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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA THIRTY-FIFTH REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH INCLUDING TWENTIETH… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1932

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THIRTY-FIFTH REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH
INCLUDING
TWENTIETH REPORT OF MEDICAL INSPECTION OF
SCHOOLS, YEAR ENDED JUNE 30th, 1931
PRINTED by
authority of the legislative assembly.
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfielo, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1931.  Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1931.
To His Honour J. W. Fordham Johnson,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report of the Provincial Board of Health
for the year ended June 30th, 1931.
S. L. HOWE,
Provincial Secretary.  REPORT of the PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1931.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Provincial Board ot
Health for the year ended June 30th, 1931.
The increase in the work of the different subdivisions of the Department will lead us to
change the date of the issuance of our Report. The school-year begins in September and ends In
June the following year, and we have been issuing our Annual Report for the Department to
conform with these dates. Consequently our Epidemiologist's report is dealing with a divided
year, and our purpose is next year to issue a separate report in regard to the Medical Inspection
of Schools, which would appear as our Reports are now, following the closing of the schools in
June, and we will revert to our old plan of making the general report for the Department as
issuable at the end of the calendar year. We are already issuing the Report of our Vital
Statistics Branch to conform to the calendar year, and, taking it all in all, we will be able to
conform with reports of other Provinces and produce figures dealing with concurrent dates.
The past year has been a notable one in the life of our Province and in that of the Dominion
of Canada. We have been forced to deal with an economic condition, described briefly as a
" depression," which has been remarkable in its world-wide extent, affecting Governments,
corporations, civic bodies, and the lives of individuals. The effect has been world-wide and the
outcome as to time is problematical.' Such a depression and such an upsetting of the ordinary
routine of life must have repercussion, and one would expect that, under the circumstances,
there would have been an enormous increase in the commoner diseases owing to the lowered
standard of living, the absence of employment, and the dire effect which such circumstances
must have on the mental attitude of the people.
British Columbia has been no exception to the rule in feeling the effects of the depression
and has bent every effort to meet conditions as they present themselves. Unfortunately we are
at the end of the line, with a mild winter climate compared to the other Provinces, and as a
result we have received and are receiving hundreds and thousands of people who have been
migrating back and forth during the past summer, but, attracted by the climatic conditions, are
planting themselves in British Columbia, and on a population per capita basis we are doing far
more than any of the other Provinces.
Every effort has been made to meet these conditions. Provision for shelter and food for
thousands of men has had to be made, in addition to which direct relief must be given to our
own residents and their families who require it. Some 200 camps have been built and the
intention is to employ all of the men in as far as we can in public works, for which they will be
remunerated, in order that some return for the money will be received. The camps were begun
at the end of August, 1931, and have been added to until there are over 200 now built. Men are
moved into them as quickly as possible. From the health point of view we have been very
agreeably surprised. There has been one case of infectious disease—scarlet fever—reported in
the three months in which the work has been carried out. The men are in excellent condition;
medical supervision has been provided; there are first-aid men and first-aid kits in each camp
and a small first-aid building; and all the hospitals adjacent to any of these camps are being
utilized for cases which require hospitalization. Many problems are presenting themselves, but
through our organization these have been met and adjusted. Our Sanitary Inspector's report,
which is published in this volume, will give some idea of the work that is being carried out.
The care of these camps has added greatly to the work of the Department, but we have been able
to meet the demand without any material increase in our staff. Local medical men adjacent to the
camps have been employed at a monthly rate for general supervision and for care of such cases
as may be necessary to forward to the hospitals. Ample attention has been paid to the kitchens
and to the dieting, and there has been a universal expression of approval of the means used
from the men themselves. P 6 ,       BRITISH COLUMBIA.
LABORATORIES.
Previous to the Great War, the Provincial Board of Health established a Public Health
Laboratory Service for the Province, with headquarters at Victoria, with the idea of establishing
other laboratories at strategic points in the Province. The war intervened and qualified men
could not be obtained to carry on, and in order to meet the demand for laboratory service an
arrangement was entered into by which the City of Vancouver and other municipalities made
grants to the Provincial Board of Health, which latter negotiated with the Vancouver General
Hospital and the Jubilee Hospital in Victoria for joint laboratories, the Province going with the
hospital laboratory, .already established, for one year. 1920 was the one year of this union
agreed to, but the arrangement continued thereafter without change of grants, despite great
increase as to the work done.
Following this adjustment, a laboratory was opened at Kamloops and one at Kelowna, both
of these in conjunction with the local hospitals, the establishment of these two offices relieving
in a large measure the pressure of work at the Vancouver General Hospital Laboratory.
But it was found that towards the end of the first decade the increase in both hospital and
public-health work at the Vancouver General Hospital Laboratory had reached a point where
no available space for further expansion could be secured. This lack of space prevented the
needed accession of further staff, in spite of two and even three shifts of workers, because the
demand for work was heaviest during the morning hours, and equable distribution of the work
during the twenty-four hours was not a satisfactory solution. Additional space was asked for
and blue-prints were actually prepared for a new and adequate laboratory building. Financial
difficulties prevented these adjustments and it became increasingly evident that an impasse
would soon be reached.
The expected crisis was reached in 1930. Both hospital-work and public-health work had
to be restricted from the sheer inability of the existing staff to handle it and the absence of
space for additional staff. Friendly negotiations between the hospital, the city, and the Province
resulted in the unanimous decision to accept the only obvious solution—namely, to separate the
hospital and public-health work—the latter to be removed to new quarters. The hospital-work
would then become possible by the expansion into the space vacated by the public-health staff,
and the public-health work would be possible in the new space provided for it.
Negotiations to establish the public-health work in a building of its own, to be erected on or
near the University Campus, progressed favourably, but the financial depression interfered with
their immediate development. As a present, if temporary, expedient, residences owned by the
Province at 761 and 763 Hornby Street, Vancouver, were taken over, remodelled, and equipped
for laboratory purposes. On Saturday, August 22nd, 1931, the public-health staff completed the
day's work at the Vancouver General Hospital Laboratories, and on Monday, August 24th, 1931,
at 8 a.m., commenced the day's work at 763 Hornby Street. Notices and pamphlets concerning
the change have been published in the Vancouver Medical Association Bulletin and distributed
to the profession throughout British Columbia.
The new laboratories are wholly under the direction of the Provincial Board of Health, but
naturally do a great deal of work for the City of Vancouver and other municipalities, which
municipalities pay to the Provincial Board of Health on a pro rata basis certain contributions
towards the maintenance of the laboratories. The work thus financed is free to the public.
It is restricted to diagnostic, preventive work, such as the examination of diphtheria cultures,
tuberculous sputum, etc., and the examination of milk, water, etc. It exists to facilitate, in
British Columbia, the control and prevention of infectious diseases and the promotion of health.
The arrangements made with the Jubilee Hospital in Victoria are to continue as they were,
as also the work at the laboratories at Kamloops and Kelowna.
The City of Nelson, in the eastern part of the Province, is moving in the matter of having
a laboratory established in their hospital, and when we have accomplished this we will have
laboratories then at strategic points which will enable us to deal with the whole of the southern
part of the Province. Later, for the northern part, a laboratory will be established at Prince
Rupert.
In connection with the laboratory-work, vaccines and antitoxins are sent out free on
request, and for the year ended June 30th, 1931, the following have been furnished: 6,223 points
smallpox vaccine, 6,570,000 units diphtheria antitoxin, 3,074 doses diphtheria toxoid, 57 packages BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 7
Schick test for diphtheria, 722 packages 2 cc. (prophylactic) scarlet fever antitoxin, 203 packages 15 cc. (curative) scarlet fever antitoxin, 47 packages Dick test for scarlet fever, 257 doses
scarlet fever toxin (for active immunization), 535 doses typhoid vaccine, 175,000 units tetanus
antitoxin, 365 packages 20 ce. anti-meningococcus serum, and 118 doses pertussis (whooping-
cough) vaccine.
VENEREAL CLINICS.
Our venereal clinics are carrying on the work quietly, thoroughly, and efficiently.
During the past year Inter-Provincial Conferences of V.D. Clinicians have been carried on.
The questions of incidence of the disease, the effect of the treatment, standardization of treatment, and education of the public were thoroughly discussed.
The present situation is well described in the report issued from the meetings, and the
following is an excerpt:—
" Although there is no definite proof as to an increase in V.D. incidence, neither is there
reliable evidence of any decrease.
" The marked increased attendance of free V.D. clinics is not altogether to be taken as
evidence of increased incidence in the disease, but rather as evidence of increased confidence on
the part of the public as regards the services rendered by these clinics. Unfortunately, however, this increasing confidence in clinic.service is largely due to the advertising of the ex-clinic
patient, who as a 'satisfied customer' is (in this instance, through his own bitter experience)
able to advise his friend where to go for help in his dire need. It is still more unfortunate that
at this time very little is being done either by means of public education or by more practical
means to promote prevention of V.D. infection.
'- Hospital statistics show a decrease in cases of congenital syphilis among infants and also
in adults of terminal stages of neuro and cardiovascular syphilis, while there is some increase
in cases of the primary and latent stages.
" In neither instance, however, can the decreases indicated above be attributed to a decrease
in incidence of the disease, but rather to earlier and more efficient treatment, due largely to the
better education of the public. This also accounts for the increase in the number of patients
reporting for treatment while the disease is still in the primary stage.
" Undoubtedly in late years our position as regards the control of syphilis has improved,
but just as undoubtedly still further efforts on the part of the profession must be made before
the weight of public opinion will be enlisted in the progressive movement; i.e., the public must
be still further educated as to the prevalence, treacherousness, and the far-reaching results of
the disease and the need for early and prolonged treatment before public opinion will demand
the rending of that ' Hush Hush ' curtain behind which syphilis has for so long thrived; the
adoption of some such slogan as ' Eradication iOf syphilis in our time,' and not only permit but
demand that the highest efficiency of medical science be brought to bear on this disease.
" In view of the progress, or rather the lack of it, made in more than 2,000 years in regard
to controlling the source of V.D., that is promiscuous intercourse, and the unchanging fundamentals in human nature, the immediate future would not seem to hold any bright prospects
for successfully attacking the problem at its source. On account of the moral issue involved
public opinion will not endorse the teaching of prophylaxis at this time. Therefore some other
methods must be employed, such as early post-exposure treatment and an increased effort along
the lines of popular education."
INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
In regard to infectious diseases, the situation, not only in British Columbia but throughout
the Dominion and the different States to the south of us, has been remarkable in the paucity
of the cases reported. Why such conditions should exist, especially in view of the economic
conditions, is hard to understand. One would think that, with almost unlimited lack of employment, the resisting-powers of our people would be very much lowered, but fortunately the
trend has been exactly the opposite of our expectations.
The number of cases of smallpox reported has decreased from 738 in 1928-29 to 37 in
1930-31. Diphtheria has fallen from 667 in 1929-30 to 286 in 1930-31, and in this connection
I may say that it is particularly gratifying to receive the continued reports in regard to the
immunization against diphtheria which is being carried out. For some unknown reason, our
anti-vaccinationist friends do not object to the chidren being immunized.    There were 37 cases P 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
of poliomyelitis in 1930-31, as against 116 in 1928-29.    The 37 cases were scattered in widely
separated points and there never was the slightest suggestion of an epidemic.
PUBLIC-HEALTH NURSING.
In my last Report, which covered the period of the last six months of 1929 and the first
six months of 1930, I reported that we had thirty-two Public Health Nurses, in addition to
which there were thirty School Nurses.    To-day, we have some seventy-three all told.
A class of eighteen graduated last year and we placed nine of them immediately, and there
is the same number in the present year class.
The people are educated to the benefits of the establishment of a Public Health Nurse in the
community, and we are doing our best, under the present depression, to hold on to what we have.
If it had not been for this depression our advance during this year would have been remarkable.
HEALTH UNITS.
Our health units are well established, demonstrating their usefulness. They are saving
money, which makes a direct appeal to our local authorities, and, what is more, the school
reports show a change in the classes, mentally and physically, that is almost miraculous.
TUBERCULOSIS.
British Columbia has been labouring under an accusation of the increased rate of deaths from
tuberculosis. The census which has just been completed puts a different complexion on this.
We have been giving our figures based on an estimated population of about 570,000, whereas the
census shows we should have based our percentages and rates on a population of 673,000. So
that for the year 1930 the tuberculosis death-rate should be 92 per 100.000, instead of 104, as
reported under the old population estimate.
The same applies to cancer. Under the new figures, the cancer death-rate is 105 per 100,000.
as against 118 under the estimated population.
Next year the reports will show that British Columbia is probably leading from a population
point of view, in having the most favourable rates of any of the Provinces.
Our suggestion in our last year's Report as to the extension of our educational programme
in regard to tuberculosis was well received, both by the Government and the public, but unfortunately we will be unable to make a beginning in this on account of the financial depression.
The report of Dr. Lamb, our Tuberculosis Officer, appears later in this Report and makes
very interesting reading.
SANITATION.
There is a full report from our Sanitary Inspector, whose report on existing conditions is
very gratifying.
We have the co-operation of the Provincial Police and the local authorities throughout the
Province, and are particularly pleased with the co-operation that we receive from the mining,
lumbering, and fruit companies in their endeavour to comply with our regulations.
We append an account of approvals for sanitary works:—
Cemetery-sites approved.—Sandwick, Campbell River, Bridesville, Doe Creek, Trail, Galiano
Island, Hardy (private) near Kelowna, Ashcroft, Yarrow (Mennonite). Alert Bay. Hornby
Island, and Tulameen.
Sewage-disposal Systems approved.—Burnaby Municipality (extensions), North Vancouver
City (extensions), Oak Bay Municipality (extensions), New Westminster (extensions). Trail
(extensions), Prince Rupert (extensions), Vernon (extensions), Kelowna (extensions). Ruskin,
Nanaimo (extensions), Port Hammond (extensions), Kamloops (extensions), Cultus Lake Park,
Revelstoke (extensions), and Vancouver (extensions).
Water-supply Systems approved.—Port Hammond. Rossland (repairs and replacements).
Cultus Lake Park, West Vancouver Municipality (alterations), Port Alberni (replacements),
North Vancouver City (renewals), North Vancouver Municipality (extensions and replacements), Port Moody (reservoir), Revelstoke (extensions), Vancouver (extensions), Kelowna
(extensions), Prince George (extensions), Merritt (extensions), Salmon Arm City (reservoir),
Trail (extensions), Cranberry District near Powell River, Coquitlam Municipality (extensions)!
and Vernon (renewals and extensions). BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 9
EDUCATIONAL.
We are making real advances in health-work in British Columbia. We have always kept
before us the idea of prevention and have worked on the basis that in order to give effect to the
methods of prevention we must be backed by an educated public opinion.
Through the efforts of our Nursing Service and through the contacts which we are making
in other directions with the local organizations in all parts of the Province, we have established
the Provincial Board of Health in a very different position to what it was five years ago. We
are accepted now, as presenting to the public policies that have been demonstrated to such an
extent that there is no doubt in the minds of the public of the benefits that will accrue provided
they follow out the directions of the Provincial Board, and back us up in our endeavour to
procure further encouragement from the powers-that-be in the different municipalities and outlying districts.
We are constantly distributing literature, and during the past year have distributed from
this office 217,000 bulletins and pamphlets. These have been sent to different parts of the
Province, but mainly through the Women's Institutes, and I have to record again our great
appreciation of the work which is being done by the Women's Institutes in British Columbia in
their making the health programme one of the most important branches of their work. From
the very beginning they have been to the Department a tower of strength, and it is pleasing to
acknowledge that the interest they have taken has never waned. We are constantly receiving
encouragement from the institutes, but our greatest encouragement lies in the fact that they are
giving, through their institutes and in the schools, effect to the policies of the Department.
There follows in this Report the account of the year's work for the Epidemiologist, the
Sanitary Inspector, and the Tuberculosis Officer, and also the report on the Medical Inspection
of the Schools.
In British Columbia we have a magnificent body of men known as the Provincial Police,
who are stationed at different parts of the Province, and who, in addition to their numerous
other duties, act as Sanitary Inspectors in the camps and mines throughout the Province. At
no time has their interest failed and a request for co-operation, through the Commissioner, meets
with instant attention. These men are interested in their profession, and I would like to
express, for myself and staff, our keen appreciation of the courtesies that we are constantly
receiving at their hands.
I would like, Sir, to express for myself and staff appreciation of the co-operation which we
receive from yourself and to say that we appreciate the active interest you are taking in our
work. Such interest lends greatly to our success, and we feel that, backed by your help and
encouragement, we will make continued progress.
I have the honour to be,
Sir.
Your obedient servant,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Health Officer. P 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GENERAL REPORTS.
SANITARY INSPECTION.
Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., September 30th, 1931.
H. E. Young, M.D.r CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present my Twenty-first Annual Report on general sanitary
conditions for the Province of British Columbia.
FISHING INDUSTRY.
The year 1931 promises to be under normal for canned salmon, due to world market
instability. Approximately only one-third of British Columbia fish-canneries were operated.
The fish caught and canned ranked the very best in years. Hundreds of tons were placed in
cold storage for local markets and export. The regulations governing sanitary operation of
canneries were strictly observed, visitors and tourists being highly complimentary in their
remarks on the cleanliness of our canneries.
FRUIT- AND VEGETABLE-CANNING ESTABLISHMENTS.
The larger portion of these establishments are located in the sunny Okanagan. Crops are
both bountiful and beautiful. Operators are keenly alive to the possibilities of development, and
already the glaring and preserving of fruit in dainty and healthful processes have reached an
export stage. Train-loads of most delicious fruit are being shipped to Canadian and European
markets, the result of hard work, care in selecting, wrapping, and shipping, together with a most
desirable climate. Our departmental regulations are strictly observed, both inside and out, at
the canning and packing establishments.
LOGGING AND MINING CAMPS.
The logging and mining camps in British Columbia compare most favourably with any
throughout the world. This Department does not assume the credit for this condition, which
was brought about by the gradual co-operation of operators and employees. Good clean shelter,
the best of food, laundry and bathing facilities are provided, and, in the larger camps, reading
and recreation halls, outside tennis and ball grounds. All camps have a first-aid man, and the
larger ones have a fully equipped hospital with resident physician and trained nurses.
NUISANCES.
With increasing industrial development come offensive trades which sometimes embarrass
Sanitary Inspectors when it is found necessary to interfere or stop an industry giving employment to many men.
Another nuisance of increasing frequency is the fox-farm. Some of our best citizens become
interested in fox-breeding, probably with one pair. After a few seasons they find themselves
disliked by neighbours, and Health Officers are compelled to take steps to ensure greater isolation. These are what may be termed " growing pains " in the development of British Columbia.
We have several under advisement at this writing.
WATERSHEDS.
Watershed areas supplying water to our cities are now declared health areas under special
rigid sanitary regulations, enforced by this Department with gratifying results. The cities thus
protected have no water-borne disease traceable to their water-supply. House-boats have been
prohibited from Cowichan Lake as a protective measure for the City of Duncan, which derives
its supply indirectly from the lake. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 11
UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF CAMPS.
The prevailing world depression has brought about in British Columbia an unemployment
relief system which adds much work to this Department. The work has just been launched, and
a preliminary survey shows the Public Works Department erecting camps with such speed that
transforms.a jungle-like stillness to a humming village in a few days. Herewith is a copy of
first report on the camps during construction :—
" Sanitary Inspector's Office,
Victoria, B.C., September 28th, 1931.
" Dr. H. E. Young,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
" Preliminary Survey of Unemployment Relief Camps.
" Sir,—Pursuant to instructions, I beg to report on trip with Dr. Maxwell S. Inglis to the
unemployment relief camps in operation and under construction by the Public Works Department on the Lower Mainland and the Interior as far as Kamloops.
" Special care is given in the selection of camp-sites for water-supply and drainage. The
buildings are all built to standard, well lighted and ventilated. The bunk-houses are all 12 to
20 inches off the ground, fitted with steel cots and vermin-proof mattresses. A minimum of 380
cubic feet of air per man is maintained in all these camps. Portable electric-light plants are
provided in the majority of camps. Ample washing and laundry facilities are provided. The
dining-rooms are large and tables are covered with sanitary oilcloth. The kitchens are equipped
in a sanitary manner. The food supplied is the very best and prepared by professional white
chefs. Ample sanitary, fly-proof toilet facilities are provided at every camp. A first-aid man is
at every camp with an outfit supplied by the Provincial Board of Health, replenished as often
as needed.
" For every group of three or more camps, a headquarters camp is being established and
sites cleared for emergency hospital (Dr. Inglis selected several during the past week). The
size of these hospitals will depend upon the location and nature of work. The work on the
Hope-Princeton Road will be very hazardous through the Coquihalla Pass. A twenty-bed
hospital is being constructed at Camp 7 and a convalescent hospital at Hope is anticipated.
" At this writing there are two camps near AVhite Rock and one near Langley. On the
section between Deroche and Harrison River there are four camps, and four more to be built.
In the Coquihalla Pass there are three, with six more to.be constructed. Between Hope and
Kamloops some twenty-five camps are being built, some already completed. North and east of
Kamloops seventeen camps are under way.
" All the camps now in operation have been supplied by this Department with disinfectants
and flea-powder, with sprayers and blowers, and further supplies are now en route to the
Resident Engineers for the camps under construction. These supplies will be replenished as
needed.
" These camps could very well be known as welfare camps. They are all well built and
nothing seems to be omitted which will add to the camp-life comfort of the men. During the
past twenty-five years the writer has officially visited thousands of industrial camps, but I have
never seen better camps nor have I met with such friendliness. Seventy-five per cent, appear to
be Canadian or British, 20 per cent, foreign, and 5 per cent. Red. I was surprised to notice the
activity of the men;  none appeared to be in the drone class.
" All the camps being new, no complaints are yet heard of lice invasion, but those in charge
are on the alert and have the remedy and preventives on hand.
" The camps are all located at a minimum isolation distance of 3 miles and have 100 to 140
men.    They look like small villages and the speed of construction amazes the local settler.
" I did not visit the Allco Camp at Port Haney, locally known as ' Camp de les Invalides,'
but it will be needed for the many cases of hernia, piles, etc., which render many of the relief-
camp men unfit for hard manual labour. A few could be used as night-watchmen or fire
wardens for camps. At this moment the Camp Engineers are at a loss to know what to do with
such cases and will be glad to hear from you.
" Copies of our Sanitary Regulations for Camps and also a special form issued by Committee
of Executive Council on Unemployment Relief are posted on bunk-house or office doors. " Our work in locating and visiting camps was made easier by the courteous co-operation of
the District Engineers and Foremen of the camps, and any suggestion, request, or advice for
sanitary safety was invited and acted upon immediately.
" I have, etc,
"(Sgd.)    F. DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Officer."
First-aid supplies and disinfectants are being sent to every camp upon completion or request,
and a constant sanitary inspection patrol will be made by local Provincial police and officers
from this Department. Up to this time a number of men have suffered by accident, but there
has been no outbreak of an infectious nature, nor complaints of any kind from the men.
I have, etc,
Frank DeGrey,
Chief Sanitary Officer. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 13
COMBINED REPORT OP TRAVELLING MEDICAL HEALTH OFFICER
AND INSPECTOR OF HOSPITALS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1931.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my Eighth Annual Report as Travelling Medical Health
Officer and Inspector of Hospitals for the Province.
As in other years, there is always some event of outstanding importance occurring. This
year differs only in that there are two such—namely, the visit of about fifty British T.B. Officers
to Canada in connection with the British Medical Association, and their meeting with the Canadian Tuberculosis Association for a week-end at Ninette Sanatorium at Ninette, Man., under
the chairmanship of our worthy President, Dr. D. A. Stewart. There were no set papers except
the presidential address, but round-table discussions on a variety of topics; all of which were
very helpful to us and, we hope, to our British confreres. The great regret of the British
Columbia delegates was that their itinerary did not include a visit to British Columbia and the
other Western Provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta. As in the case of our trip to Great
Britain and the Continent in 1928, this was a scholarship tour, the same being partially financed
by the Sun Life Insurance Company of Canada.
The second event of importance was the meeting of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association
in British Columbia this year in conjunction with the Canadian Medical Association. This
meeting took place at Tranquille Sanatorium on the week-end before the meeting in Vancouver.
Dr. A. D. Lapp, Superintendent of Tranquille, acted as host to the delegates, and a very good
time was had by all. The number of delegates from the Eastern Provinces was not large, but
this was compensated for by the enthusiasm of those attending and by the large attendance from
our own Province. Among the latter were several men whose T.B. work is only incidental to
their other practice. The presence of the Hon. S. L. Howe and his attendance at all our discussions was much appreciated.
Here the meetings were mostly round-table discussions and were voted much the most
interesting and valuable form. Among the many subjects discussed most of Saturday afternoon
and part of the following morning was the consideration of Dr. Lapp's suggestion, in report of
last year, of dealing with the T.B. situation, and I cannot do better, in summing up the conclusions of this discussion, than to quote the resolution passed at that meeting:—
" Moved, seconded, and Resolved, That the Canadian Tuberculosis Association, assembled
in annual convention at Tranquille, B.C., having had reports from all Provinces of Canada, and
having discussed from all angles the various present-day phases of the campaign against tuberculosis, wish to place before the people of Canada the following unanimous conclusions:—
" In almost every part of Canada beds for the treatment and isolation of tuberculous people
are far too few. Waiting-lists for the admission of tuberculous patients are larger than ever
before in the history of Canada, and the tuberculosis death-rate increased during 1930.
" This' Association unanimously reaffirms its firm belief in the absolute basal necessity in
the campaign against tuberculosis of ample sanatorium and hospital beds for the treatment and
isolation of patients.
" Any means, such as clinics, for the finding of cases makes the need of beds not less, but
greater.
" In some parts of the country the need is so very great that Provincial Governments are
urged to find means for the increase of beds immediately.
" We are strongly of the opinion that in all general hospitals all kinds of patients on admission should have an examination of sputum for tubercle bacilli as much a routine as examination
of the urine, and that, if possible, a single X-ray chest-plate should be made of all patients
admitted.
" These measures we consider necessary because tuberculosis is not infrequently an uncom-
plained-of, unrecognized, and undiagnosed background to more active disease, and as such is a
dangerous source of infection, especially to young pupil nurses. " We further recommend the routine examination of pupil nurses at the beginning of their
training in general hospitals, and as necessary during their training, the examination to include
tuberculin tests and stereo X-ray plates.
" This routine might very well be applied to medical internes also.
" The portion of the motion referring to undergraduate nurses in general hospitals was
adopted as a result of reports received of clinical examinations revealing a much higher
incidence of tuberculosis developing in these nurses than in nurses of a similar age and nursing
experience serving in tuberculosis sanatoria."
CLINICAL WORK.
Our clinical work has been carried on as in the last few years, practically all being done in
the various hospitals, with occasional visits to private homes to examine patients in consultation
with doctors, on account of inability of patients to come to hospital. We are thus able to make
use of hospital X-ray developing outfits in developing films taken with our portable X-ray plant.
This enables us to complete our examinations at end of each clinic and discuss the entire case,
both clinical and X-ray findings, with doctors interested before leaving town. This is much
appreciated by the doctors, as often the printed report does not follow for some days afterwards.
It has the added advantage that it makes possible the leaving of X-ray films at the hospital, so
they are available to the doctors between clinics and are there for comparison if necessary at
following clinic.
As in every year since this clinic was established, we again have pleasure in reporting a substantial increase in the number of cases examined. This has largely been contributed to.
however, by the hearty co-operation of local Medical Health Officers, Public Health Nurses, and
the medical fraternity as a whole,.together with the enthusiastic assistance of the Travelling
Nurse provided from the Christmas-seal sale funds, upon whom a great deal of the extra work
and detail falls.
Part of the increase this year has been due to continuance of clinics started last year in
New Westminster and the extension of our territory to North Vancouver at the request of the
public-health unit recently established there. We have on file a letter of appreciation of this
work from the North Vancouver Medical Association.
There is a point, however, beyond which increased numbers will not be possible with the
present staff, as to accomplish what has been done this year often required late hours and the
continuing of clinics over week-ends.
The only clinics held at definite stated intervals are those in Victoria. These are held on
the week of the first Monday of every alternate month. By arranging the work considerably in
advance it has been possible to keep these appointments, and at the same time to cover the
Province very thoroughly, the larger centres at least twice, and some of those nearer the Coast
three or four times.
The total number of examinations made during the year was 2,323. Of these, 1,629 were
new cases and 694 re-examinations.
The 694 cases returning for re-examination may be classified as follows: Pulmonary and
hylar tuberculosis, 280; T.B. bones, 3; suspects, 92; 156 as various non-tuberculous findings
(the most important of which are pleurisy, mixed infection, bronchitis, bronchial asthma,
bronchiectasis, pneumonia, mediastinitis, empyema, silicosis, anthracosis, cervical adenitis, lung
abscess, etc.) ;  and 163 as negative.    Many negative cases were contacts returning for check-over.
The 1,629 new cases may be classed as follows: 247 as positively tuberculosis, of which 207
were pulmonary tuberculosis and 40 non-pulmonary tuberculosis; 137 as suspects; 444 as other
chest conditions; 8 non-tuberculous bone conditions; 155 other diagnosis; and 638 negative
findings.
Of the above 1,629 cases, 250 were examined on account of contact only with open cases of
tuberculosis. Of these 250 eases, 20 were classed as positively tuberculosis, of which 13 were
pulmonary tuberculosis and 7 non-pulmonary tuberculosis: 40 as suspects; bronchitis, 10;
bronchial asthma, 2; pleurisy, 2; mediastinitis, 3: cervical adenitis, 5; mixed infection, 3:
other diagnosis, 9: and negative findings, 156. The proportion of definite cases of tuberculosis
is about as last year, a total of 20 in 250 cases. Classifying the new positive T.B. cases (pulmonary and hylus T.B. only) according to
nationality, making 222 in all, gives us the following: Born in British Columbia, 70, of whom
27 were Indians ; other Canadian Provinces, 39; British Isles, 49 ; other European countries, 43;
United States of America, 9; Japan, 3; China, 2; Hindu, 1; Newfoundland, 1; and doubtful, 6.
Of the 222 positive cases of T.B. diagnosis, 19, or 9 per cent., had resided in British Columbia
less than three years. The origin of these is as follows:—
Under 1 year—
Other Canadian Provinces      5
British 	
Foreign      5
— 10
From 1 to 2 years—
Other Canadian Provinces      3
British      1
Foreign     3
— T     .
From 2 to 3 years—
Other Canadian Provinces      1
British     1
Foreign 	
— 2
Total     19
NURSING AND X-RAY SERVICE.
As with the total number of patients, so the total number of X-ray films is markedly
increased, the total this year being 1,738. This represents a considerable expense, an amount
that is provided out of Christmas-seal sale funds, but we are convinced of its very great value,
both as an aid in diagnosis, especially in children, and as an attraction of the people to the
clinic. This work is done by Miss J. B. Peters, Travelling Nurse. We have had reason to refer
a number of these films to the different X-ray authorities in Vancouver and throughout the
Province and they have been very favourably commented upon. Since the services of the nurse
have been available, it has been possible, with the aid of a portable typewriter, to make reports
more complete than formerly, also our filing system has been brought up to date.
Comparative Report.
1928-29.
1929-30.
1930-31.
991
290
701
117
10
95
479
1,779
557
1,222
186
34
137
863
2,323
694
1,629
T.B. other organs	
25
Non-tuberculous  	
1,245
The number of clinics held during the year was 63, as compared with 83 in 1929-30. This is
accounted for principally in two ways—the increase in number of cases at clinics requires a
longer time for each clinic, and, secondly, the trip up the Coast this last summer did not take
place until August, which brings these clinics into next year's report.
As in former years, in our classification of diseases of cases examined, there is a large
number classed as " suspects," and for the same reason as formerly. Suspects are kept under
observation and are returned at intervals for re-examination. As stated last year, "we suspect
a great many of them are not T.B. cases." Pleurisies are also followed up very definitely for a
time, and it is my intention in the coming year to make a special effort to check up on all
pleurisy cases that have been through the clinic for last eight years. A total of 444 non-tuberculous chest conditions amongst our new cases (over 25 per cent, of
such cases) shows the determination of the medical men that no cases will escape the proper
diagnosis for lack of examination.
One event in the development of our work in Victoria deserves special mention, and that is
the installation of a complete developing outfit for X-ray films in the Spencer Clinic at the
Jubilee Hospital. The work had increased to such an extent that even the developing of our
films in the X-ray department of the hospital—we had for some time been taking our own films—
was very disturbing to the work there. I reported conditions to Mr. William Spencer and advised
him as to what would be necessary to make conditions satisfactory. The result was that a
developing plant complete, at a cost in excess of .$500, was installed, the entire cost being paid
by David Spencer, Ltd.
I would like here to publicly acknowledge this very generous gift and our due appreciation
of same.
Another improvement in the work in Victoria was the appointment of a Public Health
(V.O.N.) Nurse to do T.B. work only. She has actively co-operated with the clinic and is doing
valuable work.    This is financed- from Christmas-seal sale funds.
A very interesting piece of work was done by your Travelling Clinic when we were kindly
loaned to the Indian Department to make a complete survey of one of the Indian schools and
reserves in the Interior of the Province, a report of which is on file.
As a result of this survey an experiment is being tried in this school of segregating infected
children, not the active cases, from the balance of the children, giving them special care under
nurse's supervision, instead of returning them immediately on diagnosis to their homes to
ultimately die in most cases. The latter eventuality was likely to be preceded by extension of
infection in the family concerned. We are checking up these infected cases at each clinic in this
community, that is twice a year, for the Indian Department.
There is still a great lack of bed accommodation for tuberculous cases, both at Tranquille
and in Vancouver. There is always a long waiting-list at the Sanatorium and many of the cases
diagnosed in the early stages become moderately advanced before admission. However, this
latter is scarcely necessary if we can get patients to understand that cure can be taken at any
place or in any climate, provided rest is possible of attainment. In the latter case, however, they
lose one important part of sanatorium treatment that is very important, and that is the education of the patient in taking care of him or herself and also in prevention of spread of infection
to others.
As'stated previously, in quoting from resolution of Canadian Tuberculosis Association, the
more clinics, the more beds required.
Our death-rate, the serious increase in which a few years ago we hoped was only temporary,
still remains high, but some slight decrease each year from our peak year, 1928, of 108 per
100,000.
While these are difficult times and new expenditures can probably not be undertaken, I
believe we should keep ever in mind the necessity lor increased diagnostic and educational
facilities in form of travelling clinics, as preventive measures that will ultimately return good
dividends; also an increase in bed accommodation for the active cases as a curative measure,
but, of much greater importance, the segregation of the open active cases in the early and also
late stages and thus prevent infection.
THE EDUCATIONAL PART OP THE WORK.
As in last report, this part of my duties has been of necessity neglected, due to the great
increase in the clinical amount of work which presented itself.
Addresses were given to one class of high-school pupils; one Rotary Club; one Women's
Institute; one Public Health Nursing class at the University of B.C.; and ten lectures to classes
of nurses-in-training. This latter included two lectures to the undergraduate nurses who are
taking special courses at Tranquille Sanatorium.
HOSPITAL INSPECTION.
What has been said with regard to the educational side of the work may also be said in
regard to hospital inspection.    Lack of time prohibits more thorough inspection of hospitals. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 17
However, as regards public hospitals, I have made a formal inspection of twenty-five, including
a very full and thorough inspection and investigation into the affairs at the Mission Memorial
Hospital, Mission City. I also inspected the Boys' Industrial School at Essondale, and we
carried out a clinic there at which every student in the school was thoroughly examined, both
physically and X-ray examination.
Pour meetings were held with full Hospital Boards, two with finance committees, and
forty-two more or less extensive interviews were held with committees of Hospital Boards or
presidents or other officers. Three interviews with members of Municipal Councils were held
re payment of Tranquille accounts. Several interviews with members of Workmen's Compensation re various matters, especially mothers' pension cases, were also held.
Two new licences were issued for private hospitals and thirty-nine renewals, making in all
forty-one registered at the present time. Thirty-two of these were officially inspected during the
year, and some more than once. Seven private hospital licences were refused, or did not make
formal application after discussing the matter with the Inspector.
No questions of sufficient importance for a formal meeting of the Board of Arbitration were
submitted, but some informal discussions took place between the Inspector of Municipalities
and myself.
Once again I would like to express to you my keen appreciation of your cordial co-operation
and helpful assistance at all times in this particular line of health-work; also for much timely
advice in connection with hospital-work. I would also like to express my sincere thanks to the
doctors and nurses, and especially to nursing and clinical staffs of the many hospitals in which
clinics were held, for their ever-ready and willing co-operation. I would like to make special
mention of Dr. Miller, of the Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, who is in a different
position from the other X-ray outfits, in that it is owned by him, but he is always ready, at
great inconvenience to himself, to give us full opportunity for the use of his developing plant
and other equipment.
I have, etc.,
A. S. Lamb, M.D.,
Travelling Medical Health Officer and Hospital Inspector.
REPORT OF EPIDEMIOLOGIST.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., November 13th, 1931.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith a report of the epidemiological work for the
year ended June, 1931.
Owing to the unfortunate absence through illness of Dr. A. R. Chisholm, Provincial
Epidemiologist, there has been little or no new work carried on through this Department. Other
members of the staff, however, have continued the systems already inaugurated, and fortunately
for the Province and the Provincial Health Department there have been no serious outbreaks of
communicable diseases during the year, so that the staff of the Department has been able to
cope with what did occur.
The system of reporting communicable diseases by weekly cards from the physicians has
continued to work satisfactorily, except that there has been a slight falling-off in the percentage
of those returning the cards each week.    Whereas there were approximately 90 per cent, report- P 18                                                            BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ing regularly during 1929-30, only 86.6 per cent, gave regular returns during the ensuing twelve
months.    For the most part, however, the plvysicians have been most ready to co-operate in
providing the Board of Health with figures from which accurate and useful data regarding
disease incidence may be compiled.
The graphs and tables which follow have been used to indicate clearly and concisely the
seasonal and other variations in the incidence and mortality of infectious diseases during the
twelve-month  period.    Through  the  co-operation  of  the  Department  of Vital  Statistics,   the
fatalities from the various infectious diseases for the corresponding months have been obtained
and the fatality rates recorded.    It should be mentioned here that any figures given in this
report for deaths from infectious diseases during 1930-31 are accurate as far as could be ascertained at present, but are based on preliminary reports only and will be subject to revision when
final reports are issued through the Department of Vital Statistics.
Figures for venereal diseases have not been included among those given for communicable
diseases.
MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY.
For the year 1930-31 the infectious diseases reported to this Department and the deaths
from infectious diseases, together with the morbidity and mortality rates per 100,000 population,
are shown in the following table:—
Total Cases and Deaths from Infectious Diseases in British Columbia for 1929-30 and
1930-31, with Morbidity and Mortality Rate per 100,000 Population.
Diseases.
Cases.
Deaths.
Rate peh 100,000 Population.
Morbidity.
Mortality.
1929-30.
1930-31.
1929-30.
1930-31.
1929-30.
1930-31.
1929-30.
1930-31.
Cerebrospinal meningitis	
21
2,214
351
667
57
2
140
181
1,224
23
2,854
46
286
59
2
162
46
1,698
10
12
1
3.55
374.62
59.39
112.86
9.64
0.34
23.69
30.63
207.11
0.00
0.34
362.44
285.62
1.86
3.85
478.06
7.71
47.90
9.88
0.34
27.14
7.71
284.42
0.00
0.17
55.61
182.75
1.34
60.64
6.20
0.34
133.17
23.12
6.20
0.00
0.34
98.32
24.46
0.34
336.35
1.69
0.00
0.00
4.06
0.34
0.67
1.18
0.00
14.89
0.00
0.00
8.03
0.00
0.17
38.24
1.02
2.01
0.17
0.00
2.51
1.01
0.50
1.84
0.00
28.64
0.17
0.00
0.17
0.00
0.00
44.22
1.34
1.17
0.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
102.85
3.18
0.00
6.87
Diphtheria	
Dysentery (all forms) —
24
2
4
7
15
6
3
11
88
171
1
2
2,142
1,688
11
1
332
1,091
8
362
37
2
795
138
37
51
1
Mumps....  	
1
226
6
264
8
7
5
42
2
616
191
157
1
10
384
70
3
1,701
7.11
0.34
104.23
32.32
26.57
0.17
1.69
64.97
11.84
0.51
287.82
Puerperal septicaemia 	
8
11
1.35
1.86
0.00
0.17
0.00
104.57
1.69
0.00
2.37
1
2
587
146
2
2,008
618
10
614
19
14
41
Totals
11,877
10,724
1,047
1,179
Estimated population of British Columbia :   1929, 591,000 ;   1930, 597,000.
Iii working out the rates for the preceding table, also other rates throughout this report,
the estimated population figures of 591,000 for 1929-30 and 597,000 for 1930-31 were used. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 19
Graphs A and B illustrate the monthly incidence of some of the more common infectious
diseases. In the case of whooping-cough, chicken-pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever, and mumps, the
greater number of cases occurred during the winter months, mumps maintaining its height until
May, then dropping sharply. Measles shows a gradual decline from a peak of the previous year,
when 2,142 cases occurred, as compared with 332 this year.
JULr AUG        SEPT        OCT        NOV        DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE
|
OFCH
ICKEN
-POX/
\ND W
HOOPI
NG-CC
>UGH
500
C
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 Chicken-pox:    Cases, 2854-,    Deaths, 1.	
\
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j —&•■
500
too
300
zoo
100
GRAPH A.
It is interesting to note that the three diseases, mumps, chicken-pox, and whooping-cough,
provided 5,953 of our total of 10,724 cases of infectious diseases reported. In other words, more
than 50 per cent, of all cases were from these three diseases, which, along with measles and
rubella, have a tendency to assume epidemic proportions every few years in spite of all ordinary
precautions. 1930 - 31.
JULY       AUG        SEPT        OCT NOV DEC. JAN FEB        MAR APR MAY JUNE
CASES OF DIPHTHE
] RIA, MEAS
D   SEPTIC
LES,   MUMF
SORE    TH
'S,
180
no
SCARLET
r^EVER  AN
ROAT
	
- Meast
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?S:             Cases    33<?; Dea
eKa'.           "       £86:
thsl.
\
\
_^^-
1
	
- Mumps:                •■      (091
- Seal-let Fever.      ••       735-
1
5.1
\
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s
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i
1
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50
1
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1
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110
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30
80
70
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30
10
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1      ""
i
180
no
160
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130
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so
80
70
60
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to
30
10
10
graph b. BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 21
The table following and Graphs C and D give the monthly incidence, also total cases and
deaths, by months, from the various infectious diseases.
In both this and the preceding table the figures given for influenza, pneumonia, septic throat,
and conjunctivitis cases do not include cases from the two largest cities of the Province—namely,
Vancouver and Victoria—as no figures have been available regarding these diseases from the
above cities. The figures for dysentery cases are also incomplete as they do not include those
from Vancouver. It is to be hoped that we shall have accurate and uniform reports regarding
the occurrence of all infectious diseases from the whole Province within the near future.
Cases op Infectious Diseases as reported by Months for the Province of British Columbia,
also Total Deaths from each Disease, Xear 1930-31 (Indians included).
Diseases.
Cases.
■S CS
© CU
B3
Cerebrospinal meningitis..
Chicken-pox	
Conjunctivitis-	
Diphtheria	
Dysentery (unclassified)-.
Dysentery (amoebic)	
Dysentery (bacillary)	
Encephalitis..--	
Erysipelas	
German measles	
Influenza	
Leprosy	
Miliaria	
Measles	
Mumps	
Paratyphoid fever	
Pneumonia (unclassified).
Pneumonia (lobar)	
Pneumonia (broncho)	
Poliomyelitis.---	
Puerperal septicaemia	
Scarlet fever	
Septic sore throat -
Smallpox	
Trachoma	
Tuberculosis	
Typhoid fever	
Undulant fever	
Whooping-cough	
Totals-. -	
78
3
17
1
3
35
4
40
17
2
7
5
159
3
32
10
10
1
444
21)
1
287
2
24
4
2
9
3
34
30
9
43
20
2
1
9
9
13
17
123
3D
18
6
29
■   4
28
11
142
178
171
110
21
3
1
49
19
1
228
280
504
430
702
1121
961
4
471
43
3
306
1
15
3
2
378
20
24
1
1
228
189
3
20
1
230
1
14
19
2
155
10
718
1
13
6
398
18
26
164
1
11
153
6
161
163
169
18
22
29
1
12
103
9
3
107
4
10
28
7
36
8
111
1581   134    1581   202
5
42
3
6
6
2
6
1
37
9
63
3
1
64
23
2854
46
286
37
15
7
2
162
46
1698
1
332
1091
8
80
154
128
37
2
795
138
37
2
587
146
2
2008
12
1
15
5
1
3
11
171
1
85
102
77
8
7
614
19
41
1287
1589|1320|   919|   882
I I I
517
10,724
TUBERCULOSIS.
It is quite evident that tuberculosis continues to be one of our major public-health problems,
even though the deaths from this disease show a very slight decrease from the total of the
previous year. The revised figures for the year 1929-30 show 618 deaths from all forms of
tuberculosis, while the preliminary figures for 1930-31 show 614. The mortality rates per
100,000 population also shows a slight decrease, being 104.57 and 102.85 respectively.
Graph E shows the reported cases and deaths. The large increase in cases does not necessarily mean an actual increase in tuberculosis over the previous year, but rather an improvement
in reporting. It will be noted, however, that the number of deaths still exceed the number of
cases reported. Of the 614 deaths, 157 or 25 per cent, of the total were among the Indians,
who represent only about 4 per cent, of the total population. MONTHLY INCIDENCE OF INFECTIOUS    DISEASES
Reported   for year   1930 ~3l
Total       Cases      — 10,7<?4
Morbidity   rate, per    1,000- 18 |s^|    {32Q
1287
1589
JULY    AUG    5EPT    OCT    NOV    DEC     JAN    FEB    MAR     APR   MAY    JUNE
MONTHLY DEATHS   FROM   DISEASES    REPORTED  ABOVE
Total    deaths  —   1179
Case     fataiity   — 10-  '/*
Death rate   ber  1,000'bo-bulation
JULY   AUG   SEPT   OCT   NOV   DEC    JAN    FEB   WAR   APR   MAY   JUNE
GRAPHS C AND D. -;^.;-i ;.;:-.r'-.';-:j:'
BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 23
YEARLY  TUBERCULOSIS   CASES   AND  DEATHS
REPORTED FOR    SEVEN-YEAR   PERIOD, 1924TO 1931
Cases
529
U7-
19 24-25
318
v—
1925 - 26
\Z\
Deaths
561
235
1926-27
598
192/-28
645
1928-29
618
v*—
384
1929-30
614
587 r
1930-31
GRAPH B.
TYPHOID FEVER.
Typhoid fever, as shown by Graph F, showed a considerable increase, more than doubling
the number of cases reported during the previous year. In 1929-30 there were 70 cases and in
1930-31 this increased to 146 cases, the rate per 100,000 population increasing from 11.8 to 24.5.
Investigation showed that at least one large group of cases was due to a dairyman handling and
distributing raw milk while suffering from the disease.
With the increase in the number of cases we must also expect an increase in the number of
typhoid carriers, since it is estimated that from 1 to 2 per cent, of all cases become carriers.
These then constitute a menace to the public, and this menace becomes greater in those districts
in which raw milk is being distributed or where open privies are in existence.
DISEASE INCIDENCE BY RACE AND AGE.
Analysis of the reported cases of infectious diseases according to race and age groups for
the year 1930-31 shows that of the total cases reported the greatest number occurred in Group
C; i.e., in those from 6 to 16 years of age. But the group 6 to 16 years covers eleven years of
life, whereas Group B covers only four years and Group A two years. Groups A and B together,
then, had almost as many cases in proportion as Group C; or, in other words, Groups A and B,
if translated into an eleven-year group, would have produced 3,652 cases, as against 3,887 for
Group C. This shows the importance of control measures, such as immunization methods where
possible, being carried on amongst the children of pre-school age. P 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
1921-22      1922-23       I923n?4       l<)24-25      \<)25-Z£      1926-27       1927-26       1928-29      1929-30      1930-31
50
Zb
TYPHOID FEVER MORBIDITY RATE FOR TEINPYEAR"
PERIOD 1921 TO 1931
50
10
12-0
Showing rate Per 100,000 population
GRAPH F.
It will be noticed that a large number of cases have been reported in which age and race
have been unstated. It is expected that as physicians become more familiar with the system of
reporting there will be few cases in which the required details will not be given.
There are more cases of infectious diseases reported amongst the Indians in proportion to
the population than amongst either whites or Orientals. Whether this may be explained by a
greater accuracy in reporting cases of infection amongst the Indians, or whether there is
actually a greater incidence of such diseases, we have been unable to ascertain, but are inclined
to think that the former is the case.
The table which follows gives in detail the information obtained regarding racial and age
groups of cases of the various infectious diseases reported:— BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 25
Infectious Diseases as kepobted by Race and Age Groups fob the Province of Bbitish
Columbia, Yeab 1930-31.
Age Groups.
Total.
Race.
Diseases.
A.
B.
C.
D.
Unstated.
White.
Oriental.
Negro.
Indian.
Unstated.
Cerebrospinal meningitis...
3
59
5
5
4
4
9
7
22
40
9
18
24
10
3
4
1
134
3
420
3
35
8
2
2
17
112
120
27
11
13
20
7
118
6
9
12
10
670
7
1,683
22
110
11
10
17
221
111
559
3
10
23
26
8
377
33
14
53
29
1
559
8
103
14
54
2
1
2
115
4
606
1
25
54
4
47
100
55
3
2
127
78
11
2
410
67
1
12
2
589
2
82
12
15
26
1
737
36
442
1
12
3
19
163
18
3
108
39
627
23
2,854
46
286
37
15
7
2
162
46
1,698
1
332
1,091
8
80
154
128
37
2
795
138
37
2
587
146
2
2,008
17
2,395
42
261
29
13
7
1
79
42
874
1
289
180
6
59
125
93
10
2
522
122
35
1
118
90
2
1,716
22
6
1
5
1
104
3
7
1
4
4
15
1
4
4
11
1
90
4
3
6
1
7
270
2
71
1
8
25
31
2
5
12
1
78
12
106
6
347
Conjunctivitis	
Dysentery (unclassified)...
Dysentery (amoebic)	
Dvsentery (bacillary)	
2
1
Influenza	
450
38
833
Pneumonia (unclassified).
12
Pneumonia (broncho)	
Puerperal septicaemia
253
3
Septic sore throat	
Tuberculosis	
387
40
Undulant fever	
Totals	
361
1,631
3,887
1,908
2,937
10,724
7,131
193             1
1
735
2,664
A=(0-1  year)-
-Adult.
-Infant.    B=(2-5  years)—Pre-school.    C=(6-16  years)—School.    D=(17  and  over)
GOITRE.
The goitre survey has been continued with a view to obtaining accurate statistics over a
period of years as to the incidence and geographical distribution of goitre amongst the schoolchildren of the Province.
The report of the Medical Inspector of Schools for the year 1929-30 shows that out of 99,531
children examined, 4,955, or 5 per cent., were reported as having goitre. This is slightly lower
than the rates of 6.6 per cent, reported in 1928 and 6.7 per cent, in 1929. The Vital Statistics
Registration Districts Nos. 4 and 5 show, as formerly, the highest rate of goitre incidence.
District No. 4, which is roughly the Okanagan-Kamloops area, showed a rate of 11.5 per cent.,
and District No. 5, which is roughly the Kootenay-Revelstoke area, showed a rate of 11 per cent.
The incidence of goitre in the sea-coast areas is considerably lower in comparison, being only
3.2 per cent, for District No. 1, which is mainly Vancouver Island, and 2.2 per cent, for District
No. 2, which represents Vancouver City and surrounding district.
GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES.
The table on the next page shows the geographical distribution of the various infectious
diseases occurring within the Province during the year ended June, 1931.
I have, etc.,
A. M. Menzies, M.D., D.P.H.,
Acting Epidemiologist, Provincial Board of Health. P 26
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Williams Lake and District	
Woodflbre and  District	
Yahk   and   District	
c BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 29
REPORT ON MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS.
Provincial Board of Health,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1931.
The Honourable S. L. Howe,
Provincial Secretary, Victoria, B.C
Sir,—Herewith I beg leave to band you tbe Twentieth Annual Report of the Medical
Inspection of Schools for the Province of British Columbia.
In connection with this are the reports from three of our full-time health units, and a
glance at the figures given in the reports from these specialists would certainly convince any one
of the success that we are obtaining in our work.
Our Public Health Nurses have been particularly successful in their contact with the public.
We have increased the number by opening new districts, and, what is more pleasing, in the older
districts the cry is for an additional nurse in order to cope with the work. The nurses are
working full time and their monthly reports to the Department are very pleasing indeed, and
I would like, in passing, to mention our great appreciation of the work of our nursing staff. We
have been fortunate indeed in securing a class of young lady who is not only enthusiastic, but
is thoroughly competent and well grounded in the policies of modern public-health work. To
feel that we have such co-operation and to note the reaction of the work on the public, and also
the undiminished enthusiasm which the nurses show, is certainly gratifying to us.
We are publishing as usual the detailed information in regard to all of the schools in British
Columbia, and, as I mentioned at the beginning of my Report, a separate report will be published next year for the schools and we will then be able to devote more space to a description
of the work and give a fuller account of the details.    It will form very interesting reading.
SAANICH FULL-TIME HE.ALTH UNIT.
Royal Oak, B.C., October 31st, 1931.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D.,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith I take pleasure in presenting to you our Fifth Annual Report.
Permit me, too, Sir, to offer you my congratulations on the justification of your policy of
festina lente in our public-health work, for few realize how difficult it is to correct an error of
judgment in our work. Particularly has this policy been justified and successful in Saanich, as
the results described and tabulated will show.
In previous reports an account was given of the organization of the full-time unit in Saanich
and its subsequent development and the radical widening of its scope of work, and how year by
year the results accomplished amply fulfilled the expectations from a full-time health project.
This year the work done by the Health Centre has surpassed all previous levels, as will be
seen from the appended tables, and, in addition, the staff has undertaken more work, especially
in teaching.
Following out our policy of concentrating our energy on the younger generation, we have
carried on with our child-welfare and pre-school dental clinics with great success, with a total
attendance to date of 694. Supplementing the clinic-work, our staff has made 2,291 visits to all
children of pre-school age not able to attend the clinics on account of distance or difficulty of
transportation.
In the schools our work has been carried out on lines previously described, with every child
being inspected at regular intervals and medically examined at least once a year, and in many
cases two or three times a year for the observation of abnormal conditions.
To date of writing, 439 new defects were discovered, 554 old defects were found improved,
and 489 old defects not found improved, giving us a correction of defects of 52.1 per cent., which
is higher than last year. P 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Few realize what work is entailed by seeing that defects are corrected, innumerable visits
to enlighten and exhort parents, arrangement of clinics, etc. How the work along these lines
has grown may be seen from the appended table;—
Year.
Child-welfare
Visits.
Home School
Visits.
Children
inspected.
1926                                            	
1,714
1,360
1,979
2,200
2,287
2,291
200
148
1,314
3,015
2,055
2,017
1,517
1927            	
1,649
1928 .                      	
8,164
1929 	
9,022
1930	
6,876
1931  (10 months)	
8,138
Again the unremitting attention to the welfare of the school-child and control of infectious
disease has resulted in a raised percentage of attendance in the school population, as may be
seen in the chart hereto appended.
Percentage of Attendance of Enrolled Pupils, Saanich Schools.
School-year.
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4
CP
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p
1-5
2 ai
1924-25	
1925-26	
1926-27	
93.08
94.3
93.3
93.5
94.7
94.7
95.5
95.2
89.1
89.7
91.3
91.6
93.9
93.1
93.3
96.3
88.1
90.3
87.2
93.2
92.5
92.9
95.2
	
85.3
88.7
84.2
89.2
93.3
94.1
95.8
84.3
80.2
78.4
91.2
88.6
87.6
94.6
79.7
77.8
79.9
02.4
90.5
88.3
92.4
76.8
76.7
81.7
92.9
94.01
93.0
02.6
74.7
79.4
77.7
92.8
93.6
93.2
94.4
74.02
76.8
79.2
05.8
00.8
03.2
04.5
74.1
75.9
76.9
92.2
92.9
93.8
91.5
%
81.92
82.98
82.98
1927-28*..              	
93.48
1928-29*	
92.48
1929-30*                 	
92.40
1930-31*
03.08
1931-32*	
* Full-time health unit in charge.
Last year's school budget was $140,000, and if the attendance were maintained at old levels
$21,000 would have been wasted. This sum is $6,000 more than the entire budget for the Health
Centre.
Throughout the municipality health and freedom from infectious disease has been remarkable.    To date only ninety-one cases of infection have occurred, being mainly chicken-pox.
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Chicken-pox	
1
9
1
10
2
14
1
1
18
21
1
1
19
1
1
1
2
1
2
8
o
3
1
22
7
5
2
2
1
3
121
22
Diphtheria	
3
8
Mumps	
Measles	
German measles 	
2
3
4
Totals    	
11
12
16
18
23
21
6
14
29
7
6
163
The drop in illness is well shown by the number of nursing visits made by the
1926   2
1927 	
1928 	
1929 	
1930 	
1931 (10 months)
staff :-
.803
.966
355
853
.959
.266 The cost for isolation has also been negligible, as shown below:—
1925   $2,110.00
1926      5,535.00
1927      1,181.00
1928         140.00
1929 (isolation of diphtheria carrier)         795.00
1930         350.00
1931         235.00
In connection with infectious disease, we have continued to carry on with diphtheria
immunization and have not had a single case among those immunized. In fact, nearly all our
cases and costs have been contributed to by objectors' families.
. Health is taught regularly in all grades of our schools and high schools.
Competitions in essays and posters will again be held this year.
This year the Health Centre staff is giving regular home-nursing instructions to girls of
high-school age and the Medical Officer is giving a course of hygiene and first aid to the boys.
The value of such work cannot be overemphasized.
The usual work in sanitation and dairy supervision has been carried out as before, with
gratifying results.
From a careful observation, I have been struck with the neglect of correction of serious
defects and the treatment of conditions which endanger the future health of the community and
produce such suffering in the present, due to the present curtailment of income in such a large
proportion of the population. I am absolutely convinced that during such times it is the height
of folly to curtail health services and expenditures on the maintenance of health and treatment
of disease.    Such economy is disastrous to any community.
It is my earnest prayer, Sir, that you use your influence in extending the services and hasten
the introduction of health insurance.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation for the splendid co-operation given us by
the Reeve and Council in carrying out our work.
Respectfully submitted.
D. Berman,
Medical Health Officer.
KELOWNA HEALTH CENTRE.
Report on Activities, October, 1930, to October, 1931.
A review of the work accomplished prior to October, 1930, has been given. Our purpose here
is to reaffirm the objectives of the undertaking and to report progress which has been made
during the last year.
Health Clinics.
We have maintained public-health clinics with the purpose of teaching prenatal care to the
expectant mother; furnishing instructions to promote infant-welfare and pre-school and school
hygiene; supplying information to those who have been exposed to such communicable diseases
as tuberculosis and the venereal diseases, and providing prophylaxis against smallpox, diphtheria, and scarlet fever. Notwithstanding the fact that in two towns within a distance of 40
miles from Kelowna scarlet fever was prevailing, there did not occur any cases in Kelowna and
district, but three who were not immunized and were infected during visits to the neighbouring
towns by visiting patients who were out of quarantine on account of the finishing of the peeling.
Several tests in our laboratory convinced us that the finishing of the peeling is not a good
diagnosis that the patient is not infectious any more.
In 63 per cent, of the cases the hemolytic streptococci in the throat had disappeared at the
time the peeling was finished. In 21 per cent, they disappeared earlier and in 16 per cent, they
still were present after ceasing of the peeling.
A total of 289 children visited our baby clinics, a considerable increase compared to last
year.
A total of seventeen lectures were held, nine of which were on communicable-disease
control. We stressed the idea that " persons are infectious, not things," contrary to the old idea of
disinfection. This educational work had the result that when a case of typhoid occurred in a
far-away part of the district people asked us to perform blood tests and researches on faeces and
urine to locate the carriers. We were very much pleased with the result, and the complaints
we received afterwards from some inhabitants that we had not taken enough samples were
received very gratefully. It proves how apt people are to new ideas when they are talked over
with them.
Not always are we met with such a sympathetic support. A milk-dealer, who last year was
prohibited to sell unpasteurized milk on account of the presence of a carrier of typhoid in his
house, supplied milk to a baby. The child fell ill; the case was treated by the doctor as a case
of enteritis until the mother fell ill with typhoid some weeks later. As the family always used
canned milk the disease of the child was studied more carefully, and it proved that the child
suffered from typhoid, contracted from the milk delivered by the farmer in whose house lived a
carrier, and infected the mother. As far as it was possible to state, in our knowledge, this
carrier was the source of one death and two cases of typhoid during this year.
Our health clinics with the purpose to furnish instructions for the prevention of venereal
diseases and sexual enlightenment were so well attended that they had to be repeated.
Undulant Fever.
On our programme for next year is included a field survey of undulant fever. Many cases
of undulant fever in and outside our Health Unit were observed, perhaps due to the fact that a
large herd of cows with abortion were sold at a public sale some years ago.
The fact that abortion is but a symptom which even may be absent in the animal, that it is
a disease which even may occur in virgin animals, is not accepted in general by the farmer, who
thinks that when after one or two abortions the cow carries full time, the animal has recovered
from the disease.
The test we performed with the milk from several cows proved that we know now an easy
method to detect if the cow is still infectious. We are continuing our research on undulant
fever in human abortion.
Trachoma.
The fact that we detected some school-children with trachoma made us do a thorough
research on this disease in children. Recently we found a teacher with symptoms of conjunctivitis folliculosa. As he is teaching in a school visited by children suffering from trachoma,
we are watching this case very carefully as it might be a case of " trachoma " folliculosa.
A general survey of the eyes of the school-children for refraction for diseases is very urgent,
and when we cannot get the assistance of an eye specialist we intend to hold eye clinics in the
schools.
Malaria.
There was one case of malaria in the district, in a man coming from a malaria-infected part
of the U.S.A. The fact that the Mosquito-control Association sprayed all still-water ponds and
swamps had the effect that no complaints of mosquitoes were sent in and that no anophyles were
found in our surveys during this summer.
Health Exhibit.
An exhibit on vitamins was held in September in Kelowna. Many outside districts asked
for the exhibit, which was sent to many outlying districts and is now changed in a " travelling
exhibit, easy to put up."
Health Periodical.
Exhibits and periodicals speak to the public. They show what work has been done and
make them interested in health-work. A periodical was started in April of this year, but had to
be discontinued through lack of funds, but will soon be started again.
Laboratory Activities.
The need of better facilities for the laboratory are very urgent. The floor-space of the
laboratory, 15 by 17 feet, does not give much room when we are working there with three people. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 33
We are much handicapped by the small space, especially now we are making so many autogenous
vaccines.
The fact that we found a case of tularaemia in British Columbia makes us hope that one
day there will be money available for research-work on this disease.
# G. A. Ootmar,
District and City Health Officer.
NORTH VANCOUVER HEALTH UNIT.
North Vancouver, B.C., September, 1931.
H. E. Young, M.D., CM., LL.D., ,
Provincial Health Officer, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit this the First Annual Report of the North Vancouver
Health Unit. The report includes also a detailed statistical account of the many activities of
the staff.    The year commenced on September 1st, 1930, and ended on August 31st, 1931.
Arrangements were completed between the North Vancouver City and District Councils and
School Boards during the summer of 1930 to organize and maintain a joint or Union Health
Department; this department to be known as the North Vancouver Health Unit and to supply
all public-health services for the two municipalities, including a complete school-health
programme.
Management Committee.
The financial and business affairs of the Health Unit are managed by a committee known as
the North Vancouver Health Unit Committee. This body consists of ten members, made up as
follows: Two from each interested Council and two from each School Board, a secretary (who
is also secretary of one of the School Boards), and the Medical Director of the Health Unit.
Meetings are held on the fourth Thursday of each month, at which, besides other business, the
Medical Director presents a statistical and narrative report covering the month's activities.
Finances.
Half the total expenses of the Health Unit are met locally and the other half jointly by the
Provincial Board of Health and the Rockefeller Foundation. The local share of the expenses
is divided between the two municipalities on the basis of school enrolment.
With the expenses divided in the above-mentioned manner, the modern full-time health
service, with two nurses, transportation, etc., as well as a full-time Health Officer, costs the two
Councils less money than they paid the previous year for an untrained part-time service.
Office.
The Health Unit Office, consisting of two rooms and a toilet, is located on the main floor of
the North Vancouver General Hospital. The Hospital is centrally located and a convenient
distance from most of the schools.
Staff.
The staff consists of the Medical Director and two Public Health Nurses. All three are
trained in modern public health and preventive medicine and are full time.
Transportation.
Each of the members of the staff has the use of a car. One. is personally owned and an
allowance made for its use.    The other two cars are the property of the Health Unit.
Area served.
As stated elsewhere, the Health Unit serves two municipalities, with the possibility of a
third in the future.    The City of North Vancouver had in 1928 a population of 8,885 and at
present a school population of 1,837.    The District of North Vancouver, a sparsely settled or
rural area, had a population in 1928 of 5,642 and at present a school enrolment of 720.
3 P 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
The area extends from West Vancouver on the west to Dollarton and Deep Cove on the
east, a distance of about 12 miles. Burrard Inlet is the southern boundary and the northern
extends up on to the mountains, about 4 or 5 miles to the limit of the settled part.
Objectives of the Health Unit.
The control and prevention of communicable disease and the preservation of human health
and energy.
The programme includes all phases of public-health activities and does not include treatment
of the sick.
During the past year a great deal of time has necessarily been given to the school programme. In this field it was felt that more headway could be made in a short time with a
gradual broadening of the field of activities.
Number of Schools.
There are in all ten schools served by the Health Unit.    This includes the High School.
Programme.
The following is a brief summary of the programme of the Health Unit during its first
year:—
Prenatal.—Visits by nurses. Prenatal letters: Supplied by the Provincial Board of Health
and distributed by the Health Unit. In this way the mothers are in closer touch with the Health
Unit and the nurses;  also with the baby clinic.
Postnatal and Infant-welfare.—Postnatal letters. Home visits by nurses. AV ell-baby clinic:
Held every week. Medical Director attends and in many cases details normal diet. Babies are
physically examined.    The nurses give general nursing and feeding advice.
Pre-school.—Home visits by nurses. Physical examination at baby clinic and office. Large
numbers of children entering school in September, 1931, were given a thorough physical examination in the Health Unit Office with the mother present.    This was during the summer months.
School.—c(l.) Physical examination;  parent present by appointment.
(2.)  Special examinations when required.
(3.)  Percentage of parents present at examinations for year was 73 per cent.
(4.) Class-room inspections by nurse for infection when necessary.
(5.)  Class-room inspections with health talk by nurses.
(6.)   Class-room health talks by Medical Director of Health Unit.
(7.)  Talk, with slides, on fly menace given early in spring in all schools.
(8.) Each principal reports daily all those absent two days to the Health Unit Office. In
this way communicable diseases are found in their early stages and can be more easily controlled.
(9.) Each child absent two days or longer due to illness must report to the Health Unit Office
for a certificate to return to school.
(10.) Sanitation, lighting, ventilation, and heating of each school are closely watched and
advice given where necessary.
(11.) Home-school visits are made when and where necessary by the nurses. During these
visits many opportunities are presented where they can give advice to the parents and offer
encouragement.
(12.) Dental defects: To date we have not a dental clinic, but special attention is paid to
this aspect of the work by the nurses in class-room inspections and also by the doctor. There
is a definite improvement to date.    (See " Dental Campaign " later.)
(13.) Examinations in office: A^ery often children are sent to the Health Unit Office by their
teachers or parents for a special examination. Many children come of their own accord if they
think they might have anything contagious.
(14.) Crippled children; mentally retarded, undernourished, and subnormal children; deaf
children; defective sight: An attempt is made to see that all children in need of special care
receive whatever treatment is necessary.    This applies to pre-school as well as school.
(15.) Co-operation with all school officials is practised by the staff of the Health Unit at
all times.
(16.) Transportation of children: AAThen children are sick or injured or need transportation
to M.D.'s, dentists, or clinics, this is done by the nurses.    A Tudor Ford was purchased for this BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31. P 35
purpose, as well to be used by one of the nurses.    If necessary, a person can be transported in
the recumbent position.
The following table shows the increased percentage daily attendance in the City of North
Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver, comparing with the last three years:—
School-year. City of N.V.    District of N.V.
Per Cent. Per Cent.
1928-29   92.32 91.40
1929-30   93.58 91.20
1930-31   94.52 92.66
For the two school-years previous to the past year the city had the services of a School
Nurse and therefore shows a better percentage than the district for the same years. It is hoped
that next year will show another decided gain.
Note.—During the first three months of the school-year one of the five schools in the district
had an outbreak of diphtheria. This, plus fear, brought the attendance down as low as 58.9
per cent, in October.
Communicable Diseases.—Reporting: The local physicians are very good about reporting
communicable diseases and with check on the school absentees gives nearly a perfect knowledge
of these diseases.
Quarantine Officer: This is done by the nurses and at the same time she instructs the household re isolation and control, etc. I consider that this method is far superior to the usual
procedure.
Diagnosis:  The Medical Director is consulted by the physicians on practically all cases.
Laboratory: This service is provided by the Provincial Laboratory in Vancouver. The
Health Unit arranges the transportation of all specimens to the laboratory for the physicians.
Throat cultures: All cultures for release as well as those taken in the schools are taken by
the members of the Health Unit.
Chest clinic: Arrangements were made with the Provincial Board of Health to have its
Chest Specialist conduct a clinic in the North Vancouver General Hospital about every three
months under the auspices of the Health Unit.
T.B. follow-up:  This is done as far as possible by the Health Unit nurses.
Biological products: These are kept in a Frigidaire refrigerator in the Hospital, where
the M.D.'s may help themselves.    They are distributed free of course.
Supervision of Food-handling Establishments.—All restaurants, hot-dog stands, grocery,
meat, fish, confectionery, fruit, and candy stores, as well as bakeries, bake-shops, and soda-
fountains, are regularly inspected and supervised.
Milk, Dairies, and Farms.—These are carefully inspected. The owners are given all advice
necessary to produce as pure and safe a milk-supply as possible. Samples are taken frequently
for bacterial count. The counts have been very satisfactory on the whole. The dairymen have
always been willing to co-operate.
Water.—This is produced from a carefully guarded watershed.
Sewage.—The many septic tanks give a great deal of trouble, but are attended to whenever
reported. An attempt is being made to rid the community of the unsanitary privy as fast as
possible.
Garbage-dumps.—These places of disposal are closely supervised.
Fox-farms.—There are a number of fox and fur farms in the district requiring some supervision.
Fly Campaign.—During the spring a Destroy the Fly Campaign was conducted and considerable results obtained.
Dental Campaign.—Dr. Harry Thompson, with the help of the local dentists, the Health
Unit, and a special committee, conducted a very successful dental survey and campaign.
Student Nurses.—From time to time nurses taking the Public Health Courses at the University of British Columbia reported for training in health field-work.
Individual Health Talks.—AVhenever the opportunity presents itself a health talk is worked
into a conversation.    In the course of a month a great deal of information can be given out.
Refresher Course for Nurses.—During Easter week the two Health Unit nurses attended
the Refresher Course for Public Health Nurses given under the supervision of the Provincial
Board of Health.    A student nurse relieved during their absence. P 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Addresses.—From time to time, when asked, members of the Health Unit staff have given
addresses to clubs and organizations on health subjects.
Phone.—Through the courtesy of the Hospital Board and an extension phone, the secretary
of the Hospital answers the Health Unit phone when the staff are in the field.
Co-operation.—All during the year the finest co-operation has been shown by the following:
North Vancouver Medical Society; the School Boards; the Councils; the teachers as a whole;
the other branches or departments of the City and Municipal Halls; the majority of the parents
and the school-children themselves. The voluntary men's and women's organizations have
always been willing to help where possible in the supplying of milk to the needy, glasses for
children, special treatment when necessary, and even shoes for needy children.
Complaints.—An attempt is made to investigate all complaints made, and if not under the
jurisdiction of a Health Department they are turned over to the proper person or body.
G. F.  Amtot, M.D., D.P.H.,
Medical Director of the North Vancouver Health Unit.
Details for the examination for each school follow.
I have, etc.,
H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Health Officer.
SCHOOLS INSPECTED.
Medical Inspectors:  160.
Reports from Medical Inspectors:   158.
High Schools.
High schools, 1929-30, 67:   Reported, 43;  not reported, 24.    1930-31,  70:   Reported,  53;
not reported, 17.
Pupils inspected:  1929-30, 10,759 ;  1930-31, 12,046;   an increase of 1,287.
Junior High Schools.
Junior high schools.    1929-30, 5:   Reported, 3; not reported, 2.    1930-31, 7:   Reported, 6;
not reported, 1.
Pupils inspected :  1929-30, 4,568 ;   1930-31, 4,919 ;   an increase of 351.
Graded Citt Schools.
Cities.    1929-30,   33:    Reported,   32;    not  reported,   1.    1930-31,   33:    Reported,   33;    all
reported.
Pupils inspected:  1929-30, 48,860;  1930-31, 48,585;   a decrease of 275.
Rural Municipality Schools.
Municipalities.    1929-30, 24:   Reported, 23;   not reported, 1.    1930-31, 24:   Reported, 23;
not reported, 1.
Pupils inspected :  1929-30, 16,925;  1930-31, 17,705 ;  an increase of 780.
Rural and Assisted Schools.
Schools inspected: 1929-30, 663, at a cost of $15,755.40; 1930-31, 708, at a cost of $16,571.45.
Schools not inspected :  1929-30, 106;  1930-31, 174.
Pupils inspected:  1929-30, 18,391;  1930-31, 19,655 ;  an increase of 1,264.
Cost of inspection per pupil:  1929-30, 85.6 cents;   1930-31, 85.3 cents.
Percentage of defects : 1929-30, 104.24;  1930-31, 101.29;  a decrease of 2.95.  .
P 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
NORMAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
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5
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33
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Vancouver	
280
169
289
169
2
1
5
20
8
18
63
2
37
36
52
9
1
SI      IS
HIGH
78
31
20
19
10
181
309
10
325
11
78
162
56
65
91
84
134
74
22
9
21
125
78
69
99
60
77
496
221
22
417
40
11
70
81
71
30
20
19
10
174
365
10
325
11
62
162
54
60
98
84
134
74
22
9
4
4
3
6
4
1
14
7
1
8
3
8
6
3
6
3
3
48
115
2
163
1
1
11
1
14
3
8
Anyox:
Granby Bay	
Mrs. G. V. Yard....
10
7
1
1
4
4
12
2
5
13
1
6
3
8
4
6
9
11
3
16
4
Burnaby:
1
10
2
H. Peters	
4
22
1
2
3
Copper Mountain	
1
19
7
2
2
G. E. L. MacKinnon
11
5
7
3
10
7
5
4
3
G. K. MacNaughton.
6
3
2
7
2
Delta:
4
2
2
3
3
1
1
6
J. S. MoCallum
Miss E. Morrison...
Miss W. Seymour..
3
1
2
5
1
5
2
20
3
4
5
9
101
7
1
54
12
4
4
1
L. B. Wrinch	
2
21
121
71
69
98
57
74
487
203
22
416
40
8
58
76
4
9
2
3
3
4
2
3
W. J. Knox	
Miss E. W. Tisdall.
1
1
5
12
6
5
6
26
267
26
65
2
1
6
39
21
2
2
5
D. P. Hanington
B. B. Marr	
Miss J. Worthing-
ton
1
G. H. Tutffl	
MissH. E.Fawcett.
Miss M. D. Mac-
Dermot
11
205
1
4
60
24
1
12
6
1
4
4
25
3
4
26
11
W. P. Drysdale
E. C. Arthur	
58
37
New Westminster:
D. A. Clark	
Miss A. Stark	
24
2
2
5
20
16
3
P. P. Smyth	
6
Port Coquitlam:
"7*12
1
4
14
25
6
35
2
3
.. BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 39
SCHOOLS.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
d
1
>
3
«
a
CQ
6
fcfj
+3
m
a
B
i
o
E
bi
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Heating, ventilation,
and     accommoda-
good
Good	
13; diphtheria, 2; typhoid, 2; scarlet   fever,   6;   mastoid,   5;   rheumatism, 3; smallpox, 2; St. Vitus, 1;
hernia,  1; infantile paralysis, 2
asthma,   1; rickets   (old),   1; acne,
4;   amputated   forearm,    1;   mixed
infection chest,  1
SCHOOLS.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Nil, except 1 case chicken-pox...
Yes.
O.K.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
vision, 13
Good	
Yes.
vision, 35
Good	
3
Whooping-cough, 4; measles, 2..
Building       crowded,
class-room as well
as   the   laboratory
being in the basement; this crowds
the basement badly
so that pupil's have
no    proper    place
for lunch-hour on
wet days; ventilation could be improved
Good	
Fair.
appendicitis,   1;  psoriasis of  scalp,
1; nervous conditions, 3
OK	
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Deviated   septum,   2;   blepharitis,   3;
nasal   obstruction,    1 ;   skin-disease,
1; wax in ears,   6;  orthopaedic,   1;
anaemia, 1
--
Good.
4
1
1
O.K	
O.K.
Good	
Fair -	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
dysmenorrhea, 4
New     school;     ade
Yes.
quate    and    well
kept
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
2
2
2
Scarlet fever, 1; chicken-pox, 1;
rheumatic fever, 1
Good;        ventilation
does   not   appear
adequate
Well    heated;     not
crowded;      rather
poorly ventilated
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Orthopaedic,  2; heart,  5; anaemic, 3;
nervous, 1; pulmonary, 2
Good	
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
1
Clean; adequate. ;
P 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HIGH
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
m
'p.
fl
rH      .
- xi
O r-t
.   O
3   .
CU 'a
°s
o 3
Z 3
CO £J
9 S
08
0)
tl fl
<y .2
CO
hh a
Ii
3 a;
OK
'ect
cd
ii
'£x
v a
0}  S
3
'o
a
CO
"a
V
co .„•
|1
n o
HEh
eo
>
CO 5
'3 %
Oh
•cd
^    JC
0,5
CO
'5
C.   H.   Hankinson
and J. P. Cade
Miss M. Osborne....
204
50
135
150
70
260
113
9
46
28
120
15
28
198
804
416
653
375
436
006
1129
255
746
1099
436
167
190
8
194
48
132
130
54
259
96
9
45
28
112
14
28
198
836
404
670
332
456
753
1146
144
473
1070
436
167
189
8
59
13
1
11
12
11
2
17
33
51
1
70
1
.2
8
7
12
6
1
5
1
5
3
4
6
8
2
17
7
5
15
2
2
fl
5
23
20
2
2
42
G
37
18
2
J. H. Hamilton	
W. K. Hall	
Miss A. A. Lee
3
Richmond Municipality:
10
1
2
1
7
11
64
2
9
1
19
2
9
10
E. E. Topliff	
1
1
Miss M. Harvey
16
Drs. Beech & Beech.
13
5
2
9
4
N. J. Paul	
F. D. Sinclair	
6
2
Telkwa	
2
4
Stanley Mills	
5
2
14
Trail	
F. S. Eaton	
«i
23
40
29
31
1
3
4
9.
52
166
93
148
75
132
104
349
8
112
287
105
23
2
2
6
4
2
16
2
Vancouver:
H. White	
Miss A. McLelIan__
Miss G. Jeeves	
Mrs. D. Bellamy....
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss M. Campbell..
Miss M. Ewart
Miss E. Edwards...
Miss L. Drysdale...
Mrs. D. Bellamy....
Miss I. Smith	
Miss E. Lowther....
W. Dykes	
j
32
H. White	
1
i
13
2
2
4
4
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
H. White	
56
56
W. Dykes	
46
28
8
25
24
2
4
3
Prince of Wales	
W. Dykes	
H. White	
14
School of Commerce...,
G. A. Lamont	
11
32
Vancouver, West:
Vernon	
Mrs. S. Martin
2
C G. G. Maclean	
I
JUNIOR HIGH
Britannia  Mines..
Kamloops	
Kelowna ,
Nelson	
Ocean Falls	
Vancouver:
Fairview	
Kitsilano	
Point Grey	
Templeton	
J. W. Laing	
Kingsley Terry..
W. J. Knox..
E. C. Arthur..
P. P. Smyth-.
H. White..
W- Dykes..
W. Dykes..
H. White-
Miss O. M. Garrood.
Miss E. W. Tisdall
Mrs. D. Bellamy...
Miss M. Campbell.
Miss M. Ewart...
Miss B. Stevens..
18
17
3
5
1
2
1
6
335
311
51
28
20
79
13
224
222
o
19
1
2
7
336
34
335
34
40
4
6
2
20
1
1
29
16
90
4
4
3
195
1594
194
1368
4
101
1
47
71
664
12
248
4
1
1
1208
1144
187
67
19
3
1
26
181
3
1354
1294
287
121
8
8
3
62
393
9
6
15
10
81
1
40
103 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 41
SCHOOLS— Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
fl
1
r*
2
02
d
<D
I
a
M
O
C
■  (3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
Good.
1;   cardiac,   4;   dermatitis,   1;   scoliosis,    2;   anaemia,   1;   acne,    11;
eczema, 1
Good	
tured leg)
Good	
Good.
Whooping-cough, 1; influenza, 3
Good	
Good.
Fair	
2
Measles,     1;     chicken-pox,     2;
conjunctivitis,  1
OK	
Influenza	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
4
Ventilation difficult-
Good	
Measles ,
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Chicken-pox,  3; scarlet fever, 2.
i
Mumps,     1;    scarlet    fever     1;
whooping-cough,  1
Mumps, 17; measles, 1; chicken-
pox,  2
Mumps,     3;     chicken-pox,     9;
scarlet   fever,   1;   diphtheria,
3; diphtheria carriers,  1
2
'
3
Clean; adequate.
Both.
Good	
4
Scarlet fever, 4 ; rheumatic fever,
1; appendectomy, 2
Good;     well     ventilated and heated
quate.
SCHOOLS.
Ample room; well
lighted and heated
New brick building
attached to former
High School; well
heated and ventilated
Well lighted, ventilated, and modern;
not crowded
Defective feet, 25; posture, 24	
2
2
Pneumonia;    scarlet    fever;    influenza
Adequate closet
accommodation.
flat feet, 3; posture curvature, 4
V.D.H.,  1	
tern has now
been laid and
the schools will
be connected up
by the time
school opens in
September.
Good	
Cardiac, 1	
Cardiac, 14	
19
6
41
4
10
2
Mumps,     5;     chicken-pox,     3;
scarlet fever, 4
Mumps,    1;   measles,   2;   poliomyelitis, 1; whooping-cough, 6
Mumps,    45;    chicken-pox,    7;
scarlet fever,   3
•
Cardiac, 9	
Cardiac, 1; pulmonary 1	 P 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
A
£•§
|
d S
*H    CO
139
133
630
610
413
413
278
267
542
539
39
39
12
12
438
428
283
278
123
136
OS
o£
.6 d
SB
QP3
Alberni	
Armstrong..
Chilliwack..
Courtenay..
Cranbrook:
Central	
South Ward	
Kootenay Orchards..
Cumberland..
Duncan	
Enderby	
Fernie:
Central..
Annex...
West	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood	
Kamloops:
Lloyd George..
Stuart Wood..
Kaslo	
Kelowna..
Ladysmith:
Central—
Merritt	
Nanaimo:
Middle Ward..
North Ward..
Thos. Hodgson..
South Ward	
Nelson:
Central..
Hume....
New Westminster:
F. W. Howay	
John Robson..
Lord Lester....
Lord Kelvin...
Richard McBride..
Queensboro	
Herbert Spencer..
A. D. Morgan..
E. Henderson..
Miss P. Charlton...
Miss H. Peters..
G. E. L. McKinnon.
G. E. L. McKinnon.
G. E. L. McKinnon.
G. K. MacNaughton.
H. P. Swan....
H. W. Keith..
D. Corsan..
D. Corsan..
D. Corsan	
W. Truax.......
W. H. Wood..
K. Terry	
K. Terry..
D. J. Barclay..
W. J. Knox....
P. Hanington..
H. Tutill	
F. Drysdale....
F. Drysdale....
F. Drysdale..
F. Drysdale..
C. Arthur..
C. Arthur..
A. Clark..
A. Clark..
A. Clark..
A. Clark..
A. Clark..
A. Clark-
Miss B. Jenkins..
Miss W. Seymour.
Miss W. Seymour.
Miss W. Seymour-
Miss O. M. Garrood.
Miss O. M. Garrood.
Miss E. W. Tisdall
Miss Wortbington.
Miss M. D. Mac-
Dermot
Miss M. D. Mac-
Dermot
Miss M. D. Mac-
Dermot
Miss M. D. Mac-
Dermot
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark-
Miss A. Stark..
520
79
50
295
67
321
68
648
520
25
6
290
61
67
629
257| 256
I
304 296
162
160
115
162
160
115
571 539
1991 195
404| 397
I
374| 371
394| 388
I
4131 411
I
528] 518
138 133
4211 416
2
2 2
50 1
54 2
80
27
32
228
38
50
90
39
54
90
97
30
82
36
60
79
81
102
60
83
26
100
59
74
102
11
3
100
56
308
283
83
100
139
128
226
25
124
259
189
40|  41
I
37  24
152
4  50
144
41
181
40
255
88
313
105
81
28
229
64 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 43
SCHOOLS.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Heart, 2	
Congenital dislocation of hip, 1; cleft
palate, 1; stuttering, 2; asthma, 2;
orthopaedic, 2; blepharitis, 10; wax
in ears, 10; eczema, 1; No. vaccinated, 79; No. received toxoid, 313;
appendectomy, 2
Mastoid operations, 3; asthma, 1;
kidney condition, 2; umbilical
hernias, 2; removal of gland of
neck, 1; speech defects, 2; orthopaedic corrected, 1
Partial paralysis,  1	
13
Scarlet fever, 11; diphtheria, 3
chicken-pox, 8; ringworm, 4
scabies, 13
Mumps, 10; chicken-pox, 2..
Cardiac,  1	
Infantile paralysis, 1; orthopaedic, 1-
Skin-disease, 3; anaemia, 22; nasal
catarrh, 7; defective speech, 2; nervous, 5; pulmonary, 2; wax in ears,
89; cardiac,  2; blepharitis,  12
Chicken-pox..
Mild whooping-cough-
Nervous, 1; pulmonary, 1..
Cardiac, 1	
Valvular heart, 2..
Chicken-pox, 1; scarlet fever, 1.,
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox,  1; scarlet fever,  6
Chicken-pox, 1; scarlet fever, 8..
Mumps; chicken-pox	
Good	
Condition of schools
good; well ventilated and heated
Not crowded; poorly
ventilated
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good..
O.K..
O.K..
Bronchial, 4; heart, 5; feet, 12; posture, 14
Heart, 1; feet, 4; posture, 18..
Influenza; scarlet fever; whooping-
cough; diphtheria, 1 death;
pneumonia,  1 death
Influenza; scarlet fever; whooping-
cough, 1
Paralysis,  1	
Chorea, 9; bronchitis, 7; tuberculosis.
2; cardiac, 6; again a dental survey was made of every pupil
Epilepsy,   1;  cardiac,   7;  nervous,   2;
orthopedic, 2
Cardiac, 3	
Appendicitis,  1; orthopaedic,  1..
Appendicitis, 1; chorea, 1	
Cardiac, 2; bronchitis, 3; orthopaedic,
4; nervous, 6
Asthma, 2; bronchitis, 1; keratitis, 1;
fracture, 2
Deformed hand,  1; valvular disease of
the heart, 1
Orthopaedic,   9;  heart,  4;  anaemic, ^1
2; nervous, 3; pulmonary 1
Orthopaedic,   8;  heart,  4; anaemic, f
3 ; nervous,  1 I
Orthopaedic,   7; heart,  2;  anaemic, ")
1; nervous,  1; pulmonary 2 i
Orthopaedic,   7; heart,  2;  anaemic, [
1; pulmonary, 2 J
Orthopaedic,  4; heart, 4; anaemic, 4...
Orthopaedic,   2;   anaemic,   2;   pulmonary, 1
Orthopaedic,   9;  heart,  3; anemic,   3;
nervous, 2
Whooping-cough, 1; chicken-pox,
9; measles, 2; paratyphoid, 2;
influenza and common cold, a
lower average
Diphtheria,  1..
13
Whooping-cough, 3; chicken-pox,
6; influenza, 6
Pneumonia, 1; bronchitis, 2;
chicken-pox, 5; whooping-
cough, 3; scarlet fever, 1
Whooping-cough, 8; rheumatism,  2
Chicken - pox, 12; whooping-
cough, 14; scarlet fever, 1
Pertussis; varicella-
Pertussis; varicella-
Typhoid fever, 3; chicken-pox:
16; scarlet fever, 7; measles
5; mumps, 1; pertussis, 2
O.K	
Good	
Satisfactory..
This is a,brick building, comparatively
new; poorly heated
and ventilated
This school is a brick
building; it is
fairly well ventilated and heated
Good	
Building well lighted,
ventilated, modern,
and not crowded
Satisfactory..
Satisfactory..
Good;    no   artificial
lighting
Fairly good; lighting
might be improved
Good; lighting inadequate
Good; no artificial
lighting
Some overcrowding...
Much overcrowding...
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Clean.
Clean.
Clean.
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
Fair; adequate.
Yes.
Adequate number
of closets; clean
and sanitary.
Adequate number
of closets; clean
and sanitary.
Good.
The sewerage system has now
been laid and
the schools will
be connected up
by the time
school opens in
September.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good. P 44
,-
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
xi
n xi
5 -p
a
11
d
o
a,
P
% is
£a
oS
■it
8 p
9 .2
OI>
9    .
cj ■-.
£ a
OK
rt
to ^
■ t. ""
CJ +H
oj rt
on
5
'3
QJ
cd
<
ca   -
£ °
Kfr
CQ
CJ J3
Ice CO
rt v
Qfr
cfl
a,   ■
w3
oi
u
'3
0
A. R. Wilson	
Miss M. E. Grierson
1
37BI   375
5
6
3
19
8
4
10
10
10
2
34
23
2
2
2
1
2
10
3
3
37
40
1
113
22
4
4
12
8
9
31
29
5
11
1
5
5
24
105
64
14
5
12
8
9
13
10
14
5
1
5
6
21
1
23
12
4
3
4
1
9
6
20
22
126
63
25
31
50
13
18
172
145
29
13
8
28
103
46
18
26
14
8
36
29
11
20
43
33
43
15
59
77
79
15
43
30
52
38
60
102
55
35
32
135
36
43
180
104
9
5
108
6
2
3
1
175
164
15
13
Port Coquitlam:
170
70
207
306
99
78
468
343
56
26
170
58
207
296
98
78
398
333
44
24
7'
1
4
12
1
3
127
120
6
3
2
13
1
1
3
9
Prince George:
C. Ewert         	
Mrs. G. Bond	
Mrs. G. Bond	
Mrs. G. Bond	
Miss M. Osborne.--
Miss M. Osborne-.
Miss M. Osborne-.
Miss M. Osborne...
8
C. Ewert	
C. Ewert	
J.  H.   Carson, J.  P.
Cade, W. T. Ker-
gin, L. W. Kergin4
and   C.   H.   Han-
kin son
J.  H.  Carson, J.  P.
Cade, W. T. Ker-
gin, L. W. Kergin,
and  C.   H.   Han-
kinson
J. P. Cade	
4
Prince Rupert:
Booth Memorial	
19
18
J. P. Cade	
Revelstoke:
J. H- Hamilton	
J. H. Hamilton	
E. E. Topliffe
285    283
2D2I   1S9
10
6
38
21
4
67
16
12
27
4
0
13
1
3
14
2
61
60
18
1
1
3
7
Selkirk	
Rossland:
McLean	
Salmon Arm	
Trail-Tadanac:
1
489
187
50
883
336
52
393
561
455
142
49
883
336
52
368
542
6
19
32
10
2
71
134
69
80
34
50
114
68
73
122
137
20
68
77
93
124
56
4
1
1
	
	
	
	
	
240
28
483
180
16
65
54
50
38
.39
61
209
31
111
46
54
54
104.
52
68
130
57
9
28
42
12
9
5
2
8
4
9
2
1
13
3
4
2
	
4
1
14
2
14
S. E. & A. Beech
12
25
F. S. Eaton	
9
2
1
23
8
3
160
42
Tadanac ,	
Vancouver:
F. S, Eaton
4
H. White	
Misa H. Jukes	
MissM. Henderson.
Miss G. Hilton
15
G. A. Lamont	
o
5
2
3
2
1
12
417|   447
298[   357
1
274j   324
1
1
424|   449
1
8961   971
1
1
I
283|   264
1
4691   475
1
651]   634
6771   667
1
233|   210
434|   375
|
374|  358
1
5641   607
1
698|  744
1
[
420]   428
1
5
Beaconsfield ,	
2
H. White         	
Miss I. Smith	
Mi3s E. Bell	
16
10
Carleton	
Edith Cavell	
G. A. Lamont	
W. Dykes	
Miss E. Edwards.-
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss B. Stevens
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss M. Henderson.
Miss D. Olmstead..
Miss D. Olmstead..
Mrs. M. Schultz—
Miss D. Shields
Miss G. Hilton
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
15
9
6
H. White        	
7
6
8
3
1
4
	
7
3
18
6
7
6
36
Dawson	
H. White '.
49
G. A. Lamont	
18
3
	
8
14
37
38
26
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
19
H. White
6
Simon Fraser and
Annex
12
H. White     	
22
H. White        	
19
'
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 45
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
o
a
o
a
X
QJ
P,
to
u
S
F
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Nervous,   7; heart,   12;  limp,  4;  scoliosis,   1
Measles,  23; chicken-pox, 4; infantile
paralysis, 4
Blepharitis,   9;   stye,   1;   cardiac,   2
orthopxdic,  2; pulmonary,   1
Nervous, 5; bronchitis, 2; cardiac, 8;
pulmonary, 1; anosmia, 1; scoliosis,
1; orthopaedic, 1
Nervous,  6; bronchitis, 8; cardiac, 13
" scoliosis, 1; anaemia, 2 ; orthopaedic
3; acne, 1
Nervous, 1; anaemia, 1; scoliosis, 1....
Nervous, 2; bronchitis, 1; anamiia, 1.
Ankylosis,  1„
Cardiac,  3	
Anaemia,  2; pulmonary,  1.,
Cardiac,  3	
Cardiac, 7; nervous, 6; pulmonary, 10
Nervous, 3; pulmonary, 2; cardiac, 4.
Cardiac, 3	
No.  vaccinated,   167; cardiac,  3; pulmonary,  1
No. vaccinated, 251; pulmonary, 2.....
No. vaccinated, 156; cardiac,  6; puL
monary, 1
No. vaccinated, 116	
No. vaccinated,   106; cardiac,  1.
No. vaccinated, 143; cardiac, 3.—
No.  vaccinated,  339; cardiac,   10-
No. vaccinated, 97; cardiac,  2	
No. vaccinated, 334; cardiac, 2; pulmonary, 5
No. vaccinated, 280; cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 2
No. vaccinated, 213; cardiac, 5; pulmonary,  1
No. vaccinated, 58; cardiac, 1	
No. vaccinated, 129	
No. vaccinated, 162; cardiac, 1..
No. vaccinated, 224; cardiac, 4.
No. vaccinated, 321	
No. vaccinated,  157; cardiac,  2; pulmonary,  1
Mumps;  chicken-pox;  whooping- Good-
cough
Whooping-cough,      8;     chicken-
pox,  2; scarlet fever, 2.
Scarlet fever; chicken-pox..
Mumps;  chicken-pox;  whooping-
cough
Two temporary build
ings, poorly heated
five buildings not
adequately heated
new 8-room school
is being built now
Excellent	
Excellent.-
Exceilent..
Good-
Mumps; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Mumps; chicken-pox; whooping-
cough
Diphtheria	
Scarlet fever-
Whooping-cough. .
Mumps, 5; measles, 1; chicken-
pox, 39; whooping-cough, 1;
rubella,   1
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 11;
scarlet fever,   11
Chicken-pox, 14; scarlet fever, 1
Whooping-cough, 5; scarlet
fever, 2
Mumps, 48; chicken-pox, 24;
whooping-cough, 1; scarlet
fever,  6; diphtheria, 1
Mumps, 4; chicken-pox, 70;
diphtheria,  1
Mumps, 8; chicken-pox, 117;
whooping-cough, 4; scarlet
fever, 2; diphtheria, 9; diphtheria carriers,  6
C h i c k e n-p ox, 28; whooping-
cough,   1
Mumps, 11; chicken-pox, 6;
scarlet   fever,   1
Mumps, 15; chicken-pox, 6;
scarlet fever, 3
Mumps, 8; chicken-pox, 8;
rubella,  5
Chicken-pox, 5	
Mumps, 9; chicken-pox, 9;
whooping-cough,  1
Mumps, 5; chicken-pox, 18;
scarlet fever, 4
Mumps,   2; chicken-pox,   15	
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 24:
w h o o p i n g-cough, 4 ; scarlet
fever, 3; diphtheria, 1
Mumps, 74; chicken-pox, 5;
scarlet  fever,   6
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good..
Good..
O.K.-
Satisfactory..
Satisfactory..
Adequate	
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Excellent.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Yes. GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
fiS
f ri
■ss
111 =3
Gf»
OK
QM
■2-S
Vancouver—Continued.
Hastings H. White-
Henry Hudson..
Kerrisdale	
Lord Kitchener..
Langara	
Livingstone-
David Lloyd George....
Magee	
Moberly and Annex. .
Model	
Mount Pleasant	
McBride	
MacDonald..
MacKenzie..
Nelson-
Florence Nightingale.
Norquay and Annex.
Oak Street	
Open Air	
Prince of Wales-.
Queen Mary	
Quilchena	
Renfrew	
Cecil Rhodes-
Lord Roberts..
Laura Secord..
Selkirk	
Sexsmith-
Seymour...
Strathcona. .
Tecumseh....
Tennyson....
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes-
Mrs. M. Schultz—
Miss G. Hilton-
Miss G. Jeeves..,
Miss G. Jeeves..
W. Dykes-
Miss G. Hilton..
W. Dykes	
G. A. Lamont..
Miss G. Jeeves..
Miss F. Innes...
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes-
Miss L. Drysdale..
Miss M. Ewart	
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont. .
G- A. Lamont..
G- A. Lamont..
Miss D. Olmstead.
Miss D. Shields-
Miss D. Shields-
Miss F. Innes..
H. White Mrs. M. Schultz..
I
G. A. Lamont  Miss F. Innes	
H. White 'Miss I. Smith..
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. tamoct..
W. Dykes..
H. White..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes..
W. Dykes	
G. A. Lamont..
H. White	
H. White	
H. White	
G. A. Lamont..
G. A. Lamont..
H. White	
H. White	
G. A. Lamont..
H. White	
Miss M. Henderson
Miss J. Aske..
Miss L. Dry
Miss D. Shields...
Miss L. Drysdale.
Miss G. Jeeves	
Miss M. Ewart	
MissM. Henderson.
Miss L. Drysdale...
Miss H. Jukes	
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
Miss J. Aske	
Miss F. Bell	
Miss O. Kilpatrick.
Miss A. McLellan.
Miss D. Olmstead.
Mrs. D. Bellamy..
847
495 535
707 747
I
591| 585
3311 287 541..
I        I
4651 5231 66L
4591 421 76..
5831 5721 100L
1    I    I
644 587  85..
5431 529
501[ 494|
I
4831 513
I
6681 661
479
7871 919
I
I
6151 586
634 595
1111  71
64  45
345| 364
471 408
I
264| 260
3241 321
578| 585
790] 739
98].
951.
94).
170
4
571.
[
1431.
['
1551.
5711 7131  911.
824| 7401 170!..
3641 358[  451..
663
7S4
73
1225
1426
200
731
701
130
787
767
95
60
142
16
19
1
2J
4|
....  23  75
1|  29 122
221 107
61  35
I
151
20
381
261
15|  45!
61
15
29!
33]
.-..|   21  531 110
3)   7  63|  58
I
1|  12
I
7|  42
47| 126
[    I
I    I
21  45|
II  20
I
3!	
8|  16
151  51
531 106
83| 139
I
54| 147
I
JI  73
36
49
72
180
91
333
51
114
43
138 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 47
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
.S
I
>
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
No. vaccinated, 284; cardiac,  5; pulmonary, 2
No. vaccinated,  271; cardiac,  4..
No. vaccinated, 375	
No.  vaccinated,  235; cardiac,  2..
No. vaccinated, 235; cardiac, 1; pulmonary,  1
No.  vaccinated,   228; pulmonary,   1...
No. vaccinated, 153; cardiac, 1; pulmonary, 2
No. vaccinated,  221; cardiac,  2	
No.   vaccinated,   292;  pulmonary,   2..
No.  vaccinated,   141; cardiac,  4; pulmonary,  1
No.  vaccinated,   286	
No.  vaccinated,  97	
No.  vaccinated,  149; cardiac,  3..
No. vaccinated, 241; cardiac, 2; pulmonary,  4
No. vaccinated, 207; cardiac, 4; pulmonary,   1
No.  vaccinated,  233; cardiac,  5; pulmonary,  2
No. vaccinated, 115; pulmonary, 4..
No. vaccinated, 338; cardiac, 5	
No. vaccinated, 36	
No.  vaccinated,  19	
No. vaccinated, 197; cardiac, 2.,
No. vaccinated, 203; cardiac, 2..
No. vaccinated,
No. vaccinated,
No. vaccinated,
No. vaccinated,
monary, 2
No. vaccinated,
monary, 3
No. vaccinated,
monary, 1
No. vaccinated,
No. vaccinated,
monary, 13
65; pulmonary, 1	
100; cardiac,  1..	
308; cardiac, 2	
362; cardiac,  5; pul-
256; cardiac,  1; pul-
195; cardiac,  4; pul-
167; cardiac, 2	
468; cardiac,  3; pul-
No.    vaccinated,
pulmonary, 4
1,301;   cardiac,    4
L
No. vaccinated, 196; cardiac, 3	
No.  vaccinated,  337; cardiac,   1; pul
monary,   1
5
6
5
2
24
5
5
67
20
18
3
3
16
6
10
diphtheria,
Mumps,    3;
rubella,   1;
15
12;
Mumps, 163; chicken-pox, 55;
whooping-cough, 1; scarlet
fever, 2; diphtheria, 1
Mumps,  1; whooping-cough,  1...
C h i c k e n-pox, 5 5; whooping-
cough, 6; rubella, 1
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 13;
whooping-cough, 2; rubella,
5; scarlet fever, 2; diphtheria,
3; diphtheria carriers, 2;
poliomyelitis,   1
Chicken-pox, 3; whooping-cough,
4;  rubella, 1; scarlet fever, 3
Chicken-pox, 14 ,
Mumps, 5; chicken-pox, 25;
scarlet fever,   1
Mumps, 4; chicken-pox, 83;
scarlet fever,  1
Mumps, 7; chicken-pox, 105;
whooping-cough, 9; scarlet
fever,   1
Mumps, 1; measles, 1; rubella,
1;  scarlet  fever,   2
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 1; scarlet fever, 2
Mumps,    2;    chicken-pox,
1
chicken-pox,
scarlet fever, 26;
diphtheria, 2; diphtheria carriers,   1; poliomyelitis,   1
Mumps, 42; measles, 1; chicken-
pox,   21
Mumps, 2; chicken-pox, 24;
whooping-cough, 1; scarlet
fever, 1; diphtheria, 5; diphtheria carriers, 1; poliomyelitis,   7
Mumps, S3; chicken-pox, 9;
whooping-cough, 1; scarlet
fever, 2; diphtheria, 2; diphtheria carriers,  1
Mumps, 3; chicken-pox, 31;
diphtheria, 1; diphtheria carriers,  2
Mumps, 1; chicken-pox, 3 9;
whooping-cough, 2; scarlet
fever,   1; diphtheria,   1
Chicken-pox,  19	
Mumps, 1 ...
Chicken-pox, 1; mumps,  3	
Mumps, 1; measles, 1; chicken-
pox, 4; whooping-cough, 1;
scarlet fever, 2
Chicken-pox, 8; whooping-cough,
5; rubella,  1; scarlet fever, 2
Chicken-pox, 21; whooping-
cough, 5
Mumps, 27; chicken-pox, 22
scarlet fever,   1
Mumps, 35; chicken-pox, 68
scarlet fever, 3
Mumps, 73; chicken-pox, 35
whooping-cough, 1; scarlet
fever, 2
Mumps, 42; chicken-pox, 3S;
scarlet fever, 5; diphtheria, 4;
diphtheria carriers, 5
Mumps, 2; measles, 1; chicken-
pox, 40
Mumps, 14; chicken-pox, 6;
whooping-cough, 7; rubella,
1; scarlet fever, 2
Mumps, 89; chicken-pox, 1;
whooping-cough, 2; scarlet
fever,  1
Mumps, 31; chicken-pox, 30;
whooping-cough, 2; scarlet
fever,   2; diphtheria,  4
Mumps, 3; scarlet fever,  2	 .
P 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
GRADED CITY
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
. o
a
in xi
0)
°f
fl
co *?
>
tj a
9 P
9 .2
OJ
+35
CO   GJ
as
*c3
ci
»»
> .5
+3 3
CJ HH
c-J   O
■a
"5
a
■d
H
11
liS
>
aj £
Qfr
T3
« _c
■r.   T3
ci  fl
S3
cj
"3
O
Vancouver—Continued.
Miss E. Bell	
425
446
414
453
570
858
118
144
304
237
508
432
356
314
22
150
324
507
247
145
51
333
160
294
435
431
300
346
352
840
118
144
304
237
508
432
356
314
22
150
324
507
247
145
51
333
160
294
47
49
10
51
25
8
5
11
5
4
4
3
6
5
5
25
25
20
11
19
12
12
38
33
80
156
76
21
1
5
69
72
170
184
229
40
1
39
95
55
4
19
Wolfe	
G. A. Lamont	
G. F. Amyot	
G. F. Amyot	
Miss E. Bell.	
5
Vancouver, North:
Miss E. Lowther....
Miss E. Lowther—.
Miss E. Lowther....
Mrs. S. Martin.
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert
Miss C. Mowbray..
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss E. J. Herbert,
Miss E. J. Herbert.
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss C. Mowbray...
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss I. E. Adams..
Miss I. E. Adams..
2
5
8
12
14
16
14
17
17
G. F. Amyot	
20
Vernon:
6
Victoria:
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
2
3
3
7
3
1
4
5
10
1
3
7
8
13
3
5
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald    	
2
1
15
8
3
	
1
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
1
9
...
7
2
6
8
4
7
3
8
10
9
North Ward	
1
11
3
7
1
	
South Park	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
D. Donald	
14
11
4
1
1
5
1
3
12
3
5
1
1
l
|
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Burnaby:
1
!
55|
35!
268|
2221
1
565'
1
7841
25!
1861
6411
311|
1
453|
91!
341
102!
17|
1141
541
811
2571
\
113
22|
53
268
220
55S
1
7
8
13
24
1
5
3
11
8
5
2
2
	
1
1
1
7
4
21
32
1
	
8
6
23
32
4
5
34
28
72
110
39
23
163
133
347
488
16
126
401
196
296
60
21
56
11
75
29
48
155
56
3
9
0
51
42
80
128
2
37
119
69
29
12
6
14
2
19
7
15
41
5
3
5
1
2
2
2
2
12
1
7S2I         1
10
24
186
641
303
1
1
1
1
1
7
9
16
21
2
2
1
2
1
5
5
16
29
4
2
1
1
2
10
39
4
29
80
58
61
8
6
9
4
11
6
18
30
35
5
1
10
7
446
91
34
102
17
	
1
1
3
9
Seaforth	
1
114
54
81
	
4
5
1
4
7
3
1
2
1
2
2
6
25
1
1
,
"
2
3
Chilliwack:
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
1
1131        7
9
Camp Slough	
22
3
2 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.                                          P 49
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
I
OJ
OJ
1
CJ
d
a
tH
o
»
be
fl
s
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
4
7
4
Chicken-pox,   2;  diphtheria,   3;
diphtheria carriers, 1
Chicken-pox,      69;      whooping-
cough, 4; scarlet fever, 4
Mumps,   1;  chicken-pox,  4	
Chicken-pox,   52;   scarlet   fever,
1; whooping-cough,  4
Diphtheria,   1;   diphtheria   carriers,     1;     chicken-pox,     2;
scarlet fever, 1; mumps, 4
Scarlet    fever,     43;    rheumatic
fever,   2;  rubella,   7;  whooping-cough, 6; appendectomy, 5
No.  vaccinated,  223; cardiac,  7; pulmonary, 2
Cardiac,   1;   nervous,   6;   posture,   3;
pallor, 4; defective speech,  1
Cardiac,    8;   nervous,   8;   pallor,   8;
chronic bronchitis,   1;  posture,   11;
pulmonary, 2
Cardiac,   6;   nervous,   7;  flat-chested,
4; pallor,   7; posture,   3
Harelip   and   cleft   palate,    1;   endocarditis,    2;   stammering,    1;   congenital dislocation of hip, 1; partial
Paralysis of one arm, 1
8
10
4
2
4
4
j
1
31        2
Good	
Good	
Rl
8
16
2
7
11
16
16
10
Good	
23
1
3
14
20
4
Good	
Building  good;   well
ventilated   and
heated
Good	
Good	
Good  	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good.
10
3
2
3
2
Orthopaedic,  1	
3
Whooping-cough,    17;    chicken-
pox,  4
this year.
Good.
111     11
7
8
Good
9
9
17
4
6
6
17
	
Building   fair;   heating   and    ventilation good
Good	
Good	
Good.
13
15
2
1
3
Chicken-pox,      51;      whooping-
cough,   1
Good.
Good.
Chicken - pox,      1;      whooping-
cough,  1
Good.
3
2
2
Good	
Pair	
Good	
Good
Chicken-pox, 18; diphtheria, 1..
Chicken - pox,      6;      whooping-
cough, 3
Good.
SCHOOLS.
Good    	
Yes.
3
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Heart,    1;   orthopaedic,    2;   corrected
vision,  7
Heart,    3;   orthopaedic,    3;   corrected
vision, 22
Heart,    1;   orthopaedic,    7;   corrected
vision, 24
4
	
5
Good	
Yes.
2
2
Yes.
	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Orthopaedic,  1; corrected vision, 31—
Heart,    1;   orthopaedic,    2;   corrected
vision,   6
Heart,    1;   orthopaedic,    2;   corrected
vision,  22
 i
6
1
3
2
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good     .             ....
Yes.
Yes.
Good
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
2
Good	
Yes.
2
Good	
Yes.
1
6
4
Good	
Yes.
Corrected vision, 5 ; tonsillectomies, 3 ;
teeth corrected, 5
Pulmonary, 1; tonsillectomy, 3	
1
1
Whooping-cough, 7; chicken-pox,
Good .
Good	
Whooping-cough,  13	
4 P 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
"3
Ph   .
ol
. o
a
'p.
a .
rH'T!
0)
CM    fl
°i
rT,   CD
fl
_o
fl
fl
cSg
OS
9 .2
«   . .
2 S
Oi   0i
OK
cd
cs
55 .-
si
+3 jfl
4) cd
£ £
on
CQ
'8
3
CO
H
T3
II
fl o
HEh
1
+H      .
"qj   S3
OH
■Sci
cd fl
0.3
HO
1
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O
Chilliwack—Continued.
R. McCaffrey	
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green	
Miss W. Green	
Miss W. Green	
Miss W. Green	
Miss W. Green	
Miss W. Green	
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
Miss W. Green
61
75
28
14
.27
156
163
14
196
52
73
75
23
93
35
66
25
151
62
24
194
24
15
17
20
29
17
293
29
52
57
21
21
542
178
28
47
28
82
26
68
23
27
137
97
138
55
24
32
28
17
85
61
75
28
14
27
156
163
14
196
52
73
75
23
90
33
58
25
145
57
22
192
23
11
16
18
25
16
282
29
52
52
18
20
498
168
27
46
27
81
23
65
22
24
133
90
130
51
20
28
28
16
79
!
4
4
2
2
3
8
4
4
5
5
4
6
39
31
5
40
14
16
21
13
4
4
7
13
9
9
■ 7
51
41
7
46
15
21
44
13
7
8
9
2
12
7
7
14
9
9
7
50
41
7
46
15
21
49
15
7
8
14
2
15
7
4
40
5
2
3
1
5
5
49
9
19
15
2
3
61
79
11
2
5
7
2
6
1
3
16
10
17
8
2
1
1
2
5
12
25
20
22
65
76
8
66
22
24
25
11
4
3
9
5
18
8
3
44
11
4
4
3
6
3
25
9
13
12
1
2
86
26
8
9
1
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
1
2
4
5
R. McCaffrey	
3
9
9
1
18
6
4
6
10
2
7
3
2
8
10
5
11
2
7
11
3
5
2
4
2
1
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
o
R. McCaffrey	
r
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
4
13
R. McCaffrey	
R. McCaffrey	
Coldstream:
S. G. Baldwin	
4
1
2
1
3
1
2
3
1
S. G. Baldwin-
Coauitlam:
Glen \	
Bruce Cannon	
1
1
1
1
10
1
1
15
Bruce Cannon	
Bruce Cannon	
o
Cowichan, North:
H. B. Rogers	
Miss L. Servos	
Miss L. Servos	
Miss L. Servos	
■
10
2
4
1
14
2
H. B. Rogers	
H. B. Rogers	
Delta:
A. A. King	
1
1
2
1
4
5
31
9
15
8
1
2
2
6
2
1
2
10
A. A. King	
1
2
3
19
3
9
7
2
2
4
3
7
A. A. King	
A. A. King	
16
3
1
2
6
A. A. King	
2
2
4
5
1
3
1
A. A. King	
A. A. King	
1
2
3
3
2
2
8
4
2
4
1
2
2
1
7
14
14
1
2
1
1
1
3
5
1
3
23
79
11
3
23
79
11
2
3
3
1
5
1
2
6
5
5
4
Esquimalt:
J. S. McCallum
P. McCaffrey	
Miss E. Morrison...
10
5
2
21
Kent:
P. McCaffrey	
Langley:
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Marr	
3
1
o
1
2
3
1
3
1
3
4
5
2
1
B. B. Marr	
6
4
9
5
4
16
15
18
10
4
4
4
4
9
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Man-	
2
1
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Marr	
1
1
1
1
1
B. B. Marr	
1
1
B. B. Marr	
Otter	
B. B. Marr	
Otter, South	
B. B. Marr	
Patricia	
B. B. Marr	
B. B. Marr	
1
2
2
B. B. Marr	
i
B. B. Marr	
. 1
1 BOARD
OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31
P 51
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
9
>
CO
9
1
o
m
6
tB
'-3
CJ
ft
a
!
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
g   i                   Past Tear.
bl     1
n
Condition of
Building.   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Corrected vision, 1; tonsillectomy, 3	
12
2
1
1
2
1
4
2
1
Good
Good
Good
Orthopedic,   1;  tonsillectomy,   6; corrected vision,  6
Corrected vision,   3;  tonsillectomy,   5;
orthopaedic, 2; pulmonary, 3
Mumps,   1;  measles,   1;   whooping-cough,  11
Chicken-pox,     10;     whooping-
cough, 16
Good.
5
1
Good	
Good
Orthopaedic,   2;   cardiac,   2;   asthma,
1;   appendix,   2;   corrected   vision,
11;   tonsillectomy, 6
Pulmonary,   3;   tonsillectomy,   5;   diabetes,  1
Pulmonary,   2;   cleft   palate,   1;   corrected vision,   3;  tonsillectomy,  2
Corrected   vision,    7;   pulmonary,    3;
tonsillectomy,   1
*
1
2
1
1
7
3
6
Measles, 39; whooping-cough, 15
Good	
Good.
Good
Inadequate.
Very poor.
Good
Yes.
Granular   lids,   1;   disabled   hand,   1;
impediment   in   speech,    1;   mitral
regurgitation,    1;   Meibomian   cyst;
lordosis from hip-disease,  1
1
Clean; adequate.
Clean;     adequate;
require disinfectant.
Repair of toilet and
basement
Additional  room  required
1
1
1
Pigeon-chested,   2;   styes,   1;   impediment in speech, 1; granular lids, 1
clean.
lack of water.
Clean;     adequate;
require disinfectant.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Not  crowded;  ventilation and heating
good
Not  crowded;   ventilation and heating
fair
Not crowded; ventilation and heating
good
Good
Infantile paralysis,   1; dumb,   1	
2
1
Clean
p.
4
3
Clean
4
	
Good
Mumps,  3	
Clean.
'
Good condition	
Good	
Clean
2
4
12
Diphtheria,  1	
Clean; adequate.
Good
No	
Good
i
Good	
Good    :.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good..   .
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
	
1
i
1    .
Chicken-pox; whooping-cough
Yes.
I
1
Good	
Yes.
1 r 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Ph   -
C "
5|
O   Oi
CW
Maple Ridge:
Albion	
Alexander Robinson..
Hammond..
Haney	
Maple Ridge..
Ruskin	
Webster's Corners..
Whonnock	
Yennadon (S. Lillooet
Mission:
Cedar "Valley	
Hatzic	
Mission Public
Silverdale	
Silverhill	
Stave Falls	
Stave Gardens:.
Steelhead	
Oak Bay:
Monterey	
J. N. Taylor..
I. N. Taylor-
Pea chland..
Penticton...
Wm. Buchanan..
H. McGregor	
Pitt Meadows .G. Morse
Richmond:
Bridgeport	
Lord Byng..
W. K. Hall..
W. K. Hall-
General Currie  W. K. Hall-
English .'\V. K. Hall-
Mitchell  W. K. Hall..
Saanich:
Cedar Hill ;D. Bernian...
Cloverdale  D. Berman..
Craigftower  D. Berman..
Gordon Head  D. Berman..
Keating  D. Berman..
Lake Hill...-  D. Berman..
MeKenzie Avenue  D. Berman..
Model School...
Prospect Lake-
Royal Oak	
Saanichton	
Saanich, West-
Strawberry Vale..
Tillicum	
Tolmie	
Salmon Arm:
Broadview	
Canoe, North	
Canoe, South	
Glenden	
Larch Hill	
Mount Ida	
Salmon Ann, West..
Sumas:
Huntingdon	
Kilgard	
Jas. P. Vye..
D. Berman..
D. Berman...
D. Berman..
Miss M. Harvey-
Miss C. Rose	
Miss M. Harvey..
D. Berman  Miss M. Harvey..
D. Berman  Miss E. Naden...
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H.
Miss H.
Miss H.
Miss H.
Miss H.
Miss H.
Miss H.
Miss H.
Fawcett-.
Fawcett-
Fawcett..
Fawcett-
Fawcett..
Fawcett-
Fawcett-
Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss H. Fawcett..
Miss Bradshaw....
Miss Bradshaw..
Miss M. A. Twiddy
Miss M. Harvey..
Miss M. Harvey..
Miss C. Rose	
Miss M. Harvey-
Miss M. Harvey-
Miss M. Harvey..
Miss C. Rose	
Drs. Beech & Beech.
Drs. Beech & Beech.
Drs. Beech & Beech.
Drs. Beech & Beech.
Drs. Beech & Beech.
Drs. Beech & Beech.
Drs. Beech & Beech.
J. M. McDiarmid-
J. M. McDiarmid..
Miss E. Naden..
Miss C. Rose	
Miss C. Rose..
19
159
208
273
83
102
70
407
34
27
30
16
18
49
64 0
179
430
600
28
27
102
171
284
19
149
204
264
82
31
80
101
20
65
70
407
33
27
29
16
18
44
640
174
420
500
20
23
95
170
274
115 110
55  55
60
59
156
64
63
92
27
59
59
57
151
64
59
101
25
52
300 298
58
256
23
22
66
59
28
26
21
21
31
27
38
30
54
30
70
70
85
80
20
45
49
12
9
11
13
6
19
14
69
14
4
7
7
2
34
14
154
21
185
15
10
7
9
10
13
153
42
50
110
5
5
6 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 53
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
9
3
ifl
at
6
SO
0J
ft
a
M
O
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
1
2
3
2
1
3
3
3
1
Satisfactory	
One     room     poorly
lighted; two rooms
rather crowded
Good	
4
3
Smallpox, 5; scarlet fever, 7
Chicken-pox;  whooping-cough
Diphtheria,     1;    scarlet    fever;
whooping-cough
Chicken-pox, 2; whooping-cough-
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
2
Water-supply unsatisfactory
Good	
Smallpox; whooping-cough	
Whooping-cough; chicken-pox
ment.
3
Water-supply unsatisfactory
Yes.
3
1
8
4
1
One     room     poorly
lighted
Good	
Yes.
1
3
3
3
Scarlet    fever;    whooping-cough;
chicken-pox
Chicken-pox; whooping-cough
Chicken-pox,   3	
for improvement
Fair	
.
Good	
1
Good	
Good.
.
2
1
Fair;  some  of  seats
and desks .poor
Well heated and ventilated;   no   overcrowding
Well heated and ventilated ;   no   overcrowding
Chicken-pox; mumps; measles	
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
asthma,  1; acne,  1; cleft palate,  1
Clean; adequate.
11
6
5
3
Scarlet    fever,    8;    mumps,    1;
whooping-cough,   8; smallpox,
3;  chicken-pox
Clean; adequate.
orthopaedic, 3
Good	
Good.
1; orthopaedic,  1
Measles, 1; smallpox, 1; chicken-
pox,  1
Infantile paralysis, 2; whooping-
cough,  25
Crowded	
Good	
Fair.
2
Good.
Good	
Good.
Fair	
Good	
Fair.
Good.
1
9
1
Posture,  2;  cardiac,   11; stammering,
2 ;  pulmonary,   4
1
1
3
1
ary,   2
Cardiac, 5; nephritis, 1; pulmonary, 1
Chicken-pox, 18; scarlet fever,  1
3
6
Pulmonary,   3;  cardiac,   1;  congenital
dislocation of hips, 1
Whooping-cough,   1;   diphtheria,
1; conjunctivitis,  2
Otitis media,   1; pertussis,  2
Good	
Yes.
1
o
3
umbilical hernia,  1
Conjunctivitis,    3;    measles,    1;
mumps, 1
Chicken-pox,       16;      conjunctivitis, 1
Chicken - pox,     2 8 ;     whooping-
cough,   1
Chicken-pox,   8;  diphtheria,   1;
scarlet fever,   1
1
1
7
8
3
1
1
Cardiac,    10;   pulmonary,   5;   strabismus, 3; posture, 1
Cardiac,    6;    pulmonary,    5;    strabismus,  2
1
OK	
Yes.
O.K....	
Yes.
O.K	
Yes.
O.K	
Yes.
O.K	
Yes.
O.K	
Yes.
O.K	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
better    water-supply,   and  sanitary
drinking-cups P 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL MUNICIPAL
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
0>
"■§ ri
w   .
.3 fl
a -r.
a cd
QJ   Cj
OK
cd
cd
ii
OJ    Cd
'V   M
aa
.19
fl
■a
-H
T3
!l
Riri
P
CJ jfl
ail
£ aj
Qfr
■a
* .,
1- TJ
cd fl
fa
«0
Name of School.
a
. o
li
ft
fl   .
rH •&
rT,   CB
c
o
s
0
"cd
P,
OS
t9
'o
Sumas—Continued.
26
139
315
24
82
195
22
29
23
26
15
102
25
59
35
44
101
79
59
72
33
58
166
150
34
130
46
99
282
185
•
52
373
331
1
23
130
308
24
75
189
22
26
22
24
14
101
25
57
35
37
94
77
56
71
29
52
159
146
34
129
46
98
282
180
48
340
310
1
5
56
1
6
18
2
3
13
12
3
13
41
2
19
99
2
6
8
2
1
3
11
165
6
82
1
15
56
F. W. Andrew	
Surrey:
Anniedale	
F. D. Sinclair	
5
5
1
3
8
1
2
1
1
7
10
Cloverdale	
F. D. Sinclair	
6
1
Colebrook	
F. D. Sinclair	
-
Crescent	
F. D. Sinclair	
I
5
4
4
1
5
3
3
3
Elgin	
F. D. Sinclair	
3
1
1
Grandview Heights	
F. D. Sinclair	
1
1
11
2
12
5
2
1
5
5
11
2
7
5
ll
2
1
1
1
2
1
Green Timbers...	
F. D. Sinclair..	
2
4
Hall's Prairie....'.	
Hjorth Road	
F. D. Sinclair..	
F. D. Sinclair	
1
3
1
1
4
1
4
6
2
2
2
Johnston Road	
F. D. Sinclair	
5
2
3
i
6
5
3
2
2
3
1
7
10
21
8
Kensington, East	
F. D. Sinclair..:.:::.;.
2
Kensington Prairie	
F. D. Sinclair	
1
F. D. Sinclair". _:_•- L 444—
1
2
1
2
3
2
5
4
3
4
2
2
2
1
1
9
1
Port kells.....:. __.„
F. D: Sinclair	
2
Port Mann	
F. D- Sinclair	
Strawberry Hill	
F. D. Sinclair	
F. D. Sinclair	
1
TyneHead	
Westminster, South....
F. D. Sinclair	
4
6
17
6
7
27
18
2
1
4
4
3
12
3
2
5
9
4
26
11
30
66
44
11
16
46
White Rock	
F. D. Sinclair	
Woodward's Hill	
F. D. Sinclair	
Vancouver, North i
G. F. Amyot..	
Miss N.Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
MissN. Armstrong.
Miss N. Armstrong.
2
1
1
8
2
9
4
11
38
21
7
6
8
18
15
25
10
29
59
42
11
99
71
90
31
49
230
123
24
174
113
11
3
7
29
19
G. F. Amyot	
G. F. Amyot—     ..
North Star	
Vancouver, West:
A. C. Nash	
A. C. Nash	
1
2
1
6
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
6
A. C. Nash	
RURAL AND
222
11
15
12
12
10
50
210
10
15
11
12
10
48
14
13
27
8
25
36
15
1
19,
18
18
35
5
8
17
4
2
4
1
5
28
1
10
6
4
K. Terry-	
1            1
5
2
7
A. L. Jones 4
2
1
1
2
3
7
4
1
2
6
1
5
4
1
6
1
1
1
3
1
2
2
2
1
1
G. R. Baker	
2
.1. E. Knipfel	
13
27
8
25
36
1
j. T. Steele-	
|
1
6
6
4
3
6
12
5
1
1
Alice Siding	
G. B. Henderson	
4
1
1 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
ri '   IfJfJf.LiM     UK'"   ii'i
P 55
SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc;.).        -, -
a
J
3
r*
1
6
ft
a
S
o
§
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Yeaif \
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, ..poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate^
2
Eczema,    3;   acne,    3;    ansemia,    6;
Frame  on  concrete;
good
Crowded; water not
fit- to drink
Basement damp; no
water       ;:
Needs painting.	
Good.  4
cardiac,    2;    pulmonary,    1;    conjunctivitis,   1
Good.
3
4
3
8
Good.
Anaemia,    2;    pigeon-chest,    1;    left
inguinal hernia,, 1
1      '"
Room   dark;     water
scanty
Good	
Good.
7 1
f
Mumps, 3	
Good.
i
Good	
Tongue-tie,  2; old infantile paralysis,
1;   eczema,   1;   D.A.H.,   1;   mitral
stynosis, 1
1
Good.
,    .  1.
i
i
Endocarditis,   2;   keloid,   1;   defective
1
Scarlet fever, 2	
Good	
Good.
palate due to operation, 1
..:::::.::
6
..     .
Good.
Good	
Basement     room
crowded; no water
Good.
5
Good.
1; impediment in speech,  1
"5
Water-supply   uncer-
-   tain;  rooms  need
painting
Crowded;    water
doubtful
impediment in speech,  1
2
1
3
2
3
Manual -.training
room inadequate..
-. 2; V.D.A^ 1; cleft palate, 1
■   due   to    operation,    1;    spinal   deformity,  1
Good	
Fair.
2
Diphtheria,   15;  diphtheria  carriers, 7; chicken-poy, 2
Good	
posture, 2; pallor, 3
Good	
4
4
Good	
hernia, 1; pallor, 5
4
2
Scarlet     fever,     4;     whooping-
cough,    3;   chicken-pox,    32;
conjunctivitis,  1
Mumps,     2;     conjunctivitis,     2;
German measles, 1 ,
Good	
pulmonary, 1; posture, 3; defective
speech,    1;    hydrocephalis,    1;    pallor, 4                    	
1
Good	
.speech, 4; posture, 1; pallor j 11   ,,
Both.
Good	
Good	
Both.
Both.
1
ASSISTED SCHOOLS.
Eczema,    1;   curvature   of   spine,    1;
bronchitis, 1; cardiac disease, 1
1
No epidemics during the year	
Good	
Poor	
One poor.
Fair.
	
Fair	
Yes.
Water-supply bad
Poorly ventilated
Good	
Adequate.
Good.
Good.
Influenza	
Influenza	
Good	
Yes.
Fairly   adequate   in
every way -
Fair	
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory.
No epidemic or other diseases....
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
of long  standing
Clean; adequate. P 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
3
. o
53
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119
23
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106
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9
12
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23
10
25
32
13
23
7
12
32
12
9
18
7
8
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10
10
15
36
21
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12
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41
23
10
25
7
18
8
7
7
26
95
14
8
29
61
34
8
24
7
12
24
21
15
12
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15
16
19
9
7
7
15
34
17
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18
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117
22
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104
23
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9
11
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10
21
32
13
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12
31
12
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18
6
8
13
10
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35
21
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12
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39
23
10
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17
8
7
7
7
21
93
14
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29
61
34
8
22
7
12
19
21
14
12
25
15
14
19
i
i
i
i
2
4
2
3
3
11
14
4
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2
4
22
8
5
31
5
4
1
5
i
5
1
1
2
3
0
6
40
3
4
13
5
2
1
3
3
3
i
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
6
28
2
6
8
i
4
1
5
1
1
6
2
35
5
G H Tutill               '	
5
10
2
1
1
13
1
13
6
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
5
4
1
W. A. Watson
2
1
6
8
1
1
4
..   ..   |	
1
8
2
10
10
8
14
3
5
17
2
3
7
3
1
5
2
5
1
21
7
1
1
5
1	
2
3
4
1
4
3
3
G. R. Baker	
	
3
8
1
2
7
2
2
3
2
3
2
1
M. G. Archibald	
....... ..
2
M. G. Archibald	
2
2
1
1
1
H. A. Christie	
1
3
3
2
R. D. Rush 1	
1
2
W. H. Wood    .
	
1
8
5
10
3
12
3
6
H. S. Trefry	
4
2
1
Belford	
1
7
2
1
3
2
5
1
1
1
20
9
10
Bella Coola	
3
3
8
4
24
12
F. T. Stanier	
2
4
IS
15
5
2
2
1
R. W. Irving	
3
7
2
1
4
18
2
2
2
3
3
2
3
10
14
4
6
1
9
1
2
T. C. Holmes	
1
1
17
2
Big Creek	
Big Eddy	
3
Big Lake	
3
1
1
2
2
N. J. Paul	
6
4
1
3
5
»J
1
3
25
1
2
6
3
2
5
4
2
8
6
1
4
7
1
1
4
1
3
3
11
2
2
1
1
4
4
30
8
3
1
26
2
5
12
2
1
3
10
4
6
10
5
4
4
3
12
10
2
K. Terry	
2
3
3
I
1
3
1
2
J. E. Whitworth	
Blind Bay...-	
4
2
1
Bloedel	
5
1
3
G. A. Ootmar	
T. H. Lougheed	
Mrs. Grindon	
10
21
K. Terry	
2
2
4
7
4
2
3
1
1
o
2
R. Gibson.—	
2
1
2
1
2
'     4
3
10
5
A. E. Kydd	
	
2
3
2
1
W. H. Wood	
	
1
10
F. Inglis	
6
1
1
2
1
2
7
7
1
__...    . _        ... BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 5
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
'  J
©
>
ta
©
9
m
6
a
a -
S
M
g
y
o
fe
to
|
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Sufficient for a number of pupils
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Not  crowded;  ventilation and heating
satisfactory
Excellent; adequate-
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Yes.
Not crowded; poorly
ventilated; well
heated
Influenza	
Good	
Good.
  Good	
Yes.
     Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
O.K.
O.K.
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Good.	
O.K	
O.K.
O.K.
O.K.
Good	
2
Good	
Good	
Fair.
Overcrowded;   poorly
ventilated   and
lighted
Good	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good —
Two;  fair.
O.K	
Yes.
1
2
2
Good..	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
Good	
Good.
2
Overcrowded	
Fair.
Yes.
Very satisfactory
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Flush-toilets.
Good	
Good	
clean.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
Not   crowded;   well
heated   and   ventilated
Good	
1
kept     in     very
good condition. P 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
RURAL J
I.ND
Name of School.
a
3
. o
rT, a
ft
fl   .
Ph "fl
?!
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
fl
o
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fl
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123
15
20
132
21
71
102
22
19
11
8
14
17
53
29
12
8
6
78
26
58
62
12
25
11
30
23
10
62
9
77
17
24
12
50
19
20
17
26
56
27
97
21
51
13
9
17
12
7
20
10
12
10
62
11
10
44
8
70
42
44
100
15
20
120
21
71
98
22
19
11
6
14
15
50
28
12
8
6
78
25
57
61
12
24
10
30
23
10
61
9
76
17
24
12
49
19
18
17
21
55
24
89
21
51
13
9
17
11
6
17
10
12
8
60
10
10
41
8
70
42
43
4
8
2
3
3
6
2
3
4
25
8
1
IP
2
18
37
11
2
2
2
4
3
24
,4
7
8
30
6
12
39
5
31
49
13
8
3
4
7
5
42
4
5
3
1
10
12
2
3
2
16
72
13
6
2
6
9
Bridesville	
J. C. Stuart	
3
2
2
J. H. Palmer	
i
2
2
7
1
4
53
1
I
12
9
1
1
F. E. Coy	
2
6
22
2
4
24
P. M. Wilson	
1
5
1
1
10
K. Terry	
G. H. Tutill	
1
1
1
1
Brown Creek	
2
2
2
1
4
4
2
3
6
4
1
3
26
9
2
Burgoyne Bay	
R. D. Rush	
7
1
2
2
1
3
27
..1
Burtondale	
K.Terry	
1
1
1
R. W. Irving	
1
2
1
2
6
1
i
1
6
2
3
1
6
5
3
10
5
1
6
5
3
11
6
2
4
4
1
3
3
15
4
10
3
4
3
4
6
3
13
6
38
4
14
1
4
5
1
3
7
8
2
5
13
2
3
14
7
5
4
11
1
3
6
7
26
12
"6
6
.... 5
1
T. A. Briggs	
3
1
2
3
Canyon	
6
H. S. Trefry	
Carlin Siding	
Carroll's Landing	
Carson	
Carrier	
E. Buckell...	
1
H. F. Tyerman	
4
3
4
2
2
2
1
6
' "7
4
35
1
24
3
9
5
3
6
12
9
8
6
2
52
5
24
6
3
7
1
o
5
2
3
4
15
2
4
6
6
21
in
4
1
2
i
W. Truax	
1
1
1
t). Pi Hanington	
Miss J. Worthing-
ton
1
2
i
4
l
J. H. Palmer
3
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
8
7
1
Castle Rock	
Cawston	
G. R. Baker	
D. McCaffrey	
Mrs. Thomson	
	
1
i
1
3
3
2
-
2
4
4
V. E. R. Ardagh
W. Scatchard	
Miss F. B. Kemp..
2
6
J. H. Palmer	
1
1
i
3
2
	
1
2
4
2
4
H. A. W. Brown	
Chase Creek	
Chase River	
Cherry Creek	
38
4
13
1
1
3
D. P. Hanington
Miss Worthington.
3
1
7
9
3
2
1
Chilco	
W. Ross Stone	
3
3
1
1
2
2
2
Chinook Cove	
K. Terry ....
1
2
11
4
W. H. Wood	
Christina Lake-	
Chu Chua— ■	
W. Truax	
K. Terry	
5
7
2
2
2
Clayton :	
H. A. W. Brown	
K. Terry	
2
2
3
3
3
2
4
2
4
3
12
1
4
2
1
5
2
3
W. E. Bavis	
Coal Creek	
5
2
8
1
1
2
J. E. Whitworth	
Cobble Hill,—. --—.-.—
F. T. Stanier.M	
Cowichan Health
Centre
2
1
21|        2
1
1
-
• BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.                                          P 59
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
{Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).       y -1.
q
1
CO
9
cd
q
0?
d
to
"43
9
Q
a
a
g
o
i
3
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past, Year,.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
8
No.  1, crowded; No.
2, screens needed;
No.  3,. good; No.
4, old barn ;
Nos.   2   and   3,
yes.
Well ventilated and
heated;  np,t  overcrowded
Crowded;   well   ventilated and heated
0 K
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
0 K
Tachycardia,    6;   vomiting   spells,    1;
blepharitis,     1;    mitral    regurgitation,  2
Chicken-pox;    scarlet    fever;
whooping-cough .   .
Good
•*
Good;   poor  lighting
Two; poor.
Clean; adequate.
3
2
Satisfactory.....	
0 K
Good	
All   adequate   and
kept     in     very
good condition. _(-
1   pupil   is  very   much   crippled;   old
infantile  paralysis  case;  very little
use of arms or legs
Wooden  building  in
good   repair,   but
not   well   heated;
stove     unsatisfac-
tpry
Two;   fair   repair;
clean.
Two; clean.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
3
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Yes.,
Clean; adequate.
Poor condition.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
Inadequate.
Yes.
1
Fair.
Clean.
Clean.
Clean.
Two; O.K.
Yes.   .. ,.
Yes.
Good	
O.K ;	
8
Chicken-pox, 12	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Yes.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Two.; clean.
Yes.
Good.
Very good condition-
1
Good	
Thyroid, 3; flat chest, 1	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Poor.
To be attended to.
Clean; adequate.
Good	
Not    crowded;   well
,  heated and ventilated
Catarrhal throats,  2; cardiac case,   1;
defective posture,  2
Influenza	
No—.	
O.K.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Four;    in    good
shape. .
 1	
4
3
Satisfactory	
Not   overcrowded;
well ventilated and
heated
Rheumatic,, 2; scarlet fever, 4...
Pneumonia, 1; septic throat, 1..
 [ | |	
1            1            1 P 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
cND
RURAL A
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School- Nurse.
co
a
, o
II
P.
3   .
Ph "fl
CO
CM   fl
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"o
Columbia Gardens	
12
14
49
171
19
8
26
76
64
47
14
31
149
20
206
14
10
16
13
10
14
13
24
54
10
22
12
14
33
11
32
11
35
10
97
21
14
11
14
23
7
8
14
13
11
10
ii
14
48
168
18
8
26
76
63
36
13
30
144
10
194
12
7
16
13
10
14
13
23
52
10
22
7
13
32
11
30
11
32
10
94
21
14
10
14
22
7
8
14
13
11
10
2
i
i
6
9
3
1
3
6
1
7
35
2
2
2
i
i
12
2
29
3
50
5
6
2
8
2
9
50
5
6
1
10
20
5
1
3
3
S. Mills	
1
1
1
1
1
11
2
i
i
2
8
60
18
R. Elliot...-..."	
7
11
2
5
12
9
4
D. S. McCaffle	
L. H. Servos	
Cowichan Health
Centre
F. T. Stanier	
1
5
10
5
3
7
30
5
9
5
24
4
10
3
3
1
2
Cranberry Lake	
Crescent Valley	
28
1
1
2
4
6
1
25
3
1
3
20
3
23
3
Creston, West..	
Criss Creek	
M. G. Archibald	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
	
4
4
3
1
1
2
1
5
14
2
3
'2
s
3
2
3
3
10
3
29
10
2
Curzon	
Darlington	
1
2
2
4
1
16
26
6
'      6
6
6
3
7
5
7
3
15
11
4
2
9
20
4
3
7
2
1
2
1
8
7
4
1
6
1
4
1
1
1
Dawson Creek	
Dawson Creek, North	
Dawson Creek, South	
W. A. Watson	
2
5
14
2
2
5
1
W. A. Watson	
W. A. Watson	
1
5
T. C. Holmes	
o
1
3
2
1
Deep Cove	
S. W. Leiske	
H. W. Keith	
Miss G. Grant	
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
1
10
1
15
2
10
2
29
Departure Bay.	
4
3
1
W. H. Mclntyre	
4
1
	
7
1
13
3
6
1
22
2
W. H. Mclntyre	
6
3
1
1
1
Diamond	
D. P. Hanington
R. D. Rush	
Miss Worthington.
1
2
3
Donley's Landing	
C. H., Ployart	
Miss B. Newbolt.-.
Miss F. B. Kemp..
1
1
4
1
4
3
7
1
V. E. It. Ardagh	
2
1
2
3
3
1
H. A. Christie	
2
F. V. Agnew..,.	
R. W. Irving	
7
1
Eagle Valley	
Edgewater	
Edgewood	
Edith Lake	
Egmont	
Elk Bay.    .
E. Buckell	
31
17
29
9
22
7
13
14
23
45
22
19
21
12
17
8
27
17
29
9
22
7
13
13
22
38
22
19
20
12
17
6
2
2
1
3
2
1
3
11
1
3
9
8
17
4
3
10
5
2
2
4
5
4
1
15
4
8
7
16
24
12
1
7
8
11
2
1
2
2
J. E. H. Kelso	
1
1
2
R. W. Irving	
2
3
8
1
3
1
Elk Lake	
Elko	
1
4
8
1
1
8
1
1
2
6
5
1
5
5
1
4
3
2
3
4
7
1
6
1
19
H. A. Christie	
Ellison	
Mrs. Grindon	
6
1
1
1
2
3
H. W. Keith	
6
1
Engen	
Enterprise	 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 61
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease,  etc.).
d
1
>
Oi
05
O
ca
1
■ S
l-H
s
p .
bD
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year. ■   -.  ■
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.             -   -
pendicitis, 2
Good	
Good               	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Junior   room   poorly
ventilated  and
poor light
Good	
Yes.
1
Good.
1
Diphtheria, 4 ; whooping-cough, 8.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Wooden  building  in
poor   repair   on   a
poor site
Good	
Mumps; influenza	
Good.
Satisfactory	
O.K.
Yes.
Good	
Pertussis; scarlet fever	
Yes.
!
Not    crowded;    well
heated and ventilated
Good	
Good	
Good	
I
Good	
Condition satisfactory
buildings.
Well kept	
Yes.
One   rooms" occupied
at present and one
teacher  in  charge
of school; ventilation   and   heating
adequate and satisfactory; not overcrowded
Good	
adequate.
Clean.
Good	
Good.
Clean and sanitary-
heart, 2
boys', fair.
Floors should be
oiled
Good	
O.K.
Satisfactory	
Good	
O.K.
Fair.
O.K	
Two;  O.K.
Chicken-pox,  5	
Good	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good.
Good	
O.K.
2
 1	
Good	
Good.
Well kept	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
1
Good	
Good.
Yes.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Chicken-pox,  1;  scarlet fever,   2
Good	
Yes.
Good ,
Both.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good.
Fair	 P 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL ANL
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
H
a
Ph   .
,   "^
a
3  .
°1
fl"
p
a
"3
*" .1h
P
£ o
co co
CO
>
s i
co ,o
co .2
O
'■G c
S U
Oi   Q
an
"cd
cd
si
33 2
CO HH
CU  cd
CO   £
osa
'3
fl
•a
■H
T3
Ss
IS
3
8 •**
Oh
fc, "fl
cd fl
%S
WO
co'
'3
HH   CO
S
OS
a>
O
49
18
18
11
60
6
46
G2
15
10
63
15
47
17
17
11
58
5
44
62
15
9
62
14
1
3
3
5
5
2
3
Se
i
9
6
3
■2
42
■1
4
2
	
1
Errington	
Miss M. Griffin
1
2
4
1
7
1
2
Mrs. Grindon	
Miss Worthington.
4
D. P. Hanington
2
3
6
1
1
4
1
1
1
3
2
4
1
ll
7
3
39
13
5
1
1
1
.1
 |
3
2
4	
2
!
2
1
7
1
2
1
7
2
10
4
Fife .
W. Truax.	
2
1
H. A. W. Brown
H. A. Christie    	
9
7
6
8
11
7
10
48
33
64
12
46
28
41
8
12
13
25
12
22
42
118
51
72
9
9
20
12
11
27
18
20
8
54
22
18
11
26
53
12
45
21
8
29
14
15
115
19
10
163
9
7
6
2
9
7
9
48
33
64
12
44
27
38
8
11
11
25
12
22
38
93
50
70
9
9
20
12
10
26
16
17
8
54
22
18
11
26
50
11
42
21
7
|     27
13
12
113
15
10
1   163
1
1
2
1
1
11
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
3
1
4
2
1
12
12
24
2
18
7
4
3
5
4
6
2
12
5
12
4
21
4
6
5
2
1
4
2
3
6
5
6
1
1
A. K. Connolly  ..-
2
2
4
8
6
18
5
3
H. S. Trefry	
1
5
12
6
9
5
8
6
8
7
1
8
16
11
H. S. Trefry	
31
3
5
1
1
H. A. W. Brown	
F. W. Green	
1
6
1
2
3
1
1
2
1
1
11
4
5
1
2
2
2
1
4
4
2
2
6
2
3
8
3
H. S. Trefry	
1
1
6
1
1
2
	
3
16
3
8
21
1
4
6
2
3
2
1
2
18
15
4
13
4
3
15
4
3
13
1
6
18
2
60
1
6
6
10
1
3
1
14
Miss M. Griffin
1
1
2
3
3
2
1
3
3
3"
3
9
W. Truax	
6
2
1
1
3
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
R. D. Rush	
2
2
C. H. West ...
1
.
H. A. Christie	
R. D. Rush	
6
3
2
1
2
2
6
2
9
7
1
1
R. D. Rush...	
1
1
2
Gill	
11
2
2
6
2
2
6
3
1
21
3
1
41
4
2
J. T. Steele.—	
3
3
6
2
2
9
Glade	
11
1
2
2
6
6
17
2
2
5
P. S. Tennant	
2
!
2
4
5
7
1
2
28
|
Miss B. Jenkins
2
5
3
6
10
13
1
1
P. Ewert	
3
4
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
14
8
I. Bastow Hudson....
J. C. Stuart:	
Miss H. Kelly
Lake)
Mrs. G. V. Yard...
1
30
31
1
1
1
1
'
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 63
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,-
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
a
1
CO
.1
■s
d
a
1
p.
a
i
rl
O
&
bo
S
Acute Fever9 which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
BuildihgJ   State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
t>
m
S
Good —	
Not   crowded;   well
heated and ventilated
Good	
Good.
Good: :..	
l
Good-... ..       	
Yes.-
Seats  in  one school
are   too   close   together; alterations
recommended
Capacity   in   Junior
Divs.   I.   and   II.
satisfactory
Well kept	
cardiac disease,  1; paralysis
adequate.
Yes.
5
Very nervous and excitability marked, 1
O.K	
Yes.
Fair	
[
Excellent; adequate-
Satisfactory	
Good —
Yes.
Good.
Good	
Good	
O.K.
Good	
All   adequate   and
Good	
kept  in  very
good condition.
Good	
Both.
■*
Good	
Good.
22
3
Good	
Good.
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Yes.
Mumps; influenza	
Good	
Good.
 1	
Good	
O.K.
Good	
I
Good-	
.....   .....
Good	
Both.
Rather crowded	
Good.
Chicken-pox ....
Fair	
Good	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
Chicken-pox	
Clean.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
!
Satisfactory	
Not    crowded;    well
heated and ventilated
Satisfactory	
O.K.
.....    1   	
Clean;   adequate.
O.K.
Satisfactory	
Good	
O.K.
mia, 3
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Dirty.
Good	
O.K .....
Good	
kept   in   very
good condition.
O.K.
Whooping-cough; influenza	
Lighting   and   venti
Good.
lation poor
Good	
.               .
Adequate.
Good	
 |	
1
Yes.
flat chest, 2; atrophy of right thigh
and    calf-muscles     (result    of    congenital    talipes    equinovarus),    1;
secondary anaemia,   1
i
j
i P 04
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
Ph   .
_ •='
. 'o
53
<, co
'3,
fl  .
firg
<« a
o"l
fl"
o
fl
fl
"cd
'^7d
£ +H
£ a
OJ   CO
as
co o
co .S
CO
fc ti
33 n
%   QJ
CM
*3
Z
el
co cd
*oj £
on
'3
fl
CO
-fl
H
|1
co
>
CO £
co 2
Oh
-fl
co   .
MS
3,3
BO
co"
fc,
'3
O
Grandview  Beach	
H. W. Keith	
16
11
7
7
15
28
25
75
16
11
7
7
15
28
23
66
6
3
l
1
10
7
9
5
13
4
15
3
i
4
4
4
5
4
10
3
20
T. C. Holmes	
1
2
5
9
1
3
1
4
2
H. W. Keith	
4
1
6
6
1
(No    examination
on    account    of
late arrival)
5
22
37
6
239
17
7
31
18
24
23
27
45
14
12
17
7
16
38
7
80
13
6
18
35
12
80
12
9
11
8
7
25
9
10
9
18
117
23
16
10
21
58
13
7
12
10
13
32
7
12
14
5
22
37
6
217
15
6
30
15
24
22
25
43
10
12
14
7
16
36
76
13
6
17
34
10
80
10
9
11
8
7
24
9
10
9
18
117
18
15
7
7
21
57
13
7
12
10
12
32
7
12
14
1
i
6
3
3
4
2
34
2
1
3
I. B. Hudson	
Miss H. Kelly	
1
2
4
1
1
2
1
2
3
9
23
2
2
12
5
8
12
10
17
10
11
A. K. Connolly	
2
i
i
1
3
4
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
2
8
1
3
4
5
2
10
1
16
6
14
15
14
27
2
3
4
4
14
2
18
3
1
3
12
4
40
2
1
5
0
2
W. H. Mclntyre	
3
W. A. Watson	
3
L. B. Wrinch	
1
1
2
4
4
11
Heffley Creek           	
1
P. S. Tennant	
2
1
3
1
1
5
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
5
7
1
20
5
1
1
9
1
P. S. Tennant	
H. W. Keith	
1
Miss M. Griffin
1
1
Hilltop	
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
o
20
S
1
2
1
1
3
9
6
2
4
3
15
15
3
2
3
2
2
5
3
2
H. A. W. Brown	
2
2
1
1
7
2
4
8
2
1
3
2
15
18
3
1
2
12
15
3
2
3
4
1
5
3
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
3
W. H. Wood
4
2
17
14
1
4
2
9
4
2
5
2
3
1
8
3
1
1
3
4
J  E. H. Kelso
1
3
3
1
1
2
1
2
3
4
2
7
10
11
1
24
C. H. Ployart	
Miss Newholt	
R. D. Rush	
	
H. S. Trefry     	
2
1 	
1
11
2
9
2
H. A. Christie	
2
2
1
1
2
S. W. Leiske	
Miss G. Grant..
Mrs. Grindon	
5
1
4
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
G. H. Tutill     	
R. B. White	
1
1
2
2
4
4
1
*>
2
4
7
1
3
Kelly Creek
1
1
2
1
W. A. Watson	
(Unable   to   reach
school on account
of bad roads)
Mrs. Grindon	
Mrs. Grindon	
60
11
59
7
14
1
1
3
2
23
4
34
8
1
21
4 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 65
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
a
s
>
9
3
W
6
.£?
OJ
a
a
E
S
s
fl
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
O.K.
Good	
Fair.
Good -	
Good.
Mumps	
Good	
Yes.
Yes,
I
New building	
Good ,—
Good.
Yes.
Ventilation poor	
Yes.
2
Good ...
Good.
20
Good	
Good :	
Good     	
Good	
Heart   2
Good	
Mumps; influenza	
Good	
Good.
Chicken-pox,  6	
Good	
Good.
O.K	
Good	
Good.
Poorly ventilated
Not    crowded;    well
heated and ventilated
Good.
2
1
1
Good	
Good.
Roomy;   heated   and
ventilated
Satisfactory	
Good-         	
adequate.
both sexes.
2
Good
tention.
Good
Yes.
i
Excellent; adequate-
Good
Yes.
1,
Satisfactory	
Good	
Fair	
Good
|
Satisfactory	
kept      in      very
good condition.
i
i
Overcrowded;   poorly
heated and ventilated
Floors    should    be
oiled
fused to be examined, all from one
family,   and   are   reported   mentally
deficient and hard cases to handle)
kept fairly clean.
Club-foot,   1	
3
Good
Satisfactory	
Condition   satisfactory
Clean; adequate.
2
Good; adequate.
Good
Adequate.
Satisfactory	
Good
3
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory	
Good
Sanitation good	
Cardiac, 4; scoliosis, 2; anaemic, 1	
1
2
Chicken-pox,    1;   influenza,    8;
German measles, 3
Good	
Good
Good; adequate.
1 P 66
BRITISH
COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
p
Ph    .
■a
SJj
. o
K co
3,
VH    fl
6 9
y.  9
fl
o
fl
fl
"cd
it
2.  HH
£a
QJ   9
ait
9
>
CS .23
Qt>
Q|
cd
CO   CO
ca
"cd
cd
CD  %
"■3-fl
*C0   £
"H
'3
c
CO
T3
H
co J
&JJ ,2
fl o
CO   m
OH
■8.
SS
cd fl
11
CO
fcH
'3
■ a
Dr. McCaffrey	
W. H. Wood	
Mrs. Thomson	
82
11
11
13
7
528
10
5
8
11
9
8
9
17
144
13
8
8
19
28
7
9
26
9
10
19
19
63
28
12
6
8
8
14
8
64
17
33
21
12
15
27
16
13
7
7
20
38
92
20
24
6
14
14
11
54
58
6
8
15
21
46
10
20
23
21
19
32
20
8
81
11
11
13
i
4
7
3
2
13
6
32
4
7
8
7
Kettle Valley	
Kidd	
3
7
3
120
3
1
1
1
2
1
5
5
3
6
6
9
2
1
50
520
10
3
i
4
1
2
10
43
96
1
Kincolith	
D. J. Macdonald	
Kingcome Inlet	
Kingfisher	
B. F. Johnson	
5
2
H. W. Keith	
6
11
4
4
7
14
144
12
8
8
\
2
1
1
2
3
35
2
1
3
g
30
3
6
2
2
3
7
2
8
2
2
3
6
9
4
i
1
Kinsol	
Dr. Garner	
Miss B. Jenkins
Kispiox	
Kitchener	
L. B. Wrinch	
	
1
4
2
2
G. B. Henderson	
2
3
3
10
1
V. E. R. Ardagh
C. H. Ployart	
Miss F. B. Kemp...
i
3
2
2
R. W. Irving	
Miss B. Jenkins
2
10
11
7
5
4
2
2
9
1
1
20
8
9
25
8
10
17
18
61
27
10
6
8
8
14
8
64
17
29
14
10
15
24
10
10
6
7
20
36
91
20
24
6
12
12
8
52
58
6
8
15
21
45
10
18
22
21
19
30
19
8
5
1
H. W. Hill	
Mrs. C. A. Lucas...
Lac la Hache	
A. K. Connolly	
1
8
2
S. Mills	
1
1
5
2
3
4
5
12
4
4
6
W. A. Watson	
1
3
2
2
4
2
3
2
i
i
3
Langford	
Miss II. Kelly
4
3
6
F. W. Green	
2
2
9
1
3
1
5
2
2
8
1
4
4
5
5
5
4
7
4
4
2
2
1
1
5
1
8
8
1
4
1
6
5
38
4
2
1
1
2
G. A. C. Roberts	
1
1
1
3
Lee	
1
7
1
1
3
2
2
2
5
4
4
4
1
2
3
2
4
3
2
2
8
1
6
2
9
5
3
9
3
9
10
4
10
1
3
1
3
3
4
3
3
J. T. Steele	
3
3
3
4
J. T. Steele	
1
2
5
5
7
1
Louis Creek (Upper)	
K. Terry	
1
1
G. H. Tutill	
1
1
5
F. W. Green	
'
1
2
2
2
2
5
1
J. H. Palmer	
1
1
5
1
F. T. Stanier	
2
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
2
7
1
2
2
3
9
2
7
12
3
2
19
2
4
0
7
9
4
6
8
4
6
18
6
3
Maple Grove	
Mara	
1
1
1
2
3
H. W. Keith	
1
4
1
1
3
W. Ross Stone	
W. Scatchard	
1
2
3
1
1
2
J. C. S.Dunn	
1
C. H. West	
1
2
Miss B. Jenkins
5
2
1
19
1
4
10
3
1
H. A. Christie	
1
1
| BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 67
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
CO
9
1
ta
d
_ba
"r>
9
ft
a
a
s
P
bo
a
s
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Scarlet fever, 2; smallpox,  2
Good	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Fair .-.	
In   good   condition;
less crowded; well
heated and ventilated
Satisfactory	
Good	
O.K.
■
i
enuresis,   1;   blepharitis,   2;   hydrocephalus,  1; cleft palate,  1
Good.
	
Good	
Pertussis,   6; chicken-pox,   6
Dusty location	
Good	
O.K.
Mumps; influenza	
Good	
Good.
Good ,
Good	
O.K	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Fair	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Two; good.
3
2
Excellent	
Good	
anaemia,    2;    orthopaedic,    1;    pigmentation,  1
Good	
Good	
Fulfils     its     needs
adequately
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Crowded	
Fair	
Satisfactory	
Receptacle   should
be cleaned.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Sanitation good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good, hut needs interior painting
Good     .
Good	
Good 	
Good	
Scabies.- _	
Good	
Satisfactory .,
Good	
Not   crowded;   well
heated and ventilated
Fair only	
Satisfactory	
Good	
quate.
Clean; adequate.
0 K
Clean;  adequate.
1 P cs
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
Xm
w
rt
ft
'ft
£
rH      .
Xi
. o
!5§
°a
d 3
^ o3
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S..-2
si
co  co
1 ri
fc    tj)
'£ c
CM
Oca
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fl
9
Xi
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X)
9
■t.
Ph
Meadowvale	
Meadow Valley.
Medora Creek...
Menzinger	
Metchosin	
Meldrum Creek.
Michel-Natal	
Midway	
Milburn	
Mill Bay	
Minto	
Miocene	
Mirror Lake	
Mission Creek	
Mitchell Bay	
Moberly	
Monte Lake	
Montney	
Montrose	
Morrissey	
Mountain Ridge....
Mountain View	
Mount McPherson.
Mount Olie	
Moyie	
Mud River	
Myn caster	
McAllister	
McBride	
MeConnell Creek...
MacKenzie	
McLure	
McMurdo	
Nadina River	
Nakusp..	
Nanaimo Bay	
Nanoose Bay	
Naramata	
Needles	
New Denver	
Newgate	
New Hazelton	
Newlands	
Newlands, North..
Nickel Plate	
Nicola	
Nicomen	
Nithi River	
Nixon Creek	
Noosatsum	
North Bend	
Northfleld	
North Pine	
North Saanich..
Norwegian Creek-
Notch Hill	
Ocean Falls	
Okanagan	
W. Ross Stone..
P. W. Andrew..
0. Morris	
G. Rr Baker...	
1. Bastow Hudson..
J. E. Knipfel	
G. F. Young..
W. H. Wood..
G. R. Baker...
P. T. Stanier..
E. R. Hicks	
A. K. Connolly	
D. J. Barclay	
G. A. Ootmar	
B. F. Johnson	
Paul Ewert	
K. Terry	
H. A. W. Brown..
R. D. Nasmyth..
D. Corsan	
P. Ewert	
M. F. Lucas	
A. L. Jones	
H. L. Burris	
F. W. Green	
H. S. Trefry	
W. H. Wood	
A. K. Connolly...
M. F. Lucas	
W. H. Mclntyre..
H. A. McLean...
K. Terry	
P. Ewert	
T. C. Holmes....
H. P. Tyerman..
O. G. Ingham....
R. D. Nasmyth..
F. W. Andrew...
J. E. H. Kelso-
A. Francis	
H. A. Christie..
L. B. Wrinch...
J. T. Steele	
J. T. Steele	
D. McCaffrey	
G. H. Tutill	
W. H. Mclntyre-
D. B. Lazier	
E. L. Garner	
H. A. McLean....
A. E. Kydd	
O. G. Ingham j	
H. A. W. Brown I	
S. W. Leiske  Miss G. Grant..
Cowichan Health
Centre
(School closed).
(School closed).
Miss B. Jenkins..
W. H. Wood	
W. Scatchard	
P. P. Smyth I	
G. A. Ootmar  Mrs. Grindson..
12|
8]
I
13
12
33
362]
371..
I
9
25
74
7
9
75
10
9
16
18
13
10
10
11
9
30
21
10
4
10
64
15
12
7
16
21
3!)
9
23
10
921
551
24
13
19
171
48
13
19
171
43
4       17
3
1 1
I
30
7I
15
1
39
18
1
9
2
3
4
1 BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 69
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,  Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
ri
1
9
9
IS
at
9
ta
d
.5?
9
ft
a
i—i
a
M
O
bo
g
E
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Yes.
Frame;    fair   condition
Satisfactory	
Two outhouses;
clean.
Two; clean.
Good	
Yes.
Adequate.
mia, -1
Ventilation  by  door
and   window;   no
ante-room;   windows, two on each
side,    low    down;
poor  ventilation
16 cases of scarlet fever  (13 of
school age)
Pidic,  2
Lower room crowded
needs  more light
Good	
Influenza	
Good.
i          1          i
' 1
i
2	
Acne, 2; influenza	
Good	
Two; fair.
Stye,   1                            	
1                      1
Good	
Good	
Fair.
I         2
.....i	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Draughty;   not   well
heated
Satisfactory	
Building   in   bad
shape
Good	
Yes.
O.K.
Dirty.
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good.
Yes;
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Satisfactory _	
Fair	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Very   unsuitable
building
Satisfactory	
O.K.
Fair.
2
O.K.
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Good	
O.K.
Good	
kept   in   very
good condition.
Frame;   fair   condition
Well kept	
Whooping-cough, 6	
clean.
lung;   rickets;   septic   condition   of
gums
1
Good
Good.
Typhoid fever	
Influenza; sore throat	
Fair.
1
Log building; clean;
well   lighted   and
ventilated
door    closets;
boys'  and  girls'
closets in apposition, with
no   division   by
fence,  etc.
Satisfactory 	
Good
Good.
Good
Old rickets,  2	
Good-
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Sanitation good	
Good	
Excellent  	
Condition satisfactory
Satisfactory-	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Good	
0 K
1
Chicken-pox	
1     1
1
Influenza,  1	
Cardiac.  3;  scoliosis,   2; anaemic,  2...
3 P 70
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
&
3
rU      .
. o
rr. a.
p.
9   .
>— ti
°s
IS
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is
3
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9     .
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OJ  9
73
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O
Mrs. Grindon	
Miss Kitteringham
Mrs. Thomson	
Miss Kitteringham
27
38
8
156
14
12
19
38
8
153
13
12
3
2
1
9
i
5
1
3
3
1
33
1
6
9
10
5
31
3
4
13
8
6
23
5
1
53
1
R. B. White	
Dr. McCaffrey	
G. H. Kearney	
1
3
Olalla	
1
2
35
A. K. Connolly	
T. C. Holmes	
13
9
8
22
16
33
62
41
7
23
10
9
13
20
88
25
38
11
12
4
22
6
51
10
12
17
8
8
14
19
46
20
18
51
8
18
59
26
16
446
18
20
229
16
49
15
77
36
30
102
7
15
12
27
12
7
27
15
10
12
8
10
13
9
7
20
16
33
59
39
7
23
9
7
13
20
8 6
24
32
11
12
4
22
6
51
10
12
17
8
8
14
10
46
20
18
51
8
16
55
26
16
433
18
20
224
16
49
15
75
35
29
102
7
15
12
27
12
5
27
15
10
11
8
9
1
1
6
5
4
2
1
5
2
3
2
4
3
3
6
3
4
9
2
5
2
3
5
6
17
1
13
6
5
9
6
17
1
23
3
7
9
3
9
1
4
R. G. Large	
1
2
2
3
1
1
G. H. Kearney	
Miss Kitteringham
2
1
Otter Point	
1
4
2
1
2
5
3
5
W. Truax	
1
1
1
D. P. Hanington
T. A. Briggs	
Miss Worthington..
2
1
2
5
3
3
D. P. Hanington  .
J. C. Stuart	
Miss Worthington.
1
1
1
12
3
1
 1
	
1
V. E. R. Ardagh
T. C. Holmes	
Miss F. B. Kemp...
2
8
6
5
5
6
2
4
1
3
1
3
4
2
9
2
2
R. D. Nasmyth
Miss M. Griffin
2
1
2
1
4
2
1
J. C. Stuart	
N. J. Paul	
N. J. Paul	
1
1
2
2
2
10
R. D. Rush	
2
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
3
2
7
1
5
6
2
2
8
2
7
9
7
2
9
R. D. Rush	
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
G. H. Tutill	
1
10
2
24
4
1
17
J. C. Stuart	
2
2
3
4
11
4
28
2
7
29
2
8
14
6
1
55
5
17
28
2
8
5
9
21
2
14
1
4
10
4
J. C. S. Dunn	
3
15
1
4
2
11
2
11
8
41
2
8
22
20
2
21
10
10
65
2
11
6
20
20
4
5
2
4
2
11
2
2
6
5
1
8
4
3
8
41
W. E. Bavis	
II. G. Large	
4
2
7
2
3
1
2
1
8
3
8
7
1
5
2
17
3
10
9
18
4
17
1
11
W. A. Watson	
6
W. A. Watson	
1
50
5
24
1
3
12
2
7
1
5
12
8
3
14
1
1
2
8
3
5
2
1
4
5
W. A. Watson	
2
14
1
2
16
2
Queen Charlotte City  ....
G. A. C. Roberts...
G. R. Baker	
2
2
1
1
5
1
7
5
7
1
2
1
H. S. Trefry
4
3
J. E. H. Kelso	
4
5
1
1
1
4
1
1
8
6
7
3
2
10
7
2
2
W. H. Wood
7
3
7
2
2
Roberts Creek, East	
1
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 71
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardial
Disease, etc.).
fl
1
9
>
i
03
d
M
P.
a
a
8
s
en
ti
H
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Poorly ventilated
and heated
Satisfactory	
Building good; light
very poor
Good     	
Good; adequate.
tendant.
Septic sore throat with rash, 1;
scarlatina
Yes.
eczema, 3
Good	
Good	
O.K.
Good	
Both.
Good	
Good	
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
O.K	
Two;  O.K.
Good	
O.K.
3
O.K.
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
odorous.
O.K.
Good.
Good	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Chicken-pox; influenza	
Good	
Good.
Poorly   lighted   and
ventilated
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Good	
orthopaedic, 4
Good  	
Yes.
Not   crowded;   poor
ventilation;   heating fair
Good	
Yes.
1; contracted left arm,   1
Good	
Heart,  1	
Good	
Well  ventilated  and
heated; not overcrowded
Influenza	
Parasites	
Influenza	
Fulfils its needs adequately
Good	
Yes.
Good building; poor
lighting
Good	
Measles	
Good.
Good	
Good.
1
Poor window righting
Good	
O.K.
I   .
Good.
Satisfactory	
Well kept	
I
Yes.
1
Satisfactory	
Fair	
Yes.
I
|.
Good	
Adequate	
Yes.
 1	
Good. P 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
n
3
Ph   .
. "o
z&
<.   Oi
'ti.
3   .
fi-S
uh a
°1
s s
a
p
a
Tj
S.-H
"§ «
£a
01   9
OS
'•§ a
8.3
■3 a
a •[.
£ ri
an
"3
*|
V  +H
9   OO
"9  9
0«
ra
'3
a
•a
H
■2-
bs.%
.a °
4)
9 ji
01 S
QfrH
■a
9 „•
ri ti
■ss
9
"0
O
Robson	
J. E. H. Kelso	
36
26
18
33
23
18
1
2
3
4
9
12
8
12
10
7
12
7
1
15
7
Rock Creek	
W. H. Wood	
Rock Mountain	
W. H. Wood	
Rocky Point	
I. Bastow Hudson
R. Gibson	
Roe Lake	
12
8
17
9
10
9
24
16
12
11
27
260
33
43
8
7
15
7
18
42
12
26
31
15
21
16
11
10
13
13
8
61
20
10
10
51
9
12
13
18
117
22
67
7
12
8
17
9
10
8
18
15
12
9
25
221
31
43
6
7
14
7
17
40
12
25
29
14
18
16
11
10
13
13
7
58
19
10
ID
46
9
11
13
16
2
2
5
Roosville	
H. A. Christie	
Rosedale	
A. E. Kydd	
6
1
1
2
8
2
4
1
5
49
19
3
1
3
1
2
10
3
4
9
1
5
Rosebery	
Rose Hill	
R. W. Irving	
5
1
1
1
T. C. Holmes
i
1
6
3
3
2
4
8
143
21
7
3
3
8
3
11
7
2
Rose Prairie	
H. A. W. Brown	
Round Lake	
F. V. Agnew	
5
Round Top	
H. L. Burris	
2
2
5
71
2
1
i
2
Roy	
2
24
1
1
Royston	
E. R. Hicks	
4
1
11
1
1
1
Mrs. Grindon	
Miss B. Jenkins
i
8
1
19
57
1
3
1
3
1
2
Salmon Bench	
P. S. Tennant	
i
1
1
Salmon River	
H. S. Trefry	
1
1
3
3
1
1
Sand Creek	
W. Truax	
"~
Sand Creek, Big	
H. A. Christie	
1
9
1
2
2
1
Sandon	
13
3
9
8
3
2
4
1
27
23
Sandspit	
G. A. C. Roberts	
Sandwick	
T. A. Briggs	
6
9
5
12
17
2
9
4
2
1
4
4
6
29
2
9
Saskatoon Creek	
W. A. Watson	
3
Saturna Island	
C. H. West	
Savona	
M. G. Archibald	
Savona Road	
6
1
11
1
Sayward, Upper	
B. F. Johnson	
Mrs. E. M. Walls..
1
1
Seaford	
K. Ziegler	
1
1
Sealey Lake	
L. B. Wrinch	
2
3
1
5
Sechelt	
F. Inglis	
3
Shalalth	
J. C. Stuart	
2
2
3
8
F. T. Stanier	
J. T. Steele	
Cowichan Health
Centre
1
5
3
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
6
2
3
3
7
2
1
6
3
24
1
21
2
Shelley	
3
6
Sheraton	
T. C. Holmes	
1
1
Shoreacres	
5
3
8
1
23
7
3
5
3
37
2
Shuswap	
W. Scatchard	
Shuswap Falls	
0. Morris	
Shutty Bench	
1
2
13
1
1
2
6
1
4
1
9
Sicamous	
E. Buckell	
Sidney	
S. W. Leiske
Miss G. Grant	
6
24
Silver Creek	
E. Buckell	
171         9
1
Silverton	
66
7
2
65
49
Simoom Sound	
B. F. Johnson	
Sinclair	
F. E. Coy
Sinclair Mills	
J. T. Steele	
16
28
9
9
24
47
196
18
10
28
74
15
11
9
14
12
10
20
15
16
28
9
9
31
47
190
17
10
1
1
3
3
4
1
2
Sirdar	
Sisters Creek	
G. R. Baker	
1
4
14
8
53
2
5
3
9
5
3
Skidegate	
G. A. C. Roberts.. ..
1
1
1
1
11
1
3
22
13
93
5
4
8
6
4
1
2
6
9
4
4
2
1
5
66
Slocan Park	
7
2
7
2
1
2
8
Slocan, South	
Smithers. •_...
2
1
11
1
Snowshoe	
Soda Creek	
A. K. Connolly	
Solsqua	
1
6
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
4
2
69
4
I
Sooke, East	
15
11
9
14
Sooke, North	
Sorenson	
W. E. Bavis	
Sorrento	
W. Scatchard	
...
4
2
1
1
4
5
3
2
8
2
1
2
7
1
1
Southbank	
T. C. Holmes	
121
10]
20'
10
1
2
2
1
1
Spences Bridge	
G. H. Tntill	
1           1
Spring Bend	
H. W. Keith	
Springhouse	
A. K. Connolly	
11
1
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 73
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary, Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
Oi
>
01
3
9
m
d
•J
HI
1
O
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.   State
if clean and
adequate.
i    i
Well kept	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
 L !	
Whooping-cough	
Good	
Good ..
Yes.
Measles	
Good	
Good
Yes.
3
Chicken-pox,    45;    mumps,    1;
septic sore throat,   1
Good	
Good
O.K.
Good	
O.K.  ...
Recommend   jacket
for   stove
O.K	
Clean.
Satisfactory	
Fulfils its needs adequately
Good.    . . .
1
Condition of building
good; not crowded;
well ventilated and
heated
Wooden    building;
good repair
1
repair.
Good.
Good
5
Mumps; influenza	
Lighting insufficient..
Good.
Yes.
Fair	
Good
O.K
 1	
Satisfactory	
tion
Satisfactory......	
Good
Poor environment
Clean; adequate.
1
Fulfils its needs adequately
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
Good.
Basement  room;
crowded
Good
Influenza;    mumps;   whooping-
cough
Satisfactory-„	
Two; good.
cardiac,    3;    orthopedic,    2;    dys-
menorrhcea,   1
Unsuitable building-
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good
Adequate.
Adequate.
Clean; adequate.
i
 |	
Satisfactory...-	
Yes
'
Two; poor.
I P 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
'ft
fl
Ph   .
■ xi
."o
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3   .
.. a
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HO
9
'8
11
18
107
12
64
15
25
8
13
7
15
9
13
15
14
13
26
32
10
16
20
14
12
18
28
19
14
9
27
7
18
31
11
8
8
44
8
49
8
11
18
10
12
9
221
18
12
10
14
49
26
11
78
104
20
33
11
17
20
125
14
27
13
11
10
27
11
17
107
12
64
14
24
8
13
7
13
9
13
15
14
13
25
31
10
15
20
13
11
18
24
19
14
9
26
7
18
3
10
15
2
24
2
7
2
4
2
6
4
2
32
1
2
3
1
6
2
1
6
3
2
3
4
1
2
2
3
10
o
11
4
10
2
11
12
4
2
Squamish	
N. J. Paul	
Squirrel Cove	
H. A. Whillans     .
18
7
7
Stuart Island	
1
1
Stillwater	
7
9
3
3
1
7
7
W. R. Stone	
1
1
W. R- Stone	
1
4
Sullivan Hill. .
6
3
2
2
18
10
3
5
5
2
5
11
10
1
2
1
7
2
E. Buckell	
1
1
1
1
3
1
14
1
3
1
14
5
3
4
3
1
4
17
15
1
5
3
7
5
Sunnyside Cannery	
1
1
F. T. Stanier—	
Cowichan Health
Centre
1
3
1
1
1
3
2
H  S. Trefry     	
3
2
8
18
2
4
3
7
2
10
1
4
1
2
13
4
6
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
3
6
5
2
4
6
4
1
T. C. Holmes	
1
7
3
Telegraph Creek	
2
o
31
11
8
8
41
8
40
7
11
17
10
12
8
214
17
12
9
14
46
26
11
66
88
20
32
11
16
19
125
14
26
13
10
8
27
1
1
6
3
10
5
8
7
H. S. Trefry	
5
3
1
Three Valley	
1
4
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
11
2
2
3
1
2
1
79
3
4
1
1
7
5
5
12
1
1
14
6
6
20
6
5
5
T. C. Holmes	
1
1
1
2
5
4
2
2
S. A. Wallace	
Trinity Creek	
H. W. Keith	
1
5
2
53
2
4
2
1
19
11
7
37
9
6
5
5
2
11
1
1
79
3
2
1
1
13
35
3
1
1
7
J. E. Whitworth	
Tupper Creek	
1
1
1
2
4
1
7
5
7
5
2
15
33
1
3
3
2
E. R. Hicks..:	
12
6
8
2
1
H. W. Hill	
Mrs. C. A. Lucas...
1
Usk
2
7
8
7
6
7
3
5
2
28
5
3
1
8
3
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
J. S. Shotten	
1
1
1
18
3
8
11
52
5
5
2
4
5
19
6
3
1
9
8
1
R. D. Rush .   .
2
	
2
1
1
R. D. Rush
K. Terry	
1
3
H. A. Christie
4
5
5
1 BOARD OF HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 75
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous, Pulmonary,  Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
d
9
>
Oi
X
et
9
ta
d
Ci
g
rH
a
o
bo
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
One    room    slightly
crowded
Good	
Clean; adequate for
the present.
Good.
Good	
O.K.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Accommodation, ventilation and heating satisfactory
Satisfactory	
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Two; clean.
Wooden  building  in
fair repair
Satisfactory	
Good	
TWo;   in   poor
repair.
Yes.
1
Good.
Good	
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good	
Two; good.
Good	
Good.
Anaemia, 1
Good	
Clean; adequate.
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Very good condition;
no ante-room
Yes.
Yes.
One; clean.
Yes.
Good	
O.K.
Yes.
Good	
Yes.
Good	
Good.
Fair.
Good	
Poorly   lighted   and
ventilated
Good	
Good.
3
Good.
Good	
O.K.
Good	
Good.
Good	
Good.
Two; clean.
Yes.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Two; clean.
V.O.H.,   1
Good	
Good.
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Not    crowded;    well
heated and ventilated
Not   crowded;   well
heated and ventilated
Good	
Good.
Good     .
1
Chicken-pox, 1; measles, 1; common colds, 14; meningitis, 1
Seating and ventilation require attention
Good
adequate.
Good
Good.
Cardiac,  1	
Roomy and light	
Orthopaedic,   1	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Yes.
Good.
3
8
0 K.
0 K.
Building needs chinking    and    double
floor before winter
Satisfactory	
Clean; adequate.
1 P 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
RURAL AND
Name of School.
Medical Inspector.
School Nurse.
a
rH      .
.'o
SS
rr. 01
P.
a  .
rH  "3
fH   9
a
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3
a
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it
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9    .
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CM
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ri
Z
SS
£2
CJ HH
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on
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a
R. Gibson
39
9
70
32
10
8
8
52
36
101
9
58
6
7
7
96
35
11
14
8
91
106
36
31
12
13
24
66
42
7
84
9
60
20
80
23
24
9
25
30
9
67
31
10
7
8
52
35
100
8
53
6
7
6
91
34
11
14
8
90
104
36
31
12
13
24
58
37
6
84
9
60
20
1&
21
24
9
20
2
i
2
1
3
1
6
11
3
16
4
3
2
4
7
3
17
3
9
2
4
3
14
21
1
8
2
40
17
3
6
6
12
10
39
8
6
1
2
3
3
10
3
5
o
Wanklyn ,
H. A. Christie.    . .
7
7
3
2
2
2
4
5
10
D. P. Hanington	
Miss Worthington..
2
i
5
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
4
1
6
3
3
1
1
1
6
1
3
D. P. Hanington	
Miss Worthington.
1
7
3
3
33
W. H. AVood... .
4
1
14
5
1
1
2
1
1
4
.     4
2
4
15
5
1
1
1
1
1
.  1
25
White Lake	
E. Buckell	
1
1
4
4
16
18
8
2
1
2
1
18
13
4
24
5
9
5
10
12
4
2
13
3
2
10
7
4
10
6
7
35
18
3
25
4
16
2
14
3
15
5
1
18
1
2
4
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
3
3
J. T. Steele	
2
2
4
W. R. Stone
F. E. Coy .
1
13
2
1
1
F. E. Coy.
Winfield	
1
1
3
6
12
3
9
3
3
T. C. Holmes
1
C
1
9
2
9
4
C. G. G- Maclean—
2
18
1
H. S. Trefry	
2
1
9
1
10
2
1
Wycliffe	
F. W. Green	
2
Yahk	
3
1
1
2
12
10
12
1
Yale	
P. McCaffrey	
2
2
2
3
G. R. Baker	
4
4
5
8
° BOARD OP HEALTH REPORT, 1930-31.
P 77
ASSISTED SCHOOLS—Continued.
Other Conditions, specify,
(Nervous,   Pulmonary,   Cardiac
Disease, etc.).
fl
1
9
X
a
ta
d
+3
9
ft
a
Acute Fevers which have
occurred during the
Past Year.
Condition of
Building.    State if
crowded, poorly
ventilated, poorly
heated, etc.
Closets.    State
if clean and
adequate.
Good	
Satisfactory	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Satisfactory	
Good	
Yes.
Yes.
Good	
1
Satisfactory	
Good .-:.
Satisfactory	
Good.
Good.
Satisfactory	
Yes.
i
New  building  good;
old building poor
2
i	
Poor ventilation	
Yes.
Good.
3
1
Clean; adequate.
Good;     well     ventilated and heated
cleaning.
Good.
Clean; adequate.
Clean; adequate.
No
No
Clean; adequate.
Yes.
cough,4; eczema,  1
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Chaht.es F. Eanfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1931.
925-1231-7330

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