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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1932]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL KEPOBT
OF
THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FOR the
TEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31st
1930
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1931.  To His Honour James Alexander Macdonald,
Administrator of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1930 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
W. A. McKENZIE,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
June, 1931. The Honourable W. A. McKenzie,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Thirteenth Annual Report on the work of
the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1930.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. D. McNIVEN,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., June, 19S1. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Report of Deputy Minister      7
AVage Reductions      7
Immigration Restrictions      8
Unemployment      9
AVinnipeg Resolutions      9
Regina Conference   10
Employment Service Council Recommendation   10
" Unemployment Relief Act, 1930 "  11
Regulations    12
Apportionment of Contributions   13
Value of Works   13
Direct Relief  13
Statistics of Trade and Industries  15
Decrease in Total Pay-roll  15
Three Industrial Divisions   17
Pay-roll Comparisons   18
Decrease in Number of Apprentices  ,  18
Number of AVage-earners by Months  19
Fluctuation of Employment by Industries   20
Fluctuation in Industrial Wages Charts   21
Females in Industry   22
Lower AVages prevailing   23
Decrease in Average Industrial AVage  24
Nationality of Employees   24
Statistical Tables  '.  26
Summary of all Tables  39
" Hours of Work Act"  40
Temporary Exemptions suspended   40
Average AA^eekly Hours of Work by Industries  41
Male Minimum AVage Board   42
Licentiates of Pharmacy   42
Employing Druggists' Appeal   42
Decision of Court of Appeal  43
Act amended to exclude Professions  44
Janitors, Cleaners, AVatchmen, and Elevator Operators   44
Labour Disputes and Conciliation   45
Employment Service   47
Condition during the Year   47
Business transacted  '. , '.  48
Other Branches of Activity   50
Inspection of Factories   52
Accident-prevention   ....  52
Sanitation     53
Elevator Inspection  :  53
Child-labour     54
Report of Minimum Wage Board   56
Abnormal Conditions reflected  56
Shortages collected   56
Court Cases   56
Statistical Study   59
AATage Standards, 1929 and 1930  64
Marital Status   65
Protection afforded Employees   66
Appendix—Summary of Orders  68
Association of Employers •■  71
Union Directory  73  REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LABOUR
FOR 1930.
The present industrial depression throughout the Province is a reflection of the unfavourable
labour conditions existing all over the world.
The conditions which existed prior to the World War were swept aside, and in order to bring
success to our armies new methods were adopted to meet new circumstances. During the period
of readjustment which followed the Armistice, labour and industry passed through a period of
depression; world markets had become disorganized, old trade connections had been severed,
and with the return of our soldiers the serious problem of rearrangement of industry from a war
basis to a peace footing was before us.
During the years 1920 and 1921, unemployment was prevalent everywhere and relief
measures had to be put into effect, but in 1922 there were signs that a return of normal times
was not far distant—that industry had completed its reorganization, and that labour would be
assured of work at satisfactory remuneration. From 1921 the aggregate pay-roll of the Province
increased each year until the year 1930, and at the present time we are passing through a period
of depression similar, if not more serious, than that which existed during 1921-22.
That the present situation is serious may be judged by the fact that the Dominion Government called a special session of Parliament to deal exclusively with unemployment.
The questions which I believe industrialists should ask themselves are: " Did we reorganize
our industries in the best interests of all concerned?" "Is our present method of production
the correct one?" "Have we developed machinery to increase production and neglected to
consider the question of the purchasing-power of the people? "
The present conditions which allow thousands of men, willing and able to work, to be under
the necessity of accepting relief for themselves and families, while at the same time bank
deposits are increasing rapidly, is a sad rebuff to our present methods of business.
AVhile these factors cannot be fully discussed hero, captains of industry will have to face
and arrive at a solution of this problem, which is of vital importance to themselves.
In an endeavour to assist in maintaining favourable working conditions, this Province has
been very free from industrial disturbances for a number of years, employers and employees
realizing that where a plant is closed down because of any disagreement, both parties lose
financially, the record of time lost as measured in working-days during the last seven years
being as follows :—•
1924  223,876 1928   20,791
1025      23,309 1929       3,320
1926       28,016 1930      3,809
1927   !     17,006
It is to be hoped that a continuance of the present harmonious relations between employer
and employee will be maintained and that by a mutual understanding of each other's problems
a speedy return to normal conditions will take place.
AVAGE REDUCTIONS.
It is regrettable that during the past year there has been an almost general tendency towards
the lowering of wages.
During the year cuts in the wage-rates were made in one of our basic industries, which
brought the wages down to a very low level.
A large organization in the United States, known as the Loyal Legion of Loggers and
Lumbermen, and composed of employers and employees, organized in 1918 " to promote the
common interest of those engaged in the lumber industry," the directorate being composed of
an equal number of employers and employees, held their twenty-fourth semi-annual meeting of the
Board of Directors in Portland, Oregon, November 17th and 18th, 1930.
Among other matters dealt with the following appears: " A protest against national
industries taking advantage of the present critical condition of unemployment to reduce wages
so low that men do not make enough to live up to the American standard." E 8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
This was embodied in a resolution which the Board directs be sent to President Hoover's
Lumber Committee: " That the eight-hour day standard be applied to the lumber industry of
the whole United States, together with a minimum wage for common labour which is suggested
be not less than $3.20 for an eight-hour day throughout the country."
Another resolution called for " renewed effort to get all lumber-producing plants to adopt an
eight-hour working-day."
The report of the President, AV. G. Ruegnitz, concluded with the recommendation that the
Board " send out a ringing challenge " for industry improvement, co-operation of employees and
employers, a national eight-hour day, a work-year that will fit demand to production, reasonable
profit and fair wages—the last mentioned on an annual income basis—and that the 4L should
work for $4 a day as a minimum " and should never quit until it reaches that goal."
One of the largest sawmills on Vancouver Island instituted a five-hour shift on both day and
night crews, while in their logging operations a six-hour day was put into force. The company
also reduced the rates at the boarding-house in order to maintain as far as possible a reasonable
living wage for the men. The management was faced with the alternative of dismissing
practically the entire night crew if operations were to continue. As this would have practically
doubled the existing unemployment in Port Alberni, the company thought it better to cut the
hours of the entire staff and so keep more men employed.
IMMIGRATION RESTRICTIONS.
In order to restrict the number of immigrants entering Canada, the following Order in
Council, P.C. 1957, dated August 14th, 1930, was passed at Ottawa:—
P.C. 1957.
14th day of August, 1930.
His Excellency the Governor-General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of
Immigration and Colonization, is pleased to order as follows:—
1. Paragraphs 2, 3, 7, and 8 of the Regulations made by Order in Council P.C. 183 of the 31st
January, 1923, as amended by P.S. 642 of the 11th April, 1923, and P.C. 534 of the 8th April, 1926,
are hereby rescinded.
2. Under the authority of section 38 of the " Immigration Act," chapter 93, R.S.C. 1927, the
Regulations made by Order in Council P.C. 183 of the 31st January, 1923, amended as aforesaid, are
hereby further amended by adding thereto the following paragraph:—
"(9.)  In possession of a provisional letter of entry issued prior to the 14th day of August, 1930:
" Provided  that  all   such  provisional  letters   issued  more  than   five  months  prior  to   the  said
14th day of August, 1930, shall be and are hereby cancelled.
E. J. LEMAIRE,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
Order in Council P.C. 183, dated January 31st, 1923 (as amended), provided as follows
(the sections rescinded by the new Order are marked by asterisks) :—
From and after the 15th February, 1923, and until otherwise ordered, the landing in Canada of
immigrants of all classes and occupations is hereby prohibited, except as hereinafter provided.
The Immigration Officer in Charge may, notwithstanding the provisions of P.C. 23 of the 7th
January, 1914, permit to land in Canada any immigrant who otherwise complies with the provisions
of the " Immigration Act," if it is shown to his satisfaction that such immigrant is:—
(1.) A bona-f.de agriculturist entering Canada to farm and has sufficient means to begin farming
in Canada.
*(2.)  A bona-f.de farm-labourer entering Canada to follow that occupation  and has reasonable
assurance of employment.
*(3.)  A female domestic servant entering Canada to follow that occupation and has reasonable
assurance of employment.
(4.) The wife, or child under 18 years of age, of any person legally admitted to and resident in
Canada who is in a position to receive and care for his dependents.
(5.) Any United States citizen entering Canada from the United States who shall satisfy the
Immigration Officer in Charge at the port of entry that he has sufficient means to maintain himself
until employment is secured.
(6.) Any British subject entering Canada directly or indirectly from Great Britain or Ireland,
Newfoundland, the United States of America, New Zealand, Australia, or the Union of South Africa,
who shall satisfy the Immigration Officer in Charge at the port of entry that he has sufficient means
to maintain himself until employment is secured; Provided that the only persons admissible under the
authority of this clause are British subjects by reason of birth or naturalization in Great Britain or
Ireland, Newfoundland, New Zealand, Australia, or the Union of South Africa. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 9
*(T.)   A  person  who  has satisfied  the Minister that his labour or service is required in Canada.
*(8.)   The father or mother, the unmarried son or daughter 18 years of age or over, the unmarried
brother or sister, of any person legally admitted to and resident in Canada who has satisfied the
Minister of his willingness and ability to receive and care for such relative:
Provided that this clause shall not apply to the relative of any resident of Canada who himself
failed to observe the conditions under which he was admitted to Canada:
And provided further that the provisions of this Order in Council shall not apply to immigrants
of any Asiatic race.
UNEMPLOYMENT.
The situation for the past year regarding unemployment has been very serious. As stated
in our last report, the relationship of agriculture to industry is becoming more apparent. The
effect of wheat prices during 1929, which began to make itself felt during the latter months
of that year, increased with the opening of the present year, and spread into every basic industry
in the Province. The workers who bore the brunt of the crisis were those employed in the
lumbering industry. The year had not progressed very far before those employed in this basic
industry had a reduction made in their wages, and about the middle of the year the cut was
general all through the lumbering industry, and ranged from 10 per cent, to as high as 30
per cent. Many employers did not make more than a 10-per-cent. reduction in the wages of
married men, the Oriental employees having the heaviest reduction.
Following this effort on the part of proprietors to keep their plants operating, many of
the operations, logging and sawmills, closed down for an indefinite period. This would have
greatly increased the number of unemployed had it not been that an increase was registered in
the number engaged in manufacturing, transportation, and construction.
Another basic industry, almost equally as hard hit as lumbering, was that of metal-mining,
this condition being entirely due to the low price of metals.
That unemployment is not confined to any locality or Province in the Dominion may be
judged by the fact that a special session of the Dominion Parliament was called during the
month of September, when $20,000,000 was voted for the relief of unemployment; this sum to
be expended in constructing, extending, or improving public works and undertakings, railways,
highways, bridges and canals, harbours and wharves, assisting in defraying the cost of distribution of products of the field, farm, forest, sea, lake, river, or mine, granting aid to Provinces
and municipalities in any public work they may undertake for relieving unemployment, and
reimbursing expenditures made by Provinces and municipalities in connection with unemployment, and generally in any way that will assist in providing useful and suitable work for the
unemployed.
As an indication that the British Columbia Government was fully alive to the question, an
unemployment conference was held in Winnipeg during January and was attended by a representative of the Department of Labour, when as a result of the deliberations the following
resolutions were adopted :—
(1.) That the Federal and Provincial Governments be urged to again assume their share
of the cost of unemployment relief, and that such assistance be on the basis of the agreement
entered into during the seasons of 1920-21 and 1921-22.
(2.) That the Dominion Government reimburse the municipalities for all costs incurred by
them in connection with the care of immigrants who have become public charges, and that
deportation proceedings be completed as soon as possible.
(3.) Urging the Dominion Government to proceed immediately with its extended building
programme, including harbour-improvement work, etc., with a view to providing winter employment.
(4.) That the Dominion Government cancel all colonization agreements made with transportation and other agents for immigration, and arrange that all placements of men and women
be made through the Employment Service of Canada in order that men and women already in
Canada shall have the first opportunity of accepting work which may be available.
(5.) That the Government appoint an Economic Commission to make a thorough inquiry
into the causes and remedies for unemployment throughout Canada, with a view to discovering
and recommending practical methods which might be followed to bring about a cure of the
problem; and that in addition the Dominion Government be asked to put into immediate effect
the remedies of the problem which have already been agreed upon, and to establish a permanent
body to deal with the question. E 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
(6.) Endorsing the principle of unemployment insurance.and recommending the calling of
an Interprovincial and Federal Conference at the earliest possible date for the consideration
of the adoption of a Dominion-wide scheme.
(7.) That the Federal and Provincial Governments and municipalities be urged to provide
such employment as may be undertaken by disabled ex-service men, even though such employment be not productive of profit.
(8.) That all public bodies be requested to give particular attention to the drafting of
specifications and the wording of contracts in order that the construction of public buildings
may be carried on during winter months.
(9.) That the necessary steps be taken to provide that fair wages shall be paid for winter
relief-work, it having been brought to the attention of this conference that advantage is often
taken of men out of work to reduce wages.
(10.) That the Federal Government take into consideration their responsibility to provide
work for the ex-service men, who by reason of their war service find it very difficult to obtain
work in the competitive labour market.
(11.)  Requesting the Federal Government to establish a system of pensions for the blind.
(12.)  Inviting each Province to send representatives on the delegation to Ottawa.
(13.) The expenses of the conference to be defrayed by the municipalities and the Provinces
on a pro-rata basis.
(14.) It was pointed out that a parliamentary committee of 1928 recognized " as one of the
most serious situations confronting the country generally " what was referred as the problem
of the " broken-down or burned-out man " wholly or in part non-pensionable; and the Dominion
Government was asked to provide: (a) That to married men with dependents there be made a
living allowance; (6) that for unmarried men provision be made for their care and maintenance ; (c) that such benefits be available only to men who by reason of age or disability, wholly
or in part non-pensionable, are in necessitous circumstances and are unemployable in any available labour market; (d) that such benefits be restricted to men who have served in an actual
theatre of war; (e) that all regulations be so framed as to prevent the benefits conferred being
utilized in any way to bonus indolence.
These were subsequently placed before the Dominion Government at Ottawa on February
26th, the British Columbia Government being again represented on the delegation.
A conference of Government representatives of the three Western Provinces was held in
the Parliament Buildings at Regina on July 17th and 18th. This was attended by Hon. W. A.
McKenzie, Minister of Labour, and an official of the Department. The greater part of the time
of the conference was spent in an exchange of opinions between the representatives of the
Provinces with respect to the probable extent of unemployment during the fall and winter, but
more particularly as to the experience of the various Governments in methods adopted in
previous years in meeting the situation.
The eleventh annual meeting of the Employment Service Council of Canada was held at
Ottawa on August 21st and 22nd, this Province being represented by the Hon. S. F. Tolmie,
Premier. This Council is composed of twenty-three members, representative of the Federal
and Provincial Governments, and various groups in the economic life of Canada, and is an
advisory body instituted by Order in Council P.C. 3111 of December 23rd, 1918 (as amended
by Order in Council P.C. 2262 of September 20th, 1930), for the purpose of advising the Minister
of Labour specifically in connection with the functioning of employment offices throughout
Canada, and more generally on ways and means of preventing unemployment and of relieving
an existent situation.
At the conclusion of the Conference the Council unanimously adopted a number of recommendations setting forth its views on emergency steps that might be taken with respect to
existing unemployment with a view to relieving the situation. These recommendations were in
the following terms :—
Recommendations.
(1.) That as a means of immediate relief of unemployment, Federal, Provincial, and
Municipal authorities in their respective spheres should commence or continue works of a
permanent nature, such as building and construction, including highways, bridges, wharves,
railway terminals, subways, railway crossings, needed public buildings, and other public
improvements, as well as repairs to and maintenance of public highways and properties. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 11
(2.) That in view of the situation now existing there is a joint responsibility on the part
of the Municipal, Federal, and Provincial authorities to contribute to the cost of relief-work
measures to alleviate the unemployment situation.
(3.) That the Federal, Provincial, and Municipal authorities should use their influence with
private corporations and individuals to carry qn contemplated construction and maintenance
works forthwith to alleviate unemployment.
(4.) That all governing bodies, so far as practicable, should anticipate their requirements
and place advance orders for all lines of supplies and equipment, such as wearing-apparel, tents,
blankets, etc., same to be of Canadian production.
(5.)  That in so far as possible, in such works as may be developed to meet the present'
situation, preference in placement should be given to men with family responsibilities, in close
proximity to the communities wherein their families are located.
(6.) That when employers of labour are compelled to resort to part-time operations the
available work should be distributed equitably among the whole number of workers normally
employed, either by shortening hours or rotating working-shifts.
(7.) That in cases where direct relief must be given it is recommended that the following
principles be observed:—■
(a.)  Costs should be evenly divided between the Municipality, Province, and Dominion.
(b.) In cases of unorganized districts and municipalities, which satisfy the Province
that they are unable to meet their share, then the cost shall be borne equally by
the Provincial and the Dominion Governments.
(c.) AVhere, due to special conditions prevailing, responsibility for a large volume of
actual relief funds must be undertaken by a private charitable agency, these same
public authorities shall take recognition of the fact in the distribution of any or
such moneys as may be assigned for actual expenditure on emergency relief.
(8.) That this Council recommends the passage by Parliament at the forthcoming special
session of adequate appropriations to provide for the relief of unemployment by the methods
recommended and for such other contingencies as may arise in connection with providing work
or relief.
(9.) That an immediate survey of imports should be made, followed by such legislative
changes as will result in the production by Canadian labour of such commodities heretofore
imported, as the survey discloses can be efficiently and economically produced within the
Dominion, and that coincident therewith the Government take steps to safeguard the interests
of the consumers.
(10.) That the Federal Government give all possible encouragement to the efficient marketing of Canadian grain, farm produce, and other primary products.
(11.) The Council takes recognition of the decision of the Government to restrict the entry
of immigrants into the country at the present time, and would urge that this policy should be
continued until it is shown to the satisfaction of the Government that such immigrants can be
absorbed and given employment without detriment to the Canadian people.
(12.) That this Council urge upon the Federal authorities that provision be made for an
adequate census of the unemployed in Canada in connection with the 1931 census.
Recognizing that unemployment had become so general throughout Canada as to constitute
a matter of national concern, the Dominion Parliament in special session passed the " Unemployment Relief Act, 1930," which received Royal assent on September 22nd, 1930. The Act and
regulations made thereunder were in the following terms:—■
21 George V.
Chap. 1.
An Act foe the Granting op Aid for the Relief of Unemployment.
[Assented to 22nd September, 1930.]
Whereas unemployment, which is primarily a provincial and municipal responsibility, has become
so general throughout Canada as to constitute a matter of national concern; and whereas it is
desirable that assistance should be rendered by the Government of Canada towards the relief of such E 12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
unemployment:  Therefore, His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate and House
of Commons of Canada, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Unemployment Relief Act, 1930."
2. For the relief of unemployment, a sum not exceeding twenty million dollars is hereby appropriated and may be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of Canada for such purposes and under
such terms and  conditions  as may be approved by the Governor in Council.
3. Without restricting the generality of the terms of the next preceding section hereof, and notwithstanding the provisions of any Statute, the said sum of twenty million dollars may be expended in
constructing, extending, or improving public works and undertakings, railways, highways, bridges and
canals, harbours and wharves; assisting in defraying the cost of distribution of products of the field,
farm, forest, sea, lake, river, and mine; granting aid to Provinces and municipalities in any public
work they may undertake for relieving unemployment and reimbursing expenditures made by Provinces
and municipalities in connection with unemployment, and generally in any way that will assist in
providing useful and suitable work for the unemployed.
4. A report shall be laid before Parliament within fifteen days after the opening of the next session
thereof, containing a full and correct statement of the moneys expended under this Act and the purposes
to which they have been applied.
5. Any portion of the said sum of twenty million dollars, remaining unexpended or unappropriated
for the purposes of this Act on the thirty-first day of March, 1931, shall thereupon lapse.
P.C. 2246.
AVhereas unemployment, which is primarily a municipal and provincial responsibility, has become
so general throughout Canada as to constitute a matter of national concern:
And whereas it is desirable that assistance should be rendered by the Government of Canada
towards the relief of such unemployment:
And whereas Parliament has enacted the " Unemployment Relief Act, 1930," being an Act for the
Granting of Aid for the Relief of Unemployment:
And whereas the Act provides for the appropriation of a sum not exceeding twenty million dollars
to be paid for the relief of unemployment out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of Canada under
such terms and conditions as may be approved by the Governor in Council:
Therefore, His Excellency the Governor-General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister
of Labour, is pleased to approve the annexed regulations under which the aforesaid sum may be paid
out, and they are hereby approved accordingly.
E. J. Lemaike,
Clerk of the Privy Council.
Regulations.
1. Except where the context otherwise requires, in these regulations the expression:—
(a.)   " Act " means the " Unemployment Relief Act, 1930 " :
(6.)   " Minister " means the Minister of Labour.
2. There shall be reserved and set aside out of the moneys appropriated by the Act a sum not to
exceed four million dollars to pay one-third of the expenditures of municipalities for direct relief
where suitable work cannot be provided for the unemployed, and one-half of direct relief in unorganized
districts.
3. The Minister may enter into an agreement with the Government of any Province for the
payment by such Provincial Government of one-third of the said municipal expenditures for direct
relief.
4. The Minister may enter into an agreement with the Government of a Province in which any
municipality is situate for the payment of such municipality by the Government of Canada of twenty-
five per centum of the cost of such public works and undertakings as may be necessary to provide
suitable work for the unemployed, and by the Government of the Province of twenty-five per centum
of the said cost, and that fifty per centum of the said cost shall be assumed and borne by the
municipality.
5. Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding section and where, by reason of recent
abnormal municipal expenditures for unemployment relief, a municipality is unable to bear fifty
per centum of the cost of such public works and undertakings as may be necessary to provide work
for the unemployed in such municipality, the Minister may enter into an agreement to vary the
proportion of the cost of such public works and undertakings to be borne by the Provincial and
Dominion Governments.
0. The Minister may enter into an agreement with the Government of any Province for the
carrying-on by such Provincial Government of public works, improvements, and other undertakings
that will assist in providing suitable work for the unemployed, the cost of such public works and
improvements to be borne by the Provincial and Dominion Governments in such proportions as may
be agreed upon.
7. All agreements made with provincial and municipal authorities involving the expenditure of
any portion of the moneys appropriated by the Act for public works or undertakings shall contain
provisions for the payment of fair wages and hours of work in accordance with the intent of the
" Fair Wages and Eight-hour Day Act, 1930," and the Fair Wages Policy of the Government of Canada
as set forth in Order in Council (P.C. 1206) dated 7th June, 1922, and amendments thereto.
Agreements involving the expenditure of any portion of the said moneys for public works or under- takings shall contain a provision to the effect that all persons employed on such public works or
undertakings shall be, as far as practicable, residents of the locality in which the work is being
performed, and that in no case shall discrimination be made in the employment of any persons by
reason of political affiliation.
8. Statements of accounts for expenditures by municipalities for direct relief or for public works
and undertakings made under the provisions of the Act and these regulations shall be accompanied
by a certificate of the appropriate provincial authority that expenditures have been duly made in
accordance with such statements.
9. The Minister may at any time require the Province to furnish information, detailed or otherwise, in connection with statements of accounts rendered by the Province.
10. There may be paid out of the moneys provided by the Act such sums as may be required for
administration purposes, including salaries of temporary employees, all of which sums shall not exceed
one-half of the one per centum of the moneys thereby appropriated.
11. The administration of the Act and regulations shall be vested in the Minister of Labour,
subject to the approval of the Governor in Council, and the Minister of Labour, the Minister of
Railways and Canals, the Minister of Public AATorks, the Minister of the Interior, and the Minister
of Marine shall be an advisory committee on expenditures to be made under the Act.
The Committee appointed to administer Unemployment Relief on behalf of the Province of
British Columbia was composed of Hon. AV. A. McKenzie, Minister of Labour, Chairman;
Hon. R. AV. Bruhn, Minister of Public AArorks;   and Hon. S. L. Howe, Provincial Secretary.
Of the $20,000,000 set aside by the Dominion Government under the " Unemployment Relief
Act, 1930," an amount of $900,000 was originally granted to the Province of British Columbia
and a further $200,000 was provided in March, 1931, making a total of $1,100,000 as the
contribution of the Dominion to British Columbia.
Apportionment of Contributions.
The basis of contributions was that in work carried out by municipalities the share of the
Dominion would be 25 per cent., the Provincial share 25 per cent., and Municipal share 50 per
cent.; while in unorganized territory the Dominion paid 50 per cent, and the Province 50 per
cent, of the total cost.
AVhere direct relief was given in organized territory the Dominion paid 33% per cent., the
Province 33% per cent., and the Municipality 33% per cent., and in unorganized territory the
Dominion and Provincial Governments shared equally the cost of such relief.
Total A'alue of AA'orks.
The following tabulation shows the division of the funds as at 1st day of June, 1931:—
Organized Territory.
Provincial Government share        $591,062.00
Dominion Government share         591,063.00
Municipalities' share     1,182,125.00
Total  $2,364,250.00
The approximate man-days' work available being 528,900.
Unorganized Territory.—The value of works allocated in unorganized territory was
$1,018,632, in which the Province and Dominion shared equally. This amount provided
221,970 man-days' work.
The total value of works created under the " Unemployment Relief Act, 1930," in British
Columbia was, therefore. $3,382,882, giving approximately 750,870 man-days' work.
DIRECT RELIEF   ("UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF ACT,  1930").
The number of families and single persons who received direct relief under the above Act
up to April 30th, 1931, was as follows:—
Families.
Single.
Total.
536
4,630
887
13,327
1,423
17,957
5,166
14,214
19,380 The amount paid in direct relief was:—■
Unorganized territory      $29,051.14
Municipalities      455,540.05
Total :  $484,591.19
The amount of $29,051.14 disbursed in unorganized territory was divided equally between
the Provincial and Dominion Governments, while the $455,540.05 distributed by municipalities
was made up by the Provincial Government and the Dominion Government each paying one-third,
and the Municipality concerned paying one-third of the total cost.
NUMBER OF UNEMPLOYED.
An estimate of the total number of unemployed in the Province, gathered from reports
received from our unemployment officials, places the number of unemployed at approximately
24,000, distributed as follows: 9,500 in Arancouver, 2,000 in Victoria, 7,000 in other municipalities,
and 5,500 in unorganized districts. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 15
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
The depression existing throughout the entire world has had the effect of reducing the total
pay-roll of this Province for the first time in the last ten years.
This is not surprising when it is considered that so many of our industries, such as lumbering, metal-mining, Coast shipping, and smelting, are entirely dependent on world markets. It is
in these where the largest reduction in the amounts paid in salaries and wages are to be found.
The industries which cater to British Columbia and adjacent territory have suffered only
small reductions in comparison with the industries dependent on export trade.
4,704 RETURNS RECEIVED.
The number of firms reporting totalled 4,704, a decrease of 361 from the previous year.
This drop is largely to be found in three of the tables: Contracting, with 63; lumber industries,
141;  and metal-mining, 121.
DECREASE IN TOTAL PAY-ROLL.
The aggregate pay-roll shown by the 4,704 firms reporting was $127,160,467.53 for the year
1930, a decrease of $17,959,858 from the year 1929. The pay-rolls for the last decade from actual
returns received were:—
1921   $79,742,380.10
1922   86,192,190.73
1923   106,796,958.96
1924   107,798,771.36
1925   115,943,238.60
1926   129,420,599.55
1927   130,047,021.92
1928   136,784,484.18
1929  'j.  145,120,325.98
1930   127,160,467.53
It will be readily observed from these figures that the industries of this Province have been
advancing steadily from 1921, and had it not been for the abnormal conditions prevailing in the
lumbering and metal-mining industries we would have felt very little of the prevailing world
conditions.
The amount paid to officers, superintendents, and managers for the year 1930 was
$13,202,109.09; to clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, $14,034,744.30; and to wage-earners,
$99,923,614.14;  the percentages being 10.38, 11.03, and 78.59 respectively.
A glance at the percentage table given below reveals the fact that the amount paid to
wage-earners has, with the exception of 192S, decreased since 1926, while an increase in the
amounts paid to the other two classifications has occurred during the same period. AVhile this
condition might be easily accounted for during 1930, when a great many of the wage-earners
were laid off or placed on short time, the percentage figures clearly show that the reduction in
the amount paid to wage-earners was taking place during years when the total pay-roll of the
Province was increasing. The reason for this state could be attributed to two causes: First,
the increased use of labour-saving machinery, thereby enabling manufacturers to produce more
with fewer of the actual wage-earning class; at the same time, in order to dispose of the
increased production, a larger staff of salesmen, office-help, and executive officers was employed.
The second cause might be that the remuneration to wage-earners has not increased in the
same ratio as with other employees. This latter assumption seems to be borne out by the fact
that during 1930 there were 7,253 adult males receiving less than $19 per week, compared with
5,592 in 1929 and 4,391 in 1928.
From these figures it would appear that officers in executive positions and those on the
office and sales force have been able to maintain their salary-level, and that any reduction made
in operating costs has fallen on the wage-earners. E 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The following is the percentage figures covering the last five years :—
Adtjlt Male AA^okkers employed at Low Rates op AArA0,ES.
Weekly Kate.
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
Under $6           	
49
45
37
15S
139
297
382
1,249
867
1,454
1,635
2,695
1,796
3,806
2
1
97
27
49
110
494
588
1,267
1,550
1,409
$6 to $6.99	
3
12
53
54
97
204
359
528
965
1,438
1,311
1,952
2,520
1
11
10
9
44
72
194
171
317
619
502
1,199
1,260
1
3
10
26
70
44
214
143
283
679
574
1,092
1,252
7 to    7.99               	
8 to    8.99	
3
9 to    9.99         	
47
10 to 10.99	
57
11 to 11.99                       	
88
12 to 12.99	
182
13 to 13.99  	
184
14 to  14.99	
816
15 to  15.99               	
954
16 to  16 99             ..	
1,024
17 to  17.99	
1,950
18 to 18.99	
1,948
14,609
9,498
4,409
4,391
5,592
7,253
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Per Cent.
9.58
8.21
S2.21
Per Cent.
10.19
8.59
81.22
Per Cent.
9.29
9.31
81.40
Per Cent.
9.48
9.53
80.99
Per Cent.
10.38
11.03
78.59
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
I
I
TOTAL PAY-ROLL OF ALL INDUSTRIES.
The total amount of pay-rolls given by 4,704 firms whose returns were received in time to
tabulate in this report was $127,160,467.53. To this amount, however, must be added a number
of additional items in order that a fair estimate of the grand total of all industrial concerns in
the Province can be arrived at.
An amount of $1,395,692.63 was the total received too late to be classified under our twenty-
five tables.
An estimate of the firms who so far failed to make a return has been made at $2,200,000.
Transcontinental railways and other railways (not including logging-railways) submitted
pay-rolls which totalled $13,877,653.55, a decrease of $1,680,622.56. Employees engaged by
Dominion and Provincial Governments are estimated at $6,000,000.
AVholesale and retail businesses have a number of employees who could be reasonably termed
industrial, and though not required to make a return to this Department, it has been estimated
that these employees received $3,550,000.
We have also made an estimate for such firms as are engaged in delivery, cartage and
teaming, warehousing, butchers, moving-picture operators, coal and wood yards, and auto transportation of $4,100,000.
The estimated pay-roll of express companies and the employees of ocean-going vessels, whose
homes are in this Province, is $7,500,000, and for industrial firms who could not be included in
any of the above, we have shown $1,350,000 as miscellaneous.
The total industrial pay-roll of the Province, including the above estimated items, is given
as follows:—
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $13,202,109.09
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       14,034,744.30
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)         99,923,614.14
$127,160,467.53 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 17
Returns received too late to be included in above summary   $1,395,692.63
Estimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by Department's ;
inquiry, and from whom returns were not received   2,200,000.00 I
Transcontinental railways   13,877,653.55
Dominion and Provincial Government workers   6,000,000.00
Wholesale and retail firms  3,550,000.00
Delivery,   cartage  and   teaming,   warehousing,   butchers,   moving-picture
operators, coal and wood yards, and auto transportation   4,100,000.00
Ocean services and express companies          7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous   1,350,000.00
$39,973,346.18
Total   $167,133,813.71
THREE INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS.
For some years past the returns from employers have been segregated into three separate
divisions, embracing Greater Vancouver, Rest of Mainland, and Vancouver Island.
Greater Vancouver accounted for 38.91 per cent, of the total industrial pay-roll of the
Province, an increase of 3.13 over 1929. The Rest of the Mainland, which includes the Queen
Charlotte's and other northern islands, absorbed 42.06 per cent., a decrease of 1.54; while on
Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands the percentage was 19.03, a decrease of 1.57. While the
above percentages indicate a decided gain for Greater Arancouver, at the expense of the other
divisions, it must not be assumed this will be permanent, as the industries largely affected by
trade conditions—namely, lumbering and metal-mining—do not affect the pay-roll of Vancouver
to any great extent, and with a return to normal conditions the percentage of Greater Vancouver
would decrease and an improvement would result in the other two divisions.
The figures shown in the preceding paragraphs have been divided in the same proportion as
for the 4,704 firms reporting, and we arrive at the following division of the industrial pay-roll
of the Province for the past four years:—
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
$65,470,393.20
77,399,922.55
34,652,442.39
$65,585,625.41
80,746,121.74
36,766,034.57
$68,730,605.09
83,790,637.05
39,571,007.37
$65,031,766.92
70,296,482.05
31,805,564.74
Totals	
$177,522,758.14
$183,097,781.72
$192,091,249.51
$167,133,813.71
WHERE DIFFERENCES IN PAY-ROLLS OCCUR.
This report contains the same number of statistical tables as in previous years. In this
manner a fair comparison can be made between the years past and the year under review.
By a comparison of the table on page 18 we find that six of the tables show an increase in
the annual pay-roll, and nineteen show a reduction in the amount paid in salaries and wages.
Breweries, with which is included mineral-water manufacturers, show an increase of $25,000,
builders' materials a loss of $106,000, this being in sympathy with contracting, which suffered a
drop of $979,000; cigar and tobacco manufacturing registered another decrease, this time of
$7,000.
The condition of the coal-mining industry shows cause for grave concern. Following a
decrease in 1929 of $320,000 comes a drop of $842,000 for 1930, and a closing-down of certain
mines in the Vancouver Island coalfield would indicate a further reduction for 1931.
The large reduction of $1,615,000 in Coast shipping is a reflection of how a general depression
can affect every sphere of life, the industrial side of this industry as represented by the tow-boat
companies and the companies catering to the travelling public being both seriously curtailed.
Explosives and chemical firms registered a decrease of some $20,000. The food products
group advanced its pay-roll by $567,000, a large part of this being in the salmon-canning branch.
Garment-making lost $214,000, while house-furnishing exceeded last year by $116,000.
Jewellery, laundries, and cleaning and dyeing suffered a loss of $8,000, and leather and
fur goods decreased by $96,000.
2 E 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The position of the lumber industry may be accurately gauged by the decrease of $11,100,000
in its pay-roll, and although the prospects may be slightly better during 1931 the outlook is not
particularly encouraging.
Metal trades decreased $311,000, while the metal-mining and smelting industry decreased
$3,312,000. This was anticipated, as the wages in this industry fluctuate according to the
prevailing metal prices. Miscellaneous trades and industries had an increase of $107,000.
Oil-refining had a reduction of $300,000 and paint-manufacture a drop of $19,000. Printing and
publishing, which has made rapid strides during the past few years, dropped back $226,000; in
an industry of this nature this could be expected, as printing and publishing is largely dependent
on the success of other industries. The pulp and paper industry of this Province again had a
successful year, making an advance of $338,000 over the previous year. Ship-building decreased
slightly, while wood-manufacture (N.E.S.) suffered a loss of $592,000. As suggested in our last
report, the public utility group had another splendid year, the total pay-roll advancing
$1,281,000.
A comparison of the pay-roll in the various industries for the past three years is given in
the following table:—
Industry.
1928.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1929.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
1930.
No. of
Firms
reporting.
Total
Pay-roll.
Breweries ...
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing.
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting ,
Explosives and chemicals	
Food products	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing.... .....
Manufacturing jewellery	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing.—
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Lumber industries 1	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous .,
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper mills	
Ship-building .	
Smelting	
Street-railways, etc	
Manufacturing wood (N.E.S.)	
Totals	
37
100
9
26
133
1,169
14
516
88
45
11
- 82
61
1,062
678
276
148
29
12
121
14
44
3
82
4,846
$700
1,994
63
7,438
8,956
15,033
374,
10,940
1,005
813
263
1,611
557
36,244
8,275
9,821
2,915
1,503
285
3,592
4,943
1,473
5,694
10,055.
2,226.
$136,784
668.58
931.53
055.18
948.90
.120.75
366.78
.367.71
322.99
057.07
312.66
.720.14
.381.33
,195.11
,200.08
,917.84
.102.89
.442.87
,668.72
,748.77
,000.61
729.59.
,820.99
,432.49
226.73
743.37
35
85
6
28
120
1,272
14
507
86
42
10
97
60
1,097
723
296
147
37
13
141
19
43
2
$894
2,228
40
6,508.
9,479.
16,031
408,
11,477
1,047
838
252
1,827
628,
35,920
9,470,
12,052
2,948,
1,856
315.
4,419
5,277,
1,584
6,192
10,771,
2,646,
484.18
5,065
$145,120
,058.05
38
,740.67
89
,991.42
8
,572.73
26
,903.49
122
,889.15
1,209
,900.52
12
,417.29
490
,332.82
71
,133.83
52
,489.39
9
,406.99
80
S,171.68
46
,814.46
957
,360.77
747
,702.06
175
S.670.35
154
,105.35
25
>,877.18
11
1,619.41
144
',264.27
16
1,229.26
43
!,644.62
2
1,430.88
94
>,599.34
84
),325.98
4,704
$919
2,102
33
5,666
7,864
15,052
388,
12,044,
833,
954
244
1,819
532
24,884
9,159
8,794
3,055
1,550
296,
4,193
5,515
1,570
6,138
11,490
2,054
,439.87
,053.83
,669.01
,528.68
,024.07
,002.85
,751.18
.250.99
,225.55
,187.58
538.21
.588.56
736.45
,763.99
,847.72
,660.08
746.40
,226.44
,917.32
,899.99
,461.04
,146.20
,961.84
,070.60
,769.08
$127,160,467.53
APPRENTICES DECREASE.
A decrease of 395 in the number of apprentices employed occurred during 1930. This took
place largely in the following groups: Contracting, garment-making, house-furnishing, metal
trades, printing and publishing, street-railways, etc., and the manufacture of wood (N.E.S.).
Increases in the number of apprentices were recorded in laundries, metal-mining, food products,
builders' materials, jewellery, and the manufacture of leather goods.
It is very unfortunate that employers could not have retained their apprentices in employment, as a break in their training is a serious thing for those who were learning a trade, having
a decided tendency to unsettle their minds and make them try some other work, thereby losing
valuable years not only to themselves, but to the trade in which they had started to learn. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 19
AArERAGE NUMBER OF AV AGE-EARNERS BY MONTHS.
The purpose of the following illustration is to show the employment curves of the total
wage-earners covering the past four years.
The figures on which the chart is based are those given in the summary of all tables for
the various years, and affords striking proof of the seasonal nature of some of our industries,
among these being fish-canneries, fruit and vegetable canneries, Coast shipping, metal-mining,
and lumbering.
In some of the above-mentioned industries the individual curve is impossible to correct,
such as fish canning and packing, fruit and vegetable canning. The season of these two
important industries is of short duration, the plants in both instances being closed down for
seven or eight months in each year.
The chart reveals that in 1930, the first time in four years, the total number employed was
fewer at the close of the year than in any of the preceding months, the curve showing a
difference of some 17,000 from the peak month of July and the low month of December.
The chart and figures being applicable only to the industries covered in this report.
AVERAGE    MONTHLY   N U M BE R <=>- WAG E-EARM ERS  (Male & Female)
1927 -1930
JAN.|FEB.|MARAPL.|MAYJUNE|JULY AUG.SEPT. OCT.  NOV  DEC.
IOO.OOO
95.000
30,000
85, OOO
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
<50,000
55,OOO
50, OOO
y
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E 21
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P 60- E 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Chaet showing Fluctuation in Industrial Wages—Continued.
30%
55%
20%
15%
10%
5%
i92e
1927
1928
1929
30%
25%
20%
15%
\o%
5%
1
■   i
1 1
1  1
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IX
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fl  fl
E
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. is
FEMALES IN INDUSTRY.
The percentage of females employed in industry increased to
9.05 per cent, in 1930 from 8.06 per cent, in 1929. Increases were
noted in the following groups: Food products, breweries, house-
furnishing, leather and fur goods, and the public utility group ; while
decreases were found in cigar and tobacco manufacturing, garment-
making, laundries, miscellaneous trades and industries. The figures
would indicate that female employees have been retained on the payroll while the male employees were laid off.
SEASONAL FLUCTUATIONS.
Two of our basic industries are, in their nature, very subject to
seasonal fluctuations, and are the most seriously affected during
periods of depression, and this is shown in the tables giving the
average number of wage-earners month by month. The 4,704 firms
whose record is now under review had a total of 70,219 employees
in January. This number increased gradually each month until July,
when a total of 82,505 was reached. From this point there was a
gradual decline until December, when the figures were 65,436, being
a drop of 17,069 from the peak month.     ';   "
In the lumbering industry the peak month changed to March,
1930, from May in 1929, the numbers employed being 21,880 against
27,041 respectively; the month of least employment being December
in both years, over 7,000 fewer employees being engaged in December,
1930, than in December, 1929.
In metal-mining the month of most employment changed to
January from October, with 2,100 less employed. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 23
Printing and publishing maintained a fairly steady number of employees throughout the
year, although the number employed was below last year. The pulp and paper industry had
a better monthly average, and the number did not vary to any great extent.
Smelting employed more men than last year, the peak month being October, as in 1929.
In the public utility group the numbers employed each month were in excess of 1929, the
month with most employment being January, and the low, December, the same as last year:
The wood-manufacture group began in January with 1,229 employees, and gradually increased to 1,613 in July, but decreased more quickly to 1,126 in December.
The food products group required some 450 more employees in the peak month than in 1929,
August having 11,452 employed, and dropping sharply to 5,231 in December, February being the
month of least employment.
Coast shipping rose steadily from January to August, which was the peak,  with 5,710
employed, compared with 7,354 for July, the peak month in 1929, and decreased every month to
December, when 4,540 were employed, as compared with 5,908 in the previous year.
FLUCTUATION OF INDUSTRIAL AVAGES.
The same method of comparison has been made of the weekly wage-rates in the various
industries as in previous years. In the general summary of all tables, 6,836 adult males are
shown as having received from $19 to $19.99 per week; some, no doubt, received $19, others
$19.50 and $19.75, etc. In our calculations we set the weekly wage of these 6,836 at $19.50.
There iis also shown 14,221 receiving from $30 to $34.99 per week. In the same manner some
would receive $30, $31, $32, $33, and $34 per week, and in this block of wage-earners we have
set the wage at $32 per week for the purpose of making an average. We therefore assumed,
where steps of $1 were given in the table, that $19 to $19.99 meant $19.50, and where steps of
$5 are shown—that of $30 to $34.99, for example—meant $32. Should the above be considered
too generous, the 3,455 given as receiving $50 and over were in all cases taken to mean $50 only.
LOWER WAGES PREVAILING.
The following table sbows the increases and decreases in the weekly wages, as calculated
from the tables of this report, and shows that with a reduction in the total pay-roll of the
Province has also come a lowering of the wages in eighteen of the twenty-five tables;
explosives and chemicals increased by $2.05, followed by jewellery-manufacturing with $1.24.
The increases during the last three years in this branch more than compensated the heavy
decrease in 1927. Food products, with the continued expansion in the pay-roll, had an increase
of $1.23, which brought the weekly wages in this industry to the highest point since 1920.
The largest decreases appeared in the metal-mining and smelting. This drop in the weekly
wage-rate was anticipated in our last report, the decrease in smelting being $3.04 and in metal-
mining $1.93, followed by cigar and tobacco manufacturing with $1.52; printing and publishing
lost $1.47; Coast shipping, $1.48; house-furnishing, $1.20; coal-mining, $1.15; laundries, etc.,
$1;  all other reductions being below $1 per week.
Weekly Wages, 1930, compared with 1929.
The increases and decreases in weekly wages are shown in the following table:—■
Increases. Decreases.
Explosives and chemicals   $2.05 Breweries  $0.30
Food products, manufacture of ....    1.23 Builders' materials  66
Jewellery, manufacture of      1.24 Cigar and tobacco manufacturing.... 1.52
Metal trades  46 Coal-mining      1.15
Paint-manufacture  .' 27 Coast shipping     1.48
Ship-building  10 Contracting   23
Wood, manufacture of (N.E.S.) 54 Garment-making  34
House-furnishing        1.20
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing     1.00
Leather and fur goods,  manufacture of  72
Lumber industries  85
Metal-mining        1.93
Miscellaneous trades and industries      .33
Oil-refining 72
Printing and publishing      L47
Pulp and paper manufacturing ......      .48
Smelting ..    3.04
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
telephones, etc 68 E 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The following table shows the average industrial weekly wage for each industry from the
year 1924 to 1930. These averages are calculated from the adult male column only, and are for
one full week's work in each particular industry. It must not, however, be assumed that the
weekly rate multiplied by the number of weeks in the year is the total annual earnings, as we
have no knowledge how many weeks or months these 95,165 employees were employed during
the year, our average being for the week of employment of the greatest number.
Average Full Week's Wages in each Industry (Adult Males only).
Industry.
1924.
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
Breweries	
Builders' materials	
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Contracting	
Explosives and chemicals	
Pood products, manufacture of	
Garment-making	
House-furnishing	
Jewellery, manufacture of	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Manufacturing leather and fur goods
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil-refining	
Paint-manufacture	
Printing and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building	
Smelting	
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
telephones, etc	
Manufacturing of wood  (N.E.S.)	
$26.51
26.10
24.07
35.73
29.59
27.98
26.86
25.94
28.38
25.53
31.26
25.70
26.44
26.15
26.37
31.84
25.85
33.06
24.69
39.52
27.69
26.79
35.14
29.84
22.55
327.41
26.78
22.97
30.52
28.21
28.23
23.35
26.25
29.10
25.34
35.06
25.30
26.68
25.40
28.13
32.81
25.38
31.39
22.00
37.61
27.38
27.72
35.75
27.69
23.92
$27.32
27.38
22.24
30.06
29.59
29.06
23.79
26.20
29.48
25.67
36.69
27.00
26.90
25.56
27.92
33.34
24.61
31.48
21.94
38.25
27.47
28.74
32.90
29.26
25.26
$27.62
26.96
22.36
29.79
29.79
30.24
25.38
26.60
29.15
27.46
31.41
26.44
29.42
25.93
29.76
32.89
25.99
30.96
24.95
36.72
27.11
29.11
31.15
28.83
25.60
26.28
22.97
30.50
31.89
30.58
26.24
27.70
28.60
27.44
32.49
26.96
27.88
26.53
31.04
33.27
27.15
30.23
23.62
40.94
26.82
28.85
32.54
30.04
25.02
$27.70
28.04
26.58
30.18
32.84
30.57
24.61
26.56
28.68
26.74
36.61
28.16
29.03
26.54
29.50
35.24
26.21
30.50
25.58
40.81
27.87
30.25
33.09
30.70
25.49
$27.40
27.38
25.06
29.03
31.36
30.34
26.66
27.79
28.34
25.54
37.85
27.16
28.31
25.69
29.96
33.31
25.88
29.78
25.85
39.34
27.39
30.35
30.05
30.02
26.03
DECREASE IN AVERAGE INDUSTRIAL WAGE.
The average industrial wage covering a full week's work for the 95,165 adult males shown
in the general summary was $28.64, compared with $29.20 in 1929. As stated in the previous
paragraph this represents the pay for a full week's work; the average earnings covering the
year would likely be lower, due to stoppages, broken time, and various other conditions.
The average weekly wage for industrial workers (adult males only) since the compilation
of these statistics is as follows:—
1918   $27.97
1919   29.11
1920   31.51
1921   27.62
1922   27.29
1923   28.05
1924   28.39
1925   $27.82
1926  :  27.99
1927   28.29
1928   28.96
1929   29.20
1930   28.64
NATIONALITY OF EMPLOYEES.
The table showing the nationality of employees changed considerably from last year.
Natives of English-speaking countries increased to 72.01 per cent., almost regaining the position
held in 1928. Those from Continental Europe decreased to 16.07 per cent., while Asiatic employees decreased to 8.97 per cent.    The employees from other countries,  or nationality not REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 25
stated, increased to 2.95 per cent., the actual number of Asiatics employed being 9,978, compared
with 12,253 for 1929.    The percentage of the four divisions will be seen in the following table:—
1925.
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
Natives of English-speaking countries....
Per Cent.
70.85
15.91
11.30
1.94
Per Cent.
70.92
15.62
11.56
1.90
Per Cent.
72.51
15.05
10.20
2.24
Per Cent.
72.65
17.02
9.33
1.00
Per Cent.
70.34
18.56
10.01
1.09
Per Cent.
72.01
16.07
8.97
Prom  other  countries,   or  nationality
2.95
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
The groups employing more Asiatics were breweries, food products, oil-refining, printing and
publishing, smelting, manufacture of wood (N.E.S.), and the public utility group; and the
industries where fewer Asiatics were employed were builders' materials, coal-mining, Coast
shipping, contracting, explosives and chemicals, lumbering, metal trades, metal-mining, miscellaneous trades and industries, pulp and paper manufacturing, and ship-building.
NATIONALITY LEADERS IN INDUSTRIES.
Canadians predominate in nineteen of the twenty-five nationality tables, these being
breweries, builders' materials, cigar and tobacco manufacturing, contracting, food products,
garment-making, house-furnishing, jewellery-manufacturing, leather and fur goods group, lumber
industry, metal-mining, metal trades, miscellaneous trades and industries, oil-refining, paint-
manufacture, printing and publishing, pulp and paper manufacturing, ship-building, and the
manufacture of wood (N.E.S.). AATorkers from Great Rritain and Ireland lead in coal-mining,
Coast shipping, explosives and chemicals, laundries, cleaning and dyeing, smelting, and the
public utility group. Natives of Belgium increased to 287 from 278 in 1929. France had a
slight decrease to 456, while Italy increased to 2,685. Germany had a slight reduction, the
number employed being 955. Austria-Hungary, with 1,222, a decrease of 586. The Scandinavian
countries recorded 7,899, against 11,022 in 1929, while Russia and Europe supplied 3,780 and 590
respectively, a decrease in both totals.
EMPLOYERS AVITH LARGE PAY-ROLL.
In tabulating the number of firms with a pay-roll of over $100,000, we do not include any
public authorities, Dominion, Provincial, or municipal, nor is the wholesale or retail merchants,
transcontinental railways, or deep-sea shipping counted in the number.
The year 1930 witnessed a large drop in this group, the number being 219, compared with
262 last year, a decrease of 42. The lumbering industry, with 72 of these large firms, decreased
by 33 from last year's total. Food products had 23 of the total, an increase of 2, followed by
contracting with 15, a decrease of 1. Coast shipping had 13, a loss of 3; public utilities 12, the
same as last year. Coal-mining reports 10, followed by metal-mining with 9, a loss of 8 for the
past year. Garages had 8, an increase of 3. The printing and publishing industry had 7 and
the manufacture of wood (N.E.S.) 6. Lime, stone and cement, pulp and paper, and ship-building
had 5 each; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 4; breweries, miscellaneous trades and industries,
and oil-refining had 3 each; garment-manufacturing, machine-shops, plumbing and heating, and
smelting, 2 each; and 1 each in leather-manufacturing, explosives, house-furnishing, jewellery-
manufacturing, miscellaneous metal trades, electrical contracting, paint-manufacture, and the
sheet-metal industry.
Of the 219 with a pay-roll of over $100,000, twelve had an annual pay-roll of over $1,000,000;
two of these were between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, one between $3,000,000 and $4,000,000, one
between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, and one over $5,000,000. E 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
CONTENTS OF TABLES.
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries.—Under this heading are tabulated mineral-
water manufacturers and breweries.
No. 2. Builders' Material) etc. —Includes manufacturers of
brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lin.e, tiles, and firebrick ;
also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and crushed
rock. j J
No. 3. Cigar and Tjobacco Manufacturing.—Comprises only
these trades.
No. 4. Coal-miiting.—This group contains also the operation of
coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Contracting. -Here are grouped building trades, painting and paper-hanging, plumbing a:«d heating, and sheet-
metal works ; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and
valves, dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing,
and automatic sprinklers. Firms making return as building
contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills,
brick-furnaces, electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Chemicals, etc. — Includes the manufacture
of these commodities, also the manufacture of fertilizers.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacture of.—This table includes
bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries
and dairies, fish, fruit and vegetable canneries, packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also
manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles,
sauces, coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture
of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton goods,
shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies' outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in the
manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery, Manufacture of.—Includes the repair as well
as manufacturing of jewellery and watches and optical
instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacture of.-— Comprises
manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks, and
leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine blacksmith-
ing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of
handsaws, nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill
machinery, and repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous
enough to warrant special categories. They include manufacturers Of soap, sails, tents, awning, brooms, paper boxes,
and tin containers; also cold storage.
No. 18. Oil-refining.—Includes also the manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-miariufacturiny.—Includes also white-lead corro-
ders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—Va\s table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing, lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the
manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building.— Comprises both wooden- and steel-ship
building and repairing, also construction and repair of small
craft, and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting.— Comprises firms engaged exclusively in that
industry.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Power, etc.—This group
comprises generating and distribution of light and power,
manufacture of gas, dissolved acetylene and oxygen ; also
includes gasoline lighting and heating devices, and supply
of water to municipalities.
No. 25. Woodt Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—Here
are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior finish,
water-proof ply-wood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden
pipes and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets,
coffins, and undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1.
BREWERIES.
Returns covering 88 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers ; §151,799.10
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    143,469.56
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    624,171.21
Total :... $919,439.87
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February ....
April	
383
394
401
424
429
433
97
83
81
136
81
94
July	
August	
September .
November ..
December...
468
466
416
423
393
421
137
131
112
117
141
June	
157
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Emplo.yment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
7
7.00 to    7.99...
8 00 to     8.99...
1
4
3
10.00 to   10.99...
1
101
31
20
15
ll.OOto   11.99
12.00 to   12.99...
13 00 to   13.99...
6
18
13
5
16 00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99...
21
15
15
33
20
9
13
18
26
22
18
16
112
72
30
10
3
8
1
3
1
5
1
1
19.00 to   19.99...
1
21 00 to   21.99...
24.00 to   24.99.
25.00 to   25.99...
27.00 to   27.99  ..
29.00 to   29.99...
35 00 to   39.99..
45.00 to   49.99...
.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium.. *	
France	
Italy..
Germany..	
Austria and Hungary   ...	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country.	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
276
154
5 ,
3
1
12
11
1
6
10
3
24
164
32 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 27
Table No. 2.
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—
Returns covering
PRODUCERS
89 Firms.
OF.
Table No. 3.
CIGAR AND TOBACCO MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 8 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments,
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc ,
Total 	
1930.
$282,897.00
145,612.00
1,673,544.83
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Total	
$12,067.00
2,345.10
19,256.9]
$2,102,053.83
J33,669.01
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.   Females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
February   ...
March	
1,032
1,117
1,183
1,250
1,366
1,345
Jul;
1,401
1,334
1,313
1,272
1,247
1,107
January....
February...
May	
12
12
9
17
14
14
8
13
13
14
10
6
July	
August	
September .
OcLober ....
November..
December ..
IS
16
16
17
17
16
9
9
September .
November..
December...
8
13
May	
14
10
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
i
i
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
1 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
$6.00 to   $6.<
7.00 to     7.1
8.00 to     8 i
9.00 to     9 1
10.00 to   10.<
11.00 to   11. i
12.00 to   12.!
13 00 to   13 <
19...
2
$6.00 to   $6
7.00 to     7
8.00 to     8
9.00 to     9
10.00 to   10
11.00 to   11
12.00 to   12
13.00 to   13
14.00 to   14
15.00 to   15
99
»9
1
99
99..
19...
19.
2
1
3
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
99
9  ..
99  .
9...
9
2
99..
99..
9
4
2
5
61
33
31
191
29
190
119
17
257
103
83
108 .
36
20
139
67
88
82
64
99
99..
1
14.00 to   14.99...
1
1
6
2
1
15.00 to   15.99.   .
99
1
1
16.00 to   16 99
17 00 to   17.99...
1
17.00 to   17
18.00 to   18
99..
2
1
99..
1
19.00 to   19.99...
19.00 to   19.99.
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99  .
2
3
2
21.00 to   21.99...
1
1
3
22 00 to   22.99...
1
22.00 to   22
23.00 to   23
24 00 to   24
99..
99..
2
1
99
1
3
1
25 00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to    26.99
27.00 to   27
28.00 to   28
29.00 to   29
99 .
2S.00to   28.99...
99..
29.00 to   29.99.
1
99
1
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39 99
40.00 to   44
45.00 to   49
50.00 and a\
99
45.00 to   49.99.
99..
1
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
667
550
23
2
5
4
62
10
4
114
64
24
239
2
3
9
4
Great Britain and Ire!
United States of Ame
Great Britain and 1
United States of A
8
6
1
France 	
Italv      	
Italy 	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
1
1
1
1
Austria and HungE
1
Other European coun
Other European co
All other countries
All other countries
ec
ted	
	 E 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 4.
COAL-MINING.
Returns covering 26 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $274,750.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       195,214.40
Wages-earners (including piece-workers)    5,196,564.28
Total $5,666,528.68
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January	
F'ebruary....
4,745
4,466
4,216
3,784
3,741
3,751
5
5
5
5
5
5
July	
September .
November...
December...
3,843
3,864
3,873
4,069
4,137
4,133
6
6
6
6
6
7
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
1
7.00 to     7.99.
8.00 to     8.99...
9
20
8
9.00 to     9.99...
10.00 to   10.99...
11.00 to   11.99...
12.00 to   12 99...
6
46
126
72
64
76
96
50
76
128
77
60
51S
129
468
405
130
311
959
520
184
130
91
29
27
13
28
12
10
29
14
22
6
13.00 to   13.99...
14.00 to   14.99...
2
i
15.00 to   15.99...
16.00 to   16 99...
17.00 to   17.99.   .
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
1
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
12
8
1
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
2
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99.
4
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan   	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
808
2,343
54
1
36
13
433
52
59
80
568
39
384
61
Females.
Table No. 5.
COAST SHIPPING.
Returns covering 122 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $722,893.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc          538,392.45
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    6,602,738.62
Total $7,864,024.07
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
4,744
4,828
4,991
5,067
5,202
5,515
18
18
18
18
29
54
September..
November..
December ..
5,623
5,654
5,166
4,934
4,677
4,514
60
56
41
33
24
26
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99..
2
3
4
1
11
1
6
8
2
6
77
28
2
1
2
2
3
80
73
60
125
126
96
59
429
224
615
417
292
102
110
553
747
632
745
307
320
8.00 to     8.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
3
12.00 to   12.90..
13.00 to   13.99..
1
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
7
1
1
17.00 to   17.99..
18 00 to   18.99
19.00 to   19.99
20.00 to   20.99..
13
21.00 to   21.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99  .
25.00 to   25.99..
1
8
3
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
3
9
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99 .
35.00 to   39.99 .
40.00 to   44.99.
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia 	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia'or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated.	
Males.       Females.
2,250
2,319
81
39
10
15
31
22
177
23
3
367
22
36
2 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 29
Table No. 6.
CONTRACTING.
Returns covering 1,209 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,809,331.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,362,410.64
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 11,880,^61.31
Total $15,052,002.85
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females.
January ...
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
7,345
7,665
8,456
9,588
10,313
10,234
36
33
38
40
40
41
Month.
Males.
July	
10,414
August	
10,629
September .
10,139
October ....
9,33b
November..
10,607
December...
9,223
64
66
65
34
31
27
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99.
20.99.
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
to 26.99..
to 27.99..
to   28 99. .
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44 99..
49.99..
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
5
5
4
16
30
64
65
121
396
285
603
1,598
382
2,768
1,462
93H
505
382
375
1,315
1,080
1,846
633
1,030
ES.
Females.
Appren
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
5
1
15
23
22
11
29
1
22
16
1
20
25
29
13
41
1
14
26
11
42
4
46
6
16
27
1
11
24
11
11
17
12
3
15
9
5
19
23
5
5
1
3
15
4
6
2
1
1
11
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
3
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan   	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
6,782
6,252
275
36
48
56
437
102
136
1,143
313
55
1
31
304
47
26
1
Table No. 7.
EXPLOSIVES, CHEMICALS, ETC.
Returns covering 12 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $81,051.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     60,897.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  246,803.18
Total , $388,751.18
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
204
204
206
199
191
186
August	
September..
October....
November ..
December ..
189
191
184
185
170
165
May	
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00.    .
$6.00 to  $6.99..
8.00 to     8.99..
1
12 00 to   12 99 .
13.00 to   13 99..
14 00 to   14.99
3
5
15.00 to   15.99 .
16.00 to   16.99
17.00 to   17.99
6
6
43
13
11
13
15
26
10
11
9
9
9
34
18
11
2
4
1
19.00 to   19.99..
2
23 00 to   23 99
25.00 to   25 99  .
27.00 to   27.99.
29.00 to   29.99..
35 00 to   39 99
45.00 to   49 99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland..
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium   .
France	
Italy..
Germany 	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated    	
Males.        Females.
73
120
18 E 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 8.
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering JT90 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,484,869.95
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,601,733.07
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    8,957,647.97
Total $12,044,250.99
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March. .
April....
May	
June
4,140
4,036
4,086
4,766
5,249
6,397
894
941
870
930
1,133
1,826
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August.,..
September
October ...
November.
December .
7,685
8,260
7,601
6,588
5,101
4,214
3,048
3,292
3,706
2,720
1,639
1,017
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21 00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
i.00
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.89.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
36
17
21
22
6
46
193
133
371
425
344
892
402
470
312
685
692
414
492
355
207
1,379
942
518
128
417
Under
21 Yrs.
1
9
5
30
14
53
22
65
53
49
67
44
34
61
22
42
27
10
14
3
12
3
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
13
38
19
54
58
119
145
579
280
488
615
358
151
430
266
194
246
81
63
91
113
56
51
23
25
95
35
19
5
2
10
16
16
26
39
17
33
28
74
IS
6
10
6
2
2
2
Apprentices.
Table No. 9
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland ,	
Great Britain and Ireland .'	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan    	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
3,773
2,892
176
16
30
20
99
104
70
757
163
49
1,872
8
775
31
53
2,940
1,223
107
19
10
23
120
65
117
196
106
54
57
9
652
6
211
GARMENT-MAKING.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $139,377.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       110,771.25
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       583,077.30
Total     $833,225.55
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January.
February
March.. .
April.  ..
May	
June
196
200
207
207
206
207
402
443
441
450
438
426
July	
August....
September
October ...
November.
December .
Is3
202
212
222
216
203
420
409
462
463
451
416
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
16.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
60.00
.00 .
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
26.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
3
1
3
2
6
6
3
18
3
6
4
5
10
5
14
6
3
15
16
23
6
4
Under
21 Yrs.
Females.
18 Yrs.
&over.
4
1
3
3
37
19
73
48
45
22
30
14
23
10
27
5
4
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium   	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary ,	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China      	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
68
1
1
1
1
3
3
17
16
11
4
4
Females.
247
182
16
1
4
3
3
5
15
18
1
1
4
12 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER,  1930.
E 31
Table No.  10.
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 52 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $171,099.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    132,035.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers).    651,053.58
Total  $95i,187.58
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January ..
February.
March....
April	
May	
June	
.Males.
Females.
569
102
557
109
568
110
565
110
553
117
542
112
Month.        Males.   Females.
July 	
August....
September.
October '..
November.
December..
539
557
574
586
588
563
100
108
115
115
112
103
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under S6.
ta.OOto
7.00 to
8.00 to
9.00 to
10.00 to
11 00 to
12.00 to
13.00 to
14.00 to
15.00 to
16.00 to
17.00 to
18.00 to
19.00 to
20.00 to
21.00 to
22.00 to
23.00 to
24.00 to
25.00 to
26.00 to
27.00 to
28.00 to
29.00 to
30.00 to
35.00 to
40.00 to
45.00 to
50.00 am
00	
$6.99..
7.99..
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99.,
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99.
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
1 over. .
21 Yrs.
& over.
2
26
3
19
3
19
22
10
37
26
20
41
7
38
20
29
8
19
3
78
39
19
5
Under
21 Yrs.
1
7
9
7
11
17
12
4
3
8
11
1
1
1
1
2
2
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
4
4
2
2
4
20
16
18
9
16
3
5
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprem
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia ,     	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan  	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated 	
371
208
8
2
8
1
7
5
2
35
3
1
Females.
83
49
2
Table No.  11.
JEWELLERY—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 9 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and.Managers  $41,869.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc .'   99,606.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  103,063.21
Total $244,538.21
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
June ........
56
55
55
65
55
55
3
3
3
3
3
3
July	
September..
October.....
November..
December...
56
56
56
56
56
56
3
3
3
.   3
3
3
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wagerearners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
tices.
Under $6.00	
2
,1
7.00 to    7.99..
8.00 to     8.99.
9 00 to     9.99...
2
11.00 to   11.99..
1
12 00 to   12 99..
2
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00to   15.99..
17.00 to   17.99  .
rt..
2
18.00 to   18.99..
1
1
20.00 to   20.99
21 00 to   21.99  .
1
3
22.00 to   22 99..:
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99
25.00 to   25.99 .,'
1
26.00 to   26.99..'
1
1
1
10
9
8
5
9
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40 00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
28
,25
2
1
Italy	
3
.   1
.1 E 32
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No.  111.
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND  DYEING.
Returns covering 80 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $182,077.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       293,427.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,344,084.56
Total , $1,819,588.56
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.        Males.   Females.
January.
February
March. .
April ..  .
May	
June
542
558
658
557
561
565
1,115
1,121
1,127
1,169
1,157
1,151
July	
August ...
September.
October ...
November.
December .
564
566
545
556
643
537
1,182
1,166
1,173
1,123
1,098
1,088
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
to  7.99.
to  8.99.
to  9.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
to
to
to
to
to
and over.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
3
3
4
19
8
7
16
5
28
15
21
8
27
64
26
39
36
8
115
42
17
3
2
Under
21 Yrs.
1
3
1
1
4
2
10
4
3
6
4
4
4
Females.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
4
26
16
8
24
41
369
178
151
66
41
63
9
23
11
3
Under
18 Yrs.
1
14
29
8
24
11
1
Apprentices.
9
2
13
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland   	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc..
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.
201
292
11
4
4
1
25
7
25
513
527
24
1
3
7
14
4
3
48
20
4
55
Table IS'o.  13.
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS—MANUFACTURING OF.
Returns covering 46 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers, $ 92,372.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     73,261.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  367,103.45
Total $532,736.45
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March	
May	
June	
267
264
267
251
254
256
103
97
99
98
102
101
September..
October ....
November..
December ..
252
269
262
266
257
255
Ill
116
126
130
123
113
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
16.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00	
to $6.99.
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
16.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
23.99.
24.99.
26.99.
28.99
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34 99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
21 Yrs.
& over.
1
2
11
5
10
7
6
6
26
16
13
9
16
13
36
20
6
2
Under
21 Yrs.
F"EMALK8.
18 Yrs.
& over.
1
1
12
5
6
14
4
13
2
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
2
2
5
4
10
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America ..
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
115
97
16
1
10
12
4
3
15
4
76
50
4 REPORT OF THE DEPUTE MINISTER, 1930.
E 33
Table No. 14.
LUMBER INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 957 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,743,372.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,135,327.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) 22,006,066.99
Total $24,884,763.99
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.    Females.        Month.       Males.    Females.
January .
February
March...
April	
May	
June
16,742
19,577
21,847
21,711
21,342
19,794
23
29
33
29
31
32
July	
August...
September
October..
November
December.
10,820
14,856
14,245
13,417
12,696
11,920
29
26
19
19
22
18
Table No.  15.
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to   $6.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
22
' 37
59
70
496
373
461
782
747
4,924
898
2,562
941
639
2,849
1,048
712
1,266
752
469
2,491
1,640
652
646
665
Under
21 Yrs.
3
2
2
3
13
16
8
72
30
105
41
45
29
14
72
3
21
2
24
13
6
1
1
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy   	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
9,230
3,762
1,127
41
70
186
284
321
480
2,996
1,354
159
2,067
671
1,530
124
585
27
5
3
METAL TRADES.
Returns covering 7^7 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers $1,888,084.39
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc    1,580,763.93
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,690,999.40
Total.  $9,159,847.72
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
January .
February
March..
April
May....
June
Males.    Females.
3,926
4,061
4,148
4,281
4,432
4,576
71
71
82
82
86
88
Month.        Males.    Females.
July	
August. ...
September
October ...
November .
December..
4,866
4,641
4,464
4,279
4,145
3,677
97
96
89
72
66
62
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
38
28
38
48
34
59
43
74
26
41
76
31
53
25
22
28
18
33
8
5
8
2
2
2
2
1
4
1
1
1
3
6
4
10
17
13
5
4
5
3
1
3
$6.00 to   $6.99
7.00 to     7.99
8.00 to     8.99
9.00 to     9.99 .
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00to   12.99..
13.00to   13.99,.
14.00 to   14.99..
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99 .
17.00 to   17 99..
18.00 to   18.99..
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
4
4
19
10
19
64
38
75
82
116
164
106
408
123
262
251
145
153
141
93
893
721
314
83
168
3
3
44
35
40
13
26
22
21
11
8
29
9
7
7
5
2
3
1
1
25.00 to   25.99..
2
26.00 to   26.99
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
2
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
1
1
1
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium ....,	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China    	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries   	
Nationality not stated	
Males.        Females.
2,824
1,914
172
9
10
18
40
35
12
115
33
17
29
1
217 E 34                                                    DEPARTMENT
OF LABOUK.
Table No.  16.
METAL-MINING.
Returns covering 115 Firms.
Table No.  17.
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND INDUSTRIES.
Returns covering 154 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     7,428,598.08
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      535,574.00
Total   $3,055,746.40
Total  $8,794,660.08
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males
.   Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
4,636
4,354
4,151
4,326
4,406
4,510
48
47
46
45
43
43
Jul}
Aug
Sep
Oct<
Nov
Dec
4,547
4,396
4,339
4,024
3,729
3,897
43
43
42
41
43
43
January....
February...
May	
June	
1,278
l,42f
1,551
1,514
1,536
1.60C
287
297
308
300
295
297
Julj
Aug
Sep
Oct
No\
Dec
1,565
1,476
1,458
1,342
1,150
1,083
281
281
285
285
283
274
ember..
)ber   ...
ember...
amber...
ust	
ember,.
)ber ....
ember..
ember ..
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00
$6.00 to   $6
7.00 to     7
8.00 to     8
8
2
5
10
3
11
...rt...
10
1
1
2
8
$6.00 to  $6.
99
7
11
14
12
37
5
27
14
10
23
9
23
10
3
1
2
1
3
1
2
3
9
9
5
171
39
24
11
12
4
4
6
1
1     ,
2
7
2
2
8
2
5
1
13
1
4
7.00 to    7.
8.00 to     8.
19...
1
1
3
11
7
5
49
22
104
38
51
183
89
97
77
216
113
63
61
53
32
178
170
46
12
18
9.00 to     9.
3
9.00 to     9.99
10.00 to   10.99 .
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
14.00 to   14.99 .
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
M.OOto   17.99 .
18.00 to   18.99 .
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
21.00 to   21.99..
10.00 to   10.
1
■7
11.00 to   11.
12.00 to   12.
13.00 to   13.
»...
1
1
1
18
14.00 to   14.
2
10
2
5
7
49
26
20
53
93
39
77
104
159
742
1,901
1,457
114
173
113
2
7
2
2
3
16.00 to   16.99...
17.00 to   17.99..
18.00 to   18.99...
19.00 to   19.99...
20.00 to   20.99...
21.00 to   21.99...
22.00 to   22.99...
23.00 to   23.99...
24.00 to   24.99...
25.00 to   25.99...
26.00 to   26.99...
27.00 to   27.99...
28.00 to   28.99...
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
35.00 to   39.99...
40.00 to   44.99...
45.00 to   49.99...
50.00 and over ...
1
3
1
5
6
1
4
6
1
3
6
9
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
22.00 to   22.99..
23.00 to   23.99..
24.00 to   24.99..
25.00 to   25.99..
26.00 to   26.99..
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
50.00 and over..
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
6
3
2
6
1
3
2
1
Nationality of Employees.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Males.
Females.
Country of Origin.
Males,
Females.
1,642
1,564
234
11
11
26
241
68
93
936
472
30
98
28
17
2
Canada and Newfoundland
812
655
43
1
5
6
14
9
42
166
39
6
28
8
22
23
100
170
100
2
1
7
Italy	
Italy	
Austria and Hungary   	
Austria and HungE
2
9
Other European cou
Other European co
93
1
6
All other countries
Nationality not sta
Nationality not Stat
ed	
120
ted	 ' REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 35
Table No.  18.
OIL-REFINING.
Returns covering 25 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers. Superintendents, and Managers     $172,825.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc        427,839.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)       949,562.44
Total    $1,550,226.44
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females
January.
February
March...
April	
May	
June ....
450
499
500
599
693
713
Month.       Males.   Females.
July	
August...
September
October...
November
December.
944
879
548
429
355
10
14
13
8
1
1
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 .
to   $6.
to     7.
to     8
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
to 29.99.
to   34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
37
7
14
8
59
2
50
48
22
32
9
48
9
15
33
73
218
110
71
29
40
Under
21 Yrs.
3
2
io
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America.  	
Australasia	
Belgium    	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country    	
China	
Hindustan   	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
375
295
25
5
1
8
187
22
3
55
66
26
Females.
Table No.  19.
PAINT-MANUFACTURING.
Returns covering 11 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers   $80,749.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc..         94,544.00
Wage-earneis (including piece-workers)    121,624.32
Total   $296,917.32
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
January....
February...
March	
May	
June	
108
115
119
124
118
117
14
14
14
14
15
14
July	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
115
114
108
105
96
95
13
13
13
13
12
12
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00 .
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99
28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over .
Males.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
1
6
4
1
3
2
6
7
8
2
3
11
6
1
3
10
3
2
1
5
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Countr}' of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland .
Great Britain and Ireland ..
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France   	
Italy.
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
44
1
Females. E 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 20.
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING.
Returns covering 144 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $634,853.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc  1,269,626.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)      2,289,420.99
Total $4,193,899.99
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   F'emales. Month.        Males.   Females.
Januarj'.
February
March. .
April.. ..
May	
June
1,323
1,311
1,333
1,324
1,331
1,320
195
197
195
190
191
196
July	
August. ..
September
October...
November
December.
1,312
1,318
1,302
1,297
1,320
1,308
186
181
1*2
193
198
191
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
&over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
9
1
$6.00 to  $6.99.  .
20
4
17
7.00 to     7.99...
24
11
20
4
1
2
2
8
1
16
8.00 to     8.99.   .
9
9.00 to     9.99...
10
10
10 00 to   10.99...
2
10
15
8
10
11.00 to   11.99...
5
17
2
3
9
12.00 to   12.99...
11
10
9
3
15
13.00 to   13.99...
4
10
9
1
5
14.00 to   14.99...
3
11
17
2
5
15.00 to   15.99...
11
4
17
3
5
16.00 to   16.99...
6
9
12
1
5
17.00 to   17.99...
9
8
15
1
18.00 to   18.99...
26
1
15
6
19.00 to   19.99...
11
2
2
2
20.00 to   20.99...
24
1
14
5
21.00 to   21.99...
6
5
17
1
22.00 to   22.99...
13
26
3
23.00 to   23.99...
14
14
1
3
4
24.00to   24.99...
2
25.00 to   25.99...
33
6
3
26.00 to   26.99...
13
1
1
6
27.00 to   27.99...
23
13
12
70
1
1
28.00 to   28.99...
1
29.00 to   29.99...
30.00 to   34.99...
2
3
3
35.00to   39.99...
51
1
4
40.00 to   44.99...
101
295
266
1
45 00 to   49.99...
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland.
Great Britain and Ireland...
United States of America...
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy..
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries 	
Nationality not stated	
Males.      Females.
725
416
50
5
44
131
164
70
Table No. 21.
PULP AND PAPER—MANUFACTURE OF.
Returns covering 16 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $481,059.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      626,520.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)  4,407,882.04
Total  $5,515,461.04
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.        Males.   Females. Month.       Males.   Females.
January..
February
March...
April
May	
June
2.692
2',551
2,650
2,706
2,820
2,815
37
38
38
37
37
53
July	
August....
September.
October ...
November.
December..
2,934
2,954
2,918
2,971
2,935
2,926
66
63
62
53
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 	
$6.99  .
7.99..
8.99'..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99 .
17.99 .
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99
23.99..
24.99 .
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99.
and over..
21 Yrs.  Under
& over. 21 Yrs.
3
5
20
108
32
188
33
337
65
525
264
295
122
83
138
42
262
392
106
32
21
1
1
13
1
32
2
72
13
15
18 Yrs.  Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
23
7
11
1
Apprentices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
1,777
522
83
3
4
7
140
9
37
134
60
23
61
64
20
1 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 37
Table No. 22.
SHIP-BUILDING.
Returns covering 43 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers     $152,036.65
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc         88,897.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    1,329,212.55
Total $1,570,146.20
Average Number of Wage-earners.
January.
February
March...
April
May	
June
Males.   Females.
1,129
1,045
1,016
992
1,075
879
July	
August	
September..
October	
November ..
December...
Males.    Females.
801
767
924
867
809
598
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
Vor Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
i.00 .
7.99..
8.99..
9.99..
10.99..
11.99..
12.99..
13.99..
14.99..
15.99..
16.99..
17.99..
18.99..
19.99..
20.99..
21.99..
22.99..
23.99..
24.99..
25.99..
26.99..
27.99..
28.99..
29.99..
34.99..
39.99..
44.99..
49.99..
21 Yrs.     Under
& over     21 Yrs.
2
4
46
5
16
12
10
263
38
77
14
26
102
70
54
233
432
72
21
14
ii'
18 Yrs.     Under
& over.    18 Yrs.
Apprem
tices.
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
Males.       Females.
682
658
35
4
2
10
14
2
6
64
5
50
7
Table No. 23.
SMELTING.
Returns covering 2 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $291,121.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc       597,580.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    5,250,260.84
Total $6,138,961.84
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
3,034
3,202
3,132
3,076
3,073
3,048
July	
September..
November ..
December...
3,137
3,216
3,423
3,683
3,428
3,202
February...
April	
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Males.
Females.
Apprentices.
Employment of
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
& over.
Under
21 Yrs.
18 Yrs.
& over.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to   $6.99..
7.00 to     7.99..
8.00 to     8.99
13
9.00 to     9.99..
10.00 to   10.99..
11.00 to   11.99..
12.00 to   12.99..
13.00 to   13.99..
16
14.00 to   14.99..
2
15.00 to   15.99..
16.00 to   16.99..
17.00 to   17 99..
15
9
19.00 to   19.99..
20.00 to   20.99..
20
21.00 to   21.99.
25
22.00 to   22.99..
7
34
2
23.00 to   23.99..
4
2
24.00 to   24.99..
25 00 to   25.99..
587
730
239
415
1,000
297
97
72
87
1
1
1
27.00 to   27.99..
28.00 to   28.99..
29.00 to   29.99..
30.00 to   34.99..
35.00 to   39.99..
40.00 to   44.99..
45.00 to   49.99..
11
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China ...   	
Hindustan ,	
Japan    	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
906
1,389
94
4
16
n
533
45
54
326
251
42
21 E 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Table No. 24.
STREET RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns covering 94 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers      $769,947.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     1,877,637.00
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     8,842,486.60
Total (511,490,070.60
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.
Males.
Females.
Month.
Males.
Females.
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
4,253
4,333
4,529
4,777
4,954
4,960
1,719
1,699
1,723
1,766
1,798
1,799
July	
August	
September..
October ....
November..
December...
5,040
5,097
5,105
5,095
4,753
4,619
1,767
1,740
1,760
1,695
1,596
1,602
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17 00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
$6.00 ....
to   «.99.
to     7.99.
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
22.99.
23.99.
24.99.
25.99.
26.99.
27.99.
28.99.
29.99.
34.99.
39.99.
44.99.
49.99.
Males.
21 Yrs.
& over.
4
13
31
41
149
162
513
415
219
614
76
141
211
225
506
530
140
93
Under
21 Yrs.
1
2
1
1
4
9
36
4
18 Yrs.
& over.
2
12
4
22
7
561
198
38
138
151
310
56
73
13
Under
18 Yrs.
Apprentices.
17
132
32
22
13
10
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America 	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany ....   	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc.
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China   	
Hindustan	
Japan   	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
2,591
2,907
241
19
11
24
128
51
68
313
187
40
25
5
4
189
576
85
3
1
io'
Table No. 25.
WOOD—MANUFACTURE OF  (N.E.S.).
Returns covering 84 Firms.
Salary and Wage Payments, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers    $348,290.00
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc      212,800.00
WTage-earners (including piece-workers)  1,493,679.08
Total  $2,054,769.08
Average Number of Wage-earners.
Month.       Males.   Females.        Month.       Males.   Females.
January ,
February
March. .
April
May	
June
1,183
1,217
1,323
1,304
1,487
1,447
46
54
84
105
97
112
July ....
August.
September.
October ..
November.
December
1,512
1,494
1,414
1,302
1,145
1,070
101
73
66
73
60
56
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only).
For Week of
Employmentof
Greatest Number.
Under
$6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
10.00
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
19.00
20.00
21.00
22.00
23.00
24.00
25.00
26.00
27.00
28.00
29 00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
.00 .
7.99.
8.99.
9.99.
10.99.
11.99.
12.99.
13.99.
14.99.
15.99.
16.99.
17.99.
18.99.
19.99.
20.99.
21.99.
to   22.9
to 23.99.
to 24.99.
to 25.99.
to 26.99.
to 27.99.
to 28.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
and over.
21 Yrs.     Under
& over.    21 Yrs.
1
7
13
18
18
26
100
46
155
84
98
46
21
69
42
49
55
62
24
171
130
42
22
20
27
22
19
17
20
48
32
26
41
38
3
7
3
4
4
2
3
18 Yrs. Under
& over. 18 Yrs.
22
2
34
15
11
6
11
3
2
3
5
Apprentices.
12
4
5
3
6
1
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France 	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country   	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan	
All other countries	
Nationality not stated	
777
465
40
3
1
9
28,
23
27
31
2
57
58
42
Females.
81
26 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 39
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES.
Returns covering 4,70i Firms.
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months ended December 31st, 1930.
Officers, Superintendents, and Managers  $13,202,109.09
Clerks, Stenographers, Salesmen, etc     14,034,744.30
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)        99,923,614.14
  $127,160,467.53
Returns received too late to be included in above Summary     $1,395,692.63
Estimated pay-roll of employers in occupations covered by the Department's
Inquiry, and from whom returns were not received   2,200,000.00
Transcontinental Railways  13,877,653.55
Dominion and Provincial Government workers   6,000,000.00
Wholesale and Retail Firms  3,550,000.00
Delivery,   Cartage,   and   Teaming,   Warehousing,   Butchers,   Moving-picture
Operators, Coal and Wood Yards, and Auto Transportation   4,100,000.00
Ocean Services and Express Companies  7,500,000.00
Miscellaneous    1,350,000.00
       39,973,346.18
Total   $167,133,813.71
Average Number of Wage-earners.
During the Month of
January...
February .
March..  ..
April	
May	
June	
July	
August ...
September
October...
November
December.
64.9S9
68,040
71,500
73,464
75,402
75,315
74,790
73,227
70,815
67,430
64,664
60,157
Nationality of Employees.
Country of Origin.
Canada and Newfoundland	
Great Britain and Ireland	
United States of America	
Australasia	
Belgium	
France	
Italy	
Germany	
Austria and Hungary	
Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, etc
Russia or other Slav country	
Other European country	
China	
Hindustan	
Japan 	
All other countries.  	
Nationality not stated	
37,870
29,906
2,740
208
270
419
2,551
879
1,089
7,606
3,626
523
5,347
691
3,312
394
2595
5,230
6,294
5,329
5,553
5,716
6,462
7,715
7,895
8,358
7,215
5,985
5,279
6,112
2,976
253
23
17
37
154
76
133
293
154
60
57
571
15
278
Classified Weekly Wage-rates (Wage-earners only.)
Males.
Females.
For Week of
Employment of
Appren
Greatest Number.
21 Yrs.
Under
18 Yrs.
Under
tices.
& over.
21 Yrs.
& over.
18 Yrs.
Under $6.00	
56
16
6
11
$6.00 to   $6.99..
107
41
23
102
7.00 to    7.99..
156
32
35
88
8.00 to     8.99..
3
192
98
51
132
9.00 to     9.99..
47
175
89
53
67
10.00 to   10.99..
57
280
160
93
97
11.00 to   11.99..
88
184
200
44
70
12.00 to   12.99..
182
398
840
107
213
13.00 to   13.99..
184
256
760
49
99
14.00 to   14.99..
816
326
1,060
88
32
15.00 to   15.99..
954
381
1,436
30
66
16.00 to   16.99..
1,024
380
774
8
41
17.00 to   17.99..
1,950
234
328
11
67
18.00 to   18.99..
1,948
181
749
9
31
19.00 to   19.99..
6,836
183
472
2
34
20.00 to   20.99..
3,114
142
649
8
39
21.00 to   21.99..
5,163
167
360
2
33
22.00 to   22.99..
5,097
73
232
14
23.00 to   23.99..
2,825
102
97
2
1
24.00 to   24.99..
9,253
89
112
7
25.00 to   25.99..
4,926
62
190
1
4
26.00 to   26.99..
4,240
103
70
2
8
27.00 to   27.99..
4,514
109
65
1
1
28.00 to   28.99..
3,002
22
32
7
29.00 to   29.99..
3,661
9
40
3
30.00 to   34.99 .
14,221
28
118
10
35.00 to   39.99..
9,324
9
45
4
40.00 to   44.99..
5,621
2,660
3
21
7
45.00 to   49.99..
3,455
	
	
	
	
Totals	
95,165
4,357
9,093
625
1,281 " HOURS OF WORK ACT."
During the past year the Board administering the " Hours of Work Act " has been impressed
by the fact that throughout this period of declining production the hours worked by employees
have not exceeded forty-eight in the week in the industries covered by the Act.
It might not be amiss at this time to give the definition of " industrial undertaking " as
defined in the Act itself:—
" ' Industrial undertaking ' includes :—
"(a.) Mines, quarries, and other works for the extraction of minerals from the earth:
"(6.)  Industries in which articles are manufactured, altered, cleaned, repaired, ornamented, finished, adapted for sale, broken up or demolished, or in which materials
are transformed;   including ship-building and  the generation,  transformation,
and   transmission  of  electricity   or  motive  power   of   any   kind   and   logging
operations:
"(c.)  Construction,  reconstruction,  maintenance,  repair,  alteration,  or  demolition  of
any building, railway,  tramway, harbour,  dock, pier, canal,  inland waterway,
road, tunnel, bridge, viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gas-work, water-work, or other work of construction,
as well as the preparation for or laying the foundations of any such work or
structure;
but the term ' industrial undertaking f shall not include any branch of the agricultural, horticultural, or dairying industry."
A comparison of the above definition with the table of average weekly hours worked in each
industry will show that the industries coming within the Act are observing its provisions.
Regulations made by the Board grant exemptions to certain employees in a number of the
industries covered by the Act. These apply to employees who have to perform preparatory work
or necessary repair-work after the regular working-day has been completed in order that the
plant may be in readiness for the full crew the following morning.
The industries which operate more than forty-eight hours are those not covered by the
Act, or those operating on a continuous process, and are therefore working seven days per week,
such as smelting, certain branches of Coast shipping, the food products group, oil-refining, and
in all lumbering operations east of the Cascade Mountains, where, because of an enforced shutdown during the winter months due to climatic conditions, lumber operators were granted a
nine-hour day during their operating season.
TEMPORARY EXEMPTIONS SUSPENDED.
In order that all available work in industry would be spread over as many men as possible,
and thus absorb to a limited extent those out of employment, the Board of Adjustment decided
that no further temporary exemptions would be granted under section (9) of the Act until such
time as conditions again become normal.
SLIGHT INCREASE IN AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS.
The average weekly working-hours covered by the 4,704 firms making returns for the year
was 48.62 per week, a slight increase over 1929, when the figures were 48.25; 48.43 in 1928;
48.55 in 1927;  and 48.84 in 1926.
It is the well-considered opinion of the Board that the working-hours in this Province are
the lowest existing in any Province in Canada. 77.60 per cent, of the total wage-earners were
working eight hours per day or less, 13.36 per cent, worked between eight hours and not more
than nine hours per day, and 9.04 per cent, of all employees were working in excess of nine
hours per day; and while the above percentages do not appear as favourable as those given in
our last report, it must be realized that many of the industries affected by the present industrial
set-back are those to which the " Hours of Work Act" applies. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 41
The following table shows the trend of average weekly hours in all industries covered in
this report for the past five years :—
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES.
Industry.
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.
Breweries	
47.91
47.10
44.46
48.00
53.29
45.57
51.49
51.82
44.81
45.14
43.96
46.54
47.26
48.71
48.06
49.03
46.78
50.48
49.23
48.32
45.81
55.43
47.67
51.46
44.25
45.58
48.23
44.14
53.21
45.83
46.28
45.60
46.94
44.48
48.02
52.48
44.97
45.85
50.05
46.38
45.52
44.25
46.28
46.77
48.63
49.08
44.00
45.88
49.81
49.63
48.84
45.51
52.26
47.20
54.35
44.51
45.51
48.46
45.13
52.94
45.90
46.42
48.22
47.55
46.58
48.02
53.05
44.83
45.32
51.75
44.54
45.30
44.75
46.42
46.62
48.40
49.16
47.21
46.70
49.29
49.03
47.97
45.42
53.93
47.64
54.16
44.44
45.42
48.24
44.45
53.07
45.69
46.77
46.77
46.96
44.40
48.03
51.05
45.16
46.04
51.01
44.87
45.53
44.24
46.62
46.70
47.31
48.61
48.00
47.63
49.14
49.12
.47.86
45.87
53.96
46.10
51.61
45.09
45.44
48.35
44.15
52.72
44.61
47.03
47.18
47 09
Cigar and tobacco manufacturing	
45.00
Coal-mining	
48.03
53.94
Contracting	
45.16
45 30
Food products, manufacture of	
52.23
Garment-making	
44.08
House-furnishing	
45.25
44 07
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
46.06
Leather and fur goods, manufacture of	
Lumber industries—
46.67
48 44
Logging-railways	
50 09
Mixed plants	
48.00
Lumber-dealers	
47.59
Planing-mills	
48 68
Sawmills	
48.95
Shingle-mills	
47.84
Metal trades	
45 88
Metal-mining	
52 29
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
47.32
Oil-refining	
54 61
Paint-manufacturing	
44 40
Printing and publishing	
45 52
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
48.32
Ship-building :	
44 35
Smelting	
52 01
Street-railways, gas, water, power, etc	
46.25
Wood-manufacture (not elsewhere specified)
45.92 E 42 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
MALE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
LICENTIATES OF PHARMACY.
Following the unanimous decision of the Court of Appeal, which was printed in our last
annual report and which ordered the Male Minimum Wage Board to conduct an inquiry into the
wages and conditions of employment of licentiates of pharmacy, the Board conducted a comprehensive inquiry commencing May 19th, and concluding June 10th, 1930.
On July 31st, 1930, the Board made an Order fixing a minimum wage of 80 cents per hour
for licentiates of pharmacy in the following terms:—
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Male Minimum Wage Act."
Order fixing a Minimum Wage for Licentiates of Pharmacy.
Pursuant to. the provisions of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," chapter 43 of the Statutes of
British Columbia, 1929, the Male Minimum Wage Board constituted under that Act, having made due
inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the employment of employees in the occupation hereinafter
mentioned, hereby orders:—
1. In this Order the expression " licentiate of pharmacy " means a person who is the holder of a
certificate as a licentiate of pharmacy issued to him under the provisions of the " Pharmacy Act."
2. This Order shall apply to every employee within the meaning of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " who is engaged in the occupation of a licentiate of pharmacy in the selling, dispensing, or
compounding of poisons, drugs, medicines, or chemicals, or in the dispensing of prescriptions of
medical practitioners, whether in a drug-store, dispensary, pharmacy, laboratory, office, or eleswhere,
and whether by retail or wholesale.
3. Subject to the provisions of section 6 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," the minimum wage
to be paid to every employee to whom this Order applies shall be eighty cents an hour.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 31st day of July, 1930.
MALE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
J. D. McNiven, Chairman.
Adam Bell, Member.
The above Order to become effective September 1st, 1930.
On August 22nd, however, certain employing druggists gave notice of appeal in the Supreme
Court, asking that the minimum wage of 80 cents per hour for licentiates of pharmacy be
rescinded and set aside:—
IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In the Matter of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" ; and in the Matter of an Order of the Male
Minimum Wage Board dated the 31st Day of July, 1930, fixing a Minimum Wage for Licentiates
of Pharmacy.
Take notice that Merryfield & Dack ; Wallace S. Terry ; Frederick J. Williams; John Cochrane ;
Thos. Shotbolt, Limited ; Cunningham Drug Stores, Limited ; Knowlton's, Limited ; Owl Drug Store,
Limited; Capitola Pharmacy, Limited ; and Pacific Drug Stores, Limited, intend to appeal and hereby
appeal to the Court of Appeal at its sittings on the 6th day of January, 1931, against the order or
judgment herein of the Honourable Mr. Justice W. A. Maedonald dated the 3rd day of October, 1930,
upon the following among other grounds:—
1. That the said order or judgment is against the law.
2. That the said learned Judge erred in ruling that the Male Minimum Wage Board were entitled
to be represented by counsel upon the hearing of the appeal from the order of said Board, and to
support the order of said Board.
3. That the said learned Judge should have held that the said Board should preserve a judicial
impartiality and allow the matters arising on the appeal from their order to be litigated entirely by
the two opposing groups of parties interested.
4. That the said learned Judge erred in refusing to set aside the order of said Board as invalid
upon its face.
5. That the said learned Judge erred in ruling that objections to said order not raised in previous
mandamus proceedings were not open to the appellants, or should not have due weight given to them.
6. That there was no evidence before the said learned Judge as to the points raised in said
mandamus proceedings.
7. That the said learned Judge should have set aside the order of the said Board as being upon
its face invalid, erroneous, and beyond the competence of the said Board. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 43
8. That the said learned Judge should have held that the order of the said Board was invalid, in
that:—
(a.)  It fixes the wages of certain employees in drug-stores not by their occupation or the
duties performed by them, but by their possessing a certain qualification:
(b.)  It fixes one wage for all licentiates of pharmacy regardless of the duties they are
employed to perform:
(c.)  It is uncertain and meaningless inasmuch as it is based on the assumption that being
a licentiate of pharmacy is an occupation:
(d.)  It  discriminates  between  employees  engaged  in  the  same  work  and  in  a  common
occupation according as they are licentiates of pharmacy or not:
(e.)  It places those employers and employees engaged in the wholesale drug trade upon the
same footing as retailers:
(/.)  It purports to fix a minimum wage for licentiates in pharmacy who are employed in
wholesale dealing in drugs, whereas such wholesale dealers are excluded by section 43
• of the " Pharmacy Act" from the application of that Act.
And further take notice that the appellants will move the Court of Appeal at the Court-house,
Bastion Street, Victoria, British Columbia, on Tuesday, the 6th day of January, 1931, at the hour of
11 o'clock in the forenoon, or so soon thereafter as the appeal may be heard, that the said order or
judgment of October 3rd, 1930, be rescinded and set aside, and that the order of the Male Minimum
Wage Board dated the 31st day of July, 1930, be also rescinded and set aside, or that a direction may
be made that on hearing of the appeal therefrom to the Supreme Court the said Board are not entitled
to appear or be heard, and that such further and other relief shall be granted as the Court of Appeal
shall think just.
Dated this 16th day of October, a.d. 1930.
Crease & Crease,
Solicitors for Appellants.
To the Male Minimum Wage Board (respondent) and to W. H. M. Haldane, Esq., their solicitor;
and to H. W. Davey, Esq., solicitor for the petitioner licentiates in pharmacy for a minimum wage.
Legal counsel for the employing druggists objected to the Board being represented by counsel
at the hearing.
Mr. Justice W. A. Maedonald ruled that the Board was entitled to have legal representation
at the hearing, and intimated his intention to proceed with an inquiry to ascertain the validity
of the order of the Male Minimum Wage Board in fixing a minimum wage for licentiates of
pharmacy.
Employing druggists appealed against the decision of the Court of Appeal on February 9th,
1931, when the following decision was handed down:—
COURT OF APPEAL.
In the Matter of the " Male Minimum Wage Act";   and in the Matter of an Order of the Male
Minimum Wage Board dated the 31st Day of July, 1930, fixing a Minimum Wage for Licentiates
of Pharmacy.
Between
Merryfield & Dack ; Wallace S. Terry ; Frederick J. Williams ; John Cochrane ; Thomas Shotbolt,
Limited; Cunningham Drug Stores, Limited; Knowlton's, Limited; Owl Drug Company,
Limited; Capitola Pharmacy, Limited; and Pacific Drug Stores, Limited, Petitioners
(Appellants) ; and
The Male Minimum Wage Board and Harold M. Davenport, Respondents.
(Before the Honourable the Chief Justice of British Columbia, the Honourable Mr. Justice
Martin, the Honourable Mr. Justice Galliher, the Honourable Mr. Justice McPhillips, the Honourable
Mr. Justice Maedonald;   Monday, the 9th day of February, 1931.)
This (appeal having come on for hearing on the 9th day of February, 1931, in the presence of
Mr. Lindley Crease, K.C, and Mr. J. P. Hogg, of counsel for the appellants, and Mr. W. H. M.
Haldane, of counsel for the Male Minimum Wage Board, and Mr. H. W. Davey, of counsel for the
respondent, Harold Davenport, and upon motion by counsel for the respondents to quash the said
appeal; and upon reading the notice of appeal, the order of the Honourable Mr. Justice W. A.
Maedonald, dated the 3rd day of October, 1930, and the appeal-book herein; and upon hearing counsel
aforesaid,
This Court doth order and adjudge that this appeal be and the same is hereby quashed.'
And this Court doth further order and adjudge that the said appellants, Merryfield & Dack;
Wallace S. Terry ; Frederick J. Williams ; John Cochrane ; Thomas Shotbolt, Limited ; Cunningham
Drug Stores, Limited; Knowlton's, Limited; Owl Drug Company, Limited; Capitola Pharmacy,
Limited; and Pacific Drug Stores, Limited, do pay to the said respondent, Harold Davenport, his
costs of and incidental to this appeal forthwith, after taxation thereof.
By the Court.
B. H. Tyrwhitt Drake,
Registrar. The Court of Appeal by its decision upheld the opinion of Mr. Justice W. A. Maedonald, who
had intimated his intention to review the whole proceedings leading up to the promulgation of
the Order by the Board.
Prior to the case being reviewed by a Judge of the Supreme Court, the Legislature passed
an amendment to the " Male Minimum Wage Act " excluding the professions from the operation
of the Act in the following terms :—
An Act to amend the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
His Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia, enacts as follows:—
1. This Act may be cited as the " Male Minimum Wage Act Amendment Act, 1931."
2. Section 17 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," being chapter 43 of the Statutes of 1929, is
repealed, and the following is substituted therefor:—■
" 17. This Act shall apply to all occupations other than the following: Farm-labourers, fruit-
pickers, fruit-packers, fruit and vegetable canners, domestic servants, and the professions, the members
of which are incorporated under the laws of the Province of British Columbia."
The above amendment definitely excluded the licentiates of pharmacy, and the order made
by the Board became null and void, thus bringing to a close an application which had been
before the Board and Courts for eighteen months.
RE JANITORS, CLEANERS, WATCHMEN, AND ELEVATOR OPERATORS.
At the time of the investigation made by the Board into the occupation of licentiates of
pharmacy, an inquiry was also conducted covering the conditions of employment of janitors,
cleaners, watchmen, and elevator operators, and the Board, after fully considering all the
evidence produced at the separate hearings, decided that the conditions in these occupations
did not warrant the Board in promulgating an order.
ENFORCEMENT.
The determination of the Board that orders made under the Act shall be observed led to a
summons being issued against two sawmill operators for failure to pay their engineers the rate
set by the order of the Board dated January 22nd, 1930; in both cases a conviction was registered and the minimum fine of $50 imposed. LABOUR DISPUTES AND CONCILIATION.
The year 1930 had the same number of strikes and lockouts as 1929, there being nine disputes recorded; the number of employees affected being 177, as compared with 482 in the previous year. The time lost in working-days increased to 3,809 in 1930, as against 3,320 in 1929.
It will be noted from these figures that although the number of working-days lost was slightly
increased the number of employees affected was considerably reduced.
It might be timely to suggest to employers and employees the increasing need of keeping
alive that spirit of mutual understanding which has been so prevalent during the last few years,
in order that the trying period of readjustment in which we now find ourselves may be met
and overcome in a manner which will prove beneficial to all.
PILE-DRIVERS, LULU ISLAND.
Employees on a railway bridge-construction job ceased work on February 21st to secure
the recognized standard wages and working conditions.
A conference was arranged between the contractor and the Union, when the former agreed
to pay the Union rate for the district and workmen brought from elsewhere would be returned.
Also that those who had ceased work would be re-engaged.
CARPENTERS, FALLS RIVER.
An alleged lockout took place on April 12th, due to a proposed decrease in wages of carpenters employed on the construction of a dam and power-house at Falls River. After negotiations a settlement was effected, the rate being 85 cents per hour.
LOGGING, EXTENSION.
Employees of one company ceased work on April 16th, 1930, as a protest against a reduction
in wages.    At the end of two days work was resumed at the old rate.
MOTION-PICTURE PROJECTIONISTS, VANCOUVER.
Motion-picture projectionists in two Vancouver theatres ceased work on June 23rd, 1930,
the employer having proposed a wage reduction from $65 to $50 per week. During December
one of the theatres signed with the local Union and the men returned to work. The other
theatre has refused to accept Union conditions.
PLASTERERS, VANCOUVER.
A dispute occurred on September 2nd in Vancouver against a proposed reduction in wages
from $10.80 per day to $10 on one building. Work was resumed on September 22nd, the Union
rate having been restored.
It appears the contracting Plasterers' Association has given ninety days' notice of cancellation of the agreement as required by its clauses, but no settlement or amendment had been
agreed upon.
ORNAMENTAL-IRON WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
Ornamental-iron workers in four shops went on strike on October 16th for an increase in
wages from $7.50 to $10 per eight-hour day. On December 4th the men returned to work
at the old rate.
SASH AND DOOR FACTORY WORKERS, VANCOUVER.
On November 3rd two firms put a cut of 10 per cent, in the wages of their employees and
the men refused to start work. One of the plants, however, started work at 12 noon at the old
rate; the other plant refused the men's overtures and began to replace the men with others
■ at the reduced rate.
The assistance of the Department of Labour was requested, but we were unable to accomplish a settlement, the employer advising that it was now the policy of the firm to deal with
individual men and not with organizations. At the end of the year the dispute was still unter-
minated, but it is understood the plant has closed down and the dispute would therefore appear
to have lapsed. E 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
SUMMARY OF LABOUR DISPUTES, 1930.
Industry or Occupation.
Particulars.
No. of
Employees
affected.
Time lost
in Working-
days.
Pile-drivers—■
Ceased work to secure recognition of Union work-
20
38
70
8'
3
6
32
120
Carpenters—
Alleged lockout due to proposed decrease in hourly
rate ;   compromise, S5 cents per hour granted....
Employees of one company ceased work as a protest against wage reduction ;   work resumed at
Logging crew—
874
140
Motion-picture projectionists—
Vancouver	
Projectionists in two Vancouver theatres quit work
when wages  were  reduced from  $65  to  $50;
employees of one theatre returned to work at
1 296
Plasterers—■
Plasterers   on   one   building   ceased   work   when
wages  were   reduced  from   $10.80   to   $10   per
100
Ornamental-iron workers—
Employees  in  four  shops  went  on  strike for  increase  in  wages from  $7.50  to  $10   per  day;
men returned to work at old rate	
Employees at two plants went on strike against
a reduction of 10 per cent, in wages.     One firm
put old rate into effect and the men returned
to work same day;   the other firm replaced the
Sash and door factory workers—
250
1,029
Totals	
177
3,809 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 47
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE.
General Superintendent Jas. H. McVety.
B.C. Workmen's Compensation and Labour Offices, corner Homer
and Dunsmuir Streets, Vancouver.
Branch Offices.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets ]
Vancouver  (Women's Branch), cor. Homer and Duns- \   W. S. Dickson,  Superintendent,
mulr Streets  I
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets ) Tr    _ . .     ,   „
Victoria (Women's Branch), Langley and Broughton Streets jH- Crlsf°«l> Superintendent.
New Westminster M.  Standbridge, Superintendent.
Nanaimo ,T.   T.   Carrigan, Superintendent.
Kamloops .. J. H. How, Superintendent.
Penticton A. Gilley, Superintendent.
Nelson J. M. Dronsfield, Superintendent.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis, Superintendent.
Eevelstoke H. N. Coursier, Superintendent.
Prince Eupert J. M. Campbell, Superintendent.
Prince George ; G. C.  Sinclair, Superintendent.
Handicap Section.
[ G. S. Bell, Clerk.
Vancouver, cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets J R. L. Mavius, Clerk.
[ H. Parry, Clerk.
Victoria, Langley and Broughton Streets W. A. Turner, Clerk.
The following report is submitted by the General Superintendent of the Employment
Service:—
This is the twelfth annual report of the British Columbia Branch of the Employment
Service of Canada, a branch of the Department of Labour, and covers the work for the calendar
year 1930.
There are thirteen offices in operation in the Province, as follows: Vancouver (2), Victoria
(2), New Westminster, Nanaimo, Prince Rupert, Prince George, Cranbrook, Nelson, Revelstoke,
Kamloops, and Penticton. Separate offices are provided in Vancouver and Victoria for the
employment of women, and separate sections for dealing with the employment problems of men
handicapped through service overseas or in industrial occupations. Temporary offices were
operated in Vernon and Kelowna from April to November to take care of the seasonal labour
requirements in those districts.
CONDITIONS DURING THE YEAR.
This Province, in keeping with other parts of Canada, suffered from the world-wide depression of 1930. There was a marked slackening in industrial activity, principally affecting the
basic industries of lumbering and mining, but showing, by reflection, in practically every line
of manufacture and distribution. Contributing factors were the disturbed conditions in agriculture and the heavy influx of recently arrived immigrants who are usually absorbed in agricultural pursuits in the Prairie Provinces. For the first time in history the grain-crops of the
Prairie were harvested without the assistance of labourers from Eastern or Western Canada,
immigrants and the use of " combines " being largely responsible for shutting out the thousands
of labourers usually shipped from this Province during the harvest season.
In the early part of the year a conference on unemployment was held in Ottawa as a result
of representations made by Western Provinces and cities regarding existing conditions. During
the last quarter of the year a special session of Parliament was called to authorize the expenditure of funds for relief purposes. The sum of $20,000,000 was provided, to assist the Provinces
to meet conditions by providing work and to take care of those for whom no work could be found.
Heavy drafts were made on this fund, relief being required in every portion of the Province.
At the end of the year, despite the additional work made possible by the co-operation of Dominion,
Provincial, and Municipal Governments, the problem still remained one of first magnitude, with
prospects for immediate improvement doubtful. At the end of January, 1931, 321,802 days' work
had been provided for 22,206 men. The Order in Council prohibiting the admission of aliens under contract proved a considerable benefit to our citizens and its strict enforcement by co-operation between the Immigration
Department and Employment Service officials has revealed the degree to which aliens have
heretofore been imported for employment in the industries of the Province.
The contractions in industry and the surplus of labour resulted in a marked reduction in
the number of placements within the Province, and conditions in the Prairie Provinces were such
that all shipments of men and women to those Provinces were cancelled. The reduction in the
volume of business transacted was, however, approximately the same as the average for all
offices in Canada. The lack of employment in the Prairie Provinces was a severe loss to several
thousands of our settlers who for many years have supplemented their earnings from this source.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED DURING THE YEAR.
The business transacted is shown in detail by a chart and tables, the figures showing the
work by offices and months. Due to adverse industrial conditions, placements within the
Province suffered a sharp reduction and the shipments to the Prairie Provinces were almost
entirely wiped out. The number of placements was 33,641, all but 67 being within the Province.
Of this number, 1,032 were transferred from one employment zone to another, Vancouver offices
being responsible for the greater part of this movement to outlying parts of the Province. Of the
33,641 placements, 14,524 were sent to " regular " positions, ranging in duration from one week
to permanence. The balance, 1S,082, were given " casual" work of less than a week's duration.
This number included many workers sent to relief-work in districts where the assignment of the
men was entrusted to our offices. The number of women placed was 7,276, the number being
about equally divided between " regular " and " casual," the latter being practically all in the
domestic service branch. The work of the Handicap sections of the Vancouver and Victoria
offices is included in the foregoing figures, but is dealt with in more detail in another paragraph.
The chart shows the work of the offices in graphical form. The sharp fluctuations usually
seen in the order and placement lines, and due to seasonal employment in this and the adjoining
Provinces, are almost entirely absent, due to ample supplies of labour in the districts usually
requiring outside assistance to meet seasonal requirements. The marked rise in the number
of applicants beginning in August, followed promises of Government assistance in providing
employment. This registration reached its peak in October, when the relief employment was
about to start, but fell rapidly when it became obvious that it would not be possible to provide
for all the married applicants and that no work was available for single men.
FARM-LABOURERS FOR PRAIRIE PROVINCES.
The movement of farm-labourers from British Columbia to the Prairie Provinces was started
in 1921 to relieve an acute unemployment condition in the Coast area of this Province. As the
help furnished through the Employment Service offices was found to be more satisfactory to
the farmers than that supplied from other sources, the territory from which the help was
secured was gradually increased until it included all of the Province, with the exception of
the south-eastern portion, which is close enough to Alberta to render harvest rates unnecessary.
The application of the harvest rates to the rural districts also made it possible for thousands
of settlers, who required additional income until their own farms became productive, to obtain
other work. They were found to be well fitted for harvest-work and their earnings enabled
them to remain on their own farms during the winter months instead of increasing the pressure
of unemployment in the cities and towns. During the decade the Employment Service offices
in this Province shipped 65,197 men and women to Prairie points, practically all being harvest-
workers and experienced labourers for spring ploughing and seeding. The peak year was 1928,
when the shipments totalled 10,812, but a sharp decline followed, only 3,955 being sent forward
in 1929 and 67 in the year under review. A feature of this movement was the small number of
complaints either "regarding inability to secure employment or failure of the employers to pay
the wages agreed upon. Aside from those who did not go where they were sent and consequently
found difficulty in securing employment, less than two dozen complaints were received, and these
were all satisfactorily adjusted by the Employment Service officials in Alberta and Saskatchewan.
Assuming that each person worked 30 days at an average wage of $4 per day and board, a
conservative estimate of both wages and duration of employment, their combined earnings
amounted to nearly $8,000,000,  a material contribution to the  economic welfare  of British REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 49
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OCrtCON^Jn^-ronj-OiDCONtQiO^roaj-o^oDi^tOtn'd-nOfVl- E 50 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Columbia.    It is to be hoped that agricultural and industrial conditions improve to such an
extent as to make possible a continuation of this system of co-operation between the Provinces.
WORK IN THE  HANDICAP  SECTIONS.
In January, 1925, there were 5,410 former members of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces
in receipt of pensions resident in British Columbia. At the end of 1927 this number had
increased to 6,189, and again increased to 7,550 at December, 1930. To this number should be
added approximately 2,000 Imperial pensioners who have made their homes in this Province.
About 75 per cent, of these men are residing on the Lower Mainland and the southern end of
Vancouver Island. These districts, because of favourable climatic conditions, are also a Mecca
for physically fit men, and the nature of our major industries requires men of this class rather
than those disabled as a result of war service or industrial accidents. An excessive number
of handicapped men, a surplus of labour, and industries of a primary extractive nature form the
setting in which the Handicap sections of the Vancouver and Victoria offices must carry on
their work.
The official responsibility for the care of handicapped ex-service men rests with the Dominion
Government, but with a view to increasing the opportunities for employment an agreement was
made in December, 1924, between the Dominion and Provincial Governments, whereby the former
supplies additional staff and the latter special facilities in Vancouver and Victoria for providing
employment for handicapped workmen. Under this arrangement disabled men secure a much
wider range of opportunity of employment than if they were dependent on offices dealing exclusively with orders intended to be filled by handicapped men. Despite the work of the Handicap
sections and the hearty co-operation of members of the Employment Service staff throughout the
Province, the greater portion of whom are ex-service men, many of them with severe handicaps,
it is impossible to find employment for all the applicants. Many of them are suffering from the
disabilities of age, aggravated, no doubt, by war service, and in the constantly overstocked labour
market they are virtually unemployable. During the year the Dominion Government provided
for a large number of unemployable ex-service men by the passage of the " War Veterans' Allowance Act," which became effective October 1st, 1930. Provision is made for an allowance to men
of 60 years of age or over, provided they are pensioners or were engaged in a theatre of war.
Men under 60 who are " continuously unemployable through physical or mental disability, or
both," are, subject to the same service qualifications, similarly dealt with. This legislation has
eased the economic pressure on many ex-service men, who, by reason of age, physical or mental
disability, have found it impossible to secure employment or to retain it on such infrequent
occasions as they were able to obtain work.
Handicapped men had first choice in filling 13,710 positions in the Vancouver and Victoria
offices. Between the nature of the work to be performed and the disabilities of the applicants,
but a small number of the positions were filled by handicapped men.
Of the ex-service men, 258 were sent to " regular " employment where the duration ranged
from one week to permanency, and 24 industrial handicaps also received work in this category.
Industrials also received 296 " casual" jobs and ex-service men 1,037 of this type. The Victoria
office was responsible for 715 of the placements, the balance, 900, having been effected through
the Vancouver office. The strenuous period through which our industries are now passing has
destroyed the last vestige of response to appeals for employment, on sentimental grounds, for
handicapped men. The problem, in so far as the Coast area of the Province is concerned, is still
and likely to remain one of considerable magnitude.
OTHER BRANCHES OF ACTIVITY.
In addition to actual employment-work, the Service functions as a barometer of industrial
conditions. The officials are freely consulted by bankers, semi-public organizations, prospective
settlers, and workmen who desire to move to other parts of Canada, but before doing so seek
information regarding prospects of employment. Every effort is made to give reliable, up-to-date
information, and, although this is not always in agreement with information circulated by those
financially interested in immigration, prompt replies and accurate information are appreciated
by those who request reports on existing conditions.
The arrangement between the Departments of Labour and Immigration, referred to in a
previous report, whereby applications for leave to import labour are referred to Employment REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 51
Service officials, was continued during the period under review. The close association of the
officials with the industrial activities of the Province and their knowledge of the supply and
demand for labour enables them to advise the Division Commissioner of Immigration along lines
that result in the protection of our citizens against the competition of aliens from countries
which practically totally exclude British subjects from entering, either in search of employment
or with assurances that work awaits them. During the year applications covering approximately
500 persons were considered, many of them requiring extensive investigation to ensure proper
protection to citizens and at the same time not cripple local industries for lack of help not
obtainable here.
The Employment Service, a branch of the Department of Labour, now ending its twelfth
year, has, by providing facilities for bringing employers and workers together and by co-operation
with other Government departments, citizen organizations, and individuals in need of advice
and assistance, justified its existence as an essential part of the industrial life and development
of the Province.
BUSINESS TRANSACTED BY BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1930.
Office.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
In B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
2,727
,3.218
637
6,046
1,814
3,504
.3,4.32
1,697
11,437
1,716
27,296
26,963
17,382
2,019
11,442
4,154
829
1,158
553
3,256
1,615
1,006
1,459
663
1,254
558
3,360
4,253
5,028
695
6,120
2,567
800
1,095
538
3,252
1,614
982
1,404
659
1,252
550
3,132
4,284
4,737
686
6,117
2,539
4
4
3
5
4
410
313
289
1
14
Penticton	
3
1
35
8
3
2
Totals	
126,084
34,374
33,641
1,032
67
BUSINESS TRANSACTED MONTHLY, BRITISH COLUMBIA OFFICES, 1930.
Month.
Applications.
Employers'
Orders.
Placements.
Transfers
in B.C.
Transfers
out of
B.C.
9,522
8,207
8,425
8,542
10,019
7,998
7,411
11,566
10,765
19,422
13,594
10,613
2,475
2,040
2,250
2,933
3,395
2,579
2,594
3,928
2,621
3,130
2,960
3,469
2,405
1,968
2,215
2,871
3,180
2,517
2,500
3,858
2,610
3,080
2,940
3,497
41
45
120
76
140
49
64
140
214
96
42
5
10
5
5
5
7
2
July                	
1
21
11
Totals	
120,084
34,374
33,641
1,032
67 E 52 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
INSPECTION OF FACTORIES.
Chief Inspector W. T. Hamilton.
Assistant Inspector H. Douglas.
Assistant Inspector Essie Brown.
The following report is submitted by the Chief Inspector of Factories:—
I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of the Factory Inspection Branch
for the year 1930.
During the past year some industries of the Province have been hampered by the general
depression throughout the country. Nevertheless, new industries have located in different parts
of the Province. Some of these are as yet in their infancy and employ only a minimum amount
of labour. However, in planning their plants, preparation has been made to cope with trade
according to the demand at a minimum expense and little or no disruption of their present
working conditions.
As has been said, these industries are located in different parts of the Province. In the
lumber industry especially, operators of sawmills who in previous years hauled their logs by
truck or tractor to the mills located on some railway or spur track have to-day moved their
mills to the standing timber and haul their finished product to the railway.
Considerable time has to be spent making inspections before shipping operations are started,
which can only be accomplished by travelling miles over rough mountain roads, as these mills
have to be operated to cut material for the construction of their own roads, many firms requesting such inspections, so that every possible care shall be taken to prevent accidents.
COMPLAINTS.
During the year we did not receive the number of complaints we have in previous years,
which we are inclined to believe is due to scarcity of positions, employees being reluctant to
report their employers for non-compliance with the regulations. However, all complaints were
investigated immediately, and if there was any foundation for same, orders were issued to
remedy the condition.
ACCIDENT-PREVENTION.
In order to intelligently and effectively determine and suggest remedial measures to be taken
in connection with the hazards in all kinds of industrial occupations, it is necessary that we have
at least an elementary knowledge of the process of manufacture, so that our recommendations
shall be treated with respect and be practical for adoption.
Some years ago, when men worked together, industry had to contend with accidents, but
the serious consideration of their prevention has occupied the employers' mind but a comparatively short time. Most industries felt that they were necessary and that an accident was no
reason for additional care or prevention. When a man took a job he knew he was running a
risk, and the longer he stayed at the same work was all the more reason why he should receive
injury. The wood-working industry and especially that of sash and door factories and shingle-
mills were always looked upon as particularly hazardous. When a person would visit one of
these plants a few years ago the employee would point with pride to what remained of his fingers
or hand and would extol with glory how and when the accident occurred. It is somewhat
different to-day, as a person is more or less ashamed of the loss of a finger or a disfigurement
of any sort.
We occasionally find the type of employer who for no apparent reason appears to resent the
visit of the Inspector, and while instances of this nature are extremely rare, they leave the
impression that we are not obtaining the voluntary co-operation the Inspector desires. Regardless of this attitude on the part of some employers, we endeavour to see to it that his employees
secure their just rights.
That great progress is being made in accident-prevention there is no doubt, as the number
and severity of accidents which we are called upon to investigate are decreasing with each REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 53
succeeding year. In making this statement we are not unmindful of the fact that owing to the
present general business depression the number of persons employed has been considerably
reduced.
SANITATION.
A large percentage of employers have begun to realize that proper light, ventilation, and
sanitation of their factories and workshops should receive one of the first considerations if they
are to obtain the best results from their employees.
During our inspections one must observe the vast changes that are taking place in this
respect throughout the Province year by year. On some of our previous inspections we would
find quite a large factory located in some old building with only the minimum amount of light,
and ventilation being what was barely permissible. We have returned to the same place a few
months or a year later and found that the firm had discontinued being at this location and moved
into large new premises, well lighted and ventilated and with every sanitary convenience; and
where females were employed lunch and rest rooms were provided.
In conversation with the employer he will voluntarily tell you how his production has
increased and how much more contented his employees seem to be.
In some instances, however, employers seem to think any place is good enough for the
workers and that they do not require ventilation. In one case we located a firm operating a
dressmaking-factory in the basement of a down-town store where eleven females and a couple
of men were employed. This factory had only one small window at the rear for light and
ventilation, the employees being compelled to work under artificial light. However, orders were
issued for proper ventilation and sanitary conveniences for both male and female employees.
A number of other firms received similar orders, all of which were willingly complied with.
PASSENGER AND FREIGHT ELEVATORS.
In reporting on this portion of our work, we find it rather difficult to state anything different
from that which has been covered in previous reports, with the exception that the speed of the
cars in modern installations is being greatly increased and the starting and stopping of the cars
in high buildings are almost entirely automatic.
The principal duty of the operators in installations of this nature consists of pressing a
button in the control-panel in the car for whichever floor the passenger desires to leave the car.
Upon reaching the floor for which the button has been pressed, the car stops level with the floor
and all doors open automatically. After all doors, which are power-operated and provided with
interlocks, are securely closed and locked, the car proceeds to the next floor for which the
button has been pressed and the same cycle of events occurs.
During the year 281 passenger and 217 freight elevators were inspected in the different
parts of the Province, and orders, which inspection revealed to be necessary, were issued for the
safety of the public and employees whose duties required them to make use of this form of
conveyance.
In the past year thirty-two freight and thirteen passenger elevators were installed throughout
the Province. While this number of new installations shows a decrease from that of last year,
it proves that, regardless of the present depression, the owners of mercantile establishments and
public buildings view the future with confidence.
We regret to have to report the occurrence of three fatal accidents in connection with the
operations of elevators during the year. One occurred on a passenger and the others on freight
elevators.
That which occurred on the passenger installation was the result of injuries received by
falling a distance of approximately 9 feet down the elevator shaftway. The deceased in this
case had been employed as elevator operator and engineer in the building. When we visited
him in the hospital prior to his death he stated that he left the elevator at the main floor, pulled
the safety-switch, put the light out in the car, and went down to the basement to attend to the
furnace. Upon returning to the main floor he assumed the elevator was still there and stepped
into the open shaftway; thus inferring that some one had taken the car to an upper floor. This
statement is entirely different to evidence given by witnesses at the Coroner's inquest, they
maintaining that deceased entered the building from the street with a small parcel under his
arm, walked to the elevator, and in some manner opened the locked shaftway door, falling to
the bottom of the elevator-pit. The second fatality occurred to an elderly employee in a warehouse, and as no one actually
witnessed the accident it is rather difficult to state with any degree of certainty just what did
occur. In addition to this, the evidence given at the Coroner's inquest was of a conflicting
nature. However, it is surmised that deceased attempted to board the car while it was
ascending and in doing so slipped and fell to the bottom of the shaftway, receiving fatal injuries.
The other fatality occurred to an Oriental who was delivering produce to tenants in an
apartment-house, using the freight-elevator for this purpose. From what could be gathered
during our investigation it appears that the Oriental .had delivered some vegetables to some of
his customers on the intermediate floors, and after so doing had boarded the elevator for the
purpose of serving other customers on one of the upper floors. The supposition is that he pulled
the control-cable to start the car upwards before closing the hoistway doors, and in attempting
to close the door while the car was in motion, slipped and was crushed to death between the
platform of the car and the wall of the elevator shaftway.
ELEVATOR OPERATORS.
During 1930, 479 males and 214 females renewed their licences, and 160 males and 52 females
wrote examinations for elevator operators.
Sixteen males and six females filled out applications and were granted temporary licences,
but for a variety of reasons did not attend for examination on the expiry date.
As in previous years, a number of applications had to be rejected because of immature age,
misrepresentation, or because they were not British subjects.
HOURS OF WORK OF FEMALE EMPLOYEES.
During the year twenty-one applications were received for permission to work in excess of
the hours. Of these applications eighteen were from laundry establishments who had a rush of
work during the tourist season. One was received from a can-manufacturing firm during the
rush of the canning season and another from a soap-manufacturing company which was trying
to complete an order for boat shipment.
One application, however, was refused as it was of a blanket nature, the applicant not
specifying any day or time, only that his client be permitted to work overtime when they
thought necessary.
We had to investigate two reports of laundries working excessive hours and in each case
found the complaints justified. After advising the managers of these laundries that they were
violating the Act, they assured us that steps would be taken immediately to prevent any such
recurrence. Later investigations proved that they had rectified the conditions and were complying with all regulations.
CHILD-LABOUR.
Eighteen applications were made for permission for children to work in fruit-canneries
during the holiday season. After considering the circumstances, permission was granted, but
for the holiday season only.
On inspection of these canneries it was observed that a young boy was working after the
holiday period had expired. The employer's attention was called, and after an interview with
the young boy's father it was learned that the child's parents were members of a denomination
which conducted their own school, which did not start its fall term until two weeks later than
the public school. After taking the case up with the Public School Inspector the employer was
instructed to discontinue the employment of the child.
HOURS OF WORK IN LAUNDRIES.
In the year under review we have had less violations of the Act by laundry operators than
in the previous year, which has been accomplished only by strict and continued inspections.
Six laundrymen in Vancouver and two in New Westminster were fined $50 each for operating
their laundries excessive hours. One in Kamloops was fined $50 for operating on a holiday, and
in the City of Victoria two were fined $75 each, one $50, and one $100, the latter being a second
offence. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 55
Altogether $750 collected by this Department for fines was deposited with the proper
authorities. In the latter part of the year, however, we have observed that these Orientals are
adhering more strictly to the hours as set forth. We believe that any laxity on our part by not
making frequent inspections would result in a recurrence of such violations.
CONCLUSION.
Employers in industry, realizing that experienced help was not to be sacrificed even though
business was not what it might have been, instead of laying off their help, grasped the opportunity to better conditions in their plants for their employees.
We take this opportunity to thank both employers and employees in the manufacturing
industry for their continuous efforts to co-operate with this Branch in the betterment of working
conditions throughout the Province. E 56 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
REPORT OF THE MINIMUM WAGE BOARD.
Members of the Board.
J. D. McNiven, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Helen Gregory MacGill 1492 Harwood Street, Vancouver.
Thomas Mathews, Real-estate Broker 517 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Officials of the Board.
Mabel A. Cameron, Secretary Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Essie Brown, Inspector 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith the thirteenth annual report of the Minimum
Wage Board of British Columbia for the year ended December 31st, 1930.
ABNORMAL CONDITIONS REFLECTED.
The abnormal conditions prevailing in the business world during the period under review
have been brought forcibly to the attention of the Board in various ways in its administration of
the Act and nine Orders made thereunder.
One very marked effect has been in the returns made by employers who previously
had a staff of one or more women, and for 1930 reported " no employees." While in some
instances the firms went out of business, in the majority of cases they continued without the
services of the women or girls. Most of these businesses were small ones with a single employee,
but one firm with twenty-five women on its staff could not weather the depression and was
forced to close. Successful efforts to keep their staffs intact have been made by many establishments, but some have had to resort to the policy of temporarily placing their workers on
shorter time in order to retain their services and spread the available work over a greater
number of persons.
One hundred and eighty forms were received by the Board in its annual quest for statistical
data from firms that in 1929 had information to supply covering female workers, and in 1930
had no women on their pay-rolls. Many that in 1929 had a staff of two or more made reductions
in their personnel. These two factors have combined to cause a drop in the total number of
women and girl employees reported to the Board for 1930. Whereas in 1929 actual returns
were received covering 20,766 workers, in 1930 the figure had fallen to 20,461.
SHORTAGES COLLECTED.
Owing to the tendency on the part of some employers to reduce wages below the legal limit the
Board has exercised unceasing vigilance during the year. Through its efforts arrears have been
paid in the sum of $3,059.10. This amount represents the difference between the wages to which
the employees were entitled and the amounts they actually received, the individual adjustments
ranging from 90 cents to $200. Girls in all parts of the Province benefited from this tangible
assistance.
COURT CASES.
To effectually ensure future compliance with the regulations and to remedy actual infractions it was necessary to institute Court proceedings against fourteen employers during the year.
The informations were laid in Vancouver, Kelowna, Kamloops, and Victoria. Provisions of four
out of the nine Orders had been broken. Two violations under the Office Order were noted,
with one each under the Manufacturing and Personal Service Orders. The remaining ten
charges were brought against employers in the Public Housekeeping Occupation.
A summary of these cases is presented herewith.
Office Infractions.
1. An information was laid against the proprietor of a cleaning and pressing establishment
for paying his office assistant below the correct amount. When the case was called in Police
Court he pleaded guilty and was fined $25.   The sum of $105 was due the employee and the REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930. E 57
defendant gave five post-dated cheques for this amount, which the girl endorsed and placed in
the bank for payment as they became due.
2. A taxi company was charged with employing a woman in the office for excessively long
hours and also for paying her less than the legal minimum. When the case came before the
Magistrate strenuous legal argument ensued and the defendant was fined $25 on the first charge.
It was then discovered that through an oversight at Police Headquarters the second summons
had not been served. Solicitor for the accused offered to make a settlement, so the summons
was withheld temporarily. The employee then decided to allow the Magistrate to fix the amount
of arrears due, whereupon the second summons was served. When the case was called the
Magistrate requested the Board's Inspector to endeavour to effect a settlement in co-operation
with the defendant's solicitor. An agreement was reached, but the accused failed to make the
first payment of $25 on account. The case came up again and judgment was given for $245.31,
$10 of which was paid forthwith. The company subsequently went into liquidation, with its
finances in a most chaotic state. At the time the report goes to press it looks doubtful whether
the employee will be able to realize further on her judgment.
Breach of Personal Service Order.
3. A beauty-parlour owner underpaid her operator, who lodged complaint with the Board.
Attempts to effect a settlement proved futile and an information was laid. The accused did not
appear when the case was called and a warrant was issued. The husband of the defendant
appeared in Court when the case was next called and presented a doctor's certificate testifying
to the inability of the defendant to be present. This happened six times at intervals of a week,
and the City Prosecutor then advised withdrawing the charge as no improvement in the health
of the accused seemed probable. The charge was accordingly withdrawn, to be relaid later if a
settlement was not effected.
Violation of Manufacturing Order.
4. A cook in a delicatessen-store preparing foods for sale was working long hours and being
inadequately paid. Two charges were laid against her employer under the Manufacturing Order.
The one relative to hours was called first and argued. At the conclusion of argument the
employer was pronounced guilty and fined $25, or, in default, five days. Her lawyer appealed
the Magistrate's decision to the County Court and the appeal was dismissed, but the Judge
reduced the fine to $5. The wage case then came up in Police Court, and after several adjournments and a reserved judgment the Magistrate declared the charge as set out in the information
had been proved. He imposed a fine of $25; in default of payment, distress; in default of
distress, ten days' imprisonment. The sum of $27 was agreed upon by the lawyer and the
Inspector as the amount due the employee. Intimation of an appeal was made by counsel, but
the time in which it could be entered elapsed, and notice of appeal had not been served.
Public Housekeeping Cases.
5. A cafe proprietor in Kamloops was charged with permitting his waitresses to work longer
hours than prescribed by the Order, and underpaying them as well. He was convicted, fined $25,
and ordered to pay $16 to one girl and $2.10 to the other.    The payments were made forthwith.
6. In another Kamloops restaurant similar charges were made against the owner. Upon
conviction the proprietor was fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears amounting to $51.75 to six
employees in varying sums. Cheques were made out in favour of the girls and given to the
Inspector, who had instituted proceedings. She left them with the Chief of Police for distribution to the girls.
7. Two informations were laid against the Chinese proprietor of a Kelowna caf(5, one for
excessive hours and the other for underpayment of wages. He was convicted on the first charge,
fined $25, and as he agreed to settle the arrears the second charge was withdrawn. Cheques for
$23.25, $10, and $2.19, respectively, were handed to the girls.
8. Charges for long hours and low wages were preferred against another Kelowna cafe.
The defendant was found guilty on the excessive-hour count and fined $25 and $5 costs. The
second charge for inadequately paying the employee was withdrawn as the girl's evidence concerning the overtime was rather uncertain. As she was willing to accept $5 in settlement the
matter was adjusted in that manner. E 58 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
9. Similar infractions occurred in a third cafe in Kelowna and charges were laid against
the employer, a Chinaman. After several adjournments the defendant pleaded guilty to working
an employee overlong hours. He was fined $25 and paid $63 in arrears to the girl, whereupon
the charge for paying less than the minimum wage was withdrawn.
10. An Oriental restaurant proprietor in Vancouver was charged with failing to post a copy
of the Order in his establishment and paying less than the minimum wage. On the first charge
a conviction was obtained and a fine of $25 levied. The second charge was withdrawn when
the employee's arrears were adjusted by payment of $26.
11. Charges were laid against the proprietress of a cafe in Vancouver for failure to pay the
minimum wage to her cook and two waitresses. The first case was called, and after several
adjournments the employer was fined $25 ; in default of payment, distress; in default of distress,
ten days' imprisonment. An order was made for the payment of arrears amounting to $35.15.
The City Prosecutor allowed the withdrawal of the remaining two charges on the understanding
that adjustments be made for $12.65 and $39.80 respectively. The sum of $10 was paid to each
girl, the balance to be cleared up in a week. At the expiration of that time the case came up
again, but neither solicitor nor client appeared. The Magistrate sent word to the solicitor that
settlement must be made in two days or a distress warrant would be issued. A warrant for the
employer's arrest was subsequently made out, and when the officer went to arrest the employer
he found she had lost the cafe and had had a nervous breakdown. Her brother offered to
guarantee the amounts due provided he was permitted to take his sister to the Okanagan and
make a settlement from there. This course was adopted and the Clerk of the Police Court has
the matter in hand.
12. Another cafe-owner was fined $25 for paying less than the minimum wage, or, in default,
five days. After several sessions in Court one girl employee received $50 in arrears and another
was paid $15.
13. Information was laid against the licensee of a hotel for underpaying one of her employees. Neither defendant nor her solicitor appeared in Court to answer the charge. Later
during the session the counsel sent a request for an adjournment. The City Prosecutor complained to the Magistrate of the solicitor's actions, but an adjournment was granted for one
week. The financial status of the hotel was explained and the Prosecutor assumed the
responsibility of cancelling the charge on the understanding that a settlement for $21 be made
immediately.    The employee received this amount.
14. The Inspector laid informations against a caf6 proprietress for employing a cook longer
hours than permitted by the Order and for paying waitresses below the legal scale. The cases
proved to be most troublesome. The solicitor, who was also a director in the company, tried
unsuccessfully to induce the Inspector to withdraw proceedings. When the case was called the
lawyer agreed to plead guilty to one charge and asked to have the others withdrawn, but the
Magistrate would not consent to this. The solicitor then retracted his plea of guilty, and after
the evidence was heard the accused was fined $25. Remission of this fine was requested and
the Magistrate advised that the Attorney-General was the only person with authority to grant
such remission.    All this occurred in the case revolving around the hours worked by the cook.
The solicitor subsequently appealed the Magistrate's decision, by way of a stated case to
the Supreme Court. The Judge ruled the Magistrate had come to a wrong determination, and
the conviction of the Police Court Magistrate was quashed. The Board thereupon sought the
advice of the Deputy Attorney-General in regard to an appeal, but after consideration that
official, in view of some of the doublful and involved evidence of the case, advised against
incurring the expense of an appeal.
STATISTICAL STUDY.
The annual request of the Board to employers throughout the Province for statistical
information relevant to wages and working conditions of women employees was made at the
close of the year.    The information was sought for the week of greatest employment.
After tabulation of the figures was completed the resultant totals of firms reporting and
employees reported showed a slight decrease from the 1929 mark. In view of the economic
conditions existing in 1930 this was not wholly unexpected. During 1929 returns were received
from 3,602 firms employing 20,766 women and girls. The 1930 pay-rolls were sent in by 3,456
employers, accounting for 20,461 women workers, revealing a drop of 146 in the employing
establishments, with 305 fewer helpers on their staffs. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 59
It inevitably happens that some forms are received too late for their data to be included
in the year's report. This year proved no exception in this respect. The annual plea of the
Board for a prompt return of the information is again reiterated, and its appreciation extended
towards those who sent in their forms without undue delay.
Figures for 1930, compiled separately for the nine occupations covered by Orders of the
Board, will be found in the tables which follow, together with a summary of the combined groups.
As figures for previous years are also included, valuable comparisons may be made with the
most recent tabulations.
Mercantile Industry.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—■
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years
Average hours worked per week	
435
4,223
.3,670
553
$54,384.13
$5,177.00
$14.82
$9.36
13.09%
44.05
458
4,314
3,723
591
$56,065.22
$5,367.50
$15.06
$9.08
13.70%
43.16
478
4,237
3,563
674
553,270.55
$6,467.50
$14.95
$9.60
15.91%
43.57
480
3,917
3,282
635
$50,231.73
$6,250.50
$15.31
$9.84
16.21%
45.35
466
3,276
2,820
456
$42,508.65
$4,222.50
$15.07
$9.26
13.92%
44.54
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $12.75; 1,144 or
27.09 per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
2,150 or 50.91 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 929 or
22 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than
the $12.75 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over
18 years of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata
basis.
The mercantile industry, in point of numbers employed, stands second in the list of callings
over which the Board has jurisdiction, and was the first to have an Order promulgated for its
benefit. It includes many stores with a single employee each, but also contains within its ranks
the large departmental concerns, whose women assistants are counted by hundreds.
The year marked the opening of several branches of another " chain " organization, whose
staffs consist almost entirely of women and girls.
As the returns for the year were required for the week of greatest employment, most firms
submitted figures for the Christmas-season week. Permission under the Mercantile Order was
obtained for some overtime employment by firms to cope with the heavy business, the peak of
which occurs within a limited period at this time of year.
Laundry Industry.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years...
Average hours worked per week	
64
1,114
991
123
$14,451.00
$1,181.00
$14.58
$9.60
11.04%
45.24
70
1,203
1,056
147
$15,420.50
$1,444.50
$14.60
$9.83
12.22%
45.30
66
1,090
962
128
$14,036.49
$1,234.00
$14.59
$9.64
11.74%
45.39
59
959
822
137
$11,966.50
$1,396.00
$14.56
$10.19
14.29%
45.11
59
922
799
123
$11,484.90
$1,288.50
$14.37
$10.48
13.34?
45.02 E 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $13.50; 345 or 30.97
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount, 487 or
43.72 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 282 or 25.31 per
cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$13.50 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years
of age, and employees who worked less than 4S hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Quoting from a survey made by the Women's Bureau of the United States Department of
Labour, it may be of interest to note that " The laundry industry, unlike other factory-work, does
not create a commodity from raw material; rather, it renovates an already completed product
and does not'even own the material on which it works. In other words, it receives pay for
service and it competes not so much with other laundries as with possible customers. In spite
of these points on which it differs from other factory-run industries, however, the laundry
industry has followed them in its development. The best laundries are laid out on a production-
line basis and operated much the same as highly specialized and systematized factories."
The power-laundry industry, an outgrowth of an old home occupation, provides work for
many women and girls. In passing, it may be remarked that in British Columbia the ownership
and management of a large steam-laundry is vested in two women.
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
Average hours worked per week	
394
2,456
2,345
111
$36,582.50
$1,538.00
$15.60
$13.86
4.52%
44.90
431
2,608
2,496
112
$41,291.00
$1,565.50
$16.54
$13.98
4.29%
45.61
430
2,469
2,377
92
$39,267.25
$1,257.50
$16.52
$13.67
3.73%
45.73
375
1,945
1,877
68
$30,964.60
$918.00
$16.50
$13.50
3.50%
45.85
399
1,723
1,644
79
$27,264.81
$1,114.50
$16.59
$14.11
4.59%
45.54
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 464 or 18.89
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount, 1,613
or 65.68 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 379 or 15.43 per
cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$14 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years
of age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
In the public housekeeping occupation the Board, in common with similar administrative
bodies in other places, has experienced more difficulty in enforcing the regulations than in any
other calling. To compel the employers to confine the working-hours within the limits prescribed
by the Order has been a serious problem for the Board. Often, too, the question of meals
supplied to an employee, for which an allowance is made in the Order, is a contentious one when
adjustments of wages are being consummated. Frequently no definite understanding exists
between employer and employed as to the exact number of meals per week the employee may
have.   If trouble ensues over wages, settlement usually hinges on the number of meals supplied.
A glance at the summary of Court cases will reveal that the majority of prosecutions instituted during the year had to be brought under this particular Order. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 61
Office Occupation.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wTages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Percentage of employees under 18 years....
Average hours worked per week	
1,935
5,187
5,029
158
$102,354.05
$2,050.00
$20.35
$12.97
3.05%
42.02
1,985
5,259
5,077
182
$104,340.19
$2,322.00
$20.55
$12.75
3.46%
42.02
1,829
4,608
4,504
164
$91,042.73
$2,131.00
$20.21
$12.99
3.51%
41.91
1,919
4,399
4,247
152
$81,380.57
$1,917.50
$19.16
$12.62
3.46%
41.93
$1
1,636
3,756
3,009
147
,838.71
,878.00
$19.07
$12.78
3.91%
41.94
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15; 651 or 12.55
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount, 4,053
or 78.14 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 483 or 9.31 per
cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $15
included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years of
age, and employees who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
According to the data supplied to the Board, the role of office-worker appeals to more girls
than any other type of work. More than one-quarter of the aggregate were classified in this
grouping. Greater stability of service is apparent, too, and higher salaries come into evidence.
There were 5,187 earning their living at office-work, of whom 910 were in receipt of remuneration that brought them $25 or more per week.
Unlike some other occupations, definite training may be gained before a position is acquired.
Commercial schools provide the means for a girl to fit herself for this vocation, but it must also
be borne in mind that actual experience is essential before she becomes an efficient office-hand.
The Office Order provides for a lower scale of wages while the girl is assimilating routine of office
duties.
Personal Service Occupation.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees -	
Over 18 years	
Under 18 years	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years	
Employees under 18 years. ....
Percentage of employees under 18 years.
Average hours worked per week	
110
391
349
42
;5,829.85
$396.00
$16.70
$9.43
10.74%
39.34
106
371
338
33
i,S85.00
$270.00
$17.41
$8.18
8.89%
40.28
96
349
323
26
$5,496.24
$303.50
$17.02
$11.07
7.45?
30.38
103
359
337
22
$5,845.03
$204.00
$17.34
$12.00
6.13%
40.33
76
285
266
19
$4,381.00
$214.00
$16.47
$11.26
6.67%
38.67
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14.25; 56 or 14.32
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount, 231
or 59.08 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 104 or 26.60 per
cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the
$14.25 included girls under 18, for whom lower rates are set, inexperienced workers over 18 years
of age, and employees who worked less than 4:8 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Besides beauty-parlour operators, ushers in theatres are included in this grouping. Irregular
and short hours are often the rule for theatre attendants, and it is on account of this condition
that the average working-week is shorter than in other classes. E 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
This is one of the few sections in which a gain is recorded over the, 1929 figures in the
number of firms and the number of employees, four more concerns being responsible for twenty
more workers.
The vogue for beauty-parlour service shows no definite signs of diminishing.
Fishing Industry.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
3
71
07
4
$1,473.50
$55.00
$21.99
$13.75
5.03%
57.08
8
22
22
4
15
15
5
16
16
4
26
26
Total weekly wages—
$498.75
$292.54
$250.00
$496.25
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
$22.67
$19.50
$15.62
$19.09
Percentage of inexperienced employees...
50.18
46.13
40.09
48.00
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15.50; 4 or 5.63
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount, 59 or
83.10 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 8 or 11.27 per cent,
of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less than the $15.50
included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who worked less
than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
As workers in fish canneries do not come within the scope of the Order, the returns in this
industry are made for comparatively few employees, who are for the most part engaged in plants
where fish are prepared for drying, curing, or smoking.
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—-
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees
Average hours worked per week	
154
2,028
1,871
157
$34,057.42
$1,671.50
$18.20
$10.65
7.74%
41.02
142
2,023
1,781
242
$32,418.50
$2,719.00
$18.20
$11.24
11.96%
40.94
135
1,866
1,612
254
$29,530.00
$3,024.50
$18.32
$11.91
13.61%
41.13
127
1,669
1,553
116
$27,843.94
$1,240.00
$17.93
$10.69
6.95<j
41.42
103
1,609
1,373
236
$24,386.21
$2,842.50
$17.76
$12.04
14.67%
41.22
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $15; 403 or 19.87
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned occupation received this amount,
1,316 or 64.89 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 309 or
15.24 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $15 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who
worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Telephone operators, who are direct employees of telephone companies, together with young
ladies who attend to switchboards in business, commercial, and professional offices, comprise
the majority of employees in this setting, although telegraph staffs help to swell the figures.
It will be remembered that in one city, towards the end of the year, the operations of the
telephone system were converted to an automatic basis. This change did not affect the number
of employees in the company's report, as their week of greatest employment occurred earlier in
the year and returns were made for the peak period. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 63
Manufacturing Industry.
1930.
1929.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees.
Average hours worked per week	
310
2,507
2,076
431
$34,082.60
$4,455.50
$16.42
$10.34
17.19";
44.48
351
2,760
2,243
517
$37,550.80
$5,216.00
$16.74
$10.09
18.73%
44.90
336
2,524
2,051
473
$34,084.50
$4,729.00
$16.62
$10.00
18.74%
44.70
339
2,292
1,907
385
$31,710.09
$3,847.00
$16.63
$9.90
16.80%
44.35
335
2,018
1,491
527
$25,343.79
$6,182.00
$17.00
$11.73
26.11%
44.51
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14; 675 or 26.93
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
1,067 or 42.56 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 765 or
30.51 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $14 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees who
worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis.
Many lines of factory-work are included in this industry, as reference to the schedules under
the Manufacturing Order in the Appendix will disclose.
It is customary in many branches of the occupation to pay the workers on a piece-work basis,
but the Order provides that whatever system of payment prevails in an establishment the wages
of the employees must equal the amount specified in the regulations. It, therefore, happens that
sometimes a girl's piece-rate earnings have to be augmented by the employer to ensure a strict
compliance with the law.
Comparatively few women in industry in the Province are organized, so they are not in a
position to do any collective bargaining. The backing of the minimum-wage legislation is their
protection.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry.
1930.
1929.
1928.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Experienced	
Inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees	
Inexperienced employees	
Percentage of inexperienced employees..
Average hours worked per week  (time'
workers)	
51
Time.
2,346
1,936
410
$34,097.11
$4,555.00
$17.61
$11.11
Piece.
138
116
22
$3,205.50
$187.00
$27.63
$8.50
17.40%
48.78
51
Time.
2,119
1,587
532
$29,118.52
$5,699.00
$18.35
$10.71
Piece.
87
67
20
$1,787.71
$153.50
$26.68
$7.67
25.02%
49.01
51
Time.
1,917
1,572
345
Piece.
242
212
30
$29,026.28
$4,060.00
$5,176.45
$263.00
$18.46
$11.77
$24.42
$8.77
17.37%
50.78
For a week of 48 hours the minimum wage for experienced employees is $14.40; 181 or 7.29
per cent, of all employees reported in the above-mentioned industry received this amount,
1,482 or 59.66 per cent, of all employees reported received more than this amount, and 821 or
33.05 per cent, of all employees reported received less than this amount. Those receiving less
than the $14.40 included inexperienced workers, for whom lower rates are set, and employees
who worked less than 48 hours and received pay on a pro rata basis. E 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
The 1930 fruit season was an exceptionally busy one, and 278 more women employees were
required to attend to the handling of the perishable commodities than in 1929.
Wherever actual weekly hours were reported in the returns the employees were tabulated
as " time " workers, although it is reasonable to suppose that many of them were, paid on a
piece-rate plan. It will be noted from the foregoing table that 138 were listed as " piece"
workers. In the records these particular persons did not have their hours reported and worked
exclusively under a piece-work system.
Much of the work regulated by this Order is highly seasonal in character, and has, of
necessity, to be crowded into a few months when fruits and vegetables are ready for the
packing-houses and canneries. Field and orchard workers, who gather the crops, are excluded
from the operation of the Act.
Summary of all Occupations.
1930.
1928.
1927.
1926.
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Over 18 years, or experienced	
Under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Total weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced.
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years, or experienced.
Employees under 18 years, or inexperienced	
Percentage of employees under 18 years,
or inexperienced	
Average hours worked per week	
3,456
20,461
18,450
2,011
$320,517.66
$21,260.00
$17.37
$10.57
9.83%
43.95
3,602
20,760
18,390
2,376
$324,376.19
$24,757.00
$17.64
$10.42
11.44%
43.87
3,425
19,377
17,191
2,186
$301,223.03
$23,470.00
$17.52
$10.74
11.28%
44.05
3,455
17,507
15,697
1,810
$267,787.44
$18,820.00
$17.06
$10.40
10.34%
43.92
3,123
16,070
13,725
2,345
$234,001.53
$23,513.50
$17.05
$10.03
14.59%
43.82
Women and girls to the number of 20,461 were reported in the nine occupations and
industries. Those listed as receiving the actual minimum for their respective classes of work
aggregated 3,923, or 19.17 per cent. Rates of pay in excess of the legal minimum were earned
by 12,458 employees, or 60.89 per cent, of the total number reported. The balance, comprising
4,080 employees, or 19.94 per cent, of the total, were recorded as being in receipt of wages which
fell below the minimum. This group includes young girls and inexperienced workers, for whom
lower rates are set, and employees who worked less than 48 hours in the week and were paid
on a pro rata basis.
WAGE STANDARDS, 1929 AND 1930.
In common with others, the women and girl wage-earners felt the effects of the unusual
conditions which contributed to the business depression during 1930. From the foregoing tables
it will be gleaned that averages for the experienced employees fell below the 1929 levels in six
out of the seven non-seasonal occupations. The telephone weekly average for skilled operators
remained stationary at $18.20. It is gratifying to note, however, that even the lower averages
for 1930 are still appreciably in excess of the rates dictated in the respective Orders. The
general average for all experienced workers stands at $17.37, in comparison with $17.64 during
1929.    Reference to the tables shows that increases predominate for the younger workers.
FLUCTUATION OF EMPLOYMENT.
To show the tendency regarding labour turnover in the various occupations a table has been
prepared (and is set out hereunder) which graphically shows the number of employees appearing in the different yearly sections.
For several reasons the highest total is found in the column headed " Under 1 year." When
new hands are taken on in an establishment their suitability for the position can be determined
in a fairly short time, and if it is ascertained that their services are not to be retained it is
obvious their grading will fall under this heading. In the mercantile industry the temporary
assistants engaged for the Christmas rush will be written up in the pay-roll for the week of greatest employment. Owing to the seasonal character of the fruit and vegetable industry large
numbers are listed as being with their employer less than one year. In this connection, however,
many of these workers undoubtedly performed the same kind of work in previous seasons and
in some instances in the same establishment, but on account of the intermittent nature of their
work they have been reported as being with the employer who sent in the returns less than
one year.
Hotel and restaurant help are prone to move from place to place, often giving up their jobs
in the early summer to obtain posts at the holiday resorts.
Office-workers appear to retain their positions with a more marked degree of permanency
than is general in the other vocations.
Under normal conditions there is a certain amount of labour turnover that is unavoidable,
but when the changing of employees becomes too frequent it means a loss of profit.
Table showing Labour Turnover in each Group—Number of Employees in Continuous
Service of Employer reporting.
Name of Industry.
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102
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376
1,791
262
1,079
951
859
146
406
7
1,354
*687
235
510
1,027
411
70
435
2
270
499
162
276
705
292
70
337
251
323
116
160
516
232
29
140
115
280
77
102
428
170
19
170
49
139
40
85
310
114
15
133
31
113
39
47
205
94
11
117
3
14
96
35
30
201
55
11
70
9
52
16
20
142
45
8
36
1
3
55
13
30
94
35
3
36
3
146
44
67
475
98
4
145
1
9
4,223
1,114
2,456
5,187
2,507
391
2,028
71
2,484
435
64
Public housekeeping
Office	
394
1,935
310
Personal service	
Telephone and tele-
110
154
3
Fruit and vegetable
51
Totals	
843
6,855
3,647
2,592
1,631
1,295
867
643
507
323
269
989
20,461
3,456
MARITAL STATUS.
From information supplied on the pay-roll returns it was possible to compile the appended
table relating to the marital status of the women workers. In 1929 the percentage of married
women to the total reported figured out at 20.11 per cent. For 1930 this percentage had dropped
to 19.67. Similarly, the proportion of widows gainfully employed in the business and industrial
world fell from 3.86 per cent, in 1929 to 3.68 per cent, for the current year. These changes
caused the figures for the unmarried employees to rise from 76.03 per cent, in 1929 to 76.65
per cent, in 1930. While the changes are slight in themselves, they definitely refute the impression prevailing in many quarters that in British Columbia married women are competing with
their single sisters in increasingly large numbers each year.
Name of Industry.
Married.
Widowed.
Single.
Total.
635
307
687
525
434
73
188
44
1,132
172
49
203
132
90
16
18
2
70
3,416
758
1,566
4,530
1,983
302
1,822
25
1,282
4,223
1,114
2,456
Office	
5,187
2,507
391
2,028
71
2,484
Totals	
4,025
752
15,684
20,461
Per cent	
19.67%
3.68%
76.65%
100.00% E 60 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
PROTECTION AFFORDED EMPLOYEES.
With New Brunswick falling into line at the end of the year by putting a " Minimum Wage
Act" on its statute-books, eight of the nine Provinces of the Dominion now afford this protection
to their women employees.    Prince Edward Island has not yet taken such a legislative step.
British Columbia has been administering its law for women since 1918. The current year
has been a testing period. Wages and salaries of women and girls have been held at higher
levels than would have been possible had no minimum-wage legislation been in force. The
advantage of the law to the worker has been more clearly apparent during 1930 than at any
time since the inception of this legal backing.
A comparison of wages and the relative proportions of experienced and inexperienced
employees for the years 1918, 1929, and 1930 should prove illuminating. Figures along these
lines for the non-seasonal occupations follow:—■
Mercantile Industry.
Average weekly wages—                                                 I918- 1929. 1930.
Employees over 18 years     $12.71 $15.06 $14.82
Employees under 18 years        7.70 9.08 9.36
Percentage of employees under 18 years  15.49% 13.70% 13.09%
Laundry Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years     $11.80       $14.00       $14.58
Employees under 18 years        9.78 9.83 9.60
Percentage of employees under 18 years _  21.80%      12.22%      11.04%
Manufacturing Industry.
Average weekly wages—
Experienced employees  $12.54 $16.74 $16.42
Inexperienced employees  9.57 10.09 10.34
Percentage of inexperienced employees  28.64% 18.73% 17.19%
Telephone and Telegraph.
Average weekly wages-
Experienced employees.:  $15.55 $18.20 $18.20
Inexperienced employees  11.90 11.24 10.65
.  Percentage of inexperienced employees  8.70% 11.96% 7.74%
Personal Service Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  $13.83
Employees under 18 years  6.96
Percentage of employees under 18 years  15.38%
Office Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years     $16.53       $20.55       $20.35
Employees under 18 years      10.88 12.75 12.97
Percentage of employees under 18 years    7.45%       3.46%       3.05%
Public Housekeeping Occupation.
Average weekly wages—
Employees over 18 years  $14.23 $16.54 $15.60
Employees under 18 years ._  11.77 13.98 13.86
Percentage of employees under 18 years  5.51% 4.29% 4.52%
$17.41
$16.70
8.18
9.43
8.89%
10.74% INSPECTIONS.
The duties of the Inspector have been particularly heavy during the past year. Investigations
and inspections have kept her extremely busy, not only in Vancouver at her headquarters, but
in various other parts of the Province. Court-work consumes much time, and appearances are
necessary even though adjournments may be granted from time to time. Personal visits to
plants, to homes of employees, and interviews in the Inspector's office are all necessary in dealing
with complaints and infractions, real or imagined. As employers in the Province are drawn
from many nationalities, and employees are encountered who speak no English, the problems
of the officials of the Board are multiplied. In some cases the services of an interpreter have
to be enlisted to come to a proper understanding and settlement of a dispute.
CONCLUSION.
On the whole, the members and officials of the Board have experienced worthy co-operation
from employers, employees, and public-spirited citizens, to whom they record grateful appreciation for assistance in whatever form rendered.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
J. D. McNrvEN, Chairman.
Helen Gregory MacGill.
Thomas Mathews. E 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
APPENDIX.
SUMMARY OF ORDERS.
For convenient reference a summary of the Orders now in force is herewith appended:—
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Tears of Age or over.
$12.75.    Hourly rate, 26 %6 cents.
$7.50 for 1st  3
months.
$9.00 for 1st   3 months.
8.00
,   2nd 3
,,
10.00    „   2nd 3       „
8.50
,   3rd 3
,,
11.00    „   3rd 3
9.00
,   4th 3
,,
12.00    „   4th 3
9.50
,   5th 3
„
10.00
,   6th 3
,,
Licences required in this
10.50
,   7th 3
,,
class.
11.50
,   8th 3
"
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Maximum working-period 48 hours.
Order has been in force since January 1st, 1928, superseding Order of February 24th, 1919.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING, AND DYEING INDUSTRIES.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced Workers.
Experienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$13.50.    Hourly  rate,   28%   cents.
$8.00 for 1st   4 months.
8.50    „   2nd 4
9.00 „ 3rd 4
10.00 „ 4th 4
11.00 „ 5th 4
12.00    „   0th 4
$9.00 for 1st   4 months.
10.50     „   2nd 4
12.00    „   3rd 4
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are based on a 48-hour week. Maximum working-period 48 hours, governed by
" Factories Act."
Order has been in force since March 31st, 1919.
PUBLIC HOUSEKEEPING OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of waitresses, attendants, housekeepers, janitresses, cooks, and kitchen
help in restaurants, hotels, tea-rooms, ice-cream parlours, light-lunch stands, and other places where
food is cooked, prepared, and served for which a charge is made1; and the work of chambermaids, in
hotels, lodging-houses, and apartments where lodging is furnished, whether or not such establishments
are operated independently or in connection with any other business; and the work of all female
elevator operators.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.    Hourly rate, 29% cents.
$12.00
$12.00
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    In emergency cases 52 hours may be worked.    Time and
one-half shall be paid for work in excess of 48 hours and up to 52 hours. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 69
When lodging is furnished, not more than $3 a week may be deducted for such lodging.
When board or meals are furnished, not more than $5.25 may be deducted for a full week's board
of 21 meals.    A fraction of a week's board shall be computed upon a proportional basis.
As elevator operators are required by law to pass an examination before running elevators, no
apprenticeship is permitted under the Minimum Wage Order.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
OFFICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed as stenographers, book-keepers, typists, billing clerks,
filing clerks, cashiers, cash-girls (not included in other Orders), checkers, invoicers, comptometer
operators, auditors, attendants in physicians' and dentists' oiBces, and all kinds of clerical help.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$15.    Monthly   rate,   $65.
Hourly   rate,   31%   cents.
$11.00 for 1st   6 months.
12.00    „   2nd 6
13.00    „   3rd 6
14.00    „   4th 6
$11.00 for 1st   3 months.
12.00    „   2nd 3
13.00    „   3rd 3
14.00    „•   4th 3
Licences required in this
class.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week. Maximum weekly working-period prescribed by Order, 48
hours.
Order has been in force since August 16th, 1919.
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of females employed in manicuring, hairdressing, barbering, and other
work of like nature, or employed as ushers in theatres, attendants at shooting-galleries and other
public places of amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or as drivers of motor-cars and
other vehicles.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Inexperienced Workers.
Experienced Workers.
Under 18 Years of Age.
18 Years of Age or over.
$14.25.    Hourly rate, 29 "/M cents.
$10.00 for 1st 6 months.
11.00    ,,   2nd 6       „
12.00    „   3rd 6
13.00    „   4th 6
*$10.00 for 1st 3 months.
11.00    „   2nd 3       „
12.00    „   3rd 3
13.00    ,,   4th 3
Licences required in this
class.
* These rates for learners do not apply to attendants at shooting-galleries and other public places of
amusement, garages, and gasoline service stations, or to drivers of motor-cars or other vehicles, for whom
no apprenticeship is deemed necessary.
Above rates are for 48-hour week, which is maximum permitted.
Wages for Ushers.
Ushers in theatres, music-halls, concert-rooms, or the like, engaged after 6 p.m., on legal holidays,
and for special matinees, are entitled to a wage of not less than 30 cents an hour, with a minimum
payment of 75 cents.
Ushers working more than 18 hours a week, but not in excess of 36 hours, are entitled to not less
than $10.80 a week.     (Ushers in this category may be employed only between 1.30 p.m. and 11 p.m.)
Ushers working in excess of 36 hours a week up to 48 hours are entitled to not less than $14.25.
No distinction is made for ushers under 18 and over 18 years of age. No apprenticeship considered
necessary for ushers.
Order has been in force since September 15th, 1919. E 70                                                    DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
FISHING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving, drying, curing,
smoking, packing, or otherwise adapting for sale or use, or for shipment, any kind of fish, except in
the case of canned fish.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.50.    Hourly rate, 32 '/M cents.
$12.75   for   1st   4  months.
13.75    „    2nd 4
14.75    „    3rd   4
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Order has been in force since February 28th, 1920.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION.
This includes the work of all persons employed in connection with the operating of the various
instruments, switchboards, and other mechanical appliances used in connection with telephony and
telegraphy, and shall also include the work of all persons employed in the business or industry of the
operation of telephone or telegraph systems who are not governed by any other Order of the Board.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$15.00.    Hourly rate, 31%  cents.
$11.00   for  1st   3  months.
12.00    „    2nd  3
13.00    „    3rd   3
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    Maximum hours permitted are 8 per day and 48 per week,
except in cases of emergency, when 56 hours may be worked.     Time and one-half is payable for hours
in excess of 48.    Every employee must have one full day off duty in every week.
Where telephone and telegraph employees are customarily on duty between the hours of 10 p.m.
and 8 a.m., 10 hours on duty shall be construed as the equivalent of 8 hours of work in computing the
number of hours of employment a week.
In cases where employees reside on the employer's premises, the employer shall not be prevented
from making an arrangement with such employees to answer emergency calls between the hours of
10 p.m. and 8 a.m.
Order has been in force since April 5th, 1920, superseding Order of September 23rd, 1919.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in canning, preserving, drying, packing, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use, any kind of fruit or vegetable.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
$14.40.    Hourly rate, 30 cents.
$11.00 for 1st 2 months.
Licences required for inexperienced employees
18 years of age or over.
Above rates are for a 48-hour week.    For wor
wages shall be not less than 30 cents an hour f(
10 hours the rate shall be not less than 45 cents ai
For work over 8 hours, but not in excess of 1(
an hour for inexperienced workers, and for work i
35 cents an hour.
Order has been in force since November 2nd, !
i over 48 hours, but not in excess of 10 hours a day,
>r experienced workers, and for work in excess of
i hour.
) hours a day, wages shall be not less than 23 cents
n excess of 10 hours the rate shall be not less than
.926, superseding Order of February 28th, 1920. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 71
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.
This includes the work of females engaged in the making, preparing, altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, and adapting for use or sale any article or
commodity, but excepting fish, fruit, and vegetable drying, canning, preserving, or packing.
Weekly Minimum Wage.
Experienced Workers.
Inexperienced Workers.
Schedule 1.
Schedule 2.
Schedule 3.
$14.00. Hourly rate, 29%
cents.
$8.00 for 1st   2 mos.
10.00    „   2nd   2    „
12.00    „   3rd   2    „
$8.00 for 1st   4 mos.
10.00    „   2nd  4    „
12.00     „   3rd   4    „
$7.00 for 1st   6 mos.
10.00    „   2nd   6    „
13.00    „   3rd   6    „
Licences required for inexperienced workers 18 years of age or over.
Schedule 1 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Tea, coffee, spices, essences, sauces, jelly-powders, baking-powders, molasses,
sugar, syrups, honey, peanut butter, cream and milk products, butter, candy, confectionery, biscuits,
macaroni, vermicelli, meats, soft drinks, yeast, cans, buttons, soap, paint, varnish, drug and toilet
preparations, photographs, ink, seeds, brooms, whisks, pails, wash-boards, wooden boxes, clothes-pins,
matches, explosives, munitions, gas-mantles, and window-shades.
Schedule 2 applies to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or
adapted for use or sale: Cotton bags, envelopes, overalls, shirts, ladies' and children's wear, gloves,
hats, caps, men's neckwear, water-proof clothing, tents, awnings, regalia, carpets, furniture, bedding,
pillow-covers, loose covers, mattress-covers, draperies, casket furnishings, factory-made millinery,
knitted goods, blankets, brushes, machine-made cigars, and dipped chocolates.
Schedule 3 applies to the following occupations, or to establishments in which any of the following products are manufactured or adapted for use or sale: Bookbinding, embossing, engraving, printing,
dressmaking, men's and women's tailoring, ready-to-wear suits, paper boxes, jewellery, furs, leather
goods, hand-made cigars, boots, shoes, and hand-made millinery.
Schedule 3 does not apply to regularly indentured apprentices whose indentures have been approved
by the Minimum Wage Board.
The above rates are for a 48-hour week. No employee shall be employed more than 8 hours a
day, nor more than 48 hours a week, except when permission has been granted under the provisions
of the " Factories Act."
Order has been in force since November 20th, 1923, superseding Order of September 1st, 1919.
ASSOCIATIONS OF EMPLOYERS.
In the preparation of the following list the intention has been to confine it to organizations
which have direct connection with the employment of labour, and not to include any which are
established purely for other business or social purposes.
Box Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association — Chairman,
H. A. Renwick, B.C. Manufacturing Co., Ltd.,
New Westminster; Secretary, Hugh Dalton,
402 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
B.C. Hotels' Association—President, J. J. Kahn;
Vice-President, J. Churchill;   Treasurer, J. J.
Wyard; Secretary, J. J. Walsh, 307-308 North
■ West Building, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver.
B.C. Loggers' Association — Chairman of the
Board of Directors, Sidney G. Smith, Bloedel,
Stewart & Welch Co., Ltd., 1818 Marine Building, Vancouver ; Vice-Chairman, Roger L. Cobb,
Elk River Timber Co., Ltd., 1618 Marine
Building, Vancouver; Secretary-Manager, R.
V. Stuart, 921 Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Officers elected annually on January
15th.
B.C. Lumber & Shingle Manufacturers' Association—President (1931), R. Abernethy, Eburne
Sawmills, Ltd., 9149 Hudson Avenue, Vancouver ; Secretary, T. H. Wilkinson, 917
Metropolitan Building, Vancouver. Officers
elected annually on third Thursday in January.
Building & Construction Industries Exchange of
B.C.—President, J. P. Hodgson; Vice-President, Col. W. W. Foster; Secretary, R. J.
Lecky, 342 Pender Street AVest, Vancouver.
Canadian Jewellers' Association (B.C. Section) —
President, Walter McClean; Secretary-Treasurer, A. Fraser Reid, 1635 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division) ; Provincial Headquarters, 701-7 B.C.
Mining Building, Vancouver—Chairman, F. C.
Brown, Canada Western Cordage Co., Ltd.,
Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C.
Mining Building, Vancouver.
Canadian Manufacturers' Association (Victoria
Branch), 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria— E 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Chairman, W. A. Jameson, c/o Jameson Coffee
Co., Victoria; Secretary, T. J. Goodlake, 119
Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Canadian Storage & Transfermen's Association
(for year June, 1930, to June, 1931)—President, George H. McKeag, Security Storage Co.,
Ltd., Portage Avenue and Huntleigh Street,
Winnipeg, Manitoba; Secretary, E. A. Quig-
ley, Suite 10, 423 Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
This Association has Board of Directors in each
Province.
Canned Salmon Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association — Chairman, R.
Bell-Irving, Anglo B.C. Packing Co., Ltd., Vancouver ; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 402 Pender
Street West, Vancouver; Assistant Secretary
of Section, R. M. Winslow, 705, 402 Pender
Street West, Vancouver.
Clay Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, James
Parfitt, Victoria Brick Co., Victoria; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Feed Products Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, A. C.
Foreman, Vancouver Milling & Grain Co., Ltd.,
Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 701
B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Fertilizer Manufacturers' Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, F. Smelts, B.C. Electric Railway Co.,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Garment Manufacturers' Section, Canadian Manufacturers' Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, A. O. Koch, National Dress Co., Ltd.,
Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 701
B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
General Contractors' Association—President, Col.
W. W. Foster ; Vice-President, J. P. Hodgson ;
Secretary, R. J. Lecky, 342 Pender Street West,
Vancouver.
Jam Manufacturers' Association, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, C. D. Hunter, Empress Manufacturing
Co., Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton,
402 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Meal, Oil & Salt Fish Section, B.C. Division,
Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, J. J. Petrich, Nootka Packing Co., Ltd.,
Vancouver; Secretary, R. M. Winslow, 705
B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, Eric
Davies, c/o Vancouver Engineering Works,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701
B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Metal Trades Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, E. W.
Izard, Yarrows, Ltd., Esquimalt; Secretary,
T.'J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Millwork Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, G. B. Russell, Arbutus Sash & Door Co., Ltd., Vancouver ;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Mining Association of B.C.—President, Dale L.
Pitt, Premier, B.C.; Secretary, H. Mortimer-
Lamb, 928 Birks Building, Vancouver.
Mountain Lumber Manufacturers' Association—
President,    H.    P.    Klinestiver,    Lumberton;
Secretary-Treasurer, I. R. Poole, 204 Trades
Building, Calgary, Alberta. Officers elected at
annual meeting held in January.
Northern Alberta-B.C. Lumbermen's Association ;
Territory, Interior B.C. and Alberta. Where
meetings usually held, Calgary and Edmonton.
Day of meeting, no set date. President, J. F.
McMillan, Edmonton, Alberta ; Secretary, I. R.
Poole, 204 Trades Building, Calgary, Alberta.
Photographers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, Percy
Bentley, Dominion Photo Co., Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, R. V. Robinson, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Printers' Section, Victoria Branch, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association—Chairman, A. F.
Stevens, Acme Press, Ltd., Victoria; Secretary,
T. J. Goodlake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria.
Printers' Section, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association — Chairman, P. H.
Murphy, Murphy & Chapman, Ltd., Vancouver;
Secretary, Hugh Dalton, 701 B.C. Mining
Building, Vancouver.
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, Inc.,
B.C. Board—President, J. M. Watson, Vancouver ; 1st Vice-President, R. T. Wilson,
Nanaimo; 2nd Vice-President; J. F. Scott,
Cranbrook; Treasurer, Wm. Kerr, New Westminster ; Dominion Representative, D. H. Kent,
Vancouver; Secretary, Geo. R. Matthews, Vancouver ; Head Provincial Office at 420 Pacific
Building, Vancouver. Branches are established
at Cranbrook, Nanaimo, Revelstoke, and Vancouver. At New Westminster there is a District Branch serving the principal towns of
Lower Fraser Valley; Secretary, D. Stuart,
with office at 8 Hart Block New Westminster.
Shipping Federation of B.C., Ltd.—Manager and
Secretary, Major W. C. D. Crombie, Shipping
Federation Building, 45 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver ; President, D. M. Cameron; Vice-
President, Captain E. Aikman ; Treasurer, A.
M. Tidey ; Directors, David Baird, C. A. Cot-
terell, W. M. Crawford, B. W. Greer, H. F.
Harrison, R. L. Mason, R. G. Parkhurst, F. J.
Pickett, H. A. Stevenson, W. H. Walton, and
John Whittle. Meets for election of officers in
January of each year.
Shipyards' Section, Canadian Manufacturers'
Association (B.C. Division)—Chairman, A. H.
Seaton, B.C. Marine Engineers & Shipbuilders,
Ltd., Vancouver; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
701 B.C. Mining Building, Vancouver.
Vancouver Association of Electragists—President,
C. H. E. Williams, 509 Richards Street, Vancouver ; Hon. Secretary, J. C. Reston, 579 Howe
Street, Vancouver; Office, 425 Pacific Building.
Officers elected annually in September.
Vancouver Association of Sanitary & Heating
Engineers—President, C. Walter Murray, 716
Richards Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Robert
G. Hargreaves, 425 Pacific Building, Vancouver.    Officers elected annually in June.
Victoria Bread & Cake Manufacturers' Association—President, J. T. Taylor, c/o Rennie &
Taylor, Ltd., Victoria; Secretary, T. J. Good-
lake, 119 Pemberton Building, Victoria. Election of officers annually in January.
Victoria Builders' Exchange, Ltd.—Secretary, W.
J. Hamilton, 508 Sayward Block, Victoria. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 73
UNION DIRECTORY.
We have endeavoured to give an up-to-date directory of trade organizations and their officials
covering the whole Province, and we desire to thank those union secretaries who were prompt
in returning our questionnaire.
It is regretted that many officials did not reply to our letters, and we have assumed that
their organization is no longer is existence and have struck them from the list.
The Department will be pleased at all times to receive any changes in the published list
which may be made from time to time, and would appreciate being advised of any new organizations desiring to be listed in the next publication.
TRADES AND LABOUR CONGRESS OF
CANADA.
President, Tom Moore, 172 McLaren Street,
Ottawa; Secretary-Treasurer, P. M. Draper,
172 McLaren Street, Ottawa.
B.C. EXECUTIVE OF TRADES & LABOUR
CONGRESS OF CANADA.
Chairman, Colin McDonald, 529 Beatty Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, Fred Hoover, 2409
Clarke Drive, Vancouver.
TRADES AND LABOUR COUNCILS.
Prince Rupert—President, S.. D. McDonald, P.O.
Box 268, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. Derry,
Box 498, Prince Rupert. Meets at Carpenters'
Hall on second Thursday in each month at 8
p.m.
Vancouver, New Westminster and District—President, Colin McDonald, Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver; General Secretary-Treasurer, P. R.
Bengough, Room 200, Labour Headquarters,
Vancouver. Meets first and third Tuesdays of
each month at Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m.
Vancouver Labour Council of the All Canadian
Congress of Labour—President, W. M. Dennies,
2045 Maple Street, Vancouver;  Secretary, Geo.
B. Macaulay, Room 30, 163 Hastings Street
West. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West on
the first and third Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
Vancouver Building Trades Council—President,
W. D. Wilson, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver ; Secretary, W. Page, Office 301, Labour
Headquarters, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on second and fourth Tuesdays
in each month at 8 p.m.
Victoria and District Building Trades Council—
President, W. J. Pynn, 2225 Victor Street, Victoria ; Secretary, J. Wilson, 1008 Balmoral
Road, Victoria. Meets in the Labour Hall on
the second and fourth Thursdays at 8 p.m.
Victoria Trades and Labour Council—President,
C. Chivars, 2552 Forbes Street, Victoria; Secretary, J. Wilson, 1008 Balmoral Road, Victoria.
Meets at 8 p.m. on the first and third Wednesdays in the month at Trades Building, Courtney
Street,
DISTRICT LODGES AND COUNCILS.
Electrical Communication Workers of Canada.
British Columbia District Council No. 1—District
Chairman, B. W. Mugford, 2040 Foul Bay
Road, Victoria; Secretary, Joseph Haegert,
c/o 144 Eberts Street, Victoria.
Allied Printing Trades Council.
Vancouver—President, F. J. Milne; 2029 Pendrell
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Thomas Carroll,
842 Hamilton Street, Vancouver. Meets at
529-31 Beatty Street, Vancouver, on fourth
Monday in month at 7.30 p.m.
Victoria—President, W. W. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, T. A. Burgess,
Box 1183, Victoria. Meets at Room 411, Bank
of Toronto Building, at 8 p.m. on last Thursday
in month.
British Columbia Federation of Civic and
Municipal Employees.
President, W. J. Scribbens, 3208 Pender Street
East, Vancouver; Secretary, H. R. Simmers,
3675 Fifteenth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets at 251 Hastings Street East at call of
Chair.
TRADE UNIONS.
Ashcroft.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 210—President, J. D. Nicol,
Savona; Secretary, R. Halliday, 3481 Georgia
Street East, Vancouver. Meets at Ashcroft at
7.30 p.m. on third Saturday of March, June,
September, and December.
Corbin.
Corbin Miners' Association, Local No. 3, Sub.
Dist. No. 1—President, Ben Carter, Corbin;
Secretary, James Dorman, Corbin. Meets in
Union Hall every second Sunday at 7 p.m.
Cranbrook.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal & Soft Drink Workers,
No. 308—Secretary, John MacDonald, c/o
Cranbrook Brewing Co., Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
563—President, Hugh J. Brock, Box 551, Cranbrook ; Secretary, G. A. Hennessy, Drawer 878,
Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Mondays in Carmen's Hall.
Machinists, International, No. 588—President, W.
Henderson, Box 327, Cranbrook; Secretary,
R. J. Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook. Meets at
W. J. Flower's residence on first Sunday in
each month at 3 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
229—President, W. S. MacDonald, Box 335,
Cranbrook; Secretary, G. C. Brown, P.O. Box
739, Cranbrook. Meets at Odd Fellows' Hall,
Cranbrook, no set date. E 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No. 407—President, J. A. Genest, Box 684,
Cranbrook; Secretary, Geo. Kerwan, P.O. Box
451, Cranbrook. Meets at Cranbrook on second
Sunday in month at 2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 173—President, James Sims, Cranbrook ; Secretary, J. F. Lynn, 200 Durick
Avenue, Cranbrook. Meets at 8 p.m. at
I.O.O.F. Hall, Norbury Avenue, on first Wednesday in month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Express & Station
Employees, Mount Baker Lodge, No. 1292—■
President, John Philpott, Cranbrook; Secretary, E. G. Dingley, Box 728 Cranbrook. Meets
in Auditorium, Cranbrook, every Sunday at 3
p.m.
Essondale.
Mental Hospital Attendants' Union, No. 35 (T.
& L.C.)—President, John Gibson, Colony Farm,
Essondale; Secretary, J. McD. Nicholson,
Essondale. Meets second Thursday of each
month at 7 p.m. at Essondale.
Fernie.
Miners' Association (Independent), British Columbia—President, G. G. Sawyer, Fernie;
Secretary, W. A. Harrison, Box 595, Fernie.
Meets at Miners' Hall, Fernie, every third
Thursday at 7.30 p.m. during summer, and
every third Sunday during winter at 7.30 p.m.
Golden.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood, of, Local No.
165—President, L. Carlson, MeMurdo; Secretary, W. Rande, Field. Meets at I.O.O.F.
Hall, Golden, on first Sunday of each quarter
at 12 noon.
Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Div. No.
821—President, W. H. Govett, Kamloops;
Secretary, T. J. O'Neill, Box 753, Kamloops.
Meets at Orange Hall on first and third Sundays in month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen. Brotherhood
of, Local No. 258—President, H. C. Embree,
817 Columbia Street, Kamloops; Secretary, A.
E. Haigh, 749 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops, at 2 p.m. on
first and third Tuesdays in month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Div.
No. 611—President, H. C. Fronthart, Kamloops ; Secretary, A. G. Corry, Box 177, Kamloops. Meets at Orange Hall, Kamloops, on
second Sunday in month at 2.30 p.m.
Natal.
B.C. Miners' Association—President, J. C. Smith,
Michel; Secretary, Simeon Weaver, Natal.
Meets every second Friday at 7 p.m. in the
Mission Hall, Natal.
Nanaimo.
Carpenters, Amalgamated, of Canada—President,
Harvey May, Nanaimo; Secretary, John Kerr,
123 Craig Street. Meets at Occidental Hotel
on second and fourth Tuesdays at 8 p.m.
Nelson.
Barbers' International Union of America, Journeymen, Local No. 196—Secretary, R. M. Burgess, Box 657, Nelson. Meets at Nelson at 8
p.m. on fourth Thursday in month.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, E. J.
Hoskey Division, No. 579—President, L. L.
Boomer, Box 664, Nelson; Secretary, E. Jeff-
cott, Box 214, Nelson. Meets at Canadian
Legion Building on Sundays at 10.30 a.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
181—President, B. Melneruk, 212 Chatham
Street, Nelson; Secretary, A. Framson, Paulson. Meets on first Sunday in March, June,
September, and December at 2 p.m. at Nelson
and Grand Forks.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 98—President, D. H. Heddle, Box
235, Nelson; Secretary, G. B. Abbott, Box 272,
Nelson. Meets in K. of P. Hall, Baker Street,
Nelson, on second and fourth Tuesdays in
month at 7.30 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Div.
No. 460—Chief Conductor, G. W. Allan, Nelson; Secretary, A. B. Hall, 324 Gore Street,
Box 986, Nelson. Meets in Canadian Legion
Building at 1.30 p.m. on second Sunday in
month.
Railroad Trainmen,- Brotherhood of, Kootenay
Lodge, No. 558—Secretary, A. Kirby, 820 Carbonate Street (Box 258), Nelson. Meets at
Canadian Legion Building at 10 a.m. on second
Sunday in month.
New Westminster.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 573—President, C. Moir, Bayles' Barber
Shop, New Westminster; Secretary, Geo. York-
ston, 768 Columbia Street, New Westminster.
Meets at 768 Columbia Street on fourth Thursday in month at 7 p.m.
Carpenters, Amalgamated, of Canada, New Westminster Branch—President, A. J. Manzer, 1406
Edinburgh Street, New Westminster; Secretary, W. Taylor, 3030 Miller Avenue, New
Westminster. Meets at Hart Block, New Westminster, on second and fourth Wednesdays at
8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1251—President, E. J. Barrett, 3342 Melville Street, New Westminster;
Recording Secretary, W. A. Robertson, 224
Eleventh Street, New Westminster. Meets at
Labour Temple on first and third Thursdays in
month at 8 p.m.
Civic Employees of New Westminster, Union of-—
President, Dave McWaters, 711 Fifth Avenue,
New Westminster; Secretary, Rees Morgan,
314 Regina Street, New Westminster. Meets
at Labour Temple at 8 p.m. on first Tuesday
in month.
Civil Servants of Canada (Amalgamated) —
President, Dr. Kenneth Chester, 307 Fifth
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, G. H.
Jameson, 1814 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at Memorial Hall, Begbie Street,
New Westminster, on third Monday in month
at 8 p.m. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 75
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No.
256—President, W. Matthew, 910 London
Street, New Westminster; Secretary, C. J.
Highsted, 1230 Ewen Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at No. 1 Fire Hall once every
month at 8 p.m.
Fishermen's Protective Association of B.C., Local
No. 1—President, Richard Marshall, Pembina
Street, Lulu Island ; Secretary, Harold Maiden,
Box 427, New Westminster. Meets at New
Westminster on first Saturday of each month
at 2 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 280—President, W. Paul, 1529
Seventeenth Avenue, New Westminster; Secretary, P. Walmsley, 324 Spencer Block, New
Westminster. Meets at Canadian Legion Hall.
Begbie Street, New Westminster, on third
Friday in month at 8 p.m.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Division No. 189—President, G. Johnson,
Mount Lehman; Secretary, F. Kent, 2503
Hersham Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at
Canadian Legion Hall, New Westminster, on
the first Sunday in February, April, June,
August, October, and December at 12 noon.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, No. 134—President, C. M. Corbett. 1895 Eighteenth Street,
New Westminster; Secretary, A. J. Bond, 531
Fourteenth Street, New Westminster. Meets
in Labour Temple at 7.30 p.m. on second and
fourth Tuesdays in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
632—Secretary, R. A. Stoney, Box 754, New
Westminster. Meets in Labour Temple at
10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in February, May,
August, and November.
Penticton.
IiOComotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 884—President, C. H. Tupper,
Penticton; Secretary, R. O. Blacklock, Box
455, Penticton. Meets at K. of P. Hall on
second and third Wednesdays of each month at
2.30 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1426—Secretary, T. Bradley, Penticton. Meets
on first Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No.
914—President, Herbert Nicolson, Penticton ;
Secretary, W. B. McCallum, Penticton. Meets
at Odd Fellows' Hall, Penticton, on first and
third Mondays of each month at 3 p.m.
Prince  George.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers,  United Brotherhood of,  Local No.
202—President,    F.    P.    Donavan,    Hansard;
Secretary, C. H. Weaver, Hulton via Sinclair
Mills.    Meets at McBride and Prince George
about end of each quarter.
Railroad Employees, Local No. 28—President, W.
N.  Goheen, Prince George;    Secretary, A.  G.
Campbell, Box 138, Prince George.    Meets at
Tenth Avenue, Prince George, on first Sunday
in month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Local
No.  620—Chief  Conductor,  R.  Y.  Thompson,
Prince George; Secretary, Walter Parks, Prince
George. Meets in Prince George on second and
fourth Sundays in month at 8 p.m.
Prince Rupert.
Carpenters & Joiners of America, United Brotherhood of, Local No. 1735—President, J. J. Gells,
P.O. Box 500, Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. S.
Black, Box 694, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on first and third Wednesdays of each month.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union of the Pacific—
Secretary-Treasurer, P. B. Gill, Box 65,
Seattle.    Meets in Seattle.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 344—President, T. B. Black, Box
866, Prince Rupert; Secretary, F. H. S. Vincent, Box 866, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall at 8 p.m. on first Monday of each
month.
Longshoremen's Association, No. 2, Canadian
Federation of Labour—President, Sydney V.
Cox, Box 531, Prince Rupert; Secretary, Wm.
T. Pilford, Box 531, Prince Rupert. Meets in
Longshoremen's Hall on first Monday in month
at 8 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 426—President, F. Derry, Box 498,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, E. W. Tucker, Box
527, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall,
Eighth Street, Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m. on
second Tuesday of each month.
Railway Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Division No. 154—President, J. H. Mair, Box
679, Prince Rupert; Secretary, A. H. Scatter-
bol, Box 679, Prince Rupert. Meets in Ladies'
Waiting-room, Station Depot, on third Friday
at 7.30 p.m.
Sheet Metal Workers, International Association,
Local No. 672—President, J. W. Ratchford,
Third Avenue East, Prince Rupert; Secretary,
Geo. H. Dobb, 308 Seventh Avenue West,
Prince Rupert. Meets at 308 Seventh Avenue
West on last Monday in month at 7.30 p.m.
Steam & Operating Engineers, Local No. 510—
President, W. S. Hammond, General Delivery,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, James Black, Box
866, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 8 p.m. on first Friday of each month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
413—President, S. D. Maedonald, Box 268,
Prince Rupert; Secretary, J. M. Campbell, Box
689, Prince Rupert. Meets in Carpenters' Hall
at 2.30 p.m. on last Sunday of each month.
Revelstoke.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 407—President, Alexander Spence, General Delivery,
Revelstoke; Secretary, Jas. M. Goble, Box 283,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on the
fourth Saturday of each month at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Division
657—President, W. B. Donaldson, Box 413,
Revelstoke; Secretary, J. P. Purvis, Box 27,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on first and
third Tuesdays of each month at 2 p.m. E 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 341—President, S. J. Spurgeon,
Revelstoke; Secretary, A. McKenzie, Box 459,
Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall, Revelstoke,
on second and fourth Wednesdays of each
month at 2 p.m.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 258—President, B. Murgatroyd, Revelstoke ; Secretary, Dugald Bell, Box 209, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8 p.m. on first
Monday of month.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
208—President, A. L. Anderson, Box 667,
Revelstoke; Secretary, P. Westman, Box 464,
Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 2 p.m.
on first Sunday each quarter.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 481—President, Arthur Parker, Box
732, Revelstoke; Secretary, Chas. Lundell, Box
213, Revelstoke. Meets in Smyth's Hall at 8
p.m. on third Tuesday of each month.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Mount
Stephen Division, No. 487—Secretary, C. R.
Clay, Revelstoke. Meets in Selkirk Hall on
second Monday of each month at 7.30 p.m.
Salmon Arm.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, No. 193—President, W. Annala,
Tappen; Secretary, J. W. Miller, Carlin.
Meets at Alexander Hotel, Salmon Arm, on
third Sunday in March, June, September, and
December at 10.30 a.m.
Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No.
Ill—President, F. V. Foster, Smithers; Secretary, S. J. Mayer, Smithers. Meets at Smithers on first and third Tuesdays in month at
8 p.m.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No.
1415 (Bulkley)—President, J. S. Cathroe,
Smithers; Secretary, G. W. Smith, Smithers.
Meets at Smithers on first Thursday in month
at 7 p.m.
Railway Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Farthest
North Lodge, No. 869—President, W. F. Taylor,
Smithers; Secretary, J. H. Rife, Box 168,
Smithers. Meets at Town Hall, Smithers, on
first and third Wednesdays of each month at
8.30 p.m.
Squamish.
Railway Carmen of America, Mount Garibaldi
Lodge, Brotherhood of, No. 1419—President,
W. A. Nahood, Squamish; Secretary, J. E.
Holmes, Box 42, Squamish. Meets on second
Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the Elks' Rooms,
Squamish.
Steveston.
Steveston Fishermen's Benevolent Society—President, Motokichi Tanuka, Steveston; Secretary,
G. Takahiski, Box 54, Steveston. Meets at
Steveston on second Saturday of each month.
Three Forks.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 173—President, Frank Yurik, Sandon;
Secretary, T. H. Horner, Kaslo. Meets at
Three Forks, no set date.
Vancouver.
Bakery & Confectionery Workers, Local No. 468
—President, Jas. Brydson, 1742 Thirty-fourth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. D. Ink-
ster, 1124 Burrard Street, Vancouver. Meets
in Labour Headquarters on first and third
Saturdays of month at 7.30 p.m.
Barbers' International Union, Journeymen, Local
No. 120—President, W. F. Dawe, 562 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver; Secretary, C. E. Her-
rett, Room 304, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Room 3, 529 Beatty Street, on second
and fourth Tuesdays in month at 8 p.m.
Beverage Dispensers' Union, No. 676—President,
W. J. Gahrn, 535 Homer Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, T. J. Hanafin, Room 1, 535 Homer
Street, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on second and fourth Fridays and last
Sunday of month at 10 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 151—President, W. J. Bartlett, 1156 Howe Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, A. Arman, 2048 Second
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters at 8 p.m. on fourth Friday of
each month.
Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders' Union of
Canada, Local No. 1—President, J. Melville,
North Vancouver; Secretary, Thos. McLaughlin, 1365, No. 3, Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West on
the second and fourth Fridays of each month at
8.30 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No. 194^—President, Chas. McMillan, 1020 Hornby Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, A. Fraser, 5079 Ross
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street
at 8 p.m. on first and third Mondays.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 105—President, Mrs. Anna Harvey, 4487
Quebec Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Thomas
Carroll, 842 Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Business Women's Club, 603 Hastings
Street West, on second Tuesday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Bricklayers, Masons' International Union of
America, Local No. 1, B.C.—President, John C.
Greenwood, 3877 Eleventh Avenue West, Vancouver ; Secretary, Wm. S. Dagnall, 1442
Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at
Labour Headquarters on second and fourth
Wednesdays in month at 8 p.m.
Bridge & Structural Iron Workers, International
Association of, Local No. 97—Secretary, Paul
Lauret, Labour Headquarters, Vancouver.
Meets at 311 Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m.
each Tuesday.
Bridge, Structural, Ornamental, Reinforced Ironworkers, Pile Drivers & Riggers, Local No. 1—
President, A. Andrew, 910 Twenty-first Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, W. S. McKenzie,
647 Windermere Street. Meets at 8 p.m. every
Thursday in Room 30, 163 Hastings Street
West, Vancouver.
Camp and Mill Workers, No. 31—Secretary, K.
Tsuyuki, 544 Powell Street, Vancouver. Meets
every second Wednesday at 544 Powell Street
East at 8 p.m. REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 77
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 15—Secretary, E. Hill, 1916
Sixty-third Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 535 Homer Street on first Tuesday of each
month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated, Branch No.
1—President, H. S. T. Rayner, 732 Sixtieth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Mc-
Kinley, 817 Fiftieth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets at 163 Hastings Street West at 8 p.m.
on second and fourth Tuesdays of each month.
Carpenters of Canada, Amalgamated (Shipyard),
Branch No. 2—President, Albert E. Arnold,
209 Twenty-fifth Street West, North Vancouver ; Secretary, Wm. Bray, 72 Sixteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at Flack Building,
163 Hastings Street West, on first and third
Tuesdays of month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 452—President, Wm. Page, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver; Secretary, R. W.
Hatley, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets
at 529 Beatty Street at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Mondays in month.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of
(Floorlayers), No. 1875-—-President, Oscar
Soderman, 4010 Burns Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, John McDonald, 2905 Twelfth
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters, Vancouver, on first and third
Thursdays at 8 p.m.
City Hall Employees' Association, No. 59—President, E. Mitten, 843 Thirteenth Avenue East,
Vancouver; Secretary, J. Tarbuck, 3517
Twenty-fifth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets
at 431 Main Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on
first Wednesday of each month.
Electrical Trades Union, Canadian—President, H.
Laurie, 2243 Tenth Avenue, Vancouver; Secretary, Eric B. Finn, 3391 Thirty-fourth Avenue
West, Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street
West on first and third Thursdays at 8 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 213—Secretary and Business Agent,
E. H. Morrison, Room 201, 531 Beatty Street.
Meets at Hall No. 1, Labour Headquarters, 531
Beatty Street, on first and third Mondays at
8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, B.C. Provincial Association of—
Secretary, C. A. Watson, 1624 Eighth Avenue
East, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters, No. 18, International Association
of—President, Neil MacDonald, 1136 McLean
Drive; Financial Secretary, C. A. Watson, 1624
Eighth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 195
Pender Street East alternate first or third
Thursday monthly at 10 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Fire Fighters, Local No. 290—Secretary, Wm.
Thompson, 225 Fifteenth Street West, North
Vancouver. Meets in Fire Hall, Thirteenth
Street East, on first Monday of month at
7.30 p.m.
Glass Blowers' Association, No. 53—Secretary,
R. Cranswick, 4251 Oxford Street, Vancouver.
Meets in Hotel Ivanhoe on first and third
Fridays at 5 p.m.
Granite Cutters' International Association of
America—President, Robert C. Smart, 2684
Trinity Street, Vancouver; Secretary, Wm.
Morrice, 2228 Kitchener Street, Vancouver.
Meets on third Friday of month at O'Brien
Hall, Hastings Street, at 7.30 p.m.
Hod Carriers & Builders' Labourers, International, Local No. 602—President, Glen Harding, 1110 Denman Street; Secretary, F. Tait,
372 Forty-fifth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, on first Friday
of each month at 8 p.m.
Hotel & Restaurant Employees & International
Alliance and Bartenders' International League
of America, No. 28 (Cooks and Waiters) —
President, Flo Allen, No. 39, 413 Granville
Street, Vancouver; Secretary and Business
Agent, Harry Wood, 37-39 Williams Building,
413 Granville Street. Meets at 37-39 Williams
Building, 413 Granville Street, on second and
last Mondays of each month at 3 p.m. and
9 p.m.
Jewellery Workers' International Union, Local
No. 42—President, W. T. Cran, 5568 Bruce
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, E. G. Howells,
3107 Thirty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Meets at 529 Beatty Street on first Thursday
in month at 8 p.m.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Kamloops
Division, No. 320—President, G. P. Boston,
1763 Third' Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, S. H. Stingley, 523 Burrard Street, Vancouver. Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on second and
fourth Tuesdays in month at 2 p.m.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Local No.
656—President, T. McEwan, 350 Fourteenth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, S. H.
Waterhouse, 3438 Pandora Street. Meets at
I.O.O.F. Hall on first Thursday of each month
at 8 p.m.
Lumber Handlers' Association (Independent) —
President, M. McGrath, 696 Powell Street, Vancouver ; Business Agent, Jas. Greer, 696 Powell
Street, Vancouver. Meets on second Thursday
of the month at 8 p.m. at 696 Powell Street.
Machinists, International Association of, Local
No. 692—Secretary, Percy R. Bengough, Labour
Headquarters, Vancouver. Meets at 531 Beatty
Street at 8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays.
Mailers Union, No. 70—President, A. R. C.
Holmes, 6439 Cypress Street, Vancouver; Secretary, H. E. E. Fader, 2718 Oxford Street,
Vancouver. Meets in Labour Headquarters on
first Tuesday of each month at 5.45 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, No. 31—President, J. Firkins, Spences Bridge; Secretary, R.
McClure, 4269 Victoria Drive, Vancouver.
Meets at Vancouver and Kamloops alternately.
Day of meeting first Sunday in every second
month at 1 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
1734—President, E. S. Collins, 815 Kent Street,
Sapperton; Secretary, John Roscow, 14 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at
Eagle Hall at 10.30 a.m. on last Sunday in
month.
Marine Engineers, National Association of, No. 7
—President, Fred Slater, 4604 Walden Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, E. Read, 319 Pender
Street West, Vancouver. Meets at 319 Pender
Street West on second and fourth Fridays at
8 p.m.
Milk Wagon Drivers & Dairy Employees, Local
No. 464—President, James Mitchell, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, B. Showier, 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Fridays in month.
Millwrights' Union, No. 1638—Recording Secretary, J. Murray-Ure, 3007 Thirty-eighth Avenue
West. Meets on second and fourth Wednesdays
in Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m.
Moulders of North America, International Union
of, Local No. 281—President, John Browne, 638
Broadway West, Vancouver; Secretary, D. B.
McCormack, 669 Graham Avenue, New Westminster. Meets at Labour Headquarters, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on first and third Fridays
in month.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Union), Local No. 145—■
President, J. Bowyer, 2704 Fourth Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, W. Couling, 2724
Adanae Street, Vancouver. Meets at G.AV.V.A.
Auditorium, 856 Seymour Street, Vancouver, at
10 a.m. on second Sunday in month.
Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers of America,
Local No. 138—Secretary, Ed. Smith, 543 Sixteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Thursdays in each month.
Pattern Makers' Union of British Columbia—■
President, Harry Mackay, 6952 Knight Road,
Vancouver; Secretary, Albert Hooper, 3336
Fraser Avenue, Vancouver. Meets at 163 Hastings Street West on first Friday of every month
at 8 p.m.
Photo Engravers' Union of North America, Local
No. 54—President, P. J. Rutherford, 754
Twenty-second Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, W. Pumfrey, 3835 Twenty-sixth Avenue
AVest, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver, at 7.30
p.m. on first AVednesday in month.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, Wharf & Dock Builders,
Local No. 2404—President, Sid Grey, Box 320,
Vancouver; Secretary, S. O'Conner, Box 320,
A'ancouver; Financial Secretary, J. Thompson,
Box 320, Vancouver. Meets at 122 Hastings
Street AVest at 8 p.m. each Friday.
Plasterers & Cement Finishers, International
Association of the United States and Canada,
Local No. 89—President, Frank S. Walsh, 378
Thirty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, Alfred Hurry, 1115 Thirty-third Avenue
East, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street
at 8 p.m. on first and third Wednesdays in
month.
Plumbers & Steam Fitters of the United States
and Canada, United Association of, Local No.
170—President, Val Person, 787 Fifty-second
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary and Business Agent, AA'm. Watt, Room 307, Labour
Headquarters. Meets at 529 Beatty Street at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Fridays.
Policemen's Union, Local No. 12—President, Andrew Campbell, 2248 Triumph Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, AV. J. Bridgman, 3656 Fourteenth Street AVest, Arancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street at 7.30 p.m. on AVednesdays in
month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 69—President, W. W. Quigley, 2047 Second Avenue West,
Arancouver; Secretary, Thos. S. Ezart, 1603
Fortieth Avenue East, South Arancouver. Meets
at Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m. on second
Tuesday in month.
Projectionists' Society, B.C., Local No. 348—
Business Agent, J. R. Foster, 3050 Oak Street,
Vancouver; Secretary, John C. Richards, Suite
34 Manhattan Apartments, Arancouver. Meets
in Labour Headquarters at 10 a.m. on the first
Thursday in every month.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood, Vancouver Division, No. 189—President, G. Johnson, Mount Lehman; Secretary, F. Kent, 2503
Hersham Street, New Westminster. Meets at
Canadian Legion Hall, New AVestrninster, on
first Sunday every third month at 12 noon.
Railroad Employees, Canadian Brotherhood of,
Local Division, No. 82—President, J. B. Morrison, Box 413, Edmonton; Secretary, T. M.
Sullivan, 2715 Dundas Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Ivanhoe Hotel, no set date.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 144—
President, H. R. McConachie, 851 Bidwell
Street, Vancouver; Secretary, R. T. Houghton,
, 3825 Lanark Street, Vancouver. Meets at Odd
Fellows' Hall, corner Hamilton and Pender
Streets, on first Tuesday and third Sunday in
month at 2.30 and 7.30 p.m.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, Division No. 267—President, J. AV. Shoop, 1146
Broughton, Vancouver; Secretary, J. B.
Physick, 1156 Thurlow Street, Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday at
2 p.m.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association—President,
F. AV. Hitchcock, 3403 Twenty-seventh Avenue
East, Arancouver; Secretary, S. C. Bate, 3025
Second Avenue West, Arancouver. Meets in
Post Office Building, Vancouver, at 2.30 p.m.
on last Tuesday of month.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
No. 630—President, J. Brodie, 1434 Eighth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, W. J.
Mason, 3116 Thirteenth Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at Moose Hall, Burrard Street,
on second Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Railway & Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers,
Express & Station Employees, Brotherhood of,
Local 46—Secretary, F. H. Fallows, 1504 St.
Andrews Street, North Vancouver. Meets in
I.O.O.F. Hall, Arancouver, on fourth Friday at
8 p.m.
Retail Employees' Association No. 1 (Independent), Vancouver—President, Sidney J. Blight,
481 Forty-fourth Avenue East, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. J. Huckvale, 774 Sixteenth Street
East, North Vancouver. Meets at Piccadilly
Tea Rooms, 581 Granville Street, on first
Thursday in month at 6.15 p.m.
Sheet Metal Workers, Local No. 280—President,
James Strachan, 2205 Eleventh Avenue West,
Vancouver; Secretary, Daniel Macpherson, No.
. 308, 329 Beatty Street, Vancouver. Meets at
Room 3, 529 Beatty Street, at 8 p.m. on second
and fourth Thursdays.
Sheet Metal Workers (Railroad), No. 314—President, H. H. Swinden, 2265 Fourteenth Avenue
West, Vancouver; Secretary, Geo. AATatson,
1909 Nineteenth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets on second Friday of each month at
Labour Headquarters, 529 Beatty Street, at
8 p.m.
Sign and Pictorial Painters, Local Union 726—
Vancouver and A'icinity—President, Norman
Glazier, 3616  Jersey Avenue,  New AVestmin- REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER, 1930.
E 79
ster; Secretary, Wm. O. Clarkson, 1823
Kitchener Street, Vancouver. Meets in Room
315 Labour Temple, ATancouver, on first and
third Thursdays of each month at 8 p.m.
Steam Engineers, Sawyers, Filers & Mill Mechanics of B.C., Canadian Society of Certified
—President, J. AArilliams, 1788 Sixth Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, Alex. Williamson,
Wadsly P.O., AVest Arancouver. Meets on
second and fourth Mondays in month at 163
Hastings Street AVest at 8 p.m.
Steam & Operating Engineers, International
Union of, Local No. 844—President, Frank L.
Hunt, 954 Fourteenth Avenue West, Vancouver; Secretary, Geo. E. Jones, 4030 Trinity
Street, Arancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters at 8 p.m. every Friday.
Stereotypers & Electrotypers, International Union
of, Local No. 88—President, W. Hayter, 342
King Edward Avenue, Vancouver; Secretary,
J. McKinnon, 3635 Fourteenth Avenue West*
Vancouver. Meets at Labour Temple at 7 p.m.
on second Monday in month.
Stone-cutters, Association of North America-
President, John Downie, Cobolt Hotel, Vancouver ; Secretary, Joseph Barlow, Cobolt
Hotel, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on second and fourth Mondays in
month at 8 p.m.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101
—President, Jos. E. Smith, 1773 Thirty-sixth
Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, J. Price,
2533 Twenty-fifth Avenue East, Vancouver.
Meets at K. of P. Hall, Eighth Avenue and
Scotia Street, Arancouver, at 10.15 a.m. on first
Monday and 7 p.m. on third Monday.
Submarine Divers & Tenders Union of Canada,
Western Division—President, H. E. Ryan, 162
Fifth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, R.
Kipling, 2022 Granville Street, Vancouver..
Meets in Flack Block, Hastings Street AVest,
on the first and third Fridays at 8 p.m.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No.
Ill—President, AV. J. Ingles, 2048 Eighth
Avenue West, Arancouver; Secretary, A. S.
Crosson, 3925 Fourteenth Avenue AVest, Vancouver. Meets at Labour Headquarters on first
Sunday in month.
Tailors' Union of America, Journeymen, Local
No. 178—President, Colin McDonald, 2834 St.
George Street, Vancouver; Secretary, W. W.
Hacken, 1582 Thirteenth Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Taxi, Stage & Bus Drivers, Local No. 151—President, Wm. AVilson, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, Birt Showier, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty Street
on second Monday at 10.30 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen & Helpers, No.
466, International Brotherhood of—President,
E. Goodrich, 529 Beatty Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, Birt Showier, Room 308, Labour
Headquarters, Vancouver. Meets at Labour
Headquarters on first and third Mondays at
8 p.m.
Theatrical Arts and Crafts Canadian Society,
Local No. 1—President, L. K. Wortley, 33
South Boundary Road, Vancouver; Secretary,
H. E. McKenzie, 2650 Main Street, Vancouver.
Meets at Flack Building, Vancouver, at 1.30
p.m. on second Sunday of each month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
220—President, C. S. Campbell, 529 Beatty
Street, Vancouver ; Secretary, R. H. Neelands,
529 Beatty Street, \Tancouver. Meets at 529
Beatty Street, Arancouver, at 2 p.m. on last
Sunday in month.
Upholsterers' International Union, No. 26—
President, C. B. Thompson, 833 Eighth Avenue
East, Vancouver; Secretary, F. Slatford, 2815
Yale Street, Vancouver. Meets at 529 Beatty
Street, Arancouver, on second and fourth Tuesdays in month at 8 p.m.
Waterfront Freight Handlers' Association—President, C. Maigne, 233 Main Street, Vancouver;
Secretary, A. T. Moore, 233 Main Street, Vancouver. Meets in rear of 233 Main Street, Vancouver, on first and third AVednesdays in month
at 8 p.m.
Waterfront Workers' Association, Vancouver and
District (Independent)—President, Charles
Law, 2534 Yale Street, Vancouver; Secretary,
Allan L. Walker, 1902 Sixth Avenue AVest,
Vancouver. Meets at 132 Dunlevy Avenue on
second Friday of every month at 8 p.m.
Association Welders, Federal Labour Union, No.
19—President, J. AATilson, 186 Twentieth Avenue East, Vancouver; Secretary, M. J. Warren,
462 Forty-third Avenue East, Vancouver. Meets
at 531 Beatty Street, Vancouver," every fourth
Friday at 8 p.m.
Vernon.
Typographical Union, No. 541—President, H. G.
Bartholomew, Arernon; Secretary, AV. B. Hil-
liard, R.R. No. 1, Enderby. Meets in Arernon
at call of Chair.
Victoria.
Barbers, Journeymen, International Union of,
Local No. 372—President, G. A. Turner, 616
Avalon Road, Victoria; Secretary, Jas. A.
Green, 1319 Douglas Street, Victoria. Meets at
A.O.F. Hall on fourth Monday in month at
8 p.m.
Boilermakers, Iron Shipbuilders & Helpers of
America, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 191—President, L. Basso, 635 John Street,
Arictoria ; Secretary, P. W. Wilson, 1837 Crescent Road, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 147—President, W. W. Laing, 125 Linden
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, J. A. AViley, 141
Clarence Street, Victoria. Meets at 203 Union
Building, Victoria, at 8 p.m. on fourth Friday
in month.
Bricklayers, Masons & Plasterers of America,
International Union of, Local No. 2—President,
E. W. Mertton, 1039 Hillside Avenue, Victoria;
Secretary, J. H. Owen, 541 Toronto Street,
Victoria. Meets at 8 p.m. on second Monday
in month at Labour Hall, Courtney Street,
Victoria.
Canadian Pacific Express Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 20—President, T. C. Johns, South
Turner Street; Secretary, F. E. Dutot, 1546
Bank Street, Victoria. Meets at Canadian
Pacific Railway Building, 1104 Government
Street, on first Monday in month at 8 p.m.
Carpenters & Joiners, United Brotherhood of,
Local No. 1598—President, F. Sellars, Chapman Street, Victoria; Recording Secretary, P. E 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR.
Packford, Kings Road, Victoria. Meets at
Labour Temple at 7.30 p.m. on first and third
Mondays in month.
Civic Employees, Local No. 50—President, Norman R. Kennedy, 3033 Cedar Hill Road, Victoria ; Secretary, W. E. Farmer, 2948 Scott
Street, Victoria. Meets at Main Fire Hall,
Cormorant Street, at 8 p.m. on second AVednes-
day in month.
Cooks, Waiters & AVaitresses, Local No. 459—
President, Charles Richardson, Box 233, Victoria ; Secretary, F. Dovey, Box 233, Victoria.
Meets at A.O.F. Hall, 750 Cormorant Street,
Victoria, on first and third Tuesdays in month
at 3.30 p.m. and 8.30 p.m.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 230—President, R. D. Lemmax, 1331
Pembroke Sti-eet, Victoria; Secretary, AV. Reid,
2736 Asquith Street, Victoria. Meets at Labour
Hall, Courtney Street, at 8 p.m. on first and
third Tuesdays of month.
Firefighters, City Union No. 258—President, J.
Bayliss, No. 1 Fire Hall, Victoria; Secretary,
T. A. Heaslip, No. 1 Fire Hall, Victoria. Meets
at Headquarters Fire Hall, Cormorant Street,
at 8 p.m. on or about first of each month.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, No. 11
—President, P. H. Walker, 743 Selkirk Avenue, Arictoria ; Secretary, Arch. Blackmore, 521
Langford  Street, Arictoria.
Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen, Brotherhood
of, Local No. 690—President, E. W. Collins.
636 Raynor Street, Victoria; Secretary, Alfred
T. Thomsett, 1025 Southgate Street, Victoria.
Meets at A.O.F. Hall, Cormorant Street, on
first Wednesday and third Thursday in month
at 7.30 p.m.
Machinists, Local No. 456-—President, A. Wallace, 44 Lewis Street, Victoria ; Secretary, C. B.
Lester, 3226 Oak Street, Saanich. Meets at
City Temple, North Park Street, on fourth
Thursday in month at 8 p.m.
Maintenance-of-way Employees & Railway Shop
Labourers, United Brotherhood of, Local No.
2S24—President, W. A. AVright, 601 Kelvin
Road, Victoria; Secretary, G. E. AVilkenson, 50
Sims Avenue, Arictoria. Meets at Point Ellice
Station, C.N. Railway, on third Sunday of
March, June, September, and December at
2 p.m.
Musicians, American Federation of (Musicians'
Mutual Protective Association), Local No. 247
—President, A. Prescott, 714 Queens Avenue,
Victoria; Secretary, F. V. Horman, 418
Helmcken Street, Aletoria. Meets at Labour
Hall on second Sunday in each month at 2
p.m. in winter and 10.30 a.m. in summer.
Painters, Decorators & Paper-hangers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1119—President, J. H. Holland, 716 Vancouver  Street,  Victoria;   Secre
tary, P. AV. Smith, 1994 Leighton Road, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall, Courtney Street,
on second and fourth AVednesdays in month at
8 p.m.
Pile Drivers, Bridge, AVharf & Dock Builders,
No. 2415—President, J. D. Murray, 318 Irving
Road, Victoria; Secretary, P. Packford, P.O.
Box 1027, Victoria. Meets at Labour Hall at
8 p.m. on second and fourth Tuesdays of each
month.
Policemen's Federal Union, Local No. 24:—President, B. Acreman, 1376 Begbie Street, Victoria ; Secretary, Claude Belcher, 3231 Rutledge
Street, Victoria. Meets at Police Headquarters
at 2.30 p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Printing Pressmen & Assistants, International
Union of North America, Local No. 79—President, Thomas Nute, 534 Michigan Street, Victoria ; Secretary, F. H. Larssen, 1236 McKenzie
Street, Arictoria. Meets at the Amphion Hall
at 8 p.m. on second Monday in month.
Railway Carmen of America, Victoria Lodge No.
50—President, J. Stephenson, 1617 Burton
Avenue, Victoria; Secretary-Treasurer, H.
Greaves, 638 Victoria Avenue, Oak Bay.
Railway Conductors, No. 289—Chief Conductor,
J. N. Thompson, 556 Raynor Avenue, Victoria ;
Secretary, J. Martin, 2109 Vancouver Street,
Arictoria. Meets at Duncan, B.C., on third
Sunday in each month at 11 o'clock.
Retail Clerks' International Protective Association, Local No. 604—Victoria & District—
President, J. Talbot, 1737 Bank Street, Victoria ; Secretary, H. H. Hollins, 1318 Broad
Street, Victoria. Meets at Trades Hall, Broad
Street, at 8 p.m. on second Tuesday in month.
Sheet Metal AATorkers, International Association,
Local No. 134—President, J. Jones, Cadboro
Bay P.O.; Corresponding Secretary, T. Brooke,
1543 Morley Street, Arictoria. Meets at Temple
Hall, 842 North Park Street, at 8 p.m. on first
Thursday in month.
Street & Electric Railway Employees of America,
Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 109
—President, James P. Torrance, 2510 Blackwood Avenue, Victoria; Secretary, W. Turner,
2169 Fair Street, Victoria. Meets at corner of
Broad and Yates Streets at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
on second Tuesday in month.
Typographical Union, International, Local No.
201—President, A. AV. Stokes, 336 Arnold
Street, Victoria; Secretary, Ernest Shaw, Box
1183, Victoria. Meets at Unity Centre Hall,
739 Yates Street, Arictoria, at 2 p.m. on last
Sunday in month.
Wood, Wire & Metal Lathers, No. 332, Vancouver
Island—Secretary, J. B. White, Doncaster
Drive, Mount Tolmie P.O. Meets in Veterans'
of France Hall, Douglas Street, on first and
third Fridays of each month at 8 p.m.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Charles f. Banfield, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1931.
2,825-631-5419

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