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TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1937

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   TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT
OP  THE
PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL
HOME FOR GIRLS
OF   THE   PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APEIL 1ST, 1936, TO MARCH 31 ST, 1037
PRINTED  BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.  To His Honour E. W. Hamber,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Twenty-third Annual Report of the
Provincial Industrial Home for Girls for the year ended March 31st, 1937.
G. M. WEIR,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
Victoria, B.C. Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1937.
The Honourable G. M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls, covering the fiscal year April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent of the Provincial Industrial
Home for Girls. PROVINCIAL INDUSTRIAL HOME
FOR GIRLS.
SUPERINTENDENT'S ANNUAL REPORT.
Vancouver, B.C., April 1st, 1937.
Honourable George M. Weir, D.Paed.,
Provincial Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit to you and the honourable members of the Legislature
the Twenty-third Annual Report of the Provincial Industrial Home for Girls from April 1st,
1936, to March 31st, 1937.
During the past fiscal year there were twenty-five admissions, ranging from 13 to 19
years of age and mentally classified from morons to dull normals. Though committed from
many points in the Province, the greater number were sent in from the Vancouver Juvenile
Court.
We have had more than usual of the older, more experienced type, who are not so
adaptable nor so easily influenced to change their way of thinking and living. There is
resentment to break down before an interest in training can be aroused. Their indolent,
purposeless attitude is established and some see no necessity for change. The majority of
families have been on relief for a long time, and there is either a bitter hopelessness among
the parents or a placid acceptance, either one reacting unfavourably on the children. The
influence of these older, more hardened girls on the younger, more pliable group has to be
reckoned with. The problem of even retaining them after commitment is a serious one, and
when they leave without permission, usually other more easily influenced girls go too. We
have had thirteen girls run away, with two repeating; their time out ranging from a day
to, one instance, three months. With this variety in material it is necessary to use discretion
in the granting of privileges and does tend to lessen liberty for all. This should not be used
as a gaol, nor a place of punishment, but a training-school, and it is necessary to allow a
certain amount of freedom that goes with normal living.
We try to group according to age and experience, but segregation is difficult, though our
building is spacious. Greater interest in the various branches has been developed during
the year. Almost every girl wants to become a proficient home-maker, and, without exception,
ambitious to become better than just an ordinary cook. They are realizing that home-making
requires some ability and much training, and are accepting the fact that there is a demand
for trained workers in the home and a position is available when they are released. We are
also endeavouring to impress on the people who engage our girls that proper living conditions,
hours of labour and recreation, and a little more kindly tolerance are necessary if they expect
service and loyalty.
While their many classes occupy the greater part of each day, we do not neglect the
recreational part of their training. A physical-education director has charge of two periods
a week, also a weekly game of basket-ball or baseball after school with the school-teacher is
enjoyed. Setting-up exercises for seven minutes directly after prayers each morning, directed
by one of the girls, has been of benefit.
The day at the Exhibition, made possible by the kindness of the Board, proved enjoyable
to all, with an added thrill for the girls from isolated districts. The Rotary Ice Carnival
Committee again sent tickets, and the more deserving group had this delightful experience.
The Kiwanians also remembered us when giving their operetta, and it was most enjoyable.
The Women's Musical Society, Philharmonic, Red Cross, Child Welfare Society, and Toe H.
Auxiliary provided enjoyable evenings during the winter. The Alumna, of the Delta Gamma
Fraternity made a presentation of marcelling equipment and electric hair-dryer for our
personal hygiene classes which we are establishing. Friends of the staff have kept the girls
well supplied with current magazines. All holidays have been observed appropriately, including a Christmas tree with gifts for all.    We gratefully acknowledge the kindness of the W 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
W.C.T.U., who supplied individual remembrances; the dinner-party where our girls met the
members of the Other Girls' Club; also the treat of fruit and candy supplied by the Salvation
Army and large box of candy from the F. W. Woolworth Co., Ltd. The graduates of the
Bible Training School have never failed for many years in coming to give the religious-
education hour weekly. Our Sunday afternoon services have been supplied by volunteers
from the different churches most acceptably, and we are appreciative. Miss White has
continued faithfully her classes in first aid and home-nursing, with Dr. Florence Perry taking
the examinations. Many references are made in letters from our girls who have been released
and to the efficiency and helpfulness of this training, and their gratitude to Miss White for
her unselfish interest. We had several enjoyable rides in the truck from the Boys' School,
the outstanding one being the day we went to camp at Balmy Beach, near Caulfeild. Through
the kindness of the owner, Mr. Smith, we were offered the use of his three cottages for the
month of September. Twenty-one girls in all enjoyed at least a few days at camp; this
being in every case their first experience. It was camping de luxe and not an incident
marred the pleasure of the holiday.
Two successive " Open Days " were arranged for this year with both afternoon and
evening sessions, averaging seventy-five people at all four. The Home was open for inspection, fancy articles sold, tea served, and on the afternoon and evening of both days the
operetta " Robin Hood " was very creditably presented by the choir. For some time we have
been saving our money from the sale of lavender, fancy articles, etc., and were at last able
to buy a Gerhard Heintzman piano, practically new, with excellent tone and appearance.
This has been placed in the large dining-room, where we have most of the programmes that
are brought to us. The new radio has certainly been a boon, giving us such a variety,
including the daily news and dance programmes.
The Overseas Teachers were interested visitors to the institution, and after inspecting
the buildings had tea with us. As usual, the Social Workers' Club held their annual meeting
at this Home and the girls excelled themselves in cooking and serving dinner.
Fifteen girls completed their training and were released, positions being found for all,
with the exception of four, who were returned to their own homes, where their services
were required. A friendly supervision has been maintained and the girls are making a
satisfactory readjustment.
In closing, I acknowledge gratefully the courtesy and kindly consideration of the Government departments with whom I have been working.
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN ON PREMISES.
Vegetables.
Potatoes, 17,000 lb.  .  $255.00
Peas, 432 lb.   21.60
Beans, 575 lb  19.15
Beets, 1,200 lb. ,  21.00
Vegetable marrow, 525 lb.   10.50
Tomatoes, 1,056 lb  52.80
Cucumbers, 344   17.20
Cabbage, 471 heads   47.10
Onions, 1,800 lb.   45.00
Onions, green, 69 bunches  2.30
Lettuce, 345 heads  17.25
Corn, 1,675 ears  27.90
Turnips, 2,128 lb  31.90
Cauliflower, 105 heads   10.50
Carrots, 5,914 lb.   88.70
Parsnips, 600 lb.   9.00
Brussels sprouts, 21 lb.   5.25
Spinach, 60 lb.   3.00    -
Carried forward   $685.15 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1936-37.
W 7
ESTIMATED VALUE OF VEGETABLES AND FRUIT GROWN—Continued.
Vegetables—Continued.
Brought forward
Celery, 20 bunches 	
Manure, 15 loads 	
Fruit.
Apples, 600 lb.	
Cherries, 160 lb. ...
Raspberries, 90 lb.
Rhubarb, 125 lb. _
POPULATION OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1937.
$685.15
2.00
60.00
$747.15
$18.75
16.00
12.50
6.25
$53.50
31
On roll, March 31st, 1936 	
Girls admitted during year March 31st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937      25
Released as wards of Juvenile Court   10
Released on becoming 21 years of age  1
Released by Indian Agent  1
Released by Police Magistrate  3
56
15
Total in Home, March 31st, 1937
41
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1937.
Total inmate-days from March 31st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937.
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day	
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year	
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day .	
Operating expenditure by voucher—
Salaries  	
Office and school supplies, etc.—
Postage, office and school supplies
Telephone and telegraph 	
Travelling expenses
Farm operations 	
Household equipment (other than furniture)-
Clothing—
Clothing
Boots and shoes
Janitors' supplies	
Fuel, light, and water-
Fuel 	
Water 	
Light and power
13,106
$676.9290
1.8546
445.8840
1.2216
12,760.82
$290.37
121.44
$832.33
335.57
$2,479.26
324.95
538.55
411.81
433.00
868.77
591.84
1,167.90
397.71
3,342.76
Carried forward
$19,974.61 W 8 .     BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EXPENSE AND REVENUE STATEMENT OF HOME, MARCH 31st, 1937—Continued.
Brought forward   $19,974.61
Operating expenditure by voucher—Continued.
Provisions—
Groceries   $2,949.71
Meat     1,075.87
Fish        139.73
      4,165.31
Medical attendance and hospital supplies—
Doctor's salary       $400.00
Medical supplies         290.77
' Surgery (tonsillectomies, appendectomy, etc.)       320.00
i Dental cost  -       291.50
       1,302.27
Good Conduct Fund  85.50
Incidentals and contingencies          202.47
Total expenditure for year by voucher  $25,730.16
Maintenance and repairs  (expended through Public Works Department)       1,210.54
Inventory, March 31st, 1936          503.57
$27,444.27
Less board and rent  $2,123.40
Less other receipts     	
Less inventory, March 31st, 1937      1,013.18
       3,136.58
$24,307.69
Less Revenue Account (maintenance of inmates)       8,297.34
Net cost of inmates' maintenance to Government  $16,010.35 REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1936-37.
W 9
LIST OF GIRLS IN HOME, MARCH 31st, 1937.
Place of Birth.
Parentage.
Residence previous
to being admitted
to Home.
British
Columbia.
Canada.
Length of Term.
432
440
441
445
447
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
Maryfield, Sask.
Vancouver, B.C.	
Craik, Sask. 	
Vancouver, B.C.	
Trail, B.C 	
Lytton, B.C	
Fernie, B.C. __. 	
Edmonton, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C. 	
Gardington, Man. _	
Edmonton, Alta	
Vancouver, B.C	
Poland 	
New Westminster, B.C.
Edmonton, Alta	
Victoria, B.C _
Vancouver, B.C	
Winnipeg, Man 	
Vancouver, B.C 	
London, England	
Vancouver, B.C 	
Canora, Sask	
Saskatoon,   Sask.   	
Gilbert Plains, Man	
Poland 	
Brandon, Man. 	
Vancouver, B.C	
Moose Jaw, Sask	
Moose Jaw, Sask. 	
Nanaimo, B.C	
Yorkton, Sask	
Prince Rupert, B.C. 	
Port Alberni, B.C. 	
Lucerne, B.C 	
Burnaby, B.C.
Merritt, B.C. ..
Rutland, B.C.
Chomberg, Ont 	
New Westminster, B.C.
Winnipeg, Man 	
DesJarlais, Alta	
Scotch, Scotch-Canadian
English	
Irish	
Scotch  _	
Scotch-Indian strain..
Scotch-American,
Indian
English-Canadian	
Unknown	
Polish	
Roumanian 	
American-Swedish	
Scotch-English	
German 	
Irish-American	
English.. 	
Welsh-Canadian	
Irish-English	
Irish-Canadian	
English-Scotch	
German-English..	
Scotch-Canadian,
French-American
Russian	
English-Norwegian.—
Russian _
Polish _..
Canadian-English	
Norwegian-Danish	
Norwegian-English—
Scotch  	
Canadian-English	
Hungarian-Slav	
Scotch-Indian, Indian
Negro. 	
Swedish-Indian.	
West Indian-Negro.	
English-Canadian	
Irish-Canadian	
Irish-Swedish	
English-Irish _	
Irish-American,
English
Ukrainian 	
i4y2
2
13
15
15
13
5
13
8
15
16'/2
7
17
11
16
15
2
17
10
7
12
7
ii y2
13
16
4 mos.
4 mos.
12
17
16
14
14
17
17
16
2y2
14
15
10
Years.
15
14%
15V2
13
15
15
13
15
13
15
15
161/2
7
17
171/2
16
15
15
17
19
17
15
17
12
II1/2
16
16
17
17
12
17
16
14
14
17
17
16
13
14
15
15
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec.  20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Two years.
Three years.
Two years.
Sec. 20, subsec.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Three years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, subsec.
Sec. 20, subsec.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, subsec.
Sec. 20,
Sec. 20,
Sec. 20,
subsec.
subsec.
subsec.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
(3), J.D.A., 1929.
1929.
1929.
1929.
1929 (Recidivist).
(3), J.D.A., 1929.
(3), J.D.A., 1929.
1929.
(2), J.D.A., 1929.
(2), J.D.A., 1929.
(3), J.D.A., 1929.
(3), J.D.A., 1929.
1929 (Recidivist).
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929 (Recidivist).
Sec. 20, subsec. (3), J.D.A., 1929.
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Two years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Industrial Home for Girls Act.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Indeterminate ;
years.
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 16, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A.,
1929.
1929.
1929.
not less
1929.
1908.
1929.
1929.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929.
Industrial Home for  Girls Act.
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929. W 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NATIONALITY OF PARENTS.
English (both)   2
Scotch (both)   2
Irish  (both)    1
German (both)   1
Negro (both)    1
Polish (both)   2
  1
  2
  1
  1
  1
  2
Roumanian (both) 	
Russian (both) 	
Ukrainian (both) 	
Unknown (both)  	
American-Swedish	
Canadian-English 	
English-Canadian      2
English-Scotch 	
English-Irish 	
English-Norwegian
German-English	
Hungarian-Slav 	
Irish-American
Irish-Canadian
Irish-English —
Irish-Swedish ___
Scotch-Indian, Indian
Scotch-Indian strain _.
Scotch-English 	
Swedish-Indian 	
Welsh-Canadian	
West Indian-Negro	
Norwegian-Danish	
Norwegian-English      1
Scotch-American, Indian     1
Scotch-Canadian, French-
American 	
Scotch, Scotch-Canadian	
Total..
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
41
British Columbia
Alberta 	
Saskatchewan	
Manitoba 	
Ontario 	
WHERE GIRLS WERE BORN.
21
4
7
5
1
England
Poland -
Total .
1
2
41
Incorrigible
Theft 	
Sexual immorality
OFFENCES COMMITTED.
Vagrancy	
Total
29
2
9
1
41
PLACES OF APPREHENSION.
Ashcroft 	
Burnaby 	
Creston 	
Fort St. John
Kelowna	
Lytton 	
Montney	
Nanaimo 	
Penticton 	
Pouce Coupe      1
Port Coquitlam     1
Saanich 	
Trail 	
Vancouver
Victoria _—
TotaL
1
1
24
1
  41
J.D.A.,
Sec. 20, J.D.A., 1929...
Sec.   20,   subsec.    (2)
1929 	
Sec.   20,   subsec.    (3),   J.D.A
1929 	
Sec. 16, J.D.A., 1908 	
LENGTH OF SENTENCE.
  22
Indeterminate;   not   less   than
three years   1
Three years  2
Two years   5
Total  41
Industrial Home for Girls Act- REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1936-37.
W 11
AGES OF GIRLS IN HOME
13 years   6     18 years	
14 years  5    19 years	
15 years   12
16 years   7
17 years  10
Total  41
RELIGIOUS STATISTICS.
Baptist  2 Roman Catholic  11
Bible Student   1 Salvation Army    1
Church of England  8 United Church  14
Christian Science  1 —
Four Square Gospel   1 Total  41
Lutheran   2
GIRLS AND THEIR PARENTS.
Number who have both parents living..
Number who have both parents dead-
Number who have father living and mother dead..
Number who have mother living and father dead-
Number who are adopted 	
Total..
Of the above, the parents of 9 girls are separated;   1 is divorced
Several have established homes and families although not remarried.
  29
     1
     2
     7
     2
  41
with father remarried.
STAFF OF OFFICIALS.
The following is the present staff of officials:—
Superintendent and Nurse	
Clerk and Commercial Teacher-
Teacher	
Teacher and Supervisor	
First Assistant	
Linen-keeper	
Attendant (Sewing Supervisor).
Dietitian	
Engineer and Janitor	
Gardener-	
.Mrs. Annie G. Westman.
Miss Margaret W. Sibbald.
.Miss Marion D. Tulloch.
..Miss Ayra E. Peck.
-Mrs. Agnes C. Oxley.
.Miss Katherine M. Smith.
..Miss M. E. Murray.
..Miss Myrtle Moar.
-Claude S. Gardner.
-Henry Philip.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
ANNIE G. WESTMAN,
Superintendent. W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following medical report applies to the period from April 1st, 1936,
to March 31st, 1937:—
Calls made by physician    49
Patients seen by physician, including treatments   328
Complete physical examination     32
Patients in isolation for Neisser infection     11
Smears taken for Neisser infection   225
Blood tests for Kahn and Wasserman     61
Treatment for syphilis intravenously     61
Girls treated for syphilis intravenously       5
Lysol treatments for Neisser infection  693
Argyrol and silver nitrate treatments for Neisser infection  200
Urine tests     41
X-rays        3
Chest Clinic      4
Goitre cases treated daily       3
Basal metabolism       3
Admitted to Vancouver General Hospital  I       6
Tonsillectomy      2
Appendectomy     1
Fracture of tibia and fibula      1
Pneumonia      2
Examination by eye specialist       8
Glasses provided       8
The general health of the girls has been very good.    Each girl on admission receives
a complete physical examination and is kept in quarantine for fourteen days.
All of which is respectfully submitted. .,        _
Mary B. Campbell,
Medical Officer.
DENTIST'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—During the past year each new girl has been examined and necessary
dental work done for all.
Practically all the girls entering this Home have had no dental treatment prior to coming
here. As the result of this condition, the mouths have a great many infected teeth and other
dental defects to remedy.
The following report applies to the period from April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937:—
Visits to dentist   16
Number of girls seen  50
Amalgam fillings   64
Cement fillings  47
Extractions   22
Cleanings   11
Novacaine administrations   42
Repairing plate  1
Upper denture   1
All of which is respectfully submitted.
Stanley McQueen, D.M.D. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1936-37. W 13
SCHOOL-TEACHER'S REPORT.
Mrs. A. G. Westman,
Superintendent, Provincial Industrial Home for Girls,
Vancouver, B.C.
Dear Madam,—The following report applies to the period between April 1st, 1936, to
March 31st, 1937:—
Morning Class (9 a.m. to 12 noon).—The average monthly attendance was 7 and the
total time 2,638 hours.
The morning class is for girls capable of doing Grades I. to VII. work, the time being
divided between academic and hand-work.
In spring, summer, and fall, gardening replaces hand-work. This year the redecorating
of the gymnasium was a successful project undertaken by the morning class.
Afternoon Class (1 p.m. to U p.m.).—The average monthly attendance was 11 and the
total time 5,444% hours.
The regular Grade VIIL curriculum is followed. Successful pupils are recommended to
high school.
The girls displayed keen interest throughout the year.
Marion D. Tulloch,
School-teacher.
GENERAL REPORTS.
Dear Madam,—During the year April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937, the work started
in the previous year in correspondence instruction was carried on, with twelve girls enrolled,
of whom nine were in Grade IX. and three in Grade X. Of these, all received papers in
English literature, social studies, grammar and composition, and hygiene. In addition, nine
enrolled in Home Economics (CC) I. and one in Art. The work must of a necessity be
individual as the girls are entering or leaving the class at any time during the year, so all
are at varying stages of the work. During the year one Grade X. pupil completed all subjects
and wrote her examinations with satisfactory results.
Ayra E. Peck,
School-teacher and Supervisor.
Dear Madam,—During the year April 1st, 1936, to March 31st, 1937, eight girls were
enrolled in the Commercial Correspondence Course. One girl who enrolled the previous year
finished her training at Pitman's Business College, receiving her diploma; also silver pin
for typewriting and bronze pin for speed in shorthand.
The girls have been very interested in their work, especially typewriting, and this should
be helpful later on if they obtain work in a small hotel or restaurant.
Margaret Sibbald,
Clerk and Commercial Teacher.
Dear Madam,—-The training on main floor is varied, comprising as it does the care of
library, sitting-rooms, assembly-room, and the large dining-room where tables accommodating
four are attractive in their white-linen covers centred with flowers in season. In the serving-
room adjoining, the cafeteria has proven very satisfactory, allowing a choice on the part of
the girl, and practically no waste of food. Here also they are taught the proper method of
washing dishes, care of towels, etc.
Agnes Craig Oxley,
First Assistant. W 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Dear Madam,—All the girls have been very interested in the knitting class this year;
very few of whom have had any previous training along this line.
They completed 31 sweaters, 27 suits, 2 afghans, and 4 cushions, also a large rug.
A cap or hat, also a purse, was made to match each suit.
Agnes Craig Oxley,
First Assistant.
Dear Madam,—The entire laundry for the Home during the year has been done by
thirty-five girls, under supervision.
The number working at one time averages seven, and the work is progressive, the newcomers taking charge of the girls' clothes and working up to care of staff uniforms.
The number of articles which pass through their hands weekly averages 825, making
a total for the year of 45,724.    Working-hours for the year, 6,604.
This training fits the girls for posts in commercial laundries, or entire charge of laundry
in a private home.
Katherine Smith,
Linen-keeper.
Dear Madam,—Community singing is still an enjoyable feature of evening recreation;
some of the girls respond readily to invitations to sing a solo, recite, or dance, to entertain
the others. This helps to give them confidence when taking part in a concert to which the
public is invited.
On December 1st and 2nd a group of twelve girls gave four performances of an operetta
in costume, " Robin Hood." * They had worked hard and willingly, getting a great deal of
enjoyment out of the rehearsals, so the two matinees and evening performances were carried
through with great credit to themselves and enjoyment to their audiences.
We are indebted to Miss Sylvia Mould for her kind and able assistance in directing the
old English folk-dances.
Katherine Smith,
Director of Music.
Dear Madam,—During the past year sixteen girls received a full training in the sewing-
room; 1,208 garments were made, 271 articles were made for the dormitory floor, 94 for the
dining-room, and necessary dressings for the medical floor.
Every girl, regardless of being in the regular sewing class, is taught to mend her own
clothes and to make simple garments, including the taking of accurate measurements and
cutting out clothes from patterns.
In teaching hem-stitching, embroidery, and crocheting, many attractive pieces of fancy
work were made.    These were sold at our Open Day.
M. E. Murray,
Sewing Supervisor. REPORT OF INDUSTRIAL HOME FOR GIRLS, 1936-37. W 15
Dear Madam,—During the year twenty girls received training in the preparation, cooking, and serving of food.
Besides the every-day kitchen routine, they were taught bread-making, preserving, and
pickling. During the year 7,488 loaves of bread were made, 735 quarts of fruit were
preserved, and 350 quarts of pickles were made.
The poultry department provided 3,119 dozen of eggs, 71 hens weighing 603 lb., 25 cockerels weighing 193 lb., 12 turkeys weighing 229 lb., and 1 goose weighing 12 lb.
Several of the girls prepared and served guest dinners under supervision. Menu-planning
played an important role in their training.
Myrtle Moar,
Dietitian.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1937.
425-937-7942     

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