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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN FOR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1929

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
REPORT
OF   THE
PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN
FOR   THE   YEAR   ENDED
DECEMBER 3 1st, 1927
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Charles F. Banfield, Printer to tbe King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1928.  To His Honour Robert Randolph Bruce,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game Warden for
the year ended December 31st, 1927.
A. M. MANSON,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., 1928. Office of the Provincial Game AVarden,
Victoria, B.C., January 31st, 1928.
Honourable A. M. Manson, K.C., M.P.P.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith my Report as Provincial Game Warden for the
year ended December 31st, 1927.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. McMULLIN,
Provincial Game Warden. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.
GENERAL SUPERVISION.
The Province is divided into five territorial divisions for administrative purposes and the
accompanying reports submitted by the Inspectors commanding these divisions are a careful and
full presentation of game conditions in British Columbia during the year 1927.
The system of game-laws enforcement now in operation in the Province is, I have pleasure
in stating, meeting with the apparent hearty approval and co-operation of all interested game-
conservation bodies and the sportsmen in general. It will be noted, on referring to the statement
of prosecutions, that an increase is shown in the number of cases over any previous year, and
in this connection I wish to point out that this has been due mainly to two causes—namely,
increase in the number of hunters and extension of game supervision in every district in the
Province.
TRAP-LINE REGISTRATION.
During the year steps have been taken to finally complete arrangements for the registration
of trap-lines. The policy adopted in connection with the registration regulations has been to
proceed very carefully and slowly, but as quickly as possible, with the recording of trap-lines,
and to give all trappers an opportunity of recording their lines and also to settle any disputes
before issuing registration certificates. It is hoped that, in most of the districts in the Province
affected by the registration regulations, certificates will have been Issued before the opening of
the fall trapping season in 1928.
PUR-FARMING.
A considerable increase in the number of fur-farms in operation in the Province took place
during the year 1927, as will be noted in the statement covering the returns of licensed fur-
farmers on page 53.
It has been the practice to provide prospective fur-farmers with all available literature on
fur-farming and to assist this industry to the fullest extent.
I may say that I am considering at the present time the matter of securing and having
data printed relative to the farming of every kind of fur-bearing animal with a view of supplying this literature to every person desiring information on fur-farming.
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS.
Calendar
Year.
Informations
laid.
Convictions.
Cases
dismissed.
Firearms
confiscated.
Fines
imposed.
Revenue derived
from Sale of
Game Licences
and Fees.
Revenue
derived from
Fur Trade.
1917	
Ill
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
97
167
'242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
10
13
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
$1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
■5,676.50
4,768.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480J50
$65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.'50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
-51,093.89
1923	
60,594.18
1924	
56,356.68
1925	
56,287.78
1926	
1927	
62,535.13
71,324.96
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
The wild animal and bird life of the Province has received the maximum of protection
during the year 1927, due to the splendid work of all members of the Force and the co-operation
received from the Game Conservation Board and the sportsmen of British Columbia, and I wish to
express my thanks for the hearty support furnished by the above. J 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"A" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER ISLAND).
By Inspector T. W. S. Parsons, Officer Commanding.
For your information I beg to submit my divisional game report for the year 1927.
" A " Division, British Columbia Provincial Police, comprises the whole of Vancouver Island
and that coastal portion of the mainland of the Province lying between the 50th and 51st degrees
of latitude.
For administrative purposes this important territory is subdivided into three game districts
respectively commanded by Sergeant Robert Owens, Victoria; Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson,
Nanaimo ; and Corporal R. Matthews, Courtenay, in whom, as their reports show, the Department
possesses tried officers of skill and ability.
In my division Game Constables and Police Constables are working harmoniously and every
attention is being given to the conservation of the game. As evidence of the co-operation between
the Game and Police Branches of the Force, I might point out the increase in the number of
prosecutions launched :   1923, 90;   1924, 92 ;   1925, 72;   1926, 121;   1927, 128.
In respectfully drawing your attention to the reports submitted below, with the suggestions
therein contained, I would also, on behalf of " A " Division, express my thanks to the Chief Game
Inspector, Major M. Furber, to Staff-Sergeant F. R. Butler, and to the Headquarters Game Staff
for their invariable courtesy and unfailing assistance.
VICTORIA DISTRICT   (SOUTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report of Sergeant Robert Owens, N.C.O. i/o.
Game Animals.
Bear.—These animals are reported as being very plentiful. Complaints of black bear being
sighted close to settlements and causing annoyance have been received. Very few sportsmen
follow the hunting of bear in the district.
Deer.—Deer throughout the whole of the district have been reported as very plentiful. Does
and fawns have been numerous, especially in the Duncan and Lake Cowichan areas. During
the last open season hunters found it comparatively easy to bag some fine buck deer. As previously recommended, I am still of the opinion that the season on buck deer should be advanced
two weeks after the usual opening date, and that the season should terminate on November 30th
instead of December 15th as in the past, as during the latter part of the " rutting " season buck
deer are not in good condition.
I would suggest a short open season on does, as from reports they are quite numerous.
Wapiti (Elk).—During the year elk on the Shaw Creek Game Reserve have been steadily
increasing and have spread at a gratifying rate along the western end of Cowichan Lake.
Bands of elk sighted have been reported as being in excellent condition. Elk have also, I am
informed, been seen in the Jordan River area.
Carcasses of elk have been found by Constable Simpson on his patrols, but such casualties
have no doubt been due to natural enemies.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Good reports have been received as to the increase of beaver in parts of Cowichan
Lake District, but very few reports have come to hand as to increase of these animals in other
parts of my district. If a close season is maintained and adequate protection given beaver there
is no doubt they will increase in numbers.
Marten.—Favourable reports of this animal received from Lake Cowichan District, but
according to trappers they are very scarce in other parts of my district.
Mink.—During the year a small catch was taken and it would appear that these animals
are scarce.
Muskrats.—Muskrats are steadily increasing and enlarging their range around Somenos Lake
and Robertson River.    The swampy portions of Somenos Lake make ideal breeding-grounds.
Otter.—Very few otter have been caught in the district and are scarce.
Racoon.—Racoon are numerous throughout the district and as a result complaints have been
received as to depredations amongst domestic birds.
Weasel.—Very plentiful in various parts of the district. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 7
Game Birds.
Grouse (Blue and Willow).—A fairly good season on blue grouse was the case during the
year 1927, but these birds cannot be considered as being plentiful. Willow-grouse are increasing
and very strong coveys were observed during the breeding season.
Pheasants.—These birds are fairly plentiful throughout the district, but their increase
was retarded to a certain extent owing to depredations by big-horned owls. A short open season
on hen birds in the Duncan area, it is felt, would do no harm.
Partridge.—A number of partridge are to be found in the North Saanich and Oak Bay
Districts, but these birds cannot be considered as being plentiful.
Quail.—Quail have been very numerous and large coveys of these birds were observed during
the breeding season. Very few large bags of quail were taken during the open season. Bob-
white quail, liberated in the district a few years ago, appear to have entirely disappeared.
Migratory' Game Birds.
Ducks.—This year an increase of these birds was noted throughout the district. Mallard
ducks appeared to be very plentiful.
Geese and Brant.—These birds have been very scarce in the Victoria District.
Snipe.—Quite a number of snipe were to be found in various parts of the district, principally
in the Sooke area.
Game Reserves.
During the year conditions within the boundaries of game reserves in my district, particularly the Shaw Creek and Elk Lake Reserves, have been very favourable.
Fur-farming.
There are several well-stocked fur-farms in the district and some success has been the case in
regard to the larger farms. During the year 1927 a decrease in the number of applications for
fur-farming permits was noted.
Fur Trade.
As most of the fur trapped in the Victoria District is shipped to markets on the Mainland
and exported to Eastern Canada or to the United States, very little information can be furnished
in regard to this industry, but it is felt that the fur-catch has been as good as in past years.
Special Patrols.
Patrols have been made into remote parts of the district and general and continual patrols
have been made throughout the year. In the Cowichan Lake District more extensive patrols are
now required owing to the increased number of logging camps and settlements.
Vermin.
Cougar.—A decided decrease in the number of cougar in my district has been noted. The
predatory-animal hunters employed by the Department have accounted for a good number of
these animals in the Goldstream, Metchosin, and Sooke Districts.
Cats (Domestic).—As usual these animals have been responsible for the destruction of a
large number of young birds. A recent amendment to the " Game Act " assisted steps taken
throughout the year in decreasing the number of cats running wild in bird-nesting areas.
Wolves.—Reports have been received of tracks of wolves being seen in the Lake Cowichan
area.
Owls.—Big-horned owls again put in an appearance this year and Game Constables have
been extremely busy in trying to cut down the number of these" birds. I am of the opinion that
a small bounty should be placed on these owls.
Game-protection.
The game reserves in the district have afforded good protection to the game. Our Game
Constables have continually patrolled these reserves during the year. An increase has been noted
in the number of game-law violators charged during the year. J 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Propagation.
The past season has been an excellent one and I am sure that sportsmen will have good
hunting during the next season. The large number of pheasants liberated from the Elk Lake
Game Farm has to a great extent increased the number of this class of sporting bird in the
district.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The regulations covering the registration of trap-lines on Vancouver Island affect only a
small portion of my district. The work in connection with the registration of trap-lines and
guides comes more directly under the Headquarters Game Branch.
Hunting Accidents.
There were eight hunting accidents in the district during the year 1927. One hunter died
as the result of his wound, another lost his arm, while the remainder were of a minor nature.
Arising from one of these accidents, a prosecution was instituted, and although the accused was
found " not guilty," still I think that the publicity attached to the case will tend to have a
salutary effect on careless hunters in the future.
Summary.
In conclusion, I might add that game conditions on the whole have been generally good
throughout the district. The present system of game-protection appears to be quite satisfactory.
The usual annual and regular complaints were immediately inquired into as soon as received.
The many duties entailed through various phases of game-work have at times been vary arduous,
but the efficient manner in which the Game Constables have performed these duties and the
co-operation furnished by the Police Branch has indeed been very noteworthy.
NANAIMO DISTRICT  (CENTRAL VANCOUVER ISLAND).
Report op Staff-Sergeant A. T. Stephenson, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Game animals are still increasing in number in this district. Deer have been much more
plentiful than last year and these animals were also in good condition, except at the latter end
of the season.   Black bear are also plentiful.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver are still on the increase, except in the Alberni area, where they are scarce. There
has been a noticeable increase in racoon during the last year.
Game Birds.
The past season was not a very good one in this district. Pheasants are still very scarce
and there were very few good bags reported taken in the district. Quail, however, are very much
on the increase in spite of a hard winter.
Migratory Game Birds.
Neither geese nor ducks were plentiful in this district during the past season. The geese
have generally migrated south before the season opens.   Brant were plentiful but few were shot.
Vermin.
Ten cougar and one timber-wolf were killed in the Nanaimo area and seventeen cougar
taken in the Alberni area during the year ended December 31st, 1927. Crows are still numerous,
but it is not recommended that a bounty be placed on these birds as the results last season, when
a bounty was in effect, were not satisfactory. The bounty on crows has usually been paid
during the hatching season for game birds, with the result that it is possible for unscrupulous
persons, who are supposed to be shooting crows, to take advantage of this privilege by killing
game birds. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 9
Game-protection.
Constable H. C. Pyke has secured a large number of convictions during the year 1927, two
•of them being for having embryo of a member of the deer family in possession, and these convictions resulted in fines of $250 and $300 and costs. Constable Monks has also been doing
good work in the Alberni area, and these two officers' efforts have undoubtedly resulted in
violations of the game laws being kept down to a minimum. These officers' duties call for many
■strenuous efforts, long hours, and the exercise of much tact and discretion. Their work merits
the highest commendation.
Propagation.
Deer, elk, beaver, blue grouse, and quail appear to be making progress in the propagation of
their species. Pheasants, however, do not appear to be increasing as they should, and I would
respectfully suggest that a number of pheasants be forwarded to Nanaimo District Headquarters,
to be distributed by Constable Pyke at such points in the district as this officer may deem best.
Game Reserves.
There is no game reserve in the district at the present time, with the exception of that
-portion of Nanaimo Harbour closed for shooting under the provisions of the game regulations.
Fur Trade.
There is, as yet, no established fur trade in the Nanaimo District, notwithstanding the fact
that there are numerous holders of trappers' licences and several fur-farms are operating under
-permit.
Fur-farming.
There is no definite progress to report as yet in connection with fur-farms, although there
;are several farms in this district.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
At the present time the regulations covering the registration of trap-lines and guides are
not in effect in this district.
Special Patrols.
There have been no special patrols during the last twelve months, but the district has been
continually patrolled by Constables Pyke and Monks and the Police Branch has assisted generally in the enforcement of the " Game Act" and regulations thereunder.
Recommendations.
It is recommended that a shorter open season' on all upland game birds be declared. I am
of the opinion that the season should be shortened by two weeks.
The deer season should be shortened by two weeks—namely, that it shall be closed on
November 30th in each year—as the animals are breeding from December 1st and deer are very
often killed after this date that are in very poor condition and entirely unfit for food.
It is recommended that section 8, subsection (2), of the "Game Act" be amended so that
it shall be unlawful for any person or firm to import into the Province from any other country
or Province an embryo taken from any member of the deer family without first having obtained
a permit therefor from the Provincial Game Warden. I am of the opinion also that it be made
unlawful to hunt fur-bearing animals with dogs.
I would suggest that the tag system be adopted for deer, as such a system would assist
materially in enforcing the bag limit.
Hunting Accidents.
There were no hunting accidents in the district during the year 1927.
Remarks.
I would again take this opportunity of referring to the splendid work performed by Constables Pyke and Monks in their capacity as Game Wardens for the Nanaimo and Alberni areas
respectively. J 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
COURTENAY DISTRICT  (NORTHERN VANCOUVER ISLAND AND A PORTION
OF THE MAINLAND COAST).
Report of Corporal R. Matthews, N.C.O. i/c.
Game Animals.
Bear.—Black bear are on the increase throughout this district; at Oyster River last summer
these animals were alleged to be killing sheep and it was decided to employ a specially trained
hunter to rid the district of these sheep-killers. Last fall many black bear were killed in this
area. I believe this was due to the fact that black bear can now be taken under an ordinary
firearms licence. There are no grizzly bear on Vancouver Island, but these animals are in good
numbers around Knight Inlet and Wakeman Sound.
Deer.—Deer are plentiful all over the district and are on the increase and have been
increasing in numbers since the " buck " law was put into effect. During the year 1926 a number
of deer in this district died from some disease of the liver, but this condition was not noticed
during the past year. I still recommend that the deer season be closed by December 1st. The
same conditions are noted each season; that is, a good many of the bucks taken after this date
are not fit for human consumption.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are doing well and are on the increase. One band, estimated
at about seventy, was seen at Buttle Lake during the early summer and other bands have been
reported along the Nimpkish River and Strathcona Park to the west coast. Last year there
was a report that cougar were killing the calves, but I have no definite information at hand to
substantiate this report.
Mountain-goat.—Goat are in good numbers on the Mainland at Wakeman Sound, Kingcome
Inlet, Simoom and Thompson Sounds. Very few hunters visit these areas and the animals are
therefore not molested. I would suggest that mountain-goat be liberated at Strathcona Park,
on Vancouver Island.    This is an ideal location and I am sure the venture would be successful.
FUR-BEARING   ANIMALS.
Beaver.—On the increase and are becoming quite plentiful, especially along the Quinsam
and Nimpkish Rivers and the adjoining areas. I would recommend that an open season be
declared next season.
Fisher.—These animals are scarce.    Very few were taken last season.
Marten.—Through excessive trapping, marten have become very scarce and few trappers,
are running marten-lines.
Mink.—Very scarce south of the Campbell River. North of this river and on the Mainland
the catches have been fair. I believe that once the regulations covering the registration of trap-
lines comes into effect on Vancouver Island, all fur-bearing animals will be given an opportunity
to increase by the trappers. Excessive trapping has all but exterminated mink and other fur-
bearing animals.
Otter.—Land-otter are very scarce, but they can be found in small numbers along most of
the rivers north of Campbell River and on the Mainland. During the summer one colony of
five was seen on the Oyster River and two families were observed on the Courtenay River.
Racoon.—These animals are being seriously depleted, as they are trapped extensively and.
are being hunted with dogs.
Weasel.—Weasel are seldom seen in the district and few trappers in the district trap these
animals.
Wolverine.—Wolverine are fairly plentiful on the Mainland around Wakeman and Seymour
Inlets, Frederick and Salmon Arms, and also in the vicinity of Knight Inlet. In other parts of
the district they are reported as being scarce and are on the decrease.
Game Birds.
Grouse (Willow).—Although not in large numbers, there is a good breeding stock and a
slight increase was noted this fall. Crab-apple swamps on the logged-off lands are now a good
cover and I look for a further increase next season. Very few of these birds were taken during
the last open season owing to wet weather.
Grouse (Blue).—These birds are on the increase and were quite plentiful in this district
just before the open season last fall, but heavy rains drove many of these birds to the hills. A decrease in blue grouse was noticed on Hornby Island and a recommendation is before the
Game Conservation Board to have the season closed on this island next year.
Pheasants.—Pheasants are on the increase and have spread rapidly over the logged-off land
and are as far north as Campbell River. During the past month a number of birds perished in
the snow, but feed was set out and most of the birds were saved.
Quail.—Quail had a good nesting season and there was a noticeable increase. As yet there
are not sufficient birds for an open season. These birds suffered considerably during the cold
weather last month and many of them perished, but there still is a good breeding stock left.
Feed was set out, but all the birds could not be reached and they are helpless in the snow.
Migratory Game Birds.
Geese (Canada, White-fronted, and Snow).—Geese on Vancouver Island are not plentiful,
especially in this district, but Canada geese are reported in good numbers on the Mainland at
Shelter Bay, Knight Inlet, Wakeman and Thompson Sounds. Most of the geese seen in this
district pass over on their way south before the open season comes into effect and I would
suggest that the season on these birds be the same as that provided for ducks.
Brant.—Brant are not plentiful, but are to be found in small flocks off the sandspits between
Comox and Denman Island.
Greater and Lesser Yellow-legs.—These birds are scarce and the close season should be
continued.
Swans (Whistling).—Swans (whistling) are very scarce. Seven of these birds were
reported during the month of December in the Lower Campbell Lake. Shore and surf birds
are numerous all along the coast.
Vermin.
Cougar.—These animals are on the decrease and around seventy were killed in this area
during the year 1927. Cougar are pretty well cleaned out along the coast, but there is a number
back in the hills. Hunters in this district are bringing in good dogs and I believe that in a few
years cougar will be very scarce.
Crows.—Crows are plentiful all along the coast and they do a great deal of damage to
nesting field and song birds. Since the erection of a crow-trap near Courtenay by Game Constable Fenton 377 crows have been captured. These birds were taken during a three-month
period.
Cats (Domestic).—Stray cats are living altogether in the bush and do a great deal of damage
amongst game birds. I understand that the Game Department has cat-traps which have proved
successful and I would recommend that a number be supplied to this district.
Wolves.—Wolves are very scarce and there is no information on hand concerning them.
None of these animals have been reported seen in this area for a number of years, although they
are numerous on the mainland portion of the district.
Game-protection.
During the past year the provisions of the " Game Act" and regulations thereunder have
been vigorously enforced. Game Constable W. V. Fenton has been continually patrolling the
district and has at all times received the co-operation and assistance of Constables on the
Police Branch. Forty prosecutions were conducted under the " Game Act." In thirty-eight
cases convictions were obtained and two cases were dismissed.    Fines totalled $1,105.
Fur Trade.
There are no licensed fur-traders in this district. All trappers ship their fur to outside
markets.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farms are increasing in numbers each season and mink, marten, and muskrats are being
raised successfully. Muskrats are doing well in this district. At the present time there is only
one muskrat-farm in operation in the district, but this has proved such a success that I expect
to see farms on a much larger scale start in the near future. J 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The registration of trap-lines was to take effect this winter on Vancouver Island, but the
regulations were passed too late in the fall for the trappers to register as many of the men
were already on their trap-lines. This system seems to be working satisfactorily on the Mainland, and I believe that once this system gets into operation on Vancouver Island a general
increase in fur-bearing animals will be noted.
Special Patrols.
Special patrols were made into Robson Bight, Loughborough Inlet, Frederick Arm, Mount
Albert Edward, and Buttle Lake. On most of these patrols convictions under the Act were
obtained and much useful information was gathered concerning game in the districts in question.
Hunting Accidents.
Two men were killed in hunting accidents during the past year. In each case the party
responsible was charged with manslaughter and is awaiting trial at the Nanaimo Spring Assizes.
The third and last accident occurred when a shotgun lying on the floor of a boat was accidentally
discharged, blowing off the calf of the owner's leg, which was later amputated.
"B" DIVISION  (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. R. Dunwoody, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit, herewith annual game report for " B " Division for the calendar
year 1927, as requested in your letter of December 22nd, 1927.    In dealing with the various subjects I have conformed to the order in which they are set forth in your letter.
As the variety of game animals differs to quite an extent in the four districts comprising
the Division, I am dealing with each district separately, as I think that for reference purposes
this will be found more satisfactory than if the Division was dealt with as a whole.
Game Animals.
Boundary District.
Bear.—A very great increase is reported, insomuch that bears have become somewhat of
a pest, with consequent damage to crops and stock.
Caribou.—A few reported on the Christina Range in the vicinity of the headwaters of the
Granby River.
Deer.—In very fair numbers throughout, both mule and white-tail. Although there has been
agitation in certain circles for the repeal of the " buck " law, on the grounds that there is an
undue number of barren does, still a great many reliable observers report does with fawns as
being plentiful. Heavy snows in November drove the deer down from the higher levels and
practically every hunter got his buck or bucks. The slaughter of bucks has, as a result, been
very heavy. The young bucks were in very good condition during the rutting season, excessively
fat in some cases, which would seem to indicate that there must be older bucks in charge of
the herds. From all reports received I would be inclined to let the " buck " law remain as at
present; although possibly the season could be curtailed with advantage to the increase of the
deer. The season remains open long after these animals commence " running " and there is
little doubt but that this results in retarded propagation.
Moose.—There are no moose in the Boundary District.
Mountain-goat.—Are not in any numbers in this district. A few are reported in the Skagit
River and Chopaka areas.    There has been no word received of any being shot during 1927.
Mountain-sheep.—It is regrettable that, although a closed season has been in effect for a
good many years, there is no increase noted. What few there are, are in the Ashnola District,
and there is doubtless something to be said for the suggestion that inbreeding is having a bad
effect. Although this may not, strictly speaking, be the Rocky Mountain sheep, undoubtedly
it would be a good move to introduce new blood by liberating some fresh stock, which could
probably be obtained from the Dominion Government, the same as those liberated recently near
Lytton.
Wapiti (Elk.)—I am happy to report that the elk liberated at Adra early in 1927 are
doing well. There has been an increase of twelve in the herd. One cow and one female calf
are definitely known to have died.    It is rather disquieting to note that the elk have not moved REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 13
from the locality in which they were liberated, and should they increase to any great extent it is
possible that we shall receive complaints from orchardists in that locality. I understand that
farmers south of the line, in Washington, were obliged to petition the Government for permission
to kill elk liberated there, owing to destruction wrought by them in orchards.
Fernie District.
Bear.—Black bear are very numerous in the Fernie District and grizzlies are plentiful.
Reports have been received of black bear being in very poor condition last fall owing to the lack
of berries in the hills. This does not appear to apply to the eastern part of the district, as all
bears killed in that part last fall were in good condition.
Caribou.—A small band of these animals is reported north and west of Cranbrook. They
apparently range between the headwaters of Crawford Creek and St. Mary River.
Deer.—Very plentiful throughout the Fernie District. The greatest numbers are to be found
between Lumberton and Yahk, in the Gold Creek District, and east and south of Waldo, also-
between Galloway and Fernie. They are in great numbers in the vicinity of Elko, in a section
of the country locally known as the " Southfork," where large numbers make their winter
quarters, and I feel that something should be done to protect these animals which gather in this
section after the first fall of snow. This past season it is conservatively estimated that upwards
of 250 bucks were killed and taken out of this particular area, and in a season not so long past
it was estimated that the kill was in the neighbourhood of 4.00 bucks. It seems reasonable to
suppose that all this intensive hunting of the deer in their winter quarters, the greater part of
which takes place during the mating season, must have an injurious effect and interfere greatly
with the propagation of the deer. However, a detailed report will be submitted at a later date
in this connection.
Moose.—Moose are quite rapidly increasing. Along the Elk River they are to be seen in
great numbers each year. With the exception of two places (the upper 6 miles of the Elk River
and a spruce-swamp near Round Prairie), moose pasturage is rather scarce. However, the
moose do not seem to confine themselves to these areas, but range extensively, several now
wintering near Fernie and probably a hundred head ranging along the Flathead River and Sage-
Creek. On no account, however, should there be any open season on the moose in the Fernie
District for a number of years.
Mountain-goat.—Goats are numerous, many hunters claiming that there are too many. Our
officers, however, have seen no evidence that they are too plentiful, or that they are interfering
with any other game animals' range or feeding-grounds.
Mountain-sheep.—Sheep are quite numerous, especially in the Elk River Game Reserve and
on the east of the Fording River. They are increasing slowly. This also applies to the Bull
and White River areas.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are numerous and increasing and are gradually spreading out
into new country. A very conservative estimate places the number of elk in the Elk River Game
Reserve at 1,000 head and an equal number, and no doubt more, outside the reserve along the
Elk and Fording Rivers, White River, and Line Creek.    They are wintering well.
North-east Kootenay District.
Bear.—Bear of all kinds are numerous. Food conditions for them were not any too good
last summer, with the result that they were not in good shape with the advent of winter, so-
that there may possibly be a heavy mortality in their ranks before spring. A number of reports
have been received that both grizzly and black bear have been seen roaming around the
mountains in the most severe zero weather, which is most unusual for this hibernating animal
and probably indicates that they are in a hungry condition.
Caribou.—A small herd of caribou ranges the mountains in the upper reaches of Toby Creek.
They do not appear to be increasing appreciably. Also, this year a fairly large herd was seen
in the neighbourhood of LaForme Creek, north of Revelstoke.
Deer.—White-tailed and mule deer are plentiful and are steadily increasing in the Upper
Columbia Valley, and there appears to be no shortage of bucks. In the Upper Kootenay Valley
both species are very plentiful and are also reported as numerous in the Revelstoke area. In
fact, throughout the district deer are in larger numbers than they have been for many years.
All reports indicate that the deer were in excellent condition this past fall. J 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Moose.—In the Kootenay Valley moose are plentiful and are showing a steady increase from
year to year. On the west side of the Columbia River they are increasing, but not sufficiently
to warrant an open season for a number of years to come. In the vicinity of Golden and to the
east of Revelstoke they are present in small numbers.
Mountain-goat.—Throughout the district mountain-goat are numerous.
Mountain-sheep.—In the Columbia Valley sheep have shown a steady increase during the
past five years. At the present time a large herd is ranging between Sinclair and Vermilion
Creeks. During the winter bands of fifteen to twenty have been seen along the main highway
near Sinclair Creek. In the Kootenay Valley, however, the sheep are not so plentiful, although
they appear to have increased during the last three years. In the Camborne and Sable Creek
areas there are sheep, but not in any great numbers.
Wapiti (Elk).—Very numerous on the Palliser and White Rivers and the Kootenay Valley
and are working into the Columbia Valley, a few having been seen near Edgewater and on
Steamboat Mountain.    Some reported in the Big Bend and also south of Glacier National Park.
West Kootenay District.
Bear.—The black variety is numerous; too much so, in fact, in some localities, constituting
themselves a nuisance, especially to orchards, very few orchards indeed escaping visits from
black bear and in most cases with disastrous results to the trees. The same food conditions
for bear apparently prevailed in this district during the summer and fall of 1927 as noted in
other districts, and the bear were not in good condition with the advent of winter. In this
district, also, bear have been seen roaming around the hills this winter during the most severe
weather, which would indicate that they are indeed hungry.
Grizzly bear are reported as not very plentiful in the district as a whole.
Caribou.—A few are reported each year between Salmo and Kootenay Lake in the Bayonne
country, but no appreciable increase has been noted. The bands in the Upper Duncan and Crawford Creek areas are slowly increasing. This also applies to those on Granite and Wilson Creeks
in the Slocan and to those at the headwaters of Pingston and Kuskanax Creeks.
Deer.—White-tail deer are in large numbers throughout the district and have increased
during the past five years. Mule-deer are fairly plentiful in the Bayonne country and portions
of the Slocan. It is estimated that around sixty-five bucks were brought into Nelson and vicinity
by hunters during the last open season. The deer are somewhat of a nuisance to ranchers in
this district and several were shot while depasturing crops.
Moose.—A few were seen on Crawford Creek, near Crawford Bay, during the last summer.
These are the only moose reported in this district.
Mountain-goat.—Fairly plentiful in the Slocan and in the Lardeau, also on the Arrow Lakes
in the vicinity of Nakusp, Halcyon, Edgewood, Arrow Park, and Burton.
Mountain-sheep.—So far as known there are no mountain-sheep in the district.
Wapiti (Elk).—No reports of wapiti in the district.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Boundary District.—Beaver are reported as being fairly plentiful in this district, with the
exception of the Greenwood and Keremeos areas, where trappers are apparently not trying to
conserve them. Fisher and fox are scarce, while lynx, mink, and muskrats are in fair numbers.
Muskrats are scarce in the Greenwood and Keremeos areas, where they have apparently been
trapped out.    Marten and other fur-bearing animals, with the exception of weasel, are scarce.
Fernie District.—Beaver, with the exception of the Cranbrook area and also Yahk area,
where they were heavily trapped last season, appear to be in fair numbers, but cannot be coi>
sidered as plentiful. Fisher, fox, mink, muskrats, and otter are scarce. Marten are fairly
plentiful, while weasel are generally numerous and a great menace to the game birds, to
rabbits, and to all small wild life generally.    Wolverine are to be found in fair numbers.
North-east Kootenay District.—Beaver are very scarce, with the exception of the Revelstoke
and a small part of the district at the headwaters of the Kootenay River. These animals were
excessively trapped in the district last year by trappers. Fisher, marten, mink, and muskrats
are scarce. Foxes, with the exception of the Revelstoke area, where red and cross foxes are
apparently in fair numbers, are scarce.    Lynx, wolverine, and weasel are fairly plentiful.
West Kootenay District.—Beaver increased wonderfully in this district during the closed
season, but heavy catches were made by trappers last season and it would appear the end of REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 15
this season will see these animals practically exterminated. Another close season on beaver is
advisable. The Salmon, Duncan, and Slocan Rivers were formerly well stocked, but this is not
the case at the present time. Fisher, fox, marten, mink, otter, racoon, and wolverine are scarce.
Lynx are fairly plentiful and this also applies to weasel. Muskrats are in fair numbers in the
Slocan Valley and on the Kootenay Flats and in the vicinity of Kitchener, but are scarce in
other parts of the district.
Game Birds.
Boundary District.
Grouse.—These birds are not nearly so plentiful as in the previous year. The spring of
1927 was an unusually wet one and without doubt influenced hatching.
Partridge.—Somewhat scarce in the Penticton area, with only a few coveys to be found
here and there. These birds are, however, in fair numbers and apparently increasing in the
Grand Forks area. A few partridge are to be found in the Greenwood area, but are not
increasing.
Pheasants.—Reported fairly plentiful in the Oliver, Fairview, and Keremeos areas. In the
Penticton area our officers report that the idea that pheasants are numerous is erroneous, that
heavy snow has been responsible for these birds herding together, which gives the impression
that they are in large numbers, but scattered over a wide area they would be somewhat scarce.
On account of heavy snowfall, feeding was resorted to during the month of December at different
points.
Prairie-chicken (Sharp-tailed Grouse).—Very scarce.
Ptarmigan.—Not regarded as being in even fair numbers. A few scattered coveys are to
be found on the higher ranges.
Quail.—North and east of Penticton quail are in fair numbers. With this winter's heavy
snowfall, it is altogether likely that there will be considerable mortality amongst quail, as it is
a bird that cannot stand any protracted winter conditions.
Fernie District.
Grouse.—Grouse are scarce in this district considering it as a whole. This applies especially to willow or ruffed grouse. There has been three poor hatching seasons in succession, to
which has been added a bad forest-fire situation. The weasel has been instrumental in keeping
the increase of these birds down to a minimum. There is no doubt that a close season on all
species of grouse in this district is advisable for at least two years. This course is recommended by our officers and the majority of true sportsmen feel that it would be justified.
Partridge.—A few partridge have been seen during the summer and fall months in sections
of the Elk Valley and near the Crow's Nest. It is probable that these birds come in from the
prairies each summer and return there in the fall, as they have not been seen in this district
iii the winter.
Pheasants.—There are no pheasants in the Fernie District. A few years ago a number of
these birds were liberated near Fort Steele, but apparently did not survive. Pheasants could
hardly stand the rigorous winters experienced in the East Kootenays.
Prairie-chicken (Sharp-tailed Grouse).—In fair numbers south of Elko and around Waldo.
A few are reported in the Cranbrook area, but in the district as a whole these birds are never
numerous.
Ptarmigan.—On some of the high ranges these are fairly plentiful and are increasing.
North-east Kootenay District.
Grouse.—Franklin's grouse are found in fair numbers in the Upper Kootenay Valley, but
apparently the other varieties are not found there. In the Athalmer area—that is, from Toby
Creek north to Spillimacheen—willow and Franklin's grouse are in fair numbers, but are not
increasing. Blue grouse are on the decrease. In the Canal Flats area the same conditions
prevail amongst the grouse as in the Fernie District. Willow and blue grouse are reported in
fair numbers in the Golden and Revelstoke areas.
Prairie-chicken (Sharp-tailed Grouse).—Very scarce.
Ptarmigan.—From reports are fairly plentiful on the high ranges. J 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
West Kootenay District.
Grouse.—Throughout the greater part of the district all varieties are decidedly scarce, with
the possible exception of blue grouse in the Kaslo area, which are reported to be holding their
own. The past season has been a bad one for nesting and, taking the district as a whole, the
outlook for next year's stock is none too promising. Closed seasons are advocated as the
solution.
Partridge.—A few coveys are to be found in the vicinity of Nelson, Brilliant, and Champion
Creeks and a few near Fruitvale.    Some coveys have been noted on the Kootenay Flats.
Pheasants.—In the vicinity- of Creston and Harrop these birds are in fair numbers and
there are a few around Crawford Bay, Gray Creek, Riondel, and Nakusp. This part of the
Interior, however, is not in my opinion suitable for the pheasant. The winters are too long and
severe and the snowfall so heavy that the birds have to be fed all winter in order to save them.
Ptarmigan.—These birds are fairly plentiful on the higher ranges.
Migratory Game Birds.
Boundary District.—Very few migratory birds throughout this district. What there are,
are principally confined to the Vaseaux Lake Reserve, where a slight increase in ducks was
noted over the previous year. Geese have also increased. Seven trumpeter swans appeared on
the reserve last fall.
Fernie District.—In the eastern portion of this district ducks are scarce. In the western
part, north and west of Cranbrook, they are more plentiful. Geese appear near Wasa and along
the Kootenay River, north of Cranbrook and also west of Cranbrook. In the eastern portion
of the district geese are only seen in flight. Shore-birds are seldom seen, with the exception
of a few snipe.
North-east Kootenay District.—Geese, ducks, and shore-birds reported fairly plentiful
throughout the district.
West Kootenay District.—Migratory birds in this district are principally found in the
Kootenay Flats near Creston. There is usually a considerable number of locally bred birds there
and, as a rule, a strong northern flight, but this year the northern flight was small. Shore-birds
are not plentiful.
Vermin.
Boundary District.—The coyote has not decreased in numbers and trapping over a period
of years by numerous trappers has apparently had very little effect on their numbers. Poisoning
is probably the most effective method of dealing with these pests. There has been a lack of
news re cougar depredations, probably owing to heavy snow and few people travelling in the
hills. However, four have been reported in the Beaverdell District this winter, where our
predatory-animal hunter, Chas. Shuttleworth, expects to proceed shortly.
Fernie District.—The Indians in the Fernie District have killed a number of cougar and a
few have been taken by trappers, so that these animals are less plentiful than formerly. There
are still reports of cougar, however, in the northern and western parts of the district.
The coyote is still with us in this district in what appears to be increasing numbers. Very
few trappers seem to be successful in trapping this cunning animal. The coyotes, early this
winter, took to running deer in packs, and with the very heavy snowfall it is probable that the
deer will suffer more than ordinarily and their ranks be considerably thinned. We are having
inquiries made at the present time into the reputed abilities of a coyote-hunting expert in the
East Kootenay, and should it happen that his reputation in this respect is well established, the
Department might do worse than make him an offer of a position as a predatory-animal hunter,
as with the ever-increasing coyote menace it would seem necessary to secure the services of some
specialist or specialists in an effort to reduce the number of coyotes. A report as to this man's
qualifications will be submitted at a later date.
Horned owls appear to have decreased in numbers in the Fernie District, while crows, which
are responsible to quite an extent for the depletion of game and other birds, are numerous.
North-east Kootenay District.—Coyotes in this district are in large numbers and apparently
increasing. During November and December, 1927, bounties had been paid on twelve cougar at
Wilmer alone, so it is evident that these animals are not scarce by any means. Owls are
apparently not quite so numerous, but the crow is increasing in this district. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 17
West Kootenay District.—The same situation in respect to the coyote exists in this district
as in other districts in the Division, although to a less extent. Wolves have been reported on the
Upper Arrow Lakes. There is an odd report of cougar, but apparently they have not been
observed in any numbers in the district during the year 1927.
Game-protection.
Our Game Constables and Police Constables have been very active in the discharge of their
duties under the " Game Act " and are using their best efforts in the protection of our wild life.
Numerous big-game hunting parties visit the East and North-east Kootenays, coming from
all parts of the continent and occasionally from Europe. Unfortunately a very close check has
to be maintained on the movements of some of these parties, and to do this the Upper Kootenay
basin patrol should be increased by the addition of another officer at least, and also there is need
for another Game Constable in the southern portion of the Fernie District, especially during the
open season. ■
The further increase on bounties on crows and magpies would probably have a very good
effect in conserving our game birds. Also, I am still of the opinion that the weasel should not
receive protection, but should rather have a bounty placed on his head.
Appointments made during 1927, I presume, would properly come under the heading of game-
protection, and in this connection I might mention that during the year just closed, in accordance
with the Department's policy, a N.C.O. was appointed specially for game supervision in this
Division. Corporal C. McKenzie, formerly in the Division office, was appointed as the game
N.C.O. for the Division. This officer is well adapted to this work and I am satisfied that since
this duty has been taken over by him he has been giving it his best attention.
• Propagation.
It appears to me that my general remarks throughout this report fairly well cover this point,
as every class of game animal, bird, and fur-bearing animal has been dealt with separately in
each district.
Game Reserves.
In the Boundary District we have the Vaseaux Lake Bird Sanctuary, where a larger variation of migratory-bird life appears than in any other portion of the Okanagan Valley. This is,
without doubt, one of the finest bird reserves in the Province and has been responsible for an
increase in migratory birds, particularly geese.
Early in 1927 the Kettle River Game Reserve was cancelled. From a conservationist's
point of view, it is regrettable that it was found necessary to cancel this reserve, as this was
a most wonderful part of the country for game propagation, particularly in respect to deer.
More game reserves mean more game and it would seem a backward step in game conservation
and protection to lessen the number of existing reserves.
In the Fernie District, of course, we have'the Elk River Game Reserve, which no words can
adequately describe. At the present time this is doubtless the finest reserve in the Province.
This area is in charge of Constable I. J. Brown, of Elk Prairie Detachment, who gives it his
best attention and with excellent results. So that this fine reserve may be properly protected,
it is necessary, in my opinion, that we have cabins built at different strategic points along its
boundaries for the use of the game officers on patrol-work. This matter is being inquired into
by Sergeant Greenwood, Corpo*ral McKenzie, and Constable Brown, and I hope to very shortly
forward a report on their findings. Permanent signs or notices have also been recommended
by these officers and which has already formed the subject of a report to Headquarters. It is
necessary that some such type of sign as recommended be supplied this coming summer in order
that the reserve may be properly posted, and I trust that authority for these signs will be
granted. The main entrance to this reserve is at Brule Creek and is approached by a fairly
good road. Sergeant Greenwood has had a large sign made which he intends to have erected
this coming spring over the roadway at Brule Creek to warn people that they are entering' the
reserve and that it is unlawful to have firearms in their possession therein without having a
permit.    This sign should last for a number of years.
My report would not be complete did I not mention the Glacier, Yoho, and Kootenay National
Parks, all of which are in this Division, in the North-east Kootenay District. These are well
stocked and form excellent feeders for surrounding country.
£ J 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In the West Kootenay District we have a restricted area across the lake from Nelson.
Ducks make quite a haven of this during the latter part of the open season and pheasants and
grouse are reported fairly plentiful in this area. •
While on the subject of reserves I would like to stress the advisability of establishing a
sanctuary for deer in the " Southfork " or " Wigwam " country, in the Fernie District. I have
already drawn your attention to some of the conditions which prevail there annually, and it
does seem that if such conditions are allowed to continue all the benefits which have accrued
since the enforcement of the " buck " law will be lost. Deer should have complete protection,
I am convinced, in areas of this kind, where they gather in hundreds after the first heavy snows.
As stated previously herein, this matter will form the subject of a detailed separate report which
will be submitted at an early date.
Fur Trade.
Trapping of fur-bearing animals, with the exception of beaver and muskrats, opened in
this Division this season on November 15th.
In a great many localities intensive' trapping was carried on last season and I do not look
for the catch of fur this year that there was last year. Trappers up to the end of December
were generally reporting poor returns. The fur being caught, though, is of rather better quality
than last season's fur and is bringing higher prices.
The greater part of the furs taken in this Division are shipped to Revelstoke or Vancouver
or purchased direct from the trapper by travelling fur-traders.
Fur-farming.
There is apparently no loss of interest in fur-farming, as applications for permits -continue
to be received. Fur-farms are visited occasionally by the Constables while on patrol, but the
majority of farms have not been sufficiently long established to judge whether they will be a
success or not. In many cases, however, there would appear to be need for departmental advice
and guidance.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The registration of trap-lines seems to be working out fairly satisfactorily, and is no doubt
a step in the right direction in making the trapper realize that he has a valuable asset in his
line which, to be successfully conducted, must be looked after in a businesslike manner, with
some thought given to the future. We have had various disputes between trappers since the
inauguration of this new system, but these are gradually being ironed out and adjusted,
although often necessitating the calling-up of vast reserve stores of patience on the part of the
adjusting officers. Our officers are carrying on a steady campaign toward the education of
trappers in the principles of conservation of fur and I look for good results therefrom.
With the exception of two or three in the West Kootenay District, all our guides reside in
the Fernie and North-east Kootenay Districts, where we have a large number, of which a great
many are very efficient and competent. In the North-east Kootenay District the majority of the
parties outfit at Banff, Alberta, and not in British Columbia, which is rather unfortunate.
Special Patrols.
With the exception of a special snow-shoe patrol performed by Corporal MacKenzie and
Constable I. J. Brown in December, 1927, looking into the winter game conditions in the Elk
River Game Reserve, all other patrols could be classed as coming in the line of regular duty.
Hunting Accidents.
On September 25th, 1927, at Penticton, one Henry Langridge, it appears, was in the act
of jumping from a ledge on the slope of a hill, when he slipped or stumbled and the shotgun
he was carrying discharged in his left ear. Part of the skull was blown off and death was
instantaneous.
On October 1st, 1927, at Summerland, J. R. Sutherland, while hunting pheasants, accidentally, or rather as the result of a mistake, shot one Jack Blewitt, of Summerland, both in the
arm and the leg, the pellets penetrating both limbs to some depth.
What might be classed as a hunting accident occurred at Tata Creek, in the Fernie District,
on September 17th, 1927, when one Paul Polak discharged a rifle, the ball passing through the REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 19
hip of a boy named Harold Johnston. Johnston subsequently recovered, but immediately after
the shooting Polak disappeared. Polak's body was found on October 10th, 1927, about a mile
from the scene of the shooting, he having taken his own life, apparently in the belief that he had
caused the death of Johnston.
Summary of Game Conditions.
On the whole, I would consider conditions generally in 1927 as fairly satisfactory, but it
would seem necessary that birds should be protected by a close season or two in the Fernie,
part of the North-east Kootenay at least, and in the West Kootenay Districts. Deer also would
benefit by protection afforded them in their winter quarters. An evil condition exists with
regard to coyotes and some study should be given to the matter of more effectually dealing
with them.
Before closing, I might say that I made a special trip with the Chief Game Inspector, Major
M. Furber, through the North-east Kootenay and Fernie Districts during last summer. Arrangements were made to have this officer meet as many members of the Rod and Gun Clubs as
possible, when interesting and instructive discourses were given by Major Furber, which
apparently were greatly appreciated.
"C" DIVISION  (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN,  CARIBOO, AND
CHILCOTIN DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. L. Fernie, Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to present herewith my annual game report covering this Division for
the year 1927.
Game Animals.
Moose.—These animals continue to be seen at the headwaters of the Tranquille, Deadman,
and Criss Creeks, also in the Lower Chilcotin. Sergeant R. AV. Bowen reports them in the area
adjoining the 57-Mile House and also at Pavilion; in fact, the trend and spread of the moose in
a southerly direction continues, and the fact that these animals have been seen during the last
few years in areas where they were previously unknown would indicate they are without doubt
increasing.
Owing to the unusual severity of the winter and the depth of the snow, hay is being provided
and trees felled in order to give the wild animals access to the lichen which grows on the
branches.
Caribou.—Reports indicate that they are plentiful in the Cariboo and Clearwater areas.
A band was reported at Seymour Arm during the year, and the year previous a band was
reported on the Hunter Range, east of Grindrod, in the North Okanagan. From all accounts it
would appear that these animals are increasing, although they do not seem to spread out to
the same extent as the moose. The males of these animals seemed to have shed their horns
earlier than usual this season for some reason. A bull shot on November 9th showed that it
had already shed its antlers.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are increasing and spreading out in small bands in the areas
adjacent to the Yalakom Game Reserve. I would again recommend that some new blood be
introduced into the herds in this area, and if it is at all possible I would favour the importation
of a few bull elk, which might be obtained from the Banff or Wainwright National Parks.
Of the twenty-five elk that were turned out at Cookson, on the Kettle Valley Railway, east
of Kelowna, several have been seen during the fall in the country south of where they were
turned out, which seems to show that at least some- of these animals are thriving in their new
surroundings.
Mountain-sheep.—Two shipments of mountain-sheep were received in this Division during
the past year from the Banff National Park. The first shipment of thirty-five ewes and fourteen
rams arrived at Spences Bridge on March 22nd, one ewe having died en route from Banff.
These were released on March 23rd and from all reports are doing splendidly. From one source
I am informed that nineteen young sheep have been seen in one place, and from another source
I am told that the increase from this first shipment is at least thirty lambs. These sheep have
been kept under observation since their arrival, and on April 5th one ram and one ewe were
found dead; the carcasses were carefully examined and it is thought that they must have died
through injuries received in transit. Another shipment of forty ewes and ten rams arrived at Squilax, near Chase, on November
14th and were released at that point, which was considered a very suitable place. Previous to
their arrival a very heavy snowfall occurred; this, combined with the fact that they were being
placed on a new range, made it necessary that they be fed hay; a salt-lick was also provided,
this provision being deemed advisable until the animals became acquainted with their new
surroundings.    These sheep have been under almost continual watch since their arrival.
During the summer one ram and one ewe were seen on the mountain near Squilax. Where
these animals came from has not been ascertained, but it is thought possible that they might
have travelled from Fintry, on the west side of Okanagan Lake, at which point there are quite a
number. The ram was shot by a resident near Chase and for this offence he was very heavily
fined. However, when the above shipment of sheep was released at Squilax, care was taken to
see that one ram and two ewes were released near where this lone ewe had been seen.
The introduction of game animals into this Province seems to be proving a success,
especially as regards mountain-sheep, whose heads form one of our best trophies, and a shipment
of these animals being comparatively inexpensive, particularly because of the initial cost of
purchasing the animals being nil.
The range in the National Park, Banff, is considered to be much overstocked by the bands
of these animals, whose total numbers have been computed anywhere from 15,000 to 25,000 head.
Mountain-goat.—From all accounts they seem to be holding their own. A band of twenty-
seven was seen in the Clearwater Lake region by a trapper and at other points bands have been
reported. Owing to the fact that the haunts of these animals are usually inaccessible it is
difficult to get definite data on them.
Bear.—Black and brown bear are reported numerous throughout the Division and in some
areas are a menace to the domestic sheep. However, the new amendment to the " Game Act "
meets the case and should be found satisfactory to all concerned.
Grizzly bear are reported numerous in the Arrow Park and Monashee areas, also in the
Similkameen country. In the northern part they are not so plentiful, and owing to the fact that
they have been very heavily hunted in the Bowron Lake and Quesnel Lake areas during the past
few years I am inclined to recommend that the bag limit be reduced to one grizzly a season
instead of two. Several guides have approached the Game Wardens on this point and are in
favour of this reduction in the bag limit.
Deer.—The mule-deer would seem to be as plentiful as ever throughout the Division. An
extremely heavy and early snowfall at the beginning of November undoubtedly is responsible for
a larger number of bucks being killed than in previous years. In the Okanagan particularly,
heavy " kills " have been reported. I would still go on record as being in favour of permission
being given to kill one doe deer during the hunting season.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Fur-bearing animals are still scarce. Lynx are showing up better than for the past four
years and I think this is on account of the return of the rabbits, which are increasing slowly.
Foxes, from all accounts, are increasing slowly, particularly in the Chilcotin country. An odd
one or two have been caught this year in the North Thompson area. Muskrats and beaver were
heavily trapped last year, although on some streams there is a good showing of beaver. Marten
are scarce, while fisher are about holding their own. Weasel are reported plentiful in some
areas.    Mink show a slight increase in numbers.
With reference to the recommendation made by the Windermere District Rod and Gun Club
regarding the shooting of fur-bearing animals, I would be in favour of it being made illegal to
shoot beaver and muskrats, these being the only two animals which appear to be concerned with
the suggestion, especially in this Division.
Until the registration of trap-lines has been in force for a few years I do not anticipate any
great increase of fur-bearing animals.
Game Birds.
Partridge.—These birds continue to increase and most favourable reports are received
concerning them. They are quite numerous in the vicinity of Kamloops and they spread as
far west as Tranquille. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 21
Pheasants.—Pheasants are very plentiful in the Okanagan, even though they have been shot
at very heavily during the past season. In the Lillooet region they are reported as not being
so plentiful as in previous years.
The winter so far has been very severe on these birds, but every effort is being made to see
that they do not suffer and at various points grain is being distributed under the supervision
of Game Wardens. These birds evidently appreciate the food given them in the depth of winter,
200 birds being seen in one patch near Kelowna and 150 at another feeding-ground in the '
municipal limits of that city. I heard of 150 birds being fed in one place near Tranquille. In
other places in the Northern Okanagan birds come to feed in flocks varying from 50 to 100 at
each place.
Grouse (Willow and Blue).—Unfortunately these birds had another exceptionally bad nesting period, continuous cold rains and snow coming just at the hatching period. They are reported
very scarce in the Kamloops and Yale Districts and I am of the opinion that the season should
be closed in 1928. The Vernon District reports that they show a slight increase and that the
closed season during 1927 is responsible for this. In the Cariboo District they are reported as
holding their own, but I am afraid the present winter will sadly decrease their ranks.
Prairie-chicken,—These birds are not plentiful, although in one or two places they are fairly
numerous.
Migratory Game Birds.
Ducks and Geese.—In some parts of the Division these birds are reported as being scarce
and in other parts they are reported as showing a slight increase.
This is the first year that efforts have been made to take a bird census of migratory birds on
certain days in each month. A request was made for this information by the United States
Department of Agriculture (Bureau of Biological Survey), AVashington, D.C. The census is
being carried on throughout the various Provinces in Canada and the States in the United
States, through the assistance of the Provincial and State Game Departments and the Dominion
Parks Branch. The information obtained in this Province is very interesting and should be of
value.
I find that the book on the " Birds of AArestern Canada," by Taverner, seems to have created
a tremendous interest in the migratory birds. It seems to be a source of continual satisfaction
to be able to turn to the book and classify any bird which may have been noticed during the day.
ArERMIN.
The coyote is not classed as a fur-bearing animal under the " Game Act," and they seem
just as plentiful as ever, even in spite of the increased bounty and the increasing price paid by
fur-traders for their pelts.
It is noted, however, that* quite a number of trappers are specializing in the trapping of
coyotes and in the Kamloops area they are having great success, one trapper having caught
approximately 100 since October 1st until the end of the year (three months). It would therefore appear to be a very profitable business in trapping coyotes.
Crows and magpies are as plentiful as every throughout the Division, and it would appear
advisable to put a bounty on these birds during 1928 and that the time be extended for another
month. Efforts are now being made through the Game Branch, Arictoria, to obtain plans of the
new crow-trap recently introduced by one of our Game Wardens on Arancouver Island, and if a
few of these traps are in operation throughout the year I am sure it will greatly assist in
decreasing the number of crows.
Sergeant G. C. Mortimer, Arernon, reports that one member of the Arernon Fish and Gun
Club is responsible for the destruction of 1,300 magpies and 300 crows. The Kelowna Fish and
Game Association has also been active and a few crow shoots were organized during the year,
much good work being done.
Horned owls are reported as being plentiful. Undoubtedly they do a lot of harm to the
game birds and have also been known to prey extensively on muskrats. The Cooper, American,
and sharp-shinned hawks are also reported as becoming more numerous.
Another reason for the scarcity of grouse is probably due to the depredations of the owls
and hawks above mentioned and I would recommend that consideration be given to the placing
of a bounty on them. «■
J 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Cougar would seem to be, if anything, a little scarcer than in previous years and I have
not heard so much about their depredations as in past years. A timber-wolf is alleged to have
been seen by an Indian south of Kamloops very recently.
Game-protection.
I am very pleased to report that game enforcement during the year has been very successful
in this Division. Ninety-four prosecutions were lodged, this being a 50-per-cent. increase over
last year. In all, $1,720 in fines were paid into the Treasury and five offenders served gaol
sentences.. -
The following is a list of the items confiscated to the Crown: 8 beaver-pelts, 67 muskrat-
pelts, 2 lynx, 1 mink, 1 wildcat, 4 shotguns, 1 22-cal. rifle, and several traps; a quantity of deer-
meat (fresh and canned) was also confiscated.
Twenty-eight muskrat-pelts were given to the rightful owners in cases where persons were
caught trapping on trap-Jines other than which they had applied for.
Propagation.
The importation of sheep from the Banff National Park has met with the approval of the
public. The first shipment which arrived early in the year, as already mentioned in this report,
are doing well and the area in which they were released is undoubtedly' the best mountain-sheep
country in the Division, if not in the Province.
The last shipment of mountain-sheep, which were released near Squilax, will be watched
with interest and every protection will be given these animals.
I would recommend that, if possible, further shipments of mountain-sheep be obtained from
the Banff National Park and released at Spences Bridge, and that consideration be given to the
time of the year when shipments are made, as it is preferable to have these animals come in
the spring or summer rather than in the late fall, so that they may become acquainted with
their new ranges before winter arrives.
As there is no doubt that at one time elk were very prevalent over the whole of the Interior
plateaus of the Province, I would recommend that further shipments of these animals be made
to suitable areas in the Interior. It seems to me that the extermination of elk in the Interior
many years ago was caused by a tremendous forest fire, as many of the antlers, recovered even
to-day, are attached to the skull of the animal and are very frequently found more or less
covered by mud in the centre of shallow lakes or sloughs, to which place, I presume, the animals
attempted to escape from the flames.
I do not know whether the idea of introducing buffalo has ever been considered, but I am
given to understand that it would be quite feasible to obtain a few car-loads of these animals
from AVainwright, where the disposition of the increase of the§e animals seems to be on the
same footing as the problem of the disposition of the increase of the mountain-sheep in the
Banff National Park. It would, I think, be an interesting experiment to release a small herd
of buffalo on some of the high plateau land of the Interior.
;   Pheasants continue to be plentiful in numbers and the system of shipping them from the
Game Farm each year is satisfactory.
Game Reserves.
The Bowron Lake Game Reserve is fast establishing a name for itself. Professor T. T.
McCabe, of Indian Point, has very kindly allowed the Department the use of two of his cabins,
which are situated at convenient points.
The Yalakom Game Reserve is also proving satisfactory and a noticeable increase in the
herds of elk has been observed.
There seems to be a growing interest taken in the idea of laying aside an area of land to
the north-west of Kamloops, known as " Silwhoiakun," as a game reserve.
This would be particularly adapted for the conservation of the mule-deer and the area laid
aside would act as a sanctuary for these animals. This reserve would make a feeding-ground
for the country over which the hunters range in the open season and would prevent this area
from becoming depleted. Moose have also begun to establish themselves in the country on which
the reserve is proposed to be placed. Fur Trade.
The fur trade seems to be about the same as last year. Most of the fur caught in the
Interior is shipped to the Coast and numerous fur-traders from Vancouver ply through the
country, so it is difficult to estimate what fur is caught.
There seems to be a certain amount of discontent expressed by the fur-trader of established
stores, more particularly in the northern part of this Division, who see fur-buyers from the
larger cities coming in and visiting the Indian reserves, and trappers in their vicinity, buying
furs and so deflecting trade which would otherwise be dealt with'at their place of business and
while only paying a licence equal to that which the established trader has to pay.
Fur-farming.
Numerous applications have been received and investigated throughout the Division and it
is pleasing to note that the farmers seem to be going into this side-line in very large numbers.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The registration of trap-lines recently introduced by the Department still continues to be an
important item and many trappers make favourable comment on this idea.
We have 534 complete applications—that is the number recorded on our maps so far—but
I expect that we shall have about 700 when all applications are in and completed.
It would not appear advisable at present to issue registration certificates to the trappers, as
the Indian Department, from whom we have received dozens of Indian applications, have not
yet completed the task of going over all the Indian reserves.
I would, however, suggest that a time-limit be set after which no further applications will
be accepted if they should happen to conflict with some other trapper's line. Applications for
territory not taken up could, of course, be taken in after the time-limit. The time-limit, I would
suggest, be one month before the opening date for the 1928-29 trapping season. This, as far as
this Division is concerned, should be ample time for all Indian applications to be in.
The attitude of dealing with the applications for trap-lines, as regards the offices of this
Division, has been to treat the Indians as sympathetically as possible. In any place where an
Indian's application has conflicted with a white man's application for the same territory, the
Indian has been given preferential treatment where it would appear that he had priority claim
over the line or lines in question.
AVith regard to section 27 of the " Game Act," concerning returns to be made of big game
and fur-bearing animals killed or trapped, very few returns are made, and if it is thought
advisable I would suggest that such returns be made to the detachment where the licence was
issued or in which the trapper's line is located. This would greatly assist the Game Warden or
Constable in keeping a record of what fur was being caught in his district.
In some areas, particularly in the Cariboo, there would appear to be too many guides and
this often leads to big-game hunters hunting in a certain area coming upon other parties.
Trails cut by certain guides are used by other guides and this causes dissatisfaction amongst
the different parties involved.
Special Patrols.
All Game Wardens have been especially active throughout the year and numerous patrols
have been undertaken.
Bowron Lake Reserve and its vicinity has been carefully and continually patrolled by the
two officers stationed at Barkerville. The Chilcotin country has perhaps been patrolled more
this- year than in any previous year, one officer proceeding into the Tatlayoko Lake country, an
area which has not been patrolled before. Patrols were also taken into the Eagle Pass area
(between Revelstoke and Enderby) and in the Monashee and Penask Lake regions. Numerous
patrols were also made into the Bridge Lake country and in the neighbourhood of Clinton and
the 100-Mile House.
Hunting Accidents.
On October 25th, 1927, Charles AVoods, of Vernon, was admitted to the Vernon Hospital
suffering from a gunshot wound in the right foot due to a hunting accident. On inquiry being
made it was found that AVoods, who had gone out in his car with a friend to shoot pheasants in J 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
the Coldstream Municipality, near A'ernon, and while in the car, either through accident or carelessness, the shotgun went off, causing a gunshot wound in the right foot (which eventually
resulted in the loss of two toes) and damaging the car by blowing a hole in the flooring. AAroods
was charged for a violation of section 25 of the " Game Act " and was fined $10, the Magistrate
giving the accused a severe lecture.
On October 22nd, 1927, Raymond Despard, of Oyama, in company with a friend, a Mr. Brener,
was out hunting. The friend, wishing to smoke, asked Despard to hold his shotgun. Despard
took hold of the gun, which was loaded, and rested the muzzle on his left foot. AVhile they
were conversing Despard unthinkingly touched the trigger, causing it to explode, the shot piercing the left foot, which, like the above accident, resulted in the loss of two toes.
Mark Wakefield, of Vernon, was hunting with his son in the B.X. District, near Vernon, on
September 23rd, 1927. The son flushed a cock pheasant and fired. As he fired his father stepped
out from behind some brush into the line of fire, receiving a sprinkling of shot in the body.
Mr. Wakefield was admitted to hospital, but fully recovered and is none the worse for the
accident.
One youth from Vancouver on a hunting expedition on Quesnel Lake this fall was unfortunate enough to shoot off his finger whilst cleaning a rifle. He was rushed into Williams Lake
and from there to Quesnel before receiving any skilled medical attention.
Summary of General Game Conditions.
Game matters have been very satisfactory during the year. The registration of trap-lines
entailed a tremendous, amount of work, but if the aim of the Game Branch is attained, then
it will be time well spent.
It has been suggested by several guides in the Quesnel Lake area that all hunters, packers,
and guides when on hunting-trips should wear some bright-coloured article of clothing—i.e., a red
hat or shirt—instead of the usual khaki. I noticed on a patrol I made through the northern
country this fall that several American hunters were taking this precaution to ensure themselves
against accidents.
I would mention gratefully the assistance rendered by all the officers of " C " Division for
their work in connection with the different duties fulfilled in the supervision of the game in
the Division. This has, I know, involved many arduous and sometimes hazardous patrols,
which have been undertaken cheerfully.
" D " DIA'ISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, FORT GEORGE, PEACE RIArER,
AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS).
By Inspector W. Spiller, Officer Commanding.
Game Animals.
AH big game in the Division is on the increase, but such increase has to a certain extent
been retarded through the depredations of cougars, coyotes, and wolves. Moose in the MeBride
region are suffering from a disease that produces blisters on the liver. Arrangements are being
made for the shipment of diseased portions of moose taken in this district to Arancouver for
analysis. In the Cassiar District all big-game animals are on the increase, although very few
non-resident big-game hunters visited this district during the year 1927. In the eastern and
northern portions of this Division deer are plentiful, while in the western or Coast regions there
is a decided increase in does and it is recommended that during the 1928 hunting season it be
made legal for the taking of one doe and two bucks instead of adhering to the buck law as in
the past few years. The reduced bag on sheep in this Division was warranted and it probably
would be advisable to also reduce the bag on grizzly bear.
Game Birds.
The past close season on grouse resulted in an increase and a further close season is necessary on all upland game birds, with the exception of ptarmigan and blue grouse. The reduction in the numbers of grouse has been principally caused through the increase in coyotes and
noxious birds and the decrease in rabbits, which is the natural food for predatory animals
and birds. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AA7ARDEN, 1927. J 25
Fur-bearing Animals,
As the regulations covering the collection of fur royalties only require payment of royalties
on export of fur from the Province, most of the fur is shipped from ATancouver, and it is
therefore impossible to furnish any complete or correct data as to the fur exported from this
Division.
Fur conditions are improving and as soon as the registration of trap-lines becomes more
effective, then I am sure a very great increase in the stand of fur-bearing animals will be
noticeable.
• Migratory Game Birds.
Migratory game birds are increasing throughout the Division and hunters do not appear to
have had any difficulty during the past open season in obtaining good bags.
Vermin.
The principal predatory animals in this Division are wolves_ and coyotes. These animals
are plentiful and are responsible for the destruction of all species of game, and it is recommended that a substantial increase be made in the amount of bounties paid on these animals,
especially during the summer months.
Owls, hawks, and eagles are not numerous, with the exception of eagles on Queen Charlotte
Islands.
Game-protection.
During the spring and fall a number of Indians made periodical raids on muskrats and
beaver, but as these raids occur in very remote regions, nothing is heard of them until considerable time has elapsed, when it is too late to successfully investigate or prosecute the offenders.
Considering the vast area required to be patrolled in this Division, credit is due to the N.C-O.'s
and men for the manner in which enforcement and patrol measures have been undertaken
during the year.
Propagation.
It is expected that a good increase in all game animals and birds will be observed during
the year 1928, while better results will be obtained if steps are taken to decrease the amount or
number of predatory animals in the Division.
Game Reserves.
Five established game reserves are maintained in this Division, as follows:—
Fort George or Clearwater Reserve.—This reserve should be cancelled as it is covered by
timber limits.
Prince George Municipal Reserve.—This reserve provides excellent facilities for migratory
birds, as it enables them to find an ideal resting-place where they are assured against
molestation.
Kunghit Island Reserve.—Due to lack of transportation and for other reasons I feel that
this reserve should be cancelled.
Kaien Island Reserve.—During the year 1927 deer have increased on this reserve.
Sheep Creek Reserve.—During the later part of the year this reserve was created. ,
Fur Trade.
As most of the fur in this Division is either shipped to Arancouver or exported to the
Prairie Provinces, I am unable to give any correct data as to increase or decrease in the fur
trade. I feel safe in saying, however, that there does not appear to have been any serious
decrease in the fur trade during the past two or three years.
Fur-farming.
Fur-farming throughout this Division is becoming a popular and important industry, as in
addition to the 120 fur-farms in operation several applications for fur-farming permits are
pending. The Kinahan Fox (Blue) Farm has during the year 1927 shown an increase of 450
per cent.    The Ness Fur Farm (Blue Fox) is also operating on a paying business. Registration of Trap-lines.
During the year 1927 satisfactory progress has been made with this new system and it is
recommended that certificates of registration be issued to applicants where the trap-line is not
in dispute. AVhite trappers are very appreciative of the system and the Indian trappers are
being instructed by their various Indian Agents and, I believe, in time will realize the objects
and benefits that will be derived from the registration of trap-lines.
Special Patrols.
Sergeant T. Van Dyk patrolled to the Peace River, Finger Lake, and Atlin Disfricts—3,500
miles. Constable Soles patrolled to Sheep Creek Pass, 500 miles, and Constable Batchelor made
a patrol to Nelson River, 750 miles. All Constables in the Division have, of course, been
instructed to pay particular attention to the enforcement of the " Game Act," and I am glad to
report that there appears to be excellent co-operation between members of the Game and Police
Branches, resulting in better and more complete protection to the game of the Division.
Hunting Accidents.
In November Joseph Cook was wounded by Jack Hignell while in a gas-boat on Lakelse
Lake hunting ducks.    A prosecution against Hignell is pending.
Summary and General Conditions.
, General game conditions have been very satisfactory throughout the year.    The policy of.
affording better protection to the game in this Division is bearing fruit.
Acknowledgments.
I wish to express my appreciation to all ranks for the able manner in which they have
carried out their various duties under the "Game Act," and especially for the pains they have
taken in connection with the registration of trap-lines.
"E" DIVISION  (VANCOUVER, COAST, AND FRASER VALLEY DISTRICTS).
By Staff-Sergeant S. North,  Officer Commanding.
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in this
Division for the year 1927.
This Division of the British Columbia Police, for administration purposes, is divided into
two districts—namely, Vancouver, in charge of Sergeant J. Shirras, and Westminster, in charge
of Sergeant J. Macdonald. The Game Laws Enforcement Branch of the Division is under the
supervision of Sergeant J. G. Cunningham. All told, we have some thirty-five non-commissioned
officers and men in the Division, of which there are eleven regular men and three special officers
or probationers on game-law enforcement work.
Game Animals.
Deer.—This class of game still continues to be plentiful throughout the Division, especially
along the Coast and in the Harrison and Pitt Lake areas. Reports from our officers indicate
that from twenty-five to thirty deer were taken in the Pitt area and from sixty to sixty-five
animals around Harrison. From observations made by the officers on patrol boats along the
Coast and reports received from sportsmen, deer are increasing in numbers each year. Bowen
Island did not show up well owing to the epidemic mentioned in my 1926 report. I am pleased
to state, however, that this disease is on the wane, and while several poor deer were taken off
the island, still there were very few dead deer found. A year ago we had reports of some
thirty carcasses being found between the month of April and the opening of the hunting season.
This last summer only six carcasses were reported.
In my 1926 report I mentioned the finding of diseased deer on Gambier Island. This matter
is still under investigation, but progress has been slow. A splendid specimen for analysis was
secured just prior to the closing of the deer season and it is now in the hands of the Dominion
Animal Pathologist for analysis. At any rate, the disease on Gambier Island has not accounted
for any carcasses being found. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 27
We are continually receiving reports of hunters killing more than the bag limit on deer,
but this is a regulation that it is practically impossible to enforce without some sort of tag
system.
A great number of unorganized sportsmen are advocating an open season on does, but the
organized sportsmen appear to be in favour of keeping the season closed, and I would recommend
that the wishes of the organized clubs be supported.
Mountain-goat.—From reports received from coastal officers and sportsmen, these animals
are holding their own throughout the district. They are not hunted as extensively as in years
gone by and goat are again appearing at different points around Howe Sound, principally McNab
Creek. Mountain-goat can well take care of themselves along this Coast as long as the present
open seasons prevail.
Bear.—Black bear have been a pest in the settled portions of the Division. Bear were
especially numerous on the North Shore, Pitt Meadows and Lake, and around Chilliwack.
Several of these animals were killed by our own officers on account of depredations and the
possible menace to the community. Up-coast the bear are also plentiful and afford good sport,
especially at the heads of the inlets.
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver.—Beaver are reported scarce throughout the Division. An open season has been
provided for the Lillooet, Mackenzie, Skeena, and Prince Rupert Electoral Districts during the
past few years. It is thought and hoped that the registration of trap-lines will be instrumental
in keeping this class of fur from extermination. Last year it was necessary to grant permits
to trap beaver in the Delta Electoral District. Personally, I see no harm in providing an open
season for beaver in the Delta. In fact, the beaver do more harm than good in low-lying places
throughout the Surrey and Langley Municipalities, and by providing that district with an open
season it would eliminate the complaints, protect the farmer, and give the legitimate trapper a
chance, while as the season now stands it gives the odd poacher the opportunity to put one over
the law-abiding trapper.
Marten:—There are a fair number of these animals taken each year in the northern portion
of the Division, but they are not really plentiful along the Coast.
Mink.—The mink brought a high price last season and were trapped very extensively in the
portion of the Division where registration of trap-lines is not required; that is, portions of
Howe Sound, the islands along the Coast, and in the Lower Fraser Valley. These animals
appear to thrive well close to settled areas, where they are liable to and sometimes do become a
nuisance.   I would not recommend any curtailment of the present season on mink.
Muskrats.—These animals are still in great demand and prices on pelts are reported to be
increasing. There is a limited demand for live stock for breeding purposes and at present it is
possible to secure them at about $10 per pa_ir. A number of the Lower Fraser Valley trappers
are live trapping muskrats. Prior to the opening of the trapping season indications pointed to
muskrats being as plentiful as ever.
Muskrats are apparently holding their own around Burnaby Lake, but do not appear to be
increasing, due no doubt to the fact that animals bred on this reserve spread out and keep the
district surrounding the lake well stocked, and, this fact being known, the surrounding district
is well trapped each year.
A few years ago a number of muskrats were liberated on Green Lake, Nelson Island, by
the Green Lake Fur Farm, and in January, 1926, three pairs of these animals were liberated by
one of our officers at Hidden Bay, Nelson Island. It is very encouraging to hear that these
animals have spread all over the island and reports show that they have migrated to the Mainland, where one of the registered trappers caught a muskrat at Ruby Lake.
Racoon.—These animals are plentiful in some portions of the Division, but do not seem to
be increasing.    The prices on racoon are still high.
Otter.—Otter are not plentiful in this Division, but the trappers along the northern coastline report the usual number being taken.
Skunk.—-In a number of places in the Division these animals are a nuisance. Skunk are
plentiful throughout the Division. J 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Game Birds.
Pheasants.—Reports on pheasant conditions have been very conflicting. Prior to the opening of the season these birds seemed to be very plentiful, but after October 15th they appeared
to leave the district. During the month of December pheasants could be seen everywhere and
in some places as many as 200 birds were found together, especially where our officers were
feeding on account of severe weather conditions. Considerable adverse criticism has been given
by the sportsmen on the apparent scarcity of the pheasant throughout the Division. In my
opinion the pheasant-shooting is better than should be expected when it is taken into consideration the number of guns in the field for the area hunted, the proximity of the cities to the
hunting-grounds, the liberal bag limit, the length of season, and the fact that since the Game
Conservation Board was appointed we have not had one close season. Reports indicate that the
birds are small, due to inbreeding. I do not agree, however, as the majority of birds examined,
especially after the end of October, were in splendid condition. It is true that around the opening date some small or immature birds were taken. I would be in favour of reducing the bag
limit on cock pheasants to four per day.
Pheasants liberated around Powell River and at Bowen Island are reported to be doing well,
but should still be protected with a close season. I would recommend that fresh stock be sent
to these places again this coming spring.
Partridge.—These birds were fairly plentiful in the district south of the Fraser from the
Gulf to the Vedder River prior to the opening of the season, but by the time the sportsmen were
allowed to shoot them the birds were wild, due to the fact that the pheasant season had been
on for a month and indiscriminate shooting had taken plac'e by some of the hunters, and consequently bag limits were scarce.
A number of prosecutions were conducted for killing partridge out of season, but still I am
of the opinion that the past open season afforded better protection for partridge than if they were
opened on October 15th with the pheasants.
I would suggest that new blood be secured for the district south of the Fraser River, and
that stock be secured for liberation on Lulu Island, Pitt Meadows, and in the Mission and
Agassiz Districts, as I consider that this class of sporting bird would do as well north of the
Fraser River as they have clone in the Delta and Chilliwack Districts.
Quail.—These birds have held their own in all districts and are reported on the increase
around the Delta. It is doubtful if the quail will ever be numerous enough to warrant an open
season on the Lower Mainland. The last month of the year was a hard one on the bird-life of
the Division and reports indicate that quail suffered considerably, due to snow and ice. I do
not consider the Lower Mainland adapted for the propagation of quail.
Grouse (Willow).—Taking the Division as a whole, willow-grouse are scarce. It is true
that at different points bag limits were in evidence, but indications point out that a close
season, especially on the Mainland, would be very beneficial.
Grouse (Blue).—Blue-grouse hunting in the Howe Sound area was not any better than
during the season 1926, and certainly not as good as the season of 1925. Farther up the Coast
these birds were more plentiful and some of the launch parties from Vancouver returned with
good bags.
Migratory Game Birds.
•
Ducks.—Prior to October 15th ducks were very plentiful in all parts of the Division and
indications pointed to another successful opening day, and no doubt would have been equally
as good as the opening in 1926 had it not been for the fact that a full moon was in evidence
and a large percentage of the duck-hunters could not wait until the legal opening time on the
morning of the opening day. By daylight the birds were wild and flying very high and in a
number of cases hunters were out of shells, with few birds to show. This was especially the
case along the mouth of the main Fraser River. Some ten prosecutions resulted through the
activities of our officers at this time, which fact it is hoped will be a deterrent to early shooters
next season.
As the season advanced ducks appeared scarce, with the exception of districts provided with
private game preserves, of which there are several in this Division. In most cases the sportsmen owning these preserves feed the birds to encourage them, and also only allow two or three
days per week on which to shoot, and the results they are obtaining are certainly noticeable. REPORT OF THE PROAHNCIAL GAME AA7ARDEN, 1927. J 29
There seems to be an agitation around sporting circles to have the regulations changed to
restrict the days of shooting to two or three days a week for the general public. It is thought
that by so doing better sport will be afforded.
During the month of December the upper portions of the Fraser A7alley in this Division
were frozen over, thereby forcing the ducks to the gulf, and some good shooting was obtained
in that vicinity, especially around AA7estham Island.
I am pleased to report that wood-ducks appear to have increased wonderfully through the
protection afforded by the Migratory Birds Treaty. Sergeant Cunningham and Constable R. M.
Stewart reported seeing approximately 1,000 wood-ducks near Chilliwack on September 24th,
and Constable Urquhart reports approximately 1,000 of this species in his district during the
early part of October, the majority of these birds being on Douglas Island.
Geese and Brant.—Snow-geese are as plentiful if not more so than any previous year.
These birds range along the foreshore of Sea and Lulu Islands to Canoe Pass, off AA7estham
Island, and can only be secured on a rough day when the wind is in the west. I believe there
have been more of these birds shot this season than for several years. Geese are fairly plentiful
in the Pitt Lake District, where some 600 birds are reported to be wintering.
Brant were plentiful during the later part of November in the Boundary Bay District, but
on account of ice on the bay during December there were very few birds shot. I understand
that the organized sportsmen wish the goose season to open on the same date as ducks and to
have the brant season extend to February 28th. Personally, I would favour snow-geese being
included with the brant.
Wilson Snipe.—These birds were very plentiful, especially along the gulf foreshore, but
other shore-birds appeared scarce.
Coots.—AA7hile the regulations provide for an open season and bag limit on coots, they are
not considered a sporting bird in this Division and are only shot by some hunters wishing to
destroy, and in most cases are left where they are killed.
Swans.—A few swans were seen during the month of October around the mouth of the
Fraser River. These birds only spend a few days in the district while passing on their way
south.
Vermin.
Coyotes.—Coyotes and red fox are still a menace throughout the Delta, Chilliwack, and
Dewdney Electoral Districts. The foxes are reported to be increasing, but it is thought that it
will be possible to keep them down now that the protection has been taken off red foxes in the
Chilliwack and Delta Electoral Districts. The fact that the bounty has been raised on coyotes
has decreased rather than increased the number of applications received in this district. It
appears that the coyote-hunter would rather leave the animals alone until such time as the pelt
is prime, when he can obtain more from the fur-trader than he can from the Government
for the surrender of the pelt.
Wolves.—These animals are still a menace in the northern portions of the Division and are
reported to be doing a great deal of damage to the game. I would suggest that paid experienced
hunters be employed for hunting this pest. It has been suggested that permits be granted to
use poison, but this is a very dangerous practice unless used under the supervision of some
person working in the interests of the Department, when we would be reasonably sure that the
poison would not be used indiscrimately.
Cougar.—Cougar are fairly numerous in the vicinity of Myrtle Point and are to be found in
odd numbers throughout the rest of the Division.
Croivs.—The crow is always with us, and while it was advocated and carried out, a bounty
on crows did not appear to have any effect on the number of these birds. I would suggest that a
bounty on crows be paid the year round.
Cats.—Early in the year instructions were given to Game Constables to take steps to reduce
the number of domestic cats gone wild and roaming around the Division to the detriment of our
bird-life. A number of box traps were made and distributed to members of our Force, as well as
to some of the residents in the Division, with the result that a great number of cats have been
killed. Instructions have been given to have an additional supply of these traps made, and
I hope to be able to report the destruction of cats for the coming year in larger numbers than
during the year 1927. Game-protection.
I am pleased to report that I have had the utmost support from all officers in the Division,
as well as the various sporting clubs and associations, particularly the B.C. Fish and Game Protective Association. A number of offenders of the game laws were apprehended through information received from members of the different organizations, which fact shows that the organized
sportsmen realize that, if proper protection is to be given the game, it is their duty to assist in
the enforcement of the laws. There has been a noticeable increase in prosecutions conducted
during the year, due, in my opinion, to the support given our officers and co-operation of all
concerned rather than the fact that the public are respecting the laws less.
The following officers were almost continually engaged on game-protection work during the
year 1927: J. G. Cunningham, Sergeant i/c Game Laws Enforcement Branch for the Division;
AV. H. Cameron, Constable, Ladner Detachment; R. M. Stewart, Constable, Chilliwack Detachment ; A. J. Collison, Constable, Agassiz Detachment; F. Urquhart, Constable, Pitt Meadows
Detachment; J. Murray, Constable, Port Moody Detachment; R. AA'ilson, Constable, Langley
Detachment; J. Moir, Constable, North A7ancouver Detachment; F. Boyt, Constable, Powell River
Detachment; AV. Clark, Constable (launch " P.M.L. 3"), Arancouver Detachment; A. P. Cummins,
Constable, A7ancouver Detachment.
Special Constables: J. D. H. Stewart, Chilliwack Detachment; A. J. Butler, Mission Detachment ;  T. D. Sutherland, Sechelt Detachment.
In addition to these officers on the Game Laws Enforcement Branch, all other officers in the
Division have given their whole-hearted support.
Propagation.
The following number of pheasants were received in good condition from the pheasant-farm
near Victoria, and liberated in various parts of this Division as noted:—
North Vancouver     20
Lulu and Sea Islands   110
Ladner and Delta   136
Surrey      39
Langley      55
Sumas        30
Matsqui     30
Chilliwack        55
Agassiz     25
Mission        25
Pitt Meadows  ., *     55
Port Moody ■.     50
Squamish        32
Gambier Island        9
Powell River     20
Pender Harbour      12
Total  703
During the month of December we had considerable snow and frost, necessitating the feeding
of pheasants and quail. A great number of telephone communications and complaints of game
birds starving were received. Our officers were active throughout the Fraser Valley in feeding
birds. I am pleased to state that the farmers throughout the Division freely gave their time
as well as in a great number of cases providing grain from their own stock for the feeding of
the pheasants and quail. In several instances game associations distributed wheat as well as
paying for same out of their own funds. From reports received up to December 31st, 1927,
officers of the Division have distributed approximately 14,555 lb. of grain in addition to that
supplied by farmers and sportsmen. The Matsqui Game Protective Association supplied some
1,400 lb. of wheat in its district in addition to that supplied by the Department. In spite of
the extremely severe weather, I am firmly of the opinion that the birds survived the hardships
better than was expected, due to a large extent to the co-operation of the farmers and game
associations with officers of our Department. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AVARDEN, 1927. J 31
Game Reserves.
The following game reserves are found in this Division: Nelson, Hardy, and Captain
Islands ;   North Vancouver; Trout Lake; Deer Lake; Burnaby Lake; McGillivray Creek.
The Nelson, Hardy, and Captain Islands Reserve is situated at the mouth of Jervis Inlet
and is a refuge for deer and grouse. The game on this reserve is reported on the increase.
Last year permits were issued to bona-fide residents on the reserve to trap mink and racoon
along the shore-line, as it was considered these animals were a detriment to the bird-life of the
reserve. From the returns received the number of racoon and mink were not as plentiful as
expected, but it is advisable to keep these animals down and permits have again been granted
this year.
The North Vancouver Reserve comprises practically all the mountains and watersheds on
the North Shore. Deer, goat, bear, fur-bearing animals, and grouse can be found on this reserve,
which is one of the chief playgrounds of A7ancouver City and vicinity. Game is reported to
be on the increase in this reserve and in several instances we have been compelled to kill or
give permits to kill black bear. ;
Trout, Burnaby, and Deer Lakes are situated within the boundaries of A7ancouver City,
South Vancouver and Burnaby Municipalities. The chief advantage of these reserves is as a
refuge for the migratory game birds from the incessant hunting throughout the Lower Mainland.
Burnaby Lake is also a breeding-ground for beaver and muskrats and the ground surrounding
these lakes is a splendid breeding area for pheasants.
McGillivray Creek Reserve is without a doubt the best sanctuary in the Division. It is
situated in the Chilliwack District, near the junction of the A7edder and Fraser Rivers. During
the hunting season countless thousands of all kinds of ducks can be seen at any time of the day
on this reserve. Pheasants also find in this reserve a resting-place. It is unfortunate that the
majority of the land comprising this reserve is on private property and consequently the game
there is in jeopardy at all times. I would suggest that steps be taken to secure this reserve
either by buying or leasing it for a number of years and thereby ensure the reserve from being
taken over by private interests.
The waters of English Bay, Burrard Inlet, and the North Arm of the inlet, while not classed
as a game reserve, are practically such owing to the fact that it is illegal to discharge firearms
below high-water mark. The Municipality of Point Grey, Oakalla Prison Farm, and the Colony
Farm are also closed areas for hunting, so that it can be readily seen that this Division is amply
provided with game reserves and protected areas, especially in the southern portions.
Fur Trade.
A considerable increase in fur royalties collected in this Division has been the case since the
change effected a few years ago in the collection of this tax. The present system of collection
is still popular with the fur-dealers.
Fur-farming.
During the past year the number of fur-farms in the Division has increased. The majority
or practically all these farmers are working on a small scale and only in a very few instances
has there been any success with the farming of muskrats in pens. To figure on the successful
raising of muskrats, it must be done on a pelting basis, which cannot be accomplished when the
cost of erecting and constructing pens is taken into consideration. There appears to be a great
future for the mink-farmers. The demand for live stock has been good and it has been proven
that mink can be raised in pens successfully on a pelting basis. The demand for live muskrats
for breeding purposes has fallen off. At the present time there is any number of muskrats
obtainable at $10 per pair and less.
Since my last report the royalty on ranch-bred silver foxes has been lowered from $5 to
$1.50. The silver-fox breeders, however, still claim that the royalty is too high and are asking
for the elimination of the royalty. Every assistance should be given to all branches of the fur-
farming industry, but I personally think that the silver-fox breeders are entitled tb pay something toward the protection of game. .
J 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Registration of Trap-lines and Guides.
The registration of trap-lines in this Division has been running along smoothly and all disputes have been amicably settled. Registration has met with the whole-hearted approval of the
real trapper, and now that most disputes have been settled I believe we can look forward to
better returns from trappers. Through co-operating with Mr. Perry, Indian Agent, we have had
practically no disputes or trouble with the Indians, who have been willing to take their turn with
the white trapper.
During the year 1927 only two applications for guides' licences were received at this office.
Special Patrols.
There were no special patrols carried out in the Division for the year in review.    The Division was continuously patrolled by our Game and Police Constables.
Hunting Accidents.
I regret to report an increase in the hunting accidents for the past season, several of which
were serious and resulting in three deaths, two from drowning and one from firearms. The
matter of carelessness in the woods has been responsible fo'r considerable discussion ih the game
clubs and it has been suggested that any person found guilty of carelessness be deprived of his
hunting licence for a year. A step of this nature might have a tendency to create more caution
in hunting.    Every accident was carefully and fully investigated.
Summary of General Game Conditions.
The past season has been a successful one from a game-law-enforcement standpoint.
Revenue has increased from the sale of licences and the collection of royalty on fur. Fines
inflicted for infractions of the " Game Act " have also increased.
Game conditions have not been as good as expected, weather being the chief drawback.
During the month of December the district was covered with snow and ice, thereby forcing
migratory birds away from the favourite hunting-grounds.
The need for public shooting-grounds has been very forcibly brought out this past season.
A portion of the reclaimed land at Sumas was leased by the Dyking Commission to private
interests for hunting purposes. This fact brought a storm of protest from the hunting public.
I would suggest that all remaining Government land in the territory under the Dyking Commission at Sumas be acquired by the Game Conservation Board or the Department for public
shooting-grounds until such time as this land is purchased or acquired for farming purposes.
There are a great number of private preserves in this Division. These preserves are not
looked upon with favour by the average sportsmen, on account of the curtailment of the shooting
and the fact that in most cases these clubs are feeding the birds and only allow shooting two
or three days a week. Birds are, as a result, plentiful within the boundaries of these preserves
and the members have been having splendid shooting throughout the season, whereas on the
territory over which the public hunt the shooting has been poor. This condition is no doubt
caused through heavy shooting and no feeding taking place.
Since my last report the Department has issued tags or containers with the firearms
licences and the Act has been amended so that provision has been made for the issuing of
duplicate licences when a licence has been lost or accidentally destroyed. These two innovations have been appreciated by the public and the licence-badge has been a wonderful help to
our officers in the field.
I again urge that a tag system be put into operation to assist in checking the bag limit on
deer.    Reports are continually being received of game hogs taking more than their limit.
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to the N.C.O.'s and men of this Division
for their loyal support and the manner in which they have carried out their work, and I also
wish to express my thanks to Major M. Furber, Chief Game Inspector, for his assistance and
co-operation in settling the many difficult problems which have cropped up from time to time
during the past year.
REPORT OF THE CHIEF GAME INSPECTOR.
The period dealt with in this report has been one of great activity in game administration
throughout .the Province. AVith few exceptions, the personnel of the Department have been
indefatigable in their duties and have given general satisfaction to the sportsmen and to the
public. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 33
The increase in the number of Game Constables and the activity of these Constables, who
work seven days a week, has resulted in a large increase in the number of successful prosecutions taken under the " Game Act." The whole-hearted assistance of members of the Provincial
Police Force has also been noteworthy.
A great deal of work has been done towards placing the registration of trap-lines on a
sound working basis and it is hoped that registration certificates will be issued during the
coming year.
A noted increase in inquiries in respect to fur-farming and the number of fur-farming
permits issued has been the case during the year.
An increasing amount of office-work is the result of the growing activities of the Game
Branch and much credit is due to Staff-Sergeant F. R. Butler and his office staff, as under his
immediate supervision most of the interesting data contained in this report is collated for the
benefit of the general sporting public.
Game conditions generally throughout the whole Province are improving each year and the
Department is endeavouring to educate the public in general as to the necessity of protecting
game.
REPORT ON OPERATIONS OF ELK LAKE GAME FARM.
By J. W. Jones, Constable i/c.
I beg to submit my annual report dealing with the operations of the Elk Lake Game Farm
and the propagation of game animals and birds thereon. The farm up to the present is
incomplete. A good deal of land requires to be cleared for the erection of pens to be used
alternatively with the old pens.
During the year 1927 conditions on the farm were very favourable, except for the very heavy
rains starting in September. The birds did not feather up as they should have done and this
was somewhat of a detriment to the propagation of the birds in pens.
The following is a statement of the propagation of small game and game birds on the farm
during the year 1927 :—■
Pheasants in pens at December 31st, 1927   2,500
Breeding stock consisting of      340
Hen pheasants       300
Cock pheasants         75
Strayed from breeding-pens        25
Breeding stock killed by big-horned owls         10
Number of eggs laid (approximate number)   4,500
Set under hens   4,000
Eggs shipped      178
Small late eggs used for feeding      300
Young pheasants reared   3,300
Now in pens   2,160
Casualties       350
Strayed (approximate number)       106
Young pheasants shipped in fall of the year       659
Killed by horned owls        25
Ducks in pens at December 31st, 1927       80
Geese in pens at December 31st, 1927         10
Muskrats in pens at December 31st, 1927         18
Old muskrats         12
Muskrat died from tumour         1
Young muskrats from year's breeding          6
Vermin destroyed.—Domestic cats, 25; hawks, 20; big-horned owls, 28.
In regard to the propagation of the muskrats at the farm, I regret to have to state that this
year's operations have not been successful. In my opinion this has been due to the presence of
men working in the vicinity of the breeding-pens and in being required from time to time to
move these pens during the breeding season. During the year 1928 I expect a considerable
increase in our stock of muskrats.
3 J 34       ' BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX.
Page.
Revenue derived from sale .of resident firearms licences, January 1st, 1927, to December 31st,
1927     35
Revenue derived from sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences, January 1st, 1927,
to December 31st, 1927   36
Revenue derived from sale of fur-traders' and taxidermists' licences and from fur royalties,
January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927   37
Statement showing particulars of skins on which royalty was paid, January 1st, 1927, to
December 31st, 1927   38
Bounties paid, January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927  39
Statement of fur confiscated, January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927   40
Statement of firearms confiscated, January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927  41
Statement of expenditure, fiscal year 1927-28   42
List of guides, 1927   42
Statement showing returns of 1,201 holders of special firearms licences, season 1926-27  44
List showing personnel of Game Branch, British Columbia Provincial Police, 1927  44
Hunting accidents, 1927   47
Statement of big-game trophy fees paid, 1927   48
Prosecutions, 1927   51
Statement showing returns of fur-farmers, 1927   53
Map of field organization of Game Branch, British Columbia Provincial Police, 1927   62
Statement of migratory game bird census returns, 1927  63 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME AV ARDEN, 1927.
J 35
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J 37
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J 39
Bounties paid during the Year ended December 31st, 1927.
Government Agents.
Wolves.
Cougars.
Coyotes.
Crows.
Magpies.
Totals.
2
16
1
9
1
4
68
29
54
29
1
1
6
47
5
71
25
4
5
81
15
4
19
28
2
9
1
11
22
8
3
34
1
10
12
1
1
23
31
11
11
149
44
1,299
213
224
20
992
754
209
193
2,350
56
346
535
13
14
29
937
456
873
338
121
14'5
427
1,794
$1,024.35
4.00
2
1,215
673
1,657
246
2,677.60
Atlin	
1,595.00
3,668.00
967.85
3,407.25
633.60
82
1,521
227
901
18
111
386
381.00
Fort Fraser	
3,165.00
1,437.80
3,419.25
116 00
1,059.35
483 95
Nanaimo	
128
13
93
2,846
616
3,332
696
237
7
506
1,056
1
1,137
341
2,144
1,588 25
New Westminster	
429.40
1,386.90
6,145.00
3,843.30
7,446.95
2,043.10
Quesnel	
1,033.35
69 00
Smithers '..
1,235.00
2,826.00
1,137.55
Vancouver	
4,653.40
1,648.05
Williams Lake	
5,261.70
Totals	
344
372
20,192
10,046
2,487
$65,377.95
Note.—Bounty paid as follows :   W,olves, $15 each; cougars, $40 each ; coyotes, part of year, $2 each;
coyotes, part of year, $5 each ;   crows, 15 cents each ;   magpies, 15 cents each. J 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
List op Fur confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1927,
to December 31st, 1927.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Police
Division.
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1927.
"A"
"A"
"A"
"A"
"B "
"B"
"B"
"B "
"B"
"B"
"B"
"B"
"B"
"B"
"B"
"C"
"C"
"C"
" C"
"C"
"C"
"C"
"C"
"C"
"C"
"C"
"C"
"D"
"D"
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"D"
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"E"
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"E"
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7
12
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1
1
2
1
2
4
6
1
1
6
2
4
s
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20
1
2
36
7
6
1
'5
1
1
29
5
3
29
23
3
23
1
44
2
7
2
4
2
3
1
2
3
i
3
5
2
10
9
Chief Johnny (Ind.)....
Omshid, T. (Ind.)
Gescheit, W. F	
9
Dec.      24
Jan.      14
Francois, W. C. (Ind.).
White, A. (Ind.)	
26
26
26
Feb.      15
Holdsworth, E. E	
ii           9
23
Lindow, C. W	
21
April     25
Howden, J. M	
Jan.        7
..         14
Wilson, W	
28
Feb.      10
18
28
Gordon, A. W	
28
Culos, M...  .
March 18
Quinn, Mary (Mrs.).....
Pasteal, G. (Ind.)
25
April       1
4
„           4
Jan.      26
MacDonald, W. H,
McClusky, Mike (Ind.)
April     19
May      31
June     14
Jackson, L. (Ind.)
Sands, CM	
Telegraph Creek	
May      20
Atlin	
20
21
Stark, J	
Resolution (N.W.T.)...
Fort Smith (N.W.T.)...
21
....
July     27
Oct.       12
Carrier, W. C.
s
20
Salmon Kiver Valley....
S. Fork, Bridge River..
Jan.      13
White, G	
29
Nov.      18
Cline, J	
Pender Harbour	
Dec.        8
„          8
8
|
Totals	
*
i
60
6
5
256
6
5
i
8
12
8
Note.—Above confiscated pelts were sold at Little Bros.' Fur Sale, Vancouver,  B.C., for the sum of
$2,000.56. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.
J 41
List of Firearms confiscated for Infractions of the " Game Act," January 1st, 1927,
to December 31st, 1927.
Date of
Confiscation.
Confiscated from.
Confiscated at.
Police
Division.
Kind
confiscated.
1927.
Jan.      12
19
Feb.        3
March 17
June     16
Sept.       9
12
10
12
24
Oct.       14
18
18
Dec.      13
March  22
22
22
22
June       2
Aug.
Nov.
Jan.
Sept.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Sept.
Oct.
Dec.
Feb.
March 21
April 23
May
Sept.
14
28
23
23
23
23
10
19
29
29
10
10
Martin, E	
Porter, J. A	
Hashimoto, Y	
Kobayashi, K	
Ing, C	
Stuart, G. A	
Kruze, J	
Wright, E	
Tarashita	
Seki, H	
Dobrois, A	
Harper, B	
Bradley, V	
Garner, T. L	
Hall, W	
Morrice, W	
Bradbury, C	
Miles, C. K	
DeMontezuma, J....
Simons, V	
Moore, H. E	
Wagner, J	
Schoenemann, H....
Cody, J. A	
McPhail, G	
MacDonald, H. H..
Chiba, T	
Kelly, P	
Borden, F	
Mellos, H	
Kee, Fong Hoy	
Green, II	
Collins, W	
Boyd, M. F	
Saari, M	
Jonas, C	
Giswold, A	
Bilby, J	
Lewis, L	
Gaston, L	
Kono, J	
Parberry, L	
Brainswaite, G. G..
Sing, Wong	
Lee, C	
Niwatsukno, T	
Sakagachi, H	
Malcolm Island	
Nanoose Bay	
Steveston	
Minstrel Island	
Lockborough	
Saskatoon, Sask ,
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo	
Nanaimo	
Port Neville	
Haddon Bay	
James Island	
Victoria	
Ganges	
Trail	
Trail	
Trail	
Trail	
Crescent Bay	
Fernie	
Calgary, Alta	
Revelstoke	
Alberta	
Hope	
Salmon Arm	
Likely	
Lumby	
Pouce Coupe ,
Smithers	
Penny	
Porpoise Bay	
Harrison Hot Springs
Port Coquitlam	
McCartney Creek	
Webster's Corners	
Vancouver	
Vancouver .<	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Coquitlam	
Ruskin	
Huntingdon	
Vancouver	
Pitt Meadows	
Port Hammond	
Steveston	
Steveston	
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
' A"
'A"
'A"
'A"
' B "
'B"
•B"
'B"
'B"
1 B"
'B"
'B"
1 B"
■C"
•C"
■C"
•C"
■D"
1 D"
•D"
■B"
' E"
'E"
[E"
' E"
' E"
1 E "
1 E"
■E"
-E"
'E"
' E"
E"
'E"
'E"
<E"
shotgun.
shotgun.
rifle.
rifle.
pump-gun.
.22 rifle.
rifle.
rifle.
shotgun.
rifle.
pump-gun.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
revolver.
.22 rifle.
rifle.
shotgun.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
shotgun.
rifle.
shotgun.
rifle.
.22 rifle.
shotgun.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
rifle.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
.22 rifle.
rifle.
shotgun.
auto, shotgun.
shotgun.
shotgun.
shotgun.
shotgun.
shotgun. J 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Statement of Estimated Expenditure, Fiscal Year 1927-28.
Provincial Police—
Game Laws Enforcement Branch—
Salaries      ,$81,976.00
Expenses       48,526.00
Game Conservation Board—
Bounties on and extermination of noxious animals  (including salaries and expenses)  :      44,000.00
Game propagation (salaries and expenses, Elk Lake Game Farm)..      12,986.00
Game Conservation Board (salaries, office supplies, and miscellaneous expenses)         7,130.00
Total expenditure  $194,618.00
Estimated expenditure, fiscal year 1926-27   $136,160.00
Auston, A. R..
List of Guides, Season 1927.
Atlin District.
-Toochi. Lawson, F. ..
..Big Horn River.
Barkerville District.
Anderson, M. A Barkerville.
Cochrane, L. B        „
Cochrane, J. D        „
Duffy, J. C	
Haws, D	
Haynes, E. B         „
Iverson, H        „
Mason,  H        „
Cassiar District.
Ball, G. B Telegraph Creek. Hyland, D.  Telegraph Creek.
Fann, B  „
Kerr, J Barkerville.
Rivers, H	
Reed, F. W	
Thompson, N	
Thompson, R	
Wendle, J	
Guthrie, H Cottonwood.
Fort
Alexander, R. T Mud River.
Hughes, C. H	
Cowart, J. T Summit Lake.
O'Dell, W. H	
Vix, M. A Hixon.
LeBeck, O Swift Creek.
Miller, S. L Nichol.
Renshaw, E. T Snowshoe.
Ridler, T Willow River.
McNeil, B Streatham.
Allgier, L Dunster.
Brittain, H Red Pass.
Dennison, G. M        ,,
Smith, J. M	
Porter, H Prince George.
Woods, L. N	
Ramsland, O. M  „
Wayant, I. L  „
Blackburn, T. H Aleza Lake.
Biernes, G. M Hazelton.
Gun-A-Noot, S        „
Himadow, P        „
George District.
Colebank, G. F Woodpecker.
Cliff, C. B MeBride.
Goodel, O. D	
Goodel, W. R	
Goodel, T. R	
Wylie, R. N	
McParland, J. A         „
Minty, C. T        „
Goodel, L. E Shere.
Abram, E Mount Robson.
Hargreaves, F. N         „
Hargreaves, G. E         „
Hargreaves, R. F  „
Hargreaves, R. S  „
Hooker, J. B Dome Creek.
Jensen, E. H  „
Jensen, E. W  „
Cochrane, R. R Croydon.
Carr, S. J Tete Jaune Cache.
Hoy, D. H Fort St. James.
Sykes, B. S Penny. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.
J 43
Kamloops District.
Anderson, D Clearwater Station.
Case, M. D	
Ray, J. B Clearwater Station.
Garten, C. A Vavenby.
Canoe, H. T Ashcroft.
Boyce, J. C Canim Lake
Lillooet District.
Gott, F.
..Lillooet.
Kootenay District.
Yearling, W Athalmer.
Cameron, N Baker.
Harrison, C. H Banff.
Bergenham, P Beavermouth.
Connover, H. W Castledale.
Sheek, W. P	
Thomas, G. A        „
Thomas, W. S	
Wiedenman, O. W Leanchoil.
Boiven, W , Natal.
Baker, M. C i     „
Corke, D      „
Corke, B     „
Couilard, H     „
Nordstrom, C     „
Canning, R. F Skookumchuck.
Innocent, A  „
West, C. D	
Kain, C Wilmer.
Staples, E Wycliffe.
Riviere, G. F Crowsnest.
Krivensky, J Elk Prairie.
Colter, J Field.
Gilbert, F    „
Hutcheson, W Fort Steele.
Stork, W	
Fenz, W Golden.
Nixon,  W.  J Invermere.
Nixon, G        „
Jackson, S. H Nakusp.
Marquis, J. E Nelson.
Calder, D Revelstoke.
Munro, J. H        „
McRae, A        „
Woodrow, F Rosebery.
Sowerby, J. L Wasa.
Sowerby, T    „
Stevens, P. V '   „
Stevens,  C    „
Prince Rupert District..
Edwards, R. A Atnarko. Money, A. K..
Ratcliff, W. E       „
Ratcliff, F.  K Hagensborg.
Peace River District.
.Prince Rupert
(Alaska).
Callio, P Hudson Hope.
Callio, S	
Callio, J  „
King, J  „
Ross, J. A  „
Thomas, J. M Hudson Hope.
Cameron,  P South Pine River.
Johnson, I. C Dawson Creek.
Hill, W Rolla.
Bremner, C Likely.
Furber, G      „
Girdwood, J. B      „
Johnson, J. W      „
Larson, L      „
Lowden, D. A      „
Maxwell, T     „
Parminter, R      „
Phillips, M     „
Stephenson, A     „
Tighe, J. H     „
McLeese, P Ochiltree.
Collins, J. M Keithley Creek.
Fletcher, J  „
Quesnel District.
Felker, W. L Horsefly.
Gaspard, E. E       „
Hooker, S. B	
Hooker, F. C	
Hooker, T. O	
Parminter, J. W       „
Patenaude, G. B       „
Reid,  W.  H	
Walters, G	
Walters, L. E '.	
Williams, E       „
Dexter, B Klinaklini.
MeCormick, P       „
Squimah, T       „ J 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Vernon District.
Meriam, C Lumby.
Nanaimo District.
Casters, R. H Campbell River. Smith, J. C Comox.
Lee, E. R	
Vancouver District.
Mansell, F Vancouver. Smith, H Hollyburn.
Williams, A. B         „ Phillips, F. A North Vancouver.
Returns from 1,201 Holders of Trappers' Licences, showing the Big Game,
Fur-bearing and Predatory Animals killed, Season 1926-27.
Big Game.
Bear   283
Caribou   57
Deer   703
Moose  201
Mountain-sheep   12
Mountain-goat   100
Wapiti (elk)  	
Fur-bearing Animals.
Beaver  ,  6,657
Fox   701
Fisher    297
Lynx     1,625
Marten  3,878
Mink     4,295
Muskrats  , 17,854
Otter  288
Racoon  '.  1,959
Skunk     157
Weasel  16,707
Wolverine  335
Predatory Animals.
Coyotes    887
Cougar     19
Wolves   30
List of Game Constables, British Columbia Provincial Police.
Headquarters.
Attorney-General (Minister)  A. M. Manson, K.C Victoria.
Provincial Game Warden  Lieut.-Col. J. H. McMullin	
Chief Game Inspector  M. Furber	
Staff-Sergeant Game Warden F. R. Butler	
Stenographer Miss A. McGregor	
Game Warden T. H. M. Conly	
 G. H. Clark 	
 W.  H.  Viekers	
"A" Division (Vancouver Island District).
Inspector   T. W. S. Parsons Victoria.
Staff-Sergeant Game Warden F. R. Butler      „
Game Warden R. Gidley       „
 W. H. Hadley Sidney. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927. J 45
" A " Division (Vancouver Island District)—Continued.
Game Warden H. P.  Hughes Duncan.
 G. Williams  Lake Cowichan.
 H. C. Pyke Nanaimo.
 W. V. Fenton Courtenay.
 A. Monks  Alberni.
 O.  Mottishaw   Alert Bay.
"B" Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts).
Inspector   W. R. Dunwoody Nelson.
Corporal-Game Warden  C. K. McKenzie      „
Game Warden R. M. Robertson Penticton.
 F. II. Butwell Golden.
 D. Greenwood  Canal Flats.
 W.  J.  McKay Athalmer.
 M. G. Rutherford      „
 C. W. A. Smythe Revelstoke.
 G. Thomas  Cranbrook.
 I. J. Brown Elk Prairie.
■   "C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Chilcotin Districts).
Inspector   W. L. Fernie Kamloops.
Corporal-Game Warden  R. D. Sulivan       „
Game Warden E. G. Stedham       „
 C.  Ledoux         „
 G. D. McKenzie Clinton.
 J.  A.  Quesnel Lumby.
 W.  R.  Maxson Kelowna.
 C. F. Kearns Salmon Arm.
 G. F. Turner Barkerville.
 F. Kibbee        „
 F. Broughton Hanceville.
 L. W. S. Brown Likely.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts).
Inspector    W. V. E. Spiller Prince Rupert.
Sergeant-Game Warden  T. Van Dyk  „
Game Warden C.  D. Muirhead Fort St. James.
„  G.  H.  Soles Prince George.
 J. Hayes  Fort St. John.
„  J. C. Devlin  Fort Nelson.
Corporal-Game Warden  C. G. Barker  „
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts).
Staff-Sergeant S. North  Vancouver.
Sergeant-Game Warden  J. G. Cunningham        „
Stenographer Miss N. Bryce        „
Game Warden A. P. Cummins        „
„  W. Clark 	
„  AV.  H. Cameron Ladner.
„  J. Moir North Vancouver.
 T. D. Sutherland...., Sechelt.
„  R. M. Stewart Chilliwack.
 J. D. H. Stewart	
„  R. A. Wilson Langley Prairie. J 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts)—Continued.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Mission.
„  F. Urquhart Pitt Meadows.
„  J. Murray  Port Moody.
Predatory-animal Hunters.
Game Warden C. Shuttleworth  Penticton.
„  E. R. Lee Campbell River.
Elk Lake Game Farm.
Game Warden (in Charge) J. W. Jones Victoria.
„  E. Boorman       „
 S. H. McCall      „
„  G. H. Greenfield      „
 G. Cuthbert       „
Game Conservation Board (Advisory Body).
Chairman  M. B. Jackson, K.C Victoria.
Secretary  F. R.  Butler      „
Member    Hon. J. A. Buckham, M.L.A Golden.
 F. H. Kergin, M.L.A Alice Arm.
 Major Allan Brooks Okanagan Landing.
 Dr.  P. D. MacSween New Westminster.
 J.  Murray   Vanderhoof.
 T. B. Booth Nanaimo. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.
J 47
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•
J 48                                                         BRITISH COLUMBIA.
BlG-GAME TROPHY  FEES  PAID,  JANUARY 1ST,  1927,  TO DECEMBER 31ST,  1927.
Name and Address.
Species.
fcT-rtrt-a
01   t3
MO
01   .
£ a
Sfe
rtM
M o
a
o
fl
'u
rt
O
oi
3
a
u
OJ
0
33
£
o
CJ
tr
01    .
01 01
Po
a
rt
33,
a .
a%
o 5
01
m
o
o
s
a
rt
a o,
a oi
o oi
rr, rn
4J     "
Is
Amount.
Ashcroft—
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
....
1
I
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
....
i
i
i
i
$25.00
120.00
150.00
105.00
80.00
25.00
25.00
15.00
25.00
25.00
Bard, F. N„ Chicago, 111	
Atlin—
Yule, Lady A. H., London, England	
Rogers, F. C, Merchantville, N.J	
Rogers, Mrs. F. C, Merchantville, N.J	
Worley, Dr. P., San Antonio, Texas	
Jackson, H.,  Linton, Texas	
Barkerville—
Brown, Capt. C. C, London, England	
Schlesinger, A. A., South Milwaukee, Wis	
2
1
1
1
2
Schlesinger, A. M., South Milwaukee, Wis.
25.00
25.00
Stewart, H. B., Akron, Ohio	
15.00
80.00
Stewart, Mrs. H. B., Akron, Ohio	
Laiben, W. C, Congress Lake, Ohio	
Branderberg, H. P., Denver, Colorado	
30.00
40.00
50.00
25.00
25.00
Thompson, N., Barkerville (guide)	
Cumberland—
25.00
10.00
10.00
Costello, W. A., Mount Vernon, Wash	
Cranbrook—
Davis, D. D., Minneapolis, Minn	
Murphy, H. L., Minneapolis, Minn	
Davison, H   P., New York, N.Y	
10.00
30.00
15.00
15.00
Gates   A   L    New York,  N.Y.
1
1
2
30.00
Coombe, R. G., New York, N.Y	
15.00
Cromwell   J   H   R , New York, N.Y.
45.00
Clinton—
80.00
Fernie—
Smith, E. J., Gull Lake, Sask	
25.00
Lee   G   H    Gull Lake, Sask.
25.00
Gill  R   H    Snokane, Wash	
25.00
5.00
30.00
25.00
Golden—
Roig, A., New York, N.Y	
45.00
Van Vleck, R. A.. New York, N.Y.
25.00
Van Vleck, Mi^s A., New York, N.Y	
25.00
55.00
Kellogg, E. L., New York, N.Y	
25.00
25.00
Wishard   L   W., New York, N.Y.
55.00
Pelham, F. L. Cadillac, Mich	
15.00
1
1
1
1
2
2
30.00
Houston,  D   F.,  Kimball,  W.V.          	
80.00
120.00
Prince George—
40.00
Welch, W.  K., Lansing, Mich	
30.00
30.00 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.                           J 49
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927—Continued.
Name and Address.
Species.
rt •-,
01   t3
MO
Jt4
01    .
£ a
" o
dr-)
03 u
Ho
o
fl
'u
rt
O
oi
3
s
tH
o
Q
DO
d
o
U
tr
01    .
01 01
PS
'3
-u
a .
SIS
03
m
O
o
s
a
'3
33      .
a a
3 01
O 01
53fl
fcZ
Amount.
Prince George—Continued.
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
3
3
i
i
i
i
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
o
1
2
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
....
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
$40.00
85.00
40.00
Keller, C, Lead, S.D	
40.00
Gray, P. A., New York, N.Y	
130.00
105.00
Bates   G.,  Chicago,  111.
165.00
Keith, E., Baker City, Ore	
90.00
Snider, H., Chicago, 111            . ..
100.00
Montgomery, A. N., Cleveland, Ohio	
50.00
25.00
55.00
55.00
Ison, Dr   G. D , Blackley, Ky..
55 00
55.00
40.00
Schaffer, S. C, Sand Point, Idaho	
Bray, W. McK., Philadelphia, Penn	
50.00
80.00
McKay, T. H., Jr., Philadelphia, Penn	
90.00
Bartlett, A. G., Louisville, Penn	
115.00
25.00
25.00
Cramp, Dr. W., New York, N.Y.            	
90.00
Warm, Dr. C, New York, N.Y...
65.00
Dienst, Dr. H., New York, N.Y	
65.00
Dobbs, S. C, Atlanta, Ga	
25.00
Prince Rupert—
25.00
Penticton—
Fairbanks, F. M., Seattle, Wash	
30.00
Pouce Coupe—
80.00
55.00
1   1  ....
105.00
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
4
80.00
80.00
65.00
West, H., Denver, Col	
80.00
New Westminster—
Bird, S. E., Seattle, Wash	
10.00
Ward, R., Seattle, Wash	
10 00
Quesnel—
Swing, R. E., Cal	
25 00
Swing, E. H., Cal	
25 00
Grant, J. W., El Paso, Texas	
5.00
Smithers—
Durrell, J. H., New York, N.Y...
185 00
Corley, J. T., New Rochelle, N.Y	
170 00
Weems, F. C, New York, N.Y...
105 OO
Telegraph Creek—
OO 00
•Newboia, C. E., Philadelphia, Pa	
210.00-
Victoria—
1-5.00
Taggart, G.  M.,  Seattle,  Wash	
15.00-
Vancouver—
Heider, Dr.  C. F.,  Sutherland, Neb	
50.00
25 OO
* Holder of Scientific Collecting Permit No.
4
1147. J 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Big-game Trophy Fees paid, January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927—Continued.
Name and Address.
Species.
01 -
MO
a oi
a oi
«fl
ftfl
5@
Amount.
Vancouver—Continued.
■Gauthier, M. J., Huntington Park, Cal	
Cobbs, J. F., Santa Barbara, Cal	
Fleming, Gen. A. S., Portland, Ore	
Leadbetter, F. W., Portland, Ore	
Leadbetter, Miss B., Portland, Ore	
Billing, W., Portland, Ore	
Vieser, W., Portland, Ore	
Edmondson, H., Honolulu, T. H	
Smith,  A. A., London,  England	
Jennings, L. K., Maine, U.S.A	
Walton, C, Everett, Wash	
Cobbs, T., Santa Barbara, Cal	
Tuckett, P. T>., Sr., London, England	
Tuckett, P. D., Jr., London, England	
Schmidt, G. S., York, Pa	
Jones, H.  C,  Shelbyville,  Ind	
Chadwick, T. S., Cleveland, Ohio	
Johnson, F. M., San Mateo,  Cal	
McWilliams, C. H., Los Angeles, Cal	
Lliard, C. L. H., Los Angeles, Cal	
Nataoli,  J.,  Seattle, Wash	
Konig, G. F. H, New York, N.Y	
Taro, B., Seattle, Wash	
Wheeler, A. E., Rye, N.Y	
Burnham,  J., Evanston,  111	
Putman, H. S., New Rochelle, N.Y	
Williams Lake—
Grass,  J.  A.,  York,  Pa	
Wilmer—
Williamson, J., San Miguel, Cal	
Carpenter, R. E., Newport, Wash	
Elkins, J., Newport, Wash	
La Fors, C. W., Newport, Wash	
Worthington, D., Great Barrington, Mass,
Eberett, R., Brevard, N.C	
Workman, J., Belfast,  Ireland	
Totals	
44
44
53
11
26
1
1
1
1
1
2 1
1        1
85
46
20
$25.00
25.00
55.00
90.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
25.00
15.00
65.00
25.00
45.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
90.00
55.00
80.00
135.00
15.00
25.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
40.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
25.00
110.00
115.00
40.00
■8   I   $6,730.00 REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.
J 51
Prosecutions  (Provincial Police Divisions), January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
<B
M.£
: P
O.S
33 P
P.S
33   P
to
fl
©
fl
"3
h
t>
hS
m
; Q
Q
O
Sjg
~'rl
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Came Animals.
Game on premises of shop, logging camp, etc..
Hunting deer between sunset and sunrise 	
Killing or having game animals of the female sex
in possession 	
Killing or hunting game animals during the close
season   	
Molesting or destroying muskrat or beaver houses..
Possession of game animals during the close season
Possession of deer under 1 year of age	
Possession  of pelts of fur-bearing animals  during
the close season 	
Prospector killing game animals in   organized dis
trict without permit 	
Running deer with dogs 	
Selling or buying deer or portions thereof 	
Trading in fur during the close season 	
Game Birds.
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during the close
season 	
Exceeding daily bag limit on upland game birds
Game birds on premises of shop, etc	
Hunting game birds from a power-boat 	
Hunting  or  molesting  game  birds in  a  prohibited
area  	
Hunting upland game birds between sunset and sun
rise 	
Hunting upland game birds when  snow  is on the
ground  	
Killing or  hunting upland  game birds  during the
close season	
Killing migratory game birds by use of a rifle in
restricted  area  	
Killing or hunting migratory game birds during close
season   	
Possession  of upland game birds during the close
season	
Possession of migratory game birds during the close
season   	
Setting traps for game birds 	
Licences.
Buying fur without a licence 	
Carrying firearms without a licence 	
Guiding without a licence 	
Minor carrying firearms without being accompanied
by adult holder of a firearms licence 	
Making false application for a licence 	
Non-resident angling without a licence 	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence....
Resident non-British subject carrying firearms without a licence 	
Using another person's licence	
Firearms.
Carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same
from an automobile, etc	
3
2
2
1
4
2
2
5
3
1
4
4
3
1
4
3
1
5
2
4
2
1
1
6
1
3
1
26
16
7
3
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
6
1
5
13
4
11
2
1
12
2
1
9
2
2
22
1
1
6
4
1
9
2
2
20
1
3
3
5
13
14
2
7
1
14
1
1
4
1
6
8
2
15
5
1
7
1
2
1
24
6
2
5
80
4
2
15
2
2
3
4
3
7
3
4
2
1
4
3
3
14
17
$115.00
290.00
650.00
25.00
475.00
1,002.00
1,025.00
25.00
105.00
170.00
25.00
205.00
25.00
10.00
65.00
175.00
20.00
300.00
10.00
100.00
465.00
95.00
25.00
180.00
922.50
150.00
20.00
85.00
375.00
40.00
200.00
155.00 J 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Prosecutions  (Provincial Police Divisions), January 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927
Continued.
Description of Offence.
See Foot-note.
<6
s R
m.5
.- P
o a
P.£
: P
: P
rt =
So
ho
Fines or
Penalties
imposed.
Firearms—Continued.
Carrying pump shotgun not properly plugged 	
Carrying or discharging firearms in prohibited area
Carrying firearms  in  launch or automobile  during
close season without a permit 	
Discharging firearms on or across a highway within
boundaries of a municipality 	
Trapping.
Interfering with a licensed trap-line 	
Non-resident trapping without a licence 	
Setting out poisoned bait on a trap-line 	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
Trapping during the close season 	
Trapping on a game reserve 	
Using game as bait for trapping 	
Miscellaneous.
False information to an officer 	
Failing to keep a record-book of fur purchased 	
Failing to make return of game taken under special
firearms licence 	
Fur-farming without a permit 	
Refusing to be searched 	
Trespassing in pursuit of game 	
B.C. Special Fishery Regulations.
Exceeding bag limit and taking undersized trout....
Fishing for or in possession of trout during close
season   	
Fishing for  or  selling salmon  or  trout without  a
permit  	
Fishing with salmon-roe in prohibited waters 	
Fishing for trout in prohibited area 	
Jigging salmon or netting trout 	
Gaol Sentences.
Carrying firearms without a licence 	
Carrying  firearms  in   launch  during  close  season
without  permit  	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence....
Possession of game animals during the close season
Trapping during the close season
Trapping on another person's trap-line
Trapping without a licence 	
Trespassing in pursuit of game 	
Totals	
117
1   | 4
....   | ....
I
....   | 1
11
39
161
49
11
22
469
11
22
518
$165.00
10.00
80.00
110.00
65.00
700.00
155.00
360.00
585.00
10.00
10.00
40.00
50.00
10.00
10.00
10.00
135.00
195.00
5.00
175.00
1.00
10.00
60.00
$10,480.50
1,   10  days ;
1.  2 days.
1, 10 days.
1,  14  days.
1, 2 days ; 1,
7 days;  1,
2   months.
1,   1   month;
1, 25 days.
7  days  each.
7 days.
1 day each.
Note.—" A " Division : Vancouver Island area. " B " Division : Kootenay and Boundary areas.
" C " Division : Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Clinton areas. " D " Division : Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca. Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. " E " Division : Vancouver, Coast, and
Lower Mainland areas. REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.
J 53
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J 59
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B B B B REPORT OE THE PROVINCIAL GAME WARDEN, 1927.
J 61
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BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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c£oF-BRlTI5HCot>
^ 11928 r   _Ta,M
I
Attorney General
Z3
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Conservation
Board
Game Administration   >.
■     t—^ !
|   Provincial Game Warden    j
I Chief Game Inspector I
I
/ Federal \
| Migratory I
^     Birds        /
•k Officers J
•*• — *'
Headqaarters
Office snd Staff
ViCTORlA.B.C.
far
fur
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(&g'i5tratton5
provincial Game
Game
Breeding
Farms
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rd
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Statistics
Enforcement
Game Divisions
Sou cK East
• Mainland •
T^r—i
JD
e
1n spectors
Game Sergeants
and
Game Corporals
ns    ;
Game   Wards Miqbatoey Game Bird Census Returns, September 1st, 1927, to December 31st, 1927.
1927.
Sept.     1
Cameron, W. H., Ladner	
Stewart, R. M., Chilliwack	
Boyt, F., Powell River	
Murray, J., Port Moody	
Wilson, R. A., Langley Prairie ..
Fenton, W. V., Courtenay	
Simpson, G. B., Lake Cowichan	
Urquhart, F., Pitt Meadows	
Brown, L. W. S., Likely	
Maxson, W. R., Kejowna	
Quesnel, J. A., Lumhy	
McKenzie, G. D., Clinton	
Stedham, E. G., Kamloops	
Bishop, H., Sidney	
Moir, J., North Vancouver	
Brown, F. G.,  Athalmer	
Brown, I. J., Elk Prairie	
Mackenzie, Corp. C. K., Nelson	
Robertson, R. M., Penticton	
Butwell, F. H., Golden	
Clark, G. H., Prince Rupert	
Hayes, J., Fort St. John	
Hughes, H. P., Duncan	
Thomas, G., Cranbrook	
Cunningham, Sergt. J. G., Vancouver..
Stewart, R. M., Chilliwack	
Cameron, W. H., Ladner	
Greenwood, D., Canal Flats	
Smythe, C. W. A., Revelstoke	
Soles, G. H., Prince George	
Gidley, R., Victoria	
McLaren, H., Creston	
Fenton, W. V., Courtenay	
Simpson, G. B., Lake Cowichan	
Robertson, R. M., Penticton .	
Brown, I. J., Fernie	
Butwell, F. H., Golden	
Brown, F. G., Athalmer	
Greenwood, D., Canal Flats	
Muirhead, C. D., Fort St. James	
Murray, J., Port Moody	
Cameron, W. H., Ladner	
Cunningham, Sergt. J., Vancouver	
Moir, J., North Vancouver	
Boyt,  F., Powell River	
Urquhart, F., Pitt Meadows	
Clark, G. H., Prince Rupert	
Brown, L. W. S., Likely 	
Maxson, W., R., Kelowna	
Quesnel, J. A., Lumby	
Stewart, R. M., Chilliwack	
Wilson, R. A., Langley	
Stedham, E. G., Kamloops	
Monks, A., Alberni	
Smythe, C. W. A., Revelstoke	
Gidley,  R., Victoria	
Gidley,  R.,  Victoria	
Moir, J., North Vancouver	
Boyt,  F., Powell River '.	
Cameron, W. H„ Ladner	
Simpson, G. B., Lake Cowichan....	
Maxson, W. R., Kelowna	
Fenton, W. V., Courtenay	
Brown, L. W. S., Likely	
Robertson, R. M., Penticton	
Brown, I. J., Fernie	
Urquhart, F., Pitt Meadows	
Wilson, R. A., Langley	
Clark, G. H., Prince Rupert	
Cunningham, Sergt. J., Vancouver	
Hughes, H. P., Duncan	
Quesnel, J. A., Lumby	
Murray, J., Port Moody	
Hughes, H. P., Duncan ...
Greenwood, D., Canal Flats	
Totals	
280
143
1,800
250
4,500
200
250
350
100 |
5,000
400 I
500
1,000
220
150
700
1,800
100
100
175
3,'500
600 |
5,000
300 I
500
180
100
18
28
175
25
200
650
163
3,500
5,000
1,000
400 j
1,000
400
300
120
200
150
250
286 |
198
250
200
150
110
500
101
300
150
7
276
2,870
122
200
300
180
150
1,000
100
-I ■■-
1,014    379     249
Note.—Census taken on a set day each month, if possible, in some small portion of the Constable's district,
of Biological Survey, Washington, D.C.
Census being taken in co-operation with the Dominion Parks Branch, Ottawa, and the U.S. Bureau
Printed by Chaelm:
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Banfield, Printer to the King's
1928.
Most Excellent Majesty.

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