, and since then amendments
have been made, and finally the 1934 " Female Minimum Wage Act" became law.
The Canadian Provinces provided the machinery for protection of their women workers,
and freed employers from unfair competition within their own boundaries, by passage of
Minimum AA7age Acts at the times mentioned below:—
British  Columbia   1918
Manitoba     1918
Saskatchewan    1919
Quebec     1919
Alberta   1920
Ontario   1920
Nova Scotia   1920
New   Brunswick  1930
The wages vary throughout Canada, and while some efforts were made a few years ago
to co-ordinate rates this has not been accomplished yet.
In such unsettled times as we have been experiencing lately almost every country has been
trying to improve the status of the worker. Our neighbours to the south have been very active
in adopting measures to help women workers. The " News Letter " of the Women's Bureau of
the United States Department of Labor at Washington, D.C., outlines the situation in part as
follows:— G 88 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
" At the beginning of the year minimum-wage legislation was passed in seven States, the
first impetus that had been given to such legislation for a decade. The latter half of the year
has seen the development of a concerted effort to secure shorter hours, greater wage stability,
and increased employment through the National Recovery Act industrial codes.    .    .    .
" From 1912 to 1923 fifteen States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico passed legis-
tion enabling the fixing of a minimum wage for women's employment. Six of these laws have
remained in active operation in respect to women in certain employments. During 1933 seven
States enacted such a law. Several others are seeking to follow a similar course. The seven
States are Connecticut, Illinois, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Utah. The new
Acts . . . contain a preamble carefully prepared to withstand the pitfalls of the unconstitutionality of certain of the earlier Acts." (It was in 1923 that the Washington, DC, Act was
declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States, and following this judgment the laws in many of the States became practically inoperative.)
" Another development in minimum-wage practice during the year was the consummation
of a tri-State agreement in AVashington, Oregon, and California, upon a wage for workers in
the canning industry. This was fixed at 27% cents an hour, with piece-rates to reach this
amount for at least 35 per cent, of all women of 18 years or over."
The rate for experienced workers in British Columbia is 27 cents per hour in the fruit
industry at the present time, so the three Pacific States and our own Province agree fairly well
in this respect. The more uniform rates are in adjacent localities the easier administration
becomes.
ADMINISTRATION.
AA7ith a limited staff of officials the burden of administering the Act and Orders has been
heavy during 1933, when, owing to general business conditions, a certain element in the
employing class seemed to devote more energy towards evading the regulations than in the
direction of efficient management to comply with the law.
AVhen adjustments are made by the payment of arrears to employees, the Board wonders
why the employer could not have conformed with the provisions of the Orders voluntarily,
instead of putting all concerned to the trouble of many interviews and negotiations before
ultimately meeting the obligations.
The Inspectors have gone through a very trying twelve months, and, regrettable as it may
seem, some unpleasant contacts have been made and must be mentioned in passing.
To the majority of employers, who have, in many cases, at considerable effort, faithfully
obeyed not only the letter but also the spirit of the law, the Board expresses its sincere
appreciation.
Thanks are also due to employees who have given helpful information to our staff, and
where it was necessary to resort to Court action to enforce compliance they have acquitted
themselves with credit.
Many persons, who could be classified neither as employer nor employee, eager to see
the law respected, have helped the Board in many ways to carry out its important and difficult
duties.
To all of these we extend our sincere thanks, and trust that we may continue to count on
their whole-hearted co-operation as the scope of our work broadens out with the gradual return
to prosperity and an ever-increasing number of women and girls on the pay-rolls of the Province.
While our duties are laid down by the Act, from which we cannot deviate, our efforts to
assist employer and employee will not relax, our aim being at all times to administer the law
with a tolerant understanding.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Adam Bell, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
Herbert Geddes. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 89
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS.
For convenient reference a summary of the Orders now in force is herewith appended :-
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Tears of Age or over.
$12.75.    Hourly rate, 26 Vie cents.
$7.50 for 1st   3 months.
$9.00 for 1st  3 months.
8.00
,   2nd 3
10.00    „   2nd 3
8.50
,   3rd 3
11.00    „   3rd 3
9.00
,   4th 3
12.00    „   4th 3
9.50
,   5th 3
10.00
,   6th 3
Licences required in this
10.50
,   7th 3
class.
11.00
,   8th 3
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Maximum working-period 48 hours.
Order has been in force since January 1st, 1928, superseding Order of February 24th, 1919.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced Workers.
Experienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$13.50.    Hourly rate,  28%   cents.
$8.00 for 1st  4 months.
8.50    „   2nd 4
9.00 „ 3rd 4
10.00 „ 4th 4
11.00 „ 5th 4
12.00    „   6th 4
$9.00 for 1st   4 months.
10.50     „   2nd 4
12.00    „   3rd 4
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are based on a 48-hour week.    Maximum  working-period 48 hours,  governed  by
" Factories Act."
Order has been in force since March 31st, 1919.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, cooks, and kitchen help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where food is cooked,
prepared, and served for which a charge is made; and the work of chambermaids in hotels, lodging-
houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments are operated
independently or in connection with any other business; and the work of all female elevator operators
and jauitresses. G 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29%  cents.
$12.00
$12 for 1st 3 months.
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. In emergency cases 52 hours may be worked. Time and
one-half shall be paid for work in excess of 48 hours and up to 52 hours.
When lodging is furnished, not more than $3 a week may be deducted for such lodging.
When board or meals are furnished, not more than $5.25 may be deducted for a full week's board
of 21 meals.    A fraction of a week's board shall be computed upon a proportional basis.
As elevator operators are required by law to pass an examination before running elevators, no
apprenticeship is permitted under the Minimum Wage Order.
Order has been in force since May 24th, 1934, superseding Order of August 16th, 1919.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed as stenographers; book-keepers; typists; billing
clerks; filing clerks; cashiers; cash-girls (not included in other Orders); checkers; invoicers;
comptometer operators; auditors; attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices;
and all kinds of clerical help.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$15.    Monthly   rate,   $65.
Hourly   rate,   31%   cents.
$11.00 for 1st   6 months.
12.00    „   2nd 6
13.00    „   3rd 6
14.00    „   4th 6
$11.00 for 1st   3 months.
12.00    „   2nd 3
13.00    „   3rd 3
14.00    „   4th 3
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum weekly working-period prescribed by Order, 48
hours, unless written permission for overtime obtained from Board. Overtime to be paid at above
rates.
Order has been in force since May 24th, 1934, superseding Order of August 16th, 1919.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring, hairdressing, barbering, and other
work of like nature, or employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries and other
public places of amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or as drivers of motor-cars and
other vehicles.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced AVorkers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.25.    Hourly rate, 29 "/ie cents.
$10.00 for 1st  6 months.
11.00    „   2nd 6
12.00    „   3rd 6
13.00    „   4th 6
*$10.00 for 1st  3 months.
11.00    „   2nd 3
12.00    „   3rd 3
13.00    „   4th 3
Licences required in this
class.
* These rates for learners do not apply to attendants at shooting-galleries and other public places of
amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or to drivers of motor-cars or other vehicles, for whom
no apprenticeship is deemed necessary.
Above rates are for 48-hour week, which is maximum permitted. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 91
Wages for Ushers.
Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, or the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with a minimum
payment of 75 cents.
Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not less
than $10.80 a week.     (Ushers in this category may be employed only between 1.30 p.m. and 11 p.m.)
Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age. No apprenticeship considered
necessary for ushers.
Order has been in force since September 15th, 1919.
FISHING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50.    Hourly rate, 32'/24 cents.
$12.75  for  1st   4  months.
13.75    „    2nd 4
14.75    „    3rd  4
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Order has been in force since February 28th, 1920.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the
operation of telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.00.    Hourly rate, 31%  cents.
$11.00  for  1st   3  months.
12.00    „    2nd  3         „
13.00    „    3rd   3
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum hours permitted are 8 per day and 48 per week,
except in cases of emergency, when 56 hours may be worked. Time and one-half is payable for hours
in excess of 48.    Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m.
and 8 a.m., 10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the
number of hours of employment a week.
In cases where employees reside on the employer's premises, the employer shall not be prevented
from making an arrangement with such employees to answer emergency calls between the hours of
10 p.m. and 8 a.m.
Order has been in force since April 5th, 1920, superseding Order of September 23rd, 1919.
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, and adapting for use or sale any article or
commodity, but excepting fish, fruit, and vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing. G 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced Workers.
Schedule 1.
Schedule 2.
Schedule 3.
$14.00. Hourly rate, 29%
cents.
$8.00 for 1st   2 mos.
10.00    „   2nd   2    „
12.00    „   3rd   2    „
$8.00 for 1st   4 mos.
10.00    „   2nd  4    „
12.00    „   3rd   4    „
$7.00 for 1st   6 mos.
10.00    „   2nd   6    „
13.00    „   3rd   6    „
Licences required for inexperienced workers 18 years of age or over.
Schedule 1 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-powders, molasses,
sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, biscuits,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, soft drinks, yeast, cans, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, whisks, pails, wash-boards, wooden boxes, clothes-pins,
matches, explosives, munitions, gas-mantles, and window-shades.
Schedule 2 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Cotton bags, envelopes, overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, gloves,
hats, caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, tents, awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding,
pillow-covers, loose covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made millinery,
knitted goods, blankets, brushes, machine-made cigars, and dipped chocolates.
Schedule 3 applies to the following occupations, or to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or adapted for use or sale: Bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing,
dressmaking, men's and women's tailoring, ready-to-wear suits, paper boxes, jewellery, furs, leather
goods, hand-made cigars, boots, shoes, and hand-made millinery.
Schedule 3 does not apply to regularly indentured apprentices whose indentures have been approved
by the Minimum Wage Board.
The above rates are for a 48-hour week. No employee shall be employed more than 8 hours a
day, nor more than 48 hours a week, except when permission has been granted under the provisions
of the " Factories Act."
Order has been in force since November 20th, 1923, superseding Order of September 1st, 1919.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY, 1933.
This includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use, any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$14.40.    Hourly rate, 30 cents.
$11.00 for 1st 2 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. For work over 48 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day,
wages shall be not less than 30 cents an hour for experienced workers, and for work in excess of
10 hours the rate shall be not less than 45 cents an hour.
For work over 8 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day, wages shall be not less than 23 cents
an hour for inexperienced workers, and for work in excess of 10 hours the rate shall be not less than
35 cents an hour.
Order has been in force since November 2nd, 1926, superseding Order of February 28th, 1920.
Emergency Order No. 17b, covering the Fruit and ATegetable Industry, was promulgated June
14th, 1933, and is included in this report on page 77.
The above Orders relating to the Fruit and Vegetable Industry were superseded by Order No. 3
of the Board of Industrial Relations, which became effective on May 10th, 1934, a summary of which
is as follows :— REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 93
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY, 1934.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
27c.  an hour up to  8 in any one day.
40c.  an hour after 8  and up to  12.
54c. an hour after 12 hours in any one day.
25c. an hour up to 8 in any one day.
37 %c. an hour after 8 and up to 12.
50c. an hour after 12 hours in any one day.
In cases where employees are required to work in excess of 8 hours but not exceeding 10 hours
in any one day in order to handle perishable products which have been delivered in larger quantities
than can be handled in 8 hours, experienced employees may be paid at the rate of 27c. an hour up to
10 hours in a day, and inexperienced employees may be paid at the rate of 25c. an hour up to 10 hours
in any one day ;  the other rates set out in the summary above to apply after 10 hours.
This provision for handling perishable products was embodied in Order No. 3a (Emergency) and
became effective on June 29th, 1934.
ASSOCIATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
The following list of organizations which have a direct connection with the employment of
labour has been compiled from the latest available information and does not include any which
has been established purely for social purposes.
Box Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, J.
C. Grant, Empire Box Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender Street
AVest, Vancouver.
B.C. Hotels' Association—President, L. A. Manly ;
Vice-President, Wm. Gilchrist; Treasurer, J. B.
AVyard; Secretary, J. J. AValsh, 307-8 Lumbermen's Building, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver. The above are the officers of this Association until the annual meeting and election of
officers takes place next July.
B.C. Loggers' Association—Chairman of the
Board of Directors, Roger L. Cobb, 909 Yorkshire Building, Vancouver; Vice-Chairman,
Fred Brown, B. & K. Logging Co., Ltd., 1004
Standard Bank Building, Vancouver; Secretary-Manager, R. V. Stuart, 921 Metropolitan
Building, Arancouver. Officers elected annually
on January 15th.
B.C. Lumber & Shingle Manufacturers' Association—President (1934), J. D. McCormack,
Canadian AVestern Lumber Co., Ltd., Fraser
Mills ; Secretary, T. H. AVilkinson, 917 Metropolitan Building, Arancouver. Officers elected
annually on third Thursday in January.
Building & Construction Industries Exchange of
B.C.—President, C. L. McDonald; First Vice-
President, AValter Leek ; Second Vice-President,
J. P. McKenzie; Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342
Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Canadian Jewellers' Association (B.C. Section)
—President, A. G. Carruthers; Secretary-
Treasurer, A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street,
Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division) ; Provincial Headquarters, 701-7 B.C.
Mining Building, Vancouver—Chairman, J. G.
Robson, Timberland Lumber Co., Ltd., New
AVestminster; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701
B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (ATictoria
Branch), 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria—
Chairman, AV. B. AVilson, c/o B. Wilson Co.,
Ltd., Victoria; Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 119
Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Canadian Storage & Transferrin's Association
(for year June, 1933, to June, 1934)—President, Elmer Johnston, Johnston National Storage, Ltd., C.N.R. Freight Offices, Main Street,
Arancouver. This Association has Board of
Directors in each Province.
Canned Salmon Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, Hugh
Dalton, 402 Pender Street AVest, Vancouver;
Secretary, R. M. AVinslow, 705 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Feed Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, J. K.
Clarke, c/o Buckerfields, Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, R. Ar. Robinson, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Fertilizer Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, F. Smelts, B.C. Electric Railway Co.,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
General Contractors' Association—President, AV.
E. Jenkins; First Vice-President, N. D. La-
mont; Second A'ice-President, J. P. Hodgson;
Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender Street AVest,
Arancouver.
Jam Manufacturers' Association, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, C. D. Hunter, Empress Manufacturing
Co., Ltd., Arancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton,
402 Pender Street AVest, Arancouver.
Meal, Oil & Salt Fish Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, R. Nelson, Nelson Bros.' Fisheries, Ltd.;
Secretary, R. M. AVinslow, 705 B.C. Mining
Building, Arancouver. G 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Metal Trades Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman,'D. A.
Mcintosh, Letson & Burpee, Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, E. AV.
Izard, Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt; Secretary, T.
J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Millwork Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, E. C. Chry-
stal, E. C. Chrystal & Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Mining Association of B.C.—President, T. AV.
Bingay, Vice-President, Consolidated Mining &
Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd., Trail; Secretary,
H. Mortimer-Lamb, 605 Metropolitan Building,
Vancouver.
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers' Association—
President, H. P. Klinestiver, Lumberton;
Secretary-Treasurer, I. R. Poole, 204 Traders'
Building, Calgary, Alberta. Officers elected at
annual meeting held in January.
Printers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association — Chairman, Gordon
Hogg, AArilson Stationery Co., Ltd., Arancouver;
Secretary-Manager, A. W. Sparling, 706 B.C.
Mining Building, Vancouver.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Board—President, J. M. Watson, Vancouver ; First Vice-President, H. Everett, Vancouver ; Second Vice-President, F. Trapp, New
Westminster; Third Vice-President, J. Fred
Scott, Cranbrook; Treasurer, C. H. Moodie,
Arancouver; Dominion Councillor, R. T. AVil-
son, Nanaimo; Secretary, Geo. R. Mathews,
Vancouver; and W. H. Anderson, Nanaimo.
Head Provincial Office at 420 Pacific Building,
Vancouver. Branches are established at Cranbrook, Nanaimo, Revelstoke, Arancouver, Chilli-
wack, Abbotsford, Mission, Cloverdale, and
Ladner. Districts are operated as Direct Units
and serviced through the Provincial Office.
Shipping Federation of B.C., Ltd.—President,
R. L. Mason ; Vice-President, R. D. Williams;
Treasurer, E. F. Riddle; Manager and Secre
tary, Major W. C. D. Crombie, Shipping
Federation Building, 45 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver ; Directors, E. Aikman, D. M. Cameron,
F. H. Glendenning, C. A. Coherall, W. M.
Crawford, B. W. Greer, K. A. McLennan, R. G.
Parkhurst, F. J. Pickett, H. A. Stevenson, and
J. AVeber. Meets for election of officers in
January of each year.
Spruce Manufacturers' Association—President, J.
F. McMillan, Edmonton, Alberta; Secretary,
I. R. Poole, Calgary, Alberta. Membership includes mills in Northern B.C. and Prairie Provinces. General meetings usually held in Calgary
or Edmonton. No set date for annual meeting,
but expect it to be held in May. Address of
Secretary, 204 Traders' Building, Calgary.
Shipyards' Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, A. H.
Seaton, B.C. Marine Engineers & Shipbuilders,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Vancouver Association of Electragists—President,
C. H. E. Williams, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver ; Hon. Secretary, J. C. Reston, 524
Hornby Street, Vancouver; Office, 425 Pacific
Building. Officers elected annually in September.
A'ancouver Electrical Association—President, R.
A. Graham, 929 Pender Street West, Vancouver ; Secretary, J. C. Reston, 524 Hornby
Street, Vancouver. Offices, Western City Building, 542 Howe Street, Vancouver. Officers
elected annually in May. This Association has
seventy-one members and eight associate members.
Vancouver Employing Printers' Association—
Chairman, Malcolm MeBeath, McBeath-Camp-
bell, Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary-Manager, A.
W. Sparling, 402 Pender Street AVest, Vancouver.
Arictoria Bread & Cake Manufacturers' Association—President, J. R. Small; Secretary, D. W.
Hanbury, 952 Queens Avenue Victoria.
Arictoria Builders' Exchange, Ltd. — Secretary-
Treasurer, AV. J. Hamilton, 1712 Douglas
Street, Victoria. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 95
UNION DIRECTORY.
We have endeavoured to give an up-to-date directory of trade organizations and their
officials covering the whole Province, and we desire to thank those union secretaries who were
prompt in returning our questionnaire.
It is regretted that many officials did not reply to our letters, and we have assumed that
their organization is no longer in existence and have struck them from the list.
The Department will be pleased at all times to receive any changes in the published list
which may be made from time to time, and would appreciate being advised of any new organizations desiring to be listed in the next publication.
TRADES AND LABOUR CONGRESS
OF CANADA.
President, Tom Moore, 172 McLaren Street,
Ottawa; Secretary-Treasurer, P. M. Draper,
172 McLaren Street, Ottawa.
THE ALL-CANADIAN CONGRESS
OF LABOUR.
President, A. R. Mosher; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. T. Burford, 230 Laurier Avenue West,
Ottawa.
TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCILS.
Prince Rupert—President, S. D. McDonald, P.O.
Box 268, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. Derry,
Box 498, Prince Rupert. Meets at Prince
Rupert on second Thursday in each month at
8 p.m.
Vancouver, New Westminster, and District—
President, Colin McDonald, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver; General Secretary-Treasurer,
P. R. Bengough, Room 200, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver. Meets first and third Tuesdays of each month at Labour Headquarters at
8 p.m.
National Labour Council of Prince Rupert—Secretary, A. E. AVood, Box 679, Prince Rupert.
Vancouver Building Trades Council—President,
E. H. Morrison, 531 Beatty Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, W. Page, 531 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 531 Beatty Street on second
and fourth Tuesdays in each month at 8 p.m.
A'ictoria Trades and Labour Council—President,
R. D. Lemmax, 915 Kings Road, Victoria;
Secretary, James AVilson, 946 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on the first and
third AVednesdays in the month at Labour Hall,
Hamley Building, Broughton and Government
Streets.
DISTRICT LODGES AND COUNCILS.
Allied Printing Trades Council.
A'ancouver—President, Francis J. Milne, Englsea
Lodge, Vancouver; Secretary, AV L. McComb,
840 Nelson Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529-31
Beatty Street, Vancouver, on fourth Monday in
month at 8 p.m.
Victoria—President, W. W. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, AA7m. O. Clunk,
1624 Myrtle Street, Victoria. Meets at Jones
Building at 5 p.m. on last Thursday in month.
TRADE UNIONS.
Ashcroft.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol, Box 222, Kamloops; Secretary, R. Halliday, 3481 Georgia Street East,
Vancouver. Meets at Ashcroft at 8 p.m. on
third Saturday of March, June, September, and
December.
Corbin.
Corbin Miners' Association, Local No. 3, Sub.
Dist. No. 1—President, J. Falconer, Corbin;
Secretary, J. Press, Corbin. Meets in Burke
& Booth Hall every second Sunday at 7 p.m.
Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
563—President, Hugh J. Brock, Cranbrook;
Secretary-Treasurer, Geo. A. Hennessy, Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Mondays in Maple Hall.
Machinists, International, No. 588 — President,
W. Henderson, Box 827, Cranbrook; Secretary,
R. J. Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook. Meets at
W. J. Flower's residence on third Sunday in
each month at 3 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
229—President, Albin Aliason, Baker; Secretary, G. C. Brown, P.O. Box 739, Cranbrook.
No set date.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of. Local
No. 407—President, R. H. Harrison, Cranbrook ; Secretary, Geo. Kirwan, P.O. Box 451,
' Cranbrook. Meets at Maple Hall, Cranbrook,
on second Sunday in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 173—President, James Sims, Cranbrook ; Secretary, J. F. Lunn, Cranbrook.
Meets at 8 p.m. at Cranbrook on first Wednesday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Express & Station
Employees, Mount Baker Lodge, No. 1292—
President, A. H. Laurie, Cranbrook; Secretary,
E. G. Dingley, Box 728, Cranbrook. Meets at
Cranbrook on second Sunday at 3 p.m. each
month.
Fernie.
Minors' Association, British Columbia — President, Nicholas Cockburn, Coal Creek; Secretary, James AVilson, Box 347, Fernie. Meets
at Canadian Legion Hall, Fernie, every first
Wednesday at 11.30 a.m. G 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Canyon Lodge,
No. 165—President, J. Blysak; Secretary,
Harry Prestwick, Box 59, Golden. Meets on
last Sunday of each quarter at 1 p.m.
Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 821—President, Chas. Spencer, Kamloops;
Secretary, T. J. O'Neill, Box 753, Kamloops.
Meets at Orange Hall on first and third Sundays in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 611—President, J. A. Miller, General
Delivery, Kamloops; Secretary, H. B. Battison,
Box 377, Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall,
Kamloops, on second Sunday in month at 2
p.m.
Natal.
B.C. Miners' Association—President, M. Halko,
Michel; Secretary, G. Mannion, Michel. Meets
every second Friday at 7 p.m. in the Mission
Hall, Natal.
Nelson.
Barbers' International Union of America, Journeymen, Local No. 196—President, Eli Sut-
cliffe, Nelson; Secretary, R. M. Burgess, Box
657, Nelson. Meets at Burgess Barber Shop,
Nelson, at 7.30 p.m. on third Thursday in
month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, E. J.
Hoskey Division, No. 579—Chief Engineer, L.
W. Humphrey, P.O. Box 117, Nelson; Secretary, E. Jeffcott, P.O. Box 214, Nelson; Local
Chairman, L. L. Boomer, P.O. Box 664, Nelson.
Meets at Canadian Legion Building on first and
third Sundays in each month at 10.30 a.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, United Brotherhood of, Nelson Lodge, Local No. 181—President, O. Johnson, Procter; Secretary, J. Elia-
son, Box 682, Nelson. Meets on last Sunday
in each quarter  (subject to train service).
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 98—President, David Rees, Nelson;
Secretary, G. B. Abbott, Box 272, Nelson.
Meets at K. of P. Hall, Baker Street, Nelson,
on fourth Tuesday at 7.30 p.m.
New Westminster.
Amalgamated Building Workers of Canada—
President, W. Lannon, 1820 Eighth Avenue,
New AArestminster; Secretary, AV. Taylor, 3030
Miller Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at
28 Lome Street, New Westminster, on second
and fourth AVednesdays at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1251—President, J. T. Ban-
nan, 1008 Sixth Avenue, New Westminster;
Recording Secretary, AAr. A. Robertson, 224
Eleventh Street, New Westminster. Meets at
Labour Temple on first Thursday in month at
8 p.m.
Civic Employees' Association of New Westminster
—President, O. H. Eickhoff, Carlton Court,
New Westminster; Secretary, Rees Morgan,
314 Regina Street, New Westminster. Meets
at Labour Temple at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday in
month.
Civil Servants of Canada (Amalgamated)—President,   R.   A.   Cheale,   1710   Edinburgh   Street,
New Westminster; Secretary, G. H. Jameson,
1814 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster. Meets
at Room 4, Ellis Block, New Westminster, on
third Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C., Local
No. 14—President, Leonard Petterson, R.R.
No. 1, New Westminster; Secretary, Wm. E.
Maiden, Box 427, New AVestminster. Meets at
Canadian Legion Hall, New AArestminster, on
first Saturday of each month at 4 p.m.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local Division No. 226—President and Local
Chairman, A. Peplow, 333 Twelfth Street, New
AVestminster. Meets in Canadian Legion Hall,
New AVestminster.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
632—Secretary, R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New
Westminster. Meets in Labour Temple at
10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in each month.
Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
914—President, J. W. Cockell, Penticton; Secretary, U. B. MacCallum, Penticton. Meets at
Odd Fellows' Hall, Penticton, on first and third
Mondays of each month at 2.30 p.m.
Prince George.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 202—President, F. P. Dona-
van, Hansard ; Secretary, C. H. Weaver, Hulton
via Sinclair Mills. Meets at McBride, Prince
George, or Hulton about end of each quarter.
Railroad Employees, Nechako Division, Local No.
28—President, F. C. Saunders, Prince George;
Secretary, H. Allen, Prince George. Meets at
Third Avenue, Prince George, on first Tuesday
in month at 8 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 620—Chief Conductor, R. J. Thompson,
Prince George; Secretary, J. E. Paschal, Prince
George. Meets in Prince George on second and
fourth Sundays in month at 8 p.m.
Prince Rupert.
Canadian Longshoremen's Association, Local No.
2—President, S. V. Cox; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. A. Pilford, Box 531, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1735—President, J. J. Gillis,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. S. Black, Box
694, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 8 p.m. on first Wednesday of each month.
Conductors, Trainmen, Farthest North Lodge, No.
869—President, AV. D. Moxley, Prince Rupert;
Secretary, J. H. Rife, P.O. Box 168, Smithers.
Meets in Municipal Hall, Smithers, first and
third Wednesdays of each month at 8.30 p.m.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union of the Pacific—Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Gill, 86 Seneca Street,
Seattle. Meets in Seattle at 86 Seneca Street
on Tuesdays at 7.30 p.m. and at Ketchikan,
Alaska.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426—President, H. Leaper, P.O. Box
465, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. Derry, Box
498, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters'
Hall, Fraser Street, Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m.
on second Monday of each month.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Division No. 154—President, H. Forrest, Box REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 97
679, Prince Rupert; Secretary, G. Coverdale,
Box 679, Prince Rupert. Meets on third Monday at 7.30 p.m.; no set place.
Steam and Operating Engineers, Local No. 510.—
President, AV. S. Hammond, 1211 Seventh Avenue East, Prince Rupert; Secretary, B. R. Rice,
Box 892, Prince Rupert. Meets at 326, Sixth
Avenue East, at 8 p.m. on first Friday of each
month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
413—President, S. D. MaeDonald, Box 268,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. M. Campbell, Box
689, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 7.30 p.m. on last Thursday of each month.
Revelstoke.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
No. 657—Chief Engineer, AV. J. Johnson, Box
151, Revelstoke; Secretary, G. L. Ingram, Box
485, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on first
and third Tuesdays of each month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 341—President, S. J. Spurgeon,
Revelstoke; Secretary, A. McKenzie, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke, on
second and fourth Wednesdays of each month
at 2 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 258—President, P. Unwin, Revelstoke;
Secretary, Dugald Bell, Box 497, Revelstoke.
Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8 p.m. on first Monday of each month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 208—President, R. Wyman,
Revelstoke; Secretary, T. Bysoutt, Revelstoke.
Meets in Smyth's Hall at 1.30 p.m. on first
Sunday after 15th of every quarter.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 481—President, A. N. Watt, Box
111, Revelstoke; Secretary, Chas. Lundell, Box
213, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8
p.m. on third Tuesday of each month.
Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
Ill—President, F. V. Foster, Smithers; Secretary, S. J. Mayer, Smithers. Meets in Smithers
on first and third Tuesdays in month at 3 p.m.
at City Hall.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415 (Bulkley)—President, J. S. Cathrae,
Smithers; Secretary, G. W. Smith, Smithers.
Meets in Smithers on first Thursday at 7.30
p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Farthest
North Lodge, No. 869—President, AV. D. Mox-
ley, Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. H. Rife, Box
168, Smithers. Meets at Town Hall, Smithers,
on first and third Mondays of each month at
8.30 p.m.
Steveston.
Steveston Fishermen's Benevolent Society—President, Shigetaro Nishi, Steveston; Secretary, M.
Kuba, Steveston. Meets at Steveston on second
Saturday of each month at 2 p.m.
Three Forks.
Maintenance-of-way  Employees,- Brotherhood  of,
No. 173—President, Joe Mikus, Alamo; Secretary,  T.  H.  Horner,  Kaslo.    Meets in  Three
Forks at call of President.
7
Vancouver.
Amalgamated Building Workers of Canada, Vancouver Division—Secretary-Treasurer, J. Mc-
Kinlay, Room 34, 163 Hastings Street West.
Meets on second and fourth Tuesdays at 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Amalgamated Building Workers of Canada (Vancouver), No. 1—President, E. A. Williams, 1719
Yew Street, Vancouver; Secretary-Treasurer,
J. McKinlay, 817 Fiftieth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street AVest
on second and fourth Tuesdays in each month
at 8 p.m.
Amalgamated Building AVorkers of Canada (Shipyard), No. 2—President, A. E. Arnold, 209
Twenty-fifth Street AVest, North Vancouver;
Secretary, Wm. Bray, 116 Sixteenth Avenue
East, Vancouver. Meets at Flack Building,
163 Hastings Street East, Vancouver, on first
and third Tuesdays of each month at 8 p.m.
Bakery & Confectionery Workers, Local No. 468
—President, A. Courteney, Vancouver; Secretary, J. D. Inkster, 1124 Burrard Street, Vancouver. Meets in Labour Headquarters on
first Saturday of month at 7 p.m.
Bakery Salesmen, Local No. 189—President, A.
Courteney, Vancouver; Secretary, Birt Showier,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver, on second Tuesday
at 8 p.m.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 120—President, J. L. Jackson, Lotus Hotel
Barber Shop, Abbott Street, Vancouver; Secretary, C. E. Herrett, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street on fourth
Tuesday in month at 8 p.m.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676—President,
M. J. Galvin, Vancouver; Business Agent, T.
J. Hanafin, 402 Homer Street, Vancouver.
Meets at 402 Homer Street on last Sunday of
month at 8 p.m.
Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders' Union of
Canada, Local No. 1—President, L. C. Campbell, 349 Fifth Avenue East, North Vancouver;
Secretary, R. AVoodbridge, 2738 Telford Avenue
West, Burnaby, New Westminster. Meets at
163 Hastings Street West on the second and
fourth Fridays of each month at 8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 194—President, Chas. McMillan, 1419 Nelson Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079 Ross Street,
Arancouver. Meets at Labour Hall, Beatty
Street, at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 105—President, F. Milne, 1465 Pendrell
Street, Vancouver; Recording Secretary, Miss
G. Grossman, 2038 Columbia Street, Vancouver ; Financial Secretary, G. Mowatt, Alcazar
Hotel, 337 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver. Meets
at Business AVomen's Section, Empire Building,
Seymour and Hastings Streets, on the second
Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m.
Bricklayers & Masons' International Union of
America, Local No. 1, B.C.—President, Alex.
Fordyce, 20 Twelfth Avenue West, Vancouver;
Secretary, Wm. S. Dagnall, 1442 Twentieth
Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on second Wednesday in month
at 8 p.m. G 98
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Bridge & Structural Iron Workers, International
Association of, Local No. 97—President, Robert
McDonald, 5059 Chester Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, J. P. Rankins, 52 Eleventh Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at 531 Beatty Street
at 8 p.m. on second and last Wednesdays in
month.
Bridge, Structural, Ornamental, Reinforced Ironworkers, Pile Drivers & Riggers, Local No. 1—
President, A. Andrew, 2066 York Street, Arancouver ; Secretary, W. S. MacKenzie, 547 AVin-
dermere Street, Vancouver. Meets at 8 p.m.
every first and third Thursday in Room 30, 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver.
Camp and Millworkers, No. 31—President, Taneji
Sada, 981 Twenty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, Takaichi Umezuki, 544
Powell Street, Vancouver. Meets every second
Wednesday at 542 Powell Street, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m.
Canadian Association of Seamen—National Secretary, C. P. O'Donovan, 411a Cordova Street
AVest, Arancouver. Meets in Association's
quarters ; no set date.
Express Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 15
—President, H. A. McAffie, 1052 Pendrell
Street, A'ancouver; Secretary, E. Hill, 2352
Sixty-first Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets on
first Tuesday of each month at 8 p.m. at Victory Hall.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 452—President, R. J. Thompson, 531
Beatty Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. Page,
531 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 531
Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Mondays in month.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59—President, D. Squair, 3728 Thirtieth Avenue AVest,
Vancouver; Secretary, J. Tarbuck, 3517
Twenty-fifth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at 195 Pender Street East, Vancouver, at 8
p.m. on first Wednesday of each month.
Civic Employees' Union, Local No. 28—President,
Phil Floyd, 2275 Fifty-first Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary-Treasurer, George Harrison,
3427 Triumph Street, Vancouver. Meets on
first and third Fridays in month at 195 Pender
Street East at 8 p.m.
Coastwise Longshoremen & Freight Handlers'
Association—President, A. Boutin ; Secretary,
P. Hunt. Meets in rear of 233 Main Street,
Vancouver, on first and third Wednesdays in
each month at 8 p.m.
Electrical Trades Union, Canadian—President,
Robert S. Milne, 163 Hastings Street AVest,
Vancouver; Secretary, AVm. Shepherd, 163
Hastings Street West, Vancouver. Meets at
163 Hastings Street West on second and fourth
Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Engineers, National Union, Local No. 2—Secretary, G. Lamont, 223 Carrall Street, Arancouver. Meets at 223 Carrall Street on first
Saturday in month at 2 p.m.
lire Fighters, No. 18, International Association
of—President, Neil MacDonald, 1136 McLean
Drive, Vancouver; Secretary-Treasurer, C. A.
Watson, 1626 Eighth Avenue East, Arancouver,
Meets at 195 Pender Street East alternate
second or third Thursday monthly at 10 a.m.
and 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, Local No. 296—Secretary, Wm. H.
Galbraith, c/o Fire Department, North Vancouver. Meets in Fire Hall, Thirteenth Street
East, on first Monday of month at 7.30 p.m.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, James Glencross, 1382
Howe Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Wm. Mor-
rice, 2228 Kitchener Street, Arancouver. Meets
on third Friday of month at O'Brien Hall,
Hastings Street, at 7.30 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Kamloops
Division, No. 320—President, G. P. Boston,
1763 Third Avenue AA7est, Vancouver; Secretary, S. H. Stingley, 661 Twentieth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on
second and fourth Tuesdays in month at 2 p.m.
and 8 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 182—President, George Lyle, 1962 Napier
Street, Arancouver; Secretary, Jas. H. AVallace,
3271 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets on second Friday at 8 p.m. in Labour
Hall, Arancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 692—President, Harry Horn, 529 Beatty
Street, Arancouver; Secretary, P. R. Bengough,
Labour Headquarters, Arancouver. Meets at
529 Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on Tuesdays.
Maintenance-of-way Employees and Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1734—President, N. Sato, Colebrook; Secretary, John Roscow, 14 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Victoria House at
10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in month.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, No. 7
—President, George D. Moody, 319 Pender
Street AVest, ATancouver; Secretary, E. Read,
319 Pender Street West, Vancouver. Meets at
319 Pender Street West on second and fourth
Fridays at 8 p.m. during summer months;
weekly during winter months.
Milk AVagon Drivers & Dairy Employees, Local
No. 464—President, S. T. Blackman, 529
Beatty Street, Arancouver; Secretary, B. Showier, 529 Beatty Street, Arancouver. Meets at
529 Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on second Friday
in month.
Motion Picture Projectionists' Union, Local 348,
I.A.T.S.E. and M.P.M.O.—President, L. Clark;
Secretary, J. H. Leslie, Box 345; Business
Manager, F. G. Graham. Meets at 11.45 p.m.
on first AVednesday in each month in the Elks'
Club, 901 Dunsmuir Street.
Moulders of North America, International Union
of, Local No. 281—President, John Browne,
638 Broadway West, Vancouver; Secretary, D.
B. MeCormack, 677 Sixteenth Avenue, New
AVestminster. , Meets at Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third Fridays
in month.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, Local No.
145 (American Federation of Musicians of the
U.S. and Canada)—President, J. Bowyer, 2704
Fourth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
E. A. Jamieson, 319 Pender Street West, Vancouver. Meets at G.W.V.A. Auditorium, 856
Seymour Street, Vancouver, on second Sunday
in month, except during months of May, June,
and July.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Local  No.   138—President,   H.   O.  McDonald, REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1933.
G 99
845 Twentieth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, Ed. Smith, 5216 St. Catherines Street,
South Arancouver. Meets at 8 p.m. on second
Thursday in each month at 529 Beatty Street.
Pattern Makers' Union of British Columbia—
President, Nelson Atkinson, Thirty-ninth Avenue and Fraser, Vancouver; Secretary, Albert
Hooper, General Delivery, Ocean Falls, B.C.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Dock & Wharf Builders,
Local No. 2404—President, James McGuffie,
P.O. Box 320, Vancouver ; Recording Secretary,
John McLeod, Box 320, Vancouver. Meets at
122 Hastings Street West at 8 p.m. on each
Friday.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local No. 59—Secretary, H. Strange, 3616
Arictory Street, New AVestminster. Meets on
third Fridays at 1150 Main Street, Vancouver.
liailroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local Division No. 82—President, J. Hulme,
1937 Forty-fourth Avenue AVest, Vancouver;
Secretary, T. M. Sullivan, 2715 Dundas Street,
Arancouver. Meets at Ivanhoe Hotel, Vancouver ; no set date.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 267—President, H. M. Walker, 6168
Twelfth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. B. Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday at 2
p.m.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association—President, F.
AV. Hitchcock, 2551 Thirty-seventh Avenue
West, Arancouver; Secretary, S. C. Bate, 3025
Second Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets in
Post Office Building, Arancouver, at 2.30 p.m.
on last Tuesday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 46—President, Victor Lund, 5634
Bruce Street, Vancouver; Secretary, F. H.
Fallows, 1504-St. Andrews Street, North Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall, Vancouver,
on fourth Friday at 8 p.m.
Sheet Metal AVorkers, Local No. 280—President,
Thomas E. Burke, 3557 Dundas Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, Daniel Macpherson, No. 308,
529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth
Thursdays.
Sheet Metal AVorkers (Railroad), No. 314—President, H. H. Swinden, 2265 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver ; Secretary, Geo. Watson, 1909
Nineteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
on second Friday of each month at Labour
Headquarters, 529 Beatty Street, at 8 p.m.
Shingle Weavers, Local No. 17813—President,
J. N. Shute, 1163 Pender Street East, Vancouver ; Secretary, E. Lockhart, 8631 Montcalm Street, Arancouver. Meets on first and
third Sundays in Labour Temple at 2 p.m.
Sign & Pictorial Painters, Local Union No. 726
(Vancouver and Aricinity) — President, A.
Swanson, 224 Fourteenth Avenue AVest, Vancouver ; Secretary, AVm. O. Clarkson, 1823
Kitchener Street, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Temple, Vancouver, on first and third Thursdays of each month at 8 p.m.
Steam Engineers, International, Local No. 963—
President, James Wilson, 985 Nineteenth Avenue   West,    Vancouver;    Secretary,   Wm.   R.
Crawford, 1539 Parker Street, Arancouver.
Meets at Labour Temple on first Tuesday in
each month at 8 p.m.
Stenographers, Typists, Book-keepers and Assistants, Local No. 18177—Secretary, Anne Mac-
Donald, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets
on first and third Thursdays in each month at
529 Beatty Street.
Stone-cutters, Association of North America—
President, John Marshall, 4708 Beatrice Street,
Vancouver ; Secretary, E. W. Tonge, 4119 Grace
Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on second Monday in month at
8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101
—President, T. R. Carson, 3729 Sixteenth Avenue AVest, Arancouver; Financial Secretary and
Business Agent, F. E. Griffin, 447 Sixth Avenue East, Arancouver. Meets at K. of P. Hall,
Eighth Avenue and Scotia Street, Vancouver,
on first and third Mondays at 10.15 a.m. and
7 p.m.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No.
Ill—President, AV. J. Ingles, 2048 Eighth Avenue AVest, Arancouver; Secretary, A. S. Crosson,
3925 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets at 3925 Fourteenth Avenue AVest on first
and third Sundays at 2 p.m.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, Local
No. 178—President, Colin McDonald, 2834 St.
George Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. AV.
Hocken, 1582 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Taxi, Stage & Bus Drivers, Local No. 151—President, AV. Swain, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty Street,
Arancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first Monday and 10.30
a.m. on second Tuesday.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
466, International Brotherhood of—President,
F. Goodrich, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, Birt Showier, Room 308, Labour
Headquarters, Arancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters  on  first  and  third  Mondays   at
8 p.m.
Teamsters,  Joint Council No.  36—President,  H.
A.   Smith,   3820   Quebec   Street,   Vancouver;
Secretary,   Birt   Showier,   529   Beatty   Street,
Arancouver.    Meets   at   529   Beatty   Street   on
call of Chair.
Arancouver Plasterers—Secretary, A. Hurry, 1115
Thirty-third Avenue East, Vancouver.
Waterfront AVorkers' Association, Vancouver and
Harbour—President,   Milton   Reid,   445   Gore
Avenue,     Vancouver;     Secretary,    Allan    L.
Walker, 1906 Sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets at 45 Dunlevy Avenue on second Friday
of every month at 8 p.m.
Vernon.
Typographical Union, No. 541—President, A. R.
Hillier, Box 541, Vernon; Secretary-Treasurer,
W. B. Hilliard, R.R. No. 1, Enderby. Meets
in Vernon at call of Chair.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, International Union of
America,   Local   No.   372—President,   G.   A. G 100
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Turner, 616 Avalon Road, Victoria; Secretary,
J. A. Green, 1319 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Meets at Labour Hall on fourth Monday in
month at 8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191—President, L. Basso, 625 John Street,
Victoria; Secretary, AV. S. Duncan, 1409 May
Street, Victoria. Meets on first Tuesday of
each month at 8 p.m.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 147—President, W. W. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, J. A. Wiley, 141
Clarence Street, Victoria. Meets at Room 311,
Jones Building, 715 Fort Street, Victoria, at
8 p.m. on fourth Friday in month.
Civic Employees, Local No. 50—President, A.
Murray, 2512 Blanshard Street, Victoria; Secretary, R. Betts, 2858 Shakespeare Street, Victoria. Meets at Main Fire Hall, Cormorant
Street, at 8 p.m. on second Wednesday in
month.
Electrical AVorkers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 230—President, R. D. Lemmax, 915
King's Road, Victoria ; Secretary, W. Reid, 2736
Asquith Street, Victoria. Meets at Labour
Hall, Government Street and Broughton, on
first and third Tuesdays of month at 8 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 456—President, A. Wallace, 44 Lewis
Street, Victoria; Secretary, C. H. Lester, 1137
Caledonia Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Eagles'
Hall, 1319 Government Street, on fourth Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 247
—President, S. G. Peele, 1210 McKenzie Street,
Victoria; Secretary, F. V. Homan, 418 Hel-
mcken Street, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall
on second Sunday in each month at 2 p.m. in
winter and 10.30 a.m. in summer.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders, No.
2415—President, S. M. Berrow, 2548 Quadra
Street, Victoria; Secretary, E. E. Goldsmith,
1133 Empress Avenue, Victoria. Meets at
Labour Hall at 8 p.m. on second Fridays of
each month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 79—President, Thomas Nute, 647 Michigan Street, Victoria ; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKenzie
Street, Victoria. Meets at third floor of the
Jones Building at 8 p.m. on second Monday
in month.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 109
—President, Jas. P. Torrance, 2510 Blackwood
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, W. Turner, 2169
Fair Street, Victoria. Meets at corner of
Broad and Yates Streets at 10 a.m. and 7.30
p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
201—President, Jas. D. Davidson, 384 Burn-
side Road, Victoria ; Secretary, James Petrie,
Box 1183, Victoria. Meets in Maccabees' Hall,
724 Fort Street, Victoria, at 2 p.m. on last
Sunday in month.
AVood, AVire & Metal Lathers, No. 332, Vancouver
Island—President, L. McKay, 3074 Earl Gray
Road, Saanich; Secretary, James AVilson, 946
Caledonia Avenue, Victoria. Meets at Labour
Hall on fourth Friday of each month at 8 p.m.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Chables F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1934.
2,075-634-8008

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